Science.gov

Sample records for bed control center

  1. Test bed control center design concept for Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, E.; Draper, J.V.; Fausz, A.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes the design concept for the control center for the Single Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System test bed and the design process behind the concept. The design concept supports all phases of the test bed mission, including technology demonstration, comprehensive system testing, and comparative evaluation for further development and refinement of the TWRMS for field operations.

  2. The effects of a newsletter on bedding control on house dust mite allergen concentrations in childcare centers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeonghoon; Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Yang, Heasuk; Yum, Hye Yung; Lee, Seon Ah; Kim, Chae-Bong; Kim, Hyunjung; Lim, Wan Ryung; Hong, Soyoung; Kim, Kyoosang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Bedding in childcare centers (CCCs) can hold house dust mite (HDM) allergens. This study examined whether HDM allergen levels can be reduced through the distribution of an educational newsletter on bedding control to parents of CCC children in Korea. Methods All 38 CCCs were measured for Der 1 (sum of Der f 1 and Der p 1) concentrations on classroom floors and bedding before the intervention. Educational newsletters on children’s bedding control were sent to 21 CCCs by mail, and teachers were asked to distribute the newsletters to the parents of the children (intervention group). The remaining 17 CCCs were not sent newsletters (control group). The measurement of Der 1 concentrations in 38 CCCs was repeated after the intervention. Dust samples were collected with a vacuum cleaner and analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Results The Der 1 concentrations on the bedding were significantly higher than those on the floors in 38 CCCs at baseline (p<0.05). Although changes of the Der 1 concentrations for the control group (n=17) were not significant, Der 1 concentrations for the intervention group (n=21) decreased significantly from 2077.9 ng/g dust to 963.5 ng/g dust on the floors and from 3683.9 ng/g dust to 610.4 ng/g dust on bedding (p<0.05). Conclusions The distribution of educational newsletters on bedding control to parents may be an effective means of controlling HDMs in CCCs. PMID:26602559

  3. Treatment bed microbiological control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, Gilbert E.; Fitzpatrick, Timothy W.; Kril, Michael B.; Wilber, Georgia A.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of microbial fouling on treatment bed (TB) performance are being studied. Fouling of activated carbon (AC) and ion exchange resins (IEX) by live and devitalized bacteria can cause decreased capacity for selected sorbates with AC and IEX TB. More data are needed on organic species removal in the trace region of solute sorption isotherms. TB colonization was prevented by nonclassical chemical disinfectant compositions (quaternary ammonium resins) applied in suitable configurations. Recently, the protection of carbon beds via direct disinfectant impregnation has shown promise. Effects (of impregnation) upon bed sorption/removal characteristics are to be studied with representative contaminants. The potential need to remove solutes added or produced during water disinfection and/or TB microbiological control must be investigated.

  4. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, A.G.; Patel, J.G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance. 2 figs.

  5. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, Amirali G.; Patel, Jitendra G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance.

  6. Control of bed height in a fluidized bed gasification system

    DOEpatents

    Mehta, Gautam I.; Rogers, Lynn M.

    1983-12-20

    In a fluidized bed apparatus a method for controlling the height of the fdized bed, taking into account variations in the density of the bed. The method comprises taking simultaneous differential pressure measurements at different vertical elevations within the vessel, averaging the differential pressures, determining an average fluidized bed density, then periodically calculating a weighting factor. The weighting factor is used in the determination of the actual bed height which is used in controlling the fluidizing means.

  7. Building Controls Virtual Test Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael; Haves, Philip; Coffey, Brian

    2008-04-01

    The Building Controls Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB) is a modular software environment that is based on the Ptolemy II software environment. The BCVTB can be used for design and analysis of heterogenous systems, such as building energy and controls systems. Our additions to Ptolemy II allow users to Couple to Ptolemy II simulation software such as EnergyPlus, MATLAB/Simulink or Dymola for data exchange during run-time. Future versions of the BCVTS will also contain an interface to BACnet which is a communication protocol for building Control systems, and interfaces to digital/analog converters that allow communication with controls hardware. Through Ptolemy II, the BCVTB provides a graphical model building environment, synchronizes the exchanged data and visualizes the system evolution during run- time.

  8. Building Controls Virtual Test Bed

    2008-04-01

    The Building Controls Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB) is a modular software environment that is based on the Ptolemy II software environment. The BCVTB can be used for design and analysis of heterogenous systems, such as building energy and controls systems. Our additions to Ptolemy II allow users to Couple to Ptolemy II simulation software such as EnergyPlus, MATLAB/Simulink or Dymola for data exchange during run-time. Future versions of the BCVTS will also contain an interfacemore » to BACnet which is a communication protocol for building Control systems, and interfaces to digital/analog converters that allow communication with controls hardware. Through Ptolemy II, the BCVTB provides a graphical model building environment, synchronizes the exchanged data and visualizes the system evolution during run- time.« less

  9. Apparatus and process for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, Amirali G.; Patel, Jitendra G.

    1985-10-01

    An apparatus and process for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance.

  10. 60. VIEW OF THE CIRCULAR DRIVE AND CENTER BED. LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. VIEW OF THE CIRCULAR DRIVE AND CENTER BED. LOOKING OUT A SECOND-FLOOR WINDOW. VIEW INCLUDES THE REPAIRED RUSTIC STONE WALKWAY. (DUPLICATE OF HABS No. MA-1168-27) - Fairsted, 99 Warren Street, Brookline, Norfolk County, MA

  11. Bed Bugs: Clinical Relevance and Control Options

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Dominic E.; Peñas, Pablo F.; Russell, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Since the late 1990s, bed bugs of the species Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus have undergone a worldwide resurgence. These bed bugs are blood-sucking insects that readily bite humans. Cutaneous reactions may occur and can start out as small macular lesions that can develop into distinctive wheals of around 5 cm in diameter, which are accompanied by intense itching. Occasionally, bullous eruptions may result. If bed bugs are numerous, the patient can present with widespread urticaria or eythematous rashes. Often, bites occur in lines along the limbs. Over 40 pathogens have been detected in bed bugs, but there is no definitive evidence that they transmit any disease-causing organisms to humans. Anemia may result when bed bugs are numerous, and their allergens can trigger asthmatic reactions. The misuse of chemicals and other technologies for controlling bed bugs has the potential to have a deleterious impact on human health, while the insect itself can be the cause of significant psychological trauma. The control of bed bugs is challenging and should encompass a multidisciplinary approach utilizing nonchemical means of control and the judicious use of insecticides. For accommodation providers, risk management procedures should be implemented to reduce the potential of bed bug infestations. PMID:22232375

  12. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  13. Johnson Space Center's Regenerative Life Support Systems Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, D. J.; Henninger, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    The Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) Test Bed at NASA's Johnson Space Center is an atmospherically closed, controlled environment facility for human testing of regenerative life support systems using higher plants in conjunction with physicochemical life support systems. The facility supports NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The facility is comprised of two large scale plant growth chambers, each with approximately 11 m^2 growing area. The root zone in each chamber is configurable for hydroponic or solid media plant culture systems. One of the two chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), is capable of operating at lower atmospheric pressures to evaluate a range of environments that may be used in a planetary surface habitat; the other chamber, the Ambient Pressure Growth Chamber (APGC) operates at ambient atmospheric pressure. The air lock of the VPGC is currently being outfitted for short duration (1 to 15 day) human habitation at ambient pressures. Testing with and without human subjects will focus on 1) integration of biological and physicochemical air and water revitalization systems; 2) effect of atmospheric pressure on system performance; 3) planetary resource utilization for ALS systems, in which solid substrates (simulated planetary soils or manufactured soils) are used in selected crop growth studies; 4) environmental microbiology and toxicology; 5) monitoring and control strategies; and 6) plant growth systems design. Included are descriptions of the overall design of the test facility, including discussions of the atmospheric conditioning, thermal control, lighting, and nutrient delivery systems.

  14. Johnson Space Center's Regenerative Life Support Systems Test Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, D. J.; Henninger, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    The Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) Test Bed at NASA's Johnson Space Center is an atmospherically closed, controlled environment facility for human testing of regenerative life support systems using higher plants in conjunction with physicochemical life support systems. The facility supports NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The facility is comprised of two large scale plant growth chambers, each with approximately 11 m2 growing area. The root zone in each chamber is configurable for hydroponic or solid media plant culture systems. One of the two chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), is capable of operating at lower atmospheric pressures to evaluate a range of environments that may be used in a planetary surface habitat; the other chamber, the Ambient Pressure Growth Chamber (APGC) operates at ambient atmospheric pressure. The air lock of the VPGC is currently being outfitted for short duration (1 to 15 day) human habitation at ambient pressures. Testing with and without human subjects will focus on 1) integration of biological and physicochemical air and water revitalization systems; 2) effect of atmospheric pressure on system performance; 3) planetary resource utilization for ALS systems, in which solid substrates (simulated planetary soils or manufactured soils) are used in selected crop growth studies; 4) environmental microbiology and toxicology; 5) monitoring and control strategies; and 6) plant growth systems design. Included are descriptions of the overall design of the test facility, including discussions of the atmospheric conditioning, thermal control, lighting, and nutrient delivery systems.

  15. Johnson Space Center's Regenerative Life Support Systems Test Bed.

    PubMed

    Barta, D J; Henninger, D L

    1996-01-01

    The Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) Test Bed at NASA's Johnson Space Center is an atmospherically closed, controlled environment facility for human testing of regenerative life support systems using higher plants in conjunction with physicochemical life support systems. The facility supports NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The facility is comprised of two large scale plant growth chambers, each with approximately 11 m2 growing area. The root zone in each chamber is configurable for hydroponic or solid media plant culture systems. One of the two chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), is capable of operating at lower atmospheric pressures to evaluate a range of environments that may be used in a planetary surface habitat; the other chamber, the Ambient Pressure Growth Chamber (APGC) operates at ambient atmospheric pressure. The air lock of the VPGC is currently being outfitted for short duration (1 to 15 day) human habitation at ambient pressures. Testing with and without human subjects will focus on 1) integration of biological and physicochemical air and water revitalization systems; 2) effect of atmospheric pressure on system performance; 3) planetary resource utilization for ALS systems, in which solid substrates (simulated planetary soils or manufactured soils) are used in selected crop growth studies; 4) environmental microbiology and toxicology; 5) monitoring and control strategies; and 6) plant growth systems design. Included are descriptions of the overall design of the test facility, including discussions of the atmospheric conditioning, thermal control, lighting, and nutrient delivery systems.

  16. Johnson Space Center's regenerative life support systems test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, Donald L.; Tri, Terry O.; Barta, Daniel J.; Stahl, Randal S.

    1991-01-01

    The Regenerative Life Support System (RLSS) Test Bed at NASA's Johnson Space Center is an atmospherically closed, controlled environment facility for the evaluation of regenerative life support systems using higher plants in conjunction with physicochemical life support systems. When completed, the facility will be comprised of two large scale plant growth chambers, each with approximately 10 m(exp 2) growing area. One of the two chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), will be capable of operating at lower atmospheric pressures to evaluate a range of environments that may be used in Lunar or Martian habitats; the other chamber, the Ambient Pressure Growth Chamber (APGC) will operate at ambient atmospheric pressure. The root zone in each chamber will be configurable for hydroponic or solid state media systems. Research will focus on: (1) in situ resource utilization for CELSS systems, in which simulated lunar soils will be used in selected crop growth studies; (2) integration of biological and physicochemical air and water revitalization systems; (3) effect of atmospheric pressure on system performance; and (4) monitoring and control strategies.

  17. Control of a Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Hoowang; Rickards, Gretchen; Famouri, Parviz; Turton, Richard; Sams, W. Neal; Koduro, Praveen; Patankar, Amol; Davari, Assad; Lawson, Larry; Boyle, Edward J.

    2001-11-06

    Two methods for optimally controlling the operation of a circulating fluidized bed are being investigated, neural network control and Kalman filter control. The neural network controls the solids circulation rate by adjusting the flow of move air in the non-mechanical valve. Presented is the method of training the neural network from data generated by the circulating fluidized bed (CFB), the results of a sensitivity study indicating that adjusting the move air can control solids flow, and the results of controlling solids circulation rate. The Kalman filter approach uses a dynamic model and a measurement model of the standpipe section of the CFB. Presented are results showing that a Kalman filter can successfully find the standpipe bed height.

  18. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  19. Advanced technologies for Mission Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, John T.; Hughes, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    Advance technologies for Mission Control Centers are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: technology needs; current technology efforts at GSFC (human-machine interface development, object oriented software development, expert systems, knowledge-based software engineering environments, and high performance VLSI telemetry systems); and test beds.

  20. Towards cheaper control centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baize, Lionel

    1994-11-01

    Today, any approach to the design of new space systems must take into consideration an important constraint, namely costs. This approach is our guideline for new missions and also applies to the ground segment, and particularly to the control center. CNES has carried out a study on a recent control center for application satellites in order to take advantage of the experience gained. This analysis, the purpose of which is to determine, a posteriori, the costs of architecture needs and choices, takes hardware and software costs into account and makes a number of recommendations.

  1. Towards cheaper control centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Lionel

    1994-01-01

    Today, any approach to the design of new space systems must take into consideration an important constraint, namely costs. This approach is our guideline for new missions and also applies to the ground segment, and particularly to the control center. CNES has carried out a study on a recent control center for application satellites in order to take advantage of the experience gained. This analysis, the purpose of which is to determine, a posteriori, the costs of architecture needs and choices, takes hardware and software costs into account and makes a number of recommendations.

  2. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  3. Advanced control strategies for fluidized bed dryers

    SciTech Connect

    Siettos, C.I.; Kiranoudis, C.T.; Bafas, G.V.

    1999-11-01

    Generating the best possible control strategy comprises a necessity for industrial processes, by virtue of product quality, cost reduction and design simplicity. Three different control approaches, namely an Input-Output linearizing, a fuzzy logic and a PID controller, are evaluated for the control of a fluidized bed dryer, a typical non-linear drying process of wide applicability. Based on several closed loop characteristics such as settling times, maximum overshoots and dynamic performance criteria such as IAE, ISE and ITAE, it is shown that the Input-Output linearizing and the fuzzy logic controller exhibit a better performance compared to the PID controller tuned optimally with respect to IAE, for a wide range of disturbances; yet, the relevant advantage of the fuzzy logic over the conventional nonlinear controller issues upon its design simplicity. Typical load rejection and set-point tracking examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. FFTF Work Control Center

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    A centralized Work Control Center (WCC) is responsible for assuring that maintenance and modification of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is performed in accordance with written procedures that ensure design integrity, personnel and public safety, and equipment and system availability for the computerized Master Information Data Acquisition System (MIDAS). Each maintenance task is logged into MIDAS from a Work Request from that has been reviewed and prioritized by the WCC. Thereafter, MIDAS is used to track schedule, manpower and material requirements; authorize field work; and close out the maintenance activity.

  5. Bed Bug Infestations and Control Practices in China: Implications for Fighting the Global Bed Bug Resurgence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlu; Wen, Xiujun

    2011-01-01

    The bed bug resurgence in North America, Europe, and Australia has elicited interest in investigating the causes of the widespread and increasing infestations and in developing more effective control strategies. In order to extend global perspectives on bed bug management, we reviewed bed bug literature in China by searching five Chinese language electronic databases. We conducted telephone interviews of staff from 77 Health and Epidemic Prevention Stations in six Chinese cities in November 2010. We also conducted telephone interviews of 68 pest control firms in two cities during March 2011. Two species of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus (F.)) are known to occur in China. These were common urban pests before the early1980s. Nationwide "Four-Pest Elimination" campaigns (bed bugs being one of the targeted pests) were implemented in China from 1960 to the early 1980s. These campaigns succeeded in the elimination of bed bug infestations in most communities. Commonly used bed bug control methods included applications of hot water, sealing of bed bug harborages, physical removal, and applications of residual insecticides (mainly organophosphate sprays or dusts). Although international and domestic travel has increased rapidly in China over the past decade (2000-2010), there have only been sporadic new infestations reported in recent years. During 1999-2009, all documented bed bug infestations were found in group living facilities (military dormitories, worker dormitories, and prisons), hotels, or trains. One city (Shenzhen city near Hong Kong) experienced significantly higher number of bed bug infestations. This city is characterized by a high concentration of migratory factory workers. Current bed bug control practices include educating residents, washing, reducing clutter, putting items under the hot sun in summer, and applying insecticides (pyrethroids or organophosphates). There have not been any studies or reports on bed bug insecticide

  6. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  7. Ash bed level control system for a fixed-bed coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Rotunda, John R.

    1984-01-01

    An ash level control system is provided which incorporates an ash level meter to automatically control the ash bed level of a coal gasifier at a selected level. The ash level signal from the ash level meter is updated during each cycle that a bed stirrer travels up and down through the extent of the ash bed level. The ash level signal is derived from temperature measurements made by thermocouples carried by the stirrer as it passes through the ash bed and into the fire zone immediately above the ash bed. The level signal is compared with selected threshold level signal to determine if the ash level is above or below the selected level once each stirrer cycle. A first counter is either incremented or decremented accordingly. The registered count of the first counter is preset in a down counter once each cycle and the preset count is counted down at a selected clock rate. A grate drive is activated to rotate a grate assembly supporting the ash bed for a period equal to the count down period to maintain the selected ash bed level. In order to avoid grate binding, the controller provides a short base operating duration time each stirrer cycle. If the ash bed level drops below a selected low level or exceeds a selected high level, means are provided to notify the operator.

  8. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  9. Poison control center - emergency number

    MedlinePlus

    For a POISON EMERGENCY call: 1-800-222-1222 ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES This national hotline number will let you ... is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this ...

  10. Neural Network Based Montioring and Control of Fluidized Bed.

    SciTech Connect

    Bodruzzaman, M.; Essawy, M.A.

    1996-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop chaos analysis and neural network-based modeling techniques and apply them to the pressure-drop data obtained from the Fluid Bed Combustion (FBC) system (a small scale prototype model) located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC)-Morgantown. The second goal was to develop neural network-based chaos control techniques and provide a suggestive prototype for possible real-time application to the FBC system. The experimental pressure data were collected from a cold FBC experimental set-up at the Morgantown Center. We have performed several analysis on these data in order to unveil their dynamical and chaotic characteristics. The phase-space attractors were constructed from the one dimensional time series data, using the time-delay embedding method, for both normal and abnormal conditions. Several identifying parameters were also computed from these attractors such as the correlation dimension, the Kolmogorov entropy, and the Lyapunov exponents. These chaotic attractor parameters can be used to discriminate between the normal and abnormal operating conditions of the FBC system. It was found that, the abnormal data has higher correlation dimension, larger Kolmogorov entropy and larger positive Lyapunov exponents as compared to the normal data. Chaotic system control using neural network based techniques were also investigated and compared to conventional chaotic system control techniques. Both types of chaotic system control techniques were applied to some typical chaotic systems such as the logistic, the Henon, and the Lorenz systems. A prototype model for real-time implementation of these techniques has been suggested to control the FBC system. These models can be implemented for real-time control in a next phase of the project after obtaining further measurements from the experimental model. After testing the control algorithms developed for the FBC model, the next step is to implement them on hardware and link them to

  11. CARBON BED MERCURY EMISSIONS CONTROL FOR MIXED WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

    2010-11-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (both radioactive and hazardous according tohe Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) wastes. Depending on regulatory requirements, the mercury in the off-gas must be controlled with sometimes very high efficiencies. Compliance to the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards can require off-gas mercury removal efficiencies up to 99.999% for thermally treating some mixed waste streams. Several test programs have demonstrated this level of off-gas mercury control using fixed beds of granular sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. Other results of these tests include: (a) The depth of the mercury control mass transfer zone was less than 15-30 cm for the operating conditions of these tests, (b) MERSORB® carbon can sorb Hg up to 19 wt% of the carbon mass, and (c) the spent carbon retained almost all (98 – 99.99%) of the Hg; but when even a small fraction of the total Hg dissolves, the spent carbon can fail the TCLP test when the spent carbon contains high Hg concentrations. Localized areas in a carbon bed that become heated through heat of adsorption, to temperatures where oxidation occurs, are referred to as “bed hot spots.” Carbon bed hot spots must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Key to carbon bed hot spot mitigation are (a) designing for sufficient gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) monitoring and control of inlet gas flowrate, temperature, and composition, (c) monitoring and control of in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (d) most important, monitoring of bed outlet CO concentrations. An increase of CO levels in the off-gas downstream of the carbon bed to levels about 50-100 ppm higher than the inlet CO concentration indicate CO formation in the bed, caused by carbon bed

  12. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must... than one control center is located at an LNG Plant, each control center must have more than one means of communication with each other center. (e) Each control center must have a means of communicating...

  13. Control of acid gases using a fluidized bed adsorber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Bo-Chin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Yeh, Chia-Lin

    2003-08-01

    During incineration, secondary pollutants such as acid gases, organic compounds, heavy metals and particulates are generated. Among these pollutants, the acid gases, including sulfur oxides (SO(x)) and hydrogen chloride (HCl), can cause corrosion of the incinerator piping and can generate acid rain after being emitted to the atmosphere. To address this problem, the present study used a novel combination of air pollution control devices (APCDs), composed of a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter. The major objective of the work is to demonstrate the performance of a fluidized bed adsorber for removal of acid gases from flue gas of an incinerator. The adsorbents added in the fluidized bed adsorber were mainly granular activated carbon (AC; with or without chemical treatment) and with calcium oxide used as an additive. The advantages of a fluidized bed reactor for high mass transfer and high gas-solid contact can enhance the removal of acid gases when using a dry method. On the other hand, because the fluidized bed can filter particles, fine particles prior to and after passing through the fluidized bed adsorber were investigated. The competing adsorption on activated carbon between different characteristics of pollutants was also given preliminary discussion. The results indicate that the removal efficiencies of the investigated acid gases, SO(2) and HCl, are higher than 94 and 87%, respectively. Thus, a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter has the potential to replace conventional APCDs, even when there are other pollutants at the same time.

  14. 3. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT BOTTOM CENTER TO CENTER, CONTROL BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT BOTTOM CENTER TO CENTER, CONTROL BUILDING B AT CENTER, WATER TANK TO UPPER LEFT, VIEW TOWARDS WEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Control Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. Granular controls on the dispersion of bed load tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R. L.; Phillips, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    Coarse particles are transported in a river as bed load, i.e., they move in frequent contact with and are supported by the granular bed. This movement is typically intermittent and may be described by a series of steps are rests, the distributions of which determine particle dispersion. Laboratory and field studies of bed load tracer dispersion have reported sub- and super-diffusive behavior, both of which have been successfully reproduced with stochastic transport models. Although researchers have invoked heavy-tailed step lengths as the cause of anomalous dispersion, most observations report thin-tailed distributions. Little attention has been paid to rest periods, and stochastic transport models have not been connected to the underlying mechanics of particle motion. Based on theoretical and experimental evidence, we argue that step lengths are thin-tailed and do not control the longterm dispersion of bed load tracers; they are determined by momentum balance between the fluid and solid. Using laboratory experiments with both marbles and natural sediments, we demonstrate that the rest time distribution is power law, and argue that this distribution controls asymptotic dispersion. Observed rest times far exceed any hydrodynamic timescale. Experiments reveal that rest times of deposited particles are governed by fluctuations in river bed elevation; in particular, the return time for the bed to scour to the base of a deposited particle. Stochastic fluctuations in bed elevation are describable by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (mean-reverting random walk) model that contains two parameters, which we show are directly related to the granular shear rate and range of bed elevation fluctuations, respectively. Combining these results with the theory of asymmetric random walks (particles only move downstream), we predict superdiffusive behavior that is in quantitative agreement with our observations of tracer dispersion in a natural river.

  16. Linear Test Bed. Volume 2: Test Bed No. 2. [linear aerospike test bed for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Test bed No. 2 consists of 10 combustors welded in banks of 5 to 2 symmetrical tubular nozzle assemblies, an upper stationary thrust frame, a lower thrust frame which can be hinged, a power package, a triaxial combustion wave ignition system, a pneumatic control system, pneumatically actuated propellant valves, a purge and drain system, and an electrical control system. The power package consists of the Mark 29-F fuel turbopump, the Mark 29-0 oxidizer turbopump, a gas generator assembly, and propellant ducting. The system, designated as a linear aerospike system, was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to explore technology related to thrust vector control, thrust vector optimization, improved sequencing and control, and advanced ignition systems. The propellants are liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen. The system was designed to operate at 1200-psia chamber pressure at an engine mixture ratio of 5.5. With 10 combustors, the sea level thrust is 95,000 pounds.

  17. Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Undergraduate students Kristina Wines and Dena Renzo at Rensselaer Poloytech Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY, monitor the progress of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) mission (STS-87), Nov. 19 - Dec.5, 1997). Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC) like this one will become more common during operations with the International Space Station. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. Photo credit: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

  18. Test Bed For Control Of Optical-Path Lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neal, Michael C.; Eldred, Daniel D.; Liu, Dankai; Redding, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Truss structure and ancillary equipment constitute test bed for experiments in methods of controlling lengths of optical paths under conditions of structural vibration and deformation. Accommodates both passive and active methods of control. Experimental control system reduces millimeter-level disturbances in optical path length to nanometers. Developed for control, alignment, and aiming of distributed optical systems on large flexible structures. Test bed includes tower 2.5 meters high with two horizontal arms extending at right angles from its top. Rigidly mounted on massive steel block providing measure of isolation from ground vibrations. Optical motion-compensation system similar to one described previously in NASA Tech Briefs enclosed in flexure-mounted frame, called "trolley," at end of longer horizontal arm.

  19. Control of quality of fluidization in a tall bed using variance of pressure fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.L.; Chong, Y.O.; Leung, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    A quantitative relation was established experimentally between excess gas flow above minimum fluidization and the variance of differential pressure fluctuations in a bed. The variance was used as part of a computer control scheme to maintain the quality of fluidization in a tall bed constant. This was achieved by controlling the amount of gas bled from the fluidized bed at different bed levels. Successful demonstration of the control strategy in a 200mm diameter 2.7m tall fluidized bed is described.

  20. The reactive bed plasma system for contamination control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, Joseph G.; Moore, Robert R.; Perry, Tony R.

    1990-01-01

    The contamination control capabilities of the Reactive Bed Plasma (RBP) system is described by delineating the results of toxic chemical composition studies, aerosol filtration work, and other testing. The RBP system has demonstrated its capabilities to decompose toxic materials and process hazardous aerosols. The post-treatment requirements for the reaction products have possible solutions. Although additional work is required to meet NASA requirements, the RBP may be able to meet contamination control problems aboard the Space Station.

  1. 3. EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER, OPERATIONS CONTROL. AS SYSTEM BECOMES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER, OPERATIONS CONTROL. AS SYSTEM BECOMES INCREASINGLY AUTOMATED, EAGLE ROCK WILL BECOME MORE AND MORE THE CENTRAL CONTROL SYSTEM OF THE METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. - Eagle Rock Operations Control Center, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must have a control center from which operations and warning devices are monitored as required by this...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must have a control center from which operations and warning devices are monitored as required by this...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must have a control center from which operations and warning devices are monitored as required by this...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2441 Control center. Each LNG plant must have a control center from which operations and warning devices are monitored as required by this...

  6. Controlled waste-oil biodegradation at existing drying beds

    SciTech Connect

    Hary, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    A feasibility study at the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Facility to determine if sludge drying beds at a sewage treatment plant could be used as controlled waste oil biodegradation plots has been completed. A greenhouse-like enclosure would be constructed over three 9.1 meter by 21.3 meter beds to allow for year-round use, and any waste oil runoff would be collected by existing leachate piping. It has been determined that this proposed facility could dispose of existing radioactive waste oil generation (7200 liters/year) from the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP); however, it would be inadequate to handle radioactive waste oils from the new Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) as well. The study reviewed nuclear criticality constraints, biodegradation technology, and the capital cost for an enclosed biodegradation facility.

  7. Implications of lessons learned from tobacco control for tanning bed reform.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Craig; Makin, Jennifer K

    2013-01-01

    Tanning beds used according to the manufacturer's instructions expose the user to health risks, including melanoma and other skin cancers. Applying the MPOWER model (monitor, protect, offer alternatives, warn, enforce, and raise taxes), which has been used in tobacco control, to tanning bed reform could reduce the number of people at risk of diseases associated with tanning bed use. Among the tactics available to government are restricting the use of tanning beds by people under age 18 and those with fair skin, increasing the price of tanning bed services through taxation, licensing tanning bed operators, and banning unsupervised tanning bed operations.

  8. Implications of lessons learned from tobacco control for tanning bed reform.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Craig; Makin, Jennifer K

    2013-01-01

    Tanning beds used according to the manufacturer's instructions expose the user to health risks, including melanoma and other skin cancers. Applying the MPOWER model (monitor, protect, offer alternatives, warn, enforce, and raise taxes), which has been used in tobacco control, to tanning bed reform could reduce the number of people at risk of diseases associated with tanning bed use. Among the tactics available to government are restricting the use of tanning beds by people under age 18 and those with fair skin, increasing the price of tanning bed services through taxation, licensing tanning bed operators, and banning unsupervised tanning bed operations. PMID:23449282

  9. Fuzzy control structure for an anaerobic fluidised bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Salvador Carlos; Sanchez, Edgar N.; Béteau, Jean-François

    2012-12-01

    This article deals with the design of a fuzzy control strategy for a fluidised bed reactor, which is used for anaerobic wastewater treatment. This strategy is composed of a supervisor system and two PI L/A controllers. In addition, a biomass observer, designed on the basis of the Takagi-Sugeno approach considering a principal component analysis, is used with supervision proposals. The supervisor is also designed following the Takagi-Sugeno methodology; it detects the process state, selects and applies the most adequate control action in order to avoid the washout region. On the other side, two control actions are designed for bicarbonate regulation using the PI/LA technique: adding a base and dilution rate. These control actions, as well as the open loop operation, are selected by the supervisor in order to reject disturbances on the substrate influent allowing at the same time a high methane production. The applicability of the proposed structure in a fluidised bed reactor is illustrated via simulations.

  10. The Poison Control Center--Its Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manoguerra, Anthony S.

    1976-01-01

    Poison Control Centers are being utilized by more schools of pharmacy each year as training sites for students. This paper discusses what such a center is, its services, changes anticipated in the poison center system in the next several years and how they may influence pharmacy education, specifically as it relates to clinical toxicology.…

  11. Tapered fluidized bed bioreactor for environmental control and fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C. D.; Hancher, C. W.; Arcuri, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    Fluidized bed bioreactors are under development for use in environmental control and energy production. The most effective systems utilize a tapered portion either throughout the column or at the top of the column. This taper allows a wide range of operating conditions without loss of the fluidized particulates, and in general, results in more stable operation. The system described here utilize fixed films of microorganisms that have attached themselves to the fluidized particles. Preliminary investigations of the attachment indicate that reactor performance is related to film thickness. The biological denitrification of aqueous waste streams is typical of processes under development that utilize fluidized bed bioreactors. This development has progressed to the pilot plant scale where two 20-cm-diam x 800-cm fluidized beds in series accept aqueous wastes with nitrate concentrations as high as 10,000 mg/l and denitrification rates greater than 50 g/l/day using residence times of less than 30 minutes in each reactor. Other applications include aerobic degradation of phenolic wastes at rates greater than 25 g/l/day and the conversion of glucose to ethanol.

  12. On line diagnostics and self-tuning method for the fluidized bed temperature controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porzuczek, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the method of on-line diagnostics of the bed temperature controller for the fluidized bed boiler. Proposed solution is based on the methods of statistical process control. Detected decrease of the bed temperature control quality is used to activate the controller self-tuning procedure. The algorithm that provides optimal tuning of the bed temperature controller is also proposed. The results of experimental verification of the presented method is attached. Experimental studies were carried out using the 2 MW bubbling fluidized bed boiler.

  13. Hermes flight control center: Definition status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letalle, Pierre

    1990-10-01

    The Hermes Flight Control Center (HFCC) located in Toulouse (France) is described. The center is the third in the world after the American center in Houston and the Soviet center in Kaliningrad. All the Hermes elements, both on board and on the ground will be coordinated by the HFCC for all phases of each mission. Aspects of the detailed definition phase still in the requirements analysis subphase are described. Diagrams are used to illustrate the interplay between the different systems.

  14. Modern control centers and computer networking

    SciTech Connect

    Dy-Liacco, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    The automation of power system operation is generally achieved with the implementation of two control centers, one for the operation of the generation-transmission system and the other for the operation of the distribution system. These control centers are referred to, respectively, as the energy management system (EMS) and the distribution management system (DMS). The EMS may consist of several control centers in a hierarchy. The DMS may be made up of several independent distribution control centers. This article features the fundamental design aspects of modern EMS and DMS control centers (computer networks, distributed processing, and distributed databases), the linking of computer networks, and the communications that support such internetworking. The extension of such networking beyond the confines of system operation to other corporate networks is now made practical by the maturing concepts of client-server architectures and by the availability of modern communication technologies.

  15. Study on an advanced early rehabilitation training system for postural control using a tilting bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chang-Ho; Kim, Kyong; Kwon, Tae-Kyu; Hong, Chul-Un; Kim, Nam-Gyun

    2005-12-01

    It proposed a new early rehabilitation training system for postural control using a tilting bed, a visual display and a force plate. The conventional rehabilitation systems for postural control can't be applied to the patients lying in bed because the rehabilitation training using those systems is only possible when the patient can stand up by himself or herself. Moreover, there did not exist any device that could provide the sense of balance or the sensation of walking to the patients in bed. The software for the system consists of the training program and the analysis program. The training program was designed to improve the ability of postural control of the subjects by repeated training of moving the center of pressure (COP) applied to the forceplate. The training program consists of the COP maintaining training and the COP movement training in horizontal, vertical, 45° and -45° directions. The analysis program consists of the COP moving time analysis modules, the COP maintaining time analysis module. Through the experiments with real people, it verified the effectiveness of the new early rehabilitation training system. The results showe that this system is an effective system for early rehabilitation training and that our system might be useful as clinical equipment.

  16. 18. Station Service Control and Motor Control Center #2, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Station Service Control and Motor Control Center #2, view to the northeast. Note the circuit breaker switch on cart in left corner of photograph. This switch is part of the motor control center which has been temporarily removed from the slot marked with a tag that is visible at lower left end of control center. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  17. PNNL’s Building Operations Control Center

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, Shan

    2015-09-29

    PNNL's Building Operations Control Center (BOCC) video provides an overview of the center, its capabilities, and its objectives. The BOCC was relocated to PNNL's new 3820 Systems Engineering Building in 2015. Although a key focus of the BOCC is on monitoring and improving the operations of PNNL buildings, the center's state-of-the-art computational, software and visualization resources also have provided a platform for PNNL buildings-related research projects.

  18. JPL control/structure interaction test bed real-time control computer architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts - such as active structure - and new tools - such as combined structure and control optimization algorithm - and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. A focus mission spacecraft was designed based upon a space interferometer and is the basis for design of the ground test article. The ground test bed objectives include verification of the spacecraft design concepts, the active structure elements and certain design tools such as the new combined structures and controls optimization tool. In anticipation of CSI technology flight experiments, the test bed control electronics must emulate the computation capacity and control architectures of space qualifiable systems as well as the command and control networks that will be used to connect investigators with the flight experiment hardware. The Test Bed facility electronics were functionally partitioned into three units: a laboratory data acquisition system for structural parameter identification and performance verification; an experiment supervisory computer to oversee the experiment, monitor the environmental parameters and perform data logging; and a multilevel real-time control computing system. The design of the Test Bed electronics is presented along with hardware and software component descriptions. The system should break new ground in experimental control electronics and is of interest to anyone working in the verification of control concepts for large structures.

  19. Process Control Research, Training Center for Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee have established a measurement and controls research center and a master's-level academic engineering program. A description of this university/industry cooperative research center is provided. Indicates that a doctoral program is planned when the master's program is well…

  20. Description of emission control using fluidized-bed, heat-exchange technology

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, G.J.; Grogan, P.J.

    1980-06-01

    Environmental effects of fluidized-bed, waste-heat recovery technology are identified. The report focuses on a particular configuration of fluidized-bed, heat-exchange technology for a hypothetical industrial application. The application is a lead smelter where a fluidized-bed, waste-heat boiler (FBWHB) is used to control environmental pollutants and to produce steam for process use. Basic thermodynamic and kinetic information for the major sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and NO/sub x/ removal processes is presented and their application to fluidized-bed, waste heat recovery technology is discussed. Particulate control in fluidized-bed heat exchangers is also discussed.

  1. "Suicide" as Seen in Poison Control Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntire, Matilda S.; Angle, Carol R.

    1971-01-01

    Data on age and sex characteristics, intent and diagnosis of suicide, and toxicology are presented for 1,103 cases of poisoning (children ages 6-18 years) admitted to 50 poison control centers during 1 year. (KW)

  2. Using research and education to implement practical bed bug control programs in multifamily housing.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Gary W; Gondhalekar, Ameya D; Wang, Changlu; Buczkowski, Grzegorz; Gibb, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Multifamily housing facilities serving low-income populations have been at the forefront of bed bug outbreaks. Research conducted in the past 8 years has consistently proven that integrated pest management (IPM) is the best approach for successful suppression of bed bug infestations. Bed bug IPM in multifamily settings is especially dependent upon a collaborative community or building-wide effort involving residents, building staff and pest control technicians. Other components of a bed bug IPM program include regular monitoring to detect early-stage bed bug infestations and combined use of non-chemical and chemical interventions. Lastly, to reduce reinfestation rates and costs associated with bed bug control, it is critical to continue periodic monitoring and implement preventive control measures even after successful elimination of bed bugs has been achieved. PMID:26251256

  3. Moving granular-bed filter for multi-contaminant control

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, H.M.; Haas, J.C.; Wilson, K.B.; Gupta, R.P.

    1995-12-01

    In addition to the control of ash particulates, a moving granular-bed filter can control other contaminants found in high-temperature, high-pressure coal gas streams through the use of chemically-reactive filter media. Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy, a laboratory test program is underway to evaluate the following three types of chemically-reactive filter media: a clay-based filter medium for the control of alkali and heavy metals in either reducing or oxidizing environments, a sodium-based filter medium for the control of halogens and metaloids in reducing-gas environments, and a nickel catalyst for the destruction of ammonia and hydrogen cyanide in a reducing-gas environments. The test program calls for the evaluation of techniques for forming reactive clay filter media and the evaluation of the structural and chemical properties of clay media, nahcolite (NaHCO{sub 3}) media, and media composed of nickel catalysts. Initial results of the development of a clay-based filter medium are presented.

  4. Control centers design for ergonomics and safety.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Leonardo; Lizarazo, Cesar; Bernal, Oscar; Cordoba, Jorge; Arias, Claudia; Monroy, Magda; Cotrino, Carlos; Montoya, Olga

    2012-01-01

    This paper shows the general design conditions about ergonomics and safety for control centers in the petrochemical process industry. Some of the topics include guidelines for the optimized workstation design, control room layout, building layout, and lighting, acoustical and environmental design. Also takes into account the safety parameters in the control rooms and centers design. The conditions and parameters shown in this paper come from the standards and global advances on this topic on the most recent publications. And also the work was supplemented by field visits of our team to the control center operations in a petrochemical company, and technical literature search efforts. This guideline will be useful to increase the productivity and improve the working conditions at the control rooms. PMID:22317199

  5. Potential of Essential Oil-Based Pesticides and Detergents for Bed Bug Control.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narinderpal; Wang, Changlu; Cooper, Richard

    2014-12-01

    The bed bug, (Cimex lectularius L.), is a difficult pest to control. Prevalence of insecticide resistance among bed bug populations and concerns over human-insecticide exposure has stimulated the development of alternative bed bug control materials. Many essential oil-based pesticides and detergent insecticides targeting bed bugs have been developed in recent years. We evaluated the efficacy of nine essential oil-based products and two detergents using direct spray and residual contact bioassays in the laboratory. Two conventional insecticides, Temprid SC (imidacloprid and β-cyfluthrin) and Demand CS (λ-cyhalothrin), were used for comparison. Among the 11 nonsynthetic insecticides tested, only EcoRaider (1% geraniol, 1% cedar extract, and 2% sodium lauryl sulfate) and Bed Bug Patrol (0.003% clove oil, 1% peppermint oil, and 1.3% sodium lauryl sulfate) caused >90% mortality of nymphs in direct spray and forced exposure residual assays. However, the efficacy of EcoRaider and Bed Bug Patrol was significantly lower than that of Temprid SC and Demand CS in choice exposure residual bioassay. Direct spray of EcoRaider caused 87% egg mortality, whereas the other nonsynthetic insecticides had little effect on bed bug eggs. EcoRaider and Bed Bug Patrol did not exhibit detectable repellency against bed bugs in the presence of a carbon dioxide source. These findings suggest that EcoRaider and Bed Bug Patrol are potentially useful pesticides for controlling bed bug infestations, but further testing in naturally infested environments is needed. PMID:26470082

  6. Exploring Parental Bonding in BED and Non-BED Obesity Compared with Healthy Controls: Clinical, Personality and Psychopathology Correlates.

    PubMed

    Amianto, Federico; Ercole, Roberta; Abbate Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo

    2016-05-01

    Early inadequate attachment experiences are relevant co-factors in the development of obesity and Binge Eating Disorder (BED), which often concurs with obesity. The relationship of parental bonding with personality and psychopathology may influence treatment strategies for obese subjects, either affected or not with BED. In this study, 443 obese women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), including 243 with and 200 without BED, and 158 female controls were assessed with regards to attachment, personality and eating psychopathology measures. Clusters obtained using the scores of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) were compared with each other and with a control subjects' group. Lower scores of parental bonding distinguished obese subjects with respect to healthy controls. The cluster analysis revealed two clusters of parenting among obese subjects. The larger one displayed intermediate care and overprotection between controls and the smaller cluster, with the exception of paternal overprotection which is similar to controls. This larger cluster was characterized by low persistence and levels of psychopathology which are intermediate between healthy controls and the smaller cluster. The smaller cluster displayed lower care and higher overcontrol from both parents. It also displays more extreme personality traits (high novelty seeking and harm avoidance, and lower self-directedness and cooperativeness) and more severe eating and general psychopathology. Different parenting dynamics relate to different personality patterns and eating psychopathology of obese subjects, but not to binge eating conducts. Personality differences between parenting clusters are more extensive than those between BED and non-BED subgroups. The two different typologies of obese subjects based on parenting may be relevant for treatment personalization. PMID:26603379

  7. Exploring Parental Bonding in BED and Non-BED Obesity Compared with Healthy Controls: Clinical, Personality and Psychopathology Correlates.

    PubMed

    Amianto, Federico; Ercole, Roberta; Abbate Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo

    2016-05-01

    Early inadequate attachment experiences are relevant co-factors in the development of obesity and Binge Eating Disorder (BED), which often concurs with obesity. The relationship of parental bonding with personality and psychopathology may influence treatment strategies for obese subjects, either affected or not with BED. In this study, 443 obese women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), including 243 with and 200 without BED, and 158 female controls were assessed with regards to attachment, personality and eating psychopathology measures. Clusters obtained using the scores of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) were compared with each other and with a control subjects' group. Lower scores of parental bonding distinguished obese subjects with respect to healthy controls. The cluster analysis revealed two clusters of parenting among obese subjects. The larger one displayed intermediate care and overprotection between controls and the smaller cluster, with the exception of paternal overprotection which is similar to controls. This larger cluster was characterized by low persistence and levels of psychopathology which are intermediate between healthy controls and the smaller cluster. The smaller cluster displayed lower care and higher overcontrol from both parents. It also displays more extreme personality traits (high novelty seeking and harm avoidance, and lower self-directedness and cooperativeness) and more severe eating and general psychopathology. Different parenting dynamics relate to different personality patterns and eating psychopathology of obese subjects, but not to binge eating conducts. Personality differences between parenting clusters are more extensive than those between BED and non-BED subgroups. The two different typologies of obese subjects based on parenting may be relevant for treatment personalization.

  8. Operating and Managing a Backup Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Angela L.; Pirani, Joseph L.; Bornas, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Due to the criticality of continuous mission operations, some control centers must plan for alternate locations in the event an emergency shuts down the primary control center. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is the Mission Control Center (MCC) for the International Space Station (ISS). Due to Houston s proximity to the Gulf of Mexico, JSC is prone to threats from hurricanes which could cause flooding, wind damage, and electrical outages to the buildings supporting the MCC. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the capability to be the Backup Control Center for the ISS if the situation is needed. While the MSFC Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) does house the BCC, the prime customer and operator of the ISS is still the JSC flight operations team. To satisfy the customer and maintain continuous mission operations, the BCC has critical infrastructure that hosts ISS ground systems and flight operations equipment that mirrors the prime mission control facility. However, a complete duplicate of Mission Control Center in another remote location is very expensive to recreate. The HOSC has infrastructure and services that MCC utilized for its backup control center to reduce the costs of a somewhat redundant service. While labor talents are equivalent, experiences are not. Certain operations are maintained in a redundant mode, while others are simply maintained as single string with adequate sparing levels of equipment. Personnel at the BCC facility must be trained and certified to an adequate level on primary MCC systems. Negotiations with the customer were done to match requirements with existing capabilities, and to prioritize resources for appropriate level of service. Because some of these systems are shared, an activation of the backup control center will cause a suspension of scheduled HOSC activities that may share resources needed by the BCC. For example, the MCC is monitoring a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. As the threat to MCC

  9. Pneumatic jet-control valve for dual circulating fluidized beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haibo; Dong, Pengfei; Zhu, Zhiping; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Yukui; Lu, Qinggang

    2015-11-01

    With the rapid development of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology in different fields, the disadvantages of conventional non-mechanical valves are becoming more apparent, and they are not suitable to be used in complex CFB systems. In this paper, a novel non-mechanical valve named the jet-control valve is presented which can avoid the fluidization of solid particles. The feasibility and performance characteristics of the new valve are investigated with a cold-model dual CFB. The results show that compared with the conventional non-mechanical valve, the jet-control valve can transfer solid particles steadily over a larger range, prevent artesian flow, and improve the leakage characteristics. The effects of the operating parameters and structural parameters on the minimum aeration velocity, solid flow rate, and maximum solid flow rate are studied. A two-valve model is proposed to explain the transport capacity of the valve for one jet pipe. A semi-theoretical expression is obtained based on the experimental data with a maximum deviation of 30% providing useful guide for scaling-up the design.

  10. 78 FR 11889 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National..., National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of...

  11. The Manufacture, Shipping and Receiving and Quality Control of Rodent Bedding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Lisbeth M.

    1980-01-01

    The criteria for rodent bedding and nesting materials are discussed. The literature is reviewed regarding sources of bedding materials, manufacturing methods, quality control, procedures (microbiological, physical and chemical), storage, methods, shipment, methods of use and disposal, current knowledge concerning bedding effects on animals as related to research and testing and legal aspects. Future needs, especially with respect to the promulgation of standards, also are addressed.

  12. Poison control center - Emergency number (image)

    MedlinePlus

    For a poison emergency call 1-800-222-1222 anywhere in the United States. This national hotline number will let you ... is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the U.S. use this national ...

  13. Model-free adaptive control of supercritical circulating fluidized-bed boilers

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    A novel 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) Fuel-Air Ratio Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controller is introduced, which can effectively control key process variables including Bed Temperature, Excess O2, and Furnace Negative Pressure of combustion processes of advanced boilers. A novel 7-input-7-output (7.times.7) MFA control system is also described for controlling a combined 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) process of Boiler-Turbine-Generator (BTG) units and a 5.times.5 CFB combustion process of advanced boilers. Those boilers include Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Boilers and Once-Through Supercritical Circulating Fluidized-Bed (OTSC CFB) Boilers.

  14. Acute illnesses associated with insecticides used to control bed bugs--seven states, 2003--2010.

    PubMed

    2011-09-23

    The common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, is a wingless, reddish-brown insect that requires blood meals from humans, other mammals, or birds to survive. Bed bugs are not considered to be disease vectors, but they can reduce quality of life by causing anxiety, discomfort, and sleeplessness. Bed bug populations and infestations are increasing in the United States and internationally. Bed bug infestations often are treated with insecticides, but insecticide resistance is a problem, and excessive use of insecticides or use of insecticides contrary to label directions can raise the potential for human toxicity. To assess the frequency of illness from insecticides used to control bed bugs, relevant cases from 2003-2010 were sought from the Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR)-Pesticides program and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH). Cases were identified in seven states: California, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, New York, Texas, and Washington. A total of 111 illnesses associated with bed bug-related insecticide use were identified; although 90 (81%) were low severity, one fatality occurred. Pyrethroids, pyrethrins, or both were implicated in 99 (89%) of the cases, including the fatality. The most common factors contributing to illness were excessive insecticide application, failure to wash or change pesticide-treated bedding, and inadequate notification of pesticide application. Although few cases of illnesses associated with insecticides used to control bed bugs have been reported, recommendations to prevent this problem from escalating include educating the public about effective bed bug management.

  15. Cold tolerance of bed bugs and practical recommendations for control.

    PubMed

    Olson, Joelle F; Eaton, Marc; Kells, Stephen A; Morin, Victor; Wang, Changlu

    2013-12-01

    Bed bugs were exposed to freezing temperatures for various exposure times to determine cold tolerance and mortality estimates for multiple life stages. The mean supercooling point for all bed bug life stages ranged from -21.3 degrees C to -30.3 degrees C, with the egg stage reporting the lowest value. A probit analysis provided a lower lethal temperature (LLT99) of -31.2 degrees C when estimates from all life stages were combined, demonstrating that all stages of bed bugs are not capable of surviving temperatures below body freezing and are therefore freeze intolerant. At conditions above the LLT99, bed bug mortality depended on temperature and exposure time at temperatures above LLT99. Based on our model estimates, survival was estimated for temperatures above -12 degrees C even after 1 wk of continuous exposure. However, exposure to temperatures below -13 degrees C will result in 100% mortality in d to ensure mortality of all life stages. Unfortunately, sublethal exposure to lower temperatures did not prevent subsequent feeding behavior in surviving stages. Practical recommendations for management of potentially infested items are discussed. PMID:24498745

  16. Cold tolerance of bed bugs and practical recommendations for control.

    PubMed

    Olson, Joelle F; Eaton, Marc; Kells, Stephen A; Morin, Victor; Wang, Changlu

    2013-12-01

    Bed bugs were exposed to freezing temperatures for various exposure times to determine cold tolerance and mortality estimates for multiple life stages. The mean supercooling point for all bed bug life stages ranged from -21.3 degrees C to -30.3 degrees C, with the egg stage reporting the lowest value. A probit analysis provided a lower lethal temperature (LLT99) of -31.2 degrees C when estimates from all life stages were combined, demonstrating that all stages of bed bugs are not capable of surviving temperatures below body freezing and are therefore freeze intolerant. At conditions above the LLT99, bed bug mortality depended on temperature and exposure time at temperatures above LLT99. Based on our model estimates, survival was estimated for temperatures above -12 degrees C even after 1 wk of continuous exposure. However, exposure to temperatures below -13 degrees C will result in 100% mortality in d to ensure mortality of all life stages. Unfortunately, sublethal exposure to lower temperatures did not prevent subsequent feeding behavior in surviving stages. Practical recommendations for management of potentially infested items are discussed.

  17. Lewis Research Center's coal-fired, pressurized, fluidized-bed reactor test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobak, J. A.; Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A 200-kilowatt-thermal, pressurized, fluidized-bed (PFB) reactor, research test facility was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a NASA-funded project to assess and evaluate the effect of PFB hot-gas effluent on aircraft turbine engine materials that might have applications in stationary-power-plant turbogenerators. Some of the techniques and components developed for this PFB system are described. One of the more important items was the development of a two-in-one, gas-solids separator that removed 95+ percent of the solids in 1600 F to 1900 F gases. Another was a coal and sorbent feed and mixing system for injecting the fuel into the pressurized combustor. Also important were the controls and data-acquisition systems that enabled one person to operate the entire facility. The solid, liquid, and gas sub-systems all had problems that were solved over the 2-year operating time of the facility, which culminated in a 400-hour, hot-gas, turbine test.

  18. Process analytical tools for monitoring, understanding, and control of pharmaceutical fluidized bed granulation: A review.

    PubMed

    Burggraeve, Anneleen; Monteyne, Tinne; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fluidized bed granulation is a widely applied wet granulation technique in the pharmaceutical industry to produce solid dosage forms. The process involves the spraying of a binder liquid onto fluidizing powder particles. As a result, the (wetted) particles collide with each other and form larger permanent aggregates (granules). After spraying the required amount of granulation liquid, the wet granules are rapidly dried in the fluid bed granulator. Since the FDA launched its Process Analytical Technology initiative (and even before), a wide range of analytical process sensors has been used for real-time monitoring and control of fluid bed granulation processes. By applying various data analysis techniques to the multitude of data collected from the process analyzers implemented in fluid bed granulators, a deeper understanding of the process has been achieved. This review gives an overview of the process analytical technologies used during fluid bed granulation to monitor and control the process. The fundamentals of the mechanisms contributing to wet granule growth and the characteristics of fluid bed granulation processing are briefly discussed. This is followed by a detailed overview of the in-line applied process analyzers, contributing to improved fluid bed granulation understanding, modeling, control, and endpoint detection. Analysis and modeling tools enabling the extraction of the relevant information from the complex data collected during granulation and the control of the process are highlighted.

  19. Seismometer readings studied in Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The seismometer reading from the impact made by the Apollo 15 Saturn S-IVB stage when it struck the lunar surface is studied by scientists in the Mission Control Center. Dr. Gary Latham (dark suit, wearing lapel button) of Columbia University is responsible for the design and experiment data analysis of the Passive Seismic Experiment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). The man on the left, writing, is Nafi Toksos of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Looking on at upper left is Dave Lammlein, also with Columbia.

  20. Mounted Smartphones as Measurement and Control Platforms for Motor-Based Laboratory Test-Beds

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Jared A.; Brill, Anthony; Kapila, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory education in science and engineering often entails the use of test-beds equipped with costly peripherals for sensing, acquisition, storage, processing, and control of physical behavior. However, costly peripherals are no longer necessary to obtain precise measurements and achieve stable feedback control of test-beds. With smartphones performing diverse sensing and processing tasks, this study examines the feasibility of mounting smartphones directly to test-beds to exploit their embedded hardware and software in the measurement and control of the test-beds. This approach is a first step towards replacing laboratory-grade peripherals with more compact and affordable smartphone-based platforms, whose interactive user interfaces can engender wider participation and engagement from learners. Demonstrative cases are presented in which the sensing, computation, control, and user interaction with three motor-based test-beds are handled by a mounted smartphone. Results of experiments and simulations are used to validate the feasibility of mounted smartphones as measurement and feedback control platforms for motor-based laboratory test-beds, report the measurement precision and closed-loop performance achieved with such platforms, and address challenges in the development of platforms to maintain system stability. PMID:27556464

  1. Mounted Smartphones as Measurement and Control Platforms for Motor-Based Laboratory Test-Beds.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jared A; Brill, Anthony; Kapila, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory education in science and engineering often entails the use of test-beds equipped with costly peripherals for sensing, acquisition, storage, processing, and control of physical behavior. However, costly peripherals are no longer necessary to obtain precise measurements and achieve stable feedback control of test-beds. With smartphones performing diverse sensing and processing tasks, this study examines the feasibility of mounting smartphones directly to test-beds to exploit their embedded hardware and software in the measurement and control of the test-beds. This approach is a first step towards replacing laboratory-grade peripherals with more compact and affordable smartphone-based platforms, whose interactive user interfaces can engender wider participation and engagement from learners. Demonstrative cases are presented in which the sensing, computation, control, and user interaction with three motor-based test-beds are handled by a mounted smartphone. Results of experiments and simulations are used to validate the feasibility of mounted smartphones as measurement and feedback control platforms for motor-based laboratory test-beds, report the measurement precision and closed-loop performance achieved with such platforms, and address challenges in the development of platforms to maintain system stability. PMID:27556464

  2. Mounted Smartphones as Measurement and Control Platforms for Motor-Based Laboratory Test-Beds.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jared A; Brill, Anthony; Kapila, Vikram

    2016-08-20

    Laboratory education in science and engineering often entails the use of test-beds equipped with costly peripherals for sensing, acquisition, storage, processing, and control of physical behavior. However, costly peripherals are no longer necessary to obtain precise measurements and achieve stable feedback control of test-beds. With smartphones performing diverse sensing and processing tasks, this study examines the feasibility of mounting smartphones directly to test-beds to exploit their embedded hardware and software in the measurement and control of the test-beds. This approach is a first step towards replacing laboratory-grade peripherals with more compact and affordable smartphone-based platforms, whose interactive user interfaces can engender wider participation and engagement from learners. Demonstrative cases are presented in which the sensing, computation, control, and user interaction with three motor-based test-beds are handled by a mounted smartphone. Results of experiments and simulations are used to validate the feasibility of mounted smartphones as measurement and feedback control platforms for motor-based laboratory test-beds, report the measurement precision and closed-loop performance achieved with such platforms, and address challenges in the development of platforms to maintain system stability.

  3. Diffusion limited soil vapor extraction: Geologic and bed thickness controls

    SciTech Connect

    Beckett, G.D. ); Benson, D.A. )

    1996-01-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) can remove volatile contaminants from the subsurface environment. In a heterogeneous geologic setting, SVE cleanup will progress rapidly through advective mass transfer in permeable sediments and primarily through slow diffusion in lower permeability soil. The contrast in rates of cleanup between high and low permeability soils is further increased by the associated soil moisture retention contrasts (i.e., capillarity) in the same soils. Low permeability soil generally has a higher soil suction capacity and moisture content than high permeability soil. This results in further diminishment of cleanup rate in fine-grained sediments in a heterogeneous environment. This paper investigates how contrasts in soil type and bed thickness affect the rate of SVE diffusive cleanup. The numerical model VENT3D is used to simulate three heterogeneous geologic settings with differing soil contrasts. Within each geologic setting, four simulations are performed with varying bed thicknesses in each, effectively changing the diffusive half-length of the fine-grained soils while maintaining the total bulk percentages of fine-to coarse-grained material. Under these conditions, the bulk flow parameters measured during SVE field testing would be constant for each of the four simulations within a single geologic domain while the cleanup times would not.

  4. Diffusion limited soil vapor extraction: Geologic and bed thickness controls

    SciTech Connect

    Beckett, G.D.; Benson, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) can remove volatile contaminants from the subsurface environment. In a heterogeneous geologic setting, SVE cleanup will progress rapidly through advective mass transfer in permeable sediments and primarily through slow diffusion in lower permeability soil. The contrast in rates of cleanup between high and low permeability soils is further increased by the associated soil moisture retention contrasts (i.e., capillarity) in the same soils. Low permeability soil generally has a higher soil suction capacity and moisture content than high permeability soil. This results in further diminishment of cleanup rate in fine-grained sediments in a heterogeneous environment. This paper investigates how contrasts in soil type and bed thickness affect the rate of SVE diffusive cleanup. The numerical model VENT3D is used to simulate three heterogeneous geologic settings with differing soil contrasts. Within each geologic setting, four simulations are performed with varying bed thicknesses in each, effectively changing the diffusive half-length of the fine-grained soils while maintaining the total bulk percentages of fine-to coarse-grained material. Under these conditions, the bulk flow parameters measured during SVE field testing would be constant for each of the four simulations within a single geologic domain while the cleanup times would not.

  5. PACE: A test bed for the dynamics and control of flexible multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Smith, Monty J.; Das, Alok

    1993-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory at Edwards AFB has constructed a test bed for the validation and comparison of modeling and control theories for the dynamics and control of flexible multibody systems. This project is called the Planar Articulating Controls Experiment (PACE). This paper presents the experimental apparatus for PACE and the problem formulation. An in-depth analysis on DC motor dynamics was also performed.

  6. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    In this work, three components will form the basis for design of a control scheme for the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG) at METC: (1) a control systems analysis based on simple linear models derived from process data; (2) review of the literature on fluid bed gasifier operation and control; and (3) understanding of present FBG operation and real world considerations. Tasks accomplished during the present reporting period include: (1) observation of the FBG during the week of July 17 to July 21; (2) suggested improvements to the control of FBG backpressure and MGCR pressure; and (3) data collection from FBG run No. 11 and transfer of data to USC.

  7. 4. INTERIOR, EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER. NOTE MAP ON WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR, EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER. NOTE MAP ON WALL SHOWING POWER AND WATER LINES, LOCATIONS OF ALL AQUEDUCT FACILITIES IN AREA, INCLUDING COLORADO RIVER AQUEDUCT SYSTEM. - Eagle Rock Operations Control Center, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 2. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT LEFT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT LEFT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT CENTER, WATER TANK AT TOP CENTER, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Control Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Quarterly report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This document summarizes work performed for the period 4/1/95 to 7/31/95 on contract no. DE-FG21-94MC31384 (Work accomplished during the period 10/1/94 to 3/31/94 was summarized in the previous technical progress report included in the appendix of this report). In this work, three components will form the basis for design of a control scheme for the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG) at METC: (1) a control systems analysis based on simple linear models derived from process data, (2) review of the literature on fluid bed gasifier operation and control, and (3) understanding of present FBG operation and real world considerations. Tasks accomplished during the present reporting period include: (1) Completion of a literature survey on Fluid Bed Gasifier control, (2) Observation of the FBG during the week of July 17 to July 21, and (3) Suggested improvements to the control of FBG backpressure and MGCR pressure.

  10. 77 FR 12845 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Disease, Disability, and Injury... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (CDC/ATSDR... meetings and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and...

  11. 77 FR 46096 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of... Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces... Secretary for Health (ASH), the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the...

  12. Effects of 30-, 60-, and 90-Day Bed Rest on Postural Control in Men and Women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteves, Julie; Taylor, Laura C.; Vanya, Robert D.; Dean, S. Lance; Wood, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Head-down-tilt bed rest (HDT) has been used as a safe gr ound-based analog to mimic and develop countermeasures for the physiological effects of spaceflight, including decrements in postural stability. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of 30-, 60-, and 90-day bed rest on postural control in men and women. METHODS Twenty-nine subjects (18M,11F) underwent 13 days of ambula tory acclimatization and were placed in 6? HDT for 30 (n=12), 60 (n=8), or 90 (n=9) days, followed by 14 days of ambulatory recovery. Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) was used to assess changes in sensory and motor components of postural control, and recovery after HDT. Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) objectively evaluate one?s ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Stability during the SOTs was assessed using peak-to-peak sway and convergence toward stability limits to derive an equilibrium score. Motor Control Tests (MCTs) evaluate one?s ability to recover from unexpected support surface perturbations, with performance determined by center-of-pressure path length. Whole-body kinematic data were collected to determine body-sway strategy used to maintain stability during each condition. Baselines were determined pre-HDT. Recovery was tracked post-HDT on days 0, 1, 2, and 4. RESULTS Immediately after HDT, subjects showed decreased performance on most SOTs, primarily on sway-referenced support conditions, typically returning to baseline levels within 4 days. MCT performance was not significantly affected. There were no significant gender or duration differences in performance. Kinematic data revealed a tendency to use ankle strategy to maintain an upright stance during most SOT conditions. Interestingly, six subjects (2M,4F) experienced orthostatic intolerance and were unable to complete day 0 testing. CONCLUSION HDT mimics some un loading mechanisms of spaceflight and

  13. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This document summarizes work performed for the period 10/1/94 to 3/31/95. In this work, three components will form the basis for design of a control scheme for the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG) at METC: (1) a control systems analysis based on simple linear models derived from process data, (2) review of the literature on fluid bed gasifier operation and control, and (3) understanding of present FBG operation and real world considerations. Below we summarize work accomplished to data in each of these areas.

  14. PACE - A test bed for the dynamics and control of flexible multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, M. K.; Schlaegel, W. T.; Das, A.

    1993-04-01

    The Phillips Laboratory at Edwards AFB has constructed a test bed for the validation and comparison of modeling and control theories for the dynamics and control of flexible multibody systems. This project is called the Planar Articulating Controls Experiment (PACE). This paper presents the experimental apparatus for PACE and the equations of motion are derived by using the Hamilton principle and the assumed mode method. Control techniques for the slewing control and vibration suppression are also discussed.

  15. Evaluation of center-cut separations applying simulated moving bed chromatography with 8 zones.

    PubMed

    Santos da Silva, Francisco Vitor; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2016-07-22

    Different multi-column options to perform continuous chromatographic separations of ternary mixtures have been proposed in order to overcome limitations of batch chromatography. One attractive option is given by simulated moving bed chromatography (SMB) with 8 zones, a process that offers uninterrupted production, and, potentially, improved economy. As in other established ternary separation processes, the separation sequence is crucial for the performance of the process. This problem is addressed here by computing and comparing optimal performances of the two possibilities assuming linear adsorption isotherms. The conclusions are presented in a decision tree which can be used to guide the selection of system configuration and operation. PMID:27328885

  16. Effects of Bed Rest on Conduction Velocity of the Triceps Surae Stretch Reflex and Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Esteves, J. T.; Taylor, L. C.; DeDios, Y. E.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite rigorous exercise and nutritional management during space missions, astronauts returning from microgravity exhibit neuromuscular deficits and a significant loss in muscle mass in the postural muscles of the lower leg. Similar changes in the postural muscles occur in subjects participating in long-duration bed rest studies. These adaptive muscle changes manifest as a reduction in reflex conduction velocity during head-down bed rest. Because the stretch reflex encompasses both the peripheral (muscle spindle and nerve axon) and central (spinal synapse) components involved in adaptation to calf muscle unloading, it may be used to provide feedback on the general condition of neuromuscular function, and might be used to evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures aimed at preserving muscle mass and function during periods of unloading. Stretch reflexes were measured on 18 control subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 deg head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 degrees at a peak velocity of about 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender. Computerized posturography was also conducted on these same subjects before and after bed rest as part of the standard measures. Peak-to-peak sway was measured during Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) to evaluate changes in the ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Although no gender differences were found, a significant increase in reflex latency and a significant decrease in CV were observed during the bed

  17. Cardiovascular control and stabilization via inclination and mobilization during bed rest.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Martin; Gisler, Stefan; Sarabadani, Amirehsan; Ruest, Rafael M; Buetler, Lilith; Vallery, Heike; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena; Hund-Georgiadis, Margret; Felder, Morena; Schoenberger, Josef L; Gutknecht, Clemens; Riener, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning has long been recognized as a characteristic of the physiological adaptation to long-term bed rest in patients. The process is thought to contribute to orthostatic intolerance and enhance secondary complications in a significant way. Mobilization is a cost-effective and simple method to maintain the cardiovascular parameters (i.e., blood pressure, heart rate) stable, counter orthostatic intolerance and reduce the risk of secondary problems in patients during long-term immobilization. The aim of this project is to control the cardiovascular parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure of bed rest patients via automated leg mobilization and body tilting. In a first step, a nonlinear model predictive control strategy was designed and evaluated on five healthy subjects and 11 bed rest patients. In a next step, a clinically feasible study was conducted on two patients. The mean values differed on average less than 1 bpm from the predetermined heart rate and less than 2.5 mmHg from the desired blood pressure values. These results of the feasibility study are promising, although heterogeneous disease etiologies and individual medication strongly influence the mechanically induced reactions. The long-term goal is an automation of the control of physiological signals and the mobilization of bed rest patients in an early phase of the rehabilitation process. Therefore, this new approach could help to strengthen the cardiovascular system and prevent secondary health problems arising from long-term bed rest. PMID:24096595

  18. Cardiovascular control and stabilization via inclination and mobilization during bed rest.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Martin; Gisler, Stefan; Sarabadani, Amirehsan; Ruest, Rafael M; Buetler, Lilith; Vallery, Heike; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena; Hund-Georgiadis, Margret; Felder, Morena; Schoenberger, Josef L; Gutknecht, Clemens; Riener, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning has long been recognized as a characteristic of the physiological adaptation to long-term bed rest in patients. The process is thought to contribute to orthostatic intolerance and enhance secondary complications in a significant way. Mobilization is a cost-effective and simple method to maintain the cardiovascular parameters (i.e., blood pressure, heart rate) stable, counter orthostatic intolerance and reduce the risk of secondary problems in patients during long-term immobilization. The aim of this project is to control the cardiovascular parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure of bed rest patients via automated leg mobilization and body tilting. In a first step, a nonlinear model predictive control strategy was designed and evaluated on five healthy subjects and 11 bed rest patients. In a next step, a clinically feasible study was conducted on two patients. The mean values differed on average less than 1 bpm from the predetermined heart rate and less than 2.5 mmHg from the desired blood pressure values. These results of the feasibility study are promising, although heterogeneous disease etiologies and individual medication strongly influence the mechanically induced reactions. The long-term goal is an automation of the control of physiological signals and the mobilization of bed rest patients in an early phase of the rehabilitation process. Therefore, this new approach could help to strengthen the cardiovascular system and prevent secondary health problems arising from long-term bed rest.

  19. 75 FR 30409 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and...)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and..., Public Health Analyst, National Center for Chronic Disease and Health Promotion, Office of the...

  20. 78 FR 25279 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 12... announcements of meetings and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease...

  1. Vestibular and Somatosensory Covergence in Postural Equilibrium Control: Insights from Spaceflight and Bed Rest Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Batson, C. D.; Buxton, R. E.; Feiveson, A. H.; Kofman, I. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Miller, C. A.; Peters, B. T.; Phillips, T.; Platts, S. H.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Ryder, J. W.; Stenger, M. B.; Taylor, L. C.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Functional Task Test study is to determine the effects of space flight on functional tests that are representative of high priority exploration mission tasks and to identify the key underlying physiological factors that contribute to decrements in performance. We are currently conducting studies on both International Space Station (ISS) astronauts experiencing up to 6 months of microgravity and subjects experiencing 70 days of 6??head-down bed-rest as an analog for space flight. Bed-rest provides the opportunity for us to investigate the role of prolonged axial body unloading in isolation from the other physiological effects produced by exposure to the microgravity environment of space flight. This allows us to parse out the contribution of the body unloading somatosensory component on functional performance. Both ISS crewmembers and bed-rest subjects were tested using a protocol that evaluated functional performance along with tests of postural and locomotor control before and after space flight and bed-rest, respectively. Functional tests included ladder climbing, hatch opening, jump down, manual manipulation of objects and tool use, seat egress and obstacle avoidance, recovery from a fall, and object translation tasks. Astronauts were tested three times before flight, and on 1, 6, and 30 days after landing. Bed-rest subjects were tested three times before bed-rest and immediately after getting up from bed-rest as well as 1, 6, and 12 days after re-ambulation. A comparison of bed-rest and space flight data showed a significant concordance in performance changes across all functional tests. Tasks requiring a greater demand for dynamic control of postural equilibrium (i.e. fall recovery, seat egress/obstacle avoidance during walking, object translation, jump down) showed the greatest decrement in performance. Functional tests with reduced requirements for postural stability showed less reduction in performance. Results indicate that body unloading

  2. 75. SAC control center underground structure middle floor plan, drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. SAC control center underground structure middle floor plan, drawing number 32-02-03, dated 1 February, 1955 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  3. 72. SAC control center underground structure lower floor plan, drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. SAC control center underground structure lower floor plan, drawing number 32-02-03, dated 1 February 1955 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  4. 77. SAC control center administrative section basement floor plan, drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. SAC control center administrative section basement floor plan, drawing number not listed, dated 1 February, 1955 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  5. 78. SAC control center aboveground addition partial first floor plan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. SAC control center aboveground addition partial first floor plan, drawing number AW30-02-09, dated 15 October, 1962 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  6. 76. SAC control center underground structure upper floor plan, drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. SAC control center underground structure upper floor plan, drawing number 32-02-03, dated 1 February, 1955 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  7. 79. SAC control center administration section first floor plan, drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. SAC control center administration section first floor plan, drawing number 32-02-03, dated 1 February, 1955 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  8. 80. SAC control center administration section third floor plan, drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. SAC control center administration section third floor plan, drawing number 32-02-03, dated 1 February, 1955 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  9. Views of the mission control center during STS-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The two backup payload specialists for Drs. Byron K. Lichtenberg and Ulf Merbold huddle in the mission control center during day three activity aboard Spacelab. Seated at the Console is Dr. Michael Lampton. Leaning over Lampton's shoulder is Dutch scientist Wubbo Ockels. The two are surrounded by a few of the flight controllers in the payload operations control center (POCC) portion of JSC's mission control center.

  10. Electric Power Research Institute: environmental Control Technology Center.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-04

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved continued investigations into the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process for the production of Anhydrous Calcium Sulfate (Anhydrite). The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. From May 3-18, the NYSEG Kintigh Station and the ECTC were off-line for a two-week scheduled Station outage. During the ECTC outage, the major systems of the Center were inspected, and several preventive maintenance activities were completed. A listing of the major O&M outage activities completed during this period is presented in the Pilot/Mini-Pilot section of this report. In May 1997, an extension to the Anhydrite Production test block was started following the NYSEG outage. The extension to the Anhydrite Production test block is being funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) after promising results from the original test program. Both EPRI and the Department of Energy (DOE) funded the original test program as part of the DOE`s Advanced Power Systems Program, whose mission is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high- efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. While the pilot portion of the Anhydrite project was conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) in Barker, New York, the extension mainly used the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot wet FGD unit to reduce operating costs. The project is designed to develop an advanced FGD process that produces a useable byproduct, anhydrite (anhydrous calcium sulfate). The original CLS/Anhydrite process included three steps: chloride removal, clear liquor scrubbing, and anhydrite production. The final step in the process involved

  11. An active wound dressing for controlled convective mass transfer with the wound bed.

    PubMed

    Cabodi, Mario; Cross, Valerie L; Qu, Zheng; Havenstrite, Karen L; Schwartz, Suzanne; Stroock, Abraham D

    2007-07-01

    Conventional wound dressings-gauze, plastic films, foams, and gels-do not allow for spatial and temporal control of the soluble chemistry within the wound bed, and are thus limited to a passive role in wound healing. Here, we present an active wound dressing (AWD) designed to control convective mass transfer with the wound bed; this mass transfer provides a means to tailor and monitor the chemical state of a wound and, potentially, to aid the healing process. We form this AWD as a bilayer of porous poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and silicone; the pHEMA acts as the interface with the wound bed, and a layer of silicone provides a vapor barrier and a support for connecting to external reservoirs and pumps. We measure the convective permeability of the pHEMA sponge, and use this value to design a device with a spatially uniform flow profile. We quantify the global coefficient of mass transfer of the AWD on a dissolvable synthetic surface, and compare it to existing theories of mass transfer in porous media. We also operate the AWD on model wound beds made of calcium alginate gel to demonstrate extraction and delivery of low molecular weight solutes and a model protein. Using this system, we demonstrate both uniform mass transfer over the entire wound bed and patterned mass transfer in three spatially distinct regions. Finally, we discuss opportunities and challenges for the clinical application of this design of an AWD.

  12. An active wound dressing for controlled convective mass transfer with the wound bed.

    PubMed

    Cabodi, Mario; Cross, Valerie L; Qu, Zheng; Havenstrite, Karen L; Schwartz, Suzanne; Stroock, Abraham D

    2007-07-01

    Conventional wound dressings-gauze, plastic films, foams, and gels-do not allow for spatial and temporal control of the soluble chemistry within the wound bed, and are thus limited to a passive role in wound healing. Here, we present an active wound dressing (AWD) designed to control convective mass transfer with the wound bed; this mass transfer provides a means to tailor and monitor the chemical state of a wound and, potentially, to aid the healing process. We form this AWD as a bilayer of porous poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and silicone; the pHEMA acts as the interface with the wound bed, and a layer of silicone provides a vapor barrier and a support for connecting to external reservoirs and pumps. We measure the convective permeability of the pHEMA sponge, and use this value to design a device with a spatially uniform flow profile. We quantify the global coefficient of mass transfer of the AWD on a dissolvable synthetic surface, and compare it to existing theories of mass transfer in porous media. We also operate the AWD on model wound beds made of calcium alginate gel to demonstrate extraction and delivery of low molecular weight solutes and a model protein. Using this system, we demonstrate both uniform mass transfer over the entire wound bed and patterned mass transfer in three spatially distinct regions. Finally, we discuss opportunities and challenges for the clinical application of this design of an AWD. PMID:17106898

  13. International Space Station Sustaining Engineering: A Ground-Based Test Bed for Evaluating Integrated Environmental Control and Life Support System and Internal Thermal Control System Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Charles D.; Perry, Jay L.; Callahan, David M.

    2000-01-01

    As the International Space Station's (ISS) various habitable modules are placed in service on orbit, the need to provide for sustaining engineering becomes increasingly important to ensure the proper function of critical onboard systems. Chief among these are the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS). Without either, life onboard the ISS would prove difficult or nearly impossible. For this reason, a ground-based ECLSS/ITCS hardware performance simulation capability has been developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The ECLSS/ITCS Sustaining Engineering Test Bed will be used to assist the ISS Program in resolving hardware anomalies and performing periodic performance assessments. The ISS flight configuration being simulated by the test bed is described as well as ongoing activities related to its preparation for supporting ISS Mission 5A. Growth options for the test facility are presented whereby the current facility may be upgraded to enhance its capability for supporting future station operation well beyond Mission 5A. Test bed capabilities for demonstrating technology improvements of ECLSS hardware are also described.

  14. Atlanta Air Route Traffic Control Center's involvement in aviation weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of weather information throughout the Air Traffic Control System is discussed along with the development of meteorological radar, and the modifications to the Air Route Traffic Control Center radars for locating and determining the severity of storms' cells. The planned improvements in the availability of weather data to the control centers are listed.

  15. Study of instrumentation needs for process control and safety in coal fluidized-bed combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, C.L.; Griggs, K.E.; Henry, R.F.; Podolski, W.F.

    1981-02-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the current state of the art of instrumentation for planned and operating fluidized-bed combustion systems. This study is intended to identify instrumentation needs and serve as a data base for projects to develop this instrumentation. A considerable number of needs for measurements for which presently available instrumentation is not suitable were reported by respondents. The identified deficiencies are presented with the associated physical parameter ranges for FBC processes. New techniques and instrumentation under development, as well as some available alternative instruments, are discussed briefly. Also, newly instituted mechanisms for technical information exchange on instrumentation for fossil energy applications are identified. Development of instruments to meet the identified measurement deficiencies is recommended in order to ensure the feasibility of automatic control of large-scale fluidized-bed combustion systems, and to advance the state of the art of fluidized-bed combustion technology.

  16. Design and control of the precise tracking bed based on complex electromechanical design theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Changzhi; Liu, Zhao; Wu, Liao; Chen, Ken

    2010-05-01

    The precise tracking technology is wide used in astronomical instruments, satellite tracking and aeronautic test bed. However, the precise ultra low speed tracking drive system is one high integrated electromechanical system, which one complexly electromechanical design method is adopted to improve the efficiency, reliability and quality of the system during the design and manufacture circle. The precise Tracking Bed is one ultra-exact, ultra-low speed, high precision and huge inertial instrument, which some kind of mechanism and environment of the ultra low speed is different from general technology. This paper explores the design process based on complex electromechanical optimizing design theory, one non-PID with a CMAC forward feedback control method is used in the servo system of the precise tracking bed and some simulation results are discussed.

  17. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2004-10-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2004 through September 30, 2004. The following tasks have been completed. First, renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building have started. Second, the design if the component parts of the CFBC system have been reviewed and finalized so that the drawings may be released to the manufacturers during the next quarter. Third, the experiments for solid waste (chicken litter) incineration have been conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). This is in preparation for testing in the simulated fluidized-bed combustor. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter has been outlined in this report.

  18. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-01-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period October 1, 2004 through December 31, 2004. The following tasks have been completed. First, the renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building have proceeded well. Second, the detailed design of supporting and hanging structures for the CFBC was completed. Third, the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed facility was modified after completing a series of pretests. The two problems identified during the pretest were solved. Fourth, the carbonization of chicken waste and coal was investigated in a tube furnace and a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter has been outlined in this report.

  19. Co-Simulation of Building Energy and Control Systems with the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    2010-08-22

    This article describes the implementation of the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB). The BCVTB is a software environment that allows connecting different simulation programs to exchange data during the time integration, and that allows conducting hardware in the loop simulation. The software architecture is a modular design based on Ptolemy II, a software environment for design and analysis of heterogeneous systems. Ptolemy II provides a graphical model building environment, synchronizes the exchanged data and visualizes the system evolution during run-time. The BCVTB provides additions to Ptolemy II that allow the run-time coupling of different simulation programs for data exchange, including EnergyPlus, MATLAB, Simulink and the Modelica modelling and simulation environment Dymola. The additions also allow executing system commands, such as a script that executes a Radiance simulation. In this article, the software architecture is presented and the mathematical model used to implement the co-simulation is discussed. The simulation program interface that the BCVTB provides is explained. The article concludes by presenting applications in which different state of the art simulation programs are linked for run-time data exchange. This link allows the use of the simulation program that is best suited for the particular problem to model building heat transfer, HVAC system dynamics and control algorithms, and to compute a solution to the coupled problem using co-simulation.

  20. Dynamic responsiveness of the vascular bed as a regulatory mechanism in vasomotor control.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Mair; Norton, Katelyn; Fleischhauer, Arlene; Frances, Maria F; Goswami, Ruma; Usselman, Charlotte W; Nolan, Robert P; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2009-07-01

    The dynamics of blood supply to a vascular bed depend on lumped mechanical properties of that bed, namely the compliance (C), resistance (R), viscoelasticity (K), and inertance (L). While the study of regulatory mechanisms has so far placed the emphasis largely on R, it is not known how the remaining properties contribute collectively to the play of dynamics in vasomotor control. To examine this question and to establish some benchmark values of these properties, simultaneous measurements of pressure and flow waveforms in the vascular bed of the forearm were obtained from three groups: young healthy individuals, older hypertensives with controlled blood pressure, and older hypertensives with uncontrolled blood pressure. The values of R and C were found to vary within a wide range in each of the three groups to the extent that neither R nor C could be used independently as an indicator of health or age of the subjects tested. However, higher level dynamic properties of the bed, such as the time constants and damping index, which depend on combinations of C,K, and L, and which may reflect measures of the dynamic responsiveness or "sluggishness" of the system, were found to be maintained over a wide range of pulse pressures. These findings support a hypothesis that the pulsatile dynamics of blood supply to a vascular bed are adapted to the individual baseline values of R and C in different subjects with the effect of optimizing the level of dynamic responsiveness to changes in pressure or flow, and that this dynamic property of the vascular bed may be a protected and/or regulated property.

  1. Getting Rid of Bed Bugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed Bugs — Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control — Pesticides to Control Bed Bugs Bed Bug Information Clearinghouse ... Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology Air Climate Change Ecosystems ...

  2. TEXSYS. [a knowledge based system for the Space Station Freedom thermal control system test-bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, John

    1990-01-01

    The Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project has recently completed a major test and evaluation of TEXSYS, a knowledge-based system (KBS) which demonstrates real-time control and FDIR for the Space Station Freedom thermal control system test-bed. TEXSYS is the largest KBS ever developed by NASA and offers a unique opportunity for the study of technical issues associated with the use of advanced KBS concepts including: model-based reasoning and diagnosis, quantitative and qualitative reasoning, integrated use of model-based and rule-based representations, temporal reasoning, and scale-up performance issues. TEXSYS represents a major achievement in advanced automation that has the potential to significantly influence Space Station Freedom's design for the thermal control system. An overview of the Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project, the thermal control system test-bed, the TEXSYS architecture, preliminary test results, and thermal domain expert feedback are presented.

  3. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Final report (includes technical progress report for October 1994--January 1995), September 1994--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document presents a modeling and control study of the Fluid Bed Gasification (FBG) unit at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The work is performed under contract no. DE-FG21-94MC31384. The purpose of this study is to generate a simple FBG model from process data, and then use the model to suggest an improved control scheme which will improve operation of the gasifier. The work first developes a simple linear model of the gasifier, then suggests an improved gasifier pressure and MGCR control configuration, and finally suggests the use of a multivariable control strategy for the gasifier.

  4. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the completion of the Clear Liquor Scrubbing with Anhydrite Production test block extension. Also, the test plan for July (Dry Sorbent Injection with the Carbon Injection System) was developed and reconfiguration activities were initiated. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified. In June 1997, the extension to the Anhydrite Production test block was completed. The extended Anhydrite test block was funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) after reviewing the promising results from the original test program. Both EPRI and the Department of Energy (DOE) funded the original PRDA test program as part of the DOE`s Advanced Power Systems Program, whose mission is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The project is designed to develop an advanced FGD process that produces a usable byproduct, anhydrite (anhydrous calcium sulfate). While the pilot portion of the Anhydrite PRDA project was conducted on the 4-MW wet FGD pilot unit at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) in Barker, New York, the extension testing mainly used the 0.4 MW wet FGD pilot unit to reduce operating costs. As discussed in previous progress reports, the original CLS/Anhydrite process included three steps: chloride removal, clear liquor scrubbing, and anhydrite production. The final step in the process involved sending the calcium sulfite slurry from the sludge bed reactor to the anhydrite reaction tank for conversion to anhydrous calcium sulfate (anhydrite). The original objective in the PRDA

  5. Remote Operations and Ground Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Barry S.; Lankford, Kimberly; Pitts, R. Lee

    2004-01-01

    The Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center supports the International Space Station (ISS) through remote interfaces around the world. The POIC was originally designed as a gateway to space for remote facilities; ranging from an individual user to a full-scale multiuser environment. This achievement was accomplished while meeting program requirements and accommodating the injection of modern technology on an ongoing basis to ensure cost effective operations. This paper will discuss the open POIC architecture developed to support similar and dissimilar remote operations centers. It will include technologies, protocols, and compromises which on a day to day basis support ongoing operations. Additional areas covered include centralized management of shared resources and methods utilized to provide highly available and restricted resources to remote users. Finally, the effort of coordinating the actions of participants will be discussed.

  6. Technology test bed engine real-time failure control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panossian, Hagop V.; Kemp, Victoria R.

    1992-01-01

    The Real-Time Failure Control (RTFC) program involves development of a failure detection algorithm, for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). This failure detection approach is signal-based and entails monitoring SSME measurement signals based on predetermined as well as on-line computed mean and standard deviation values. Twenty-four engine measurements are monitored in the algorithm and provisions are made to add more parameters if needed. Each of the first values of every measurement signal at the algorithm start is checked against safety limits placed around a pre-computed engine-to-engine mean value (MV) with a bandwidth equal to a given multiple of the pre-computed standard deviation (SD). If several parameters are out of the bounds of these limits a failure is signaled. During the first two seconds (after algorithm start) a moving average (MA) and a SD is computed on-line in real-time. The moving average of each parameter is computed by averaging the incoming signal measurement with the four most recent previous signal measurements. The moving average is updated at every sampling interval (40 msec) and is checked against a similar safety band around the initial signal value for each parameter. If several anomalies are registered, a failure is signaled by the algorithm. At the end of the two-second interval the MA is fixed as the mean value for the rest of the algorithm operation and a safety band is placed above and below this value equal to a multiple of the computed SD. However, the safety band is adjusted by adjusting the mean value when propellant tank repressurization and venting take place. 'Influence Coefficients' are used to make the necessary adjustments to the safety limits of those parameters that are affected by repressurization and venting or valve closure and opening. The MA is, in both cases, continuously updated and checked against the safety band. Once more, if several parameters exceed the limits a failure is signaled. At the start of every

  7. Efficacy of an Essential Oil-Based Pesticide for Controlling Bed Bug (Cimex lectularius) Infestations in Apartment Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal; Cooper, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F.) are among the most difficult urban pests to manage. Many essential oil-based bed bug control products that are considered reduced risk to mammals compared to synthetic insect neurotoxins have become commercially available, but their effectiveness as a stand-alone control method is unknown. This study assessed the field efficacy of an essential oil-based bed bug control product (EcoRaider; a.i. 1% geraniol + 1% cedar oil + 2% sodium lauryl sulfate) compared to a pyrethroid and neonicotinoid mixture spray (0.075% Temprid SC; a.i. beta-cyfluthrin + imidacloprid). After 12 weeks, the three treatments—EcoRaider, Temprid SC, and EcoRaider + Temprid SC caused 92.5 ± 2.7, 92.9 ± 3.0, and 91.7% ± 2.7% bed bug count reduction, respectively. No significant differences existed in the bed bug reduction among the treatments. Bed bugs were eliminated from only 22% of the treated apartments. Among those still with bed bugs, 76% of the residents did not know bed bugs were present. We documented the residents’ self-control practices and discussed the potential of using essential oil-based insecticides in bed bug management programs to minimize the health risks to building occupants and pets and to slow down the development of insecticide resistance. PMID:26462944

  8. Use of a "Freak Out" Control Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casse, Robert M.

    1970-01-01

    A student staffed center, established to help those on bad trips", utilizes services of volunteer personnel for therapeutic support. A physician is on call to administer chemotherapy when needed. During the first year of operation, no cases of hepatitis or freak outs have been reported. (CJ)

  9. 13. Sewage treatment lagoon, drainage control at center left, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Sewage treatment lagoon, drainage control at center left, looking south - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  10. RoboCon: A general purpose telerobotic control center

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Noakes, M.W.; Schempf, H.; Blair, L.M.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes human factors issues involved in the design of RoboCon, a multi-purpose control center for use in US Department of Energy remote handling applications. RoboCon is intended to be a flexible, modular control center capable of supporting a wide variety of robotic devices.

  11. US-CERT Control System Center Input/Output (I/O) Conceputal Design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-02-01

    This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Center of the National Cyber Security Division (NCSD) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs the federal departments to identify and prioritize critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the NCSD to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems; the I/O upgrade described in this document supports these goals. The vulnerability assessment Test Bed, located in the Information Operations Research Center (IORC) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), consists of a cyber test facility integrated with multiple test beds that simulate the nation's critical infrastructure. The fundamental mission of the Test Bed is to provide industry owner/operators, system vendors, and multi-agency partners of the INL National Security Division a platform for vulnerability assessments of control systems. The Input/Output (I/O) upgrade to the Test Bed (see Work Package 3.1 of the FY-05 Annual Work Plan) will provide for the expansion of assessment capabilities within the IORC facility. It will also provide capabilities to connect test beds within the Test Range and other Laboratory resources. This will allow real time I/O data input and communication channels for full replications of control systems (Process Control Systems [PCS], Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems [SCADA], and components

  12. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; Songgeng Li

    2006-04-01

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Work was performed on the following activities. First, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility were completed. The riser, primary cyclone and secondary cyclone of Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Combustor have been erected. Second, the Mercury Control Workshop and the Grand Opening of Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET) were successfully held on February 22 and 23, 2006, respectively. Third, effects of hydrogen chlorine (HCl) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) on mercury oxidation were studied in a drop tube reactor. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  13. Apparatus for high flux photocatalytic pollution control using a rotating fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali; Muradov, Nazim Z.; Martin, Eric

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus based on optimizing photoprocess energetics by decoupling of the process energy efficiency from the DRE for target contaminants. The technique is applicable to both low- and high-flux photoreactor design and scale-up. An apparatus for high-flux photocatalytic pollution control is based on the implementation of multifunctional metal oxide aerogels and other media in conjunction with a novel rotating fluidized particle bed reactor.

  14. Free-Piston Stirling Convertor Controller Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    The free-piston Stirling convertor end-to-end modeling effort at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has produced a software-based test bed in which free-piston Stirling convertors can be simulated and evaluated. The simulation model includes all the components of the convertor - the Stirling cycle engine, linear alternator, controller, and load. This paper is concerned with controllers. It discusses three controllers that have been studied using this model. Case motion has been added to the model recently so that effects of differences between convertor components can be simulated and ameliorative control engineering techniques can be developed. One concern when applying a system comprised of interconnected mass-spring-damper components is to prevent operation in any but the intended mode. The design mode is the only desired mode of operation, but all other modes are considered in controller design.

  15. Reports of long-lasting insecticidal bed nets catching on fire: a threat to bed net users and to successful malaria control?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the control tools to reduce malaria transmission is the use of LLINs. However, several studies show that household bed net use is quite low. A study was developed to better understand the cultural factors that might explain these gaps in Benin. One reason mentioned is that bed nets can catch on fire and cause harm. This paper presents a summary of these findings, their analysis and the ensuing issues. Methods This anthropological study is based on an inductive qualitative approach, including 91 semi-structured interviews conducted from July 2011 to March 2012 in a health district in Southern Benin. Results Fifty-six persons stated that bed nets can catch on fire but do not always refer to specific facts. However, 34 of the 56 people narrate specific events they heard or experienced. 39 accounts were geographically located and situated in time, with various details. In 27 situations, people were burned, for which 12 people reportedly died. Discussion The disparity between these results and the dearth of bibliographic documentation in the initial search prompted a more in-depth literature review: 16 contributions between 1994 and 2013 were found. Bed net fires were noted in 10 countries, but it is impossible to ascertain the frequency of such events. Moreover, bodily harm can be significant, and several cases of death attributed to bed net fires were noted. Conclusions Indisputably, the use of bed nets to reduce the impact of this terrible disease is an optimal control method. However, the perception that LLINs have a potentially negative effect hinders the use rate in the real world, at least for some. If some people fear the risk of fires, this possibility must be addressed during information and prevention sessions on malaria, with a communication strategy tailored to specific social contexts. Moreover, all possible measures should be taken to limit the harm suffered by individuals and their families. PMID:24972637

  16. Test Results of the Modified Space Shuttle Main Engine at the Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Test Bed Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J.; Dumbacher, D.; Ise, M.; Singer, C.

    1990-01-01

    A modified space shuttle main engine (SSME), which primarily includes an enlarged throat main combustion chamber with the acoustic cavities removed and a main injector with the stability control baffles removed, was tested. This one-of-a-kind engine's design changes are being evaluated for potential incorporation in the shuttle flight program in the mid-1990's. Engine testing was initiated on September 15, 1988 and has accumulated 1,915 seconds and 19 starts. Testing is being conducted to characterize the engine system performance, combustion stability with the baffle-less injector, and both low pressure oxidizer turbopump (LPOTP) and high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) for suction performance. These test results are summarized and compared with the SSME flight configuration data base. Testing of this new generation SSME is the first product from the technology test bed (TTB). Figure test plans for the TTB include the highly instrumented flight configuration SSME and advanced liquid propulsion technology items.

  17. Water Quality, Fish Tissue, and Bed Sediment Monitoring in Waterbodies of Fort Chaffee Maneuver Training Center, Arkansas, 2002-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justus, B.G.; Stanton, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The Fort Chaffee Maneuver Training Center is a facility used to train as many as 50,000 Arkansas National Guardsmen each year. Due to the nature of ongoing training and also to a poor understanding of environmental procedures that were practiced in the World War II era, areas within Fort Chaffee have the potential to be sources of a large number of contaminants. Because some streams flow on to Fort Chaffee, there is also the potential for sources that are off post to affect environmental conditions on post. This study evaluates constituent concentrations in water, fish tissue, and bed sediment collected from waterbodies on Fort Chaffee between September 2002 and July 2004. Constituent concentrations detected in the three media and measured at nine stream sites and four lake sites were compared to national and regional criteria when available. Two of the larger streams, Big and Vache Grasse Creeks, were sampled at multiple sites. All three sampled media were analyzed for insecticides, PCBs, explosives, and trace elements. Additionally, water samples were analyzed for nutrients and herbicides. The different constituents detected in the three sample media (water, fish tissue, and bed sediment) indicate that land-use activities both on and off post are influencing environmental conditions. Contaminants such as explosives that were sometimes detected in water samples have an obvious relation to military training; however, the occurrence and locations of some nutrients, insecticides, and trace elements suggest that land use both on and off post also could be influencing environmental conditions to some degree. Constituent concentrations at sites on Vache Grasse Creek, and particularly the most upstream site, which was located immediately downstream from an off-post wastewater-treatment facility, indicate that environmental conditions were being influenced by an off-post source. The most upstream site on Vache Grasse Creek had both the highest number of detections and the

  18. Common front end systems for Space Shuttle and Space Station control centers at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uljon, Linda; Muratore, John

    1993-03-01

    In the beginning of the fiscal year 1992, the development organizations of Johnson Space Center (JSC) were poised to begin two major projects: the Space Station Control Center and the refurbishment of the telemetry processing area of the Space Shuttle Mission Control Center. A study team established that a common front end concept could be used and could reduce development costs for both projects. A standard processor was defined to support most of the front end functions of both control centers and supports a consolidation of control positions which effectively reduces operations cost. This paper defines that common concept and describes the progress that has been made in development of the Consolidated Communications Facility (CCF) during the past year.

  19. PNNL’s Building Operations Control Center

    ScienceCinema

    Belew, Shan

    2016-07-12

    PNNL's Building Operations Control Center (BOCC) video provides an overview of the center, its capabilities, and its objectives. The BOCC was relocated to PNNL's new 3820 Systems Engineering Building in 2015. Although a key focus of the BOCC is on monitoring and improving the operations of PNNL buildings, the center's state-of-the-art computational, software and visualization resources also have provided a platform for PNNL buildings-related research projects.

  20. "WhatsApp"ening in orthopedic care: a concise report from a 300-bedded tertiary care teaching center.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Vishesh; Sambandam, Senthil N; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-07-01

    Smartphones have emerged as essential tools providing assistance in patient care, monitoring, rehabilitation, communication, diagnosis, teaching, research and reference. Among innumerable communication apps, WhatsApp has been widely popular and cost effective. The aim of our study was to report the impact of introduction of a smartphone app "WhatsApp" as an intradepartmental communication tool on (1) awareness of patient-related information, (2) efficiency of the handover process and (3) duration of traditional morning handovers among orthopedic residents in a 300-bedded tertiary care teaching center. Written handovers and paging used for communication at our center led to occasional inefficiencies among residents. Widespread use, low cost, availability and double password protection (phone lock and WhatsApp lock) made WhatsApp's group conversation feature an ideal tool for intradepartmental patient-related communication. Twenty-five consecutive admissions before and after WhatsApp (BW, AW) were included in the study. Eight orthopedic residents attempted fifty randomly arranged questions based on the twenty-five patients in each study period. A null hypothesis that introduction of WhatsApp group would neither increase the awareness of patient-related information nor improve the efficiency of the handovers among residents was assumed. A significant improvement observed in scores obtained by residents in the AW group led to rejection of the null hypothesis. The residents also reported swifter and efficient handovers after the introduction of WhatsApp. Our results indicate that the introduction of a smartphone app "WhatsApp" as an intradepartmental communication tool can bring about an improvement in patient-related awareness, communication and handovers among orthopedic residents.

  1. MCCx C3I Control Center Interface Emulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mireles, James R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the project to develop and demonstrate alternate Information Technologies and systems for new Mission Control Centers that will reduce the cost of facility development, maintenance and operational costs and will enable more efficient cost and effective operations concepts for ground support operations. The development of a emulator for the Control Center capability will enable the facilities to conduct the simulation requiring interactivity with the Control Center when it is off line or unavailable, and it will support testing of C3I interfaces for both command and telemetry data exchange messages (DEMs).

  2. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Kunlei Liu; John T. Riley

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' in this quarter (September-December of 2003). The main tasks in this quarter consisted of the following four parts. First, all documents for managing this project have been prepared and sent to the Office of Project Management at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Second, plans for the renovation of space for a new combustion laboratory for the CFBC system has progressed smoothly. Third, considerable progress in the design of the CFBC system has been made. Finally, a lab-scale simulated fluidized-bed combustion facility has been set up in order to make some fundamental investigations of the co-firing of coal with waste materials in the next quarter. Proposed work for the next quarter has been outlined in this report.

  3. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Zhongxian Cheng; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2006-09-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project entitled ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2006 through September 30, 2006. The following activities have been completed: the steel floor grating around the riser in all levels and the three-phase power supply for CFBC System was installed. Erection of downcomers, loop seals, ash bunker, thermal expansion joints, fuel and bed material bunkers with load cells, rotary air-lock valves and fuel flow monitors is underway. Pilot-scale slipstream tests conducted with bromine compound addition were performed for two typical types of coal. The purposes of the tests were to study the effect of bromine addition on mercury oxidization. From the test results, it was observed that there was a strong oxidization effect for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The proposed work for next quarter and project schedule are also described.

  4. NASA Stennis Space Center Integrated System Health Management Test Bed and Development Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Holland, Randy; Coote, David

    2006-01-01

    Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is a capability that focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex System (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, prognosis of future anomalies), and provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK)-not just data-to control systems for safe and effective operation. This capability is currently done by large teams of people, primarily from ground, but needs to be embedded on-board systems to a higher degree to enable NASA's new Exploration Mission (long term travel and stay in space), while increasing safety and decreasing life cycle costs of spacecraft (vehicles; platforms; bases or outposts; and ground test, launch, and processing operations). The topics related to this capability include: 1) ISHM Related News Articles; 2) ISHM Vision For Exploration; 3) Layers Representing How ISHM is Currently Performed; 4) ISHM Testbeds & Prototypes at NASA SSC; 5) ISHM Functional Capability Level (FCL); 6) ISHM Functional Capability Level (FCL) and Technology Readiness Level (TRL); 7) Core Elements: Capabilities Needed; 8) Core Elements; 9) Open Systems Architecture for Condition-Based Maintenance (OSA-CBM); 10) Core Elements: Architecture, taxonomy, and ontology (ATO) for DIaK management; 11) Core Elements: ATO for DIaK Management; 12) ISHM Architecture Physical Implementation; 13) Core Elements: Standards; 14) Systematic Implementation; 15) Sketch of Work Phasing; 16) Interrelationship Between Traditional Avionics Systems, Time Critical ISHM and Advanced ISHM; 17) Testbeds and On-Board ISHM; 18) Testbed Requirements: RETS AND ISS; 19) Sustainable Development and Validation Process; 20) Development of on-board ISHM; 21) Taxonomy/Ontology of Object Oriented Implementation; 22) ISHM Capability on the E1 Test Stand Hydraulic System; 23) Define Relationships to Embed Intelligence; 24) Intelligent Elements Physical and Virtual; 25) ISHM Testbeds and Prototypes at SSC Current Implementations; 26) Trailer

  5. Disease Control and Ototoxicity Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Tumor-Bed Boost for Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Polkinghorn, William R.; Dunkel, Ira J.; Souweidane, Mark M.; Khakoo, Yasmin; Lyden, David C.; Gilheeney, Stephen W.; Becher, Oren J.; Budnick, Amy S.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We previously reported excellent local control for treating medulloblastoma with a limited boost to the tumor bed. In order to decrease ototoxicity, we subsequently implemented a tumor-bed boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the clinical results of which we report here. Patients and Methods: A total of 33 patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma, 25 with standard risk, and 8 with high risk, were treated on an IMRT tumor-bed boost following craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Six standard-risk patients were treated with an institutional protocol with 18 Gy CSI in conjunction with intrathecal iodine-131-labeled monoclonal antibody. The majority of patients received concurrent vincristine and standard adjuvant chemotherapy. Pure-tone audiograms were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median age was 9 years old (range, 4-46 years old). Median follow-up was 63 months. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for standard-risk patients who received 23.4 or 36 Gy CSI (not including those who received 18 Gy CSI with radioimmunotherapy) were 81.4% and 88.4%, respectively, at 5 years; 5-year PFS and OS rates for high-risk patients were both 87.5%. There were no isolated posterior fossa failures outside of the boost volume. Posttreatment audiograms were available for 31 patients, of whom 6%, at a median follow-up of 19 months, had developed Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusion: An IMRT tumor-bed boost results in excellent local control while delivering a low mean dose to the cochlea, resulting in a low rate of ototoxicity.

  6. 24. DETAIL ELEVATION OF SECOND FLOOR AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DETAIL ELEVATION OF SECOND FLOOR AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL CEN-TER DOOR. - Newark International Airport, Administration Building, Brewster Road between Route 21 & New Jersey Turnpike Exchange No. 14, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  7. Contemplating the plasmalemmal control center model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickard, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    An abundant epidermal mechanosensory calcium-selective ion channel appears able not only to detect mechanical stimuli such as those that initiate gravitropism but also to detect thermal, electrical, and various chemical stimuli. Because it responds to multimodal input with a second messenger output, this channel system seems likely to be an integrator that can engage in feedbacks with many other systems of the cell--and feedback is the hallmark of regulation. In general, the mechanical tension required for channel activation is likely transmitted from the relatively rigid cell wall to the plasma membrane system via linkage or adhesion sites that display antigenicities recognized by antibodies to animal beta-1 integrin, vitronectin, and fibronectin and which have mechanical connections to the cytoskeleton. Thus, functionally, leverage exerted against any given adhesion site will tend to control channels within a surrounding domain. Reactions initiated by passage of calcium ions through the channels could presumably be more effectively regulated if channels within the domains were somewhat clustered and if appropriate receptors, kinases, porters, pumps, and some key cytoskeletal anchoring sites were in turn clustered about them. Accumulating evidence suggests not only that activity of clusters of channels may contribute to control of cytoskeletal architecture and of regulatory protein function within their domain, but also that both a variety of regulatory proteins and components of the cortical cytoskeleton may contribute to control of channel activity. The emerging capabilities of electronic optical microscopy are well suited for resolving the spatial distributions of many of these cytoskeletal and regulatory molecules in living cells, and for following some of their behaviors as channels are stimulated to open and cytosolic calcium builds in their vicinity. Such microscopy, coupled with biochemical and physiological probing, should help to establish the nature of

  8. Views of the mission control center during STS-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Busy moment in the customer management room (CMR) of JSC's mission control center during Spacelab 1 day 2. Three personnel from the European Space Agency (ESA) huddle around a console along with Ralph Hoodless (seated at left), of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. Others pictured are Lars Tedeman and Hildegard Binck (standing); and Frank Longhurst (seated right). Tedeman is with ESA's quality control division and Longhurst is Spacelab operations manager.

  9. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of Mission Operations Control Room in Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) during the ceremonies aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission. The Apollo 13 spacecraft, with Astronauts James Lovell, John Swigert, and Fred Haise aboard splashed down in the South Pacific at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970.

  10. Insecticide-impregnated bed nets for malaria control: varying experiences from Ecuador, Colombia, and Peru concerning acceptability and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, A; Mancheno, M; Alarcon, J; Pesse, K

    1995-10-01

    Between 1991 and 1994, an intervention program with permethrin- and lambdacyhalothrin-impregnated bed nets was carried out over a period of nine months in each of five endemic, malarious areas of Ecuador, Peru, and Colombia. This program was evaluated through household surveys, blood sampling, in-depth longitudinal studies, and entomologic analysis. Eighty-four communities (including approximately 35,000 individuals) were paired according to malaria incidence, size, and coverage with bed nets and then randomly allocated to intervention and control groups. The results showed that peoples' acceptance of the measure was related to their perception of an immediate protective effect against insects. The effectiveness of the bed nets, measured as a reduction of malaria incidence in intervention communities as against control communities, showed large variations between and within the study areas. The protective efficacy varied between 0% and 70% when looking only at the postintervention differences between intervention and control groups. The average protection was 40.8% when considering a four-month incidence of clinical malaria attacks and 28.3% when considering a two-week malaria incidence. Important factors for the success of the bed net program were insect susceptibility to pyrethroids, high coverage with impregnated bed nets, high malaria incidence, good community participation, high mosquito densities when people go to bed, and a high proportion of Plasmodium falciparum. In one area, where DDT spraying in the control communities was executed, the effectiveness of bed net impregnation was slightly better than that of spraying.

  11. Coherence times of precise depth controlled NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Zhang, Wenlong; Zhang, Jian; You, Jie; Li, Yan; Guo, Guoping; Feng, Fupan; Song, Xuerui; Lou, Liren; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Guanzhong

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the depth dependence of coherence times of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers through precise depth control using oxidative etching at 580 °C in air. By successive nanoscale etching, NV centers could be brought close to the diamond surface step by step, which enabled us to track the evolution of the number of NV centers remaining in the chip and to study the depth dependence of coherence times of NV centers with diamond etching. Our results showed that the coherence times of NV centers declined rapidly with the depth reduction in the last about 22 nm before they finally disappeared, which revealed a critical depth for the influence of a rapid fluctuating surface spin bath. Moreover, by using the slow etching method combined with low-energy nitrogen implantation, NV centers with depths shallower than the initially implanted depths can be generated, which are preferred for detecting external spins with higher sensitivity.

  12. Once-yearly zoledronic acid and days of disability, bed rest, and back pain: randomized, controlled HORIZON Pivotal Fracture Trial.

    PubMed

    Cauley, Jane A; Black, Dennis; Boonen, Steven; Cummings, Steven R; Mesenbrink, Peter; Palermo, Lisa; Man, Zulema; Hadji, Peyman; Reid, Ian R

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of once-yearly zoledronic acid on the number of days of back pain and the number of days of disability (ie, limited activity and bed rest) owing to back pain or fracture in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 240 clinical centers in 27 countries. Participants included 7736 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Patients were randomized to receive either a single 15-minute intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid (5 mg) or placebo at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months. The main outcome measures were self-reported number of days with back pain and the number of days of limited activity and bed rest owing to back pain or a fracture, and this was assessed every 3 months over a 3-year period. Our results show that although the incidence of back pain was high in both randomized groups, women randomized to zoledronic acid experienced, on average, 18 fewer days of back pain compared with placebo over the course of the trial (p = .0092). The back pain among women randomized to zoledronic acid versus placebo resulted in 11 fewer days of limited activity (p = .0017). In Cox proportional-hazards models, women randomized to zoledronic acid were about 6% less likely to experience 7 or more days of back pain [relative risk (RR) = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90-0.99] or limited activity owing to back pain (RR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.87-1.00). Women randomized to zoledronic acid were significantly less likely to experience 7 or more bed-rest days owing to a fracture (RR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.47-0.72) and 7 or more limited-activity days owing to a fracture (RR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.58-0.78). Reductions in back pain with zoledronic acid were independent of incident fracture. Our conclusion is that in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, a once-yearly infusion with zoledronic acid over a 3-year period significantly reduced the

  13. Neural network-based monitoring and control of fluidized bed. Quarterly progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bodruzzaman, M.

    1995-09-27

    This report is to review the work done for the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) project in the past three months, and introduce a general research plan for the next six months. In the last two months, a literature review has been performed on most of the previous work done in the areas of chaotic system analysis, chaotic system identification, chaotic system control, neural network models for non-linear and chaotic systems, fluidized bed behavior analysis, and fluidized bed behavior modeling and control. A clear view has been developed on the status of the FBC technology and the main problems that need to be solved.

  14. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-07-30

    This purpose of this report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the new Combustion Laboratory was occupied on June 15, 2005, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final painting stage. Second, the fabrication and manufacturing contract for the CFBC Facility was awarded to Sterling Boiler & Mechanical, Inc. of Evansville, Indiana. Sterling is manufacturing the assembly and component parts of the CFBC system. The erection of the CFBC system is expected to start September 1, 2005. Third, mercury emissions from the cofiring of coal and chicken waste was studied experimentally in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed combustion facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described.

  15. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-04-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2005 through March 31, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory is nearly complete, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final stages. Second, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is being discussed with a potential contractor. Discussions with potential contactor regarding the availability of materials and current machining capabilities have resulted in the modification of the original designs. The selection of the fabrication contractor for the CFBC Facility is expected during the next quarter. Third, co-firing experiments conducted with coal and chicken waste have been initiated in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  16. Activity in the Mission Control Center during Apollo 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Two individuals are examining a seismic reading in the Mission Control Center's Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP) Room during the Apollo 14 S-IVB impact on the moon. Dr. Maurice Ewing (left) is the Director of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory at Columbia University. David Lammlein, a Columbia graduate student, is on the right (17609); Partial view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center at the time the Apollo 14 S-IVB stage impacted on the lunar surface. The flight director's console in in the foregroune. Eugene F. Kranz, Chief of the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Flight Control Division, is in the right foreground. Seated at the console is Glynn S. Lunney, Head of the Flight Directors Office, Flight Control Division. Facing the camera is Gerald D. Griffin, Flight Director of the Third (Gold) team (17610).

  17. Burn coal cleanly in a fluidized bed - The key is in the controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobak, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) process produces few sulfur emissions, and can burn wood, municipal solid waste as well as every kind of coal available in the U.S. The presurized, coal-burning fluidized-bed reactor at NASA's Lewis Research Center is described, together with a discussion of the operating results. The FBC system at Lewis, having a completely instrumented reactor, is used to test turbine blade alloys for future power plant applications. With the same type of coal and limestone used in the first testing phase covering 136 hours, it was found that all NOx values were below the EPA standard of 0.7 lb/MBtu, whereas the maximum observed level of SO2 was above the EPA standard of 1.3 lb/MBtu, but with the average SO2 level, however, only 0.63 lb/MBtu. Unburned hydrocarbon and CO levels were very low, indicating combustion efficiencies of close to 99% in almost all tests. Testing is now underway using high temperature cyclones and gas turbine to eliminate erosion and corrosion effects which were observed after the initial tests on the turbine and blades.

  18. Center-cut separation of intermediately adsorbing target component by 8-zone simulated moving bed chromatography with internal recycle.

    PubMed

    Kiwala, Dawid; Mendrella, Jadwiga; Antos, Dorota; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    An 8-zone simulated moving bed chromatography with internal recycle (8ZSMB-IR) has been designed for center-cut separation, that is, for isolating an intermediately adsorbed component out of a multicomponent mixture. The system consists of two integrated subunits and operates in a fully continuous manner. In the first subunit the feed mixture is split into two fractions containing either a single component or a binary mixture. The binary mixture is recycled through the internal raffinate or extract port into the second subunit, where the target product is isolated. Additionally, the solvent is also recycled internally. For a case study, the separation of a ternary mixture of cycloketones as a model system under weakly non-linear isotherm conditions has been investigated. A few novel configurations of the 8ZSMB-IR unit including the arrangement of the internal recycle of extract, raffinate and solvent streams between two subunits have been examined with respect to various performance indicators for the process realization. The unit performed best with the developed configuration when the internal raffinate stream was recycled and the solvent recycling loop was closed between the last and the first zone of the first subunit. That configuration has further been analyzed experimentally and numerically. On the basis of the results a strategy for determining reliable operating conditions for the 8ZSMB-IR process has been developed. The procedure exploited a model of the process dynamics, which was implemented to refine the isotherm coefficients and to quantify the mixing effect of the liquid stream inside the recycling loops. The upgraded model with the adjusted parameters has been validated based on experimental data and successfully applied for optimizing the operating conditions of the separation.

  19. 60. Shock isolator at center, pneumatic control group panel at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Shock isolator at center, pneumatic control group panel at left, power distribution box at right, all at right of entrance to lcc. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  20. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Overall view of JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR) during Flight Day 1 of STS-26 integrated simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS).

  1. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR), astronauts John O. Creighton (right) and L. Blaine Hammond review their notes while serving as spacecraft communicators (CAPCOMs) for STS-26 simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS).

  2. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR), flight directors (FDs) Lee Briscoe (left) and Charles W. Shaw, seated at FD console, view front visual display monitors during STS-26 simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS).

  3. Bedding control on landslides: a methodological approach for computer-aided mapping analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grelle, G.; Revellino, P.; Donnarumma, A.; Guadagno, F. M.

    2011-05-01

    Litho-structural control on the spatial and temporal evolution of landslides is one of the major typical aspects on slopes constituted of structurally complex sequences. Mainly focused on instabilities of the earth flow type, a semi-quantitative analysis has been developed with the purpose of identifying and characterizing litho-structural control exerted by bedding on slopes and its effects on landsliding. In quantitative terms, a technique for azimuth data interpolation, Non-continuous Azimuth Distribution Methodological Approach (NADIA), is presented by means of a GIS software application. In addition, processed by NADIA, two indexes have been determined: (i) Δ, aimed at defining the relationship between the orientation of geological bedding planes and slope aspect, and (ii) C, which recognizes localized slope sectors in which the stony component of structurally complex formations is abundant and therefore operates an evolutive control of landslide masses. Furthermore, some Litho-Structural Models (LSMs) of slopes are proposed aiming at characterizing recurrent forms of structural control in the source, channel and deposition areas of gravitational movements. In order to elaborate evolutive models controlling landslide scenarios, LSMs were qualitatively related and compared with Δ and C quantitative indexes. The methodological procedure has been applied to a lithostructurally complex area of Southern Italy where data about azimuth measurements and landslide mapping were known. It was found that the proposed methodology enables the recognition of typical control conditions on landslides in relation to the LSMs. Different control patterns on landslide shape and on style and distribution of the activity resulted for each LSM. This provides the possibility for first-order identification to be made of the spatial evolution of landslide bodies.

  4. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2007-03-31

    This report is to present the progress made on the project entitled ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. The effort in this quarter has concentrated on installing the CFBC Facility and for conducting cold fluidization operations tests in the CFBC facility. The assembly of the ash recirculation pipe duct from the cyclones back to the bed area of the combustor, including the upper and lower loop seals was completed. The electric bed pre-heater was installed to heat the fluidizing air as it enters the wind box. The induced draft fan along with its machine base and power supply was received and installed. The flue gas duct from secondary cyclone outlet to induced draft fan inlet was received and installed, as well as the induced fan flue gas discharge duct. Pressure testing from the forced draft fan to the outlet of the induced fan was completed. In related research a pilot-scale halogen addition test was conducted in the empty slipstream reactor (without (Selective Catalytic Reduction) SCR catalyst loading) and the SCR slipstream reactor with two commercial SCR catalysts. The greatest benefits of conducting slipstream tests can be flexible control and isolation of specific factors. This facility is currently used in full-scale utility and will be combined into 0.6MW CFBC in the future. This work attempts to first investigate performance of the SCR catalyst in the flue gas atmosphere when burning Powder River Basin (PRB), including the impact of PRB coal flue gas composition on the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) under SCR conditions. Secondly, the impacts of hydrogen halogens (Hydrogen fluoride (HF), Hydrogen chloride (HCl), Hydrogen Bromide (HBr) and Hydrogen Iodine (HI)) on Hg(0) oxidation and their mechanisms can be explored.

  5. Real-Time Building Energy Simulation Using EnergyPlus and the Building Controls Test Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Xiufeng; Bhattachayra, Prajesh; O'Neill, Zheng; Haves, Philip; Wetter, Michael; Bailey, Trevor

    2011-11-01

    Most commercial buildings do not perform as well in practice as intended by the design and their performances often deteriorate over time. Reasons include faulty construction, malfunctioning equipment, incorrectly configured control systems and inappropriate operating procedures (Haves et al., 2001, Lee et al., 2007). To address this problem, the paper presents a simulation-based whole building performance monitoring tool that allows a comparison of building actual performance and expected performance in real time. The tool continuously acquires relevant building model input variables from existing Energy Management and Control System (EMCS). It then reports expected energy consumption as simulated of EnergyPlus. The Building Control Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB) is used as the software platform to provide data linkage between the EMCS, an EnergyPlus model, and a database. This paper describes the integrated real-time simulation environment. A proof-of-concept demonstration is also presented in the paper.

  6. Technologies for the marketplace from the Centers for Disease Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid-Sanden, Frances L.; Greene, R. Eric; Malvitz, Dolores M.

    1991-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control, a Public Health Service agency, is responsible for the prevention and control of disease and injury. Programs range from surveillance and prevention of chronic and infectious diseases to occupational health and injury control. These programs have produced technologies in a variety of fields, including vaccine development, new methods of disease diagnosis, and new tools to ensure a safer work environment.

  7. Langley Research Center contributions in advancing active control technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active control technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. Some of the contributions of the Langley Research Center in advancing active control technology are described. Contributions are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  8. STS-26 simulation activities in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR), flight controller Granvil A. Pennington, leaning on console, listens to communications during the STS-26 integrated simulations in progress between MCC and JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5 fixed-base (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). MCC FCR visual displays are seen in background. Five veteran astronauts were in the FB-SMS rehearsing their roles for the scheduled June 1988 flight aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103.

  9. Biomechanics-based active control of bedding support properties and its influence on sleep.

    PubMed

    Van Deun, D; Verhaert, V; Willemen, T; Wuyts, J; Verbraecken, J; Exadaktylos, V; Haex, B; Vander Sloten, J

    2012-01-01

    Proper body support plays an import role in the recuperation of our body during sleep. Therefore, this study uses an automatically adapting bedding system that optimises spinal alignment throughout the night by altering the stiffness of eight comfort zones. The aim is to investigate the influence of such a dynamic sleep environment on objective and subjective sleep parameters. The bedding system contains 165 sensors that measure mattress indentation. It also includes eight actuators that control the comfort zones. Based on the measured mattress indentation, body movements and posture changes are detected. Control of spinal alignment is established by fitting personalized human models in the measured indentation. A total of 11 normal sleepers participated in this study. Sleep experiments were performed in a sleep laboratory where subjects slept three nights: a first night for adaptation, a reference night and an active support night (in counterbalanced order). Polysomnographic measurements were recorded during the nights, combined with questionnaires aiming at assessing subjective information. Subjective information on sleep quality, daytime quality and perceived number of awakenings shows significant improvements during the active support (ACS) night. Objective results showed a trend towards increased slow wave sleep. On the other hand, it was noticed that % N1-sleep was significantly increased during ACS night, while % N2-sleep was significantly decreased. No prolonged N1 periods were found during or immediately after steering.

  10. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Sigurd A. Sjoberg, Director of Flight Operations at Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), views the Apollo 13 liftoff from a console in the MSC Mission Control Center, bldg 30. Apollo 13 lifted off at 1:13 p.m., April 11, 1970 (34627); Astronaut Thomas F. Mattingly II, who was scheduled as a prime crewman for the Apollo 13 mission but was replaced in the final hours when it was discovered he had been exposed to measles, watches the liftoff phase of the mission. He is seated at a console in the Mission Control Center's Mission Operations Control Room. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, a spacecraft communicator for the mission, looks on at right (34628).

  11. Evaluation of power control concepts using the PMAD systems test bed. [Power Management and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, R. F.; Kimnach, G. L.; Jett, T. A.; Trash, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) System testbed and its use in the evaluation of control concepts applicable to the NASA Space Station Freedom electric power system (EPS) are described. The facility was constructed to allow testing of control hardware and software in an environment functionally similar to the space station electric power system. Control hardware and software have been developed to allow operation of the testbed power system in a manner similar to a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system employed by utility power systems for control. The system hardware and software are described.

  12. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan, Kunlei Liu; John T. Riley

    2004-07-30

    This report presents the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the quarter April 1--June 30, 2004. The following tasks have been completed. First, the final specifications for the renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory and the construction of the CFB Combustor Building have been delivered to the architect, and invitations for construction bids for the two tasks have been released. Second, the component parts of the CFBC system have been designed after the design work for assembly parts of the CFBC system was completed. Third, the literature pertaining to Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins (PCDD) and Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans (PCDF) released during the incineration of solid waste, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) have been reviewed, and an experimental plan for fundamental research of MSW incineration on a simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) facility has been prepared. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter has been outlined in this report.

  13. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Songgeng Li; John T. Riley

    2005-10-01

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building was completed. The experimental facilities have been moved into the CFB Combustor Building. Second, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is in the final stage and is expected to be completed before November 30, 2005. Third, the drop tube reactor has been remodeled and installed to meet the specific requirements for the investigation of the effects of flue gas composition on mercury oxidation. This study will start in the next quarter. Fourth, the effect of sulfur dioxide on molecular chlorine via the Deacon reaction was investigated. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  14. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. ); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. ); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. )

    1992-05-01

    This topical report on Sulfur Control'' presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT's electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  15. Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator test bed for continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.V. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator, located on the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, continues to be the only operational incinerator in the country that can process hazardous and radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. During 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems established a continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) test bed and began conducting evaluations of CEMS under development to measure contaminants from waste combustion and thermal treatment stacks. The program was envisioned to promote CEMS technologies meeting requirements of the recently issued Proposed Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors as well as monitoring technologies that will allay public concerns about mixed waste thermal treatment and accelerate the development of innovative treatment technologies. Fully developed CEMS, as well as innovative continuous or semi-continuous sampling systems not yet interfaced with a pollutant analyzer, were considered as candidates for testing and evaluation. Complementary to other Environmental Protection Agency and DOE sponsored CEMS testing and within compliant operating conditions of the TSCA Incinerator, prioritization was given to multiple metals monitors also having potential to measure radionuclides associated with particulate emissions. In August 1996, developers of two multiple metals monitors participated in field activities at the incinerator and a commercially available radionuclide particulate monitor was acquired for modification and testing planned in 1997. This paper describes the CEMS test bed infrastructure and summarizes completed and planned activities.

  16. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of Mission Operations Control Room in Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) during the ceremonies aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission. Dr. Donald K. Slayton (in black shirt, left of center), Director of Flight Crew Operations at MSC, and Chester M. Lee of the Apollo Program Directorate, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters, shake hands, while Dr. Rocco A. Petrone, Apollo Program Director, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters (standing, near Lee), watches the large screen showing Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., Apollo 13 commander, during the on-board ceremonies. In the foreground, Glynn S. Lunney (extreme left) and Eugene F. Kranz (smoking a cigar), two Apollo 13 Flight Directors, view the activity from their consoles.

  17. Future Concepts for Realtime Data Interfaces for Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearney, Mike W., III

    2004-01-01

    Existing methods of exchanging realtime data between the major control centers in the International Space Station program have resulted in a patchwork of local formats being imposed on each Mission Control Center. This puts the burden on a data customer to comply with the proprietary data formats of each data supplier. This has increased the cost and complexity for each participant, limited access to mission data and hampered the development of efficient and flexible operations concepts. Ideally, a universal format should be promoted in the industry to prevent the unnecessary burden of each center processing a different data format standard for every external interface with another center. With the broad acceptance of XML and other conventions used in other industries, it is now time for the Aerospace industry to fully engage and establish such a standard. This paper will briefly consider the components that would be required by such a standard (XML schema, data dictionaries, etc.) in order to accomplish the goal of a universal low-cost interface, and acquire broad industry acceptance. We will then examine current approaches being developed by standards bodies and other groups. The current state of CCSDS panel work will be reviewed, with a survey of the degree of industry acceptance. Other widely accepted commercial approaches will be considered, sometimes complimentary to the standards work, but sometimes not. The question is whether de facto industry standards are in concert with, or in conflict with the direction of the standards bodies. And given that state of affairs, the author will consider whether a new program establishing its Mission Control Center should implement a data interface based on those standards. The author proposes that broad industry support to unify the various efforts will enable collaboration between control centers and space programs to a wider degree than is currently available. This will reduce the cost for programs to provide realtime

  18. 60. View of radome hydraulic module control center in mezzanine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. View of radome hydraulic module control center in mezzanine level in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. Views of the mission control center during STS-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Some of the life sciences experiments onboard Spacelab are being followed by payload controllers at JSC. Dr. Larry R. Young, center, principal investigator for the vestibular experiment 1NS 102, is joined by co-investigator Dr. K. E. Money, right, in following the progress of relevant onboard activity.

  20. The Centers for Disease Control partners with Lysol manufacturer.

    PubMed

    Herreria, J

    1998-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and the makers of Lysol join a partnership to create a program for prevention methods called "An Ounce of Prevention Keeps the Germs Away." This program teaches the general public, especially families with young children ages 2 to 12, seven simple and inexpensive ways to prevent the spread of infectious disease. PMID:10186409

  1. Center of excellence for atomically controlled fabrication technology.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yuji; Saito, Akira; Arima, Kenta; Ohmi, Hiromasa

    2011-04-01

    This short review aims to show the introduction of the educational and research program of "Center of excellence of atomically controlled fabrication technology" supported ministry of education, culture, sports, science and technology--Japan. We would like to introduce research activity and a unique trait of educational system.

  2. Future applications of artificial intelligence to Mission Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Future applications of artificial intelligence to Mission Control Centers are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: basic objectives of the NASA-wide AI program; inhouse research program; constraint-based scheduling; learning and performance improvement for scheduling; GEMPLAN multi-agent planner; planning, scheduling, and control; Bayesian learning; efficient learning algorithms; ICARUS (an integrated architecture for learning); design knowledge acquisition and retention; computer-integrated documentation; and some speculation on future applications.

  3. A new process control strategy for aqueous film coating of pellets in fluidised bed.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Crilles C; Sonnergaard, Jørn M; Bertelsen, Poul; Holm, Per

    2003-11-01

    The parameters with effect on maximum spray rate and maximum relative outlet air humidity when coating pellets in a fluidised bed were investigated. The tested variables include type of water based modified release film coating (Eudragit NE 30D, Eudragit RS 30D, Aquacoat ECD) coating principle (top spray, bottom spray), inlet air humidity and type of pellets (sugar spheres, microcrystalline cellulose pellets). The maximum spray rate was not influenced by the coating principles. The highest spray rate was obtained for the film polymer with the lowest tackiness which is assumed to be the controlling factor. The type of pellets affected the maximum spray rate. A thermodynamic model for the coating process is employed throughout the process and not just during steady state. The thermodynamic model is incorporated into a new process control strategy. The process control strategy is based on in-process calculation of degree of utilisation of the potential evaporation energy (DUE) of the outlet air and the relative outlet air humidity (RH). The spray rate is maximised using set points of DUE and RH as control parameters. The product temperature is controlled simultaneously by regulating the inlet air temperature. PMID:14592693

  4. A new process control strategy for aqueous film coating of pellets in fluidised bed.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Crilles C; Sonnergaard, Jørn M; Bertelsen, Poul; Holm, Per

    2003-11-01

    The parameters with effect on maximum spray rate and maximum relative outlet air humidity when coating pellets in a fluidised bed were investigated. The tested variables include type of water based modified release film coating (Eudragit NE 30D, Eudragit RS 30D, Aquacoat ECD) coating principle (top spray, bottom spray), inlet air humidity and type of pellets (sugar spheres, microcrystalline cellulose pellets). The maximum spray rate was not influenced by the coating principles. The highest spray rate was obtained for the film polymer with the lowest tackiness which is assumed to be the controlling factor. The type of pellets affected the maximum spray rate. A thermodynamic model for the coating process is employed throughout the process and not just during steady state. The thermodynamic model is incorporated into a new process control strategy. The process control strategy is based on in-process calculation of degree of utilisation of the potential evaporation energy (DUE) of the outlet air and the relative outlet air humidity (RH). The spray rate is maximised using set points of DUE and RH as control parameters. The product temperature is controlled simultaneously by regulating the inlet air temperature.

  5. Control Law-Control Allocation Interaction: F/A-18 PA Simulation Test - Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne; Nelson, Mark

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the first stage of research into Control Law - Control Allocation Interactions. A three-year research effort was originally proposed: 1. Create a desktop flight simulation environment under which experiments related to the open questions may be conducted. 2. Conduct research to determine which aspects of control allocation have impact upon control law design that merits further research. 3. Conduct research into those aspects of control allocation identified above, and their impacts upon control law design. Simulation code was written utilizing the F/A-18 airframe in the power approach (PA) configuration. A dynamic inversion control law was implemented and used to drive a state-of-the-art control allocation subroutine.

  6. Analysis and control of the METC fluid-bed gasifier. Quarterly report, October 1994--January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Farell, A.E.; Reddy, S.

    1995-03-01

    This document summarizes work performed for the period 10/1/94 to 2/1/95. The initial phase of the work focuses on developing a simple transfer function model of the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG). This transfer function model will be developed based purely on the gasifier responses to step changes in gasifier inputs (including reactor air, convey air, cone nitrogen, FBG pressure, and coal feedrate). This transfer function model will represent a linear, dynamic model that is valid near the operating point at which the data was taken. In addition, a similar transfer function model will be developed using MGAS in order to assess MGAS for use as a model of the FBG for control systems analysis.

  7. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Songgeng Li

    2006-01-01

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Work was performed on the following activities. First, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is nearly completed. The erection of the CFBC facility is expected to start in the second week of February, 2006. Second, effect of flue gas components on mercury oxidation was investigated in a drop tube reactor. As a first step, experiment for mercury oxidation by chlorine was investigated. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  8. Quality control of laser- and powder bed-based Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berumen, Sebastian; Bechmann, Florian; Lindner, Stefan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Craeghs, Tom

    The quality of metal components manufactured by laser- and powder bed-based additive manufacturing technologies has continuously been improved over the last years. However, to establish this production technology in industries with very high quality standards the accessibility of prevalent quality management methods to all steps of the process chain needs still to be enhanced. This publication describes which tools are and will be available to fulfil those requirements from the perspective of a laser machine manufacturer. Generally five aspects of the part building process are covered by separate Quality Management (QM) modules: the powder quality, the temperature management, the process gas atmosphere, the melt pool behaviour and the documentation module. This paper sets the focus on melt pool analysis and control.

  9. Mission Control Center enhancement opportunities in the 1990's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Wayne

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a framework for understanding the major enhancement opportunities for Air Force Mission Control Center/Test Support Centers (MCC's/TSC's) in the 1990's. Much of this paper is based on the findings of Study 232 and work currently underway in Study 2-6 for the Air Force Systems Command, Space System Division, Network Program Office. In this paper, we will address MCC/TSC enhancement needs primarily from the operator perspective, in terms of the increased capabilities required to improve space operations task performance.

  10. Controls on the Alluviation of Oxbow Lakes by Bed Load as Observed Along the Sacramento River of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantine, J. A.; Dunne, T.; Piegay, H.; Kondolf, G. M.

    2007-12-01

    As the products of meander cutoff that are widespread within many floodplains, oxbow lakes can affect the ability of rivers to migrate across their valleys, as well as physical and chemical exchanges between the river and floodplain environment. The particular functions of the oxbow lake are determined by the manner it is filled by sedimentation. Although the alluviation of oxbow lakes has been observed in natural settings and generalized by means of rules in planform evolution models, no theory exists to explain how oxbow lakes are filled because the controls on the process have not been widely studied or physically interpreted. Utilizing existing theory and field data from lakes of the Sacramento River, we examined the controls on oxbow alluviation by bed load and found that the transport of bed material through a channel abandoned by cutoff is highly sensitive to the orientation of the abandoned-channel entrance. In particular, the diversion angle, the angle between the approaching active- channel flow and the abandoned-channel entrance, is a direct control on discharge through the abandoned channel, and thus can significantly reduce boundary shear-stress and limit the transport capacity of bed load. The higher the angle, the more greatly reduced is the capacity to transmit bed material, and the more quickly the channel is hydraulically disconnected as diverted bed load rapidly aggrades the channel entrance. In contrast, the lower the angle, the longer the duration the channel remains hydraulically connected, and the more likely it will experience filling and narrowing by bed load because sufficient flow allows for the downstream and transverse transport of bed material. Our findings from the Sacramento River compare well to observations from other large meandering rivers and may explain why some lakes are terrestrialized within decades of cutoff, whereas others remain as open-water habitat for considerably longer.

  11. Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

    2005-04-01

    In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nation’s critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

  12. Simulation and control of water-gas shift packed bed reactor with inter-stage cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, S. Z.; Nandong, J.

    2016-03-01

    Water-Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR) has become one of the well-known pathways for H2 production in industries. The issue with WGSR is that it is kinetically favored at high temperatures but thermodynamically favored at low temperatures, thus requiring careful consideration in the control design in order to ensure that the temperature used does not deactivate the catalyst. This paper studies the effect of a reactor arrangement with an inter-stage cooling implemented in the packed bed reactor to look at its effect on outlet temperature. A mathematical model is developed based on one-dimensional heat and mass transfers which incorporate the intra-particle effects. It is shown that the placement of the inter-stage cooling and the outlet temperature exiting the inter-stage cooling have strong influence on the reaction conversion. Several control strategies are explored for the process. It is shown that a feedback- feedforward control strategy using Multi-scale Control (MSC) is effective to regulate the reactor temperature profile which is critical to maintaining the catalysts activity.

  13. A Modular Building Controls Virtual Test Bed for the Integrations of Heterogeneous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael; Wetter, Michael; Haves, Philip

    2008-06-30

    This paper describes the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB) that is currently under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An earlier prototype linked EnergyPlus with controls hardware through embedded SPARK models and demonstrated its value in more cost-effective envelope design and improved controls sequences for the San Francisco Federal Building. The BCVTB presented here is a more modular design based on a middleware that we built using Ptolemy II, a modular software environment for design and analysis of heterogeneous systems. Ptolemy II provides a graphical model building environment, synchronizes the exchanged data and visualizes the system evolution during run-time. Our additions to Ptolemy II allow users to couple to Ptolemy II a prototype version of EnergyPlus,MATLAB/Simulink or other simulation programs for data exchange during run-time. In future work we will also implement a BACnet interface that allows coupling BACnet compliant building automation systems to Ptolemy II. We will present the architecture of the BCVTB and explain how users can add their own simulation programs to the BCVTB. We will then present an example application in which the building envelope and the HVAC system was simulated in EnergyPlus, the supervisory control logic was simulated in MATLAB/Simulink and Ptolemy II was used to exchange data during run-time and to provide realtime visualization as the simulation progresses.

  14. Controls on bacterial gas accumulations in thick Tertiary coal beds and adjacent channel sandstones, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D.; Flores, R.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Coal beds, as much as 250 ft thick, and adjacent sandstones in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation are reservoirs for coal-derived natural gas in the Powder River basin. The discontinuous coal beds were deposited in raised, ombrotrophic peat bogs about 3 mi{sup 2} in size, adjoining networks of fluvial channels infilled by sand. Coal-bed thickness was controlled by basin subsidence and depositional environments. The average maceral composition of the coals is 88% huminite (vitrinite), 5% liptinite, and 7% inertinite. The coals vary in rank from subbituminous C to A (R{sub o} values of 0.4 to 0.5%). Although the coals are relatively low rank, they display fracture systems. Natural gas desorbed and produced from the coal beds and adjacent sandstones is composed mainly of methane with lesser amount of Co{sub 2} ({lt}10%). The methane is isotopically light and enriched in deuterium. The gases are interpreted to be generated by bacterial processes and the fermentation pathway, prior to the main phase of thermogenic methane generation by devolatilization. Large amounts of bicarbonate water generated during early stages of coalification will have to be removed from the fracture porosity in the coal beds before desorption and commercial gas production can take place. Desorbed amounts of methane-rich, bacterial gas in the Powder River basin are relatively low ({lt}60 Scf/ton) compared to amounts of thermogenic coal-bed gases (hundreds of Scf/ton) from other Rocky Mountain basins. However, the total coal-bed gas resource in both the coal beds and the adjacent sandstones is considered to be large (as much as 40 Tcf) because of the vast coal resources (as much as 1.3 trillion tons).

  15. Effects of Artificial Gravity and Bed Rest on Spatial Orientation and Balance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.; Moore, S. T.; Feiveson, A. H.; Taylor, L. C.

    2007-01-01

    While the vestibular system should be well-adapted to bed rest (a condition it experiences approximately 8/24 hrs each day), questions remain regarding the degree to which repeated exposures to the unusual gravito-inertial force environment of a short-radius centrifuge might affect central processing of vestibular information used in spatial orientation and balance control. Should these functions be impaired by intermittent AG, its feasibility as a counter-measure would be diminished. We, therefore, examined the effects of AG on spatial orientation and balance control in 15 male volunteers before and after 21 days of 6 HDT bed rest (BR). Eight of the subjects were treated with daily 1hr AG exposures (2.5g at the feet; 1.0g at the heart) aboard a short radius (3m) centrifuge, while the other seven served as controls (C). Spatial orientation was assessed by measures of ocular counter-rolling (OCR; rotation of the eye about the line of sight, an otolith-mediated reflex) and subjective visual vertical (SVV; perception of the spatial upright). Both OCR and SVV measurements were made with the subject upright, lying on their left sides, and lying on their right sides. OCR was measured from binocular eye orientation recordings made while the subjects fixated for 10s on a point target directly in front of the face at a distance of 1 m. SVV was assessed by asking subjects (in the dark) to adjust to upright (using a handheld controller) the orientation of a luminous bar randomly perturbed (15) to either side of the vertical meridian. Balance control performance was assessed using a computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) protocol similar to that currently required for all returning crew members. During each session, the subjects completed a combination of trials of sensory organization test (SOT) 2 (eyes closed, fixed platform) and SOT 5 (eyes closed, sway-referenced platform) with and without static and dynamic pitch plane head movements (plus or minus 20 deg., dynamic

  16. Bathing a patient in bed

    MedlinePlus

    Bed bath; Sponge bath ... Some patients cannot safely leave their beds to bathe. For these people, daily bed baths can help keep their skin healthy, control odor, and increase comfort. If moving the ...

  17. Bed disturbance via foraging fish increases bedload transport during subsequent high flows and is controlled by fish size and species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pledger, A. G.; Rice, S. P.; Millett, J.

    2016-01-01

    Benthic foraging by fish can modify the nature and rates of fine sediment accrual and the structure and topography of coarse-grained fluvial substrates, with the potential to alter bed material characteristics, particle entrainment thresholds, and bedload transport fluxes. However, knowledge of what controls the nature, extent, and intensity of benthic foraging and the consequent influence of these controls on geomorphic impact remain rudimentary. An ex-situ experiment utilising Barbel Barbus barbus and Chub Leuciscus cephalus extended previous work by considering the role of fish size and species as controls of sediment disturbance by foraging and the implications for bed material characteristics and bedload transport. In a laboratory flume, changes in bed microtopography and structure were measured when a water-worked bed of 5.6-22.6 mm gravels was exposed to four size classes of Barbel (4-5″, 5-6″, 6-8″, 8-10″ in length) and a single size class of Chub (8-10″). In line with other studies that have investigated animal size as a control of zoogeomorphic agency, increasing the size of Barbel had a significant effect on measured disturbance and transport metrics. Specifically, the area of disturbed substrate, foraging depth, and the fish's impact on microtopographic roughness and imbrication all increased as a function of fish size. In a comparison of the foraging effects of like-sized Barbel and Chub, 8-10″ in length, Barbel foraged a larger area of the test bed and had a greater impact on microtopographic roughness and sediment structure. Relative to water-worked beds that were not foraged, bed conditioning by both species was associated with increased bedload transport during the subsequent application of high flows. However, the bedload flux after foraging by Barbel, which is a specialist benthivore, was 150% higher than that following foraging by Chub, which feed opportunistically from the bed, and the total transported mass of sediment was 98

  18. 76 FR 77537 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal..., National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  19. [Medical controlling as medical economical service center. Successful concept for orthopedics and trauma surgery centers?].

    PubMed

    Auhuber, T C; Hoffmann, R

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients from administrative admission through the orthopedic-surgical treatment to completion of the billing is complex. Additional challenges originate from the necessity to treat patients in both outpatient and inpatient departments and in more than one medical sector. A superior coordination is essential for a successful cooperation of the various procedures of controlling. The model of a medical controlling department as a service center with effective competence in the management of service and cost, functions as a successful solution to the problem. Central elements of a successful medical economical case management are a well-defined assignment of tasks and definitions of intersections, the integration of health professionals and administrative employees, the utilization of software for process control and the implementation of inlier controlling.

  20. Moving granular-bed filter development program, Option III: Development of moving granular-bed filter technology for multi-contaminant control. Task 14: Test plan; Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, J.C.; Olivo, C.A.; Wilson, K.B.

    1994-04-01

    An experimental test plan has been prepared for DOE/METC review and approval to develop a filter media suitable for multi-contaminant control in granular-bed filter (GBF) applications. The plan includes identification, development, and demonstration of methods for enhanced media morphology, chemical reactivity, and mechanical strength. The test plan includes media preparation methods, physical and chemical characterization methods for fresh and reacted media, media evaluation criteria, details of test and analytical equipment, and test matrix of the proposed media testing. A filter media composed of agglomerated limestone and clay was determined to be the best candidate for multi-contaminate control in GBF operation. The combined limestone/clay agglomerate has the potential to remove sulfur and alkali species, in addition to particulate, and possibly halogens and trace heavy metals from coal process streams.

  1. Research into language concepts for the mission control center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellenback, Steven W.; Barton, Timothy J.; Ratner, Jeremiah M.

    1990-01-01

    A final report is given on research into language concepts for the Mission Control Center (MCC). The Specification Driven Language research is described. The state of the image processing field and how image processing techniques could be applied toward automating the generation of the language known as COmputation Development Environment (CODE or Comp Builder) are discussed. Also described is the development of a flight certified compiler for Comps.

  2. Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). [spacelab flight operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, D. L.; Noneman, S. R.; Terry, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    The Spacelab payload operations control center (POCC) timeline analysis program which is used to provide POCC activity and resource information as a function of mission time is described. This program is fully automated and interactive, and is equipped with tutorial displays. The tutorial displays are sufficiently detailed for use by a program analyst having no computer experience. The POCC timeline analysis program is designed to operate on the VAX/VMS version V2.1 computer system.

  3. Development of Ada language control software for the NASA power management and distribution test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Ted; Mackin, Michael; Gantose, Dave

    1989-01-01

    The Ada language software developed to control the NASA Lewis Research Center's Power Management and Distribution testbed is described. The testbed is a reduced-scale prototype of the electric power system to be used on space station Freedom. It is designed to develop and test hardware and software for a 20-kHz power distribution system. The distributed, multiprocessor, testbed control system has an easy-to-use operator interface with an understandable English-text format. A simple interface for algorithm writers that uses the same commands as the operator interface is provided, encouraging interactive exploration of the system.

  4. Bed wise cost analysis of in-patient treatment of brachial plexus injury at a Level I trauma Center in India

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Nityanand; Gupta, Deepak; Mahapatra, Ashok; Harshvardhan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to calculate, in monetary terms, total cost incurred by a Level I trauma center in providing in-patient care to brachial plexus injury patients during their preoperative and the postoperative stay. Subjects and Methods: All patients of brachial plexus injury admitted and discharged between January and December 2010 were included in the study. Total cost per bed was calculated under several cost heads in pre- and post-operative ward care. Intra-operative costs were excluded. Results: A total of 69 patients were admitted in the year 2010. Of these 60 were operated and the rest were planned conservative management. The total cost incurred by the trauma center in providing in-patient care to patients admitted in the ward, excluding high dependency unit, came out to be Rs. 3,650.00/patient/bed/day. Of this Rs. 2,234.645, the maximum amount was incurred in providing manpower alone. The average preoperative wait was 12 days (maximum 41 days and minimum 1-day). The average postoperative stay was 2 days. Total cost incurred in the preoperative period was Rs. 2,975,125 (US$ 59392) or Rs. 43,117/patient (US$ 861). It was Rs. 386,948 (US$ 7724) in the postoperative period (Rs. 6,449 or US$ 129/patient). Nine patients were not operated and had waited from 2 to 12 days before finally being planned for observant treatment. This itself cost the hospital Rs. 226,328 (US$ 4518). Conclusion: By just reducing the preoperative length of stay to 1-day the cost can be brought down by 93% for brachial plexus injury patients alone and the beds can be used to admit more critical patients. PMID:25126124

  5. Development and Implementation of a Hardware In-the-Loop Test Bed for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Control Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyangweso, Emmanuel; Bole, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Successful prediction and management of battery life using prognostic algorithms through ground and flight tests is important for performance evaluation of electrical systems. This paper details the design of test beds suitable for replicating loading profiles that would be encountered in deployed electrical systems. The test bed data will be used to develop and validate prognostic algorithms for predicting battery discharge time and battery failure time. Online battery prognostic algorithms will enable health management strategies. The platform used for algorithm demonstration is the EDGE 540T electric unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The fully designed test beds developed and detailed in this paper can be used to conduct battery life tests by controlling current and recording voltage and temperature to develop a model that makes a prediction of end-of-charge and end-of-life of the system based on rapid state of health (SOH) assessment.

  6. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2008-05-31

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new

  7. Air Route Traffic Control Center. Controller Over-The-Shoulder Training Review: Instruction Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The instruction manual provides 12 step-by-step instructions for air traffic control supervisors in conducting over-the-shoulder training observations of enroute center controllers. Since the primary purpose of the review is to quickly identify training needs and requirements, the control responsibilities are approached from a deficiency…

  8. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface

  9. Subglacial bed form morphology controlled by ice speed and sediment thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Dowling, Thomas P. F.; Stokes, Chris R.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2016-07-01

    Subglacial bed forms (drumlins, ribbed moraines, and megascale glacial lineations) are enigmatic repetitive flow-parallel and flow-transverse landforms common in glaciated landscapes. Their evolution and morphology are a potentially powerful constraint for ice sheet modeling, but there is little consensus on bed form dynamics or formative mechanisms. Here we explore shallow sediment bed form dynamics via a simple model that iterates (i) down-flow till flux, (ii) pressure gradient-driven till flux, and (iii) entrainment and deposition of sediment. Under various boundary conditions, replicas of subglacial bed forms readily emerge. Bed form dynamics mirror those in subaqueous and aeolian domains. Transitions between ribbed moraines and elongate flow-parallel bed forms are associated with increasing ice speeds and declining sediment thickness. These simulations provide quantitative flux estimates and suggest that widely observed transitions in shallow sediment subglacial bed forms (e.g., ribbed moraines to drumlinoids to megascale glacial lineations) are manifestations of subtle variations in ice velocity and sediment thickness.

  10. Evaluation of completeness of selected poison control center data fields.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Jeanie E; Marchbanks, Brenda; Willis, Branch; Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-08-01

    Poison control center data are used in research and surveillance. Due to the large volume of information, these efforts are dependent on data being recorded in machine readable format. However, poison center records include non-machine readable text fields and machine readable coded fields, some of which are duplicative. Duplicating this data increases the chance of inaccurate/incomplete coding. For surveillance efforts to be effective, coding should be complete and accurate. Investigators identified a convenience sample of 964 records and reviewed the substance code determining if it matched its text field. They also reviewed the coded clinical effects and treatments determining if they matched the notes text field. The substance code matched its text field for 91.4% of the substances. The clinical effects and treatments codes matched their text field for 72.6% and 82.4% of occurrences respectively. This under-reporting of clinical effects and treatments has surveillance and public health implications.

  11. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance, and affordability, as well as the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA Aeronautics Research Mission programs. The rest of the paper provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges, and the key progress to date are summarized.

  12. Overview of Active Flow Control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, L. G.; Joslin, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper summarizes Active Flow Control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state-of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R&D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry. Keywords: active flow control, separation control, MEMS, review

  13. Development and evaluation of diltiazem hydrochloride controlled-release pellets by fluid bed coating process

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Mikkilineni Bhanu; Vidyadhara, Suryadevara; Sasidhar, Reddyvalam Lankapalli C.; Balakrishna, Talamanchi; Trilochani, Pavuluri

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop controlled-release pellets of diltiazem HCl with ethyl cellulose and hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose phthalate as the release rate retarding polymers by fluid bed coating technique. The prepared pellets were evaluated for drug content, particle size, subjected to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Differential Scanning Calori metry (DSC), and evaluated for in vitro release. Stability studies were carried out on the optimized formulations for a period of 3 months. The drug content was in the range of 97%-101%. The mean particle size of the drug-loaded pellets was in the range 700-785 μm. The drug release rate decreased as the concentration of ethyl cellulose increased in the pellet formulations. Among the prepared formulations, FDL10 and FDL11 showed 80% drug release in 16 h, matching with USP dissolution test 6 for diltiazem HCl extended-release capsules. SEM photographs confirmed that the prepared formulations were spherical in nature with a smooth surface. The compatibility between drug and polymers in the drug-loaded pellets was confirmed by DSC studies. Stability studies indicated that the pellets were stable. PMID:23833750

  14. Biofilm growth in gravel bed streams controls solute residence time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Hanrahan, Brittany; Bolster, Diogo; Tank, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    Streambed substrates harbor a rich biome responsible for biogeochemical processing in riverine waters. Beyond their biological role, the presence of benthic and hyporheic biofilms can play an important role in influencing large-scale transport of solutes, even for conservative tracers. As biofilms grow and accumulate biomass, they actively interact with and influence surface and subsurface flow patterns. To explore this effect, we conducted experiments at the Notre Dame Linked Ecosystems Experimental Facility in four outdoor streams, each with different gravel beds. Over the course of 20 weeks we conducted transport experiments in each of these streams and observed different patterns in breakthrough curves as biofilms grew on the substrate. Biofilms played a major role in shaping the observed conservative transport patterns. Overall, while the presence of biofilms led to a decreased exchange rate between the fast (mobile) and slow (immobile) parts of the flow domain, water that was exchanged tended to be stored in the slow regions for longer times once biofilms had established. More specifically, we observed enhanced longitudinal dispersion in breakthrough curves as well as broader residence time distributions when biofilms were present. Biofilm colonization over time homogenized transport patterns across the four streams that were originally very distinct. These results indicate that stream biofilms exert a strong control on conservative solute transport in streams, a role that to date has not received enough attention.

  15. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl

    2003-05-15

    of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) in 2001 to carry out a project entitled ''Greenhouse Gas Emissions Control by Oxygen Firing in Circulating Fluidized Bed Boilers.'' This two-phased project is in effect from September 28, 2001, to October 27, 2004. (U.S. DOE NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41146). Phase I consisted of an evaluation of the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants, and supporting bench-scale testing. And Phase II consists of pilot-scale testing, supporting a refined performance and economic evaluation of the oxygen-fired AFC concept. Phase I, detailed in this report, entails a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen separate but related cases (listed below), representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated as described herein. The first seven cases represent coal combustion cases in CFB type equipment. The next four cases represent Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The last two cases represent advanced Chemical Looping systems, which were completely paid for by ALSTOM and included herein for completeness.

  16. Evaluating fine sediment mobilization and storage in a gravel-bed river using controlled reservoir releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petticrew, E. L.; Krein, A.; Walling, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    Two controlled flow events were generated by releasing water from a reservoir into the Olewiger Bach, located near Trier, Germany. This controlled release of near bank-full flows allowed an investigation of the fine sediment (<63 μm) mobilized from channel storage. Both a winter (November) and a summer (June) release event were generated, each having very different antecedent flow conditions. The characteristics of the release hydrographs and the associated sediment transport indicated a reverse hysteresis with more mass, but smaller grain sizes, moving on the falling limb. Fine sediment stored to a depth of 10 cm in the gravels decreased following the release events, indicating the dynamic nature and importance of channel-stored sediments as source materials during high flow events. Sediment traps, filled with clean natural gravel, were buried in riffles before the release of the reservoir water and the total mass of fine sediment collected by the traps was measured following the events. Twice the mass of fine sediment was retained by the gravel traps compared with the natural gravels, which may be due to their altered porosity. Although the amount of fine sediment collected by the traps was not significantly related to measures of gravel structure, it was found to be significantly correlated to measures of local flow velocity and Froude number. A portion of the traps were fitted with lids to restrict surface exchange of water and sediment. These collected the highest amounts of event-mobilized sediments, indicating that inter-gravel lateral flows, not just surface infiltration of sediments, are important in replenishing and redistributing the channel-stored fines. These findings regarding the magnitude and direction of fine sediment movement in gravel beds are significant in both a geomorphic and a biological context. Copyright

  17. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month continued with the Phase I DOE/PRDA investigation of the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process with Anhydrite Production and Chloride Control. The Phase I DOE/PRDA testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHE) also continued this month as the inlet particulate control system (installed September 1996) is maintaining the inlet particulate mass loading to the unit at an average value of 0.2 lb./MMBTU. The one-year tube wear analysis project conducted across this unit will be completed in the early part of March. At the completion of testing, a final inspection will be conducted before the unit is cleaned, disassembled, and returned to B&W and CH Corp. for additional analysis. Once the unit is removed from the ECTC, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber unit will be assembled and configured back into the flue gas path for future testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter configuration) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. In February 1997, the Clear Liquor Scrubbing with Anhydrite Production test block continued. This PRDA project is being jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Department of Energy and is part of the DOE`s Advanced Power Systems Program, whose mission is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The pilot portion of the CLS/Anhydrite project is being conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). The project is designed to develop an advanced FGD process incorporating chloride control, clear liquor scrubbing, and anhydrite (anhydrous calcium sulfate) production. While the three areas of the

  18. Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. Also the propulsion systems required to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Vision for Space Exploration in an affordable manner will need to have high reliability, safety and autonomous operation capability. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet these challenges through the concept of Intelligent Propulsion Systems. This paper describes the current activities of the CDB under the NASA Aeronautics Research and Exploration Systems Missions. The programmatic structure of the CDB activities is described along with a brief overview of each of the CDB tasks including research objectives, technical challenges, and recent accomplishments. These tasks include active control of propulsion system components, intelligent propulsion diagnostics and control for reliable fault identification and accommodation, distributed engine control, and investigations into unsteady propulsion systems.

  19. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), as appropriate, for the location where it is installed. In... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1) provides guidance on the differences between devices meeting... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers....

  20. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), as appropriate, for the location where it is installed. In... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1) provides guidance on the differences between devices meeting... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers....

  1. An integrated command control and communications center for first responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Richard A.; Hludik, Frank; Vidacic, Dragan; Melnyk, Pavlo

    2005-05-01

    First responders to a major incident include many different agencies. These may include law enforcement officers, multiple fire departments, paramedics, HAZMAT response teams, and possibly even federal personnel such as FBI and FEMA. Often times multiple jurisdictions respond to the incident which causes interoperability issues with respect to communication and dissemination of time critical information. Accurate information from all responding sources needs to be rapidly collected and made available to the current on site responders as well as the follow-on responders who may just be arriving on scene. The creation of a common central database with a simple easy to use interface that is dynamically updated in real time would allow prompt and efficient information distribution between different jurisdictions. Such a system is paramount to the success of any response to a major incident. First responders typically arrive in mobile vehicles that are equipped with communications equipment. Although the first responders may make reports back to their specific home based command centers, the details of those reports are not typically available to other first responders who are not a part of that agencies infrastructure. Furthermore, the collection of information often occurs outside of the first responder vehicle and the details of the scene are normally either radioed from the field or written down and then disseminated after significant delay. Since first responders are not usually on the same communications channels, and the fact that there is normally a considerable amount of confusion during the first few hours on scene, it would be beneficial if there were a centralized location for the repository of time critical information which could be accessed by all the first responders in a common fashion without having to redesign or add significantly to each first responders hardware/software systems. Each first responder would then be able to provide information

  2. Mission Control Center/Building 30. Historical Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    As part of this nation-wide study, in September 2006, historical survey and evaluation of NASA-owned and managed facilities was conducted by NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The results of this study are presented in a report entitled, Survey and Evaluation of NASA-owned Historic Facilities and Properties in the Context of the U.S. Space Shuttle Program, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, prepared in November 2007 by NASA JSC s contractor, Archaeological Consultants, Inc. As a result of this survey, the Mission Control Center (Building 30) was determined eligible for listing in the NRHP, with concurrence by the Texas State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO). The survey concluded that Building 30 is eligible for the NRHP under Criteria A and C in the context of the U.S. Space Shuttle Program (1969-2010). Because it has achieved significance within the past 50 years, Criteria Consideration G applies. It should be noted that the Mission Control Center was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1985 for its role in the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing. At the time of this documentation, Building 30 was still used to support the SSP as an engineering research facility, which is also sometimes used for astronaut training. This documentation package precedes any undertaking as defined by Section 106 of the NHPA, as amended, and implemented in 36 CFR Part 800, as NASA JSC has decided to proactively pursue efforts to mitigate the potential adverse affects of any future modifications to the facility. It includes a historical summary of the Space Shuttle program; the history of JSC in relation to the SSP; a narrative of the history of Building 30 and how it supported the SSP; and a physical description of the structure. In addition, photographs documenting the construction and historical use of Building 30 in support of the SSP, as well as photographs of the facility documenting the existing conditions, special technological features

  3. Adaptation of a Control Center Development Environment for Industrial Process Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Ronnie L.; Malik, James M.

    1994-01-01

    In the control center, raw telemetry data is received for storage, display, and analysis. This raw data must be combined and manipulated in various ways by mathematical computations to facilitate analysis, provide diversified fault detection mechanisms, and enhance display readability. A development tool called the Graphical Computation Builder (GCB) has been implemented which provides flight controllers with the capability to implement computations for use in the control center. The GCB provides a language that contains both general programming constructs and language elements specifically tailored for the control center environment. The GCB concept allows staff who are not skilled in computer programming to author and maintain computer programs. The GCB user is isolated from the details of external subsystem interfaces and has access to high-level functions such as matrix operators, trigonometric functions, and unit conversion macros. The GCB provides a high level of feedback during computation development that improves upon the often cryptic errors produced by computer language compilers. An equivalent need can be identified in the industrial data acquisition and process control domain: that of an integrated graphical development tool tailored to the application to hide the operating system, computer language, and data acquisition interface details. The GCB features a modular design which makes it suitable for technology transfer without significant rework. Control center-specific language elements can be replaced by elements specific to industrial process control.

  4. Standpipe models for diagnostics and control of a circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, James C.; Panday, Rupen

    2013-01-01

    Two models for a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) standpipe were formulated, implemented and validated to estimate critical CFB operational parameters. The first model continuously estimates standpipe bed height using incremental pressure measurements within the standpipe. The second model estimates variations in the void fraction along the standpipe using the Ergun equation in conjunction with the overall pressure drop across the bed, solids circulation rate and the standpipe aeration flows introduced at different locations of the pipe. The importance of different standpipe parameters obtained from these models is discussed in terms of successful operation of the overall CFB system. Finally, the applications of these models are shown in improving the solids circulation rate measurement and in calculating riser inventory.

  5. Fluvial processes and local lithology controlling abundance, structure, and composition of mussel beds

    PubMed Central

    Vannote, Robin L.; Minshall, G. Wayne

    1982-01-01

    In the Salmon River Canyon, Idaho, the fresh-water pearl mussel, Margaritifera falcata, attains maximum density and age in river reaches where large block-boulders structurally stabilize cobbles and interstitial gravels. We hypothesize that block-boulders prevent significant bed scour during major floods, and these boulder-sheltered mussel beds, although rare, may be critical for population recruitment elsewhere within the river, especially after periodic flood scour of less protected mussel habitat. Mussel shells in Indian middens adjacent to these boulder-stabilized areas suggest that prehistoric tribes selectively exploited the high-density old-aged mussel beds. Locally, canyon reaches are aggrading with sand and gravel, and M. falcata is being replaced by Gonidea angulata. PMID:16593208

  6. CONTROL OF INTERFACIAL DUST CAKE TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY OF MOVING BED GRANULAR FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Gerald M. Colver

    2002-10-31

    The goal of this research is to improve the performance of moving bed granular filters for gas cleaning at high temperatures and pressures. A second objective is to better understand dust capture interfacial phenomena and cake formation in moving bed filters. The experimental bed tested in the present study has several unique design features configured as cold flow, axially symmetric, counter-current flow to simulate a filter operating at high temperatures (1088 K) and elevated pressures (10 atmospheres). The granular filter is evaluated in two separate performance studies: (1) optimization of particle collection efficiency and bed pressure drop in a factorial study at near-atmospheric operating pressures through appropriate use of granular bed materials, particle sizes, and feed rates; and (2) high temperature and high pressure model simulation conducted at above-atmospheric pressures and room temperature utilizing dust and granular flow rates, granular size, system pressure, and superficial velocity. The factorial study involves a composite design of 16 near-atmospheric tests, while the model simulation study is comprised of 7 above-atmospheric tests. Similarity rules were validated in tests at four different mass dust ratios and showed nearly constant collection efficiencies ({approx} 99.5 {+-} 0.3%) for operating pressures of 160 kPa gage (23.2 psig) at room temperature (20 C), which simulates the hydrodynamic conditions expected for typical gasification streams (1088 K, 10 atmospheres). An important outcome from the near-atmospheric pressure studies are relationships developed using central composite design between the independent variables, superficial velocity (0.16-0.22 m/s), dust feed rate (0.08-0.74 kg/hr), and granular flow rate (3.32-15.4 kg/hr). These operating equations were optimized in contour plots for bed conditions that simultaneously satisfy low-pressure drop and high particle collection efficiency.

  7. Improvements and validation of the erythropoiesis control model for bed rest simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The most significant improvement in the model is the explicit formulation of separate elements representing erythropoietin production and red cell production. Other modifications include bone marrow time-delays, capability to shift oxyhemoglobin affinity and an algorithm for entering experimental data as time-varying driving functions. An area of model development is suggested by applying the model to simulating onset, diagnosis and treatment of a hematologic disorder. Recommendations for further improvements in the model and suggestions for experimental application are also discussed. A detailed analysis of the hematologic response to bed rest including simulation of the recent Baylor Medical College bed rest studies is also presented.

  8. National SCADA Test Bed: FY05 Progress on Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Erik J.; Michalski, John M.; Brian P. Van Leeuwen

    2006-07-01

    This document provides the status of the Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE) under development at Sandia National Laboratories. This development effort is funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) Program. Specifically the document presents a Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and software interface capability that supports the analysis of Process Control Systems (PCS) used in critical infrastructures. This document describes the development activities performed through June 2006 and the current status of the VCSE development task. Initial activities performed by the development team included researching the needs of critical infrastructure systems that depend on PCS. A primary source describing the security needs of a critical infrastructure is the Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector. A literature search of PCS analysis tools was performed and we identified a void in system-wide PCS M&S capability. No existing tools provide a capability to simulate control system devices and the underlying supporting communication network. The design team identified the requirements for an analysis tool to fill this void. Since PCS are comprised of multiple subsystems, an analysis framework that is modular was selected for the VCSE. The need for a framework to support the interoperability of multiple simulators with a PCS device model library was identified. The framework supports emulation of a system that is represented by models in a simulation interacting with actual hardware via a System-in-the-Loop (SITL) interface. To identify specific features for the VCSE analysis tool the design team created a questionnaire that briefly described the range of potential capabilities the analysis tool could include and requested feedback from potential industry users. This initial industry outreach was also intended to identify several industry users that are willing to participate in a dialog through the development process so that we

  9. The Network Operations Control Center upgrade task: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherif, J. S.; Tran, T.-L.; Lee, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article synthesizes and describes the lessons learned from the Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) upgrade project, from the requirements phase through development and test and transfer. At the outset, the NOCC upgrade was being performed simultaneously with two other interfacing and dependent upgrades at the Signal Processing Center (SPC) and Ground Communications Facility (GCF), thereby adding a significant measure of complexity to the management and overall coordination of the development and transfer-to-operations (DTO) effort. Like other success stories, this project carried with it the traditional elements of top management support and exceptional dedication of cognizant personnel. Additionally, there were several NOCC-specific reasons for success, such as end-to-end system engineering, adoption of open-system architecture, thorough requirements management, and use of appropriate off-the-shelf technologies. On the other hand, there were several difficulties, such as ill-defined external interfaces, transition issues caused by new communications protocols, ambivalent use of two sets of policies and standards, and mistailoring of the new JPL management standard (due to the lack of practical guidelines). This article highlights the key lessons learned, as a means of constructive suggestions for the benefit of future projects.

  10. Mist control at a machining center, Part 1: Mist characterization.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, W A; Yacher, J M; Deye, G J; Spencer, A B

    2000-01-01

    At a machining center used to produce transmission parts, aerosol instrumentation was used to quantitatively study mist generation and to evaluate the performance of an air cleaner for controlling the mist. This machining center drilled and tapped holes at rotational speeds of 1000 to 3000 rpm. During most machining operations, the metal-working fluid (MWF) was flooded over the part. To facilitate metal chip removal during some operations, MWF was pumped through the orifices in some tools at a pressure of 800 psi. These machining operations were performed in a nearly complete enclosure that was exhausted to an air cleaner at a flow rate of 1.1 m3/sec (2400 ft3/m). Although the use of high-pressure MWF increased the mist concentration by about 200%, it did not affect the mist size distribution. The observed penetration through the air cleaner appeared to be mostly consistent with the manufacturer's specifications on the air cleaner's filters. During the testing, MWF was observed to accumulate in the bottom of the filter housing and may have been reentrained due to air motion or mechanical vibration.

  11. Is function-based control room design human-centered?

    SciTech Connect

    Norros, L.; Savioja, P.

    2006-07-01

    Function-based approaches to system interface design appears an appealing possibility in helping designers and operators to cope with the vast amount of information needed to control complex processes. In this paper we provide evidence of operator performance analyses showing that outcome-centered performance measures may not be sufficiently informative for design. We need analyses indicating habitual patterns of using information, operator practices. We argue that practices that portray functional orienting to the task support mastery of the process. They also create potential to make use of function-based information presentation. We see that functional design is not an absolute value. Instead, such design should support communication of the functional significance of the process information to the operators in variable situations. Hence, it should facilitate development of practices that focus to interpreting this message. Successful function-based design facilitates putting operations into their contexts and is human-centered in an extended sense: It aids making sense in the complex, dynamic and uncertain environment. (authors)

  12. 77 FR 58847 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency...

  13. 75 FR 13285 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Transfer of Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... AGENCY Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in accordance with 40 CFR 2.309(c) and 2.308(h)(2). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will perform work for OPP under an Interagency Agreement...

  14. 77 FR 14805 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the... Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health...

  15. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month continued with the DOE/PRDA Phase I investigation of the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process with Anhydrite Production. The DOE/PRDA Phase I testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CH) was completed this month. This one-year tube wear analysis investigation was completed on 3/10/97, and a final inspection of the unit was made on 3/21/97. The CH unit and its related equipment are currently being removed from the ECTC test configuration, disassembled, and returned to B&W and CH Corp. for additional analyses. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly.

  16. Ex vivo engineered immune organoids for controlled germinal center reactions

    PubMed Central

    Purwada, Alberto; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Ahn, Haelee; Nojima, Takuya; Kitamura, Daisuke; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Cerchietti, Leandro; Singh, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo engineered three-dimensional organotypic cultures have enabled the real-time study and control of biological functioning of mammalian tissues. Organs of broad interest where its architectural, cellular, and molecular complexity has prevented progress in ex vivo engineering are the secondary immune organs. Ex vivo immune organs can enable mechanistic understanding of the immune system and more importantly, accelerate the translation of immunotherapies as well as a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that lead to their malignant transformation into a variety of B and T cell malignancies. However, till date, no modular ex vivo immune organ has been developed with an ability to control the rate of immune reaction through tunable design parameter. Here we describe a B cell follicle organoid made of nanocomposite biomaterials, which recapitulates the anatomical microenvironment of a lymphoid tissue that provides the basis to induce an accelerated germinal center (GC) reaction by continuously providing extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell–cell signals to naïve B cells. Compared to existing co-cultures, immune organoids provide a control over primary B cell proliferation with ~100-fold higher and rapid differentiation to the GC phenotype with robust antibody class switching. PMID:26072995

  17. Space Station propulsion system test bed and control system testing results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, A. M.; Briley, G. L.; Nave, L. H.; Pavlinsky, J. F.; Allums, S.

    1987-01-01

    The test bed fabricated to demonstrate hydrogen/oxygen propulsion technology readiness for the IOC Space Station application is described and test results are presented. The reliability and safety of the O2/H2 system was demonstrated with blowdowns and thruster firings. The flexibility of the system was demonstrated through the addition of an electrolysis supply module.

  18. Sorbent utilization prediction methodology: sulfur control in fluidized-bed combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Fee, D.C.; Wilson, W.I.; Shearer, J.A.; Smith, G.W.; Lenc, J.F.; Fan, L.S.; Myles, K.M.; Johnson, I.

    1980-09-01

    The United States Government has embarked on an ambitious program to develop and commercialize technologies to efficiently extract energy from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. One of the more promising new technologies for steam and power generation is the fluidized-bed combustion of coal. In this process, coal is burned in a fluidized bed composed mainly of calcined limestone sorbent. The calcium oxide reacts chemically to capture the sulfur dioxide formed during the combustion and to maintain the stack gas sulfur emissions at acceptable levels. The spent sulfur sorbent, containing calcium sulfate, is a dry solid that can be disposed of along with coal ash or potentially used. Other major advantages of fluidized-bed combustion are the reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions because of the relatively low combustion temperatures, the capability of burning wide varieties of fuel, the high carbon combustion efficiencies, and the high heat-transfer coefficients. A key to the widespread commercialization of fluidized-bed technology is the ability to accurately predict the amount of sulfur that will be captured by a given sorbent. This handbook meets this need by providing a simple, yet reliable, user-oriented methodology (the ANL method) that allows performance of a sorbent to be predicted. The methodology is based on only three essential sorbent parameters, each of which can be readily obtained from standardized laboratory tests. These standard tests and the subsequent method of data reduction are described in detail.

  19. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the Carbon Injection System (the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber and the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter). Testing also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger this month as the effects of increased particulate loading are being studied. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. Testing in October at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) included tests from the Pilot Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block as part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions. The 1996 program is being performed on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and the spray dryer/pulse jet fabric filter (SDA/PJFF) pilot units. The 1996 Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block is a continuation of the 1995 TER test block and will focus on up to five research areas, depending on experimental results. These areas are: (1) Mercury speciation methods; (2) Effect of FGD system operating variables on mercury removal; (3) Novel methods for elemental mercury control; (4) Catalytic methods for converting elemental mercury to oxidized mercury; and (5) Electrostatic charging of particulate material in the FGD inlet flue gas stream. The work during October continued to focus on catalytic oxidation of elemental mercury. These tests included the evaluation of two different loadings of catalyst CT-9 (carbon-based material) over extended periods (8-10 days) and an evaluation of FAB-2B (bulk bituminous fly ash taken from the first hopper of the

  20. Hydrodynamic Controls of Immobile Boulders on Bed Load Grain Movement in Mountain Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakiris, Achilleas; Papanicolaou, Thanos

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the interaction between the turbulent fluid flow and bed load sediment flux in a river is fundamental for predicting erosion and landscape evolution, managing riverine infrastructure, and protecting and improving aquatic habitat. To date, this fundamental understanding is lacking especially in steep mountain streams, where transport occurs close to the threshold of entrainment and bed load flux is highly intermittent. A unique feature of mountain streams that warrants special attention, and which is the focus of this study, is the presence of large, rarely-mobile boulders. Because of their large size, these boulders may become fully or partially submerged, thus exhibiting high or low relative submergence, H/dc, respectively, with H and dc denoting the approach flow depth and the boulder diameter. It is speculated that the type of submergence affects the dominant vortex topology around the boulders. We test two hypotheses, namely: (1) that the topology of the vortex structures resulting from the interaction of the boulders with the approach turbulent flow varies with varying relative submergence; and (2) that the patterns of motion of mobile sediment around the boulders are influenced by the vortex structure topology developing for each relative submergence condition. A series of detailed flume experiments were conducted for a single boulder mounted atop a flat rough bed under full and partial submergence conditions. For each condition, detailed flow field measurements were acquired using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The PIV measurements revealed that the topology of the developing vortices around the boulder was distinctly different for the high and low relative submergence conditions. More specifically, the wake of the fully submerged boulder was dominated by arch structures, which tilted downstream under the intense ambient flow shear, as well as by a pair of inner vortices resulting from the roll-up of the secondary vorticity layer on the

  1. The NASA Short-term Prediction and Research Transition (SPoRT) Center: A Research to Operations Test Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2005-01-01

    to the Florida coastal WFOs. A SPoRT Test bed, together with input from other interagency and university partners, will provide a means and a process to effectively transition ESE observations and technology to NWS operations and decision makers at both the globdnational and regional scales. The transition of emerging experimental products into operations through the SPoRT infrastructure will allow NASA to foster and accelerate the progress of this Science Mission Directorate research strategy over the coming years.

  2. PCR analysis of the presence and location of Mycobacterium avium in a constructed reed bed, with implications for avian tuberculosis control.

    PubMed

    Drewe, Julian A; Mwangi, David; Donoghue, Helen D; Cromie, Ruth L

    2009-02-01

    The potential of reed beds to act as biofilters of pathogenic and environmental mycobacteria was investigated through examination of the fate of mycobacteria in a constructed reed bed filtering effluent from a large captive wildfowl collection. Particular emphasis was placed on the presence and location of Mycobacterium avium--the causal agent of avian tuberculosis (ATB)--in an effort to clarify the potential role of reed beds in the control of this disease. Water, sediment, and stems and roots of common reed (Phragmites australis) and greater reedmace (Typha latifolia) were taken from 15 locations within the reed bed plus sites upstream and downstream. Samples were analysed for mycobacteria using PCR and specifically for M. avium using nested PCR. Environmental mycobacteria were found throughout the entire reed bed but M. avium was not found downstream of the first vegetation growth. The reed bed was found to effectively remove M. avium from the water through a combination of sedimentation and adsorption onto vegetation stems. The results of this study show that constructed reed beds composed of a settlement lagoon and one or more vegetation beds can act as valuable and ecologically friendly tools in the environmental control of ATB.

  3. Depositional and subrosional Salina halite-bed terminations in northeastern Ohio are structurally controlled

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, A.H.; Peng, S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01

    Halite bed-bearing Silurian Salina Group units B through F-4 occur in the subsurface of northeastern Ohio where they have been restudied in a five county (Ashtabula, Geauga, Lake, Portage, Trumbull) area of the eastern interior salt basin at the edge of the Appalachian Basin. Three major factors affect the distributional pattern of the salts. First is the underlying topography, especially the presence of thick (reef-like) Lockport Dolomite over a basement gravity and magnetic high on the west side of the study area. Second is the preferential subsidence along fault zones which bound the depositional limits of some salts, for example the southern B salt edge at the Suffield Fault Zone. Third is the patterned removal of salt in the subsurface in northeast Ashtabula County along northwest trending fault zones. The F-2, F-1 and D salts progressively disappear to the northeast in Ashtabula County, toward Lake Erie and the Pennsylvania border in northwest trending bands which coincide with identified lineaments in adjacent Pennsylvania, e.g. the Home-Gallizen lineament or are subparallel to it and similar ones e.g. the Blaisville-Broad Top and Tyrone-Mount Union lineaments. The cause of the progressively deeper removal of halite beds from the Salina F-2, F-1, D and B units can be attributed to fresh or brackish water influx and subrosion below the sub-Oriskany (Acadian) unconformity. No salt beds are found shallower than 300 feet below the Oriskany horizon base. It appears that maps of Salina salt beds reflect penecontemporaneous Paleozoic structural (hence topographic) features and hydrologic regimes.

  4. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] AND LAUNCH CONTROL CENTER [LCC] FISHEYE VIEW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] AND LAUNCH CONTROL CENTER [LCC] FISHEYE VIEW KSC-366-0131.01 105-KSC-366-131.1, P-01506, ARCHIVE-04313 Fisheye view of the Vehicle Assembly Building and Launch Control Center, Complex 39, John F. Kennedy Space Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Electric Power Esearch Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process, the DOE PRDA testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), and support for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. The test configuration utilized in the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process included the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber (SDA), the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter (PJFF), and a new Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) reactor installed at the ECTC. During this testing, O&M support was also required to conclude the test efforts under the EPRI Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. This included the on-site development efforts for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. In the DOE PRDA project with the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), the effects of the increased particulate loading to the unit were monitored throughout the month. Also, the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly.

  6. Mini All-purpose Satellite Control Center (MASCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaouche, Gerard

    1994-01-01

    A new generation of Mini All-purpose Satellite Control Centers (MASCC) has been developed by CNES (F). They turn out to be easily adaptable to different kinds of satellites, both Low Earth Orbital or Geostationary. The features of MASCC allow both standard satellite control activities, and checking of passengers experiments hosted on a space platform. In the different environments in which it may be used, MASCC provides standard broadcasting of telemetry parameters on animated synoptics (curves, bar graphs, alphanumeric displays, ...), which turns out to be a very useful and ergonomic medium for operational teams or satellite specialists. Special care has been taken during the MASCC development about two points: - automation of all routine tasks, allowing automated operation, and limiting human commitment to system supervision and decision making, - software adaptability. To reach these two main objectives, the MASCC design provides:(1) a simple, robust and flexible hardware architecture, based on powerful distributed workstations; and (2) a table-driven software architecture, easily adapted to various operational needs. Satellite characteristics are described in a central Data Base. Hence, the processing of telemetry and commands is largely independent from the satellite itself. In order to validate these capabilities, the MASCC has been customized to several types of satellites and orbital platforms: (1) SPOT4, the French new generation of remote sensing satellites; (2) TELECOM2, the French geostationary TV and telecommunication satellite; and (3) MIR, the Russian orbital platform. MASCC development has been completed by the third quarter of 1993. This paper will provide first a description of the MASCC basic functions, of its hardware and software design. It will then detail the increased automation capability, along with the easy adaptation of the MASCC to new satellites with minimal software modifications.

  7. ISS Update: Huntsville Control Center Celebrates 12 Years – 03/07/13

    NASA Video Gallery

    From Mission Control Center, JSC Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly commemorates 12 years of continuous space station science operations at the Payload Operations Center (POC) at Marshall Space Fli...

  8. 50. VIEW OF CENTRAL CONTROL STATION AND VISITOR CENTER/RIVER SIDES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. VIEW OF CENTRAL CONTROL STATION AND VISITOR CENTER/RIVER SIDES (Visitor Center Building constructed after field negatives were taken and numbered.) - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 11, Upper Mississippi River, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  9. Modern processes controlling the sea bed sediment formation in Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanyuk, I.; Dmitrievsky, A.; Shapovalov, S.; Chaikina, O.; Akivis, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Barents Sea is one of the key regions for understanding of the postglacial history of the climate and circulation of the World Ocean. There are the limits of warm North Atlantic waters penetration to the Arctic and a zone of interaction between Atlantic and Arctic waters. The Barents Se's limits are the deep Norwegian Sea in the West, the Spitsbergen Island and the Franz Josef Land and the deep Nansen trough in the North, the Novaya Zemlya archipelago in the East and the North shore of Europe in the South. An analysis of Eurasian-Arctic continental margin shows correspondence between the rift systems of the shelf with those of the ocean. This relation can be observed in the central Arctic region. All the rift systems underlying the sediment basin are expressed in the sea bed relief as spacious and extensive graben valleys burnished by lobes. Two transverse trenches cross both shelf and continental slope, namely the Medvezhinsky trench between Norway and Spitsbergen in the West and the Franz Victoria trench between Spitsbergen and the Franz Josef Land in the North. The Barents and the Kara Seas are connected by the Kara Gate Strait and wide transverse trough of Saint Anna in the North-West. The recent assessment of the eolian solid sediment supply to the Barents Sea is about 0.904 tons. The Barents Sea as a whole should be considered as "starving" in terms of its feeding with solid sediment matter. Observations show the considerable part of the sea bottom to be free of Holocene sediment cover. The more ancient Quaternary units or bedrock can be seen at the bottom surface. This phenomenon is the most typical for arches of relatively shallow elevations. Thick accumulations of new sediments are connected with fjords. The amount of sea ice delivered from the Barents Sea to the Arctic Ocean is 35 km3 a year. This value should be added by iceberg delivery from the North island of Novaya Zemlya, the Franz Josef Land, the Spitsbergen Island and North Norway but most of

  10. Community control of health services. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's community management system.

    PubMed

    Tichy, N M; Taylor, J I

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the case of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of control, namely, management, without experiencing destructive conflicts and the deterioration of health services.

  11. Bed bugs.

    PubMed

    Foulke, Galen T; Anderson, Bryan E

    2014-09-01

    The term bed bug is applied to 2 species of genus Cimex: lectularius describes the common or temperate bed bug, and hemipterus its tropical cousin. Cimex lectularius is aptly named; its genus and species derive from the Latin words for bug and bed, respectively. Though the tiny pest is receiving increased public attention and scrutiny, the bed bug is hardly a new problem. PMID:25577850

  12. Intelligent robot control using an adaptive critic with a task control center and dynamic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. L.; Ghaffari, M.; Liao, X.; Alhaj Ali, S. M.

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the design, development and simulation of a real time controller for an intelligent, vision guided robot. The use of a creative controller that can select its own tasks is demonstrated. This creative controller uses a task control center and dynamic database. The dynamic database stores both global environmental information and local information including the kinematic and dynamic models of the intelligent robot. The kinematic model is very useful for position control and simulations. However, models of the dynamics of the manipulators are needed for tracking control of the robot's motions. Such models are also necessary for sizing the actuators, tuning the controller, and achieving superior performance. Simulations of various control designs are shown. Also, much of the model has also been used for the actual prototype Bearcat Cub mobile robot. This vision guided robot was designed for the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Contest. A novel feature of the proposed approach is that the method is applicable to both robot arm manipulators and robot bases such as wheeled mobile robots. This generality should encourage the development of more mobile robots with manipulator capability since both models can be easily stored in the dynamic database. The multi task controller also permits wide applications. The use of manipulators and mobile bases with a high-level control are potentially useful for space exploration, certain rescue robots, defense robots, and medical robotics aids.

  13. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center Dynamics and Controls Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steve

    2015-01-01

    NASA Armstrong continues its legacy of exciting work in the area of Dynamics and Control of advanced vehicle concepts. This presentation describes Armstrongs research in control of flexible structures, peak seeking control and adaptive control in the Spring of 2015.

  14. Fourth NASA Inter-Center Control Systems Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Space vehicle control applications are discussed, along with aircraft guidance, control, and handling qualities. System simulation and identification, engine control, advanced propulsion techniques, and advanced control techniques are also included.

  15. Velocity control as a tool for optimal plume containment in the Equus Beds aquifer, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidari, M.; Sadeghipour, J.; Drici, O.

    1987-01-01

    A ground-water-management model was developed to investigate the best management options for the containment of an oil-field-brine plume in the Equus Beds aquifer in south-central Kansas. The main purpose of the management model was to find the optimal locations and minimum rates of pumpage of a set of plume-interception wells, to successfully reverse the velocity vectors at observation wells located along the plume front, and also to satisfy freshwater demands from supply wells. The effects of the calculated minimum withdrawals from the interception wells on the migration of contaminants throughout the ground-water system were evaluated utilizing a solute-transport model. This latter analysis was carried out to ensure the containment of the plume. Whereas application of the management model to the study area achieves the management objectives, the implementation of the results is believed to be impractical and expensive.

  16. Vegetation control of gravel-bed channel morphology and adjustment: the case of Carex nudata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.

    2010-12-01

    In the high energy, gravel- to cobble-bed Middle Fork John Day River of eastern Oregon, C. nudata (torrent sedge) germinates on gravel bars and forms tussocks 0.5 m across by 0.3m high or larger, with dense, tough root masses that are very resistant to erosion. Tussocks may be uprooted during floods (probably >Q-5yr), travel as boulder-sized masses, and may re-root where deposited. Individual tussocks, however, commonly persist for more than a decade in one position. When established, these tussocks behave more like channel obstructions than typical stream side sedges. Lines of C. nudata tussocks form on the stream side margin of former bare gravel bars, creating a secondary flow path and an eroding bank on their landward side. C. nudata also forms small mid-channel islets with bed scour at their base and occasional lee depositional zones. Chains of mid-channel islets can anchor pool boundaries. Observations in the field and from aerial photo time sequences suggest the following evolutionary model for channels with C. nudata. C. nudata establishes on a bare gravel bar, and can stabilize the bar surface or create erosional forms as described above. C. nudata fosters weaker sedges and other species that help extend stabilization of the bar surface. Mid-channel islets form through selective uprooting of tussocks. Observations of a reach where cattle grazing was eliminated in 2000 show that C. nudata has expanded. It has stabilized some formerly active bar surfaces but is now causing bank erosion and channel widening in some locations. In this case, C. nudata mediated the potentially stabilizing effects of management change by increasing channel instability in some respects.

  17. Assembly-Controlled Permeability of Layer-by-Layer Polymeric Microcapsules Using a Tapered Fluidized Bed.

    PubMed

    Noi, Ka Fung; Roozmand, Ali; Björnmalm, Mattias; Richardson, Joseph J; Franks, George V; Caruso, Frank

    2015-12-23

    Nano- and microcapsules engineered through layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly are finding an increasingly large number of applications as catalysts, electrochemical biosensors, bioreactors, artificial cells and drug delivery vehicles. While centrifugation-based LbL assembly is the most common method for coating template particles and preparing capsules, it is a batch process and requires frequent intervention that renders the system challenging to automate and scale up. Here, we report the use of a tapered fluidized bed (TFB) for the preparation of multilayered polymer capsules. This is a significant improvement over our recent approach of fluidizing particles in cylindrical fluidized beds (CFB) for LbL assembly. We demonstrate that TFB is compatible with particles <3 μm in diameter (an order-of-magnitude improvement compared with CFB), which can be fluidized with minimal entrainment. Additionally, layering materials were expanded to include both electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding polymer pairs (e.g., poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS), and thiol-modified poly(methacrylic acid) (PMASH) and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVPON), respectively). Finally, differences between capsules prepared via centrifugation-based and TFB LbL assembly were investigated. The obtained TFB microcapsules demonstrate increased film thickness and roughness compared with those prepared using centrifugation-based LbL assembly. Furthermore, PMASH microcapsules exhibit lower swelling and permeability when prepared via TFB LbL assembly compared with centrifugation-based LbL assembly due to enhanced multilayer deposition, entanglement, and cross-linking. Therefore, polymeric capsules fabricated via TFB LbL assembly may be useful for encapsulation and retention of relatively low molecular weight (∼20 kDa) hydrophilic biomacromolecules to passively or responsively release the payload for drug delivery applications. PMID:26651354

  18. Field Study of the Comparative Efficacy of Three Pyrethroid/Neonicotinoid Mixture Products for the Control of the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal; Cooper, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Three insecticide mixtures that contain two classes of insecticides (pyrethroid and neonicotinoid) were recently developed to control bed bugs. We evaluated three integrated bed bug management strategies in apartments, each using the same non-chemical control methods and one of the three insecticide mixture products: Tandem (lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam), Temprid SC (beta-cyfluthrin + imidacloprid), and Transport Mikron (bifenthrin + acetamiprid). No insecticides were applied in the Control apartments. In all apartments, we installed vinyl mattress encasements (if not already present) and applied steam to beds and other infested upholstered furniture. Insecticide sprays were applied in the three treatments. Each treatment and the Control included 8-10 occupied apartments. Re-treatment was conducted during biweekly inspections if necessary. After eight weeks, the mean (± SEM) bed bug count reduction in the Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron, and Control was 89 ± 9, 87 ± 6, 98 ± 1, and 23 ± 54%, respectively. Only Tandem and Transport Mikron treatments resulted in significantly higher population reduction than the Control at eight weeks. There were no significant differences in mean percent reduction among the three treatments (Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron) at eight weeks. Tandem spray caused significantly faster bed bug reduction than Temprid SC spray and Transport Mikron spray. PMID:26463075

  19. Field Study of the Comparative Efficacy of Three Pyrethroid/Neonicotinoid Mixture Products for the Control of the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal; Cooper, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Three insecticide mixtures that contain two classes of insecticides (pyrethroid and neonicotinoid) were recently developed to control bed bugs. We evaluated three integrated bed bug management strategies in apartments, each using the same non-chemical control methods and one of the three insecticide mixture products: Tandem (lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam), Temprid SC (beta-cyfluthrin + imidacloprid), and Transport Mikron (bifenthrin + acetamiprid). No insecticides were applied in the Control apartments. In all apartments, we installed vinyl mattress encasements (if not already present) and applied steam to beds and other infested upholstered furniture. Insecticide sprays were applied in the three treatments. Each treatment and the Control included 8–10 occupied apartments. Re-treatment was conducted during biweekly inspections if necessary. After eight weeks, the mean (± SEM) bed bug count reduction in the Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron, and Control was 89 ± 9, 87 ± 6, 98 ± 1, and 23 ± 54%, respectively. Only Tandem and Transport Mikron treatments resulted in significantly higher population reduction than the Control at eight weeks. There were no significant differences in mean percent reduction among the three treatments (Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron) at eight weeks. Tandem spray caused significantly faster bed bug reduction than Temprid SC spray and Transport Mikron spray. PMID:26463075

  20. Field Study of the Comparative Efficacy of Three Pyrethroid/Neonicotinoid Mixture Products for the Control of the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal; Cooper, Richard

    2015-03-18

    Three insecticide mixtures that contain two classes of insecticides (pyrethroid and neonicotinoid) were recently developed to control bed bugs. We evaluated three integrated bed bug management strategies in apartments, each using the same non-chemical control methods and one of the three insecticide mixture products: Tandem (lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam), Temprid SC (beta-cyfluthrin + imidacloprid), and Transport Mikron (bifenthrin + acetamiprid). No insecticides were applied in the Control apartments. In all apartments, we installed vinyl mattress encasements (if not already present) and applied steam to beds and other infested upholstered furniture. Insecticide sprays were applied in the three treatments. Each treatment and the Control included 8-10 occupied apartments. Re-treatment was conducted during biweekly inspections if necessary. After eight weeks, the mean (± SEM) bed bug count reduction in the Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron, and Control was 89 ± 9, 87 ± 6, 98 ± 1, and 23 ± 54%, respectively. Only Tandem and Transport Mikron treatments resulted in significantly higher population reduction than the Control at eight weeks. There were no significant differences in mean percent reduction among the three treatments (Tandem, Temprid SC, Transport Mikron) at eight weeks. Tandem spray caused significantly faster bed bug reduction than Temprid SC spray and Transport Mikron spray.

  1. Bed rest in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Catherine; Stone, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    The use of bed rest in medicine dates back to Hippocrates, who first recommended bed rest as a restorative measure for pain. With the formalization of prenatal care in the early 1900s, maternal bed rest became a standard of care, especially toward the end of pregnancy. Antepartum bed rest is a common obstetric management tool, with up to 95% of obstetricians utilizing maternal activity restriction in some way in their practice. Bed rest is prescribed for a variety of complications of pregnancy, from threatened abortion and multiple gestations to preeclampsia and preterm labor. Although the use of bed rest is pervasive, there is a paucity of data to support its use. Additionally, many well-documented adverse physical, psychological, familial, societal, and financial effects have been discussed in the literature. There have been no complications of pregnancy for which the literature consistently demonstrates a benefit to antepartum bed rest. Given the well-documented adverse effects of bed rest, disruption of social relationships, and financial implications of this intervention, there is a real need for scientific investigation to establish whether this is an appropriate therapeutic modality. Well-designed randomized, controlled trials of bed rest versus normal activity for various complications of pregnancy are required to lay this debate to rest once and for all. PMID:21425272

  2. The infection control information system of the Hospital Infections Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Manangan, L P

    1996-12-01

    In December 1990 the Investigation and Prevention Branch, Hospital Infections Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), developed the Hospital Infections Program infection control information system (HIP ICIS) to respond more efficiently to more than 200 public inquiries (telephone or written) that HIP receives daily. The HIP ICIS allows anyone with a Touch-Tone telephone, fax machine, or computer to access CDC information that answers the most commonly asked questions from infection control practitioners and other health care workers. The HIP ICIS has received approximately 56,608 inquiries; of these, 33% were about CDC guidelines on prevention and control of nosocomial infections, 25% about issues related to HIV, 16% about sterilization and disinfection of medical devices, 8% about methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 3% about long-term care facilities, and 17% miscellaneous topics (e.g., nosocomial infection rates, infection control courses, and ventilation, construction, and renovation of hospitals). The HIP ICIS is an efficient method of providing infection control guidance to the infection control community. In this article, we a) review the history of the HIP ICIS, b) present data on HIP ICIS usage, c) summarize the current HIP ICIS contents, and d) present step-by-step instructions on how to access the HIP ICIS.

  3. Simulation test beds for the space station electrical power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center and its prime contractor are responsible for developing the electrical power system on the space station. The power system will be controlled by a network of distributed processors. Control software will be verified, validated, and tested in hardware and software test beds. Current plans for the software test bed involve using real time and nonreal time simulations of the power system. This paper will discuss the general simulation objectives and configurations, control architecture, interfaces between simulator and controls, types of tests, and facility configurations.

  4. Simulation test beds for the Space Station electrical power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center and its prime contractor are respnsible for developing the electrical power system on the Space Station. The power system will be controlled by a network of distributed processors. Control software will be verified, validated, and tested in hardware and software test beds. Current plans for the software test bed involve using real time and nonreal time simulations of the power system. This paper will discuss the general simulation objectives and configurations, control architecture, interfaces between simulator and controls, types of tests, and facility configurations.

  5. Status of Urban Bed Bug Infestations in Southern China: An Analysis of Pest Control Service Records in Shenzhen in 2012 and Dongguan in 2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Cai, Xuquan; Xu, Yijuan

    2015-01-01

    The recent resurgence of bed bugs (Cimex spp.) in many developed countries has drawn increasing attention worldwide. The status of urban bed bug infestations were investigated in Shenzhen and Dongguan, two major cities in southern Guangdong Province of southern China, based on pest control service records from two different companies (one during 2012 and another during 2013). The results showed that Shenzhen and Dongguan have a severe problem with bed bug infestations: the control of bed bugs is a constant concern, except during the winter. In Shenzhen, a similar number of premises were treated for bed bugs in central business districts and suburban districts. However, in Dongguan, more premises were treated for bed bugs in suburban districts than in central business districts. The treatment rate for worker sleeping quarters, apartments, hotel, and private houses in Shenzhen was 53.8, 43.0, 1.9, and 1.3%, respectively. The percentage of treated rooms was 56.1% for worker sleeping quarters and 91.1% for apartments. In Dongguan, the treatment rate for worker sleeping quarters, apartments, hotel, and private houses was 90.0, 10.0, 0.0, and 0.0%, respectively. PMID:26336282

  6. Status of Urban Bed Bug Infestations in Southern China: An Analysis of Pest Control Service Records in Shenzhen in 2012 and Dongguan in 2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Cai, Xuquan; Xu, Yijuan

    2015-01-01

    The recent resurgence of bed bugs (Cimex spp.) in many developed countries has drawn increasing attention worldwide. The status of urban bed bug infestations were investigated in Shenzhen and Dongguan, two major cities in southern Guangdong Province of southern China, based on pest control service records from two different companies (one during 2012 and another during 2013). The results showed that Shenzhen and Dongguan have a severe problem with bed bug infestations: the control of bed bugs is a constant concern, except during the winter. In Shenzhen, a similar number of premises were treated for bed bugs in central business districts and suburban districts. However, in Dongguan, more premises were treated for bed bugs in suburban districts than in central business districts. The treatment rate for worker sleeping quarters, apartments, hotel, and private houses in Shenzhen was 53.8, 43.0, 1.9, and 1.3%, respectively. The percentage of treated rooms was 56.1% for worker sleeping quarters and 91.1% for apartments. In Dongguan, the treatment rate for worker sleeping quarters, apartments, hotel, and private houses was 90.0, 10.0, 0.0, and 0.0%, respectively.

  7. 76 FR 7217 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... research and control activities related to injury. Matters to be Discussed: The BSC, NCIPC will discuss...

  8. Usable Translational Hand Controllers for NASA's Habitability Design Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westbrook, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    This summer I was given the opportunity to work at the Habitability Design Center (HDC). NASA Johnson Space Center's HDC is currently developing Cislunar and Mars spacecraft mockups. I contributed to this effort by designing from scratch low cost, functional translational hand controllers (THCs) that will be used in spacecraft mission simulation in low to medium fidelity exploration spacecraft mockups. This project fell under the category of mechatronics, a combination of mechanical, electrical, and computer engineering. Being an aerospace engineering student, I was out of my comfort zone. And that was a wonderful thing. The autonomy that my mentor, Dr. Robert Howard, allowed me gave me the opportunity to learn by trying, failing, and trying again. This project was not only a professional success for me, but a significant learning experience. I appreciated the freedom that I had to take the time to learn new things for myself rather than blindly follow instructions. I was the sole person working on this project, and was required to work independently to solve the many hardware and software challenges that the project entailed. I researched THCs that have been used on the ISS, the Space Shuttle, and the Orion MPVC and based my design off of these. I worked through many redesigns before finding an optimal configuration of the necessary mechanisms and electrical components for the THC. Once I had a functional hardware design, I dove into the challenge of getting an Arduino Uno, an extremely low cost and easily programmable microcontroller, to behave as a human interface device. The THCs I built needed to be able to integrate to a mission simulation designed by NASA's Graphics and Visualization Lab. This proved to be the most challenging aspect of the project. To accomplish this I learned how to change the firmware of the USB serial converter microcontroller. The process was very complicated as it involved multiple software programs and manual flashing of pins on the

  9. 78 FR 18602 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ...), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the.... Place: CDC, Building 21, Rooms 1204 A/B, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Atlanta, Georgia 30333. Status: Open...

  10. 78 FR 60876 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the... Place: CDC, Building 21, Rooms 1204 A/B, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Atlanta, Georgia 30333. Status: Open...

  11. 78 FR 60876 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the..., 2013. Place: CDC, Building 21, Rooms 1204 A/B, 1600 Clifton Road NE., Atlanta, Georgia 30333....

  12. 76 FR 28438 - Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) The meeting announced below concerns RFA CE10-004,...

  13. 78 FR 29754 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the...

  14. 78 FR 64505 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... and Control. Matters to be Discussed: The BSC, NCIPC will discuss the recommendations provided by the... strategies needed to guide the Center's focus. The BSC members will also discuss potential topics for...

  15. 78 FR 37542 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) Correction: This notice was published in...

  16. 77 FR 31018 - Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) The meeting announced below concerns Research Grants...

  17. 75 FR 1062 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the...

  18. 78 FR 35036 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) Correction: This notice was published in...

  19. 77 FR 72868 - The Centers for Disease Control (CDC)/Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention The Centers for Disease Control (CDC)/Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention... (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis...

  20. 78 FR 69682 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Board of Scientific...

  1. Chaotic behavior control in fluidized bed systems using artificial neural network. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bodruzzaman, M.; Essawy, M.A.

    1996-02-27

    Pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (FBC) are becoming very popular, efficient, and environmentally acceptable replica for conventional boilers in Coal-fired and chemical plants. In this paper, we present neural network-based methods for chaotic behavior monitoring and control in FBC systems, in addition to chaos analysis of FBC data, in order to localize chaotic modes in them. Both of the normal and abnormal mixing processes in FBC systems are known to undergo chaotic behavior. Even though, this type of behavior is not always undesirable, it is a challenge to most types of conventional control methods, due to its unpredictable nature. The performance, reliability, availability and operating cost of an FBC system will be significantly improved, if an appropriate control method is available to control its abnormal operation and switch it to normal when exists. Since this abnormal operation develops only at certain times due to a sequence of transient behavior, then an appropriate abnormal behavior monitoring method is also necessary. Those methods has to be fast enough for on-line operation, such that the control methods would be applied before the system reaches a non-return point in its transients. It was found that both normal and abnormal behavior of FBC systems are chaotic. However, the abnormal behavior has a higher order chaos. Hence, the appropriate control system should be capable of switching the system behavior from its high order chaos condition to low order chaos. It is to mention that most conventional chaos control methods are designed to switch a chaotic behavior to a periodic orbit. Since this is not the goal for the FBC case, further developments are needed. We propose neural network-based control methods which are known for their flexibility and capability to control both non-linear and chaotic systems. A special type of recurrent neural network, known as Dynamic System Imitator (DSI), will be used for the monitoring and control purposes.

  2. Mist control at a machining center, Part 2: Mist control following installation of air cleaners.

    PubMed

    Yacher, J M; Heitbrink, W A; Burroughs, G E

    2000-01-01

    At a machining center used to produce transaxle and transmission parts, aerosol instrumentation was used to quantitatively evaluate size-dependent mist generation of a synthetic metalworking fluid (MWF) consisting primarily of water and triethanolamine (TEA). This information was used to select an air cleaner for controlling the mist. During most machining operations, the MWF was flooded over the part. These machining operations were performed in a nearly complete enclosure that was exhausted to an air cleaner consisting of three sections: a fall-out chamber, a trifilter section to capture metal chips and mist, and a 1.13 m3/sec (2400 ft3/min) blower. The partnering company requested that National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers perform an evaluation of the effectiveness of a commercially available air cleaner. After NIOSH researchers characterized mist generation at the machining centers and found that performance of a test air cleaner appeared to be suitable, the company installed more than 25 air cleaners on different machining centers in this plant and enclosed the corresponding fluid filtration unit. The facility also has implemented a maintenance program for the air cleaners that involves regularly scheduled filter changes; performance is ensured by monitoring static pressure. A NIOSH-conducted air sampling evaluation showed that area TEA concentrations were reduced from a geometric mean of 0.25 to 0.03 mg/m3. Personal total particulate concentrations were reduced from a geometric mean of 0.22 to 0.06 mg/m3. These results show the effectiveness of this combination of enclosure, ventilation, and filtration to greatly reduce the exposure to MWF mist generated in modern machining centers.

  3. Follow on Research for Multi-Utility Technology Test Bed Aircraft at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (FY13 Progress Report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2013-01-01

    Modern aircraft employ a significant fraction of their weight in composite materials to reduce weight and improve performance. Aircraft aeroservoelastic models are typically characterized by significant levels of model parameter uncertainty due to the composite manufacturing process. Small modeling errors in the finite element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of Multi Utility Technology Test-bed (MUTT) aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression, and therefore in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of MUTT aircraft. The ground vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite element model of the MUTT aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite element model of MUTT aircraft is improved using the in-house Multi-disciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of MUTT aircraft have been improved simultaneously in a single model tuning procedure.

  4. Development and application of an actively controlled hybrid proton exchange membrane fuel cell-Lithium-ion battery laboratory test-bed based on off-the-shelf components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yufit, V.; Brandon, N. P.

    The use of commercially available components enables rapid prototyping and assembling of laboratory scale hybrid test-bed systems, which can be used to evaluate new hybrid configurations. The development of such a test-bed using an off-the-shelf PEM fuel cell, lithium-ion battery and DC/DC converter is presented here, and its application to a hybrid configuration appropriate for an unmanned underwater vehicle is explored. A control algorithm was implemented to regulate the power share between the fuel cell and the battery with a graphical interface to control, record and analyze the electrochemical and thermal parameters of the system. The results demonstrate the applicability of the test-bed and control algorithm for this application, and provide data on the dynamic electrical and thermal behaviour of the hybrid system.

  5. Controlled variables: psychology as the center fielder views it.

    PubMed

    Marken, R S

    2001-01-01

    Perceptual control theory (PCT) views behavior as the control of perception. The central explanatory concept in PCT is the controlled variable, which is a perceived aspect of the environment that is brought to and maintained in states specified by the organism. According to PCT, understanding behavior is a matter of discovering the variables that organisms control. But the possible existence of controlled variables has been largely ignored in the behavioral sciences. One notable exception occurs in the study of how baseball outfielders catch fly balls. In these studies it is taken for granted that the fielder gets to the ball by controlling some visual aspect of the ball's movement. This article describes the concept of a controlled variable in the context of research on fly ball catching behavior and shows how this concept can contribute to our understanding of behavior in general.

  6. Effect of grade-control structures at various stages of their destruction on bed sediments and local channel parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galia, Tomáš; Škarpich, Václav; Hradecký, Jan; Přibyla, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Grade-control structures (GCSs) represent the typical management of torrential streams, preventing massive bed erosion and bedload transport. The original and present geometric and sedimentary parameters of 18 GCSs at various stages of their destruction since the 1970s were evaluated to determine the relationship between the former and present-day components of the managed Mohelnice River (the western Carpathians, Czech Republic). The latest changes in the GCS geometry, related scour holes, and bed surface grain size of sedimentary wedges were caused by the 2010 flood event of 20-50 R.I. discharge. No relationship exists between the bed surface grain sizes and the present water drop or the present equilibrium channel slope of the sedimentary wedge. A significant downstream coarsening of the largest grain size percentile represented by D95 is detected through the sequence of GCSs. Also, statistically insignificant trends in downstream coarsening were observed for D16, D50, and D84 grain sizes. However, the investigated sequence is still passable for grain diameters up to 200 mm during high-magnitude floods similar to the 2010 event, as documented by the development of a confluent gravel bar downstream of the sequence. Bedload transport simulations provide the highest bedload transport rates for the initial stage of the uppermost studied channel reach without the presence of GCSs (30,000 kg min- 1 for Q50). Grade-control structures reconstruction in the 1970s significantly decreased transport rates (> 2000 kg min- 1 for Q50). Owing to the erosion of GCS crests and an increase in related equilibrium channel slope, damage on GCSs can lead to an increase in bedload transport intensity (13,000 kg min- 1 for Q50). Significant linear relationships exist among the present parameters of the scour holes (length of scour hole, maximum scour depth, and horizontal distance between the point of maximum depth and the GCS crest). A statistical significant power relationship exists

  7. Adsorptive control of water in esterification with immobilized enzymes: II. fixed-bed reactor behavior.

    PubMed

    Mensah, P; Gainer, J L; Carta, G

    1998-11-20

    Experimental and theoretical studies are conducted to understand the dynamic behavior of a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor in which an esterification is catalyzed by an immobilized enzyme in an organic solvent medium. The experimental system consists of a commercial immobilized lipase preparation known as Lipozyme as the biocatalyst, with propionic acid and isoamyl alcohol (dissolved in hexane) as the reaction substrates. A complex dynamic behavior is observed experimentally as a result of the simultaneous occurrence of reaction and adsorption phenomena. Both propionic acid and water are adsorbed by the biocatalyst resulting in lower reaction rates. In addition, an excessive accumulation of water in the reactor leads to a rapid irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. A model based on previously-obtained adsorption isotherms and kinetic expressions, as well as on adsorption rate measurements obtained in this work, is used to predict the concentration and thermodynamic activity of water along the reactor length. The model successfully predicts the dynamic behavior of the reactor and shows that a maximum thermodynamic activity of water occurs at a point at some distance from the reactor entrance. A cation exchange resin in sodium form, packed in the reactor as a selective water adsorbent together with the catalyst particles, is shown to be an effective means for preventing an excessive accumulation of water formed in the reaction. Its use results in longer cycle times and greater productivity. As predicted by the model, the experimental results show that the water adsorbed on the catalyst and on the ion exchange resin can be removed with isoamyl alcohol with no apparent loss in enzyme activity.

  8. 13. DETAIL OF CENTER OF CENTRAL CONTROL CONSOLE IN SLC3W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL OF CENTER OF CENTRAL CONTROL CONSOLE IN SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM SHOWING USAF LAUNCH CONTROLLER AND ASSISTANT USAF LAUNCH CONTROLLER PANELS. CONSOLES AND CHAIRS NEAR NORTH WALL IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. Controls on boron and germanium distribution in the low-sulfur Amos coal bed, Western Kentucky coalfield, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Ruppert, L.F.; Williams, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Duckmantian-aged Amos coal bed is a thin (<51 cm) coal bed that occurs in lobate southwest-trending pods separated by thin sandstones in the Western Kentucky coalfield. The coal bed, which is comprised of up to two benches and a rider coal, is low in ash yield (<6%) and sulfur content (<1%). The coal tends to be thin (<40 cm), but it was heavily mined in the 1980s because it could be combusted as mined. Geochemical analysis of the Amos coal bed shows higher concentrations of B and Ge than other Western Kentucky coal beds. High total B concentrations as well as high B/Be, both considered to be indicators of marine environments, increase toward the top of the coal bed. Most of the B values for the Amos samples range from 66 to 103 ppm (whole coal basis) indicating deposition in a brackish environment. High Ge concentrations in coals have been considered to be a function of seam thickness and proximity to the top and bottom of the coal bed. Thin coals, such as the Amos, are dominated by the coal bed margins and, therefore, have a tendency to have relatively high Ge concentrations. In the case of the Amos coal bed, the lower bench has a higher Ge content, suggesting that the substrate was a more important source of Ge than the roof rock. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Secure Remote Access Issues in a Control Center Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Lee; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISS finally reached an operational state and exists for local and remote users. Onboard payload systems are managed by the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). Users access HOSC systems by internet protocols in support of daily operations, preflight simulation, and test. In support of this diverse user community, a modem security architecture has been implemented. The architecture has evolved over time from an isolated but open system to a system which supports local and remote access to the ISS over broad geographic regions. This has been accomplished through the use of an evolved security strategy, PKI, and custom design. Through this paper, descriptions of the migration process and the lessons learned are presented. This will include product decision criteria, rationale, and the use of commodity products in the end architecture. This paper will also stress the need for interoperability of various products and the effects of seemingly insignificant details.

  11. Interplay between insecticide-treated bed-nets and mosquito demography: implications for malaria control.

    PubMed

    Ngonghala, Calistus N; Mohammed-Awel, Jemal; Zhao, Ruijun; Prosper, Olivia

    2016-05-21

    Although malaria prevalence has witnessed a significant reduction within the past decade, malaria still constitutes a major health and economic problem, especially to low-income countries. Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) remain one of the primary measures for preventing the malignant disease. Unfortunately, the success of ITN campaigns is hampered by improper use and natural decay in ITN-efficacy over time. Many models aimed at studying malaria transmission and control fail to account for this decay, as well as mosquito demography and feeding preferences exhibited by mosquitoes towards humans. Omitting these factors can misrepresent disease risk, while understanding their effects on malaria dynamics can inform control policy. We present a model for malaria dynamics that incorporates these factors, and a systematic analysis, including stability and sensitivity analyses of the model under different conditions. The model with constant ITN-efficacy exhibits a backward bifurcation emphasizing the need for sustained control measures until the basic reproduction number, R0, drops below a critical value at which control is feasible. The infectious and partially immune human populations and R0 are highly sensitive to the probability that a mosquito feeds successfully on a human, ITN coverage and the maximum biting rate of mosquitoes, irrespective of whether ITN-efficacy is constant or declines over time. This implies that ITNs play an important role in disease control. When ITN-efficacy wanes over time, we identify disease risks and corresponding ITN coverage, as well as feeding preference levels for which the disease can be controlled or eradicated. Our study leads to important insights that could assist in the design and implementation of better malaria control strategies. We conclude that ITNs that can retain their effectiveness for longer periods will be more appropriate in the fight against malaria and that making more ITNs available to highly endemic regions is

  12. Anaerobic soil disinfestation for non-chemical weed control in Florida raised-bed vegetable production.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is an increased interest in non-chemical weed control alternatives to soil fumigation with methyl bromide. One such approach is the use of anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD), which combines the approaches of biological soil disinfestation and soil reduction sterilization. ASD combines heati...

  13. Longevity of controlled release fertilizer influences the growth of bedding Impatiens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) have not been extensively used in floriculture production, perhaps due to lack of grower experience and research-based information with their use in herbaceous plant production. Any information about the correct use of CRF should increase growers’ confidence in ...

  14. Speech recognition and synthesis for electric utility dispatch control centers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Edman, T.R.; Penner, R.R.; Metz, S.V.

    1986-03-01

    Voice devices now on the market could boost efficiency and reduce error and fatigue in busy utility dispatch control centers. The potential for the fast-developing voice technologies is greatest in such complex centers, where work loads are heavy and responses must often be immediate.

  15. 74. SAC control center addition sect 9top three floors, first ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. SAC control center addition sect 9-top three floors, first floor plan, drawing number AS-BLT.AW30-02-03, dated May, 1958 - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  16. CNC Turning Center Advanced Operations. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-332.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.; Tatum, Kenneth

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to introduce the student to the operations and functions of a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 presents course expectations and syllabus, covers safety precautions, and describes the CNC turning center components, CNC…

  17. Chaotic behavior control in fluidized bed systems using artificial neural network. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bodruzzaman, M.; Essawy, M.A.

    1996-07-30

    We have developed techniques to control the chaotic behavior in the Fluidized Bed (FBC) Systems using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). For those techniques to cross from theory to implementation, the computer programs we are developing have to be interfaced with the outside world, as a necessary step towards the actual interface with an FBC system or its experimental mock up. For this reason we are working on a Data Acquisition Board setup that will enable communication between our programs and external systems. Communication is planned to be enabled in both ways to deliver feedback signals from a system to the control programs in one way, and the control signals from the control programs to the controlled system in the other way. On the other hand, since most of our programs are PC based, they have to follow the revolutionary progress in the PC technology. Our programs were developed in the DOS environment using an early version of Microsoft C compiler. For those programs to meet the current needs of most PC users, we are working on converting those programs to the Windows environment, using a very advanced and up to date C++ compiler. This compiler is known as the Microsoft Visual C++ Version 4.0. This compiler enables the implementation of very professional and sophisticated Windows 95, 32 bit applications. It also allows a simple utilization of the Object Oriented Programming (OOP) techniques, and lots of powerful graphical and communication tools known as the Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC). This compiler also allows creating Dynamic Link Libraries (DLLS) that can be liked together or with other Windows programs. These two main aspects, the computer-system interface and the DOS-Windows migration will give our programs a leap frog towards their real implementation.

  18. HOW TO MANAGE ENVIRONMENT FROM A CENTRAL CONTROL CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MULLER, HENRY J.

    THE PROBLEMS OF REGULATION AND MAINTENANCE OF HEATING, VENTILATING, AND AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT IN MULTIBUILDING SITUATIONS HAS LEAD TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN AUTOMATIC MONITOR AND CONTROL SYSTEM AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY. THE WORK LOAD HAS INCREASED WITH--(1) THE ADDITION OF MORE BUILDINGS, (2) THE INSTALLATION OF MORE COMPLEX SYSTEMS IN EXISTING…

  19. 25. Typical valves used to control flow into and out ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Typical valves used to control flow into and out of filtration bed. Left valve (painted red) drains the bed, and center valve (painted green) admits water into the bed. The right valve is a cross over valve which is used to admit water into a dry bed from the bottom. This bottom fill excludes entrapped air as the bed is filled. When the water reached to top of the bed, filling is continued from the top of the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  20. Microscale packed bed reactor for controlled hydrogen peroxide decomposition as a fuel cell oxidant aboard unmanned undersea vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, E.; Burke, A. A.; Ocampo, M.; Besser, R. S.

    The multiphase catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen is notoriously susceptible to thermal runaway (heat of reaction: -98 kJ mol -1). The high surface area to volume ratio (S/ V) in a microscale packed bed (MPB) reactor (radius 0.5 mm) was investigated for reducing the risk of thermal runaway during hydrogen peroxide decomposition to oxygen intended as a fuel cell oxidant aboard an unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV). A microscale reactor channel with a S/ V of ∼2 × 10 3 m 2 m -3 simulated under convective cooling generated a significant heat rise (T rise ∼ 100 K), whereas a microreactor with a higher S/ V (∼200 × 10 3 m 2 m -3) achieved thermal control (T rise < 10 K) over the simulated reaction zone. Although thermal management was successfully accomplished using the higher S/ V, experimental conversions of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen (5-18%) measured from the outlet were lower than simulated conversions (38-63%). Simulation assumptions, such as homogeneously dispersed flow and perfect catalyst interaction among other factors, contributed to the discrepancies between the simulated and experimental degrees of peroxide conversion to oxygen. Even though thermal control of the MPB was achieved, this work indicates that mass transfer limitations are a factor in the MPB reactor during a multiphase reaction, like decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water, and suggests means to overcome them even on the microscale level.

  1. 75 FR 7606 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ...), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the... Information: Anne C. Haddix, PhD, Designated Federal Officer, ACD, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., M/S...

  2. 76 FR 67192 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal.... Matters To Be Discussed: The BSC, NCIPC will discuss the recommendations provided by the expert panel...

  3. System and method for transferring telemetry data between a ground station and a control center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Timothy J. (Inventor); Ly, Vuong T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems, computer-implemented methods, and tangible computer-readable media for coordinating communications between a ground station, a control center, and a spacecraft. The method receives a call to a simple, unified application programmer interface implementing communications protocols related to outer space, when instruction relates to receiving a command at the control center for the ground station generate an abstract message by agreeing upon a format for each type of abstract message with the ground station and using a set of message definitions to configure the command in the agreed upon format, encode the abstract message to generate an encoded message, and transfer the encoded message to the ground station, and perform similar actions when the instruction relates to receiving a second command as a second encoded message at the ground station from the control center and when the determined instruction type relates to transmitting information to the control center.

  4. 75 FR 8366 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... procedures for considering petitions by classes of nuclear weapons workers to be added to the ``Special...)--Extension--National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control...

  5. 76 FR 4911 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Centers of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Centers of Excellence To Promote a Healthier Workforce, Request for... Excellence to Promote a Healthier Workforce, RFA OH11-001.'' Contact Person for More Information:...

  6. Current Level of Mission Control Automation at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maks, Lori; Breed, Julie; Rackley, Michael; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA is particularly concerned with reducing mission operations costs through increased automation. This paper examines the operations procedures within NASA Mission Control Centers in order to uncover the level of automation that currently exists within them. Based on an assessment of mission operations procedures within three representative control centers, this paper recommends specific areas where there is potential for mission cost reduction through increased automation.

  7. Topographic and lithologic controls on occurrence of cobble-boulder channel beds: implications for salmonid over-wintering habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, E. T.; Sklar, L. S.; Marshall, J. A.; Ligon, F. K.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2009-12-01

    Channel beds dominated by cobble- and boulder-sized particles provide over-wintering habitat to Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and other salmonids because the fish use the interstitial space as refuge from high flows, particularly where large woody debris and off-channel habitat are not present. Methods for predicting the occurrence and quality of cobble-boulder (CoBo) substrate are needed to guide population modeling and landuse management to support salmonid restoration efforts. Here we report results of an ongoing study of the controls on CoBo occurrence in Pescadero Creek, a forested coastal watershed draining the north-western side of the Santa Cruz mountains in central California. Our operational definition of CoBo is a bed material median grain size of 120 mm, with a thickness of at least 150 mm, open interstitial matrix, and low recurrence interval of mobilization (e.g 50 years). CoBo habitat is typically found at channel slopes of 2% and greater, and where drainage area is sufficient to provide perennial flow, however many channels with these slope-area characteristics are too fine-grained to serve as CoBo habitat. We hypothesize that the occurrence of Cobo habitat is controlled by hillslope sediment supply conditions. In particular, production of a sufficient supply of cobbles and boulders requires a durable bedrock lithology and either steep topography capable of producing debris flow-generating landslides or bedrock-walled inner gorges. In larger-drainage-area, lower-slope mainstem channels, coarse sediment plumes associated with tributary junctions may also be common sites of CoBo occurrence. We are using a combination of field reconnaissance and surveying, geologic mapping, and DEM analysis of channel network and hillslope topography to assess sediment supply conditions associated with occurrence of CoBo substrates. We are also assessing the habitat quality of reaches with CoBo substrates, which can be degraded by high supply of gravel and

  8. Health care cost effects of public use of a regional poison control center.

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, T E; Olson, K R; Bero, L A; Heard, S E; Blanc, P D

    1995-01-01

    Poison control centers in the United States are threatened with closure, and attempts at a cost-benefit analysis of these services have been indeterminate. The purpose of this study was to compare the operating costs of a regional poison control center resulting from public use of its telephone hotline services with those of hypothetical alternative sources of advice and care. We conducted a follow-up telephone survey among 589 public callers to the San Francisco Bay Area Regional Poison Control Center who had been managed at home without medical referral after an unintentional poisoning. All survey respondents were asked what alternative action they would have taken had the poison control center not been available to assist them by telephone consultation. We then surveyed emergency departments and physicians' offices cited as alternatives by the callers to determine their response and charges for evaluating a suspected poisoning case. A total of 464 (79%) of the callers surveyed would have sought assistance from their local emergency health care system had the poison control center not been available. We conservatively estimated that the total charges for such evaluations would be +71,900. Comparatively, the total actual operating cost of services provided by the poison control center for all 589 poisoning cases was +13,547. Most of the study subjects (429 [73%]) had private insurance coverage. Direct public access to these services probably reduces the use of emergency health care resources, thus lowering health care costs. PMID:7618308

  9. User attitudes in analyzing digital slides in a quality control test bed: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Della Mea, Vincenzo; Demichelis, Francesca; Viel, Federico; Dalla Palma, Paolo; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto

    2006-05-01

    The pathologist examines suitably stained glass slides through a bright field microscope in order to render histopathological or cytological diagnosis by looking at tissues and cells. Glass slides serve as a permanent record of the patient disease. Over the course of a patient's treatment slides may need to be reviewed at other institutions before treatment can commence. Due to their fragile nature a transportable permanent digital facsimile of the glass slide would be ideal. A digital slide is a set of digital images representing the whole slide normally used by the pathologist, or a significant part of it; it is usually made by a large amount of images, up to thousands, which makes its management difficult. The present paper provides a description of the requirements needed to reproduce glass slides and of the available technological equipment, then the features of the two systems we implemented on different hardware are described, together with those of the digital slide viewer. The viewer was evaluated in two experimental test phases, during which user behaviour and diagnostic reports were measured. Digital slides used in the two experiments were acquired with either system. Possible applications of digital slides are then discussed, including undergraduate and professional education, quality control, and image analysis on full samples as well as on tissue microarrays.

  10. Swing-beds: the Arizona experience.

    PubMed

    Williams, F G; Netting, F E

    1991-06-01

    Swing-beds are acute-care hospital beds temporarily used for long-term care. A demonstration program was developed to evaluate the effectiveness of using swing-beds as catalysts for the expansion of rural hospitals into community health centers to respond better to the needs of older persons in their respective communities. We examined the background and implementation issues of the swing-bed demonstration program in six rural Arizona hospitals.

  11. Transportable Payload Operations Control Center reusable software: Building blocks for quality ground data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahmot, Ron; Koslosky, John T.; Beach, Edward; Schwarz, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    The Mission Operations Division (MOD) at Goddard Space Flight Center builds Mission Operations Centers which are used by Flight Operations Teams to monitor and control satellites. Reducing system life cycle costs through software reuse has always been a priority of the MOD. The MOD's Transportable Payload Operations Control Center development team established an extensive library of 14 subsystems with over 100,000 delivered source instructions of reusable, generic software components. Nine TPOCC-based control centers to date support 11 satellites and achieved an average software reuse level of more than 75 percent. This paper shares experiences of how the TPOCC building blocks were developed and how building block developer's, mission development teams, and users are all part of the process.

  12. DISPOSAL OF FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH IN AN UNDERGROUND MINE TO CONTROL ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND SUBSIDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-04-01

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion-FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). This document reports on progress made during Phase III. The report is divided into three major sections. The first deals with the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report describes the progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase III tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis is covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

  13. DISPOSAL OF FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH IN AN UNDERGROUND MINE TO CONTROL ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND SUBSIDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-07-01

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion-FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). This document reports on progress made during Phase III. The report is divided into three major sections. The first deals with the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report describes the progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase III tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis is covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

  14. DISPOSAL OF FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH IN AN UNDERGROUND MINE TO CONTROL ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND SUBSIDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-01-01

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion-FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). This document reports on progress made during Phase III. The report is divided into four major sections. The first deals with the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report reports on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase III tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis is covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase III (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

  15. DISPOSAL OF FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH IN AN UNDERGROUND MINE TO CONTROL ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND SUBSIDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-04-01

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion-FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). This document reports on progress made during Phase III. The report is divided into three major sections. The first deals with the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report describes the progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase III tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis is covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

  16. DISPOSAL OF FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH IN AN UNDERGROUND MINE TO CONTROL ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND SUBSIDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-01-01

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion-FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). This document reports on progress made during Phase III. The report is divided into three major sections. The first deals with the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report describes the progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase III tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis is covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

  17. Online process control of a pharmaceutical intermediate in a fluidized-bed drier environment using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Märk, Julia; Karner, Martin; Andre, Max; Rueland, Jochen; Huck, Christian W

    2010-05-15

    In the production plant of an antibiotic substance, a new fluidized-bed drier has been installed. For online process control of the drying progress and determination of the ideal drying end point, a continuous near-infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) measuring setup was implemented to rapidly and simultaneously gain all essential product information. A bypass system outside the drier combined with a robust process probe proved to provide the best sampling system geometry. The spectrometer was equipped with an additional laboratory probe for complementary offline analysis. Multivariate calibrations for product assay, water content, and residual solvent were calculated, optimized, and compared for the two probes. The final root-mean-square error of cross validation (RMSECV) for the process probe could be reduced to 0.81% for the product assay, 0.25% for water, and 0.06% for acetone. The laboratory-probe prediction values show good agreement with reference data during the testing period. The calibrations of the process probe were checked by comparing its predictions to those of the validated laboratory probe. The monitoring system could be automated to a large extent, and product quality could be improved considerably. The established technology is of high importance for the pharmaceutical industry carrying out high-throughput routine analysis because of its advantages in terms of of time and cost reductions.

  18. Controls on variation of calcite content in arkose beds of the Sangre de Cristo Formation, (Pennsylvanian-Permian) Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wysong, J.R.; Bain, R.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01

    Arkosic conglomerates and sandstones of the Pennsylvanian-Permian Sangre de Cristo Formation of south-central Colorado were deposited on alluvial plains and nearshore marine shelves adjacent to the highlands of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains. Thin limestone units occur locally, however calcite content of arkoses varies independent of these limestones. The thinly bedded to laminated arkoses contain abundant detrital orthoclase and plagioclase feldspars, micas and quartz. Authigenic clay (kaolinite) and calcite occur both as void-filling cement and replacement of feldspars. Fine-grained arkoses possess more calcite and authigenic clay than their coarse-grained counterparts. Calcite occurs as plagioclase replacement in fine-grained samples whereas in coarse-grained rocks it fills interstitial voids. Calcite content in fine-grained arkoses is low where laminae are preserved and increases with the presence of bioturbation. Diagenetic processes responsible for calcite and clay content of these arkoses were controlled by several factors including original sediment texture, composition, and grain orientation. Plagioclase has been altered to produce calcite and clay more than orthoclase. Permeability of coarse-grained rocks was higher and resulted in primarily void-filling cement. In fine-grained arkoses, permeability was less and water remained in contact with grains longer thereby altering plagioclase. Aligned mica grains of laminae retarded flow and impeded diagenetic alteration whereas bioturbation disrupted grain orientation thereby enhancing diagenesis.

  19. 75 FR 7284 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces...

  20. 75 FR 34459 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the following meeting of the...

  1. 75 FR 7483 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention-Ethics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention--Ethics Subcommittee (ES); Correction AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting; meeting time correction. SUMMARY:...

  2. An investigation into the usefulness of different empirical modeling techniques for better control of spray-on fluidized bed melt granulation.

    PubMed

    Aleksić, Ivana; Đuriš, Jelena; Ibrić, Svetlana; Parojčić, Jelena

    2015-12-30

    Melt granulation in fluid bed processors is an emerging technique, but literature data regarding the modeling of this granulation method are lacking. In the present study different techniques (response surface analysis, multilayer perceptron neural network, and partial least squares method) were applied for modeling of spray-on fluidized bed melt granulation. Experiments were organized in line with central composite design. The effect of binder content and spray air pressure on granule properties was evaluated. The results obtained indicate that binder content can be identified as a critical factor controlling the granule size and size distribution. It was found that agglomeration mechanism involved, i.e., granule shape, can be greatly influenced by binder properties. The spray air pressure was identified as critical process parameter affecting granule flowability. The results presented indicate that application of in silico tools enables enhanced understanding and better control of novel pharmaceutical processes, such as melt granulation in fluidized bed. The artificial neural networks and partial least squares method were found to be superior to response surface methodology in prediction of granule properties. According to the results obtained, application of more advanced empirical modeling techniques complementary to design of experiments can be a suitable approach in defining the design space and optimization of spray-on fluidized bed melt granulation. PMID:26551673

  3. Effects of proprioceptive training program on core stability and center of gravity control in sprinters.

    PubMed

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Martínez-López, Emilio; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a 6-week specific-sprinter proprioceptive training program on core stability and gravity center control in sprinters. Thirty-three athletes (age = 21.82 ± 4.84 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.07 m, weight = 67.82 ± 08.04 kg, body mass index = 21.89 ± 2.37 kg · m(-2)) from sprint disciplines were divided into a control (n = 17) and experimental (n = 16) groups. A 30-minute proprioceptive training program was included in the experimental group training sessions, and it was performed for 6 weeks, 3 times each week. This program included 5 exercises with the BOSU and Swiss ball as unstable training tools that were designed to reproduce different moments of the technique of a sprint race. Stability with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed, postural stability, and gravity center control were assessed before and after the training program. Analyses of covariance (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences in stability in the medial-lateral plane with EO, gravity center control in the right direction and gravity center control in the back direction after the exercise intervention in the experimental athletes. Nevertheless, no other significant differences were demonstrated. A sprinter-specific proprioceptive training program provided postural stability with EO and gravity center control measures improvements, although it is not clear if the effect of training would transfer to the general population.

  4. Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Comparato, Joseph R.; Jacobs, Martin

    1982-01-01

    A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

  5. View of Medical Support Room in Mission Control Center during Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Dr. J.F. Zieglschmid, M.D., Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) White Team Surgeon, is seated in the Medical Support Room in the Mission Control Center as he monitors crew biomedical data being received from the Apollo 16 spacecraft on the third day of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission.

  6. 77 FR 58847 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... research and control activities related to injury. Matters To Be Discussed: The BSC, NCIPC will discuss the... to the BSC. There will be 15 minutes allotted for public comments at the end of the open...

  7. Guidance, Navigation and Control Innovations at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, Aprille Joy

    2002-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on guidance navigation and control innovations at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. The topics include: 1) NASA's vision; 2) NASA's Mission; 3) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE); 4) Guidance, Navigation and Control Division (GN&C); 5) Landsat-7 Earth Observer-1 Co-observing Program; and 6) NASA ESE Vision.

  8. Bed exit alarms.

    PubMed

    2004-09-01

    Bed-exit alarms alert caregivers that a patient who should not get out of bed unassisted is doing so. These alarms can help reduce the likelihood of falls and can promote speedy assistance to patients who have already fallen. But as we described in our May 2004 Guidance Article on bed-exit alarms, they don't themselves prevent falls. They are only effective if used as part of an overall fall-prevention program and with a clear understanding of their limitations. This Evaluation examines the effectiveness of 16 bed-exit alarms from seven suppliers. Our ratings focus primarily on each product's reliability in detecting bed-exit events and alerting caregivers, its ability to minimize nuisance alarms (alarms that sound even though the patient isn't leaving the bed or that sound while a caregiver is helping the patient to leave the bed), and its resistance to deliberate or inadvertent tampering. Twelve of the products use pressure-sensor-activated alarms (mainly sensor pads placed on or under the mattress); three use a cord that can attach to the patient's garment, alarming if the cord is pulled loose from the control unit; and one is a position-sensitive alarm attached to a leg cuff. All the products reliably detect attempted or successful bed exits. But they vary greatly in how effectively they alert staff, minimize nuisance alarms, and resist tampering. Ease of use and battery performance also vary for many units. Of the pressure-sensor units, three are rated Preferred. Those units meet most of our criteria and have no significant disadvantages. Five of the other pressure-sensor products are Acceptable, and the remaining four are Not Recommended. All three cord-activated alarms are rated Acceptable, as is the patient-worn alarm.

  9. Disposal of Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash in an Underground Mine to Control Acid Mine Drainage and Subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-31

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. YO void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase Ill the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the spring of 1998 and monitored for following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during the winter of 1997. This document will report on progress made during Phase Ill. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase Ill tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis will be covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase Ill (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

  10. STS-35 TV OPS Area of the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Pictured is the TV OPS area of the SL POCC.

  11. Staffing the ISS Control Centers: Lessons Learned from Long-Duration Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Carrie D.; Horvath, Timothy J.; Davis, Sally P.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been in operation with a permanent human presence in space for over five years, and plans for continued operations stretch ten years into the future. Ground control and support operations are, likewise, a 15-year enterprise. This long-term, 24-hour per day, 7 day per week support has presented numerous challenges in the areas of ground crew training, initial and continued certification, and console staffing. The Mission Control Center in Houston, Texas and the Payload Operations Center in Huntsville, Alabama have both tackled these challenges, with similar, yet distinct, approaches. This paper describes the evolution of the staffing and training policies of both control centers in a chronological progression. The relative merits and shortcomings of the various policies employed are discussed and a summary of "lessons learned" is presented. Finally, recommendations are made as best practices for future long-term space missions.

  12. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control. Topical report for Subtask 3.1, In-bed sulfur capture tests; Subtask 3.2, Electrostatic desulfurization; Subtask 3.3, Microbial desulfurization and denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M.; Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T.; Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    This topical report on ``Sulfur Control`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT`s electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  13. Mission Control Center (MCC) system specification for the shuttle Orbital Flight Test (OFT) timeframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Mission Control Center Shuttle (MCC) Shuttle Orbital Flight Test (OFT) Data System (OFTDS) provides facilities for flight control and data systems personnel to monitor and control the Shuttle flights from launch (tower clear) to rollout (wheels stopped on runway). It also supports the preparation for flight (flight planning, flight controller and crew training, and integrated vehicle and network testing activities). The MCC Shuttle OFTDS is described in detail. Three major support systems of the OFTDS and the data types and sources of data entering or exiting the MCC were illustrated. These systems are the communication interface system, the data computation complex, and the display and control system.

  14. Control of material strength in a fluidized bed to discover principles of animal foot impact during locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, D. I.; Korff, W. L.; Full, R. J.

    2004-11-01

    We study the impact of flat disks (≈ 1 cm diameter) into a deep (800 particle diameters) bed of 250 μ m glass spheres of fixed volume fraction φ, and use a vertical flow of air (a fluidized bed) to change the material properties of the medium. By applying a series of air pulses to the bed we can achieve 0.57<φ<0.64; increasing the number of pulses increases φ, strengthening the material. A constant flow Q below the onset of bed fluidization weakens the solid: at fixed φ the penetration depth of a disk increases with increasing Q. We use this discovery to address a long-standing issue in animal locomotion -- the interaction of feet with the ground. We measure the average speed, foot impact depth, and foot contact time as a function of material strength for the desert-dwelling lizard Callisaurus draconoides (length 16 cm, mass=20 g) during rapid running on sand. The animal maintains high speed (1.4 m/sec) even when foot penetration depth varies as we manipulate material strength.

  15. Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  16. Critical Point Facility (CPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  17. Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  18. Crystal Growth Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) During the STS-42

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Crystal Growth team in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  19. Activities in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) During the STS-42 IML-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured are activities in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  20. Real-time automated failure identification in the Control Center Complex (CCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Sarah; Lauritsen, Janet; Pack, Ginger; Ha, Anhhoang; Jowers, Steven; Mcnenny, Robert; Truong, The; Dell, James

    1993-01-01

    A system which will provide real-time failure management support to the Space Station Freedom program is described. The system's use of a simplified form of model based reasoning qualifies it as an advanced automation system. However, it differs from most such systems in that it was designed from the outset to meet two sets of requirements. First, it must provide a useful increment to the fault management capabilities of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Control Center Complex (CCC) Fault Detection Management system. Second, it must satisfy CCC operational environment constraints such as cost, computer resource requirements, verification, and validation, etc. The need to meet both requirement sets presents a much greater design challenge than would have been the case had functionality been the sole design consideration. The choice of technology, discussing aspects of that choice and the process for migrating it into the control center is overviewed.

  1. Initial Flight Test of the Production Support Flight Control Computers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, John; Stephenson, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has completed the initial flight test of a modified set of F/A-18 flight control computers that gives the aircraft a research control law capability. The production support flight control computers (PSFCC) provide an increased capability for flight research in the control law, handling qualities, and flight systems areas. The PSFCC feature a research flight control processor that is "piggybacked" onto the baseline F/A-18 flight control system. This research processor allows for pilot selection of research control law operation in flight. To validate flight operation, a replication of a standard F/A-18 control law was programmed into the research processor and flight-tested over a limited envelope. This paper provides a brief description of the system, summarizes the initial flight test of the PSFCC, and describes future experiments for the PSFCC.

  2. Moving-bed, granular-bed filter development program option III: Development of moving-bed filter technology for multi-contaminant control task 14: Test plan. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, J.C.; Wilson, K.B.

    1994-11-01

    Hot gas cleanup of fuel gas resulting from coal gasification and combustion streams is described. Testing of various clay and sodium compound sorbents was performed and reviewed. Efforts are described for the control of halogens, sodium, cesium, lead, ammonia, potassium, and chlorine.

  3. Root Cause Assessment of Pressure Drop Rise of a Packed Bed of Lithium Hydroxide in the International Space Station Trace Contaminant Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilera, Tatiana; Perry, Jay L.

    2009-01-01

    The trace contaminant control system (TCCS) located in the International Space Station s (ISS) U.S. laboratory module employs physical adsorption, thermal catalytic oxidation, and chemical adsorption to remove trace chemical contamination produced by equipment offgassing and anthropogenic sources from the cabin atmosphere. The chemical adsorption stage, consisting of a packed bed of granular lithium hydroxide (LiOH), is located after the thermal catalytic oxidation stage and is designed to remove acid gas byproducts that may be formed in the upstream oxidation stage. While in service on board the ISS, the LiOH bed exhibited a change in flow resistance that leading to flow control difficulties in the TCCS. Post flight evaluation revealed LiOH granule size attrition among other changes. An experimental program was employed to investigate mechanisms hypothesized to contribute to the change in the packed bed s flow resistance. Background on the problem is summarized, including a discussion of likely mechanisms. The experimental program is described, results are presented, and implications for the future are discussed.

  4. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurement bias from moving-bed conditions without global positioning during the 2004 Glen Canyon Dam controlled flood on the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    Discharge measurements were made by acoustic Doppler current profiler at two locations on the Colorado River during the 2004 controlled flood from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona. Measurement hardware and software have constantly improved from the 1980s such that discharge measurements by acoustic profiling instruments are now routinely made over a wide range of hydrologic conditions. However, measurements made with instruments deployed from moving boats require reliable boat velocity data for accurate measurements of discharge. This is normally accomplished by using special acoustic bottom track pings that sense instrument motion over bottom. While this method is suitable for most conditions, high current flows that produce downstream bed sediment movement create a condition known as moving bed that will bias velocities and discharge to lower than actual values. When this situation exists, one solution is to determine boat velocity with satellite positioning information. Another solution is to use a lower frequency instrument. Discharge measurements made during the 2004 Glen Canyon controlled flood were subject to moving-bed conditions and frequent loss of bottom track. Due to site conditions and equipment availability, the measurements were conducted without benefit of external positioning information or lower frequency instruments. This paper documents and evaluates several techniques used to correct the resulting underestimated discharge measurements. One technique produces discharge values in good agreement with estimates from numerical model and measured hydrographs during the flood. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  5. Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children. A Statement by the Centers for Disease Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control (DHHS/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    This document is the fourth revision of a statement by the Centers for Disease Control. Introductory and background chapters present data that indicate significant adverse effects of lead levels in children's blood that were previously believed to be safe. Other chapters discuss: (1) sources of lead exposure, including paint, soil and dust, and…

  6. 76 FR 62071 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ...), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), CDC announces the following meeting of the aforementioned committee. Time and date: 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., October 27, 2011. Place: CDC, 1600 Clifton Road,...

  7. 78 FR 64503 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ...), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Cancellation: This notice was published in the Federal..., Committee Management Specialist, Office Chief of Staff, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road NE., Mail Stop D-14, Atlanta, Georgia 30303, Telephone: (404) 639-7158, Fax: (404) 639-7212, Email: ghickman@cdc.gov . This notice...

  8. 75 FR 62844 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ...), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the CDC announces the following meeting of the aforementioned committee: Time and Date: 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., October 28, 2010. Place: CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE.,...

  9. Effects of a major earthquake on calls to regional poison control centers.

    PubMed

    Nathan, A R; Olson, K R; Everson, G W; Kearney, T E; Blanc, P D

    1992-03-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the effect of the Loma Prieta earthquake on calls to 2 designated regional poison control centers (San Francisco and Santa Clara) in the area. In the immediate 12 hours after the earthquake, there was an initial drop (31%) in call volume, related to telephone system overload and other technical problems. Calls from Bay Area counties outside of San Francisco and Santa Clara decreased more dramatically than those from within the host counties where the poison control centers are located. In the next 2 days, each poison control center then handled a 27% increase in call volume. Requests for information regarding safety of water supplies and other environmental concerns were significantly increased. The number of cases of actual poisoning exposure decreased, particularly poison and drug ingestions in children. Most calls directly related to the earthquake included spills and leaks of hazardous materials and questions about water and food safety. Regional poison control centers play an essential role in the emergency medical response to major disasters and are critically dependent on an operational telephone system.

  10. Synonymy of strains of Center for Disease Control group DF-1 with species of Capnocytophaga.

    PubMed

    Williams, B L; Hollis, D; Holdeman, L V

    1979-10-01

    Of eight strains of Center for Disease Control group DF-1 examined, seven had 62 to 87% deoxyribonucleic acid homology with the neotype strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea and one had 72% deoxyribonucleic acid homology with the type strain of C. gingivalis. Deoxyribonucleic acid homology of four strains of Bacteroides ochraceus with the neotype strain of C. ochrecea was 76 to 86%.

  11. Guidance, Navigation and Control Innovations at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, Aprille Joy; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses NASA's role in sponsoring on-going research projects involving innovations in spacecraft guidance, navigation and control systems. Topics covered include: partnerships, ESE Spaceborne Missions, spacecraft systems supported and designed by NASA Goddard Flight Center, NASA's changing mission, Large Aperture Sensing Spectrum, Distributed Spacecraft Systems, Landsat-7/ Earth Observer-1 Co-observing Program, and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna program.

  12. Publications in acoustic and noise control from NASA Langley Research Center during 1940-1979. [bibliographies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, B. A. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    Reference lists of approximately 900 published Langley Research Center reports in various areas of acoustics and noise control for the period 1940-1979 are presented. Specific topic areas covered include: duct acoustics; propagation and operations; rotating blade noise; jet noise; sonic boom; flow surface interaction noise; structural response/interior noise; human response; and noise prediction.

  13. 78 FR 36595 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, National Center for Natural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, National Center for Natural Products Research-NIDA; Correction In Federal Register (FR DOC) 2013-09325 on page 23597, in...

  14. CNC Turning Center Operations and Prove Out. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-334.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to instruct the student in the recommended procedures used when setting up tooling and verifying part programs for a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 discusses course content and reviews and demonstrates set-up procedures…

  15. 77 FR 13633 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; National Center for Natural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Register on October 7, 2011, 76 FR 62449, National Center for Natural Products Research-NIDA MProject... following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I The company plans to cultivate marihuana for the National Institute on Drug Abuse for...

  16. 78 FR 23597 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, National Center for Natural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... November 9, 2012, 77 FR 67398, National Center for Natural Products Research-NIDA MProject, University of... classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) II Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) II The company plans to cultivate marihuana for the National Institute on Drug Abuse for research approved by...

  17. Personnel and Training Requirements for the ASR-21 Rescue Control Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Joseph F.; Noble, John F.

    This report covers personnel and training requirements for Rescue Control Center (RCC) twin hull submarine rescue ships (ASRs). Skills and knowledge similar to those of a sonar technician (ST-0408) and a data system technician (DS-1666) are needed to operate the special sonar set and computer based system, but no suitable Navy training facility…

  18. 77 FR 19018 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Communications Workgroup; the Ethics Subcommittee, and the Health Disparities Subcommittee, as well as an update... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee to the Director...

  19. MICROTURBULENCE IN GRAVEL BED STREAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, T.; Tsakiris, A. G.; Kramer, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    The overarching objective of this investigation was to evaluate the role of relative submergence on the formation and evolution of cluster microforms in gravel bed streams and its implications to bedload transport. Secondary objectives of this research included (1) a detailed analysis of mean flow measurements around a clast; and (2) a selected number of experimental runs where the mean flow characteristics are linked together with the bed micro-topography observations around a clast. It is hypothesized that the relative submergence is an important parameter in defining the feedback processes between the flow and clasts, which governs the flow patterns around the clasts, thus directly affecting the depositional patterns of the incoming sediments. To examine the validity of the hypothesis and meet the objectives of this research, 19 detailed experimental runs were conducted in a tilting, water recirculating laboratory flume under well-controlled conditions. A fixed array of clast-obstacles were placed atop a well-packed bed with uniform size glass beads. During the runs, multifractional spherical particles were fed upstream of the clast section at a predetermined rate. State-of-the-art techniques/instruments, such as imaging analysis software, Large Scale Particle Velocimeter (LSPIV) and an Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) were employed to provide unique quantitative measurements for bedload fluxes, clast/clusters geomorphic patterns, and mean flow characteristics in the vicinity of the clusters. Different flow patterns were recorded for the high relative submergence (HRS) and low relative submergence (LRS) experimental runs. The ADV measurements provided improved insight about the governing flow mechanisms for the HRS runs. These mechanisms were described with flow upwelling at the center of the flume and downwelling occurring along the flume walls. Flow downwelling corresponded to an increase in the free surface velocity. Additionally, the visual observations

  20. SU-C-BRE-02: BED Vs. Local Control: Radiobiological Effect of Tumor Volume in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Park, J; Kumar, P; Wang, F

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT with hypofractionated dose schemata has emerged a compelling treatment modality for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients. It requires more accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery technique. This report presents the relationship between tumor control probability(TCP) and size-adjusted biological effective dose(sBED) of tumor volume for MC lung SBRT patients. Methods: Fifteen patients who were treated with MC-based lung SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions to PTVV100%=95% were studied. ITVs were delineated on MIP images of 4DCT-scans. PTVs diameter(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 2.7–4.9cm (mean 3.7cm). Plans were generated using non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVMC algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX with HD-MLCs and 6MVSRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG-0813 dosimetric guidelines. To understand the known uncertainties of conventional heterogeneities-corrected/uncorrected pencil beam (PBhete/ PB-homo) algorithms, dose distributions were re-calculated with PBhete/ PB-homo using same beam configurations, MLCs and monitor units. Biologically effective dose(BED10) was computed using LQ-model with α/β=10Gy for meanPTV and meanITV. BED10-c*L, gave size-adjusted BED(sBED), where c=10Gy/cm and L=PTV diameter in centimeter. The TCP model was adopted from Ohri et al.(IJROBP, 2012): TCP = exp[sBEDTCD50]/ k /(1.0 + exp[sBED-TCD50]/k), where k=31Gy corresponding to TCD50=0Gy; and more realistic MC-based TCP was computed for PTV(V99%). Results: Mean PTV PB-hete TCP value was 6% higher, but, mean PTV PB-homo TCP value was 4% lower compared to mean PTV MC TCP. Mean ITV PB-hete/PB-homo TCP values were comparable (within ±3.0%) to mean ITV MC TCP. The mean PTV(V99%)had BED10=90.9±3.7%(median=92.2%),sBED=54.1±8.2%(median=53.5%) corresponding to mean MC TCP value of 84.8±3.3%(median=84.9%) at 2- year local control. Conclusion: The TCP model which incorporates BED10 and tumor diameter indicates that radiobiological

  1. The psychology of computer displays in the modern mission control center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granaas, Michael M.; Rhea, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    Work at NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) has demonstrated the need for increased consideration of psychological factors in the design of computer displays for the WATR mission control center. These factors include color perception, memory load, and cognitive processing abilities. A review of relevant work in the human factors psychology area is provided to demonstrate the need for this awareness. The information provided should be relevant in control room settings where computerized displays are being used.

  2. Bed Bugs FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Bed Bugs FAQs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... are bed bugs treated and prevented? What are bed bugs? Bed bugs ( Cimex lectularius ) are small, flat, parasitic ...

  3. Quantum Control of Nuclear Spins Coupled to Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangtawesin, Sorawis

    This dissertation presents experiments on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. The NV center is an optically active color center formed by one substitutional nitrogen atom and an adjacent vacancy in the diamond lattice. Its ground state spin triplet transitions are accessible in the microwave regime and their corresponding excited state transitions exhibit spin-dependent fluorescence that allows for optical spin state readout. We present methods for the deterministic placement and the fine tuning of the NV center population in bulk diamond via ion implantation. We demonstrate quantum control of the nuclear spin in diamond through manipulation of the NV center electronic spin. By utilizing the hyperfine coupling between the electronic and nuclear spins, fast phase gates on the intrinsic nitrogen nuclear spin can be achieved within half a microsecond, a speed that far exceeds that of the gates performed with conventional nuclear magnetic resonance pulses. The hyperfine coupling also results in an enhancement of the effective nuclear gyromagnetic ratio. We demonstrate the tunability of this enhancement by changing the magnetic field. Finally, we discuss preliminary experiments aimed towards coupling a single NV center to higher nuclear spin systems.

  4. 'You feel helpless, that's exactly it': parents' and young people's control beliefs about bed-wetting and the implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Morison, M J; Tappin, D; Staines, H

    2000-05-01

    'You feel helpless, that's exactly it': parents' and young people's control beliefs about bed-wetting and the implications for practice Young people wet the bed when they fail to wake up to a full bladder. The causes of bed-wetting are far from certain and this uncertainty is reflected in the diversity of treatments on offer and the lack of any guarantee that treatment will work in a particular case. Most young people are sad and ashamed about the bed-wetting and want it to stop, but they vary widely in their belief in their own capacity to influence the situation, and in their optimism about what the future holds. The problem can persist into adolescence or even adulthood, with far reaching social and emotional consequences, both for the young people and their families. In an ethnographic study involving 19 families 'perceived helplessness' emerged as a key issue permeating the whole system and often activating a downward spiral, leading to abdication of effort and responsibility by the young people themselves, by their parents and sometimes by health care professionals. Informed by the insights gained from this study and an extensive review of the literature on perceived control the Family Perspectives on Bed Wetting Questionnaire has been developed to explore family members' feelings, degree of concern and dimensions of perceived control relating to: effort, ability, luck, important others and the unknown. This questionnaire was used as a basis for structured interviews with family members in a longitudinal survey, involving 40 families attending one of nine community-based, nurse-led enuresis clinics in Greater Glasgow. It was found that only 38% of the young people were entering into treatment with the belief that they had the ability to be dry at night. This became self-fulfilling, with only 33% achieving initial success of 14 consecutive dry nights in a 16-week period (chi-squared test, P=0.029). Seventy per cent of young people felt that luck was important

  5. The Current State of Poison Control Centers in Pakistan and the Need for Capacity Building

    PubMed Central

    KHAN1, NADEEM ULLAH; MIR, MOHAMMED UMER; KHAN, UZMA RAHIM; KHAN, AFSHAN RAHIM; ARA, JAMAL; RAJA, KHURRAM; MIRZA, FARHAT HUSSAIN

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemical exposure is a major health problem globally. Poison control centers (PCCs) play a leading role both in developed and developing countries in the prevention and control of poisonous chemical exposures. In this study, we aimed to assess the current state of PCCs in Pakistan and highlight capacity building needs in these centers. Methods A cross-sectional survey of the two registered PCCs was done during August – December 2011. Necessary services of the PCCs were evaluated and the data were recorded on a predesigned checklist. Results Both PCCs are affiliated to a tertiary care hospital. Clinical services to poisoned patients were available 24 hours a day / 7 days a week. Information on common local products was available to poison center staff. Both centers were involved in undergraduate and post graduate teaching. Telephone poison information service was not available in either of centers. There was a limited capacity for qualitative and analytical toxicology. Common antidotes were available. There were limited surveillance activities to capture toxic risks existing in the community and also a deficiency was observed in chemical disaster planning. Conclusion PCCs in Pakistan need capacity building for specialized training in toxicology, toxicovigilance, chemical disaster planning, analytical laboratory tests and telephone service for consultation in poisoning cases. PMID:26985441

  6. Fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Botros, P E

    1990-04-01

    This report describes the activities of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center's research and development program in fluidized-bed combustion from October 1, 1987, to September 30, 1989. The Department of Energy program involves atmospheric and pressurized systems. Demonstrations of industrial-scale atmospheric systems are being completed, and smaller boilers are being explored. These systems include vortex, multi-solid, spouted, dual-sided, air-cooled, pulsed, and waste-fired fluidized-beds. Combustion of low-rank coal, components, and erosion are being studied. In pressurized combustion, first-generation, combined-cycle power plants are being tested, and second-generation, advanced-cycle systems are being designed and cost evaluated. Research in coal devolatilization, metal wastage, tube corrosion, and fluidization also supports this area. 52 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. 76 FR 22708 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Health Resources and Services Administration (CDC/HRSA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Health Resources and Services Administration (CDC/HRSA) Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and... related to prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and other STDs, the support of health care services...

  8. 75 FR 34458 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on... Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the following meeting of the aforementioned review group: Time...

  9. 75 FR 34459 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the following meeting of the aforementioned review...

  10. Publications in acoustics and noise control from the NASA Langley Research Center during 1940 - 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. C. (Compiler); Laneave, J. N. (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    This document contains reference lists of published Langley Research Center papers in various areas of acoustics and noise control for the period 1940-1974. The research work was performed either in-house by the center staff or by other personnel supported entirely or in part by grants or contracts. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Duct acoustics, (2) Propagation and operations, (3) Rotating blade noise, (4) Jet noise, (5) Sonic boom, (6) Flow-surface interaction noise, (7) Human response, and (8) Structural response.

  11. Analysis of mental workload of electrical power plant operators of control and operation centers.

    PubMed

    Vitório, Daiana Martins; Masculo, Francisco Soares; Melo, Miguel O B C

    2012-01-01

    Electrical systems can be categorized as critical systems where failure can result in significant financial loss, injury or threats to human life. The operators of the electric power control centers perform an activity in a specialized environment and have to carry it out by mobilizing knowledge and reasoning to which they have adequate training under the terms of the existing rules. To reach this there is a common mental request of personnel involved in these centers due the need to maintain attention, memory and reasoning request. In this sense, this study aims to evaluate the Mental Workload of technical workers of the Control Centers of Electrical Energy. It was undertaken a research on operators control centers of the electricity sector in Northeast Brazil. It was used for systematic observations, followed by interview and application of the instrument National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index known as NASA-TLX. As a result there will be subsidies for an assessment of mental workload of operators, and a contribution to improving the processes of managing the operation of electric utilities and the quality of workers.

  12. Changes in the channel-bed level of the eastern Carpathian rivers: Climatic vs. human control over the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rădoane, Maria; Obreja, Florin; Cristea, Ionuţ; Mihailă, Dumitru

    2013-07-01

    This paper is focused on the changes over the past 50 years in the channel beds of seven major rivers that are part of the Siret drainage basin located in eastern Romania. Each river has been subjected to various degrees of human intervention, assessed based on the morphological quality index (MQI): two rivers (Siret and Bistrita) have undergone complex human interventions on 40 and 60%, respectively, of their channel lengths, two rivers (Suceava and Moldova) are 30% artificial, and the remaining three rivers (Trotus, Putna, and Buzău) have a good or moderate MQI. The changes occurring in channel beds and data on water discharge (Qw) and sediment load (Qs) were assessed simultaneously for the last 50 years. The bedload was indirectly evaluated as ranging between 5 and 15% of the total sediment load. It was determined that incision was prevalent among the processes acting on the channel-bed sections under investigation (representing 62% of the altered area and changing bed level by between - 0.25 and - 2.70 m), with aggradation accounting for the remaining 38% (causing changes ranging from + 0.15 to + 1.25 m). The magnitude of the processes (incision or aggradation) for sections with an MQI < 0.3 was four times higher than for sections with a moderate or good MQI (> 0.3). The pattern of change in the channel-bed processes between 1960 and 2010 for all river categories was as follows: a low rate of incision from 1960 to 1979, followed by a higher rate of incision from 1980 to 1989, and finally a tendency of recovery toward the river's initial state, characterised by a decrease in the incision rate or slight aggradation after 1990. The variable that exhibited the strongest response to climate conditions was water discharge (Qw), whereas the sediment load (Qs) was highly responsive to both climatic signals and anthropogenic factors. The sediment load has been instrumental in the adjustments of the channel beds by maintaining a balance between the two controlling

  13. Depositional mechanisms controlling formation of coarse fluvial conglomerates in the lower triassic continental red beds of middle europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Detlef

    Coarse fluvial conglomerates containing numerous cobbles and boulders occur in various formations within the Lower Triassic continental red beds of Middle Europe. The rudites mainly originate as longitudinal gravel bars in highly-braided river systems with narrowly-spaced and straight to slightly sinuous channels. The high-energy stream sedimentation and the frequent and rapid lateral shifting of the watercourses control origin, distribution and preservation of finer-grained substratum deposits, topstratum sediments, aeolian dune sands and palaeosols within the alluvial plain which are governed by both internal and external mechanisms. The main processes operating within the alluvial plain which result in stacking of coarse conglomerates from successive cyclothems to multistorey complexes are primary-depositional restriction and suppression of formation and secondary-erosional destruction of finer-grained channel sediments, floodplain deposits, aeolian dune sands and palaeosols. The internal processes leading to vertical superimposition and lateral amalgamation of polygenetic conglomerate complexes are elements working under control of various external mechanisms. These are mainly slow subsidence of the basin allowing effective vertical and lateral erosion to take place during sidewards shifting of channels as well as supply of large amounts of coarse detritus from the source areas by tectonic uplift keeping pace with or even slightly exceeding erosional downcutting of relief, leading to inhibition of advance of the evolution of fluvial style beyond the initial stages of the depositional history. In the early stages of infilling of marginal parts of the basin, the partially considerable relief of the pre-Triassic basement provides locally shelter for parts of the floodplains by blocking off winds and deflection of alluvial channels. Depending on distribution of source areas, configuration of the basin and palaeocurrent pattern, wedge-shaped or sheet

  14. STS-26 long duration simulation in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 long duration simulation is conducted in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR). Director of Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Eugene F. Kranz (left) and Chief of the Flight Directors Office Tommy W. Holloway monitor activity during the simulation. The two are at their normal stations on the rear row of consoles. The integrated simulation involves MCC flight controllers communicating with crewmembers stationed in the fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  15. STS-26 long duration simulation in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 long duration simulation is conducted in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR). Front row of consoles with Propulsion Engineer (PROP) and Guidance, Navigation, and Control Systems Engineer (GNC) are visible in the foreground. CBS television camera personnel record front visual displays (orbital chart and data) for '48 Hours' program to be broadcast at a later date. The integrated simulation involved communicating with crewmembers stationed in the fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  16. Pulse Detonation Engine Test Bed Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    2002-01-01

    A detonation is a supersonic combustion wave. A Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) repetitively creates a series of detonation waves to take advantage of rapid burning and high peak pressures to efficiently produce thrust. NASA Glenn Research Center's Combustion Branch has developed a PDE test bed that can reproduce the operating conditions that might be encountered in an actual engine. It allows the rapid and cost-efficient evaluation of the technical issues and technologies associated with these engines. The test bed is modular in design. It consists of various length sections of both 2- and 2.6- in. internal-diameter combustor tubes. These tubes can be bolted together to create a variety of combustor configurations. A series of bosses allow instrumentation to be inserted on the tubes. Dynamic pressure sensors and heat flux gauges have been used to characterize the performance of the test bed. The PDE test bed is designed to utilize an existing calorimeter (for heat load measurement) and windowed (for optical access) combustor sections. It uses hydrogen as the fuel, and oxygen and nitrogen are mixed to simulate air. An electronic controller is used to open the hydrogen and air valves (or a continuous flow of air is used) and to fire the spark at the appropriate times. Scheduled tests on the test bed include an evaluation of the pumping ability of the train of detonation waves for use in an ejector and an evaluation of the pollutants formed in a PDE combustor. Glenn's Combustion Branch uses the National Combustor Code (NCC) to perform numerical analyses of PDE's as well as to evaluate alternative detonative combustion devices. Pulse Detonation Engine testbed.

  17. Fluidization quality analyzer for fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Daw, C.S.; Hawk, J.A.

    1995-07-25

    A control loop and fluidization quality analyzer for a fluidized bed utilizes time varying pressure drop measurements. A fast-response pressure transducer measures the overall bed pressure drop, or over some segment of the bed, and the pressure drop signal is processed to produce an output voltage which changes with the degree of fluidization turbulence. 9 figs.

  18. Fluidization quality analyzer for fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Daw, C. Stuart; Hawk, James A.

    1995-01-01

    A control loop and fluidization quality analyzer for a fluidized bed utilizes time varying pressure drop measurements. A fast-response pressure transducer measures the overall bed pressure drop, or over some segment of the bed, and the pressure drop signal is processed to produce an output voltage which changes with the degree of fluidization turbulence.

  19. Coherent control over diamond nitrogen-vacancy center spins with a mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate coherent Rabi oscillations of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins driven directly by a mechanical resonator without mediation by a magnetic driving field. Using a bulk-mode acoustic resonator fabricated from single crystal diamond, we exert non-axial ac stress on NV centers positioned at an antinode of a gigahertz frequency mechanical mode. When the Δms = -1 to +1 spin state splitting energy is tuned into resonance with a driven mechanical mode, we observe Δms = +/-2 spin transitions, which are forbidden by the magnetic dipole selection rule. To rule out stray electric and magnetic fields as the origin of these spin transitions, we study the spin signal as a function depth within the diamond resonator. We find that the spin signal reproduces the periodicity of the acoustic standing wave, confirming the mechanical origin of the observed spin resonance. Using single-crystal diamond mechanical resonators with fQ products of 2 ×1012 , we observe coherent mechanically driven Rabi oscillations up to 4 MHz. For ensembles of NV centers coupled to the resonator, we analyze Rabi oscillations and their dephasing with a combination of spatially inhomogeneous mechanical driving and fluctuating magnetic fields from a noisy spin environment. Additionally, we examine the coherence of mechanically controlled NV center qubits and compare it to the coherence of magnetically controlled spin qubits in the NV center ground state spin manifold. This work demonstrates direct and coherent coupling between NV center spins and resonator phonons, which has potential for NV-based metrology using hybrid spin-mechanical sensors, fundamental research into spin-phonon interactions at the nanoscale, and as a platform for hybrid spin-mechanical quantum systems. Funding from ONR is gratefully acknowledged. In collaboration with E. R. MacQuarrie, T. A. Gosavi, A. M. Moehle, N. R. Jungwirth, and S. A. Bhave.

  20. Avionics test bed development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. H.; Parks, J. M.; Murdock, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A development plan for a proposed avionics test bed facility for the early investigation and evaluation of new concepts for the control of large space structures, orbiter attached flex body experiments, and orbiter enhancements is presented. A distributed data processing facility that utilizes the current laboratory resources for the test bed development is outlined. Future studies required for implementation, the management system for project control, and the baseline system configuration are defined. A background analysis of the specific hardware system for the preliminary baseline avionics test bed system is included.

  1. Dynamic Modeling and Control Studies of a Two-Stage Bubbling Fluidized Bed Adsorber-Reactor for Solid-Sorbent CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Modekurti, Srinivasarao; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2013-07-31

    A one-dimensional, non-isothermal, pressure-driven dynamic model has been developed for a two-stage bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) adsorber-reactor for solid-sorbent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture using Aspen Custom Modeler® (ACM). The BFB model for the flow of gas through a continuous phase of downward moving solids considers three regions: emulsion, bubble, and cloud-wake. Both the upper and lower reactor stages are of overflow-type configuration, i.e., the solids leave from the top of each stage. In addition, dynamic models have been developed for the downcomer that transfers solids between the stages and the exit hopper that removes solids from the bottom of the bed. The models of all auxiliary equipment such as valves and gas distributor have been integrated with the main model of the two-stage adsorber reactor. Using the developed dynamic model, the transient responses of various process variables such as CO{sub 2} capture rate and flue gas outlet temperatures have been studied by simulating typical disturbances such as change in the temperature, flowrate, and composition of the incoming flue gas from pulverized coal-fired power plants. In control studies, the performance of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, feedback-augmented feedforward controller, and linear model predictive controller (LMPC) are evaluated for maintaining the overall CO{sub 2} capture rate at a desired level in the face of typical disturbances.

  2. Variability of bed drag on cohesive beds under wave action

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Ilgar

    2016-01-01

    Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law), a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10  m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold) with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  3. Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) in a Control Center Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirani, Joseph; Calvelage, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The technology of transmitting voice over data networks has been available for over 10 years. Mass market VoIP services for consumers to make and receive standard telephone calls over broadband Internet networks have grown in the last 5 years. While operational costs are less with VoIP implementations as opposed to time division multiplexing (TDM) based voice switches, is it still advantageous to convert a mission control center s voice system to this newer technology? Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) has converted its mission voice services to a commercial product that utilizes VoIP technology. Results from this testing, design, and installation have shown unique considerations that must be addressed before user operations. There are many factors to consider for a control center voice design. Technology advantages and disadvantages were investigated as they refer to cost. There were integration concerns which could lead to complex failure scenarios but simpler integration for the mission infrastructure. MSFC HOSC will benefit from this voice conversion with less product replacement cost, less operations cost and a more integrated mission services environment.

  4. Effect of films on 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin emission, soil concentration, and root-knot nematode control in a raised bed.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lifang; Yates, Scott R; Ashworth, Daniel J; Xuan, Richeng; Becker, J Ole

    2013-03-13

    Soil fumigation is an important component of U.S. agriculture, but excessive emissions can be problematic. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of agricultural films (e.g., tarps) on soil fumigant atmospheric emissions and spatiotemporal distributions in soil, soil temperature, and plant pathogen control in the field using plastic films with various permeabilities and thermal properties. A reduced rate of 70% InLine (60.8% 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and 33.3% chloropicrin (CP)) was applied via drip line to raised soil beds covered with standard high-density polyethylene film (HDPE), thermic film (Thermic), or virtually impermeable film (VIF). 1,3-D and CP emission rates were determined using dynamic flux chambers, and the concentrations in soil were measured using a gas sampler. The pest control efficacy for the three treatments was determined using bioassay muslin bags containing soil infested with citrus nematodes (Tylenchulus semipenetrans). The results show that the Thermic treatment had the highest emission rates, followed by the HDPE and VIF treatments, and the soil concentrations followed the reverse order. In terms of pest control, covering the beds with thermic film led to sufficient and improved efficacy against citrus nematodes compared to standard HDPE film. Under HDPE, >20% of nematodes survived in the soil at 30 cm depth at day 12. The VIF treatment substantially reduced the emission loss from the bed (2% of the Thermic and 6% of the HDPE treatments) and eliminated plant parasitic nematodes because of its superior ability to entrap fumigant and heat within soils. The findings imply that not only the film permeability but also the synergistic ability to entrap heat should be considered in the development of new improved films for fumigation.

  5. Application of a fluidized bed reactor charged with aragonite for control of alkalinity, pH and carbon dioxide in marine recirculating aquaculture systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul S Wills, PhD; Pfeiffer, Timothy; Baptiste, Richard; Watten, Barnaby J.

    2016-01-01

    Control of alkalinity, dissolved carbon dioxide (dCO2), and pH are critical in marine recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) in order to maintain health and maximize growth. A small-scale prototype aragonite sand filled fluidized bed reactor was tested under varying conditions of alkalinity and dCO2 to develop and model the response of dCO2 across the reactor. A large-scale reactor was then incorporated into an operating marine recirculating aquaculture system to observe the reactor as the system moved toward equilibrium. The relationship between alkalinity dCO2, and pH across the reactor are described by multiple regression equations. The change in dCO2 across the small-scale reactor indicated a strong likelihood that an equilibrium alkalinity would be maintained by using a fluidized bed aragonite reactor. The large-scale reactor verified this observation and established equilibrium at an alkalinity of approximately 135 mg/L as CaCO3, dCO2 of 9 mg/L, and a pH of 7.0 within 4 days that was stable during a 14 day test period. The fluidized bed aragonite reactor has the potential to simplify alkalinity and pH control, and aid in dCO2 control in RAS design and operation. Aragonite sand, purchased in bulk, is less expensive than sodium bicarbonate and could reduce overall operating production costs.

  6. A real-time navigation monitoring expert system for the Space Shuttle Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Fletcher, Malise

    1993-01-01

    The ONAV (Onboard Navigation) Expert System has been developed as a real time console assistant for use by ONAV flight controllers in the Mission Control Center at the Johnson Space Center. This expert knowledge based system is used to monitor the Space Shuttle onboard navigation system, detect faults, and advise flight operations personnel. This application is the first knowledge-based system to use both telemetry and trajectory data from the Mission Operations Computer (MOC). To arrive at this stage, from a prototype to real world application, the ONAV project has had to deal with not only AI issues but operating environment issues. The AI issues included the maturity of AI languages and the debugging tools, verification, and availability, stability and size of the expert pool. The environmental issues included real time data acquisition, hardware suitability, and how to achieve acceptance by users and management.

  7. The elimination of dead center in the controls of airplanes with thick sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Thomas

    1922-01-01

    In several instances where control flaps are placed in the trailing edges of thick sections, it has appeared that a dead center (slackness or lack of control) exists about the neutral position. The condition was also experienced in the rudder action of the XB1A observation airplane. Examination of smoke pictures of the airflow around struts and airfoils indicates what may be the cause of the phenomenon. The streamwise airflow about the thick fin does not follow the surface of the rudder, and consequently the rudder can be moved between the boundaries of the intervening turbulent zone without developing an aerodynamic force. In order to alleviate this condition, a modification was designed and built for the XB1A. The modified rudder was intended to remedy the condition by thickening the section sufficiently to fill in the zone of turbulent flow and thus eliminate the dead center. The positive results of flight tests are given.

  8. Optomechanical Quantum Control of a Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond.

    PubMed

    Golter, D Andrew; Oo, Thein; Amezcua, Mayra; Stewart, Kevin A; Wang, Hailin

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate optomechanical quantum control of the internal electronic states of a diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in the resolved-sideband regime by coupling the NV to both optical fields and surface acoustic waves via a phonon-assisted optical transition and by taking advantage of the strong excited-state electron-phonon coupling of a NV center. Optomechanically driven Rabi oscillations as well as quantum interferences between the optomechanical sideband and the direct dipole-optical transitions are realized. These studies open the door to using resolved-sideband optomechanical coupling for quantum control of both the atomlike internal states and the motional states of a coupled NV-nanomechanical system, leading to the development of a solid-state analog of trapped ions. PMID:27104709

  9. Optomechanical Quantum Control of a Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golter, D. Andrew; Oo, Thein; Amezcua, Mayra; Stewart, Kevin A.; Wang, Hailin

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate optomechanical quantum control of the internal electronic states of a diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in the resolved-sideband regime by coupling the NV to both optical fields and surface acoustic waves via a phonon-assisted optical transition and by taking advantage of the strong excited-state electron-phonon coupling of a NV center. Optomechanically driven Rabi oscillations as well as quantum interferences between the optomechanical sideband and the direct dipole-optical transitions are realized. These studies open the door to using resolved-sideband optomechanical coupling for quantum control of both the atomlike internal states and the motional states of a coupled NV-nanomechanical system, leading to the development of a solid-state analog of trapped ions.

  10. Semantic definitions of space flight control center languages using the hierarchical graph technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaghloul, M. E.; Truszkowski, W.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper a method is described by which the semantic definitions of the Goddard Space Flight Control Center Command Languages can be specified. The semantic modeling facility used is an extension of the hierarchical graph technique, which has a major benefit of supporting a variety of data structures and a variety of control structures. It is particularly suited for the semantic descriptions of such types of languages where the detailed separation between the underlying operating system and the command language system is system dependent. These definitions were used in the definition of the Systems Test and Operation Language (STOL) of the Goddard Space Flight Center which is a command language that provides means for the user to communicate with payloads, application programs, and other ground system elements.

  11. Application-oriented integrated control center (AICC) for heterogeneous optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Xuping; Wang, Dajiang; Wu, Koubo; Cai, Yinxiang; Gu, Wanyi

    2011-12-01

    Various broad bandwidth services have being swallowing the bandwidth resource of optical networks, such as the data center application and cloud computation. There are still some challenges for future optical networks although the available bandwidth is increasing with the development of transmission technologies. The relationship between upper application layer and lower network resource layer is necessary to be researched further. In order to improve the efficiency of network resources and capability of service provisioning, heterogeneous optical networks resource can be abstracted as unified Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) which can be open to various upper applications through Application-oriented Integrated Control Center (AICC) proposed in the paper. A novel Openflow-based unified control architecture is proposed for the optimization of cross layer resources. Numeric results show good performance of AICC through simulation experiments.

  12. Re-Engineering the ISS Payload Operations Control Center During Increased Utilization and Critical Onboard Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Angela L.; Dudley, Stephanie R. B.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the utilization and hours of payload operations being executed onboard the International Space Station (ISS), upgrading the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) ISS Payload Control Area (PCA) was essential to gaining efficiencies and assurance of current and future payload health and science return. PCA houses the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) responsible for the execution of all NASA payloads onboard the ISS. POIC Flight Controllers are responsible for the operation of voice, stowage, command, telemetry, video, power, thermal, and environmental control in support of ISS science experiments. The methodologies and execution of the PCA refurbishment were planned and performed within a four month period in order to assure uninterrupted operation of ISS payloads and minimal impacts to payload operations teams. To vacate the PCA, three additional HOSC control rooms were reconfigured to handle ISS realtime operations, Backup Control Center (BCC) to Mission Control in Houston, simulations, and testing functions. This involved coordination and cooperation from teams of ISS operations controllers, multiple engineering and design disciplines, management, and construction companies performing an array of activities simultaneously and in sync delivering a final product with no issues that impacted the schedule. For each console operator discipline, studies of Information Technology (IT) tools and equipment layouts, ergonomics, and lines of sight were performed. Infusing some of the latest IT into the project was an essential goal in ensuring future growth and success of the ISS payload science returns. Engineering evaluations led to a state of the art media wall implementation and more efficient ethernet cabling distribution providing the latest products and the best solution for the POIC. These engineering innovations led to cost savings for the project. Constraints involved in the management

  13. 75 FR 48699 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ...), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)--National Biosurveillance Advisory Subcommittee (NBAS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the CDC announces... tentatively scheduled for 10 a.m.-10:05 a.m. and 3:25 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Purpose: As a subcommittee to the...

  14. Centers for disease control and prevention lead guidelines: do pediatricians know them?

    PubMed

    Balk, S J; Landesman, L Y; Spellmann, M

    1997-08-01

    American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) fellows responded to a questionnaire measuring knowledge of 1991 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. Generalists' scores on a knowledge scale were positively correlated with reporting CDC and AAP documents as knowledge sources, and negatively correlated with private practice, medical school as a knowledge source, and age. However, private practitioners who read AAP documents scored well. PMID:9290627

  15. Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT) Work Station in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Due to loss of data used for pointing and operating the ultraviolet telescopes, MSFC ground teams were forced to aim the telescopes with fine tuning by the flight crew. This photo captures the activity of WUPPE (Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment) data review at the Science Operations Area during the mission. This image shows mission activities at the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT) Work Station in the Science Operations Area (SOA).

  16. 75 FR 78997 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Health Resources and Services Administration (CDC/HRSA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Health Resources and Services Administration (CDC/HRSA) Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and...-463) of October 6, 1972, that the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and...

  17. 75 FR 55803 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Epi-Centers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Epi-Centers for the Prevention of Healthcare- Associated...

  18. 75 FR 69686 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control; Special Emphasis Panel: Epi-Centers for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control; Special Emphasis Panel: Epi-Centers for the Prevention of Healthcare-Associated...

  19. Test Platform for Advanced Digital Control of Brushless DC Motors (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    A FY 2001 Center Director's Discretionary Fund task to develop a test platform for the development, implementation. and evaluation of adaptive and other advanced control techniques for brushless DC (BLDC) motor-driven mechanisms is described. Important applications for BLDC motor-driven mechanisms are the translation of specimens in microgravity experiments and electromechanical actuation of nozzle and fuel valves in propulsion systems. Motor-driven aerocontrol surfaces are also being utilized in developmental X vehicles. The experimental test platform employs a linear translation stage that is mounted vertically and driven by a BLDC motor. Control approaches are implemented on a digital signal processor-based controller for real-time, closed-loop control of the stage carriage position. The goal of the effort is to explore the application of advanced control approaches that can enhance the performance of a motor-driven actuator over the performance obtained using linear control approaches with fixed gains. Adaptive controllers utilizing an exact model knowledge controller and a self-tuning controller are implemented and the control system performance is illustrated through the presentation of experimental results.

  20. Electrical Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-02-18

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the EPRI/ADA Technologies dry sorbent sampling unit and the testing of Hg catalysts/sorbents in this low-flow, temperature controlled system. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future work is identified.

  1. STS-26 long duration simulation in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 long duration simulation is conducted in JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR). CBS television camera personnel record MCC activities at Spacecraft Communicator (CAPCOM) and Flight Activities Officer (FAO) (foreground) consoles for '48 Hours' program to be broadcast at a later date. The integrated simulation involved communicating with crewmembers stationed in the fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. MCC FCR visual displays are seen in front of the rows of consoles.

  2. A Mixed Outbreak of Epidemic Typhus Fever and Trench Fever in a Youth Rehabilitation Center: Risk Factors for Illness from a Case-Control Study, Rwanda, 2012.

    PubMed

    Umulisa, Irenee; Omolo, Jared; Muldoon, Katherine A; Condo, Jeanine; Habiyaremye, Francois; Uwimana, Jean Marie; Muhimpundu, Marie Aimee; Galgalo, Tura; Rwunganira, Samuel; Dahourou, Anicet G; Tongren, Eric; Koama, Jean Baptiste; McQuiston, Jennifer; Raghunathan, Pratima L; Massung, Robert; Gatei, Wangeci; Boer, Kimberly; Nyatanyi, Thierry; Mills, Edward J; Binagwaho, Agnes

    2016-08-01

    In August 2012, laboratory tests confirmed a mixed outbreak of epidemic typhus fever and trench fever in a male youth rehabilitation center in western Rwanda. Seventy-six suspected cases and 118 controls were enrolled into an unmatched case-control study to identify risk factors for symptomatic illness during the outbreak. A suspected case was fever or history of fever, from April 2012, in a resident of the rehabilitation center. In total, 199 suspected cases from a population of 1,910 male youth (attack rate = 10.4%) with seven deaths (case fatality rate = 3.5%) were reported. After multivariate analysis, history of seeing lice in clothing (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-5.8), delayed (≥ 2 days) washing of clothing (aOR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.6-9.6), and delayed (≥ 1 month) washing of beddings (aOR = 4.6, 95% CI = 2.0-11) were associated with illness, whereas having stayed in the rehabilitation camp for ≥ 6 months was protective (aOR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.10-0.40). Stronger surveillance and improvements in hygiene could prevent future outbreaks. PMID:27352876

  3. Adequate Wound Care and Use of Bed Nets as Protective Factors against Buruli Ulcer: Results from a Case Control Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Jordi; Boisier, Pascal; Fotso Piam, Félix; Noumen-Djeunga, Blanbin; Simé, Joseph; Wantong, Fidèle Gaetan; Marsollier, Laurent; Fontanet, Arnaud; Eyangoh, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is an infectious disease involving the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Its exact transmission mechanism remains unknown. Several arguments indicate a possible role for insects in its transmission. A previous case-control study in the Nyong valley region in central Cameroon showed an unexpected association between bed net use and protection against Buruli ulcer. We investigated whether this association persisted in a newly discovered endemic Buruli ulcer focus in Bankim, northwestern Cameroon. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a case-control study on 77 Buruli ulcer cases and 153 age-, gender- and village-matched controls. Participants were interviewed about their activities and habits. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis identified systematic use of a bed net (Odds-Ratio (OR) = 0.4, 95% Confidence Interval [95%CI] = [0.2–0.9], p-value (p) = 0.04), cleansing wounds with soap (OR [95%CI] = 0.1 [0.03–0.3], p<0.0001) and growing cassava (OR [95%CI] = 0.3 [0.2–0.7], p = 0.005) as independent protective factors. Independent risk factors were bathing in the Mbam River (OR [95%CI] = 6.9 [1.4–35], p = 0.02) and reporting scratch lesions after insect bites (OR [95%CI] = 2.7 [1.4–5.4], p = 0.004). The proportion of cases that could be prevented by systematic bed net use was 32%, and by adequate wound care was 34%. Conclusions/Significance Our study confirms that two previously identified factors, adequate wound care and bed net use, significantly decreased the risk of Buruli ulcer. These associations withstand generalization to different geographic, climatic and epidemiologic settings. Involvement of insects in the household environment, and the relationship between wound hygiene and M. ulcerans infection should now be investigated. PMID:22087346

  4. Transport and concentration controls for chloride, strontium, potassium and lead in Uvas Creek, a small cobble-bed stream in Santa Clara County, California, U.S.A. 2. Mathematical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackman, A.P.; Walters, R.A.; Kennedy, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Three models describing solute transport of conservative ion species and another describing transport of species which adsorb linearly and reversibly on bed sediments are developed and tested. The conservative models are based on three different conceptual models of the transient storage of solute in the bed. One model assumes the bed to be a well-mixed zone with flux of solute into the bed proportional to the difference between stream concentration and bed concentration. The second model assumes solute in the bed is transported by a vertical diffusion process described by Fick's law. The third model assumes that convection occurs in a selected portion of the bed while the mechanism of the first model functions everywhere. The model for adsorbing species assumes that the bed consists of particles of uniform size with the rate of uptake controlled by an intraparticle diffusion process. All models are tested using data collected before, during and after a 24-hr. pulse injection of chloride, strontium, potassium and lead ions into Uvas Creek near Morgan Hill, California, U.S.A. All three conservative models accurately predict chloride ion concentrations in the stream. The model employing the diffusion mechanism for bed transport predicts better than the others. The adsorption model predicts both strontium and potassium ion concentrations well during the injection of the pulse but somewhat overestimates the observed concentrations after the injection ceases. The overestimation may be due to the convection of solute deep into the bed where it is retained longer than the 3-week post-injection observation period. The model, when calibrated for strontium, predicts potassium equally well when the adsorption equilibrium constant for strontium is replaced by that for potassium. ?? 1984.

  5. Stirling Convertor Control for a Concept Rover at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaze-Dugala, Gina M.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Sunpower Inc., and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for potential use as an electric power system for space science missions. This generator would make use of the free-piston Stirling cycle to achieve higher conversion efficiency than currently used alternatives. NASA GRC initiated an experiment with an ASRG simulator to demonstrate the functionality of a Stirling convertor on a mobile application, such as a rover. The ASRG simulator made use of two Advanced Stirling Convertors to convert thermal energy from a heat source to electricity. The ASRG simulator was designed to incorporate a minimum amount of support equipment, allowing integration onto a rover powered directly by the convertors. Support equipment to provide control was designed including a linear AC regulator controller, constant power controller, and Li-ion battery charger controller. The ASRG simulator is controlled by a linear AC regulator controller. The rover is powered by both a Stirling convertor and Li-ion batteries. A constant power controller enables the Stirling convertor to maintain a constant power output when additional power is supplied by the Li-ion batteries. A Li-ion battery charger controller limits the charging current and cut off current of the batteries. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, and implementation of these three controllers.

  6. Mission Control Center (MCC) System Specification for the Shuttle Orbital Flight Test (OFT) Timeframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    System specifications to be used by the mission control center (MCC) for the shuttle orbital flight test (OFT) time frame were described. The three support systems discussed are the communication interface system (CIS), the data computation complex (DCC), and the display and control system (DCS), all of which may interfere with, and share processing facilities with other applications processing supporting current MCC programs. The MCC shall provide centralized control of the space shuttle OFT from launch through orbital flight, entry, and landing until the Orbiter comes to a stop on the runway. This control shall include the functions of vehicle management in the area of hardware configuration (verification), flight planning, communication and instrumentation configuration management, trajectory, software and consumables, payloads management, flight safety, and verification of test conditions/environment.

  7. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Technology Control Center, report to the Steering committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report describes test for air pollution control of flue gas and mercury as a result of coal combustion. The NYSEG Kintigh Station provided flue gas to the Center 100% of the time during this performance period. As the Kintigh Station operated with a variety of coals, fluctuations in the Center`s inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations were experienced. Safety training for the month was conducted by the O&M Superintendent, Maintenance Supervisor and Shift Supervisors. {open_quotes}Personal Protective Equipment{close_quotes} was the topic of the month. Inspections of the ECTC Facility and safety equipment (SCR air-packs, fire extinguishers, etc.) were completed and recorded this month. All systems were found to be in good condition. By continuing to emphasize safe work habits at the Center, we have raised the total number of days without a lost time injury to 1426 as of 4/30/96. The monthly safety meeting with the NYSEG Kintigh Station was held on April 30, 1996 with both NYSEG and ECTC representatives. The topics of discussion included an overview of NYSEG`s upcoming alternate fuel burn, an update on plant staffing changes, and a discussion of future safety training activities.

  8. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), as appropriate, for the location where it is installed. In... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1) provides guidance on the differences between devices meeting NEMA and those meeting IEC for motor service. (b) Low-voltage release. Each motor controller for a...

  9. Activities in the Payload Operations Control Center at MSFC During the IML-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photograph shows activities during the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) mission (STS-42) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Members of the Fluid Experiment System (FES) group monitor the progress of their experiment through video at the POCC. The IML-1 mission was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research. The mission was to explore, in depth, the complex effects of weightlessness on living organisms and materials processing. The crew conducted experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and the effects on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Low gravity materials processing experiments included crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury, iodine, and virus. The International space science research organizations that participated in this mission were: The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administion, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the French National Center for Space Studies, the German Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The POCC was the air/ground communication charnel used between astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew.

  10. Activities in the Payload Operation Control Center at MSFC During the IML-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photograph shows activities during the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) mission (STS-42) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The IML-1 mission was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research. The mission was to explore, in depth, the complex effects of weightlessness on living organisms and materials processing. The crew conducted experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and the effects on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Low gravity materials processing experiments included crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury, iodine, and virus. The International space science research organizations that participated in this mission were: The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the French National Center for Space Studies, the German Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The POCC was the air/ground communication charnel used between the astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew.

  11. Re-Engineering the ISS Payload Operations Control Center During Increased Utilization and Critical Onboard Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Stephanie R. B.; Marsh, Angela L.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in utilization and hours of payload operations being executed onboard the International Space Station (ISS), upgrading the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) ISS Payload Control Area (PCA) was essential to gaining efficiencies and assurance of current and future payload health and science return. PCA houses the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) responsible for the execution of all NASA payloads onboard the ISS. POIC Flight Controllers are responsible for the operation of voice, stowage, command, telemetry, video, power, thermal, and environmental control in support of ISS science experiments. The methodologies and execution of the PCA refurbishment were planned and performed within a four-month period in order to assure uninterrupted operation of ISS payloads and minimal impacts to payload operations teams. To vacate the PCA, three additional HOSC control rooms were reconfigured to handle ISS real-time operations, Backup Control Center (BCC) to Mission Control in Houston, simulations, and testing functions. This involved coordination and cooperation from teams of ISS operations controllers, multiple engineering and design disciplines, management, and construction companies performing an array of activities simultaneously and in sync delivering a final product with no issues that impacted the schedule. For each console operator discipline, studies of Information Technology (IT) tools and equipment layouts, ergonomics, and lines of sight were performed. Infusing some of the latest IT into the project was an essential goal in ensuring future growth and success of the ISS payload science returns. Engineering evaluations led to a state of the art Video Wall implementation and more efficient ethernet cabling distribution providing the latest products and the best solution for the POIC. These engineering innovations led to cost savings for the project. Constraints involved in the management of

  12. Internet Protocol Display Sharing Solution for Mission Control Center Video System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of broadcast television as a constant source of information throughout the NASA manned space flight Mission Control Center (MCC) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the current Video Transport System (VTS) characteristics provides the ability to visually enhance real-time applications as a broadcast channel that decision making flight controllers come to rely on, but can be difficult to maintain and costly. The Operations Technology Facility (OTF) of the Mission Operations Facility Division (MOFD) has been tasked to provide insight to new innovative technological solutions for the MCC environment focusing on alternative architectures for a VTS. New technology will be provided to enable sharing of all imagery from one specific computer display, better known as Display Sharing (DS), to other computer displays and display systems such as; large projector systems, flight control rooms, and back supporting rooms throughout the facilities and other offsite centers using IP networks. It has been stated that Internet Protocol (IP) applications are easily readied to substitute for the current visual architecture, but quality and speed may need to be forfeited for reducing cost and maintainability. Although the IP infrastructure can support many technologies, the simple task of sharing ones computer display can be rather clumsy and difficult to configure and manage to the many operators and products. The DS process shall invest in collectively automating the sharing of images while focusing on such characteristics as; managing bandwidth, encrypting security measures, synchronizing disconnections from loss of signal / loss of acquisitions, performance latency, and provide functions like, scalability, multi-sharing, ease of initial integration / sustained configuration, integration with video adjustments packages, collaborative tools, host / recipient controllability, and the utmost paramount priority, an enterprise solution that provides ownership to the whole

  13. Packed Bed Reactor Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

  14. Co-option of pre-existing vascular beds in adipose tissue controls tumor growth rates and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sharon; Hosaka, Kayoko; Nakamura, Masaki; Cao, Yihai

    2016-06-21

    Many types of cancer develop in close association with highly vascularized adipose tissues. However, the role of adipose pre-existing vascular beds on tumor growth and angiogenesis is unknown. Here we report that pre-existing microvascular density in tissues where tumors originate is a crucial determinant for tumor growth and neovascularization. In three independent tumor types including breast cancer, melanoma, and fibrosarcoma, inoculation of tumor cells in the subcutaneous tissue, white adipose tissue (WAT), and brown adipose tissue (BAT) resulted in markedly differential tumor growth rates and angiogenesis, which were in concordance with the degree of pre-existing vascularization in these tissues. Relative to subcutaneous tumors, WAT and BAT tumors grew at accelerated rates along with improved neovascularization, blood perfusion, and decreased hypoxia. Tumor cells implanted in adipose tissues contained leaky microvessel with poor perivascular cell coverage. Thus, adipose vasculature predetermines the tumor microenvironment that eventually supports tumor growth.

  15. Disaster preparedness of poison control centers in the USA: a 15-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Darracq, Michael A; Clark, Richard F; Jacoby, Irving; Vilke, Gary M; DeMers, Gerard; Cantrell, F Lee

    2014-03-01

    There is limited published literature on the extent to which United States (US) Poison Control Centers (PCCs) are prepared for responding to disasters. We describe PCCs' disaster preparedness activities and compare and contrast these results to those previously reported in the medical literature. We also describe the extent to which PCCs are engaged in disaster and terrorism preparedness planning and other public health roles such as surveillance. An electronic questionnaire was sent via email to the managing directors of the 57 member PCCs of the American Association of Poison Control Centers. Collected data included the population served and number of calls received, extent of disaster preparedness including the presence of a written disaster plan and elements included in that plan, the presence and nature of regular disaster drills, experience with disaster including periods of inability to operate, involvement in terrorism and disaster preparedness/response policy development, and public health surveillance of US PCCs. Descriptive statistics were performed on collected data. Comparisons with the results from a previously published survey were performed. A response was obtained from 40/57 (70 %) PCCs. Each PCC serves a larger population (p < 0.0001) and receives more calls per year (p = 0.0009) than the previous descriptions of PCC preparedness. More centers report the presence of a written disaster plan (p < 0.0001), backup by another center (p < 0.0001), regular disaster drills (p < 0.0001), and comfort with ability to operate in a disaster (p < 0.0001) than previously described. PCCs are involved in disaster (34/40, 85 %) and terrorism (29/40, 73 %) preparedness at the local, state, or federal levels. PCCs (36/40, 90 %) are also involved in public health functions (illness surveillance or answering "after hours" public health calls). Despite an increase in calls received and population served per center as compared to previous

  16. Nanoscale imaging and control of domain-wall hopping with a nitrogen-vacancy center microscope.

    PubMed

    Tetienne, J-P; Hingant, T; Kim, J-V; Diez, L Herrera; Adam, J-P; Garcia, K; Roch, J-F; Rohart, S; Thiaville, A; Ravelosona, D; Jacques, V

    2014-06-20

    The control of domain walls in magnetic wires underpins an emerging class of spintronic devices. Propagation of these walls in imperfect media requires defects that pin them to be characterized on the nanoscale. Using a magnetic microscope based on a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, we report domain-wall imaging on a 1-nanometer-thick ferromagnetic nanowire and directly observe Barkhausen jumps between two pinning sites spaced 50 nanometers apart. We further demonstrate in situ laser control of these jumps, which allows us to drag the domain wall along the wire and map the pinning landscape. Our work demonstrates the potential of NV microscopy to study magnetic nano-objects in complex media, whereas controlling domain walls with laser light may find an application in spintronic devices.

  17. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Controls Systems Design and Analysis Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center maintains a critical national capability in the analysis of launch vehicle flight dynamics and flight certification of GN&C algorithms. MSFC analysts are domain experts in the areas of flexible-body dynamics and control-structure interaction, thrust vector control, sloshing propellant dynamics, and advanced statistical methods. Marshall's modeling and simulation expertise has supported manned spaceflight for over 50 years. Marshall's unparalleled capability in launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control technology stems from its rich heritage in developing, integrating, and testing launch vehicle GN&C systems dating to the early Mercury-Redstone and Saturn vehicles. The Marshall team is continuously developing novel methods for design, including advanced techniques for large-scale optimization and analysis.

  18. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 emergency return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view showing some of the activity in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of the Mission Control Center (MCC) during the final 24 hours of the Apollo 13 mission. Here, flight controllers and several NASA/MSC Officials confer at the flight director's console. When this picture was made, the Apollo 13 moon landing had been cancelled and the Apollo 13 crewmen were in transearth trajectory attempting to bring their crippled spacecraft back home (35368); Discussion in the MOCR dealing with the Apollo 13 crewmen during their final day in space. From left to right are Glynn S. Lunney, Shift 4 Flight Director; Gerald D. Griffin, SHift 2 Flight Director; Astronaut James A. McDivitt, Manager, APollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Donald K. Slayton, Director of Flight Crew Operations, MSC; and Dr. Willard R. Hawkins, M.D., Shift 1 Flight Surgeon (35369).

  19. Propulsion Controls and Health Management Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2002-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with the U.S. aerospace industry and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet these challenges. These technologies are being developed with a view towards making the concept of "Intelligent Engines" a reality. The major research activities of the Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch are described in the following.

  20. Clinical skills: bed making and patient positioning.

    PubMed

    Pellatt, Glynis Collis

    Providing a clean, comfortable bed and positioning a patient in the optimum posture for prevention of complications and to enable maximum independence are fundamental nursing skills. Bed-making is a daily routine that requires practical and technical skills. Selecting the correct posture for a patient in bed or in a chair is essential for physiological functioning and recovery. In this article bed-making is described, as are positioning and re-positioning in relation to patients in bed, armchairs and wheelchairs. Infection control and moving and handling issues are also considered. PMID:17505378

  1. A multi-center quality control study of different CA15-3 immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Hubl, Walter; Demant, Thomas; Albrecht, Steffen; Bewarder, Nils; Grunow, Gabriele; Keller, Ruprecht; Klapdor, Rainer; Klos, Karl-Jürgen; Kruse, Klaus; Müller, Robert; Päge, Ilona; Schmidt, Reinhard; Stolle, Heidrun; Wiefelspütz, Johannes; vom Baur, Egon; Zinsmeyer, Jörg; Zwirner, Manfred

    2005-01-01

    A long-term multi-center quality control study of CA15-3 determinations based on measurements of liquid BIOREF CA15-3 control sera was conducted in 17 participating laboratories. Seven different CA15-3 assays were applied using the appropriate automatic immunoanalyzers. CA15-3 means were determined for BIOREF low, medium and high level control sera. Values were 19.3 +/- 2.7 kU/l, 75.2 +/- 11.4 kU/l and 162.9 +/- 37.1 kU/l, respectively. Inter-assay imprecisions were calculated for each of the controls for each laboratory and for each of the methods, with coefficients of variation (CV) ranging from 2.9-15.5%. As a means of evaluation of assay linearity concentration ratios (high/medium, medium/low, high/low) were calculated and found to be in good agreement with reference values throughout the study. Individual long-term time courses of CA15-3 control measurements provided evidence for variability of test results due to changes in assay calibration. Comparisons with CV data obtained with BIOREF controls 17 years ago demonstrate significant improvements of CA15-3 assay precision in recent years. In conclusion, test-independent reference material can be used for CA15-3 quality control and in particular enables applicants to check for long-term stability of CA15-3 assay performance.

  2. Flight Evaluation of an Aircraft with Side and Center Stick Controllers and Rate-Limited Ailerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deppe, P. R.; Chalk, C. R.; Shafer, M. F.

    1996-01-01

    As part of an ongoing government and industry effort to study the flying qualities of aircraft with rate-limited control surface actuators, two studies were previously flown to examine an algorithm developed to reduce the tendency for pilot-induced oscillation when rate limiting occurs. This algorithm, when working properly, greatly improved the performance of the aircraft in the first study. In the second study, however, the algorithm did not initially offer as much improvement. The differences between the two studies caused concern. The study detailed in this paper was performed to determine whether the performance of the algorithm was affected by the characteristics of the cockpit controllers. Time delay and flight control system noise were also briefly evaluated. An in-flight simulator, the Calspan Learjet 25, was programmed with a low roll actuator rate limit, and the algorithm was programmed into the flight control system. Side- and center-stick controllers, force and position command signals, a rate-limited feel system, a low-frequency feel system, and a feel system damper were evaluated. The flight program consisted of four flights and 38 evaluations of test configurations. Performance of the algorithm was determined to be unaffected by using side- or center-stick controllers or force or position command signals. The rate-limited feel system performed as well as the rate-limiting algorithm but was disliked by the pilots. The low-frequency feel system and the feel system damper were ineffective. Time delay and noise were determined to degrade the performance of the algorithm.

  3. SPOT satellite family: Past, present, and future of the operations in the mission and control center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philippe, Pacholczyk

    1993-01-01

    SPOT sun-synchronous remote sensing satellites are operated by CNES since February 1986. Today, the SPOT mission and control center (CCM) operates SPOT1, SPOT2, and is ready to operate SPOT3. During these seven years, the way to operate changed and the CCM, initially designed for the control of one satellite, has been modified and upgraded to support these new operating modes. All these events have shown the performances and the limits of the system. A new generation of satellite (SPOT4) will continue the remote sensing mission during the second half of the 90's. Its design takes into account the experience of the first generation and supports several improvements. A new generation of control center (CMP) has been developed and improves the efficiency, quality, and reliability of the operations. The CMP is designed for operating two satellites at the same time during launching, in-orbit testing, and operating phases. It supports several automatic procedures and improves data retrieval and reporting.

  4. 21 CFR 880.2400 - Bed-patient monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bed-patient monitor. 880.2400 Section 880.2400... Devices § 880.2400 Bed-patient monitor. (a) Identification. A bed-patient monitor is a battery-powered... to leave the bed. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  5. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-01-12

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified.

  6. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1997-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future work is identified.

  7. Center for Disease Control Diagnostic Immunology Proficiency Testing Program results for 1978.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R N; Fulford, K M; Przybyszewski, V A; Pope, V

    1979-01-01

    Data from about 1,000 laboratories participating in the Diagnostic Immunology portion of the 1978 Center for Disease Control Proficiency Testing Program provided information dealing with laboratory performance and trends in testing protocols. Ninety specimens were distributed in scheduled quarterly and semiannual shipments, and five additional specimens were provided in a special survey. The specimens offered both qualitative and quantitative challenges for a wide variety of analytes which included syphilis serology, rheumatoid factor, bacterial agglutinins, hepatitis B surface antigen, immunoglobulins and other serum proteins, infectious mononucleosis, rubella, toxoplasma, antinuclear antibodies, and streptococcal exoenzymes. This paper summarizes the results of the 1978 program. PMID:230201

  8. Multi-Vehicle Cooperative Control Research at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, 2000-2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt

    2014-01-01

    A brief introductory overview of multi-vehicle cooperative control research conducted at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center from 2000 - 2014. Both flight research projects and paper studies are included. Since 2000, AFRC has been almost continuously pursuing research in the areas of formation flight for drag reduction and automated cooperative trajectories. An overview of results is given, including flight experiments done on the FA-18 and with the C-17. Other multi-vehicle cooperative research is discussed, including small UAV swarming projects and automated aerial refueling.

  9. Evaluation of emergency drug releases from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Quarantine Stations.

    PubMed

    Roohi, Shahrokh; Grinnell, Margaret; Sandoval, Michelle; Cohen, Nicole J; Crocker, Kimberly; Allen, Christopher; Dougherty, Cindy; Jolly, Julian; Pesik, Nicki

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Quarantine Stations distribute select lifesaving drug products that are not commercially available or are in limited supply in the United States for emergency treatment of certain health conditions. Following a retrospective analysis of shipment records, the authors estimated an average of 6.66 hours saved per shipment when drug products were distributed from quarantine stations compared to a hypothetical centralized site from CDC headquarters in Atlanta, GA. This evaluation supports the continued use of a decentralized model which leverages CDC's regional presence and maximizes efficiency in the distribution of lifesaving drugs. PMID:27149310

  10. Evaluation of emergency drug releases from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Quarantine Stations.

    PubMed

    Roohi, Shahrokh; Grinnell, Margaret; Sandoval, Michelle; Cohen, Nicole J; Crocker, Kimberly; Allen, Christopher; Dougherty, Cindy; Jolly, Julian; Pesik, Nicki

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Quarantine Stations distribute select lifesaving drug products that are not commercially available or are in limited supply in the United States for emergency treatment of certain health conditions. Following a retrospective analysis of shipment records, the authors estimated an average of 6.66 hours saved per shipment when drug products were distributed from quarantine stations compared to a hypothetical centralized site from CDC headquarters in Atlanta, GA. This evaluation supports the continued use of a decentralized model which leverages CDC's regional presence and maximizes efficiency in the distribution of lifesaving drugs. PMID:25779896

  11. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee, July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-15

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the Carbon Injection System (the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System and the Pulse Jet Fabric Filter). Testing also continued across the B and W/CHX Heat Exchanger project. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Inspections of these idled systems were conducted this month.

  12. Using Web 2.0 (and Beyond?) in Space Flight Operations Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Word processing was one of the earliest uses for small workstations, but we quickly learned that desktop computers were far more than e-typewriters. Similarly, "Web 2.0" capabilities, particularly advanced search engines, chats, wikis, blogs, social networking, and the like, offer tools that could significantly improve our efficiency at managing the avalanche of information and decisions needed to operate space vehicles in realtime. However, could does not necessarily equal should. We must wield two-edged swords carefully to avoid stabbing ourselves. This paper examines some Web 2.0 tools, with an emphasis on social media, and suggests which ones might be useful or harmful in real-time space operations co rnotl environments, based on the author s experience as a Payload Crew Communicator (PAYCOM) at Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) for the International Space Station (ISS) and on discussions with other space flight operations control organizations and centers. There is also some discussion of an offering or two that may come from beyond the current cyber-horizon.

  13. Opioids depress cortical centers responsible for the volitional control of respiration.

    PubMed

    Pattinson, Kyle T S; Governo, Ricardo J; MacIntosh, Bradley J; Russell, Elizabeth C; Corfield, Douglas R; Tracey, Irene; Wise, Richard G

    2009-06-24

    Respiratory depression limits provision of safe opioid analgesia and is the main cause of death in drug addicts. Although opioids are known to inhibit brainstem respiratory activity, their effects on cortical areas that mediate respiration are less well understood. Here, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine how brainstem and cortical activity related to a short breath hold is modulated by the opioid remifentanil. We hypothesized that remifentanil would differentially depress brain areas that mediate sensory-affective components of respiration over those that mediate volitional motor control. Quantitative measures of cerebral blood flow were used to control for hypercapnia-induced changes in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Awareness of respiration, reflected by an urge-to-breathe score, was profoundly reduced with remifentanil. Urge to breathe was associated with activity in the bilateral insula, frontal operculum, and secondary somatosensory cortex. Localized remifentanil-induced decreases in breath hold-related activity were observed in the left anterior insula and operculum. We also observed remifentanil-induced decreases in the BOLD response to breath holding in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, the cerebellum, and periaqueductal gray, brain areas that mediate task performance. Activity in areas mediating motor control (putamen, motor cortex) and sensory-motor integration (supramarginal gyrus) were unaffected by remifentanil. Breath hold-related activity was observed in the medulla. These findings highlight the importance of higher cortical centers in providing contextual awareness of respiration that leads to appropriate modulation of respiratory control. Opioids have profound effects on the cortical centers that control breathing, which potentiates their actions in the brainstem. PMID:19553457

  14. Chaotic behavior monitoring & control in fluidized bed systems using artificial neural network. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bodruzzaman, M.

    1996-10-30

    We have developed techniques to control the chaotic behavior in Fluidized Bed Systems (FBC) systems using recurrent neural networks. For the sake of comparison of the techniques we have developed with the traditional chaotic system control methods, in the past three months we have been investigating the most popular and first known chaotic system control technique known as the OGY method. This method was developed by Edward Ott, Celso Grebogi and James York in 1990. In the past few years this method was further developed and applied by many researchers in the field. It was shown that this method has potential applications to a large cross section of problems in many fields. The only remaining question is whether it will prove possible to move from laboratory demonstrations on model systems to real world situations of engineering importance. We have developed computer programs to compute the OGY parameters from a chaotic time series, to control a chaotic system to a desired periodic orbit, using small perturbations to an accessible system parameter. We have tested those programs on the logistic map and the Henon map. We were able to control the chaotic behavior in such typical chaotic systems to period 1, 2, 3, 5..., as shown in some sample results below. In the following sections a brief discussion for the OGY method will be introduced, followed by results for the logistic map and Henon map control.

  15. 75 FR 12769 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Workshop on Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine...: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) invites the.... Seating is limited. Background: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)...

  16. Effect of Propellant and Catalyst Bed Temperatures on Thrust Buildup in Several Hydrogen Peroxide Reaction Control Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanhainen, John P.; Ross, Phil S.; DeWitt, Richard L.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of chamber and propellant feed temperatures on the starting characteristics of hydrogen peroxide thrust chambers. Start delay times for two types of thrust chamber designs in the 1- to 24-pound-thrust range were obtained over a range of chamber and propellant feed temperatures from 30 to 100 F. Start delay times obtained during the first minute of catalyst bed life and again after 6 minutes of total accumulated running time are presented as a function of chamber and propellant feed temperatures. The initial cold-start delay time of the hydrogen peroxide thrust chambers investigated was approximately 0.150 second to attain 90 percent of steady-state chamber pressure at chamber and propellant feed temperatures of 70 F and above. Both thrust chamber designs could be started at chamber and propellant feed temperatures as low as 30 F; start delay times did, however, generally increase at low temperatures. When the chamber was at an elevated temperature from a preceding firing, the start delay time was reduced to approximately 0.050 second, indicating a marked effect of chamber temperature at constant propellant feed temperatures. Accumulated run time affected the starting characteristics only when both the chamber and propellant feed temperatures were at reduced levels.

  17. Bed Bugs: The Australian Response.

    PubMed

    Doggett, Stephen L; Orton, Christopher J; Lilly, David G; Russell, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    Australia has experienced a sudden and unexpected resurgence in bed bug infestations from both Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F. A survey in 2006 revealed that infestations had increased across the nation by an average of 4,500% since the start of the decade. In response, a multi-disciplinary approach to combat the rise of this public health pest was implemented and involved the coordinated efforts of several organizations. The key components of the strategy included the introduction of a pest management standard 'A Code of Practice for the Control of Bed Bug Infestations in Australia' that defines and promotes 'best practice' in bed bug eradication, the development of a policy and procedural guide for accommodation providers, education of stakeholders in best management practices, and research. These strategies continue to evolve with developments that lead to improvements in 'best practice' while bed bugs remain problematic in Australia.

  18. Bed Bugs: The Australian Response

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, Stephen L.; Orton, Christopher J.; Lilly, David G.; Russell, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Australia has experienced a sudden and unexpected resurgence in bed bug infestations from both Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F. A survey in 2006 revealed that infestations had increased across the nation by an average of 4,500% since the start of the decade. In response, a multi-disciplinary approach to combat the rise of this public health pest was implemented and involved the coordinated efforts of several organizations. The key components of the strategy included the introduction of a pest management standard ‘A Code of Practice for the Control of Bed Bug Infestations in Australia’ that defines and promotes ‘best practice’ in bed bug eradication, the development of a policy and procedural guide for accommodation providers, education of stakeholders in best management practices, and research. These strategies continue to evolve with developments that lead to improvements in ‘best practice’ while bed bugs remain problematic in Australia. PMID:26467616

  19. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 oxygen cell failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Several persons important to the Apollo 13 mission, at consoles in the Mission Operations Control Room of the Mission Control Center (MCC). Seated at consoles, from left to right, are Astronaut Donald K. Slayton, Director of Flight Crew Operations; Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Shift 3 spacecraft communicator; and Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 13 back-up crew. Standing, left to right, are Astronaut Tom K. Mattingly, who was replaced as Apollo 13 command module pilot after it was learned he may come down with measles, and Astronaut Vance D. Brand, Shift 2 spacecraft communicator. Several hours earlier crew members of the Apollo 13 mission reported to MCC that trouble had developed with an oxygen cell in their spacecraft.

  20. Rockwell Automation PLC-5 Lands Stennis Space Center with a Reliable, Flexible Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epperson, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Ever since the first rocket was launched, people have been infatuated with the vast and unchartered frontier of space. Whether it's visiting a space center or watching a shuttle launch, people are waiting to see what will be discovered next. And even though orbiting the Earth or taking soil samples form the Moon now seems effortless, decades worth of behind-the-scenes work have helped the U.S. space program get to this point. Even today, NASA must take every precaution to ensure equipment is up to the endeavor of setting foot on the moon. As part of the initial push to put the first man on the moon, NASA established the John C. Stennis Space Center, Hancock County, Mississippi in 1961 for space engine propulsion system development. Today, Stennis has three major test complexes where engine and component testing is carried out and integrated into full motion systems for space shuttles and vehicles as well as secondary testing facilities. With different products being tested throughout the facilities, Stennis was in need of an automation system that could link the operations. By integrating a control system based on a Rockwell Automation's flexible and reliable PLC-5 controller, Stennis was able to implement projects more efficiently and focus its efforts on getting the next generation of products ready for space.

  1. Activities During Spacelab-J Mission at Payload Operations and Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The group of Japanese researchers of the Spacelab-J (SL-J) were thumbs-up in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center after the successful launch of Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour that carried their experiments. The SL-J was a joint mission of NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a marned Spacelab module. The mission conducted microgravity investigations in materials and life sciences. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, frogs, and frog eggs. The POCC was the air/ground communications channel between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The Spacelab science operations were a cooperative effort between the science astronaut crew in orbit and their colleagues in the POCC. Spacelab-J was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour on September 12, 1992.

  2. Bed bug aggregation pheromone finally identified.

    PubMed

    Gries, Regine; Britton, Robert; Holmes, Michael; Zhai, Huimin; Draper, Jason; Gries, Gerhard

    2015-01-19

    Bed bugs have become a global epidemic and current detection tools are poorly suited for routine surveillance. Despite intense research on bed bug aggregation behavior and the aggregation pheromone, which could be used as a chemical lure, the complete composition of this pheromone has thus far proven elusive. Here, we report that the bed bug aggregation pheromone comprises five volatile components (dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, 2-hexanone), which attract bed bugs to safe shelters, and one less-volatile component (histamine), which causes their arrestment upon contact. In infested premises, a blend of all six components is highly effective at luring bed bugs into traps. The trapping of juvenile and adult bed bugs, with or without recent blood meals, provides strong evidence that this unique pheromone bait could become an effective and inexpensive tool for bed bug detection and potentially their control. PMID:25529634

  3. Controlled Blood Pressure in Iranian Patients: A Multi-Center Report.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Ezzatollah; Behnood-Rod, Azin; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Shobeiri, Elham; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Ormoz, Ehsan; Sadigh, Nader; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2016-01-01

    We decided to determine the percentage of hypertensive patients whose blood pressure (BP) measurements were within recommended controlled range and to identify predictive factors for controlled BP. In this study carried out in 2014, 280 patients were included consecutively through sampling from both university and private medical centers/pharmacies in four Iranian cities. Demographic data as well as information about duration of HTN and prescribed medications, admission to emergency department (ED) because of HTN crisis, comorbidities, and control of HTN during the last 6 months by a healthcare provider were gathered. Adherence to anti-hypertensives was also determined using the validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Controlled BP was defined as systolic BP< 140 and diastolic BP< 90 mmHg in non-diabetics and < 130/80 mmHg in diabetics. Of 280 patients, 122 subjects (43.6%) had controlled BP. Among 55 diabetics, only two patients (3.6%) had controlled BP. Multiple logistic regression revealed the following variables as significant predictors of controlled BP: higher MMAS-8 score (adjusted odds ratio (OR)= 1.19, P= 0.03), fewer number of comorbid conditions (adjusted OR= 0.71, P = 0.03), having occupation as clerk/military personnel (adjusted OR= 1.03, P= 0.04), and not having history of ED admission during the last 6 months because of HTN crisis (adjusted OR= 2.11, P= 0.01). Considerable number of the studied patients had uncontrolled BP. Regarding the dramatic consequences of uncontrolled high BP in long term, it is advisable that careful attention by health care providers to the aforementioned factors could raise the likelihood of achieving controlled BP. PMID:26573037

  4. Kennedy Space Center's Command and Control System - "Toasters to Rocket Ships"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lougheed, Kirk; Mako, Cheryle

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the history of the development of the command and control system at Kennedy Space Center. From a system that could be brought to Florida in the trunk of a car in the 1950's. Including the development of larger and more complex launch vehicles with the Apollo program where human launch controllers managed the launch process with a hardware only system that required a dedicated human interface to perform every function until the Apollo vehicle lifted off from the pad. Through the development of the digital computer that interfaced with ground launch processing systems with the Space Shuttle program. Finally, showing the future control room being developed to control the missions to return to the moon and Mars, which will maximize the use of Commercial-Off-The Shelf (COTS) hardware and software which was standards based and not tied to a single vendor. The system is designed to be flexible and adaptable to support the requirements of future spacecraft and launch vehicles.

  5. ASTEC and MODEL: Controls software development at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, John P.; Bauer, Frank H.; Surber, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-01

    The ASTEC (Analysis and Simulation Tools for Engineering Controls) software is under development at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The design goal is to provide a wide selection of controls analysis tools at the personal computer level, as well as the capability to upload compute-intensive jobs to a mainframe or supercomputer. In the last three years the ASTEC (Analysis and Simulation Tools for Engineering Controls) software has been under development. ASTEC is meant to be an integrated collection of controls analysis tools for use at the desktop level. MODEL (Multi-Optimal Differential Equation Language) is a translator that converts programs written in the MODEL language to FORTRAN. An upgraded version of the MODEL program will be merged into ASTEC. MODEL has not been modified since 1981 and has not kept with changes in computers or user interface techniques. This paper describes the changes made to MODEL in order to make it useful in the 90's and how it relates to ASTEC.

  6. Improved hypertension control using a surveillance system in a neighborhood health center.

    PubMed

    Smith, D A; Schnall, P L

    1980-07-01

    The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Health Center has developed a simple inexpensive McBee Card Surveillance System for following approximately 2,000 registered patients with hypertension. The system has been in use for the past two years by three health teams. On a quarterly basis teams and physicians are given reports on the percentage of their hypertensive patients with controlled blood pressure (bp) (bp less than or equal to 140/90 for patients younger than 50; bp less than or equal to 160/95 for 50 or older). In addition, patients not seen in the past 4 months are identified for follow-up by family health workers. During the 2-year period that the system has been in operation, the three teams have increased their percentage of patients under control by 50%. Of 929 patients with hypertension, 411 were controlled at the inception of the study and 617 were controlled 2 years later. Such a simple surveillance and self-evaluaton system is readily applicable to all ambulatory care settings.

  7. 6. Detail view northeast of rear of filtration bed building. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail view northeast of rear of filtration bed building. Note monitor roof with clerestory windows over central corridor between filtration beds at center right of photograph. Laboratory building is at center right of photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  8. 5. View northeast of rear of filtration bed building. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View northeast of rear of filtration bed building. Note monitor roof with clerestory windows over central corridor between filtration beds at center right of photograph. Laboratory building is at extreme center right of photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  9. 10. View west of east entry to filtration beds. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View west of east entry to filtration beds. Note monitor roof and clerestory windows over central corridor. Laboratory building is sited over the center of the filtration bed building at extreme left center of photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  10. The role of the United States military in the development of vector control products, including insect repellents, insecticides, and bed nets.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Lynn W; Lawrence, Kendra L; Coleman, Russell E

    2009-06-01

    Arthropod-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue, scrub typhus, and leishmaniasis continue to pose a significant threat to U.S. military forces deployed in support of operational and humanitarian missions. These diseases are transmitted by a variety of arthropods, including mosquitoes, ticks, chiggers, sand flies, and biting midges. In addition to disease threats, biting arthropods can cause dermatitis, allergic reactions, and sleep loss; therefore, monitoring of vector impact and integrated use of personal protective measures (PPM) and methods to reduce the vector populations are needed to protect service members. The U.S. military has played a vital role in vector identification tools and the development and testing of many of the most effective PPM and vector control products available today, including the topical repellent DEET and the repellent/insecticide permethrin, which is applied to clothing and bed nets. Efforts to develop superior products are ongoing. Although the U.S. military often needs vector control products with rather specific properties (e.g., undetectable, long-lasting in multiple climates) in order to protect its service members, many Department of Defense vector control products have had global impacts on endemic disease control.

  11. Poison control centers in developing countries and Asia's need for toxicology education

    SciTech Connect

    Makalinao, Irma R. . E-mail: docirma@mydestiny.net; Awang, Rahmat

    2005-09-01

    Poison control centers (PCCs) in developing countries have been set up in response to the challenge of decreasing mortality and morbidity from poisoning. The services range from poison information to actual clinical treatment mostly of acute cases. Lately, PCCs have expanded from their traditional role to one that actively engages in community health studies, toxicovigilance along with treatment of chronic poisoning. Recognizing that types of poisoning and specific needs may vary from country to country, toxicology education that addresses these unique regional issues has become more necessary. Toxicology education, both formal and informal, exists in various stages of development in Asia. Clearly, there are gaps that need to be addressed especially in areas where there are no poison centers or where strengthening is necessary. Collaboration between PCCs in developing countries can help augment available resources including human, analytical and technical expertise. The critical mass of trained toxicologists will fill in the demand for clinical and regulatory specialists and educators as well. This paper highlights the experiences and resources available to the Philippine and Malaysian poison centers and the strengths generated by networking and collaboration. The role of Asia Pacific Association of Medical Toxicology (APAMT) as the Science NGO representative to the Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety (IFCS) forum standing committee in promoting chemical safety at the regional level will be discussed. The 'Clearinghouse on the Sound Management of Chemicals', a platform for engaging multi-stakeholder and interdisciplinary partnerships, will be described as a possible model for capacity building to advance chemical safety through education and training not only in developing countries in Asia but globally as well.

  12. Neural network-based monitoring and control of fluidized bed. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bodruzzaman, M.

    1995-12-31

    This report summarizes work on chaotic behavior control in FBC systems. An update is given to the chaos control method designed to control the chaotic behavior in an FBC system; this method inludes a fully recurrent neural network called the Dynamic System Imitator (DSI). DSI mimics the behavior of a wide variety of dynamic systems in the real world; it was used for modeling linear, nonlinear and chaotic systems, and is also used for iterative prediction of chaotic system behavior. A general methodology for using the DSI to control a nonlinear system is applied to control the chaotic behavior of the Lorenz System. A plan is also outlined for using this method to the FBC system for predicting and controlling its chaotic behavior. Chaotic pressure data from an experimental FBC system was obtained (from METC) on normal and abnormal mixing. Results of chaos analysis applied to these data are presented. These techniques are used to identify the system behavior at different conditions, estimate system order, construct the system attractor, and locate the chaotic behavior in the pressure-drop time series data. Preliminary analysis show that both normal and abnormal conditions of FBC have chaotic characteristics. Objective is to develop a neuro-chaos controller to preserve the normal operational performance of the system.

  13. Northern European Satellite Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster-Bruce, Alan; Lawson, James; Quinlan, Michael; McGregor, Andrew

    Satellite Based Augmentation Systems are being developed in Europe (EGNOS), the USA (WAAS), and in Japan (MSAS). As part of their support to EGNOS, NATS and Racal have developed and deployed a prototype SBAS system called the Northern European Satellite Test Bed (NEST Bed). NEST Bed uses GPS L1/L2 reference stations at: Aberdeen, Rotterdam, Ankara, Cadiz, Keflavik, and Bronnoysund. Data is sent to the Master Control Centre at NATS Gatwick Services Management Centre for processing. The resulting 250 bits-per-second message is sent to Goonhilly for up-linking by BT to the Navigation Payload of either the Inmarsat AOR-E or F5 spare satellite. NEST Bed was deployed and commissioned during summer 1998, and flight tests were successfully demonstrated at the September 1998 Farnborough Air Show where approaches were flown to Boscombe Down on the DERA BAC1-11 aircraft. In October 1998, a NATS/FAA flight trial was held in Iceland involving NEST Bed and the FAA NSTB. NEST Bed is also being used for SARPS validation.

  14. Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

    2012-04-01

    The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in

  15. Space station propulsion test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briley, G. L.; Evans, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    A test bed was fabricated to demonstrate hydrogen/oxygen propulsion technology readiness for the intital operating configuration (IOC) space station application. The test bed propulsion module and computer control system were delivered in December 1985, but activation was delayed until mid-1986 while the propulsion system baseline for the station was reexamined. A new baseline was selected with hydrogen/oxygen thruster modules supplied with gas produced by electrolysis of waste water from the space shuttle and space station. As a result, an electrolysis module was designed, fabricated, and added to the test bed to provide an end-to-end simulation of the baseline system. Subsequent testing of the test bed propulsion and electrolysis modules provided an end-to-end demonstration of the complete space station propulsion system, including thruster hot firings using the oxygen and hydrogen generated from electrolysis of water. Complete autonomous control and operation of all test bed components by the microprocessor control system designed and delivered during the program was demonstrated. The technical readiness of the system is now firmly established.

  16. plasmatis Center for Innovation Competence: Controlling reactive component output of atmospheric pressure plasmas in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    The novel approach of using plasmas in order to alter the local chemistry of cells and cell environment presents a significant development in biomedical applications. The plasmatis center for innovation competence at the INP Greifswald e.V. performs fundamental research in plasma medicine in two interdisciplinary research groups. The aim of our plasma physics research group ``Extracellular Effects'' is (a) quantitative space and time resolved diagnostics and modelling of plasmas and liquids to determine distribution and composition of reactive species (b) to control the plasma and apply differing plasma source concepts in order to produce a tailored output of reactive components and design the chemical composition of the liquids/cellular environment and (c) to identify and understand the interaction mechanisms of plasmas with liquids and biological systems. Methods to characterize the plasma generated reactive species from plasma-, gas- and liquid phase and their biological effects will be presented. The diagnostic spectrum ranges from absorption/emission/laser spectroscopy and molecular beam mass spectrometry to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and cell biological diagnostic techniques. Concluding, a presentation will be given of the comprehensive approach to plasma medicine in Greifswald where the applied and clinical research of the Campus PlasmaMed association is combined with the fundamental research at plasmatis center.

  17. Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

  18. CDC: better needlestick reporting required. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    PubMed

    1997-03-01

    A recent study of percutaneous injuries from phlebotomy devices showed that only about half of all injuries were reported through the hospital surveillance system. In light of the success of post-exposure prophylaxis in reducing occupational HIV transmission, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that health care facilities work to improve reporting. The year-long CDC study of health-care professionals revealed that on average 54 percent of needlestick injuries were reported, though reporting rates varied by occupation. Janine Jagger, director of the International Health Care Worker Safety Research and Resource Center, says some workers fail to report injuries because they do not consider a needlestick a high-risk event. Others, she notes, are concerned about the potential problems associated with contracting a bloodborne pathogen. The CDC, which recently issued recommendations for post-exposure prophylaxis, hopes that reports confirming the benefit of treatment will improve the reporting of accidents. Setting up a 24-hour hotline for employees is one way to improve reporting by making it convenient and confidential.

  19. BNL ALARA Center experience with an information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.; Khan, T.A.

    1992-04-01

    The essential elements of an international information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants are summarized. Information was collected from literature abstracting services, by attending technical meetings, by circulating data collection forms, and through personal contacts. Data are assembled in various databases and periodically disseminated to several hundred interested participants through a variety of publications and at technical meetings. Immediate on-line access to the data is available to participants with modems, commercially available communications software, and a password that is provided by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center to authorized users of the system. Since January 1992, rapid access also has been provided to persons with fax machines. Some information is available for ``polling`` the BNL system at any time, and other data can be installed for polling on request. Most information disseminated to data has been through publications; however, new protocols, simplified by the ALARA Center staff, and the convenience of fax machines are likely to make the earlier availability of information through these mechanisms increasingly important.

  20. Adaptation of Control Center Software to Commerical Real-Time Display Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing an enhanced Huntsville Operation Support Center (HOSC) system designed to support multiple spacecraft missions. The Enhanced HOSC is based upon a distributed computing architecture using graphic workstation hardware and industry standard software including POSIX, X Windows, Motif, TCP/IP, and ANSI C. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is currently developing a prototype of the Display Services application for this system. Display Services provides the capability to generate and operate real-time data-driven graphic displays. This prototype is a highly functional application designed to allow system end users to easily generate complex data-driven displays. The prototype is easy to use, flexible, highly functional, and portable. Although this prototype is being developed for NASA-MSFC, the general-purpose real-time display capability can be reused in similar mission and process control environments. This includes any environment depending heavily upon real-time data acquisition and display. Reuse of the prototype will be a straight-forward transition because the prototype is portable, is designed to add new display types easily, has a user interface which is separated from the application code, and is very independent of the specifics of NASA-MSFC's system. Reuse of this prototype in other environments is a excellent alternative to creation of a new custom application, or for environments with a large number of users, to purchasing a COTS package.

  1. Flight investigation of the effect of control centering springs on the apparent spiral stability of a personal-owner airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Hunter, Paul A; Hewes, Donald E; Whitten, James B

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of a flight investigation conducted on a typical high-wing personal-owner airplane to determine the effect of control centering springs on apparent spiral stability. Apparent spiral stability is the term used to describe the spiraling tendencies of an airplane in uncontrolled flight as affected both by the true spiral stability of the perfectly trimmed airplane and by out-of-trim control settings. Centering springs were used in both the aileron and rudder control systems to provide both a positive centering action and a means of trimming the airplane. The springs were preloaded so that when they were moved through neutral they produced a nonlinear force gradient sufficient to overcome the friction in the control surface at the proper setting for trim. The ailerons and rudder control surfaces did not have trim tabs that could be adjusted in flight.

  2. The Effects of Dinner-to-Bed Time and Post-Dinner Walk on Gastric Cancer Across Different Age Groups: A Multicenter Case-Control Study in Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Le; Zhang, Xi; Lu, Jun; Dai, Jia-Xi; Lin, Ren-Qin; Tian, Fang-Xi; Liang, Bing; Guo, Yi-Nan; Luo, Hui-Yu; Li, Ni; Fang, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Ruo-Hua; Huang, Chang-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major killer throughout the world. Despite the dramatic decrease in GC over the last century, its etiology has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated the possible independent and combined effects of the dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk on the risk for GC across different age groups. A population-based, case-control study was conducted in southeast China, including 452 patients with GC and 465 age-, race-, and gender-matched controls. A self-designed questionnaire was used to collect information on demographic characteristics, dinner-to-bed time, post-dinner walk, and other behavioral factors. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the effects of the dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk as well as their joint effect on the risk for GC across different age groups. Individuals with dinner-to-bed time <3 hours were more prone to have GC (P < 0.001), and the shorter the dinner-to-bed time was, the higher was the risk for GC (Ptrend < 0.001). Post-dinner nonwalk was associated with a 2.9-fold increased risk for GC compared with post-dinner walk (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.942, 95% confidence intervals [95% CIs] = 2.072-4.179). The interaction effect of dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk on GC risk was detected (AOR = 1.862, 95% CIs = 1.584-3.885, synergy index [SI] = 2.654, 95% CIs = 2.27-3.912). Participants with dinner-to-bed time <3 hours who did not walk after dinner were 7.4 times likely to suffer from GC (AOR = 7.401, 95% CIs = 4.523-13.16) than those with dinner-to-bed time ≥4 hours who took such walk. The risk of GC due to dinner-to-bed time <3 hours, post-dinner nonwalk and their interaction was positively correlated with age. The strongest risk was observed among people ≥70 years old, but the effects were not significant for people ≤55 years old. Dinner-to-bed time <3 hours and post-dinner nonwalk are independent risk

  3. 7 CFR 2902.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bedding, bed linens, and towels. 2902.15 Section 2902... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that group of woven cloth products used as coverings on a bed. Bedding includes products such as...

  4. Stability Control of Grasping Objects with Different Locations of Center of Mass and Rotational Inertia

    PubMed Central

    Slota, Gregory P.; Suh, Moon Suk; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe how the digits of the hand adjust to varying location of the center of mass (CoM) above/below the grasp and rotational inertia (RI) of a hand held object. Such manipulations do not immediately affect the equilibrium equations while stability control is affected. Participants were instructed to hold a handle, instrumented with five force/torque transducers and a 3-D rotational tilt sensor, while either the location of the CoM or the RI values were adjusted. On the whole, people use two mechanisms to adjust to the changed stability requirements; they increase the grip force and redistribute the total moment between the normal and tangential forces offsetting internal torques. The increase in grip force, an internal force, and offsetting internal torques allows for increases in joint and hand rotational apparent stiffness while not creating external forces/torques which would unbalance the equations of equilibrium. PMID:22456054

  5. Controllable quantum dynamics of inhomogeneous nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles coupled to superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wan-Lu; Yang, Wan-Li; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Chen, Chang-Yong; Feng, Mang

    2016-09-01

    We explore controllable quantum dynamics of a hybrid system, which consists of an array of mutually coupled superconducting resonators (SRs) with each containing a nitrogen-vacancy center spin ensemble (NVE) in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. We focus on a three-site model, which compared with the two-site case, shows more complicated and richer dynamical behavior, and displays a series of damped oscillations under various experimental situations, reflecting the intricate balance and competition between the NVE-SR collective coupling and the adjacent-site photon hopping. Particularly, we find that the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble can suppress the population transfer between the SR and the local NVE. In this context, although the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble diminishes entanglement among the NVEs, optimal entanglement, characterized by averaging the lower bound of concurrence, could be achieved through accurately adjusting the tunable parameters.

  6. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and a simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). At the end of the month, a series of Duct Injection tests began in a study to determine the efficiencies of alkaline injection for removing trace elements (mercury). On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, low temperature performance testing continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the SCR reactor. This report describes the status of the facilities and test activities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  7. Implications and impact of the new US Centers for Disease Control and prevention HIV testing guidelines.

    PubMed

    Millen, Jennifer C; Arbelaez, Christian; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2008-05-01

    Of the 1.2 million Americans estimated to be living with HIV in the United States, approximately 250,000 are unaware of their diagnosis and therefore unable to access clinical care and life-sustaining treatment. The revised 2006 US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidelines for HIV testing recommend universal, routine, and voluntary HIV screening in public and private health care settings for all adults and adolescents between 13 and 64 years old. These major revisions present new challenges for health care providers, hospitals, government agencies, and community advocacy groups. In this review, we discuss the important issues in diverse care venues such as opt-out testing, consent and confidentiality, barriers to treatment, and financial impact. The implications of the revised recommendations for HIV testing are addressed in the context of a fragmented, overstressed, underfunded US health care system.

  8. Operator-centered control of a semi-autonomous industrial robot

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Jones, S.L.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents work done by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Remotec, Inc., to develop a new operator-centered control system for Remotec`s Andros telerobot. Andros robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities, the armed forces, and numerous law enforcement agencies to perform tasks which are hazardous for human operators. This project has automated task components and enhanced the video graphics display of the robot`s position in the environment to significantly reduce operator workload. The procedure of automating a telerobot requires the addition of computer power to the robot, along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robots performance in and relationship to its environment The resulting vehicle serves as a platform for research on strategies to integrate automated tasks with those performed by a human operator. The addition of these capabilities will greatly enhance the safety and efficiency of performance in hazardous environments.

  9. Deep Space Network (DSN), Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) computer-human interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellman, Alvin; Carlton, Magdi

    1993-01-01

    The Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) of the DSN is responsible for scheduling the resources of DSN, and monitoring all multi-mission spacecraft tracking activities in real-time. Operations performs this job with computer systems at JPL connected to over 100 computers at Goldstone, Australia and Spain. The old computer system became obsolete, and the first version of the new system was installed in 1991. Significant improvements for the computer-human interfaces became the dominant theme for the replacement project. Major issues required innovating problem solving. Among these issues were: How to present several thousand data elements on displays without overloading the operator? What is the best graphical representation of DSN end-to-end data flow? How to operate the system without memorizing mnemonics of hundreds of operator directives? Which computing environment will meet the competing performance requirements? This paper presents the technical challenges, engineering solutions, and results of the NOCC computer-human interface design.

  10. The adrenal capsule is a signaling center controlling cell renewal and zonation through Rspo3.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Valerie; Sacco, Sonia; Rocha, Ana Sofia; da Silva, Fabio; Panzolini, Clara; Dumontet, Typhanie; Doan, Thi Mai Phuong; Shan, Jingdong; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Bird, Tom; Vainio, Seppo; Martinez, Antoine; Schedl, Andreas

    2016-06-15

    Adrenal glands are zonated endocrine organs that are essential in controlling body homeostasis. How zonation is induced and maintained and how renewal of the adrenal cortex is ensured remain a mystery. Here we show that capsular RSPO3 signals to the underlying steroidogenic compartment to induce β-catenin signaling and imprint glomerulosa cell fate. Deletion of RSPO3 leads to loss of SHH signaling and impaired organ growth. Importantly, Rspo3 function remains essential in adult life to ensure replenishment of lost cells and maintain the properties of the zona glomerulosa. Thus, the adrenal capsule acts as a central signaling center that ensures replacement of damaged cells and is required to maintain zonation throughout life. PMID:27313319

  11. Controllable quantum dynamics of inhomogeneous nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles coupled to superconducting resonators

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wan-lu; Yang, Wan-li; Yin, Zhang-qi; Chen, Chang-yong; Feng, Mang

    2016-01-01

    We explore controllable quantum dynamics of a hybrid system, which consists of an array of mutually coupled superconducting resonators (SRs) with each containing a nitrogen-vacancy center spin ensemble (NVE) in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. We focus on a three-site model, which compared with the two-site case, shows more complicated and richer dynamical behavior, and displays a series of damped oscillations under various experimental situations, reflecting the intricate balance and competition between the NVE-SR collective coupling and the adjacent-site photon hopping. Particularly, we find that the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble can suppress the population transfer between the SR and the local NVE. In this context, although the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble diminishes entanglement among the NVEs, optimal entanglement, characterized by averaging the lower bound of concurrence, could be achieved through accurately adjusting the tunable parameters. PMID:27627994

  12. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1997-11-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. Also, several installation activities were initiated this month for the testing of a new EPRI/ADA Technologies sorbent sampling system in December. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future work is identified.

  13. The adrenal capsule is a signaling center controlling cell renewal and zonation through Rspo3.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Valerie; Sacco, Sonia; Rocha, Ana Sofia; da Silva, Fabio; Panzolini, Clara; Dumontet, Typhanie; Doan, Thi Mai Phuong; Shan, Jingdong; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Bird, Tom; Vainio, Seppo; Martinez, Antoine; Schedl, Andreas

    2016-06-15

    Adrenal glands are zonated endocrine organs that are essential in controlling body homeostasis. How zonation is induced and maintained and how renewal of the adrenal cortex is ensured remain a mystery. Here we show that capsular RSPO3 signals to the underlying steroidogenic compartment to induce β-catenin signaling and imprint glomerulosa cell fate. Deletion of RSPO3 leads to loss of SHH signaling and impaired organ growth. Importantly, Rspo3 function remains essential in adult life to ensure replenishment of lost cells and maintain the properties of the zona glomerulosa. Thus, the adrenal capsule acts as a central signaling center that ensures replacement of damaged cells and is required to maintain zonation throughout life.

  14. Information Requirements for Health Information Exchange Supported Communication between Emergency Departments and Poison Control Centers.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Mollie R; Crouch, Barbara I; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Mateos, Brenda; Muthukutty, Anusha; Wyckoff, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed audio recordings of telephone calls between emergency departments (EDs) and poison control centers (PCCs) in order to describe the information requirements for health information exchange. Analysis included a random sample of 120 poison exposure cases involving ED-PCC communication that occurred during 2009. We identified 52 information types characterized as patient or provider information, exposure information, ED assessment and treatment/ management, or PCC consultation. These information types constitute a focused subset of information that should be shared in the context of emergency treatment for poison exposure. Up to 60% of the information types identified in the analysis of call recordings can be represented using existing clinical terminology. In order to accomplish standards-based health information exchange between EDs and PCCs using data coded according to a standard clinical terminology system, it is necessary to define appropriate terms, information models and value sets.

  15. The lysosome as a command-and-control center for cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun-Yan; Zoncu, Roberto

    2016-09-12

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles found in every eukaryotic cell. They are widely known as terminal catabolic stations that rid cells of waste products and scavenge metabolic building blocks that sustain essential biosynthetic reactions during starvation. In recent years, this classical view has been dramatically expanded by the discovery of new roles of the lysosome in nutrient sensing, transcriptional regulation, and metabolic homeostasis. These discoveries have elevated the lysosome to a decision-making center involved in the control of cellular growth and survival. Here we review these recently discovered properties of the lysosome, with a focus on how lysosomal signaling pathways respond to external and internal cues and how they ultimately enable metabolic homeostasis and cellular adaptation. PMID:27621362

  16. Stability control of grasping objects with different locations of center of mass and rotational inertia.

    PubMed

    Slota, Gregory P; Suh, Moon Suk; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe how the digits of the hand adjust to varying location of the center of mass (CoM) above or below the grasp and rotational inertia (RI) of a handheld object. Such manipulations do not immediately affect the equilibrium equations while stability control is affected. Participants were instructed to hold a handle, instrumented with 5 force-torque transducers and a 3-D rotational tilt sensor, while either the location of the CoM or the RI values were adjusted. On the whole, people use 2 mechanisms to adjust to the changed stability requirements; they increase the grip force and redistribute the total moment between the normal and tangential forces offsetting internal torques. The increase in grip force, an internal force, and offsetting internal torques allows for increases in joint and hand rotational apparent stiffness while not creating external forces-torques that would unbalance the equations of equilibrium. PMID:22456054

  17. Examining the Role of Gender in Career Advancement at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kakoli; Gotway Crawford, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, efforts to promote gender parity in the healing and public health professions have met with only partial success. We provide a critical update regarding the status of women in the public health profession by exploring gender-related differences in promotion rates at the nation's leading public health agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Using personnel data drawn from CDC, we found that the gender gap in promotion has diminished across time and that this reduction can be attributed to changes in individual characteristics (e.g., higher educational levels and more federal work experience). However, a substantial gap in promotion that cannot be explained by such characteristics has persisted, indicating continuing barriers in women's career advancement. PMID:20075327

  18. Implications of the new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention blood lead reference value.

    PubMed

    Burns, Mackenzie S; Gerstenberger, Shawn L

    2014-06-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently established a new reference value (≥ 5 μg/dL) as the standard for identifying children with elevated blood lead levels (EBLs). At present, 535,000 US children aged 1 to 5 years (2.6%) are estimated to have EBLs according to the new standard, versus 0.8% according to the previous standard (≥ 10 μg/dL). Because EBLs signify the threshold for public health intervention, this new definition increases demands on lead poisoning prevention efforts. Primary prevention has been proven to reduce lead poisoning cases and is also cost effective; however, federal budget cuts threaten the existence of such programs. Protection for the highest-risk children necessitates a reinstatement of federal funding to previous levels. PMID:24825227

  19. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Test Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Darlene

    1989-01-01

    Different aspects of Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) testing are currently taking place at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Unique to this testing is the variety of test areas and the fact that all are located in one building. The north high bay of building 4755, the Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), contains the following test areas: the Subsystem Test Area, the Comparative Test Area, the Process Material Management System (PMMS), the Core Module Simulator (CMS), the End-use Equipment Facility (EEF), and the Pre-development Operational System Test (POST) Area. This paper addresses the facility that supports these test areas and briefly describes the testing in each area. Future plans for the building and Space Station module configurations will also be discussed.

  20. Strengthening public health ethics at the centers for disease control and prevention.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Drue H; Bernier, Roger H; Sowell, Anne L

    2008-01-01

    In early 2005, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched an initiative to strengthen leadership in public health ethics. This resulted in the formation of an external Ethics Subcommittee of the Advisory Committee to the Director, an internal CDC Public Health Ethics Committee, and the creation of a new position, the CDC Public Health Ethics Coordinator, to oversee the activities of these two committees and to serve as the main point of contact for public health ethics at the agency. Through this effort, the CDC is collaborating with the Ethics Subcommittee to develop ethical guidance documents that address specific public health program concerns, including pandemic influenza, emergency preparedness and response, and genomics. It is anticipated that as the public health ethics activities grow within the CDC, benefits will be seen in greater participation and partnership with affected stakeholders and strengthened public trust in health recommendations.

  1. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Motor control centers; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.; O`Hearn, E.

    1994-02-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) commercial nuclear power plant motor control centers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  2. Implications of the New Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Blood Lead Reference Value

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Mackenzie S.; Gerstenberger, Shawn L.

    2014-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently established a new reference value (≥ 5 μg/dL) as the standard for identifying children with elevated blood lead levels (EBLs). At present, 535 000 US children aged 1 to 5 years (2.6%) are estimated to have EBLs according to the new standard, versus 0.8% according to the previous standard (≥ 10 μg/dL). Because EBLs signify the threshold for public health intervention, this new definition increases demands on lead poisoning prevention efforts. Primary prevention has been proven to reduce lead poisoning cases and is also cost effective; however, federal budget cuts threaten the existence of such programs. Protection for the highest-risk children necessitates a reinstatement of federal funding to previous levels. PMID:24825227

  3. Using the accreditation journey to achieve global impact: UHN's experience at the Kuwait Cancer Control Center.

    PubMed

    Ladha-Waljee, Nafeesa; McAteer, Stephen; Nickerson, Veronica; Khalfan, Adil

    2014-01-01

    On January 1, 2011, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (PM) - University Health Network (UHN) began a five-year partnership agreement with the Kuwait Ministry of Health's Kuwait Cancer Control Center (KCCC) to enhance cancer care services. Over the course of the partnership, opportunities for improvement were identified by UHN experts in order to accelerate KCCC's development toward subspecialty cancer care. Many of these opportunities involved building a robust infrastructure to support foundational hospital operation processes and procedures. Harnessing UHN's own successes in accreditation, the partnership took advantage of the national accreditation mandate in Kuwait to initiate a quality program and drive clinical improvement at KCCC. This resulted in improved staff engagement, better awareness and alignment of administration with clinical management and a stronger patient safety culture. This article discusses the successes and lessons learned at KCCC that may provide insight to healthcare providers implementing Accreditation Canada International's accreditation framework in other countries and cultures. PMID:25191806

  4. Controllable quantum dynamics of inhomogeneous nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles coupled to superconducting resonators.

    PubMed

    Song, Wan-Lu; Yang, Wan-Li; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Chen, Chang-Yong; Feng, Mang

    2016-01-01

    We explore controllable quantum dynamics of a hybrid system, which consists of an array of mutually coupled superconducting resonators (SRs) with each containing a nitrogen-vacancy center spin ensemble (NVE) in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. We focus on a three-site model, which compared with the two-site case, shows more complicated and richer dynamical behavior, and displays a series of damped oscillations under various experimental situations, reflecting the intricate balance and competition between the NVE-SR collective coupling and the adjacent-site photon hopping. Particularly, we find that the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble can suppress the population transfer between the SR and the local NVE. In this context, although the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble diminishes entanglement among the NVEs, optimal entanglement, characterized by averaging the lower bound of concurrence, could be achieved through accurately adjusting the tunable parameters. PMID:27627994

  5. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center monthly report to the Steering Committee, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-02

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot FGD unit continued this month with High Velocity Scrubbing and the Tampa Electric Company (TECO) Tailored Collaboration test block. Additionally, Phase III of the Toxics Removal/Carbon Injection test block was conducted concurrently with FGD testing. At the beginning of the month, a second phase of third-party testing began for Suncor, Inc. The Suncor Gypsum Sample Collection test block (MSUN) began on June 5 on the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet FGD unit. Testing was completed on June 13. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, testing continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted under low catalyst inlet temperatures and at baseline conditions.

  6. Prewarning of the China National Aquatics Center using Johnson transformation based statistical process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Deyi; Bao, Yuequan; Li, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2009-07-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is regarded as an effective technique for structural damage diagnosis, safety and integrity assessment and service life evaluation. SHM techniques based on vibration modal parameters are ineffective for space structure health maintenance and the statistical process control (SPC) technique is a simple and effective tool to monitor the operational process of structures. Therefore, employing strain measurements from optical fiber Bragg grating (OFBG) sensors, the Johnson transformation based SPC is proposed to monitor structural health state and some unexpected excitements on line in this paper. The large and complicated space structure-the China National Aquatics Center is employed as an example to verify the proposed method in both numerical and experimental aspects. It is found that the Johnson transformation can effectively improve the quality of SPC for SHM process, and it can clearly and effectively monitor structural health state and detect the unexpected external load happened in structures.

  7. Regulation study for the facility control system design at the Facility Operations Center at TA55

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-16

    NMT-8 is proposing to upgrade the existing Facility Control System (FCS) located within the Facility Operations Center (FOC) at the TA-55 Plutonium Processing and Handling Facility (PPHF). The FCS modifications will upgrade the existing electronics to provide better reliability of system functions. Changes include replacement of the FCS computers and field multiplex units which are used for transmitting systems data. Data collected at the FCS include temperature, pressure, contact closures, etc., and are used for monitoring and/or control of key systems at TA-55. Monitoring is provided for the electrical power system status, PF-4 HVAC air balance status (Static Differential pressure), HVAC fan system status, site chill water return temperature, fire system information, and radioactive constant air monitors alarm information, site compressed air pressure and other key systems used at TA-55. Control output signals are provided for PF-4 HVAC systems, and selected alarms for criticality, fire, loss of pressure in confinement systems. A detailed description of the FCS modifications is provided in Section 2.

  8. Malaria Epidemiology and Control Within the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research.

    PubMed

    Moss, William J; Dorsey, Grant; Mueller, Ivo; Laufer, Miriam K; Krogstad, Donald J; Vinetz, Joseph M; Guzman, Mitchel; Rosas-Aguirre, Angel M; Herrera, Socrates; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Chery, Laura; Kumar, Ashwani; Mohapatra, Pradyumna K; Ramanathapuram, Lalitha; Srivastava, H C; Cui, Liwang; Zhou, Guofa; Parker, Daniel M; Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Kazura, James W

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the epidemiological features and metrics of malaria in endemic populations is a key component to monitoring and quantifying the impact of current and past control efforts to inform future ones. The International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) has the opportunity to evaluate the impact of malaria control interventions across endemic regions that differ in the dominant Plasmodium species, mosquito vector species, resistance to antimalarial drugs and human genetic variants thought to confer protection from infection and clinical manifestations of plasmodia infection. ICEMR programs are conducting field studies at multiple sites with the aim of generating standardized surveillance data to improve the understanding of malaria transmission and to monitor and evaluate the impact of interventions to inform malaria control and elimination programs. In addition, these epidemiological studies provide a vast source of biological samples linked to clinical and environmental "meta-data" to support translational studies of interactions between the parasite, human host, and mosquito vector. Importantly, epidemiological studies at the ICEMR field sites are integrated with entomological studies, including the measurement of the entomological inoculation rate, human biting index, and insecticide resistance, as well as studies of parasite genetic diversity and antimalarial drug resistance.

  9. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Preetinder S; Gill, Tejkaran S; Kamath, Ashwini; Whisnant, Billy

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms) are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving health care-related literature and, in turn, promoting health literacy. Based on the comprehensive literature review and assessment of the 40 documents associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury, recommendations have been made for improving the readability, suitability, and usability of health care-related documents. The recommendations are

  10. Contamination Control and Hardware Processing Solutions at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, DeWitt H.; Hampton, Tammy; Huey, LaQuieta; Mitchell, Mark; Norwood, Joey; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    The Contamination Control Team of Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processes Laboratory supports many Programs/ Projects that design, manufacture, and test a wide range of hardware types that are sensitive to contamination and foreign object damage (FOD). Examples where contamination/FOD concerns arise include sensitive structural bondline failure, critical orifice blockage, seal leakage, and reactive fluid compatibility (liquid oxygen, hydrazine) as well as performance degradation of sensitive instruments or spacecraft surfaces such as optical elements and thermal control systems. During the design phase, determination of the sensitivity of a hardware system to different types or levels of contamination/FOD is essential. A contamination control and FOD control plan must then be developed and implemented through all phases of ground processing, and, sometimes, on-orbit use, recovery, and refurbishment. Implementation of proper controls prevents cost and schedule impacts due to hardware damage or rework and helps assure mission success. Current capabilities are being used to support recent and on-going activities for multiple Mission Directorates / Programs such as International Space Station (ISS), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Space Launch System (SLS) elements (tanks, engines, booster), etc. The team also advances Green Technology initiatives and addresses materials obsolescence issues for NASA and external customers, most notably in the area of solvent replacement (e.g. aqueous cleaners containing hexavalent chrome, ozone depleting chemicals (CFC s and HCFC's), suspect carcinogens). The team evaluates new surface cleanliness inspection and cleaning technologies (e.g. plasma cleaning), and maintains databases for processing support materials as well as outgassing and optical compatibility test results for spaceflight environments.

  11. Quality risk management of top spray fluidized bed process for antihypertensive drug formulation with control strategy engendered by Box-behnken experimental design space

    PubMed Central

    Mukharya, Amit; Patel, Paresh U; Shenoy, Dinesh; Chaudhary, Shivang

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Lacidipine (LCDP) is a very low soluble and highly biovariable calcium channel blocker used in the treatment of hypertension. To increase its apparent solubility and to reduce its biovariability, solid dispersion fluid bed processing technology was explored, as it produces highly dispersible granules with a characteristic porous structure that enhances dispersibility, wettability, blend uniformity (by dissolving and spraying a solution of actives), flow ability and compressibility of granules for tableting and reducing variability by uniform drug-binder solution distribution on carrier molecules. Materials and Methods: Main object of this quality risk management (QRM) study is to provide a sophisticated “robust and rugged” Fluidized Bed Process (FBP) for the preparation of LCDP tablets with desired quality (stability) and performance (dissolution) by quality by design (QbD) concept. Results and Conclusion: This study is principally focusing on thorough mechanistic understanding of the FBP by which it is developed and scaled up with a knowledge of the critical risks involved in manufacturing process analyzed by risk assessment tools like: Qualitative Initial Risk-based Matrix Analysis (IRMA) and Quantitative Failure Mode Effective Analysis (FMEA) to identify and rank parameters with potential to have an impact on In Process/Finished Product Critical Quality Attributes (IP/FP CQAs). These Critical Process Parameters (CPPs) were further refined by DoE and MVDA to develop design space with Real Time Release Testing (RTRT) that leads to implementation of a control strategy to achieve consistent finished product quality at lab scale itself to prevent possible product failure at larger manufacturing scale. PMID:23799202

  12. User and Task Analysis of the Flight Surgeon Console at the Mission Control Center of the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kathy A.; Shek, Molly

    2003-01-01

    Astronauts in a space station are to some extent like patients in an intensive care unit (ICU). Medical support of a mission crew will require acquisition, transmission, distribution, integration, and archiving of significant amounts of data. These data are acquired by disparate systems and will require timely, reliable, and secure distribution to different communities for the execution of various tasks of space missions. The goal of the Comprehensive Medical Information System (CMIS) Project at Johnson Space Center Flight Medical Clinic is to integrate data from all Medical Operations sources, including the reference information sources and the electronic medical records of astronauts. A first step toward the full CMIS implementation is to integrate and organize the reference information sources and the electronic medical record with the Flight Surgeons console. In order to investigate this integration, we need to understand the usability problems of the Flight Surgeon's console in particular and medical information systems in general. One way to achieve this understanding is through the use of user and task analyses whose general purpose is to ensure that only the necessary and sufficient task features that match users capacities will be included in system implementations. The goal of this summer project was to conduct user and task analyses employing cognitive engineering techniques to analyze the task of the Flight Surgeons and Biomedical Engineers (BMEs) while they worked on Console. The techniques employed were user interviews, observations and a questionnaire to collect data for which a hierarchical task analysis and an information resource assessment were performed. They are described in more detail below. Finally, based on our analyses, we make recommendations for improvements to the support structure.

  13. Advanced Technologies for Future Spacecraft Cockpits and Space-based Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Galan, Carlos; Uckun, Serdar; Gregory, William; Williams, Kerry

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a new era of Space Exploration, aimed at sending crewed spacecraft beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO), in medium and long duration missions to the Lunar surface, Mars and beyond. The challenges of such missions are significant and will require new technologies and paradigms in vehicle design and mission operations. Current roles and responsibilities of spacecraft systems, crew and the flight control team, for example, may not be sustainable when real-time support is not assured due to distance-induced communication lags, radio blackouts, equipment failures, or other unexpected factors. Therefore, technologies and applications that enable greater Systems and Mission Management capabilities on-board the space-based system will be necessary to reduce the dependency on real-time critical Earth-based support. The focus of this paper is in such technologies that will be required to bring advance Systems and Mission Management capabilities to space-based environments where the crew will be required to manage both the systems performance and mission execution without dependence on the ground. We refer to this concept as autonomy. Environments that require high levels of autonomy include the cockpits of future spacecraft such as the Mars Exploration Vehicle, and space-based control centers such as a Lunar Base Command and Control Center. Furthermore, this paper will evaluate the requirements, available technology, and roadmap to enable full operational implementation of onboard System Health Management, Mission Planning/re-planning, Autonomous Task/Command Execution, and Human Computer Interface applications. The technology topics covered by the paper include enabling technology to perform Intelligent Caution and Warning, where the systems provides directly actionable data for human understanding and response to failures, task automation applications that automate nominal and Off-nominal task execution based

  14. Hybrid fluidized bed combuster

    DOEpatents

    Kantesaria, Prabhudas P.; Matthews, Francis T.

    1982-01-01

    A first atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed furnace is combined with a second turbulent, circulating fluidized bed furnace to produce heat efficiently from crushed solid fuel. The bed of the second furnace receives the smaller sizes of crushed solid fuel, unreacted limestone from the first bed, and elutriated solids extracted from the flu gases of the first bed. The two-stage combustion of crushed solid fuel provides a system with an efficiency greater than available with use of a single furnace of a fluidized bed.

  15. The NASA Bed Rest Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Bradley; Meck, Janice

    2005-01-01

    NASA s National Vision for Space Exploration includes human travel beyond low earth orbit and the ultimate safe return of the crews. Crucial to fulfilling the vision is the successful and timely development of countermeasures for the adverse physiological effects on human systems caused by long term exposure to the microgravity environment. Limited access to in-flight resources for the foreseeable future increases NASA s reliance on ground-based analogs to simulate these effects of microgravity. The primary analog for human based research will be head-down bed rest. By this approach NASA will be able to evaluate countermeasures in large sample sizes, perform preliminary evaluations of proposed in-flight protocols and assess the utility of individual or combined strategies before flight resources are requested. In response to this critical need, NASA has created the Bed Rest Project at the Johnson Space Center. The Project establishes the infrastructure and processes to provide a long term capability for standardized domestic bed rest studies and countermeasure development. The Bed Rest Project design takes a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, integrated approach that reduces the resource overhead of one investigator for one campaign. In addition to integrating studies operationally relevant for exploration, the Project addresses other new Vision objectives, namely: 1) interagency cooperation with the NIH allows for Clinical Research Center (CRC) facility sharing to the benefit of both agencies, 2) collaboration with our International Partners expands countermeasure development opportunities for foreign and domestic investigators as well as promotes consistency in approach and results, 3) to the greatest degree possible, the Project also advances research by clinicians and academia alike to encourage return to earth benefits. This paper will describe the Project s top level goals, organization and relationship to other Exploration Vision Projects, implementation

  16. Floating brine crusts, reduction of evaporation and possible replacement of fresh water to control dust from Owens Lake bed, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneveld, D. P.; Huntington, J. L.; Barz, D. D.

    2010-10-01

    SummaryOwens Lake, California, a saline terminal lake desiccated after diversion of its water source, was formerly the single largest anthropogenic source of fugitive dust in North America. Over 100 billion m -3 yr -1 of fresh water are projected to be used for mandated dust control in over 100 km 2 of constructed basins required to be wetted to curtail emissions. An extensive evaporite deposit is located at the lake's topographic low and adjacent to the dust control basins. Because this deposit is non-dust-emissive, it was investigated as a potential replacement for the fresh water used in dust control. The deposit consists of precipitated layers of sodium carbonate and sulfate bathed by, and covered with brine dominated by sodium chloride perennially covered with floating salt crust. Evaporation ( E) rates through this crust were measured using a static chamber during the period of highest evaporative demand, late June and early July, 2009. Annualized total E from these measurements was significantly below average annual precipitation, thus ensuring that such salt deposits naturally remain wet throughout the year, despite the arid climate. Because it remains wetted, the evaporite deposit may therefore have the potential to replace fresh water to achieve dust control at near zero water use.

  17. A child-centered scale of informal social control for Latino parents of preschool-age children: Development and validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perceived neighborhood informal social control may determine whether parents allow their young children to be physically active in the neighborhood. We developed and validated a scale of neighborhood child-centered informal social control appropriate for Latino parents of preschool-age children. The...

  18. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    David Holloway

    2005-09-30

    Beginning the fall semester of 1999, The University of Maryland, Departments of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research served as a U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies. A key goal was to produce a graduate level education program that educated and prepared students to address the technical challenges of designing and developing hybrid electric vehicles, as they progressed into the workforce. A second goal was to produce research that fostered the advancement of hybrid electric vehicles, their controls, and other related automotive technologies. Participation ended at the University of Maryland after the 2004 fall semester. Four graduate courses were developed and taught during the course of this time, two of which evolved into annually-taught undergraduate courses, namely Vehicle Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory. Five faculty members from Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and the Institute for Systems Research participated. Four Ph.D. degrees (two directly supported and two indirectly supported) and seven Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering resulted from the research conducted. Research topics included thermoelectric waste heat recovery, fuel cell modeling, pre- and post-transmission hybrid powertrain control and integration, hybrid transmission design, H{sub 2}-doped combustion, and vehicle dynamics. Many of the participating students accepted positions in the automotive industry or government laboratories involved in automotive technology work after graduation. This report discusses the participating faculty, the courses developed and taught, research conducted, the students directly and indirectly supported, and the publication list. Based on this collection of information, the University of Maryland firmly believes that the key goal of the program was met and that the majority of the

  19. The development of test beds to support the definition and evolution of the Space Station Freedom power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.; Frye, Robert J.; Phillips, Rudy L.

    1991-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP), the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International have had extensive efforts underway to develop test beds to support the definition of the detailed electrical power system design. Because of the extensive redirections that have taken place in the Space Station Freedom Program in the past several years, the test bed effort was forced to accommodate a large number of changes. A short history of these program changes and their impact on the LeRC test beds is presented to understand how the current test bed configuration has evolved. The current test objectives and the development approach for the current DC Test Bed are discussed. A description of the test bed configuration, along with its power and controller hardware and its software components, is presented. Next, the uses of the test bed during the mature design and verification phase of SSFP are examined. Finally, the uses of the test bed in operation and evolution of the SSF are addressed.

  20. Metal-centered polymers: Using controlled polymerization methodologies for the generation of responsive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert Matthew

    Controlled polymerization methods were used to prepare highly modular polymeric metal complexes via convergent and divergent strategies. In these materials, the metal center provides a versatile hub for preparing diverse architectures through coordinative bonds. Moreover, the metal complex introduces various properties to the polymer such as luminescence, magnetism, or electroactivity. Suitably functionalized metal complexes have been used for the atom transfer radical polymerization of acrylate and methacrylate monomers by metalloinitiation to generate luminescent biocompatible materials through a divergent synthesis. By cleaving the tert-butyl groups from poly(tert -butyl acrylate), water soluble [Ru(bpyPAA2)3] 2+ has been prepared as well as the amphiphilic star block copolymer [Ru{bpy(PLA-PAA)2}3]2+ (PLA = poly(lactic acid), PAA = poly(acrylic acid) Bipyridine-centered polymeric macroligands may be chelated to a variety of metal salts. The polymer size greatly influences the formation of [Fe(bpy) 3]2+ centered polymers. As the molecular weight increases (> ˜25 kDa) tris complex formation decreases. Tris(bpy) synthesis is also impacted by chemical composition. BpyPtBA2 (PtBA = poly(tert-butyl acrylate) generates an iron mono(bpy) complex before giving rise to the bis(bpy) iron complex; no tris complex is observed. In contrast, the combination of bpyPEG2 (3 equiv) (PEG = (poly(ethylene glycol)) results in the formation of some iron tris(bpy) compound; however, complete tris(bpy) product formation is suppressed, presumably because of the chelating ability of the PEG chains. These examples contrast with other polymeric macroligands such as bpyPS2, bpyPMMA2, bpyPCL2 and bpyPLA 2 (PS = polystyrene; PMMA = poly(methyl methacrylate); PCL = poly(epsilon-caprolactone); PLA = poly(DL-lactic acid)) for which chelation reactions are facile for low molecular weight macroligands (<15 kDa), with chelation efficiencies (defined as (epsilonPMC/epsilonbpy) x 100%) only declining