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Sample records for beech regeneration sites

  1. Dynamic of Plant Composition and Regeneration following Windthrow in a Temperate Beech Forest

    PubMed Central

    Mollaei Darabi, Sakineh; Kooch, Yahya; Hosseini, Seyed Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    The effects of soil pedoturbation (i.e., pit and mound microtopography, PM) on development of herbaceous plant species and woody species regeneration were examined in a temperate beech forest (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) in northern Iran. We recorded the vegetation in 20 pairs of disturbed and adjacent undisturbed plots and established a chronosequence of PM ages to study the effect of time since microsite formation on cover percent of herbaceous plants and woody regeneration status. According to our findings, Carex acutiformis L., Sambucus ebulus L., Brachypodium pinnatum L., and Cyclamen coum L. are found only in the PM microsites, whereas the Equisetum ramosissimum L. is recorded only under closed canopy. The coverage percent of Rubus caesius L. increased in PM microsites compared to closed canopy intensively. In addition, Albizia julibrissin Durazz. is detected in PM microsite, whereas the Acer cappadocicum B. and Prunus persica L. species were recorded only under closed canopy. We found significant differences in understory species diversity between different ages of PM, and disturbed and adjacent undisturbed plots. Our study supports that the PM complex will create a mosaic of environmental conditions. This environmental heterogeneity could be responsible for the diversity of herbaceous plant species and regeneration of woody species. PMID:27379260

  2. Dynamic of Plant Composition and Regeneration following Windthrow in a Temperate Beech Forest.

    PubMed

    Mollaei Darabi, Sakineh; Kooch, Yahya; Hosseini, Seyed Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    The effects of soil pedoturbation (i.e., pit and mound microtopography, PM) on development of herbaceous plant species and woody species regeneration were examined in a temperate beech forest (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) in northern Iran. We recorded the vegetation in 20 pairs of disturbed and adjacent undisturbed plots and established a chronosequence of PM ages to study the effect of time since microsite formation on cover percent of herbaceous plants and woody regeneration status. According to our findings, Carex acutiformis L., Sambucus ebulus L., Brachypodium pinnatum L., and Cyclamen coum L. are found only in the PM microsites, whereas the Equisetum ramosissimum L. is recorded only under closed canopy. The coverage percent of Rubus caesius L. increased in PM microsites compared to closed canopy intensively. In addition, Albizia julibrissin Durazz. is detected in PM microsite, whereas the Acer cappadocicum B. and Prunus persica L. species were recorded only under closed canopy. We found significant differences in understory species diversity between different ages of PM, and disturbed and adjacent undisturbed plots. Our study supports that the PM complex will create a mosaic of environmental conditions. This environmental heterogeneity could be responsible for the diversity of herbaceous plant species and regeneration of woody species.

  3. An approach to modeling the consequences of beech mortality from beech bark disease

    Treesearch

    Harry T. Valentine

    1983-01-01

    Changes to an extant model of forest growth and transition that allow an evaluation of the consequences of beech bark disease are outlined. Required are a function to scale beech growth for the effects of beech bark disease, a function to predict beech mortality from beech bark disease, and a function that predicts root-sprout regeneration of beech.

  4. Hydraulic properties of naturally regenerated beech saplings respond to canopy opening.

    PubMed

    Caquet, Blandine; Barigah, Têtè S; Cochard, Hervé; Montpied, Pierre; Collet, Catherine; Dreyer, Erwin; Epron, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Enhanced sapling growth in advance regeneration requires gaps in the canopy, but is often delayed after canopy opening, because acclimation of saplings to the new environment is gradual and may last for several years. Canopy opening is expected to result in an increased transpiration because of a larger climatic demand and a higher stomatal conductance linked to the higher rates of photosynthesis. Therefore, we focused on the changes in water relations and the hydraulic properties of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) saplings during 2 years after canopy opening. We tested the hypothesis that an increase in leaf-specific hydraulic conductance and a decrease in vulnerability to cavitation occur to sustain an enhanced transpiration. Hydraulic conductance of defoliated shoots, vulnerability to cavitation, size and density of xylem vessels as well as stomatal conductance were recorded on saplings growing in shade (S saplings) or in gaps created by opening the canopy (shade-to-light, SL saplings). Hydraulic conductance per unit cross-sectional area (K(AS)) did not differ in the shoots of S and SL saplings. But a higher ratio stem cross-sectional area/leaf area resulted in a higher leaf-specific hydraulic conductance of the shoots (K(AL)) of SL saplings. Contrary to expectations, vulnerability to cavitation increased transitorily in stems during the first year after canopy opening and no difference was observed between the two treatments in light-saturated stomatal conductance. During the second year, vulnerability to cavitation was similar in the S and SL saplings and light-saturated stomatal conductance increased in SL saplings. These results demonstrate a release of the hydraulic constraints after canopy opening with an adjustment of the ratio stem cross-sectional area/leaf area. But the larger vulnerability to cavitation during the first year could limit stomatal opening and therefore the ability of beech saplings to use the available light for photosynthesis and could

  5. Effects of species composition and site factors on the severity of beech bark disease in western Massachusetts and the White Mountains of New Hampshire: a preliminary report

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Twery; W.A. Patterson

    1983-01-01

    The extent of beech bark disease was examined on permanent inventory plots in western Massachusetts and on Bartlett Experimental Forest in New Hampshire. The amount of disease-caused defect was correlated with a reduction in the proportion of beech in a stand. Sites on lower slopes and with greater abundance of hemlock contained more defective beech.

  6. Wood structural differences between northern and southern beech provenances growing at a moderate site.

    PubMed

    Eilmann, B; Sterck, F; Wegner, L; de Vries, S M G; von Arx, G; Mohren, G M J; den Ouden, J; Sass-Klaassen, U

    2014-08-01

    Planting provenances originating from southern to northern locations has been discussed as a strategy to speed up species migration and mitigate negative effects of climate change on forest stability and productivity. Especially for drought-susceptible species such as European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), the introduction of drought-tolerant provenances from the south could be an option. Yet, beech has been found to respond plastically to environmental conditions, suggesting that the climate on the plantation site might be more important for tree growth than the genetic predisposition of potentially drought-adapted provenances. In this study, we compared the radial growth, wood-anatomical traits and leaf phenology of four beech provenances originating from southern (Bulgaria, France) and northern locations (Sweden, the Netherlands) and planted in a provenance trial in the Netherlands. The distribution of precipitation largely differs between the sites of origin. The northern provenances experience a maximum and the southern provenances experience a minimum of rainfall in summer. We compared tree productivity and the anatomy of the water-conducting system for the period from 2000 to 2010, including the drought year 2003. In addition, tree mortality and the timing of leaf unfolding in spring were analysed for the years 2001, 2007 and 2012. Comparison of these traits in the four beech provenances indicates the influence of genetic predisposition and local environmental factors on the performance of these provenances under moderate site conditions. Variation in radial growth was controlled by environment, although the growth level slightly differed due to genetic background. The Bulgarian provenance had an efficient water-conducting system which was moreover unaffected by the drought in 2003, pointing to a high ability of this provenance to cope well with dry conditions. In addition, the Bulgarian provenance showed up as most productive in terms of height and radial

  7. Site-adapted admixed tree species reduce drought susceptibility of mature European beech.

    PubMed

    Metz, Jérôme; Annighöfer, Peter; Schall, Peter; Zimmermann, Jorma; Kahl, Tiemo; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Ammer, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Some forest-related studies on possible effects of climate change conclude that growth potential of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) might be impaired by the predicted increase in future serious drought events during the growing season. Other recent research suggests that not only multiyear increment rates but also growth resistance and recovery of beech during, respectively, after dry years may differ between pure and mixed stands. Thus, we combined dendrochronological investigations and wood stable isotope measurements to further investigate the impact of neighborhood diversity on long-term performance, short-term drought response and soil water availability of European beech in three major geographic regions of Germany. During the last four decades, target trees whose competitive neighborhood consisted of co-occurring species exhibited a superior growth performance compared to beeches in pure stands of the same investigation area. This general pattern was also found in exceptional dry years. Although the summer droughts of 1976 and 2003 predominantly caused stronger relative growth declines if target trees were exposed to interspecific competition, with few exceptions they still formed wider annual rings than beeches growing in close-by monocultures. Within the same study region, recovery of standardized beech target tree radial growth was consistently slower in monospecific stands than in the neighborhood of other competitor species. These findings suggest an improved water availability of beech in mixtures what is in line with the results of the stable isotope analysis. Apparently, the magnitude of competitive complementarity determines the growth response of target beech trees in mixtures. Our investigation strongly suggest that the sensitivity of European beech to environmental constrains depends on neighborhood identity. Therefore, the systematic formation of mixed stands tends to be an appropriate silvicultural measure to mitigate the effects of global

  8. Microbial colonization of beech and spruce litter--influence of decomposition site and plant litter species on the diversity of microbial community.

    PubMed

    Aneja, Manish Kumar; Sharma, Shilpi; Fleischmann, Frank; Stich, Susanne; Heller, Werner; Bahnweg, Günther; Munch, Jean Charles; Schloter, Michael

    2006-07-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of decomposition site and plant litter species on the colonizing microbial communities. For this, litter bag technique using beech and spruce litter was combined with RNA-based fingerprinting and cloning. Litter bags were incubated for 2 and 8 weeks in the Ah horizon of beech and beech-spruce mixed forest sites. Although sugars and starch were rapidly lost, lignin content increased by more than 40% for beech and more than doubled for spruce litter at both soil sites at the end of the experiment. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of 16S and 18S rRNA RT-PCR products was used for screening of differences between bacterial and fungal communities colonizing the two litter types. Development of the microbial community over time was observed to be specific for each litter type and decomposition site. RT-PCR products from both litter types incubated in beech-spruce mixed forest site were also cloned to identify the bacterial and fungal colonizers. The 16S rRNA clone libraries of beech litter were dominated by gamma-proteobacterial members, whereas spruce libraries were mainly composed of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-proteobacterial members. Ascomycota members dominated the 18S rRNA clone libraries. Clones similar to Zygomycota were absent from spruce, whereas those similar to Basidiomycota and Glomeromycota were absent from beech libraries. Selective effects of litter quality were observed after 8 weeks. The study provides an insight into the bacterial and fungal communities colonizing beech and spruce litter, and the importance of litter quality and decomposition site as key factors in their development and succession.

  9. Containerized plants regenerate difficult reclamation sites

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.P.

    1983-07-01

    Container planting improves survival and growth of many species and allows a faster response to changing reforestation needs. The use of container-grown seedlings remains supplementary to bare-root production, but is a valuable method with difficult sites or with species that are difficult to regenerate. 4 references.

  10. Comparative estimates of transpiration of ash and beech forest at a chalk site in southern Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John; Rosier, Paul T. W.

    1994-11-01

    (1) During the dry summer of 1989 stomatal conductance ( gs), boundary-layer conductance ( ga), leaf water and osmotic potentials ( ψ1, ψπ) and leaf area index ( L∗) measurements were made in mature ash and beech stands growing on shallow soil over chalk near Winchester, Hampshire, UK. In addition measurements of gs and L∗ were made in the understorey layer in the ash stand, comprised mainly of dog's mercury, hazel and bramble. Automatic weather stations located (i) above the beech stand and (ii) at the understorey level (within the ash stand) provided hourly averages of weather variables. Changes in soil moisture deficit in both stands were determined from regular measurements made with a neutron probe. (2) Maximum values of gs (up to 0.3 mol m -2 s -1) were found at the top of the ash and beech canopies at the start of the day, while at the canopy base gs was about half of these values. At all canopy levels the value of gs was more closely associated with specific humidity deficit (at the time of measurement) than with any other weather variable, and there was no relationship between gs and soil mositure deficit or leaf water status, described by ψ1 and ψπ on the day of measurement. (3) Values of gs of the understorey plants were only half those of the tree species and changed less during the day. However, seasonal changes in gs of dog's mercury did seem to be associated with increased soil moisture deficit. (4) Estimates of L∗ in the ash and beech stands were made from leaf litter collections and partitioned into canopy layers using ratios determined by destructive sampling. L∗ of the beech stand was 5.3 and for the ash stand 2.7. L∗ of the understorey varied seasonally and rose to a peak of 3 in June falling gradually for the remainder of the summer period. (5) Hourly values of gs and ga in each stand for each canopy layer were scaled up to the canopy by using L∗ of the individual canopy layers (including the understorey level in the ash stand

  11. Distribution of attack by beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga, in beech progeny trials

    Treesearch

    D. Wainhouse; R.S. Howell

    1983-01-01

    Surveys of beech scale infestation among progeny of single beech trees demonstrated significant variation in susceptibility between the progenies. Relative differences in susceptibility of some progeny were maintained on three different sites in southern England.

  12. Beech Bark Disease

    Treesearch

    David R. Houston; James T. O' Brien

    1983-01-01

    Beech bark disease causes significant mortality and defect in American beech, Fagus grandifolia (Ehrh.). The disease results when bark, attacked and altered by the beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind., is invaded and killed by fungi, primarily Nectria coccinea var. faginata Lohman, Watson, and Ayers, and sometimes N. galligena Bres.

  13. Beech bark disease

    Treesearch

    David R. Houston

    1998-01-01

    In forests of North America the beech bark disease (BBD) complex affects American beech, Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. BBD begins when bark tissues, attacked by the exotic beech scale insect, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind. are rendered susceptible to killing attacks by fungi of the genus Nectria. The principal fungus,...

  14. Grazing on Regeneration Sites Encourages Pine Seedling Growth

    Treesearch

    Raymond D. Ratliff; Renee G. Denton

    1995-01-01

    Effects of season-long, deferred-rotation, and rest-rotation grazing, on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) seedling growth and herbaceous vegetation control were studied in regeneration sites at Boyd Hill, Modoc National Forest, California. Seedlings were planted in 1989. Pine seedling survival and damage did not differ, but the...

  15. Climate Change Impairs Nitrogen Cycling in European Beech Forests

    PubMed Central

    Dannenmann, Michael; Bilela, Silvija; Gasche, Rainer; Hanewinkel, Marc; Baltensweiler, Andri; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    European beech forests growing on marginal calcareous soils have been proposed to be vulnerable to decreased soil water availability. This could result in a large-scale loss of ecological services and economical value in a changing climate. In order to evaluate the potential consequences of this drought-sensitivity, we investigated potential species range shifts for European beech forests on calcareous soil in the 21st century by statistical species range distribution modelling for present day and projected future climate conditions. We found a dramatic decline by 78% until 2080. Still the physiological or biogeochemical mechanisms underlying the drought sensitivity of European beech are largely unknown. Drought sensitivity of beech is commonly attributed to plant physiological constraints. Furthermore, it has also been proposed that reduced soil water availability could promote nitrogen (N) limitation of European beech due to impaired microbial N cycling in soil, but this hypothesis has not yet been tested. Hence we investigated the influence of simulated climate change (increased temperatures, reduced soil water availability) on soil gross microbial N turnover and plant N uptake in the beech-soil interface of a typical mountainous beech forest stocking on calcareous soil in SW Germany. For this purpose, triple 15N isotope labelling of intact beech seedling-soil-microbe systems was combined with a space-for-time climate change experiment. We found that nitrate was the dominant N source for beech natural regeneration. Reduced soil water content caused a persistent decline of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and therefore, a massive attenuation of gross nitrification rates and nitrate availability in the soil. Consequently, nitrate and total N uptake of beech seedlings were strongly reduced so that impaired growth of beech seedlings was observed already after one year of exposure to simulated climatic change. We conclude that the N cycle in this ecosystem and here

  16. Climate Change Impairs Nitrogen Cycling in European Beech Forests.

    PubMed

    Dannenmann, Michael; Bimüller, Carolin; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Tejedor, Javier; Bilela, Silvija; Gasche, Rainer; Hanewinkel, Marc; Baltensweiler, Andri; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    European beech forests growing on marginal calcareous soils have been proposed to be vulnerable to decreased soil water availability. This could result in a large-scale loss of ecological services and economical value in a changing climate. In order to evaluate the potential consequences of this drought-sensitivity, we investigated potential species range shifts for European beech forests on calcareous soil in the 21st century by statistical species range distribution modelling for present day and projected future climate conditions. We found a dramatic decline by 78% until 2080. Still the physiological or biogeochemical mechanisms underlying the drought sensitivity of European beech are largely unknown. Drought sensitivity of beech is commonly attributed to plant physiological constraints. Furthermore, it has also been proposed that reduced soil water availability could promote nitrogen (N) limitation of European beech due to impaired microbial N cycling in soil, but this hypothesis has not yet been tested. Hence we investigated the influence of simulated climate change (increased temperatures, reduced soil water availability) on soil gross microbial N turnover and plant N uptake in the beech-soil interface of a typical mountainous beech forest stocking on calcareous soil in SW Germany. For this purpose, triple 15N isotope labelling of intact beech seedling-soil-microbe systems was combined with a space-for-time climate change experiment. We found that nitrate was the dominant N source for beech natural regeneration. Reduced soil water content caused a persistent decline of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and therefore, a massive attenuation of gross nitrification rates and nitrate availability in the soil. Consequently, nitrate and total N uptake of beech seedlings were strongly reduced so that impaired growth of beech seedlings was observed already after one year of exposure to simulated climatic change. We conclude that the N cycle in this ecosystem and here

  17. The role of the organic layer for phosphorus nutrition of young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) at two sites differing in soil Phosphorus availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauenstein, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Simon Hauenstein1, Thomas Pütz2, and Yvonne Oelmann1, 1 Geoecology, Department of Geosciences, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany 2 Agrosphere (IBG-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, Germany The accumulation of an organic layer in forests is linked to the ratio between litterfall rates and decomposition rates with decomposition rates being decelerated due to acidification and associated nutrient depletion with proceeding ecosystem development. Nevertheless, the nutrient pool in the organic layer might still represent an important source for Phosphorus (P) nutrition of forests on nutrient-poor soils. Our objective was to assess the importance of the organic layer to P nutrition of young beech trees at two sites differing in soil P availability. We established a mesocosm experiment including plants and soil from a Phosphorus depleted forest site on a Haplic Podzol in Lüss and a Phosphorus rich forest site on a Eutric Cambisol in Bad Brückenau either with or without the organic layer. After 1 year under outdoor conditions, we applied 33P to the pots. After 0h, 24h, 48h, 96h, 192h, 528h we destructively harvested the young beech trees (separated into leaves, branches, stems) and sampled the organic layer and mineral soil of the pots. In each soil horizon we measured concentrations of resin-extractable P, plant available P fractions and total P. We extracted the xylem sap of the whole 2-year-old trees by means of scholander pressure bomb. 33P activity was measured for every compartment in soil and plant. The applied 33P was recovered mainly in the organic layer in Lüss, whereas it was evenly distributed among organic and mineral horizons in pots of Bad Brückenau soil. Comparing pots with and without an organic layer, the specific 33P activity differed by 323% between pots with and without an organic layer present in the Lüss soil. For both sites, the presence of the organic layer increased 33P activity in xylem sap compared to the treatment without

  18. Interaction between beech and beech scale

    Treesearch

    D. Wainhouse

    1983-01-01

    Trees heavily infested with beech scale are commonly observed either singly or in small groups within infested forests. This appears to be due partly to the presence of resistant trees and also, in the U.K. at least, to the existence of sub-populations of scale insects, some of which appear to be adapted to individual host trees. It is suggested that the greater...

  19. Classifying Oriental Beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky.) Forest Sites Using Direct, Indirect and Remote Sensing Methods: A Case Study from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Günlü, Alkan; Baskent, Emin Zeki; Kadiogullari, Ali İhsan; Ercanli, İlker

    2008-01-01

    Determining the productivity of forest sites through various classification techniques is important for making appropriate forest management decisions. Forest sites were classified using direct and indirect (site index) and remote sensing (Landsat 7 ETM and Quickbird satellite image) methods. In the direct method, forest site classifications were assigned according to edafic (soil properties), climate (precipitation and temperature) and topographic (altitude, slope, aspect and landform) factors. Five different forest site classes (dry, moderate fresh, fresh, moist and highly moist) were determined. In the indirect method, the guiding curve was used to generate anamorphic site index (SI) equations resulting in three classes; good (SI=I-II), medium (SI=III) and poor (SI=IV-V). Forest sites were also determined with a remote sensing method (RSM) using supervised classification of Landsat 7 ETM and Quickbird satellite images with a 0.67 kappa statistic value and 73.3% accuracy assessments; 0.88 kappa statistic value and 90.7% accuracy assessments, respectively. Forest sites polygon themes obtained from the three methods were overlaid and areas in the same classes were computed with Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The results indicated that direct and SI methods were consistent as a 3% dry site (19.0 ha) was exactly determined by both the direct and SI methods as a site class IV. Comparison of SI and RMS methods indicated a small difference as the area was highly homogeneous and unmanaged. While 15.4 ha area (open and degraded areas) was not determined by SI but RSM. A 19.0 ha (100%) poor site was determined by the SI method, 14.9 ha (78%) poor site was in Landsat 7 ETM satellite image and 17.4 ha (92%) poor site in Quickbird satellite image. The relationship between direct and SI methods were statistically analyzed using chi-square test. The test indicated a statistically significant relationships between forest sites determined by direct method and Quicbird

  20. Classifying Oriental Beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky.) Forest Sites Using Direct, Indirect and Remote Sensing Methods: A Case Study from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Günlü, Alkan; Baskent, Emin Zeki; Kadiogullari, Ali İhsan; Ercanli, İlker

    2008-04-09

    Determining the productivity of forest sites through various classification techniques is important for making appropriate forest management decisions. Forest sites were classified using direct and indirect (site index) and remote sensing (Landsat 7 ETM and Quickbird satellite image) methods. In the direct method, forest site classifications were assigned according to edafic (soil properties), climate (precipitation and temperature) and topographic (altitude, slope, aspect and landform) factors. Five different forest site classes (dry, moderate fresh, fresh, moist and highly moist) were determined. In the indirect method, the guiding curve was used to generate anamorphic site index (SI) equations resulting in three classes; good (SI=I-II), medium (SI=III) and poor (SI=IV-V). Forest sites were also determined with a remote sensing method (RSM) using supervised classification of Landsat 7 ETM and Quickbird satellite images with a 0.67 kappa statistic value and 73.3% accuracy assessments; 0.88 kappa statistic value and 90.7% accuracy assessments, respectively. Forest sites polygon themes obtained from the three methods were overlaid and areas in the same classes were computed with Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The results indicated that direct and SI methods were consistent as a 3% dry site (19.0 ha) was exactly determined by both the direct and SI methods as a site class IV. Comparison of SI and RMS methods indicated a small difference as the area was highly homogeneous and unmanaged. While 15.4 ha area (open and degraded areas) was not determined by SI but RSM. A 19.0 ha (100%) poor site was determined by the SI method, 14.9 ha (78%) poor site was in Landsat 7 ETM satellite image and 17.4 ha (92%) poor site in Quickbird satellite image. The relationship between direct and SI methods were statistically analyzed using chi-square test. The test indicated a statistically significant relationships between forest sites determined by direct method and Quicbird

  1. Tree ring isotopes of beech and spruce in response to short-term climate variability across Central European sites: Common and contrasting physiological mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigt, Rosemarie; Klesse, Stefan; Treydte, Kerstin; Frank, David; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.

    2016-04-01

    The combined study of tree-ring width and stable C and O isotopes provides insight in the coherences between carbon allocation during stem growth and the preceding conditions of gas exchange and formation of photosynthates as all influenced by environmental variation. In this large-scale study comprising 10 sites across a range of climate gradients (temperature, precipitation) throughout Central Europe, we investigated tree-rings in European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees. The sampling design included larger and smaller trees. The short-term, i.e. year-to-year, variability in the isotope time series over 100 yrs was analyzed in relation to tree-ring growth and climate variation. The generally strong correlation between the year-to-year differences in δ13C (corrected for the atmospheric shift due to 13C-depleted CO2 from fossil combustion) and δ18O across most sites emphasized the role of stomatal conductance in controlling leaf gas exchange. However, the correlation between both isotopes decreased during some periods. At several sites this reduction in correlation was particularly pronounced during recent decades. This suggests a decoupling between stomatal and photosynthetic responses to environmental conditions on the one hand, and carbon allocation to stem tissue on the other hand. Variability in the isotopic ratio largely responded to summer climate, but was weakly correlated to annual stem growth. In contrast, climate sensitivity of radial growth in both species was rather site-dependent, and was strongest at the driest (in terms of soil water capacity) site. We will also present results of isotope responses with respect to extreme climate events. Understanding the underlying physiological mechanisms controlling the short-term variation in tree-ring signals will help to assess and more precisely constrain the possible range of growth performance of these ecologically and economically important tree species under future climate

  2. Water shortage affects the water and nitrogen balance in Central European beech forests.

    PubMed

    Gessler, A; Keitel, C; Nahm, M; Rennenberg, H

    2004-05-01

    Whilst forest policy promotes cultivation and regeneration of beech dominated forest ecosystems, beech itself is a highly drought sensitive tree species likely to suffer from the climatic conditions prognosticated for the current century. Taking advantage of model ecosystems with cool-moist and warm-dry local climate, the latter assumed to be representative for future climatic conditions, the effects of climate and silvicultural treatment (different thinning regimes) on water status, nitrogen balance and growth parameters of adult beech trees and beech regeneration in the understorey were assessed. In addition, validation experiments with beech seedlings were carried out under controlled conditions, mainly in order to assess the effect of drought on the competitive abilities of beech. As measures of water availability xylem flow, shoot water potential, stomatal conductance as well as delta (13)C and delta (18)O in different tissues (leaves, phloem, wood) were analysed. For the assessment of nitrogen balance we determined the uptake of inorganic nitrogen by the roots as well as total N content and soluble N compounds in different tissues of adult and young trees. Retrospective and current analysis of delta (13)C, growth and meteorological parameters revealed that beech growing under warm-dry climatic conditions were impaired in growth and water balance during periods with low rain-fall. Thinning affected water, N balance and growth mostly of young beech, but in a different way under different local climatic conditions. Under cool, moist conditions, representative for the current climatic and edaphic conditions in beech forests of Central Europe, thinning improves nutrient and water status consistent to published literature and long-term experience of forest practitioners. However, beech regeneration was impaired as a result of thinning at higher temperatures and under reduced water availability, as expected in future climate.

  3. A Shelterwood-Burn Technique for Regenerating Productive Upland Oak Sites in the Piedmont Region

    Treesearch

    Patrick H. Brose; David H. van Lear; Patrick D. Keyser

    1999-01-01

    Regenerating oak stands on productive uplandsires is widely recognized byforesters as a major problem in hardwood management. Recent research indicates that oak regeneration is more resistant to surface fires than its primary competitors on these sites if burning occurs 3 to 5 yr after a partial overstory harvest. This combination of cutting followed by fire (...

  4. Intra-specific variations in expression of stress-related genes in beech progenies are stronger than drought-induced responses.

    PubMed

    Carsjens, Caroline; Nguyen Ngoc, Quynh; Guzy, Jonas; Knutzen, Florian; Meier, Ina Christin; Müller, Markus; Finkeldey, Reiner; Leuschner, Christoph; Polle, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Rapidly decreasing water availability as a consequence of climate change is likely to endanger the range of long-lived tree species. A pressing question is, therefore, whether adaptation to drought exists in important temperate tree species like European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), a wide-spread, dominant forest tree in Central Europe. Here, five beech stands were selected along a precipitation gradient from moist to dry conditions. Neutral genetic markers revealed strong variation within and little differentiation between the populations. Natural regeneration from these stands was transferred to a common garden and used to investigate the expression of genes for abscisic acid (ABA)-related drought signaling [9-cis-epoxy-dioxygenase (NCED), protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C), early responsive to dehydration (ERD)] and stress protection [ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), glutamine amidotransferase (GAT)] that are involved in drought acclimation. We hypothesized that progenies from dry sites exhibit constitutively higher expression levels of ABA- and stress-related genes and are less drought responsive than progenies from moist sites. Transcript levels and stress responses (leaf area loss, membrane integrity) of well-irrigated and drought-stressed plants were measured during the early, mid- and late growing season. Principal component (PC) analysis ordered the beech progenies according to the mean annual precipitation at tree origin by the transcript levels of SOD, ALDH, GAT and ERD as major loadings along PC1. PC2 separated moist and drought treatments with PP2C levels as important loading. These results suggest that phosphatase-mediated signaling is flexibly acclimated to the current requirements, whereas stress compensatory measures exhibited genotypic variation, apparently underlying climate selection. In contrast to expectation, the drought responses were less pronounced than the progeny-related differences and the

  5. Regeneration

    Treesearch

    George A. Schier; Wayne D. Shepperd; John R. Jones

    1985-01-01

    There are basically two approaches to regenerating aspen stands-sexual reproduction using seed, or vegetative regeneration by root suckering. In the West, root suckering is the most practical method. The advantage of having an existing, well established root system capable of producing numerous root suckers easily outweighs natural or artificial reforestation in the...

  6. Site index model for naturally regenerated even-aged longleaf pine

    Treesearch

    Dwight K. Lauer; John S. Kush

    2013-01-01

    Data from the Regional Longleaf Growth Study (339 permanent sample plots) were used to develop a site index model for naturally regenerated, even-aged longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). The site index equation was derived using the generalized algebraic difference approach and is base-age invariant. Using height as a measure of site productivity...

  7. Some aspects of the ecology of Nectria on beech

    Treesearch

    David Lonsdale; Christine. Sherriff

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the mycoflora of beech bark infested with Cryptococcus fagisuga suggested that Nectria coccinea can colonise sites on and in the outer tissues, and that invasion of imer bark could later develop. Although these sites harboured fungi antagonistic to N. coccinea, experiments suggested that it is...

  8. Bone regeneration at dental implant sites with suspended stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, R C; Park, Y K; Cho, J J; Kim, S K; Heo, S J; Koak, J Y; Lee, J H

    2014-10-01

    primary BMMSC isolation have bone regeneration capacity like that of BMMSCs, not only in vitro but also in vivo. ECM was valuable for propagation of MSCs for cell-based bone regeneration. Therefore, the suspended cells could also be useful tools for bone regeneration after implant surgery. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  9. Armillaria mellea and mortality of beech affected by beech bark disease

    Treesearch

    Philip M. Wargo

    1983-01-01

    The role of Armillaria mellea in the mortality of beech trees affected by beech bark disease was determined by excavating root systems of beech trees infested by beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga, or also infected by the bark fungus, Nectria coccinea var. faginata. Only trees infected by

  10. Battling beech bark disease: establishment of beech seed orchards in Michigan

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Koch; Robert L. Heyd

    2013-01-01

    Amidst the dead, dying, and deformed beech trees left in the wake of beech bark disease (BBD), we are fortunate to find beech trees that remain healthy even in heavily infested areas. In stands across several US states it has been reported that disease-free beech trees are often found in clusters, providing evidence that resistance could be a genetic trait. Trees...

  11. Assessment of beech scale resistance in full- and half-sibling American beech families

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Koch; David W. Carey; Mary E. Mason; C. Dana Nelson

    2010-01-01

    A beech bark disease infested American beech tree (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) and two uninfested trees were selected in a mature natural stand in Michigan, USA, and mated to form two full-sib families for evaluating the inheritance of resistance to beech scale (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind.), the insect element of beech bark disease....

  12. Weed Control and Site Preparation for Natural Regeneration of Cottonwood

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Johnson

    1962-01-01

    Some of the finest forest land in the country is in the batture of the Mississippi River - the area between the levees and the river. Many of these sites once bore nearly pure stands of cottonwood, and cottonwood probably is the most valuable timber crop that could be grown on them today. After the old-growth was harvested, though, the sites were taken over largely by...

  13. An Updated Site Index Equation for Naturally Regenerated Longleaf Pine Stands

    Treesearch

    Jyoti N. Rayamajhi; John S. Kush; Ralph S. Meldahl

    1999-01-01

    From 1964 to 1967. the U.S. Forest Service established the Regional Longleaf Growth Study (RLGS) in the Gulf States with the objective of obtaining a database for the development of prediction systems for naturally regenerated, even-aged. longleaf pine stands. The database has been used for numerous quantitative studies. One of these efforts was a site index equation...

  14. Using Shelterwood Harvests and Prescribed Fire to Regenerate Oak Stands on Productive Upland Sites

    Treesearch

    Patrick H. Brose; David H. van Lear; Roderick Cooper

    1999-01-01

    Regenerating oak stands on productive upland sites in the Piedmont region is a major problem because of intense competition from yellow-poplar. As a potential solution to this problem, we tested the hypothesis that a shelterwood harvest of an oak-dominated stand. followed several years later by a prescribed fire, would adequately regeneraie the stand. Three oak-...

  15. American beech resistance to Cryptococcus fagisuga

    Treesearch

    David R. Houston

    1983-01-01

    American beech trees that were free of beech bark disease in forests long-affected by beech bark disease were challenged with C. fagisuga using the 'foam' technique. Trees were resistant: no insects reached maturity. In Nova Scotia, 12-15 disease-free trees per hectare occurred in the stands examined. Many of these trees occurred in groups...

  16. Beech status in New England's aftermath forests

    Treesearch

    George L. McCaskill; Randall S. Morin

    2012-01-01

    American beech (Fagus grandifolia) is one of the three most dominant tree species occupying the northern hardwoods forest of New England. We studied Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York to capture those areas with higher concentrations of beech. The status of beech in the northern hardwood forests is important because of the long-term impacts...

  17. Site preparation as an aid to sugar pine regeneration

    Treesearch

    H.A. Fowells

    1944-01-01

    On many thousands of acres of cut-over timber lands in California, brush of various species has gained such control of the soil that the success of natural reproduction is problematical. This condition is particularly serious in the high site quality sugar pine-white fir and sugar pine-ponderosa pine types, where the maintenance of sugar pine in the stands is a...

  18. Intra- and interspecific interactions of Scots pine and European beech in mixed secondary forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanifard, Yousef; Stereńczak, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    By the mid successional stages, secondary forests of Scots pine in Europe are dominated by mixed stands of pioneer Scots pine and late-successional European beech. The objective of this study was to explore the interactions of pine and beech with their conspecific and heterospecific neighbours in these forests. To accomplish the objective, pine and beech trees were stem-mapped in forty 500 m2 plots randomly located within 18 mixed stands in Milomlyn Forest District, northern Poland. The interactions within and between the species were analysed through two structurally different univariate and bivariate second-order summary statistics, i.e. pair correlation function g(r) and mark correlation function kmm(r). Field measurements showed that the overstorey was dominated by even-aged pine, whereas uneven-aged beech was the only species in the understorey. Pine trees presented an aggregation, while beech trees exhibited a dispersed structure in all stands. In addition, pine trees showed strong attraction to beech trees at small spatial scales (0-2 m). Negative correlation was found between tree height and diameter at breast height of beech, while there was no correlation between height and diameter of pine trees. We conclude that pine trees exhibit negative intraspecific interactions at small spatial scales that are mostly driven by their competitive interactions. Beech trees show strong positive intraspecific interactions and form clumps within pine canopy cover. The strong positive interspecific interactions of pine and beech are the outcome of their different shade tolerance. Our results help to explain successful coexistence of pine and beech in the study site and highlight detailed tree-tree interactions of the species in mixed stands.

  19. Biologic Agents for Periodontal Regeneration and Implant Site Development

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-López del Amo, Fernando; Tang, ZhiHui; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of molecular mediators or biologic agents has increased tremendously during the last decade in periodontology and dental implantology. Implant site development and reconstruction of the lost periodontium represent main fields in which these molecular mediators have been employed and investigated. Different growth factors trigger different reactions in the tissues of the periodontium at various cellular levels. Proliferation, migration, and differentiation constitute the main target areas of these molecular mediators. It was the purpose of this comprehensive review to describe the origin and rationale, evidence, and the most current understanding of the following biologic agents: Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB), Enamel Matrix Derivate (EMD), Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF), Recombinant Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (rhFGF-2), Bone Morphogenic Proteins (BMPs, BMP-2 and BMP-7), Teriparatide PTH, and Growth Differential Factor-5 (GDF-5). PMID:26509173

  20. Another scale insect on beech

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1962-01-01

    A scale insect, tentatively identified as Xylococculus betulae (Perg.) Morrison, is responsible for one type of bark roughening that is commonly seen on American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) trees in certain areas of New England. The insect has also been found on paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) and...

  1. Amputation induces stem cell mobilization to sites of injury during planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Guedelhoefer, Otto C; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2012-10-01

    How adult stem cell populations are recruited for tissue renewal and repair is a fundamental question of biology. Mobilization of stem cells out of their niches followed by correct migration and differentiation at a site of tissue turnover or injury are important requirements for proper tissue maintenance and regeneration. However, we understand little about the mechanisms that control this process, possibly because the best studied vertebrate adult stem cell systems are not readily amenable to in vivo observation. Furthermore, few clear examples of the recruitment of fully potent stem cells, compared with limited progenitors, are known. Here, we show that planarian stem cells directionally migrate to amputation sites during regeneration. We also show that during tissue homeostasis they are stationary. Our study not only uncovers the existence of specific recruitment mechanisms elicited by amputation, but also sets the stage for the systematic characterization of evolutionarily conserved stem cell regulatory processes likely to inform stem cell function and dysfunction in higher organisms, including humans.

  2. Using templated agarose scaffolds to promote axon regeneration through sites of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Koffler, Jacob; Samara, Ramsey F; Rosenzweig, Ephron S

    2014-01-01

    The past 30 years of research in spinal cord injury (SCI) have revealed that, under certain conditions, some types of axons are able to regenerate. To aid these axons in bridging the lesion site, many experimenters place cellular grafts at the lesion. However, to increase the potential for functional recovery, it is likely advantageous to maximize the number of axons that reach the intact spinal cord on the other side of the lesion. Implanting linear-channeled scaffolds at the lesion site provides growing axons with linear growth paths, which minimizes the distance they must travel to reach healthy tissue. Moreover, the linear channels help the regenerating axons maintain the correct mediolateral and dorsoventral position in the spinal cord, which may also improve functional recovery by keeping the axons nearer to their correct targets. Here, we provide a protocol to perform a full spinal cord transection in rats that accommodates an implanted scaffold.

  3. Establishment success of sooty beech scale insects, Ultracoelostoma sp., on different host tree species in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Wardhaugh, Carl W.; Didham, Raphael K.

    2006-01-01

    crawlers being better provisioned to search for appropriate establishment sites. The results of this study indicate that beech scale insects perform better on mountain beech at this site, although crawlers did not preferentially establish on mountain beech. PMID:19537979

  4. Beech bark disease: the oldest "new" threat to American beech in the United States

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Koch

    2010-01-01

    Beech bark disease (BBD) has been killing American beech trees in eastern North America since the late 1890s (Ehrlich, 1934). The disease is initiated by feeding of the beech scale insect, Cryptococcus fagisuga, which leads to the development of small fissures in the bark. Over time, as the population of scale insects builds on the bark, the small...

  5. A technique to artificially infest beech bark with beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga (Lindinger)

    Treesearch

    David R. Houston

    1982-01-01

    Beech bark disease is initiated when bark of beech trees (Fagus spp.) is attacked by the beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lindinger. The effects of the insect predispose tissues to bark cankering fungi of the genus Nectria. Critical studies of insect-fungus-host interactions had been stymied by the inability to...

  6. Comparisons of protein profiles of beech bark disease resistant and susceptible American beech (Fagus grandifolia)

    Treesearch

    Mary E. Mason; Jennifer L. Koch; Marek Krasowski; Judy. Loo

    2013-01-01

    Beech bark disease is an insect-fungus complex that damages and often kills American beech trees and has major ecological and economic impacts on forests of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canadian forests. The disease begins when exotic beech scale insects feed on the bark of trees, and is followed by infection of damaged bark tissues by one of the...

  7. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 on Microbial Community Structure at the Plant-Soil Interface of Young Beech Trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) Grown at Two Sites with Contrasting Climatic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Engel, Marion; Kublik, Susanne; Dannenmann, Michael; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Soil microbial community responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) occur mainly indirectly via CO2-induced plant growth stimulation leading to quantitative as well as qualitative changes in rhizodeposition and plant litter. In order to gain insight into short-term, site-specific effects of eCO2 on the microbial community structure at the plant-soil interface, young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) from two opposing mountainous slopes with contrasting climatic conditions were incubated under ambient (360 ppm) CO2 concentrations in a greenhouse. One week before harvest, half of the trees were incubated for 2 days under eCO2 (1,100 ppm) conditions. Shifts in the microbial community structure in the adhering soil as well as in the root rhizosphere complex (RRC) were investigated via TRFLP and 454 pyrosequencing based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Multivariate analysis of the community profiles showed clear changes of microbial community structure between plants grown under ambient and elevated CO2 mainly in RRC. Both TRFLP and 454 pyrosequencing showed a significant decrease in the microbial diversity and evenness as a response of CO2 enrichment. While Alphaproteobacteria dominated by Rhizobiales decreased at eCO2, Betaproteobacteria, mainly Burkholderiales, remained unaffected. In contrast, Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria, predominated by Pseudomonadales and Myxococcales, respectively, increased at eCO2. Members of the order Actinomycetales increased, whereas within the phylum Acidobacteria subgroup Gp1 decreased, and the subgroups Gp4 and Gp6 increased under atmospheric CO2 enrichment. Moreover, Planctomycetes and Firmicutes, mainly members of Bacilli, increased under eCO2. Overall, the effect intensity of eCO2 on soil microbial communities was dependent on the distance to the roots. This effect was consistent for all trees under investigation; a site-specific effect of eCO2 in response to the origin of the trees was not observed.

  8. Water fluxes within beech stands in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Holst, Jutta; Grote, Rüdiger; Offermann, Christine; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Gessler, Arthur; Mayer, Helmut; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the water balances of two beech stands (Fagus sylvatica L.) on opposite slopes (NE, SW) of a narrow valley near Tuttlingen in the southern Swabian Jura, a low mountain range in Southwest Germany. Our analysis combines results from continuous measurements of forest meteorological variables significant to the forest water balance, stand transpiration (ST) estimates from sap flow measurements, and model simulations of microclimate and water fluxes. Two different forest hydrological models (DNDC and BROOK90) were tested for their suitability to represent the particular sites. The investigation covers the years 2001-2007. Central aims were (1) to evaluate meteorological simulations of variables below the forest canopy, (2) to evaluate ST, (3) to quantify annual water fluxes for both beech stands using the evaluated hydrological models, and (4) to analyse the model simulations with regard to assumptions inherent in the respective model. Overall, both models were very well able to reproduce the observed dynamics of the soil water content in the uppermost 30 cm. However, the degree of fit depended on the year and season. The comparison of experimentally determined ST within the beech stand on the NE-slope during the growing season of 2007 with simulated transpiration did not yield a reliable statistical relationship. The simulation of water fluxes for the beech stand on the NE- and SW-slopes showed similar results for vegetation-related fluxes with both models, but different with respect to runoff and percolation flows. Overall, the higher evaporation demand on the warmer SW-slope did not lead to a significantly increased drought stress for the vegetation but was reflected mainly in decreased water loss from the system. This finding is discussed with regard to potential climate change and its impact on beech growth.

  9. Upland beech trees significantly contribute to forest methane exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacova, Katerina; Maier, Martin; Svobodova, Katerina; Halaburt, Ellen; Haddad, Sally; Lang, Friederike; Urban, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Methane (CH4) can be emitted not only from soil, but also from plants. Fluxes of CH4were predominantly investigated in riparian herbaceous plants, whereas studies on trees, particularly those lacking an aerenchyma, are rare. In soil produced CH4 can be taken up by roots, transported via intercellular spaces and the aerenchyma system, or transpiration stream to aboveground plant tissues and released to the atmosphere via lenticels or stomata. Although CH4 might be also produced by microorganisms living in plant tissues or photochemical processes in plants, these processes are relatively minor. It has been shown that seedlings of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) emit CH4 from its stems despite the lack of an aerenchyma. Our objectives were to determine the CH4 fluxes from mature beech trees and adjacent soil under natural field conditions, and to estimate the role of trees in the CH4exchange within the soil-tree-atmosphere continuum. Measurements were conducted in two mountain beech forests with different geographical and climatic conditions (White Carpathians, Czech Republic; Black Forest, Germany). CH4 fluxes at stems (profile) and root bases level were simultaneously measured together with soil-atmosphere fluxes using static chamber systems followed by chromatographic analysis or continuous laser detection of CH4 concentrations. Our study shows that mature beech trees have the ability to exchange CH4 with the atmosphere. The beech stems emitted CH4 into the atmosphere at the White Carpathians site in the range from 2.00 to 179 μg CH4 m-2 stem area h-1, while CH4 flux rates ranged between -1.34 to 1.73 μg CH4 m-2 h-1 at the Black Forest site. The root bases of beech trees from the White Carpathians released CH4 into the atmosphere (from 0.62 to 49.8 μg CH4 m-2 root area h-1), whereas a prevailing deposition was observed in the Black Forest (from -1.21 to 0.81 μg CH4 m-2 h-1). These fluxes seem to be affected by soil water content and its spatial heterogeneity

  10. Imaging spectroscopy in soil-water based site suitability assessment for artificial regeneration to Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Maarit; Närhi, Paavo; Sutinen, Raimo

    In a humid northern boreal climate, the success rate of artificial regeneration to Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) can be improved by including a soil water content (SWC) based assessment of site suitability in the reforestation planning process. This paper introduces an application of airborne visible-near-infrared imaging spectroscopic data to identify suitable subregions of forest compartments for the low SWC-tolerant Scots pine. The spatial patterns of understorey plant species communities, recorded by the AISA (Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications) sensor, were demonstrated to be dependant on the underlying SWC. According to the nonmetric multidimensional scaling and correlation results twelve understorey species were found to be most abundant on sites with high soil SWCs. The abundance of bare soil, rocks and abundance of more than ten species indicated low soil SWCs. The spatial patterns of understorey are attributed to time-stability of the underlying SWC patterns. A supervised artificial neural network (radial basis functional link network, probabilistic neural network) approach was taken to classify AISA imaging spectrometer data with dielectric (as a measure volumetric SWC) ground referencing into regimes suitable and unsuitable for Scots pine. The accuracy assessment with receiver operating characteristics curves demonstrated a maximum of 74.1% area under the curve values which indicated moderate success of the NN modelling. The results signified the importance of the training set's quality, adequate quantity (>2.43 points/ha) and NN algorithm selection over the NN algorithm training parameter optimization to perfection. This methodology for the analysis of site suitability of Scots pine can be recommended, especially when artificial regeneration of former mixed wood Norway spruce ( Picea abies L. Karst) - downy birch ( Betula pubenscens Ehrh.) stands is being considered, so that artificially regenerated areas to Scots pine can be optimized

  11. Comparison of protein profiles of beech bark disease-resistant or beech bark disease-susceptible American beech

    Treesearch

    Mary E. Mason; Marek Krasowski; Judy Loo; Jennifer. Koch

    2011-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of beech bark proteins from trees resistant and susceptible to beech bark disease (BBD) was conducted. Sixteen trees from eight geographically isolated stands, 10 resistant (healthy) and 6 susceptible (diseased/infested) trees, were studied. The genetic complexity of the sample unit, the sampling across a wide geographic area, and the complexity of...

  12. Status of beech bark disease in Pennsylvania

    Treesearch

    Barry. Towers

    1983-01-01

    Results of periodical surveys for beech bark disease in Pennsylvania from 1958 to 1982 reveal that the disease is slowly spreading in a south- and westward direction. Although the disease complex is still confined to the northern and eastern portions of the state, beech mortality is occurring in the areas infested longest.

  13. Micropropagation of juvenile and mature american beech

    Treesearch

    Melanie J. Barker; Paula M. Pijut; Michael E. Ostry; David R. Houston

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to micropropagate juvenile and mature American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) resistant to beech bark disease. Shoot tips (from juvenile seedlings and root sprouts of mature trees) and buds from branches of mature trees, were cultured and multiplied on aspen culture medium supplemented with 0.89 ?M 6-benzyladenine, 0.27 ?M a-...

  14. Leaching and persistence of herbicides for kudzu (Pueraria montana) control on pine regeneration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Taylor, John, W.

    2006-03-01

    Kudzu is an exotic vine that threatens forests in the southeastern United States. It can climb, overtop, and subsequently kill new seedlings or mature trees. Herbicides are commonly used to control kudzu; however, eradication might require retreatment for 3 to 10 yr in young stands and 7 to 10 yr for mature stands. Clopyralid, picloram, triclopyr, metsulfuron, and tebuthiuron exert various degrees of control, depending on soil type, meteorological conditions, herbicide formulation, seasonal application, characteristics of the kudzu stand, and frequency and number of herbicide. Field residue data for soil or leachate are lacking for all of these herbicides when they are used in actual forest regeneration programs in the Coastal Plain. These data are needed to assess the relative potential for the herbicides to leach into groundwater or to move off-site into sensitive ecological areas of the Coastal Plain in which sandy soils predominate and the groundwater tends to be shallow. As part of an integrated pest management program to control kudzu on forest regeneration areas at the Savannah River Site near New Ellenton, SC, five herbicides were evaluated from the standpoints of herbicide leaching, kudzu control, and plant community development. Three herbicide chemical families were represented. This included pyridinecarboxylic acid herbicides (clopyralid, picloram 1 2,4-D, and triclopyr), a sulfonylurea herbicide (metsulfuron), and a substituted urea herbicide (tebuthiuron).

  15. Amputation induces stem cell mobilization to sites of injury during planarian regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Guedelhoefer, Otto C.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    How adult stem cell populations are recruited for tissue renewal and repair is a fundamental question of biology. Mobilization of stem cells out of their niches followed by correct migration and differentiation at a site of tissue turnover or injury are important requirements for proper tissue maintenance and regeneration. However, we understand little about the mechanisms that control this process, possibly because the best studied vertebrate adult stem cell systems are not readily amenable to in vivo observation. Furthermore, few clear examples of the recruitment of fully potent stem cells, compared with limited progenitors, are known. Here, we show that planarian stem cells directionally migrate to amputation sites during regeneration. We also show that during tissue homeostasis they are stationary. Our study not only uncovers the existence of specific recruitment mechanisms elicited by amputation, but also sets the stage for the systematic characterization of evolutionarily conserved stem cell regulatory processes likely to inform stem cell function and dysfunction in higher organisms, including humans. PMID:22899852

  16. Comparing regeneration techniques for afforesting previously farmed bottomland hardwood sites in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockhart, B.R.; Keeland, B.; McCoy, J.; Dean, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    A study was implemented to test site preparation methods and artificial regeneration of three oak (Quercus spp.) species on four agricultural fields in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley in Louisiana, USA. Six years after establishment, few consistent differences were found in oak density between sowing acorn methods (seed drill versus broadcast seeding), autumn sowing versus spring sowing, and sowing acorns versus planting oak seedlings. Results indicated that some degree of site preparation is needed to establish oak seedlings but few differences were found between site preparation treatments. These results indicate that no one prescription for oak regeneration fits all potential afforestation projects in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Successful bottomland hardwood afforestation projects will require plans that include specific objectives, site evaluation, and a regeneration prescription prior to sowing the first seed or planting the first seedling.

  17. Variation in Ecophysiological Traits and Drought Tolerance of Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Seedlings from Different Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cocozza, Claudia; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, L'ubica; Marino, Stefano; Maiuro, Lucia; Alvino, Arturo; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Bolte, Andreas; Tognetti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Frequency and intensity of heat waves and drought events are expected to increase in Europe due to climate change. European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is one of the most important native tree species in Europe. Beech populations originating throughout its native range were selected for common-garden experiments with the aim to determine whether there are functional variations in drought stress responses among different populations. One-year old seedlings from four to seven beech populations were grown and drought-treated in a greenhouse, replicating the experiment at two contrasting sites, in Italy (Mediterranean mountains) and Germany (Central Europe). Experimental findings indicated that: (1) drought (water stress) mainly affected gas exchange describing a critical threshold of drought response between 30 and 26% SWA for photosynthetic rate and Ci/Ca, respectively; (2) the Ci to Ca ratio increased substantially with severe water stress suggesting a stable instantaneous water use efficiency and an efficient regulation capacity of water balance achieved by a tight stomatal control; (3) there was a different response to water stress among the considered beech populations, differently combining traits, although there was not a well-defined variability in drought tolerance. A combined analysis of functional and structural traits for detecting stress signals in beech seedlings is suggested to assess plant performance under limiting moisture conditions and, consequently, to estimate evolutionary potential of beech under a changing environmental scenario. PMID:27446118

  18. Growth and Fusiform Rust Responses of Piedmont Loblolly Pine After Severa1 Site Preparation and Regeneration Methods

    Treesearch

    W. Henry McNab

    1990-01-01

    Cutover pine-hardwood sites in the Piedmont of central Georgia were prepared by prescribed burning or drum chopping and regenerated to loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) by planting or direct-seeding. Site preparation had little effect on soil physical properties. After an average of 12 years, trees were larger in dbh and total height, the merchantable...

  19. Public preferences for nontimber benefits of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) stands regenerated by different site preparation methods

    Treesearch

    Jianbang Gan; Stephen H. Kolison; James Miller

    2000-01-01

    This study assesses public preferences for nontimber benefits of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)stands regenerated 1.5 yr earlier using different site preparation treatments at national forest and industrial forestry sites. Treatments tested on the Tuskegee National Forest were none, chainsaw felling, tree injection, and soil-active herbicide. At the...

  20. Decomposition of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and pine (Pinus nigra) litter along an Alpine elevation gradient: Decay and nutrient release.

    PubMed

    Berger, Torsten W; Duboc, Olivier; Djukic, Ika; Tatzber, Michael; Gerzabek, Martin H; Zehetner, Franz

    2015-08-01

    Litter decomposition is an important process for cycling of nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate direct and indirect effects of climate on litter decomposition along an altitudinal gradient in a temperate Alpine region. Foliar litter of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Black pine (Pinus nigra) was incubated in litterbags during two years in the Hochschwab massif of the Northern Limestone Alps of Austria. Eight incubation sites were selected following an altitudinal/climatic transect from 1900 to 900 m asl. The average remaining mass after two years of decomposition amounted to 54% (beech) and 50% (pine). Net release of N, P, Na, Al, Fe and Mn was higher in pine than in beech litter due to high immobilization (retention) rates of beech litter. However, pine litter retained more Ca than beech litter. Altitude retarded decay (mass loss and associated C release) in beech litter during the first year only but had a longer lasting effect on decaying pine litter. Altitude comprises a suite of highly auto-correlated characteristics (climate, vegetation, litter, soil chemistry, soil microbiology, snow cover) that influence litter decomposition. Hence, decay and nutrient release of incubated litter is difficult to predict by altitude, except during the early stage of decomposition, which seemed to be controlled by climate. Reciprocal litter transplant along the elevation gradient yielded even relatively higher decay of pine litter on beech forest sites after a two-year adaptation period of the microbial community.

  1. Decomposition of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and pine (Pinus nigra) litter along an Alpine elevation gradient: Decay and nutrient release

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Torsten W.; Duboc, Olivier; Djukic, Ika; Tatzber, Michael; Gerzabek, Martin H.; Zehetner, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition is an important process for cycling of nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate direct and indirect effects of climate on litter decomposition along an altitudinal gradient in a temperate Alpine region. Foliar litter of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Black pine (Pinus nigra) was incubated in litterbags during two years in the Hochschwab massif of the Northern Limestone Alps of Austria. Eight incubation sites were selected following an altitudinal/climatic transect from 1900 to 900 m asl. The average remaining mass after two years of decomposition amounted to 54% (beech) and 50% (pine). Net release of N, P, Na, Al, Fe and Mn was higher in pine than in beech litter due to high immobilization (retention) rates of beech litter. However, pine litter retained more Ca than beech litter. Altitude retarded decay (mass loss and associated C release) in beech litter during the first year only but had a longer lasting effect on decaying pine litter. Altitude comprises a suite of highly auto-correlated characteristics (climate, vegetation, litter, soil chemistry, soil microbiology, snow cover) that influence litter decomposition. Hence, decay and nutrient release of incubated litter is difficult to predict by altitude, except during the early stage of decomposition, which seemed to be controlled by climate. Reciprocal litter transplant along the elevation gradient yielded even relatively higher decay of pine litter on beech forest sites after a two-year adaptation period of the microbial community. PMID:26240437

  2. Prescribed burning ineffective for improving turkey habitat on a recently regenerated mesic site in southern Appalachian Mountains

    Treesearch

    W. Henry McNab; Ted M. Oprean; Erik C. Berg

    2007-01-01

    Recently regenerated mesic sites in the southern Appalachian Mountains often provide poor brooding areas for wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) because shade from thick stands of hardwood saplings reduces cover of herbaceous vegetation and the accompanying insects that provide the essential protein needed by young poults. An operational prescribed...

  3. Comparing regeneration techniques for afforesting previously farmed bottomland hardwood sites in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley, USA

    Treesearch

    Brian Roy Lockhart; Bob Keeland; John McCoy; Thomas J. Dean

    2003-01-01

    A study was implemented to test site preparation methods and artificial regeneration of three oak (Quercus spp.) species on four agricultural fields in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley in Louisiana, USA. Six years after establishment, few consistent differences were found in oak density between sowing acorn methods (seed drill versus broadcast...

  4. A technique to screen American beech for resistance to the beech scale insect (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind.)

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Koch; David W. Carey

    2014-01-01

    Beech bark disease (BBD) results in high levels of initial mortality, leaving behind survivor trees that are greatly weakened and deformed. The disease is initiated by feeding activities of the invasive beech scale insect, Cryptococcus fagisuga, which creates entry points for infection by one of the Neonectria species of fungus....

  5. Effect of reserve trees on regeneration in central Wisconsin oak sites

    Treesearch

    Michael C. Demchik; Kevin M. Schwartz; Elijah Mujuri; Emily E. Demchik

    2017-01-01

    Anecdotally, higher retention levels after harvest are believed to have a negative impact on oak (Quercus) regeneration accumulation. For this study, harvests with four retention levels of 0, 15, 30, and 45 percent were established to determine the impact of overstory retention on the success of oak regeneration after harvest. Previous research has...

  6. Comparison of site preparation methods and stock types for artificial regeneration of oaks in bottomlands

    Treesearch

    Gordon W. Shaw; Daniel C. Dey; John Kabrick; Jennifer Grabner; Rose-Marie Muzika

    2003-01-01

    Regenerating oak in floodplains is problematic and current silvicultural methods are not always reliable. We are evaluating the field performance of a new nursery product, the RPM™ seedling, and the benefit of soil mounding and a cover crop of redtop grass to the survival and growth of pin oak and swamp white oak regeneration on former bottomland cropfields....

  7. BVOC emissions from English oak (Quercus robur) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica) along a latitudinal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka; Holst, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    English oak (Quercus robur) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica) are amongst the most common tree species growing in Europe, influencing the annual biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) budget in this region. Studies have shown great variability in the emissions from these tree species, originating from both genetic variability and differences in climatic conditions between study sites. In this study, we examine the emission patterns for English oak and European beech in genetically identical individuals and the potential variation within and between sites. Leaf scale BVOC emissions, net assimilation rates and stomatal conductance were measured at the International Phenological Garden sites of Ljubljana (Slovenia), Grafrath (Germany) and Taastrup (Denmark). Sampling was conducted during three campaigns between May and July 2014. Our results show that English oak mainly emitted isoprene whilst European beech released monoterpenes. The relative contribution of the most emitted compounds from the two species remained stable across latitudes. The contribution of isoprene for English oak from Grafrath and Taastrup ranged between 92 and 97 % of the total BVOC emissions, whilst sabinene and limonene for European beech ranged from 30.5 to 40.5 and 9 to 15 % respectively for all three sites. The relative contribution of isoprene for English oak at Ljubljana was lower (78 %) in comparison to the other sites, most likely caused by frost damage in early spring. The variability in total leaf-level emission rates from the same site was small, whereas there were greater differences between sites. These differences were probably caused by short-term weather events and plant stress. A difference in age did not seem to affect the emission patterns for the selected trees. This study highlights the significance of within-genotypic variation of BVOC emission capacities for English oak and European beech, the influence of climatic variables such as temperature and light on emission

  8. Status of beech bark disease in the Province of Quebec

    Treesearch

    Denis. Lachance

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of beech bark disease has not changed significantly in recent years in Quebec. It has remained as scattered infected stands located within relatively old beech-scale-infested areas. This scale covers the southeastern half of the beech natural range in the province and it is spreading slowly westward.

  9. Current status of beech bark disease in France

    Treesearch

    R. Perrin

    1983-01-01

    The two organisms involved in beech bark disease are endemic everywhere in France. Nevertheless the disease is restricted to the northern part of the beech's range, where it grows on the plains. During the last five years beech bark disease has shown a general decrease in severity but there have been local increases in the north and north-eastern parts of forests...

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies a major gene for beech bark disease resistance in American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.)

    Treesearch

    Irina Ćalić; Jennifer Koch; David Carey; Charles Addo-Quaye; John E. Carlson; David B. Neale

    2017-01-01

    Background: The American Beech tree (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.), native to eastern North America, is ecologically important and provides high quality wood products. This species is susceptible to beech bark disease (BBD) and is facing high rates of mortality in North America. The disease occurs from an interaction between the woolly beech scale...

  11. Artificial regeneration of northern red oak and white oak on high-quality sites: effect of root morphology and relevant biological characteristics

    Treesearch

    Paul P. Kormanik; Shi-Jean S. Sung; Stanley J. Zarnoch; G. Thomas Tibbs

    2002-01-01

    Northern red oak (Quercus rubra) and white oak (Quercus alba) are important components of high-quality mesic sites and are essential as lumber species and hard mast producers. Regeneration of these species has been difficult, and their absence in newly regenerated stands is a major concern of foresters and wildlife biologists....

  12. Effects of pre- and post-harvest site preparation treatments on natural regeneration success in a mixed hardwood stand after 10 years

    Treesearch

    Wayne K. Clatterbuck; Martin R. Schubert

    2010-01-01

    Advance regeneration, sprouts and seeds are sources of reproduction in the regeneration of mixed hardwood stands following harvest. The control of undesirable, non-commercial, competing vegetation is a common technique in site preparation to promote the establishment and growth of desirable species. This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of pre- and post...

  13. Templated agarose scaffolds for the support of motor axon regeneration into sites of complete spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingyong; Lu, Paul; Bednark, Bridget; Lynam, Dan; Conner, James M; Sakamoto, Jeff; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2013-02-01

    Bioengineered scaffolds have the potential to support and guide injured axons after spinal cord injury, contributing to neural repair. In previous studies we have reported that templated agarose scaffolds can be fabricated into precise linear arrays and implanted into the partially injured spinal cord, organizing growth and enhancing the distance over which local spinal cord axons and ascending sensory axons extend into a lesion site. However, most human injuries are severe, sparing only thin rims of spinal cord tissue in the margins of a lesion site. Accordingly, in the present study we examined whether template agarose scaffolds seeded with bone marrow stromal cells secreting Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) would support regeneration into severe, complete spinal cord transection sites. Moreover, we tested responses of motor axon populations originating from the brainstem. We find that templated agarose scaffolds support motor axon regeneration into a severe spinal cord injury model and organize axons into fascicles of highly linear configuration. BDNF significantly enhances axonal growth. Collectively, these findings support the feasibility of scaffold implantation for enhancing central regeneration after even severe central nervous system injury.

  14. Evaluation of the bone regeneration potential of bioactive glass in implant site development surgeries: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Andreas L; Kotsakis, Georgios A; Kumar, Tarun; Hinrichs, James E; Romanos, Georgios

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the efficacy of bioactive glass (BG) in bone regeneration for implant site development procedures. The following specific question was formulated with reference to Population, Intervention, Control, Outcomes (PICO): "In persons that undergo bone regeneration surgeries for implant site development, what histological outcomes does the use of BG yield, alone or in combination with AB, compared to positive or negative controls?". The 1st phase of screening yielded 400 titles and abstracts. A total of 12 studies reporting on the use of bioactive glass were scrutinized for inclusion in the final analysis and 5 studies were selected for qualitative synthesis of the results. Data were divided into two categories: ridge preservation (n = 2) and sinus augmentation (n = 3). Within the limitations of this review, it can be concluded that (1) the combination of BG with AB chips in a 1:1 ratio is an efficacious treatment modality for direct sinus augmentation, with histological results comparable to 100 % AB. (2) When used for ridge preservation, BG yields a high percentage of true bone regeneration. (3) Currently, no reliable controlled studies report histological outcomes from the use of BG in ridge augmentation procedures. Clinicians may consider BG bone substitutes as efficacious alternatives for ridge preservation and sinus augmentation surgical procedures. Further controlled clinical studies are warranted to determine if bone-to-implant contact is improved in BG-grafted sites versus controls.

  15. Spatiogenetic characteristics of beech stands with different degrees of autochthony

    PubMed Central

    Gregorius, Hans-Rolf; Kownatzki, Dierk

    2005-01-01

    Background Autochthony in forest tree stands is characterized by a number of criteria, among which the range over which stands act as a population has been suggested to play a central role. Therefore, measures are needed for the delineation of populations or the detection of subpopulation structure. It is argued here that methods of population delineation must be based on the combined consideration of spatial distances and genetic differences between adult individuals. Conventional approaches and a set of newly developed methods are applied to seven isozyme loci in four beech stands which are distinguished by different types of forest management based on natural regeneration. Results Permutation analyses show that correlations between spatial distances and genetic differences vary only little in the studied beech stands. In view of the popularity of this and related descriptors of spatiogenetic covariation, this result came as a surprise. The newly developed methods lead to a different conclusion. Significant spatiogenetic structure is indicated in all stands when considering the mean and variance of spatiogenetic separation, where separation is measured by the smallest spatiogenetic difference of an individual from all others. Spatiogenetic difference is measured here by a combination of the spatial distances and genetic differences between individuals. This descriptor indicates the existence of spatiogenetic clusters in the beech stands. In order to arrive at an explicit representation of cluster structure as a representation of subpopulation structure, two types of cluster structure (primary and α-isolated) are distinguished, both of which reflect desirable characteristics of subpopulation structure. Particularly in the α-isolated structure, the proportion of individuals organized in clusters, the effective size, and the effective number of clusters clearly distinguish and consistently rank the four stands with respect to their types of forest management and

  16. Beech bark disease in Great Britain

    Treesearch

    E. John. Parker

    1983-01-01

    The status of beech bark disease in Great Britain is summarised with respect both to historical perspectives and to the contemporary situation. Features of the disease which relate particularly to its occurrence in Great Britain are listed. Some tentative findings from recent observations and experimental work are presented.

  17. The Children at Beech Tree House.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Malcolm

    1979-01-01

    The article describes the program at Beech Tree House, an experimental unit providing short-term education for multihandicapped children (9 to 13 years old) with deviant behavior. Sections address the following components: referral and duration of stay, facilities, parents, use of punishment, and research. (SBH)

  18. Silvical characteristics of beech (Fagus grandifolia)

    Treesearch

    Francis M. Rushmore

    1961-01-01

    Of all the trees in our forests, the beech somehow always stands out. Its clean, smooth, sculptured blending of bole and branch gives it a form that is unique. Also unique is its smooth gray bark, which does not become furrowed with old age as that of other trees, but remains smooth from ground to crown.

  19. Biomass in Serbia - potential of beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasanac-Bosanac, Lj.; Cirkovic-Mitrovic, T.; Popovic, V.; Jokanovic, D.

    2012-04-01

    As for the renewable sources for energy production, biomass from forests and wood processing industry comes to the second place. The woody biomass accounts for 1.0 Mtoe, that is equivalent with 1.0 Mtoe of oil. Due to current evaluations, the greatest part of woody biomass would be used for briquettes and pallets production. As the biomass from forests is increasingly becoming the interest of national and international market, a detailed research on overall potential of woody supply from Serbian forests is required. Beech forests account for 29.4 % of forest cover of Serbia. They also have the greatest standing volume (42.4 % of the overall standing volume) and the greatest mean annual increment (32.3 %)(Bankovic,et.al.2009). Herewith, the aim of this poster is to determine the long-term biomass production of these forests.For this purpose a management unit called Lomnicka reka has been chosen. As these beech forests have similar structural development, this location is considered representative for whole Serbia. DBH of all trees were measured with clipper and the accuracy of 0.01 mm, and the heights with a Vertex 3 device (with accuracy of 0.1 m). All measurements were performed on the fields each 500 m2 (square meters). The overall quantity of root biomass was calculated using the allometric equations. The poster shows estimated biomass stocks of beech forests located in Rasina area. Dates are evaluated using non-linear regression (Wutzler,T.et.al.2008). Biomass potential of Serbian beech forests will enable the evaluation of long-term potential of energy generation from woody biomass in agreement with principles of sustainable forest management. The biomass from such beech forests can represent an important substitution for energy production from fossil fuels (e.g. oil) and herewith decrease the CO2 emissions.

  20. The impact of broadleaved woodland on water resources in lowland UK: II. Evaporation estimates from sensible heat flux measurements over beech woodland and grass on chalk sites in Hampshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Rosier, P.; Smith, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    The impact on recharge to the Chalk aquifer of substitution of broadleaved woodland for pasture is a matter of concern in the UK. Hence, measurements of energy balance components were made above beech woodland and above pasture, both growing on shallow soils over chalk in Hampshire. Latent heat flux (evaporation) was calculated as the residual from these measurements of energy balances in which sensible heat flux was measured with an eddy correlation instrument that determined fast response vertical wind speeds and associated temperature changes. Assessment of wind turbulence statistics confirmed that the eddy correlation device performed satisfactorily in both wet and dry conditions. There was excellent agreement between forest transpiration measurements made by eddy correlation and stand level tree transpiration measured with sap flow devices. Over the period of the measurements, from March 1999 to late summer 2000, changes in soil water content were small and grassland evaporation and transpiration estimated from energy balance-eddy flux measurements were in excellent agreement with Penman estimates of potential evaporation. Over the 18-month measurement period, the cumulative difference between broadleaved woodland and grassland was small but evaporation from the grassland was 3% higher than that from the woodland. In the springs of 1999 and 2000, evaporation from the grassland was greater than that from the woodland. However, following leaf emergence in the woodland, the difference in cumulative evaporation diminished until the following spring.

  1. Climate change impairs processes of soil and plant N cycling in European beech forests on marginal soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Javier; Gasche, Rainer; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Bimüller, Carolin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Pole, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Rennenberg, Heinz; Simon, Judy; Hanewinkel, Marc; Baltensweiler, Andri; Bilela, Silvija; Dannenmann, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Beech forests of Central Europe are covering large areas with marginal calcareous soils, but provide important ecological services and represent a significant economical value. The vulnerability of these ecosystems to projected climate conditions (higher temperatures, increase of extreme drought and precipitation events) is currently unclear. Here we present comprehensive data on the influence of climate change conditions on ecosystem performance, considering soil nitrogen biogeochemistry, soil microbiology, mycorrhiza ecology and plant physiology. We simultaneously quantified major plant and soil gross N turnover processes by homogenous triple 15N isotope labeling of intact beech natural regeneration-soil-microbe systems. This isotope approach was combined with a space for time climate change experiment, i.e. we transferred intact beech seedling-soil-microbe mesocosms from a slope with N-exposure (representing present day climate conditions) to a slope with S exposure (serving as a warmer and drier model climate for future conditions). Transfers within N slope served as controls. After an equilibration period of 1 year, three isotope labeling/harvest cycles were performed. Reduced soil water content resulted in a persistent decline of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in soil (AOB). Consequently, we found a massive five-fold reduction of gross nitrification in the climate change treatment and a subsequent strong decline in soil nitrate concentrations as well as nitrate uptake by microorganisms and beech. Because nitrate was the major nutrient for beech in this forest type with little importance of ammonium and amino acids, this resulted in a strongly reduced performance of beech natural regeneration with reduced N content, N metabolite concentrations and plant biomass. These findings provided an explanation for a large-scale decline of distribution of beech forests on calcareous soils in Europe by almost 80% until 2080 predicted by statistical modeling. Hence, we

  2. The allergen profile of beech and oak pollen.

    PubMed

    Egger, C; Focke, M; Bircher, A J; Scherer, K; Mothes-Luksch, N; Horak, F; Valenta, R

    2008-10-01

    Beech and oak pollen are potential allergen sources with a world-wide distribution. We aimed to characterize the allergen profile of beech and oak pollen and to study cross-reactivities with birch and grass pollen allergens. Sera from tree pollen-allergic patients with evidence for beech and oak pollen sensitization from Basel, Switzerland, (n=23) and sera from birch pollen-allergic patients from Vienna, Austria, (n=26) were compared in immunoblot experiments for IgE reactivity to birch (Betula pendula syn. verrucosa), beech (Fagus sylvatica) and oak (Quercus alba) pollen allergens. Subsequently, beech and oak pollen allergens were characterized by IgE inhibition experiments with purified recombinant and natural allergens and with allergen-specific antibody probes. Birch-, beech- and oak pollen-specific IgE levels were determined by ELISA. Beech and oak pollen contain allergens that cross-react with the birch pollen allergens Bet v 1, Bet v 2 and Bet v 4 and with the berberine bridge enzyme-like allergen Phl p 4 from timothy grass pollen. Sera from Swiss and Austrian patients exhibited similar IgE reactivity profiles to birch, beech and oak pollen extracts. IgE levels to beech and oak pollen allergens were lower than those to birch pollen allergens. IgE reactivity to beech pollen is mainly due to cross-reactivity with birch pollen allergens, and a Phl p 4-like molecule represented another predominant IgE-reactive structure in oak pollen. The characterization of beech and oak pollen allergens and their cross-reactivity is important for the diagnosis and treatment of beech and oak pollen allergy.

  3. Evaluation of microorganisms cultured from injured and repressed tissue regeneration sites in endangered giant aquatic Ozark Hellbender salamanders.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Cheryl A; Ott, C Mark; Castro, Sarah L; Garcia, Veronica M; Molina, Thomas C; Briggler, Jeffrey T; Pitt, Amber L; Tavano, Joseph J; Byram, J Kelly; Barrila, Jennifer; Nickerson, Max A

    2011-01-01

    Investigation into the causes underlying the rapid, global amphibian decline provides critical insight into the effects of changing ecosystems. Hypothesized and confirmed links between amphibian declines, disease, and environmental changes are increasingly represented in published literature. However, there are few long-term amphibian studies that include data on population size, abnormality/injury rates, disease, and habitat variables to adequately assess changes through time. We cultured and identified microorganisms isolated from abnormal/injured and repressed tissue regeneration sites of the endangered Ozark Hellbender, Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi, to discover potential causative agents responsible for their significant decline in health and population. This organism and our study site were chosen because the population and habitat of C. a. bishopi have been intensively studied from 1969-2009, and the abnormality/injury rate and apparent lack of regeneration were established. Although many bacterial and fungal isolates recovered were common environmental organisms, several opportunistic pathogens were identified in association with only the injured tissues of C.a. bishopi. Bacterial isolates included Aeromonas hydrophila, a known amphibian pathogen, Granulicetella adiacens, Gordonai terrae, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aerococcus viridans, Streptococcus pneumoniae and a variety of Pseudomonads, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. stutzeri, and P. alcaligenes. Fungal isolates included species in the genera Penicillium, Acremonium, Cladosporium, Curvularia, Fusarium, Streptomycetes, and the Class Hyphomycetes. Many of the opportunistic pathogens identified are known to form biofilms. Lack of isolation of the same organism from all wounds suggests that the etiological agent responsible for the damage to C. a. bishopi may not be a single organism. To our knowledge, this is the first study to profile the external microbial consortia cultured from a

  4. Sleeping Sites and Latrines of Spider Monkeys in Continuous and Fragmented Rainforests: Implications for Seed Dispersal and Forest Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    González-Zamora, Arturo; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Oyama, Ken; Sork, Victoria; Chapman, Colin A.; Stoner, Kathryn E.

    2012-01-01

    Spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) use sites composed of one or more trees for sleeping (sleeping sites and sleeping trees, respectively). Beneath these sites/trees they deposit copious amounts of dung in latrines. This behavior results in a clumped deposition pattern of seeds and nutrients that directly impacts the regeneration of tropical forests. Therefore, information on the density and spatial distribution of sleeping sites and latrines, and the characteristics (i.e., composition and structure) of sleeping trees are needed to improve our understanding of the ecological significance of spider monkeys in influencing forest composition. Moreover, since primate populations are increasingly forced to inhabit fragmented landscapes, it is important to assess if these characteristics differ between continuous and fragmented forests. We assessed this novel information from eight independent spider monkey communities in the Lacandona rainforest, Mexico: four continuous forest sites and four forest fragments. Both the density of sleeping sites and latrines did not differ between forest conditions. Latrines were uniformly distributed across sleeping sites, but the spatial distribution of sleeping sites within the areas was highly variable, being particularly clumped in forest fragments. In fact, the average inter-latrine distances were almost double in continuous forest than in fragments. Latrines were located beneath only a few tree species, and these trees were larger in diameter in continuous than fragmented forests. Because latrines may represent hotspots of seedling recruitment, our results have important ecological and conservation implications. The variation in the spatial distribution of sleeping sites across the forest indicates that spider monkeys likely create a complex seed deposition pattern in space and time. However, the use of a very few tree species for sleeping could contribute to the establishment of specific vegetation associations typical of the

  5. Sleeping sites and latrines of spider monkeys in continuous and fragmented rainforests: implications for seed dispersal and forest regeneration.

    PubMed

    González-Zamora, Arturo; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Oyama, Ken; Sork, Victoria; Chapman, Colin A; Stoner, Kathryn E

    2012-01-01

    Spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) use sites composed of one or more trees for sleeping (sleeping sites and sleeping trees, respectively). Beneath these sites/trees they deposit copious amounts of dung in latrines. This behavior results in a clumped deposition pattern of seeds and nutrients that directly impacts the regeneration of tropical forests. Therefore, information on the density and spatial distribution of sleeping sites and latrines, and the characteristics (i.e., composition and structure) of sleeping trees are needed to improve our understanding of the ecological significance of spider monkeys in influencing forest composition. Moreover, since primate populations are increasingly forced to inhabit fragmented landscapes, it is important to assess if these characteristics differ between continuous and fragmented forests. We assessed this novel information from eight independent spider monkey communities in the Lacandona rainforest, Mexico: four continuous forest sites and four forest fragments. Both the density of sleeping sites and latrines did not differ between forest conditions. Latrines were uniformly distributed across sleeping sites, but the spatial distribution of sleeping sites within the areas was highly variable, being particularly clumped in forest fragments. In fact, the average inter-latrine distances were almost double in continuous forest than in fragments. Latrines were located beneath only a few tree species, and these trees were larger in diameter in continuous than fragmented forests. Because latrines may represent hotspots of seedling recruitment, our results have important ecological and conservation implications. The variation in the spatial distribution of sleeping sites across the forest indicates that spider monkeys likely create a complex seed deposition pattern in space and time. However, the use of a very few tree species for sleeping could contribute to the establishment of specific vegetation associations typical of the

  6. Artificially regenerating longleaf pine on wet sites: preliminary analysis of effects of site preparation treatments on early survival and growth

    Treesearch

    Benjamin O. Knapp; G. Geoff Wang; Joan L. Walker

    2010-01-01

    Our study, conducted over two years on poorly drained, sandy sites in Onslow County, NC, compared the effects of eight common site preparation treatments on early survival and growth of planted longleaf pine seedlings. Through two growing seasons, we found survival to be similar across all treatments (p = 0.8806), but root collar diameter was greatest with combinations...

  7. Bioinspired structure of bioceramics for bone regeneration in load-bearing sites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Faming; Chang, Jiang; Lu, Jianxi; Lin, Kaili; Ning, Congqin

    2007-11-01

    The major problem with the use of porous bioceramics as bone regeneration grafts is their weak mechanical strength, which has not been overcome to date. Here we described a novel way to solve this problem. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) bioceramics with a bioinspired structure were designed and prepared with a porous cancellous core (porosity: 70-90%) inside and a dense compact shell (porosity: 5-10%) outside that mimics the characteristics of natural bone. They showed excellent mechanical properties, with a compressive strength of 10-80MPa and an elastic modulus of 180MPa-1.0GPa, which could be tailored by the dense/porous cross-sectional area ratio obeying the rule of exponential growth. The in vitro degradation of the bioinspired bioceramics was faster than that of dense bioceramics but slower than that of porous counterparts. The changes in mechanical properties of the bioinspired ceramics during in vitro degradation were also investigated. A concept of the bioinspired macrostructure design of natural bone was proposed which provided a simple but effective way to increase the mechanical properties of porous bioceramics for load-bearing bone regeneration applications. It should be readily applicable to other porous materials.

  8. Ectomycorrhizal Communities on the Roots of Two Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Populations from Contrasting Climates Differ in Nitrogen Acquisition in a Common Environment

    PubMed Central

    Leberecht, Martin; Dannenmann, Michael; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Bilela, Silvija; Meier, Rudolf; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; Schloter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica), a dominant forest species in Central Europe, competes for nitrogen with soil microbes and suffers from N limitation under dry conditions. We hypothesized that ectomycorrhizal communities and the free-living rhizosphere microbes from beech trees from sites with two contrasting climatic conditions exhibit differences in N acquisition that contribute to differences in host N uptake and are related to differences in host belowground carbon allocation. To test these hypotheses, young trees from the natural regeneration of two genetically similar populations, one from dryer conditions (located in an area with a southwest exposure [SW trees]) and the other from a cooler, moist climate (located in an area with a northeast exposure [NE trees]), were transplanted into a homogeneous substrate in the same environment and labeled with 13CO2 and 15NH4+. Free-living rhizosphere microbes were characterized by marker genes for the N cycle, but no differences between the rhizospheres of SW or NE trees were found. Lower 15N enrichment was found in the ectomycorrhizal communities of the NE tree communities than the SW tree communities, whereas no significant differences in 15N enrichment were observed for nonmycorrhizal root tips of SW and NE trees. Neither the ectomycorrhizal communities nor the nonmycorrhizal root tips originating from NE and SW trees showed differences in 13C signatures. Because the level of 15N accumulation in fine roots and the amount transferred to leaves were lower in NE trees than SW trees, our data support the suggestion that the ectomycorrhizal community influences N transfer to its host and demonstrate that the fungal community from the dry condition was more efficient in N acquisition when environmental constraints were relieved. These findings highlight the importance of adapted ectomycorrhizal communities for forest nutrition in a changing climate. PMID:26092464

  9. Ecological species group—Environmental factors relationships in unharvested beech forests in the north of Iran

    Treesearch

    Mohammad Naghi Adel; Hassan Pourbabaei; Daniel C. Dey

    2014-01-01

    Beech forests are the richest forest community in Iran because they are both economically and environmentally valuable. The greatest forest volume occurs in Iran's beech forests. Forests dominated by oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipskey) cover about 565,000 ha and represent the total area of indigenous forests in Guilan Province. A system for classifying beech...

  10. Use of microsatellite markers in an American beech (Fagus grandifolia) population and paternity testing

    Treesearch

    Jennifer Koch; Dave Carey; M.E. Mason

    2010-01-01

    Cross-species amplification of six microsatellite markers from European beech (Fagus sylvatica Linn) and nine markers from Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume) was tested in American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.). Three microsatellites from each species were successfully adapted for use in American beech...

  11. Two Drosophila model neurons can regenerate axons from the stump or from a converted dendrite, with feedback between the two sites.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kavitha S; Rolls, Melissa M

    2017-08-17

    After axon severing, neurons recover function by reinitiating axon outgrowth. New outgrowth often originates from the remaining axon stump. However, in many mammalian neurons, new axons initiate from a dendritic site when the axon is injured close to the cell body. Drosophila sensory neurons are ideal for studying neuronal injury responses because they can be injured reproducibly in a variety of genetic backgrounds. In Drosophila, it has been shown that a complex sensory neuron, ddaC, can regenerate an axon from a stump, and a simple sensory neuron, ddaE, can regenerate an axon from a dendrite. To provide a more complete picture of axon regeneration in these cell types, we performed additional injury types. We found that ddaE neurons can initiate regeneration from an axon stump when a stump remains. We also showed that ddaC neurons regenerate from the dendrite when the axon is severed close to the cell body. We next demonstrated if a stump remains, new axons can originate from this site and a dendrite at the same time. Because cutting the axon close to the cell body results in growth of the new axon from a dendrite, and cutting further out may not, we asked whether the initial response in the cell body was similar after both types of injury. A transcriptional reporter for axon injury signaling, puc-GFP, increased with similar timing and levels after proximal and distal axotomy. However, changes in dendritic microtubule polarity differed in response to the two types of injury, and were influenced by the presence of a scar at the distal axotomy site. We conclude that both ddaE and ddaC can regenerate axons either from the stump or a dendrite, and that there is some feedback between the two sites that modulates dendritic microtubule polarity.

  12. Comparisons of protein profiles of beech bark disease resistant and susceptible American beech (Fagus grandifolia)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Beech bark disease is an insect-fungus complex that damages and often kills American beech trees and has major ecological and economic impacts on forests of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canadian forests. The disease begins when exotic beech scale insects feed on the bark of trees, and is followed by infection of damaged bark tissues by one of the Neonectria species of fungi. Proteomic analysis was conducted of beech bark proteins from diseased trees and healthy trees in areas heavily infested with beech bark disease. All of the diseased trees had signs of Neonectria infection such as cankers or fruiting bodies. In previous tests reported elsewhere, all of the diseased trees were demonstrated to be susceptible to the scale insect and all of the healthy trees were demonstrated to be resistant to the scale insect. Sixteen trees were sampled from eight geographically isolated stands, the sample consisting of 10 healthy (scale-resistant) and 6 diseased/infested (scale-susceptible) trees. Results Proteins were extracted from each tree and analysed in triplicate by isoelectric focusing followed by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gels were stained and protein spots identified and intensity quantified, then a statistical model was fit to identify significant differences between trees. A subset of BBD differential proteins were analysed by mass spectrometry and matched to known protein sequences for identification. Identified proteins had homology to stress, insect, and pathogen related proteins in other plant systems. Protein spots significantly different in diseased and healthy trees having no stand or disease-by-stand interaction effects were identified. Conclusions Further study of these proteins should help to understand processes critical to resistance to beech bark disease and to develop biomarkers for use in tree breeding programs and for the selection of resistant trees prior to or in early stages of BBD development in stands. Early

  13. Regeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic axons after transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells and fibroblasts prevents fibrotic scar formation at the lesion site.

    PubMed

    Teng, Xichuan; Nagata, Isao; Li, Hong-Peng; Kimura-Kuroda, Junko; Sango, Kazunori; Kawamura, Koki; Raisman, Geoffrey; Kawano, Hitoshi

    2008-11-01

    The fibrotic scar formed after central nervous system injury has been considered an obstacle to axonal regeneration. The present study was designed to examine whether cell transplantation into a damaged central nervous system can reduce fibrotic scar formation and promote axonal regeneration. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic axons were unilaterally transected in rats and cultures of olfactory-ensheathing cells (OECs), and olfactory nerve fibroblasts were transplanted into the lesion site. In the absence of transplants, few tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive axons extended across the lesion 2 weeks after the transection. Reactive astrocytes increased around the lesion, and a fibrotic scar containing type IV collagen deposits developed in the lesion center. The immunoreactivity of chondroitin sulfate side chains and core protein of NG2 proteoglycan increased in and around the lesion. One and 2 weeks after transection and simultaneous transplantation, dopaminergic axons regenerated across the transplanted tissues, which consisted of p75-immunoreactive OECs and fibronectin-immunoreactive fibroblasts. Reactive astrocytes and chondroitin sulfate immunoreactivity increased around the transplants, whereas the deposition of type IV collagen and fibrotic scar formation were completely prevented at the lesion site. Transplantation of meningeal fibroblasts similarly prevented the formation of the fibrotic scar, although its effect on regeneration was less potent than transplantation of OECs and olfactory nerve fibroblasts. The present results suggest that elimination of the inhibitory fibrotic scar is important for neural regeneration.

  14. The regeneration of central hardwoods with emphasis on the effects of site quality and harvesting practice

    Treesearch

    G. R., Jr. Trimble

    1973-01-01

    This report is an attempt to integrate and summarize research results from studies made mostly in West Virginia and to show the relationship of site quality and cutting practices to hardwood reproduction, with special emphasis on species composition. Reproduction has been found satisfactory in numbers and distribution after both clearcutting and selection cutting, but...

  15. Factors limiting regeneration of Quercus alba and Cornus florida in formerly cultivated coastal plain sites, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Joseph, M., Jr.; Jones, Robert, H.

    2003-01-01

    Riley, J.M. Jr., and R.H.Jones. 2003. Factors limiting regeneration of Quercus alba and Cornus florida in formerly cultivated coastal plain sites, South Carolina. For. Ecol., and Mgt. 177:571-586. To determine the extent that resources, conditions, and herbivoryy limit regeneration of Quercus alba L. and Cornus florida L. in formerly cultivated coastal plain uplands, we planted seedlings of the two species in two pine and one pine-hardwood forest understory and three adjacent clearcuts. Soil carbon and moisture, available nitrogen and phosphorous, and gap light index (GLI) were measured next to each seedling. Over two growing seasons, stem and leaf herbivory were estimated and survival was recorded. At the end of 2 years, all surviving stems were harvested to determine total leaf area and 2-year biomass growth. Survival to the end of the study was not significantly different between clearcuts and understories. However, clearcuts led to significantly greater biomass growth and leaf area for both Q. alba and C. florida. Soil moisture and available nutrients were also greater in the clearcuts. Using separate multiple linear (growth) or logistic (survival) regressions for each combination of three sites, two cutting treatments and two species, we found that soil moisture significantly affected survival in 12.5% and biomass growth in 8.3% of the regressions. Light availability significantly impacted biomass growth in 16.7% of the regressions. Stem and leaf herbivory had very little impact on survival (8.3%), but when combined, these two factors significantly impacted leaf area or biomass growth in 33.3% of the regressions. Seedling responses were highly variable, and no regression model accounted for more that 70.0% of this variation. In our study, stand-scalevariation in seedling responses (especially the difference between clearcut and understory) was much greater than within-stand variation. Of the within stand factors measured, herbivory was clearly the most

  16. GMP-conformant on-site manufacturing of a CD133(+) stem cell product for cardiovascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Skorska, Anna; Müller, Paula; Gaebel, Ralf; Große, Jana; Lemcke, Heiko; Lux, Cornelia A; Bastian, Manuela; Hausburg, Frauke; Zarniko, Nicole; Bubritzki, Sandra; Ruch, Ulrike; Tiedemann, Gudrun; David, Robert; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2017-02-10

    CD133(+) stem cells represent a promising subpopulation for innovative cell-based therapies in cardiovascular regeneration. Several clinical trials have shown remarkable beneficial effects following their intramyocardial transplantation. Yet, the purification of CD133(+) stem cells is typically performed in centralized clean room facilities using semi-automatic manufacturing processes based on magnetic cell sorting (MACS®). However, this requires time-consuming and cost-intensive logistics. CD133(+) stem cells were purified from patient-derived sternal bone marrow using the recently developed automatic CliniMACS Prodigy® BM-133 System (Prodigy). The entire manufacturing process, as well as the subsequent quality control of the final cell product (CP), were realized on-site and in compliance with EU guidelines for Good Manufacturing Practice. The biological activity of automatically isolated CD133(+) cells was evaluated and compared to manually isolated CD133(+) cells via functional assays as well as immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, the regenerative potential of purified stem cells was assessed 3 weeks after transplantation in immunodeficient mice which had been subjected to experimental myocardial infarction. We established for the first time an on-site manufacturing procedure for stem CPs intended for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases using an automatized system. On average, 0.88 × 10(6) viable CD133(+) cells with a mean log10 depletion of 3.23 ± 0.19 of non-target cells were isolated. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these automatically isolated cells bear proliferation and differentiation capacities comparable to manually isolated cells in vitro. Moreover, the automatically generated CP shows equal cardiac regeneration potential in vivo. Our results indicate that the Prodigy is a powerful system for automatic manufacturing of a CD133(+) CP within few hours. Compared to conventional manufacturing processes, future clinical

  17. A technique to screen American beech for resistance to the beech scale insect (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind.).

    PubMed

    Koch, Jennifer L; Carey, David W

    2014-05-27

    Beech bark disease (BBD) results in high levels of initial mortality, leaving behind survivor trees that are greatly weakened and deformed. The disease is initiated by feeding activities of the invasive beech scale insect, Cryptococcus fagisuga, which creates entry points for infection by one of the Neonectria species of fungus. Without scale infestation, there is little opportunity for fungal infection. Using scale eggs to artificially infest healthy trees in heavily BBD impacted stands demonstrated that these trees were resistant to the scale insect portion of the disease complex(1). Here we present a protocol that we have developed, based on the artificial infestation technique by Houston(2), which can be used to screen for scale-resistant trees in the field and in smaller potted seedlings and grafts. The identification of scale-resistant trees is an important component of management of BBD through tree improvement programs and silvicultural manipulation.

  18. Segregation of nitrogen use between ammonium and nitrate of ectomycorrhizas and beech trees.

    PubMed

    Leberecht, Martin; Dannenmann, Michael; Tejedor, Javier; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; Polle, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Here, we characterized nitrogen (N) uptake of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and their associated ectomycorrhizal (EM) communities from NH4(+) and NO3(-) . We hypothesized that a proportional fraction of ectomycorrhizal N uptake is transferred to the host, thereby resulting in the same uptake patterns of plants and their associated mycorrhizal communities. (15) N uptake was studied under various field conditions after short-term and long-term exposure to a pulse of equimolar NH4(+) and NO3(-) concentrations, where one compound was replaced by (15) N. In native EM assemblages, long-term and short-term (15) N uptake from NH4(+) was higher than that from NO3(-) , regardless of season, water availability and site exposure, whereas in beech long-term (15) N uptake from NO3(-) was higher than that from NH4(+) . The transfer rates from the EM to beech were lower for (15) N from NH4(+) than from NO3(-) . (15) N content in EM was correlated with (15) N uptake of the host for (15) NH4(+) , but not for (15) NO3(-) -derived N. These findings suggest stronger control of the EM assemblage on N provision to the host from NH4(+) than from NO3(-) . Different host and EM accumulation patterns for inorganic N will result in complementary resource use, which might be advantageous in forest ecosystems with limited N availability.

  19. Effects of forest management on carbon and energy exchange of beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Mathias; Mund, Martina; Knohl, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric carbon and energy fluxes of a managed beech forest are compared with those of a nearby unmanaged, old-growth beech forest in central Germany. Both forests are located at similar altitude and they face similar meteorological conditions. They are also similar with respect to canopy height (37 m) and mean tree age (120 years). The managed forest is a monospecific, even-aged stand with species-rich ground vegetation and a leaf area index of about 4, whereas the old stand is clearly beech-dominated but interspersed with ash and sycamore trees. It has a multi-layer canopy made up of trees of various ages and its leaf area index is about 5. The comparison is based on 23 site-years of eddy covariance measurements of carbon and energy fluxes and on regular biomass measurements in terms of dendrometry and litter collection. On average the two forests did not differ significantly in annual net carbon uptake derived from eddy covariance data (508 and 483 g C m-2a-1 for the managed and the unmanaged forest, respectively), however the managed forest showed a much larger interannual variability in gross primary production than the unmanaged forest did. This trend agreed well with independent dendrometric measurements of net ecosystem production from both forests. In contrast, ecosystem respiration did neither vary significantly between the two forests nor between different years. The total annual evapotranspiration was higher at the unmanaged forest site (549 mm a-1 compared to 504 mm a-1 at the managed site), which was probably due to a higher interception loss from the denser canopy in the unmanaged forest. We discuss whether the conclusion can be drawn from this case study that common forest management activities improve the water use efficiency of European beech forests but make them more vulnerable, in terms of carbon uptake, against extreme meteorological conditions such as, for example, summer heat waves or late frosts in springtime. Regardless of this

  20. Exogenous BDNF enhances the integration of chronically injured axons that regenerate through a peripheral nerve grafted into a chondroitinase-treated spinal cord injury site.

    PubMed

    Tom, Veronica J; Sandrow-Feinberg, Harra R; Miller, Kassi; Domitrovich, Cheryl; Bouyer, Julien; Zhukareva, Victoria; Klaw, Michelle C; Lemay, Michel A; Houlé, John D

    2013-01-01

    Although axons lose some of their intrinsic capacity for growth after their developmental period, some axons retain the potential for regrowth after injury. When provided with a growth-promoting substrate such as a peripheral nerve graft (PNG), severed axons regenerate into and through the graft; however, they stop when they reach the glial scar at the distal graft-host interface that is rich with inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. We previously showed that treatment of a spinal cord injury site with chondroitinase (ChABC) allows axons within the graft to traverse the scar and reinnervate spinal cord, where they form functional synapses. While this improvement in outgrowth was significant, it still represented only a small percentage (<20%) of axons compared to the total number of axons that regenerated into the PNG. Here we tested whether providing exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via lentivirus in tissue distal to the PNG would augment regeneration beyond a ChABC-treated glial interface. We found that ChABC treatment alone promoted axonal regeneration but combining ChABC with BDNF-lentivirus did not increase the number of axons that regenerated back into spinal cord. Combining BDNF with ChABC did increase the number of spinal cord neurons that were trans-synaptically activated during electrical stimulation of the graft, as indicated by c-Fos expression, suggesting that BDNF overexpression improved the functional significance of axons that did reinnervate distal spinal cord tissue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Exogenous BDNF enhances the integration of chronically injured axons that regenerate through a peripheral nerve grafted into a chondroitinase-treated spinal cord injury site

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Veronica J.; Sandrow-Feinberg, Harra R.; Miller, Kassi; Domitrovich, Cheryl; Bouyer, Julien; Zhukareva, Victoria; Klaw, Michelle C.; Lemay, Michel A.; Houlé, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Although axons lose some of their intrinsic capacity for growth after their developmental period, some axons retain the potential for regrowth after injury. When provided with a growth-promoting substrate such as a peripheral nerve graft (PNG), severed axons regenerate into and through the graft; however, they stop when they reach the glial scar at the distal graft-host interface that is rich with inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. We previously showed that treatment of a spinal cord injury site with chondroitinase (ChABC) allows axons within the graft to traverse the scar and reinnervate spinal cord, where they form functional synapses. While this improvement in outgrowth was significant, it still represented only a small percentage (<20%) of axons compared to the total number of axons that regenerated into the PNG. Here we tested whether providing exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via lentivirus in tissue distal to the PNG would augment regeneration beyond a ChABC-treated glial interface. We found that ChABC treatment alone promoted axonal regeneration but combining ChABC with BDNF-lentivirus did not increase the number of axons that regenerated back into spinal cord. Combining BDNF with ChABC did increase the number of spinal cord neurons that were trans-synaptically activated during electrical stimulation of the graft, as indicated by c-Fos expression, suggesting that BDNF overexpression improved the functional significance of axons that did reinnervate distal spinal cord tissue. PMID:23022460

  2. The influece of forest gaps on some properties of humus in a managed beech forest, northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajari, K. A.

    2015-10-01

    The present research focuses on the effect of eight-year-old artificially created gaps on some properties of humus in managed beech-dominated stand in Hyrcanian forest of northern Iran. In this study, six-teen gaps were sampled in site and were classified into four classes (small, medium, large, and very large) with four replications for each. Humus sampling was carried out at the centre and at the cardinal points within each gap as well as in the adjacent closed stand, separately, as composite samples. The variables of organic carbon, P, K, pH, and total N were measured for each sample. It was found that the gap size had significant effect only on total N (%) and organic carbon (%) in beech stand. The amount of potassium clearly differed among three positions in beech forest. The adjacent stand had higher significantly potassium than center and edge of gaps. Different amount of potassium was detected in gap center and gap edge. Comparison of humus properties between gaps and its adjacent stand pointed to the higher amount of potassium in adjacent stand than that in gaps but there was no difference between them regarding other humus properties. According to the results, it can be concluded that there is relatively similar condition among gaps and closed adjacent stands in terms of humus properties eight years after logging in the beech stand.

  3. Site-specific bioconjugation of an organometallic electron mediator to an enzyme with retained photocatalytic cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Yoon, Sungho; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-04-07

    Photosynthesis consists of a series of reactions catalyzed by redox enzymes to synthesize carbohydrates using solar energy. In order to take the advantage of solar energy, many researchers have investigated artificial photosynthesis systems mimicking the natural photosynthetic enzymatic redox reactions. These redox reactions usually require cofactors, which due to their high cost become a key issue when constructing an artificial photosynthesis system. Combining a photosensitizer and an Rh-based electron mediator (RhM) has been shown to photocatalytically regenerate cofactors. However, maintaining the high concentration of cofactors available for efficient enzymatic reactions requires a high concentration of the expensive RhM; making this process cost prohibitive. We hypothesized that conjugation of an electron mediator to a redox enzyme will reduce the amount of electron mediators necessary for efficient enzymatic reactions. This is due to photocatalytically regenerated NAD(P)H being readily available to a redox enzyme, when the local NAD(P)H concentration near the enzyme becomes higher. However, conventional random conjugation of RhM to a redox enzyme will likely lead to a substantial loss of cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. In order to avoid this issue, we investigated whether bioconjugation of RhM to a permissive site of a redox enzyme retains cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. As a model system, a RhM was conjugated to a redox enzyme, formate dehydrogenase obtained from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH). A RhM-containing azide group was site-specifically conjugated to p-azidophenylalanine introduced to a permissive site of TsFDH via a bioorthogonal strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition and an appropriate linker. The TsFDH-RhM conjugate exhibited retained cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity.

  4. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of the groundwater system behavior to support Brownfield regeneration of Hunedoara (Romania) former steel production site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogu, R.; Gaitanaru, D.; Ciugulea, O.; Boukhemacha, M. A.; Bica, I.

    2012-04-01

    Located in the Western part of Romania, the study area is the Hunedoara former steel industry site. The current contamination status of the subsurface shows a real threat due to the contribution of more than 100 years of steel production, ironworks operations, coke products generation, and recovery of recycling materials. Analyses performed in 2007 indicated high contaminations with heavy metals like copper, lead, cadmium, manganese, and chromium. As the contamination of the soil and groundwater severe, brownfield regeneration of this site is essential for a sustainable land management. Intelligent remediation techniques with regard to phytoremediation and soil washing with recycled solutions could be applied. However, these techniques could be correctly chosen and applied if a reliable image of the hydrological, geological, hydrogeological, pedological settings exits and after a deep understanding of the contamination mechanisms. As consequence the development of a groundwater flow and contaminant transport model for this area is compulsory. Hunedoara County has a complex geological structure, made by crystalline-Mesozoic units belonging to Southern Carpathians and by sedimentary-volcanic units of Western Carpathians. The site area is shaped by the presence of alluvial deposits from the Superior Holocene. From the lithologic point of view, covered by a thick layer of clay a sandy formation is located at depths bellow 10 m. The two strata are covering an extended carbonate media. The main aquifer is represented by a groundwater body located under the clay layer. The groundwater table of the superficial aquifer is located at about 10 m depth. The one layer groundwater flow model simulating aquifer behavior covers about 1,2 km2. Its conceptual model relies on a 3D geological model made by using 7 accurate geological cross-sections of the studied domain. Detailed geological data was provided by direct-push core sampling correlated with the penetration time and with

  5. Site properties have a stronger influence than fire severity on ectomycorrhizal fungi and associated N-cycling bacteria in regenerating post-beetle-killed lodgepole pine forests.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nabla M; Robertson, Susan J; Green, D Scott; Scholefield, Scott R; Arocena, Joselito M; Tackaberry, Linda E; Massicotte, Hugues B; Egger, Keith N

    2015-09-01

    Following a pine beetle epidemic in British Columbia, Canada, we investigated the effect of fire severity on rhizosphere soil chemistry and ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM) and associated denitrifying and nitrogen (N)-fixing bacteria in the root systems of regenerating lodgepole pine seedlings at two site types (wet and dry) and three fire severities (low, moderate, and high). The site type was found to have a much larger impact on all measurements than fire severity. Wet and dry sites differed significantly for almost all soil properties measured, with higher values identified from wet types, except for pH and percent sand that were greater on dry sites. Fire severity caused few changes in soil chemical status. Generally, bacterial communities differed little, whereas ECM morphotype analysis revealed ectomycorrhizal diversity was lower on dry sites, with a corresponding division in community structure between wet and dry sites. Molecular profiling of the fungal ITS region confirmed these results, with a clear difference in community structure seen between wet and dry sites. The ability of ECM fungi to colonize seedlings growing in both wet and dry soils may positively contribute to subsequent regeneration. We conclude that despite consecutive landscape disturbances (mountain pine beetle infestation followed by wildfire), the "signature" of moisture on chemistry and ECM community structure remained pronounced.

  6. Remodelling of periodontal tissues adjacent to sites treated according to the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR).

    PubMed

    Brägger, U; Hämmerle, C H; Mombelli, A; Bürgin, W; Lang, N P

    1992-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the remodelling of alveolar bone adjacent to periodontal sites following therapy according to the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) using computer-assisted densitometric image analysis (CADIA), and to compare the radiographic results to traditional clinical parameters. As required for digital subtraction analyses, periodically reproducible radiographs were obtained using a modification of the Rinn System and individual acrylic bite blocks for periodical identical radiographs. Ideally, a digital subtraction image from a site where absolutely no change in density had occurred would show a perfect cancellation of the structures. An average grey level value of 128 (the middle of the digitizer grey level range set by software) would show up at each pixel. Areas with grey levels < 128 in the subtraction image would indicate loss in density and grey levels > 128 would indicate increase in density. Within the subtraction images, areas were defined using the cursor to draw "regions of interest" (ROI) projected on the bony defect exposed to GTR covering the crestal bone as well as the region of potential "bonefill". The mean, median, the standard deviation and range of the grey levels of pixels within a particular ROI were calculated. Similarly sized ROI were drawn in bone areas not exposed to the GTR procedure serving as controls. The differences in the mean grey levels of all pixels within a particular ROI between the baseline, 3 and 12 months images were calculated for documentation of gain or loss in density. From 14 patients, standardized radiographs were available from baseline, 3 months and 12 months postsurgically, depicting one infraosseous defect before and after treatment according to the principles of GTR. The densitometric changes observed in these defects were compared to the clinically assessed changes measured at the site with the deepest baseline pocket depth. A mean clinical attachment gain of 2.36 mm

  7. Fast acclimation of freezing resistance suggests no influence of winter minimum temperature on the range limit of European beech.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Armando; Hoch, Günter; Vitasse, Yann

    2016-04-01

    Low temperature extremes drive species distribution at a global scale. Here, we assessed the acclimation potential of freezing resistance in European beech (Fagus sylvaticaL.) during winter. We specifically asked (i) how do beech populations growing in contrasting climates differ in their maximum freezing resistance, (ii) do differences result from genetic differentiation or phenotypic plasticity to preceding temperatures and (iii) is beech at risk of freezing damage in winter across its distribution range. We investigated the genetic and environmental components of freezing resistance in buds of adult beech trees from three different populations along a natural large temperature gradient in north-western Switzerland, including the site holding the cold temperature record in Switzerland. Freezing resistance of leaf primordia in buds varied significantly among populations, with LT50values (lethal temperature for 50% of samples) ranging from -25 to -40 °C, correlating with midwinter temperatures of the site of origin. Cambial meristems and the pith of shoots showed high freezing resistance in all three populations, with only a trend to lower freezing resistance at the warmer site. After hardening samples at -6 °C for 5 days, freezing resistance of leaf primordia increased in all provenances by up to 4.5 K. After additional hardening at -15 °C for 3 days, all leaf primordia were freezing resistant to -40 °C. We demonstrate that freezing resistance ofF. sylvaticahas a high ability to acclimate to temperature changes in winter, whereas the genetic differentiation of freezing resistance among populations seems negligible over this small geographic scale but large climatic gradient. In contrast to the assumption made in most of the species distribution models, we suggest that absolute minimum temperature in winter is unlikely to shape the cold range limit of beech. We conclude that the rapid acclimation of freezing resistance to winter temperatures allows

  8. Conserved loop cysteines of vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1-like 1 (VKORC1L1) are involved in its active site regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Jin, Da-Yun; Stafford, Darrel W

    2014-03-28

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) reduces vitamin K epoxide in the vitamin K cycle for post-translational modification of proteins that are involved in a variety of biological functions. However, the physiological function of VKORC1-like 1 (VKORC1L1), a paralogous enzyme sharing about 50% protein identity with VKORC1, is unknown. Here we determined the structural and functional differences of these two enzymes using fluorescence protease protection (FPP) assay and an in vivo cell-based activity assay. We show that in vivo VKORC1L1 reduces vitamin K epoxide to support vitamin K-dependent carboxylation as efficiently as does VKORC1. However, FPP assays show that unlike VKORC1, VKORC1L1 is a four-transmembrane domain protein with both its termini located in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the conserved loop cysteines, which are not required for VKORC1 activity, are essential for VKORC1L1's active site regeneration. Results from domain exchanges between VKORC1L1 and VKORC1 suggest that it is VKORC1L1's overall structure that uniquely allows for active site regeneration by the conserved loop cysteines. Intermediate disulfide trapping results confirmed an intra-molecular electron transfer pathway for VKORC1L1's active site reduction. Our results allow us to propose a concerted action of the four conserved cysteines of VKORC1L1 for active site regeneration; the second loop cysteine, Cys-58, attacks the active site disulfide, forming an intermediate disulfide with Cys-139; the first loop cysteine, Cys-50, attacks the intermediate disulfide resulting in active site reduction. The different membrane topologies and reaction mechanisms between VKORC1L1 and VKORC1 suggest that these two proteins might have different physiological functions.

  9. Development of molecular tools for use in beech bark disease management

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Koch; David W. Carey; Mary E. Mason; C. Dana Nelson; Abdelali Barakat; John E. Carlson; David. Neale

    2011-01-01

    Beech bark disease (BBD) has been killing American beech trees in eastern North America since the late 1890s. The disease is initiated by feeding of the beech scale insect, Cryptococcus fagisuga, which leads to the development of small fissures in the bark.

  10. Screening for resistance to beech bark disease: Improvements and results from seedlings and grafted field selections

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Koch; Mary E. Mason; David W. Carey

    2012-01-01

    Beech bark disease (BBD) is an insect-disease complex that has been killing American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) trees since the accidental introduction of the beech scale insect (Cryptococcus fagisuga) to Canada around 1890. Insect infestation is followed by infection with Neonectria ditissima or

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of galectins-1 and -3 and monitoring of tissue galectin-binding sites during tubular regeneration after renal ischemia reperfusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vansthertem, David; Cludts, Stéphanie; Nonclercq, Denis; Gossiaux, Annabel; Saussez, Sven; Legrand, Alexandre; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Toubeau, Gérard

    2010-11-01

    Endogenous lectins act as effectors of cellular activities such as growth regulation, migration and adhesion. In this study, we report the histochemical detection of galectins and their binding sites in rat kidneys after ischemic injury (35 min) with regard to renal regeneration. In this context, we have shown in a previous publication (Vansthertem et al., 2008) that extrarenal cells (CD44+, vimentin +) could be involved in this process of tubular restoration. In controls, galectin-1 is expressed by fusiform-shaped cells within cortical and medullar interstitium. Two days after ischemia, the number of positive interstitial cells increased temporarily within OSOM in the vicinity of altered tubules to later reach control level. After ischemia, we identified a population of galectin-3 (+), CD44 (+), and vimentin (+) interstitial round cells located in the outer stripe of outer medulla (OSOM) in the vicinity of necrotic tubules, but also in the lumen of adjacent blood vessels. The immunocytochemical characteristics of theses cells, along with their distribution within OSOM, suggest the involvement of a unique cell population during kidney regeneration. On the other hand, the distribution and density of binding sites for galectins within OSOM were not modified after ischemia and remained similar to controls. Altogether, our observations suggest that galectin-3 may be involved in the complex process of kidney regeneration following ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  12. Implant placement in alveolar composite defects regenerated with rhBMP-2, anorganic bovine bone, and titanium mesh: a report of eight reconstructed sites.

    PubMed

    Butura, Caesar C; Galindo, Daniel F

    2014-01-01

    To present a retrospective report of eight significant alveolar defects in which the alveolus was regenerated with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) combined with anorganic bovine bone and contoured using titanium mesh to facilitate implant-supported restorations. A total of seven patients underwent extractions and debridement of the compromised alveolar sites with simultaneous grafting using a mixture of rhBMP-2 and anorganic bovine bone. The three-dimensional contour of the compromised alveolus was reestablished using titanium mesh with rigid screw fixation. Implants were placed a minimum of 6 months after healing and subsequently were restored. The treated defects were successfully regenerated and did not require any additional surgery prior to implant placement or prosthetic restoration. A total of 14 implants were placed and restored with fixed single or multiple restorations. Thirteen of the 23 treated sites were in the anterior esthetic zone. Vertical and horizontal alveolar bone defects can be predictably regenerated by grafting with a combination of rhBMP-2 and anorganic bovine bone contained by titanium mesh to successfully accommodate implant placement.

  13. Competition for nitrogen between European beech and sycamore maple shifts in favour of beech with decreasing light availability.

    PubMed

    Simon, Judy; Li, Xiuyuan; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Plant species use different strategies for maximizing growth and fitness under changing environmental conditions. At the ecosystem level, seedlings in particular compete with other vegetation components for light and nitrogen (N), which often constitute growth-limiting resources. In this study, we investigated the effect of light availability on the competition for N between seedlings of European beech and sycamore maple and analysed the consequences of this competition for the composition of N metabolites in fine roots. Our results show different strategies in N acquisition between beech and sycamore maple. Both species responded to reduced light availability by adapting their morphological and physiological traits with a decrease in biomass and net assimilation rate and an increase in specific leaf area and leaf area ratio. For beech seedlings, competition with sycamore maple led to a reduction in organic N uptake capacity. Reduced light availability led to a decrease in ammonium, but an increase in glutamine-N uptake capacity in sycamore maple. However, this response was stronger compared with that of beech and was accompanied by reduced growth. Thus, our results suggest better adaptation of N acquisition to reduced light availability in beech compared with sycamore maple seedlings.

  14. Sorption of some textile dyes by beech wood sawdust.

    PubMed

    Dulman, Viorica; Cucu-Man, Simona Maria

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the experimental conditions for removal of several textile dyes from aqueous solutions by sorption on beech wood sawdust, an industrial waste lignocellulosic product. From the six dyes tested, the sorbent shows preference for three dyes: Direct Brown, Direct Brown 2 and Basic Blue 86. Sorption of dyes on the beech wood sawdust is dependent on the nature of dye, pH, dyes concentration, contact time, and amount of sorbent. By comparative kinetic studies, the rate of sorption was found to conform with good correlation to pseudo-second-order kinetics. The parameters that characterize the sorption were determined on the basis of Langmuir isotherms. The preference of beech sawdust for dyes increases as follows: Basic Blue 86

  15. Periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  16. Decrease in Available Soil Water Storage Capacity Reduces Vitality of Young Understorey European Beeches (Fagus sylvatica L.)—A Case Study from the Black Forest, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Tamalika; Saha, Somidh; Reif, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Growth and survival of young European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is largely dependent on water availability. We quantified the influence of water stress (measured as Available Soil Water Storage Capacity or ASWSC) on vitality of young beech plants at a dry site. The study site was located in a semi-natural sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl.) stand adjacent to beech stands on a rocky gneiss outcrop in southwestern Germany. Plant vitality was measured as crown dieback and estimated by the percentage of dead above ground biomass. The magnitude of crown dieback was recorded in different vertical parts of the crown. Biomass was calculated from the harvested plants following allometric regression equations specifically developed for our study site. Stem discs from harvested plants were used for growth analysis. We found that soil depth up to bedrock and skeleton content significantly influenced ASWSC at the study site. A significant negative correlation between ASWSC and crown dieback was found. Highest rates of crown dieback were noticed in the middle and lower crown. The threshold of crown dieback as a function of drought stress for young beech plants was calculated for the first time in this study. This threshold of crown dieback was found to be 40% of above ground biomass. Beyond 40% crown dieback, plants eventually experienced complete mortality. In addition, we found that the extremely dry year of 2003 significantly hampered growth (basal area increment) of plants in dry plots (ASWSC < 61 mm) in the study area. Recovery in the plants’ radial growth after that drought year was significantly higher in less dry plots (ASWSC > 61 mm) than in dry plots. We concluded that a decrease in ASWSC impeded the vitality of young beech causing partial up to complete crown dieback in the study site. PMID:27137398

  17. Natural Regeneration of Longleaf Pine

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer

    1979-01-01

    Natural regeneration is now a reliable alternative for existing longleaf pine forests. The shelterwood system, or modifications of it, has been used experimentally to regenerate longleaf pine for over 20 years, and regional tests have confirmed its value for a wide range of site conditions. Natural regeneration, because of its low cost when compared to other...

  18. Response to prescribed burning of 5-year-old hardwood regeneration on a mesic site in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    Treesearch

    W. Henry McNab; Erik C. Berg; Ted M. Oprean

    2013-01-01

    Five years after a Southern Appalachian cove was regenerated, vegetation was dominated by a dense stand of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), which averaged 9,181±13,042 stems per acre, and other mesophytic hardwood seedlings and saplings. The stand was prescribed burned during late spring to improve habitat for turkey by reducing density of...

  19. Carabid beetle diversity and mean individual biomass in beech forests of various ages

    PubMed Central

    Jelaska, Lucija Šerić; Dumbović, Vlatka; Kučinić, Mladen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Carabid beetle diversity and mean individual biomass (MIB) were analysed in three different successional stages of beech tree stands (60, 80 and 150 years old). Carabid beetles were captured using pitfall traps placed at nine sites (three per age class) in the Papuk Mountain of East Croatia during 2008. A cluster analysis identified three groupings that corresponded to the beech age classes. MIB values increased with stand age, ranging from 255 in 60-year-old stand to 537 in the oldest forests. The 80-year-old stand showed the highest species richness and diversity values. With respect to species composition, large species such as Carabus scheidleri and Carabus coriaceus were dominant only in the oldest forests. Furthermore, species that overwinter in the larval stage were more abundant in the oldest forests (45% of the total number of individuals from the 150-year-old stand) than in the younger ones (20% of individuals from 60-year-old, and 22% of individuals from 80-year-old stands). Our results showed that the analyses of species composition and life history traits are valuable for estimating the conservation values of older forests. Although the investigated sites form part of a continuous forested area and are only a couple of kilometres apart, MIB values detect significant differences associated with forest age and can be a useful tool in evaluating the degree to which a forest reflects a natural state. PMID:21738423

  20. Carabid beetle diversity and mean individual biomass in beech forests of various ages.

    PubMed

    Jelaska, Lucija Šerić; Dumbović, Vlatka; Kučinić, Mladen

    2011-01-01

    Carabid beetle diversity and mean individual biomass (MIB) were analysed in three different successional stages of beech tree stands (60, 80 and 150 years old). Carabid beetles were captured using pitfall traps placed at nine sites (three per age class) in the Papuk Mountain of East Croatia during 2008. A cluster analysis identified three groupings that corresponded to the beech age classes. MIB values increased with stand age, ranging from 255 in 60-year-old stand to 537 in the oldest forests. The 80-year-old stand showed the highest species richness and diversity values. With respect to species composition, large species such as Carabus scheidleri and Carabus coriaceus were dominant only in the oldest forests. Furthermore, species that overwinter in the larval stage were more abundant in the oldest forests (45% of the total number of individuals from the 150-year-old stand) than in the younger ones (20% of individuals from 60-year-old, and 22% of individuals from 80-year-old stands). Our results showed that the analyses of species composition and life history traits are valuable for estimating the conservation values of older forests. Although the investigated sites form part of a continuous forested area and are only a couple of kilometres apart, MIB values detect significant differences associated with forest age and can be a useful tool in evaluating the degree to which a forest reflects a natural state.

  1. Quantitative, nondestructive assessment of beech scale (Hemiptera: Cryptococcidae) density using digital image analysis of wax masses.

    PubMed

    Teale, Stephen A; Letkowski, Steven; Matusick, George; Stehman, Stephen V; Castello, John D

    2009-08-01

    Beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lindinger, is a non-native invasive insect associated with beech bark disease. A quantitative method of measuring viable scale density at the levels of the individual tree and localized bark patches was developed. Bark patches (10 cm(2)) were removed at 0, 1, and 2 m above the ground and at the four cardinal directions from 13 trees in northern New York and 12 trees in northern Michigan. Digital photographs of each patch were made, and the wax mass area was measured from two random 1-cm(2) subsamples on each bark patch using image analysis software. Viable scale insects were counted after removing the wax under a dissecting microscope. Separate regression analyses at the whole tree level for the New York and Michigan sites each showed a strong positive relationship of wax mass area with the number of underlying viable scale insects. The relationships for the New York and Michigan data were not significantly different from each other, and when pooling data from the two sites, there was still a significant positive relationship between wax mass area and the number of scale insects. The relationships between viable scale insects and wax mass area were different at the 0-, 1-, and 2-m sampling heights but do not seem to affect the relationship. This method does not disrupt the insect or its interactions with the host tree.

  2. Tree-ring growth of Scots pine, Common beech and Pedunculate oak under future climate in northeastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurasinski, Gerald; Scharnweber, Tobias; Schröder, Christian; Lennartz, Bernd; Bauwe, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Tree growth depends, among other factors, largely on the prevailing climatic conditions. Therefore, tree growth patterns are to be expected under climate change. Here, we analyze the tree-ring growth response of three major European tree species to projected future climate across a climatic (mostly precipitation) gradient in northeastern Germany. We used monthly data for temperature, precipitation, and the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) over multiple time scales (1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months) to construct models of tree-ring growth for Scots pine (Pinus syl- vestris L.) at three pure stands, and for Common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) at three mature mixed stands. The regression models were derived using a two-step approach based on partial least squares regression (PLSR) to extract potentially well explaining variables followed by ordinary least squares regression (OLSR) to consolidate the models to the least number of variables while retaining high explanatory power. The stability of the models was tested with a comprehensive calibration-verification scheme. All models were successfully verified with R2s ranging from 0.21 for the western pine stand to 0.62 for the beech stand in the east. For growth prediction, climate data forecasted until 2100 by the regional climate model WETTREG2010 based on the A1B Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) emission scenario was used. For beech and oak, growth rates will likely decrease until the end of the 21st century. For pine, modeled growth trends vary and range from a slight growth increase to a weak decrease in growth rates depending on the position along the climatic gradient. The climatic gradient across the study area will possibly affect the future growth of oak with larger growth reductions towards the drier east. For beech, site-specific adaptations seem to override the influence of the climatic gradient. We conclude that in Northeastern

  3. Reducing borer damage in oak regeneration and sawtimber

    Treesearch

    Jimmy R. Galford

    1989-01-01

    Borers cause millions of dollars in damaged wood annually to oak stands, and adversely affect the form and vigor of oak regeneration. A moth and four species of beetles cause most of the damage; the carpenterworm moth, the oak timberworm, the red oak borer, the living-beech borer, and the white oak borer. The larvae of these insects chew holes in the wood ranging from...

  4. Prince William Forest Park American Beech , Approximately one mile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Prince William Forest Park American Beech , Approximately one mile from visitor’s center, south bank of the south fork of Quantico Creek, about 75 yards upstream from its confluence with Quantico Creek, Near Birch Bluff Trail, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  5. Conservation genetics of the European beech in France

    Treesearch

    A. Ducousso; B. Musch; S. Irola; A. Quenu; A. Hampe; R.J. Petit

    2017-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica) is one of the most abundant tree species in Europe. Its genetic structure and diversity have been investigated using both molecular markers and adaptive traits as assessed in field and laboratory experimental tests looking at adaptative traits. A great deal of information also exists on the Quaternary history of the...

  6. Present state of beech bark disease in Germany

    Treesearch

    Klaus J. Lang

    1983-01-01

    Beech bark disease can be found at present time in young and old stands (20-150 years old) of Fagus sylvatica. The present state of the disease may be described as "normal" and apart from some cases, it is no threat to the existence of the stands.

  7. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization in beech and spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nickolas K.; Mina, Marco

    2012-03-01

    A novel synergistic approach to reducing emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is presented. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization (FCO) aims to provide cleaner burning fuels through optimization of forestry and renewable energy management practices. In this work, beech and spruce forests of average and high quality were modelled and analysed to determine the volume of fuel wood and its associated bark fraction produced during typical forestry cycles. Two separate fuel wood bark production regimes were observed for beech trees, while only one production regime was observed for spruce. The single tree and stand models were combined with existing thinning parameters to replicate existing management practices. Utilizing estimates of initial seedling numbers and existing thinning patterns a dynamic model was formed that responded to changes in thinning practices. By varying the thinning parameters, this model enabled optimization of the forestry practices for the reduction of bark impurities in the fuel wood supply chain. Beech forestry cycles responded well to fuel cycle optimization with volume reductions of bark from fuel wood of between ˜10% and ˜20% for average and high quality forest stands. Spruce, on the other hand, was fairly insensitive to FCO with bark reductions of 0-5%. The responsiveness of beech to FCO further supports its status as the preferred RWC fuel in Switzerland. FCO could easily be extended beyond Switzerland and applied across continental Europe and North America.

  8. Hot callusing for propagation of American beech by grafting

    Treesearch

    David W. Carey; Mary E. Mason; Paul Bloese; Jennifer L. Koch

    2013-01-01

    To increase grafting success rate, a hot callus grafting system was designed and implemented as part of a multiagency collaborative project to manage beech bark disease (BBD) through the establishment of regional BBD-resistant grafted seed orchards. Five years of data from over 2000 hot callus graft attempts were analyzed using a logistic regression model to determine...

  9. Climate threats on growth of rear-edge European beech peripheral populations in Spain.

    PubMed

    Dorado-Liñán, I; Akhmetzyanov, L; Menzel, A

    2017-07-21

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forests in the Iberian Peninsula are a clear example of a temperate forest tree species at the rear edge of its large distribution area in Europe. The expected drier and warmer climate may alter tree growth and species distribution. Consequently, the peripheral populations will most likely be the most threatened ones. Four peripheral beech forests in the Iberian Peninsula were studied in order to assess the climate factors influencing tree growth for the last six decades. The analyses included an individual tree approach in order to detect not only the changes in the sensitivity to climate but also the potential size-mediated sensitivity to climate. Our results revealed a dominant influence of previous and current year summer on tree growth during the last six decades, although the analysis in two equally long periods unveiled changes and shifts in tree sensitivity to climate. The individual tree approach showed that those changes in tree response to climate are not size dependent in most of the cases. We observed a reduced negative effect of warmer winter temperatures at some sites and a generalized increased influence of previous year climatic conditions on current year tree growth. These results highlight the crucial role played by carryover effects and stored carbohydrates for future tree growth and species persistence.

  10. Climate threats on growth of rear-edge European beech peripheral populations in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado-Liñán, I.; Akhmetzyanov, L.; Menzel, A.

    2017-07-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forests in the Iberian Peninsula are a clear example of a temperate forest tree species at the rear edge of its large distribution area in Europe. The expected drier and warmer climate may alter tree growth and species distribution. Consequently, the peripheral populations will most likely be the most threatened ones. Four peripheral beech forests in the Iberian Peninsula were studied in order to assess the climate factors influencing tree growth for the last six decades. The analyses included an individual tree approach in order to detect not only the changes in the sensitivity to climate but also the potential size-mediated sensitivity to climate. Our results revealed a dominant influence of previous and current year summer on tree growth during the last six decades, although the analysis in two equally long periods unveiled changes and shifts in tree sensitivity to climate. The individual tree approach showed that those changes in tree response to climate are not size dependent in most of the cases. We observed a reduced negative effect of warmer winter temperatures at some sites and a generalized increased influence of previous year climatic conditions on current year tree growth. These results highlight the crucial role played by carryover effects and stored carbohydrates for future tree growth and species persistence.

  11. Effects of pine-hardwood management practices on forest regeneration and woody species diversity at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA.

    SciTech Connect

    K, Crider Kimberly

    2003-08-01

    Crider. Kimberly K. 2003 Effects of pine-hardwood management practices on forest regeneration and woody species diversity at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA. MS Thesis. The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee. 107 pp. Abstract: In 1989, mixed hardwood-pine forest sites at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina were chosen by USDA Forest Service employees for use in a study of the effects of a combination of forest management practices on woody species composition and diversity. The sites were surveyed for species composition, harvested commercially, burned using several severities, and planted with pine seedlings during 1990. In 1991 and 1993 the sites were surveyed again by Forest Service employees for post-disturbance species composition. I recovered and compiled the earlier pre- and post-disturbance data, and resurveyed the sites in 2002 to compare the immediate effects and the possible persistence of effects of the management treatments on woody species composition and diversity over an 11 year period. Overall, the results suggest that mixed hardwood-pine forests in the Atlantic Coastal Plain (ACP) consist of species able to vigorously recolonize following disturbances as severe as clearcutting. Although these types of management disturbances might have immediate effects on woody species composition and diversity, the results suggest that these effects are minimal over time in the absence of additional disturbance.

  12. Soil base saturation combines with beech bark disease to influence composition and structure of sugar maple-beech forests in an acid rain-impacted region

    Treesearch

    Gregory B. Lawrence; Todd C. McDonnell; Timothy J. Sullivan; Martin Dovciak; Scott W. Bailey; Michael R. Antidormi; Michael R. Zarfos

    2017-01-01

    Sugar maple, an abundant and highly valued tree species in eastern North America, has experienced decline from soil calcium (Ca) depletion by acidic deposition, while beech, which often coexists with sugar maple, has been afflicted with beech bark disease (BBD) over the same period. To investigate how variations in soil base saturation combine with effects of BBD in...

  13. Floods on Beech River, Wolf and Owl Creeks, Brazil, Onemile and Town Branches; and an unnamed Tributary to Beech River in the vicinity of Lexington, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the extent and severity of the flood potential along selected reaches of the Beech River, Tributary to Beech River, Owl and Wolf Creeks, and Brazil, Onemile and Town Branches in the vicinity of Lexington, Tennessee. The study was requested by the city of Lexington to provided detailed information in order to better administer its floodplain management program.

  14. Alterations in the nitrogen dynamics of European beech trees infested by the woolly beech aphid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, D. F.; Michalzik, B.

    2012-12-01

    Insects are a major stressor in wooded ecosystems, triggering profound changes in the hydrology, biogeochemistry, and net primary productivity of infested forests. The influence of woolly beech aphids (Phyllaphis fagi L.) on nitrogen cycling via throughfall, stemflow, and litter leachates is not well understood. Employing a combination of field sampling, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we examined and compared the alterations and partitioning of nitrogen (particulate, dissolved, organic, inorganic) between control (uninfested) and infested trees. Preliminary results suggest that the amount of nitrogen routed to the soil is much lower in throughfall and stemflow of infested trees than control trees. Preliminary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy measurements on the abaxial surface of sample leaves have demonstrated that the surface microbiology and nitrogen chemistry of control, lightly infested, and heavily infested leaves are notably different. These observations suggest that the aphids alter the phyllosphere ecology to such an extent that they trigger nitrogen uptake by microbes on the leaf surface in the presence of easily available carbon from aphid excretions (i.e., honeydew). A better understanding of nitrogen cycling in stressed forests would advance theories of nitrogen cycling.

  15. Combining a regeneration-promoting ipt gene and site-specific recombination allows a more efficient apricot transformation and the elimination of marker genes.

    PubMed

    López-Noguera, Sonia; Petri, César; Burgos, Lorenzo

    2009-12-01

    The presence of marker genes conferring antibiotic resistance in transgenic plants represents a serious obstacle for their public acceptance and future commercialization. In addition, their elimination may allow gene stacking by the same selection strategy. In apricot, selection using the selectable marker gene nptII, that confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, is relatively effective. An attractive alternative is offered by the MAT system (multi-auto-transformation), which combines the ipt gene for positive selection with the recombinase system R/RS for removal of marker genes from transgenic cells after transformation. Transformation with an MAT vector has been attempted in the apricot cultivar 'Helena'. Regeneration from infected leaves with Agrobacterium harboring a plasmid containing the ipt gene was significantly higher than that from non-transformed controls in a non-selective medium. In addition, transformation efficiencies were much higher than those previously reported using antibiotic selection, probably due to the integration of the regeneration-promoting ipt gene. However, the lack of an ipt expression-induced differential phenotype in apricot made difficult in detecting the marker genes excision and plants had to be evaluated at different times. PCR analysis showed that cassette excision start occurring after 6 months approximately and 1 year in culture was necessary for complete elimination of the cassette in all the transgenic lines. Excision was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. We report here for the first time in a temperate fruit tree that the MAT vector system improves regeneration and transformation efficiency and would allow complete elimination of marker genes from transgenic apricot plants by site-specific recombination.

  16. Fifty-year impacts of the beech bark disease in the Bartlett Experimental Forest, New Hampshire

    Treesearch

    William B. Leak

    2006-01-01

    Records from the early 1950s on the Bartlett Experimental Forest in New Hampshire showed that the percentage of American beech trees infected with heavy beech scale and Nectria was up to the 80 to 90% range. An inventory of beech bark disease conditions in three stands in 2004 showed that an older, uneven-aged stand managed by individual tree selection for 50 years had...

  17. Ovariectomized Rats with Established Osteopenia have Diminished Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Bone Marrow and Impaired Homing, Osteoinduction and Bone Regeneration at the Fracture Site.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Deepshikha; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Sagar, Nitin; China, Shyamsundar P; Singh, Atul K; Kheruka, Subhash C; Barai, Sukanta; Tewari, Mahesh C; Nagar, Geet K; Vishwakarma, Achchhe L; Ogechukwu, Omeje E; Bellare, Jayesh R; Gambhir, Sanjay; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2015-04-01

    We investigated deleterious changes that take place in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and its fracture healing competence in ovariectomy (Ovx)-induced osteopenia. MSC from bone marrow (BM) of ovary intact (control) and Ovx rats was isolated. (99m)Tc-HMPAO (Technitium hexamethylpropylene amine oxime) labeled MSC was systemically transplanted to rats and fracture tropism assessed by SPECT/CT. PKH26 labeled MSC (PKH26-MSC) was bound in scaffold and applied to fracture site (drill-hole in femur metaphysis). Osteoinduction was quantified by calcein binding and microcomputed tomography. Estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, fulvestrant was used to determine ER dependence of osteo-induction by MSC. BM-MSC number was strikingly reduced and doubling time increased in Ovx rats compared to control. SPECT/CT showed reduced localization of (99m)Tc-HMPAO labeled MSC to the fracture site, 3 h post-transplantation in Ovx rats as compared with controls. Post-transplantation, Ovx MSC labeled with PKH26 (Ovx PKH26-MSC) localized less to fracture site than control PKH26-MSC. Transplantation of either control or Ovx MSC enhanced calcein binding and bone volume at the callus of control rats over placebo group however Ovx MSC had lower efficacy than control MSC. Fulvestrant blocked osteoinduction by control MSC. When scaffold bound MSC was applied to fracture, osteoinduction by Ovx PKH26-MSC was less than control PKH26-MSC. In Ovx rats, control MSC/E2 treatment but not Ovx MSC showed osteoinduction. Regenerated bone was irregularly deposited in Ovx MSC group. In conclusion, Ovx is associated with diminished BM-MSC number and its growth, and Ovx MSC displays impaired engraftment to fracture and osteoinduction besides disordered bone regeneration.

  18. New collagen matrix to avoid the reduction of keratinized tissue during guided bone regeneration in postextraction sites.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Daniele; Cucchi, Alessandro; de Gemmis, Antonio; Nocini Pier, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    For decades, there has been an ongoing controversy regarding the need for an "adequate" width of keratinized gingiva/mucosa to preserve periodontal and implant health. Today, the presence of a certain width of keratinized tissue is recommended for achieving long-term periodontal and implant success, and therefore, a new collagen matrix has been developed to enhance the width of keratinized gingiva/mucosa. During postextraction socket preservation, guided bone regeneration techniques require complete coverage of the barrier membrane to reduce the risk of infection, occasionally causing a reduction of the width of keratinized tissue. Using the new collagen matrix, it is possible to leave the membrane intentionally uncovered, without suturing the surgical flap above it, to avoid the reduction of such tissue.

  19. Beech cupules as keystone structures for soil fauna

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Navarro, Gerardo; Moya-Laraño, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Facilitative or positive interactions are ubiquitous in nature and play a fundamental role in the configuration of ecological communities. In particular, habitat modification and niche construction, in which one organism locally modifies abiotic conditions and favours other organisms by buffering the effects of adverse environmental factors, are among the most relevant facilitative interactions. In line with this, ‘keystone structures’, which provide resources, refuge, or advantageous services decisive for other species, may allow the coexistence of various species and thus considerably contribute to diversity maintenance. Beech cupules are woody husks harbouring beech fruits that remain in the forest soil for relatively long periods of time. In this study, we explored the potential role of these cupules in the distribution and maintenance of the soil fauna inhabiting the leaf litter layer. We experimentally manipulated cupule availability and soil moisture in the field to determine if such structures are limiting and can provide moist shelter to soil animals during drought periods, contributing to minimize desiccation risks. We measured invertebrate abundances inside relative to outside the cupules, total abundances in the leaf litter and animal body sizes, in both dry and wet experimental plots. We found that these structures are preferentially used by the most abundant groups of smaller soil animals—springtails, mites and enchytraeids—during droughts. Moreover, beech cupules can be limiting, as an increase in use was found with higher cupule densities, and are important resources for many small soil invertebrates, driving the spatial structure of the soil community and promoting higher densities in the leaf litter, probably through an increase in habitat heterogeneity. We propose that fruit woody structures should be considered ‘keystone structures’ that contribute to soil community maintenance. Therefore, beech trees may indirectly facilitate soil

  20. Beech cupules as keystone structures for soil fauna.

    PubMed

    Melguizo-Ruiz, Nereida; Jiménez-Navarro, Gerardo; Moya-Laraño, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Facilitative or positive interactions are ubiquitous in nature and play a fundamental role in the configuration of ecological communities. In particular, habitat modification and niche construction, in which one organism locally modifies abiotic conditions and favours other organisms by buffering the effects of adverse environmental factors, are among the most relevant facilitative interactions. In line with this, 'keystone structures', which provide resources, refuge, or advantageous services decisive for other species, may allow the coexistence of various species and thus considerably contribute to diversity maintenance. Beech cupules are woody husks harbouring beech fruits that remain in the forest soil for relatively long periods of time. In this study, we explored the potential role of these cupules in the distribution and maintenance of the soil fauna inhabiting the leaf litter layer. We experimentally manipulated cupule availability and soil moisture in the field to determine if such structures are limiting and can provide moist shelter to soil animals during drought periods, contributing to minimize desiccation risks. We measured invertebrate abundances inside relative to outside the cupules, total abundances in the leaf litter and animal body sizes, in both dry and wet experimental plots. We found that these structures are preferentially used by the most abundant groups of smaller soil animals-springtails, mites and enchytraeids-during droughts. Moreover, beech cupules can be limiting, as an increase in use was found with higher cupule densities, and are important resources for many small soil invertebrates, driving the spatial structure of the soil community and promoting higher densities in the leaf litter, probably through an increase in habitat heterogeneity. We propose that fruit woody structures should be considered 'keystone structures' that contribute to soil community maintenance. Therefore, beech trees may indirectly facilitate soil fauna

  1. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species.

  2. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Mediated Guided Bone Regeneration in Immediate Implant Placement in Molar Sites with Buccal Bone Defects.

    PubMed

    Santana, Ronaldo B; Santana, Carolina Mm; Dibart, Serge

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the clinical outcomes of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor BB and beta-tricalcium phosphate (rhPDGF-BB/βTCP) with guided bone regeneration (GBR) in immediate implant placement in molar extraction sockets with buccal bone defects versus conventional implant placement. Twenty-eight implants were placed in fourteen patients. Clinical and radiographic evaluations assessed peri-implant soft and hard tissue parameters after 12 months. No implants were lost during the 1-year observation period, yielding a survival rate of 100%. Similar clinical and radiographic parameters were observed for both treatment groups. Use of rhPDGF-BB/βTCP and GBR in immediate implants in molars was as successful as conventional implant placement in fully healed extraction sites.

  3. Hardwood regeneration related to overstory shortleaf pine basal area and site index in Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma

    Treesearch

    Douglas J. Stevenson; Thomas B. Lynch; James M. Guldin

    2007-01-01

    Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) grows in association with many other woody species, particularly understory hardwoods, which compete with it, limiting its productivity. Along with other species, sweet-gum (Liquidambar styracifua L.) is a major competitor on better-quality sites but decreases rapidly in importance as pine site...

  4. Effects of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations on beech litter decomposition, enzyme activities and protein expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Roschitzki, B.; Schmid, E.; Eberl, L.; Hämmerle, I.; Leitner, S.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbes are major players in leaf litter decomposition and therefore advances in the understanding of their control on element cycling are of paramount importance. Our aim was to investigate the influence of leaf litter stoichiometry in terms of carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) : phosphorus (P) on the decomposition process, and to follow changes in microbial community structure and function in response to temperature-stress treatments. To elucidate how the stoichiometry of beech litter (Fagus sylvatica L.) and stress treatments interactively affect the decomposition processes, a terrestrial microcosm experiment was conducted. Beech litter from different Austrian sites covering C:N ratios from 39 to 61 and C:P ratios from 666 to 1729 were incubated at 15 °C and 60% moisture for six months. Part of the microcosms were then subjected to severe changes in temperature (+30 °C and -15 °C) to monitor the influence of temperature stress. Extracellular enzyme activities were assayed and respiratory activities measured. A semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass-spectrometry; unique spectral counting) was employed to investigate the impact of the applied stress treatments in dependency of litter stoichiometry on structure and function of the decomposing community. In litter with narrow C:nutrient ratios microbial decomposers were most abundant. Cellulase, chitinase, phosphatase and protease activity decreased after heat and frost treatments. Decomposer communities and specific functions varied with site i.e. stoichiometry. The applied stress evoked strong changes of enzyme activities, dissolved organic nitrogen and litter pH. Freeze treatments resulted in a decline in residual plant litter material, and increased fungal abundance indicating slightly accelerated decomposition. Overall, we could detect a strong effect of litter stoichiometry on microbial community structure as well as function. Temperature

  5. Factors impacting stemflow generation in a European beech forest: Individual tree versus neighborhood properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Johanna Clara; Germer, Sonja; Hildebrandt, Anke

    2017-04-01

    The redistribution of precipitation by canopies changes the water flow dynamics to the forest floor. The spatial pattern of throughfall has been researched in a number of studies in different ecosystems. Yet, also stemflow substantially influences water input patterns, constituting a mean of 12% of gross precipitation for European beech as one of the most abundant tree species in Central Europe. While the initiation of stemflow depends mostly on precipitation event properties, stemflow amounts are strongly shaped by canopy structure. Stemflow research has mainly addressed the impact of single tree morphological variables. In previous studies, the impact of forest structure on area-based stemflow was studied comparing plots with different properties using few exemplary stemflow measurements. In non-homogeneous stands, this approach might not be accurate, as the variation of stand properties like tree density could change tree individual stemflow fluxes. To investigate this, a total measurement of all trees per plot is required. We hypothesize, that in addition to individual tree metrics, tree neighborhood relations have a significant impact on stemflow generation in a heterogeneous beech forest. Our study site is located in the pristine forest of the National Park Hainich, central Germany. It is heterogeneous in respect to tree density, species composition and tree age. We measured stemflow in an areal approach, for all trees on 11 subplots (each 10 m x 10 m) spaced evenly throughout a 1 ha plot. This involved overall 65 trees, which is 11% of the plot's trees. 27 precipitation events were recorded in spring and early summer of 2015 and 2016. Stand properties were surveyed, including diameter at breast height, height, position and species of a tree. From this data, we calculated neighborhood properties for each tree, as number, basal area, and relative height of neighboring trees within a radius of the plot's mean tree distance. Using linear mixed effects models, we

  6. Fate of recently fixed carbon in European beech (Fagus sylvatica) saplings during drought and subsequent recovery.

    PubMed

    Zang, Ulrich; Goisser, Michael; Grams, Thorsten E E; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer; Matzner, Egbert; Borken, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Drought reduces the carbon (C) assimilation of trees and decouples aboveground from belowground carbon fluxes, but little is known about the response of drought-stressed trees to rewetting. This study aims to assess dynamics and patterns of C allocation in beech saplings under dry and rewetted soil conditions. In October 2010, 5-year-old beech saplings from a forest site were transplanted into 20 l pots. In 2011, the saplings were subjected to different levels of soil drought ranging from non-limiting water supply (control) to severe water limitation with soil water potentials of less than -1.5 MPa. As a physiologically relevant measure of drought, the cumulated soil water potential (i.e., drought stress dose (DSD)) was calculated for the growing season. In late August, the saplings were transferred into a climate chamber and pulse-labeled with (13)C-depleted CO2 (δ(13)C of -47‰). Isotopic signatures in leaf and soil respiration were repeatedly measured. Five days after soil rewetting, a second label was applied using 99 atom% (13)CO2. After another 12 days, the fate of assimilated C in each sapling was assessed by calculating the (13)C mass balance. Photosynthesis decreased by 60% in saplings under severe drought. The mean residence time (MRT) of recent assimilates in leaf respiration was more than three times longer than under non-limited conditions and was positively correlated to DSD. Also, the appearance of the label in soil respiration was delayed. Within 5 days after rewetting, photosynthesis, MRT of recent assimilates in leaf respiration and appearance of the label in soil respiration recovered fully. Despite the fast recovery, less label was recovered in the biomass of the previously drought-stressed plants, which also allocated less C to the root compartment (45 vs 64% in the control). We conclude that beech saplings quickly recover from extreme soil drought, although transitional after-effects prevail in C allocation, possibly due to repair

  7. Increased carbon sequestration in a Danish beech forest during 1996-2016: Observations and hypotheses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilegaard, Kim; Ibrom, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    A study of the net exchange of CO2 (NEE) between the atmosphere and a beech forest near Sorø, Denmark, during 14 years (1996-2009) showed that the beech forest acted as an increasing sink of CO2 [1]. A significant increase in gross primary production (GPP) and a smaller and not significant increase in ecosystem respiration (RE) were also found. Thus, the increased NEE was mainly attributed to an increase in GPP. The length of the carbon uptake period (CUP) significantly increased, whereas there was a no increase in the leafed period (LP). This means that the leaves stayed active longer. The increase in the carbon uptake period explained about half of the increasing NEE. The remaining increase was believed to be due to an observed increased uptake capacity of the canopy and increased annual radiation efficiency[2]. The causes for this were hypothesized to be a combination of increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration, higher summer precipitation, and increased availability of N. A higher nitrogen content in the leaves was observed towards the end of the observation period. An updated analysis of the flux data, now including the years 1996-2016, confirms the increasing trend in carbon sequestration of the forest, an increasingly longer growing season, and a significant correlation of NEE and CUP, however, similarly to the first study, the increase in CUP only explains about half of the total increase. Here we investigate three hypotheses for the remaining reasons for the increase: H1: increased canopy nitrogen content H2: carbon dioxide fertilisation H3: increased water availability due to changing precipitation patterns. We describe the multiannual development of canopy photosynthesis capacity with regression analysis and perform sensitivity studies with the canopy model MAESTRA [3] to investigate the above hypotheses. The results will be presented, critically discussed and interpreted with respect to general effects of global climate change and site specific, local

  8. Overview on the pest status and research plans on beech bark disease: A new exotic in Michigan

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Toby R. Petrice; Nathan W. Siegert

    2001-01-01

    Beech bark disease was first discovered in Michigan in spring 2000 in Ludington State Park and soon thereafter it was found in the upper peninsula in the bass Lake campground. since then, surveyshave found it in six counties in Michigan. Beech bark disease involves two exotic organisms: the beech bark scale (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind.; Eriococcidae...

  9. Ecological species group—Environmental factors relationships in unharvested beech forests in the north of Iran

    Treesearch

    Mohammad Naghi Adel; Hassan Pourbabaei; Daniel C. Dey

    2014-01-01

    Beech forests are the richest forest community in Iran because they are both economically and environmentally valuable. The greatest forest volume occurs in Iran's beech forests. Forests dominated by oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipskey) cover about 565,000 ha and represent the total area of indigenous forests in Guilan Province. A system...

  10. Spread of beech bark disease in the eastern United States and its relationship to regional forest composition

    Treesearch

    Randall S. Morin; Andrew M. Liebhold; Patrick C. Tobin; Kurt W. Gottschalk; Eugene Luzader

    2007-01-01

    Beech bark disease (BBD) is an insect-fungus complex involving the beech scale insect (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind.) and one of two canker fungi. Beech scale was introduced to Halifax, Nova Scotia around 1890, presumably with the fungus Neonectria coccinea var. faginata Lohm. The disease has subsequently spread...

  11. Management of beech stands infected by Cryptococcus fagisuga in West Germany

    Treesearch

    Hermann. Bogenschutz

    1983-01-01

    Beech trees in an experimental plot in the Odenwald (southwest Germany), with different intensities of attack by Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind. since at least 1970, were observed from 1972 until 1982 in order to ascertain the role of scale insects in beech bark disease and to facilitate decisions for the management of infested stands. At the beginning...

  12. Wood and bark anatomy of young beech in relation to Cryptococcus attack

    Treesearch

    David. Lonsdale

    1983-01-01

    Within a sample of European beech, partial resistance to attack by the beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga, was associated with a smooth bark which had a regular, vertical pattern in its surface 'growth lines'. Such bark contained relatively little lignified outer parenchyma, and the main stone cell layer was strongly developed. The '...

  13. A comparison of two stem injection treatments applied to American beech in central West Virginia

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey D. Kochenderfer; Gary W. Miller; James N. Kochenderfer

    2012-01-01

    Efficacies for two herbicide stem injection treatments on American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) and impacts to nontarget residual trees were evaluated in central West Virginia. The treatments consisted of hack-and-squirt injection of all beech stems ≥1.0 in. to 9.9 in. diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) with either imazapyr as Arsenal...

  14. Current status of beech bark disease in New England and New York

    Treesearch

    Margaret. Miller-Weeks

    1983-01-01

    The advancing front of beech bark disease in the northeast is now located in western New York and Pennsylvania. The disease is killing trees as far west as central New York. Cryptococcus fagisuga scale was found on nearly every tree examined during a northern New England disease survey. From that survey and Resource Evaluation plot data, beech...

  15. Extending the time interval for applying herbicide in cut-stump treatments on American beech

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey D. Kochenderfer; James N. Kochenderfer; Gary W. Miller

    2013-01-01

    American Beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) root sprouts often form dense understories that interfere with tree reproduction throughout much of the eastern hardwood region. The cut-stump treatment, whereby herbicide is applied to the stump within a few hours after a larger beech is felled, has been shown to mitigate the interference problem by...

  16. Beech root sprouts can be damaged by sodium arsenite treatment of parent tree

    Treesearch

    Frederick H. Berry

    1956-01-01

    American beech (Fagus grandifolia) can produce an abundance of root sprouts. In some cut-over woodlands, the sprouts occupy space that could be utilized by more desirable tree species. Therefore it seemed desirable to explore methods of destroying beech root sprouts.

  17. Controlling beech root and stump sprouts using the cut-stump treatment

    Treesearch

    Jeffery D. Kochenderfer; James N. Kochenderfer; Gary W. Miller

    2006-01-01

    Application costs and efficacy were determined for cut-stump treatments applied to American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) to control root and stump sprouts in central West Virginia. Glyphosate as Glypro (53.8%) was applied to the outer 2 in. of beech stumps from trees >6.0-in. dbh within 1 hour after cutting. In addition to treatment plots,...

  18. Timely salvage can reduce losses from beech scale-Nectria attack

    Treesearch

    David Crosby; J. C. Bjorkbom

    1958-01-01

    Beech is one of our more common hardwoods. It is an important component of the northern hardwood forest type, which occupies about 29 percent of the commercial forest land in the New England and Middle Atlantic States. In terms of total sawtimber volume, beech follows close on sugar maple, red oak, and yellow birch. It is used for a variety of products such as...

  19. Physiological responses of beech and sessile oak in a natural mixed stand during a dry summer.

    PubMed

    Raftoyannis, Yannis; Radoglou, Kalliopi

    2002-06-01

    Responses of CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance to decreasing leaf water potential, and to environmental factors, were analysed in a mixed natural stand of sessile oak (Quercus petraea ssp. medwediewii) and beech (Fagus svlvatica L.) in Greece during the exceptionally dry summer of 1998. Seasonal courses of leaf water potential were similar for both species, whereas mean net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance were always higher in sessile oak than in beech. The relationship between net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was strong for both species. Sessile oak had high rates of photosynthesis even under very low leaf water potentials and high air temperatures, whereas the photosynthetic rate of beech decreased at low water potentials. Diurnal patterns were similar in both species but sessile oak had higher rates of CO2 assimilation than beech. Our results indicate that sessile oak is more tolerant of drought than beech, due, in part, to its maintenance of photosynthesis at low water potential.

  20. Physiological Responses of Beech and Sessile Oak in a Natural Mixed Stand During a Dry Summer

    PubMed Central

    RAFTOYANNIS, YANNIS; RADOGLOU, KALLIOPI

    2002-01-01

    Responses of CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance to decreasing leaf water potential, and to environmental factors, were analysed in a mixed natural stand of sessile oak (Quercus petraea ssp. medwediewii) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in Greece during the exceptionally dry summer of 1998. Seasonal courses of leaf water potential were similar for both species, whereas mean net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance were always higher in sessile oak than in beech. The relationship between net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was strong for both species. Sessile oak had high rates of photosynthesis even under very low leaf water potentials and high air temperatures, whereas the photosynthetic rate of beech decreased at low water potentials. Diurnal patterns were similar in both species but sessile oak had higher rates of CO2 assimilation than beech. Our results indicate that sessile oak is more tolerant of drought than beech, due, in part, to its maintenance of photosynthesis at low water potential. PMID:12102528

  1. Two centuries of masting data for European beech and Norway spruce across the European continent.

    PubMed

    Ascoli, Davide; Maringer, Janet; Hacket-Pain, Andy; Conedera, Marco; Drobyshev, Igor; Motta, Renzo; Cirolli, Mara; Kantorowicz, Władysław; Zang, Christian; Schueler, Silvio; Croisé, Luc; Piussi, Pietro; Berretti, Roberta; Palaghianu, Ciprian; Westergren, Marjana; Lageard, Jonathan G A; Burkart, Anton; Gehrig Bichsel, Regula; Thomas, Peter A; Beudert, Burkhard; Övergaard, Rolf; Vacchiano, Giorgio

    2017-02-27

    Tree masting is one of the most intensively studied ecological processes. It affects nutrient fluxes of trees, regeneration dynamics in forests, animal population densities, and ultimately influences ecosystem services. Despite a large volume of research focused on masting, its evolutionary ecology, spatial and temporal variability, and environmental drivers are still matter of debate. Understanding the proximate and ultimate causes of masting at broad spatial and temporal scales will enable us to predict tree reproductive strategies and their response to changing environment. Here we provide broad spatial (distribution range-wide) and temporal (century) masting data for the two main masting tree species in Europe, European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.). We collected masting data from a total of 359 sources through an extensive literature review and from unpublished surveys. The data set has a total of 1,747 series and 18,348 yearly observations from 28 countries and covering a time span of years 1677-2016 and 1791-2016 for beech and spruce, respectively. For each record, the following information is available: identification code; species; year of observation; proxy of masting (flower, pollen, fruit, seed, dendrochronological reconstructions); statistical data type (ordinal, continuous); data value; unit of measurement (only in case of continuous data); geographical location (country, Nomenclature of Units for Territorial Statistics NUTS-1 level, municipality, coordinates); first and last record year and related length; type of data source (field survey, peer reviewed scientific literature, gray literature, personal observation); source identification code; date when data were added to the database; comments. To provide a ready-to-use masting index we harmonized ordinal data into five classes. Furthermore, we computed an additional field where continuous series with length >4 yr where converted into a five classes

  2. Manipulations to regenerate aspen ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Wayne D. Shepperd

    2001-01-01

    Vegetative regeneration of aspen can be initiated through manipulations that provide hormonal stimulation, proper growth environment, and sucker protection - the three elements of the aspen regeneration triangle. The correct course of action depends upon a careful evaluation of the size, vigor, age, and successional status of the existing clone. Soils and site...

  3. Space sequestration below ground in old-growth spruce-beech forests—signs for facilitation?

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, Andreas; Kampf, Friederike; Hilbrig, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Scientists are currently debating the effects of mixing tree species for the complementary resource acquisition in forest ecosystems. In four unmanaged old-growth spruce-beech forests in strict nature reserves in southern Sweden and northern Germany we assessed forest structure and fine rooting profiles and traits (≤2 mm) by fine root sampling and the analysis of fine root morphology and biomass. These studies were conducted in selected tree groups with four different interspecific competition perspectives: (1) spruce as a central tree, (2) spruce as competitor, (3) beech as a central tree, and (4) beech as competitor. Mean values of life fine root attributes like biomass (FRB), length (FRL), and root area index (RAI) were significantly lower for spruce than for beech in mixed stands. Vertical profiles of fine root attributes adjusted to one unit of basal area (BA) exhibited partial root system stratification when central beech is growing with spruce competitors. In this constellation, beech was able to raise its specific root length (SRL) and therefore soil exploration efficiency in the subsoil, while increasing root biomass partitioning into deeper soil layers. According to relative values of fine root attributes (rFRA), asymmetric below-ground competition was observed favoring beech over spruce, in particular when central beech trees are admixed with spruce competitors. We conclude that beech fine rooting is facilitated in the presence of spruce by lowering competitive pressure compared to intraspecific competition whereas the competitive pressure for spruce is increased by beech admixture. Our findings underline the need of spatially differentiated approaches to assess interspecific competition below ground. Single-tree approaches and simulations of below-ground competition are required to focus rather on microsites populated by tree specimens as the basic spatial study area. PMID:24009616

  4. Space sequestration below ground in old-growth spruce-beech forests-signs for facilitation?

    PubMed

    Bolte, Andreas; Kampf, Friederike; Hilbrig, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Scientists are currently debating the effects of mixing tree species for the complementary resource acquisition in forest ecosystems. In four unmanaged old-growth spruce-beech forests in strict nature reserves in southern Sweden and northern Germany we assessed forest structure and fine rooting profiles and traits (≤2 mm) by fine root sampling and the analysis of fine root morphology and biomass. These studies were conducted in selected tree groups with four different interspecific competition perspectives: (1) spruce as a central tree, (2) spruce as competitor, (3) beech as a central tree, and (4) beech as competitor. Mean values of life fine root attributes like biomass (FRB), length (FRL), and root area index (RAI) were significantly lower for spruce than for beech in mixed stands. Vertical profiles of fine root attributes adjusted to one unit of basal area (BA) exhibited partial root system stratification when central beech is growing with spruce competitors. In this constellation, beech was able to raise its specific root length (SRL) and therefore soil exploration efficiency in the subsoil, while increasing root biomass partitioning into deeper soil layers. According to relative values of fine root attributes (rFRA), asymmetric below-ground competition was observed favoring beech over spruce, in particular when central beech trees are admixed with spruce competitors. We conclude that beech fine rooting is facilitated in the presence of spruce by lowering competitive pressure compared to intraspecific competition whereas the competitive pressure for spruce is increased by beech admixture. Our findings underline the need of spatially differentiated approaches to assess interspecific competition below ground. Single-tree approaches and simulations of below-ground competition are required to focus rather on microsites populated by tree specimens as the basic spatial study area.

  5. Characterization of soil microarthropod communities in Italian beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, F. D.; Menta, C.; Piovesan, G.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of soil organisms to ecosystem functions such as decomposition, nutrient recycling and the maintenance of physico-chemical properties is well recognised, as is the fact that soil fauna plays an important role in the formation and stabilisation of soil structure. The diversity of soil fauna includes a quarter of described living species, the majority of which are insects and arachnids. Soil fauna plays an essential role in forests and agro-ecosystems by maintaining their functionality and productivity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the biodiversity of soil microarthropods communities in different Italian beech forest. Particular attention is paid to the role of fossorial microarthropods in the maintenance of soil structure and in the organic matter movements. Three beech forests are studied, two located in the North and one in the Centre of Italy. Microarthropods are extracted from litter and soil with a Berlese-Tullgren funnel, identified to order level (class level for myriapods) and counted using a microscope. Relative order abundance and biodiversity are expressed using the Shannon-Weaver diversity index (H) and evenness index (J). Soil biological quality is expressed using the QBS-ar index and Acari/Collembola ratio. The results show a richness of microarthropods: several orders, till 19 different groups, are determined and identified. Acari and collembola are the main represented taxa and, especially in litter samples, pseudoscorpions, different specimens of diplopods (or millipedes) and chilopods (centipedes) are found. Thus the presence in particular of diplopods offers the possibility of studying fossorial microarthropods functions in detail. Furthermore, both in soil and in litter samples, adapted groups are recognized, such as pauropods, symphyla, proturans and diplurans, with specific morphological characteristics that these species suited to soil habitat. Therefore they attest a good level of soil quality and high natural value

  6. Climate Change Induces Shifts in Abundance and Activity Pattern of Bacteria and Archaea Catalyzing Major Transformation Steps in Nitrogen Turnover in a Soil from a Mid-European Beech Forest

    PubMed Central

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  7. Climate change induces shifts in abundance and activity pattern of bacteria and archaea catalyzing major transformation steps in nitrogen turnover in a soil from a mid-European beech forest.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimüller, Carolin; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  8. Vegetative regeneration

    Treesearch

    George A. Schier; John R. Jones; Robert P. Winokur

    1985-01-01

    Aspen is noted for its ability to regenerate vegetatively by adventitious shoots or suckers that arise on its long lateral roots. It also produces sprouts from stumps and root collars; but they are not common. In a survey of regeneration after clearcutting mature aspen in Utah. Baker (1918b) found that 92% of the shoots originated from roots, 7% from root collars, and...

  9. Regeneration methods

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; James B. Baker

    1991-01-01

    Southern pines can be regenerated naturally, by clearcutting, seedtree, shelterwood, or selection reproduction culling methods, or artificially, by direct seeding or by planting either container or bareroot seedlings. All regeneration methods have inherent advantages: and disadvantages; thus, land managers must consider many factors before deciding on a specific method...

  10. Regional Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris) Natural Regeneration

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer

    1998-01-01

    Duration: 1968-present Objective: Test the shelterwood system of longleaf pine natural regeneration. Methods: Longleaf pine natural regeneration tests were established from 1966 through 1970 at ten locations in seven states from North Carolina to Louisiana. One of these was established on a 50-acre flatwoods site on Eglin AFB in 1968. Regeneration was initially...

  11. Guide to Regeneration of Bottomland Hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Martha R. McKevlin

    1992-01-01

    This guide will help landowners, consulting foresters, and public service foresters regenerate bottomland hardwoods. It discusses (1) interpretation of site characteristics, (2) selection of species, and (3) selection of regeneration methods. A dichotomous key for selection of appropriate regeneration methods under various conditions is presented.

  12. Oak regeneration why big is better

    Treesearch

    Paul P. Kormanik; Shi-Jean S. Sung; T.L. Kormanik; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    1995-01-01

    It is generally accepted that large preharvest advanced oak regeneration is required for maintaining a significant oak component in future stands. However, developing advanced oak regeneration on productive sites has been difficult because stand prescriptions encouraging oak regeneration are the same conditions that favor development of potentially faster growing...

  13. Heterogeneous genetic structure in a Fagus crenata population in an old-growth beech forest revealed by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Asuka, Y; Tomaru, N; Nisimura, N; Tsumura, Y; Yamamoto, S

    2004-05-01

    The within-population genetic structure of Fagus crenata in a 4-ha plot (200 x 200 m) of an old-growth beech forest was analysed using microsatellite markers. To assess the genetic structure, Moran's I spatial autocorrelation coefficient was calculated. Correlograms of Moran's I showed significant positive values less than 0.100 for short-distance classes, indicating weak genetic structure. The genetic structure within the population is created by limited seed dispersal, and is probably weakened by overlapping seed shadow, secondary seed dispersal, extensive pollen flow and the thinning process. Genetic structure was detected in a western subplot of 50 x 200 m with immature soils and almost no dwarf bamboos (Sasa spp.), where small and intermediate-sized individuals were distributed in aggregations with high density because of successful regeneration. By contrast, genetic structure was not found in an eastern subplot of the same size with mature soils and Sasa cover, where successful regeneration was prevented, and the density of the small and intermediate-sized individuals was low. Moreover, genetic structure of individuals in a small-size class (diameter at breast height < 12 cm) was more obvious than in a large-size class (diameter at breast height >/= 12 cm). The apparent genetic structure detected in the 4-ha plot was therefore probably the result of the structure in the western portion of the plot and in small and intermediate-sized individuals that successfully regenerated under the favourable environment. The heterogeneity in genetic structure presumably reflects variation in the density that should be affected by differences in regeneration dynamics associated with heterogeneity in environmental conditions.

  14. Influence of partial harvesting and site factors on the abundance and composition of natural regeneration in the Acadian Forest of Maine, USA

    Treesearch

    Mohammad Bataineh; Laura Kenefic; Aaron Weiskittel; Robert Wagner; John. Brissette

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the factors regulating the composition and abundance of natural regeneration in forest ecosystems is critical to sustainable management worldwide. Using a long-term silvicultural experiment in Maine, we partitioned the variation in natural regeneration and examined the contribution of overstory and understory vegetation (biotic factors), substrate and...

  15. Demonstration and Validation of a Regenerated Cellulose Dialysis Membrane Diffusion Sampler for Monitoring Groundwater Quality and Remediation Progress at DoD Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    trace elements that did not equilibrate within 28 days. Equilibration times for selected explosive compounds through dialysis membranes were...PROTOCOL Demonstration and Validation of a Regenerated Cellulose Dialysis Membrane Diffusion Sampler for Monitoring Groundwater Quality and...Demonstration and Validation of a Regenerated Cellulose Dialysis Membrane Diffusion Sampler for Monitoring Groundwater Quality and Remediation Progress at DoD

  16. Safeguarding saproxylic fungal biodiversity in Apennine beech forest priority habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Oriana; Lunghini, Dario; Pecoraro, Lorenzo; Sabatini, Francesco Maria; Persiani, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    The FAGUS LIFE Project (LIFE11/NAT/IT/135) targets two European priority habitats, i.e. Habitat 9210* Apennine beech forests with Taxus and Ilex, and Habitat 9220* Apennine beech forests with Abies alba, within two National Parks: Cilento, Vallo di Diano and Alburni; Gran Sasso and Monti della Laga. The current limited distribution of the target habitats is also due to the impact of human activities on forest systems, such as harvesting and grazing. The FAGUS project aims at developing and testing management strategies able to integrate the conservation of priority forest habitats (9210* and 9220*) and the sustainable use of forest resources. In order to assess the responses to different management treatments the BACI monitoring design (Before-After, Control-Intervention) has been applied on forest structure and diversity of focus taxa before and after experimental harvesting treatments. Conventional management of Apennine beech forests impacts a wealth of taxonomic groups, such as saproxylic beetles and fungi, which are threatened throughout Europe by the lack of deadwood and of senescing trees, and by the homogeneous structure of managed forests. Deadwood has been denoted as the most important manageable habitat for biodiversity in forests not only for supporting a wide diversity of organisms, but also for playing a prominent role in several ecological processes, creating the basis for the cycling of photosynthetic energy, carbon, and nutrients stored in woody material. Especially fungi can be regarded as key group for understanding and managing biodiversity associated with decaying wood. The before-intervention field sampling was carried out in Autumn 2013 in 33 monitoring plots across the two national Parks. The occurrence at plot level of both Ascomycota and Basidiomycota sporocarps was surveyed. All standing and downed deadwood with a minimum diameter of 10 cm was sampled for sporocarps larger than 1 mm, and information on decay class and fungal morphogroups

  17. Current near-to-nature forest management effects on functional trait composition of saproxylic beetles in beech forests.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Martin M; Lachat, Thibault; Brunet, Jörg; Isacsson, Gunnar; Bouget, Christophe; Brustel, Hervé; Brandl, Roland; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Müller, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    With the aim of wood production with negligible negative effects on biodiversity and ecosystem processes, a silvicultural practice of selective logging with natural regeneration has been implemented in European beech forests (Fagus sylvatica) during the last decades. Despite this near-to-nature strategy, species richness of various taxa is lower in these forests than in unmanaged forests. To develop guidelines to minimize the fundamental weaknesses in the current practice, we linked functional traits of saproxylic beetle species to ecosystem characteristics. We used continental-scale data from 8 European countries and regional-scale data from a large forest in southern Germany and forest-stand variables that represented a gradient of intensity of forest use to evaluate the effect of current near-to-nature management strategies on the functional diversity of saproxylic beetles. Forest-stand variables did not have a statistically significant effect on overall functional diversity, but they did significantly affect community mean and diversity of single functional traits. As the amount of dead wood increased the composition of assemblages shifted toward dominance of larger species and species preferring dead wood of large diameter and in advanced stages of decay. The mean amount of dead wood across plots in which most species occurred was from 20 to 60 m(3) /ha. Species occurring in plots with mean dead wood >60 m(3) /ha were consistently those inhabiting dead wood of large diameter and in advanced stages of decay. On the basis of our results, to make current wood-production practices in beech forests throughout Europe more conservation oriented (i.e., promoting biodiversity and ecosystem functioning), we recommend increasing the amount of dead wood to >20 m(3) /ha; not removing dead wood of large diameter (50 cm) and allowing more dead wood in advanced stages of decomposition to develop; and designating strict forest reserves, with their exceptionally high amounts of

  18. Competition for nitrogen sources between European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Simon, J; Waldhecker, P; Brüggemann, N; Rennenberg, H

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the short-term consequences of direct competition between beech and sycamore maple on root N uptake and N composition, mycorrhizal seedlings of both tree species were incubated for 4 days (i.e. beech only, sycamore maple only or both together) in an artificial nutrient solution with low N availability. On the fourth day, N uptake experiments were conducted to study the effects of competition on inorganic and organic N uptake. For this purpose, multiple N sources were applied with a single label. Furthermore, fine roots were sampled and analysed for total amino acids, soluble protein, total nitrogen, nitrate and ammonium content. Our results clearly show that both tree species were able to use inorganic and organic N sources. Uptake of inorganic and organic N by beech roots was negatively affected in the presence of the competing tree species. In contrast, the presence of beech stimulated inorganic N uptake by sycamore maple roots. Both the negative effect of sycamore maple on N uptake of beech and the positive effect of beech on N uptake of sycamore maple led to an increase in root soluble protein in beech, despite an overall decrease in total N concentration. Thus, beech compensated for the negative effects of the tree competitor on N uptake by incorporating less N into structural N components, but otherwise exhibited the same strategy as the competitor, namely, enhancing soluble protein levels in roots when grown under competition. It is speculated that enhanced enzyme activities of so far unknown nature are required in beech as a defence response to inter-specific competition.

  19. Soil base saturation combines with Beech Bark Disease to influence composition and structure of Sugar Maple-Beech forests in an acid rain-impacted region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Dovciak, Martin; Bailey, Scott W.; Antidormi, Michael; Zarfos, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Sugar maple, an abundant and highly valued tree species in eastern North America, has experienced decline from soil calcium (Ca) depletion by acidic deposition, while beech, which often coexists with sugar maple, has been afflicted with beech bark disease (BBD) over the same period. To investigate how variations in soil base saturation combine with effects of BBD in influencing stand composition and structure, measurements of soils, canopy, subcanopy, and seedlings were taken in 21 watersheds in the Adirondack region of NY (USA), where sugar maple and beech were the predominant canopy species and base saturation of the upper B horizon ranged from 4.4 to 67%. The base saturation value corresponding to the threshold for Al mobilization (16.8%) helped to define the species composition of canopy trees and seedlings. Canopy vigor and diameter at breast height (DBH) were positively correlated (P < 0.05) with base saturation for sugar maple, but unrelated for beech. However, beech occupied lower canopy positions than sugar maple, and as base saturation increased, the average canopy position of beech decreased relative to sugar maple (P < 0.10). In low-base saturation soils, soil-Ca depletion and BBD may have created opportunities for gap-exploiting species such as red maple and black cherry, whereas in high-base saturation soils, sugar maple dominated the canopy. Where soils were beginning to recover from acidic deposition effects, sugar maple DBH and basal area increased progressively from 2000 to 2015, whereas for beech, average DBH did not change and basal area did not increase after 2010.

  20. Prospective evaluation of the use of motorized ridge expanders in guided bone regeneration for future implant sites.

    PubMed

    Mazzocco, Fabio; Nart, Jose; Cheung, Wai S; Griffin, Terrence J

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this prospective, randomized, controlled clinical investigation were to evaluate the performance of motorized ridge expanders (MREs) and to compare their results with those achieved using lateral ridge augmentation (LRA). Eight subjects with bilateral ridge deformities were selected. One technique was used on the right side and the other on the left. Implants were placed 6 months after bone augmentation procedures. All measurements were recorded at 2 and 5 mm from the most coronal aspect of the crest. The augmentation achieved with both techniques was statistically significant: 1.2 mm for LRA and 1.5 mm for MRE 2 mm from the crest and 1.5 mm for LRA and 1.6 mm for MRE at 5 mm from the crest. The differences between the two techniques were statistically insignificant. The amount of expansion achieved in the MRE sites appeared to be negatively correlated with the thickness of the cancellous bone (P < .05), and it was not affected by the thickness of the cortical plate. The MRE technique appears to be as effective as the LRA technique in augmenting the thickness of atrophic ridges. Defects treated with MREs showed less bone width contraction during the first 6 months of healing.

  1. Carbon isotopic composition and oxygen isotopic enrichment in phloem and total leaf organic matter of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) along a climate gradient.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Claudia; Matzarakis, Andreas; Rennenberg, Heinz; Gessler, Arthur

    2006-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of climate on the carbon isotopic composition (sigma13C) and oxygen isotopic enrichment (delta18O) above the source water of different organic matter pools in European beech. In July and September 2002, sigma13C and delta18O were determined in phloem carbohydrates and in bulk foliage of adult beech trees along a transect from central Germany to southern France, where beech reaches its southernmost distributional limit. The data were related to meteorological and physiological parameters. The climate along the transect stretches from temperate [subcontinental (SC)] to submediterranean (SM). Both sigma13Cleaf and delta18Oleaf were representative of site-specific long-term environmental conditions. sigma13C of leaves collected in September was indicative of stomatal conductance, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and radiation availability of the current growing season. delta18O was mainly correlated to mean growing season relative humidity (RH) and VPD. In contrast to the leaves, sigma13Cphloem varied considerably between July and September and was well correlated with canopy stomatal conductance (Gs) in a 2 d integral prior to phloem sampling. The relationship between sigma13C and delta18O in both leaves and phloem sap points, however, to a combined influence of stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity on the variation of sigma13C along the transect. delta18Ophloem could be described by applying a model that included 18O fractionation associated with water exchange between the leaf and the atmosphere and with the production of organic matter. Hence, isotope signatures can be used as effective tools to assess the water balance of beech, and thus, help predict the effects of climatic change on one of the ecologically and economically most important tree species in Central Europe.

  2. [New challenge of tissue repair and regenerative medicine: to achieve a perfect repair and regeneration of multiple tissues in wound sites].

    PubMed

    Fu, X B

    2016-01-01

    Great achievements in the study of tissue repair and regeneration have been made, and many of these successes have been shown to be beneficial to the patients in recent years. However, perfect tissue repair and regeneration of damaged tissues and organs remain to be great challenges in the management of trauma and diseases. Based on the progress in developmental biology in animals and advances in stem cell biology, it is possible to attain the aim of perfect repair and regeneration by means of somatic cell reprogramming and different inducing techniques.

  3. Influences of different large mammalian fauna on dung beetle diversity in beech forests.

    PubMed

    Enari, Hiroto; Koike, Shinsuke; Sakamaki, Haruka

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on biological relationships between mammalian species richness and the community structure of dung beetles in cool-temperate forests in the northernmost part of mainland Japan. The composition of beetle assemblages was evaluated at 3 sites in undisturbed beech forests with different mammalian fauna. In spring and summer 2009, beetles were collected at each site using pitfall traps baited with feces from Japanese macaques, Macaca fuscata Blyth (Primates: Cercopithecidae); Asiatic black bears, Ursus thibetanus Cuvier (Carnivora: Ursidae); Japanese serows, Capricornis crispus Temminck (Artiodactyla: Bovidae); and cattle. In the present study, 1,862 dung beetles representing 14 species were collected, and most dung beetles possessed the ecological characteristic of selecting specific mammalian feces. The present findings indicated that although species diversity in dung beetle assemblages was not necessarily positively correlated with mammalian species richness in cool-temperate forests, the absence of the macaque population directly resulted in the marked reduction of the beetle abundance, with the loss of the most frequent species, Aphodius eccoptus Bates (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) during spring.

  4. Influences of Different Large Mammalian Fauna on Dung Beetle Diversity in Beech Forests

    PubMed Central

    Enari, Hiroto; Koike, Shinsuke; Sakamaki, Haruka

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on biological relationships between mammalian species richness and the community structure of dung beetles in cool-temperate forests in the northernmost part of mainland Japan. The composition of beetle assemblages was evaluated at 3 sites in undisturbed beech forests with different mammalian fauna. In spring and summer 2009, beetles were collected at each site using pitfall traps baited with feces from Japanese macaques, Macaca fuscata Blyth (Primates: Cercopithecidae); Asiatic black bears, Ursus thibetanus Cuvier (Carnivora: Ursidae); Japanese serows, Capricornis crispus Temminck (Artiodactyla: Bovidae); and cattle. In the present study, 1,862 dung beetles representing 14 species were collected, and most dung beetles possessed the ecological characteristic of selecting specific mammalian feces. The present findings indicated that although species diversity in dung beetle assemblages was not necessarily positively correlated with mammalian species richness in cool-temperate forests, the absence of the macaque population directly resulted in the marked reduction of the beetle abundance, with the loss of the most frequent species, Aphodius eccoptus Bates (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) during spring. PMID:23909510

  5. Structure and properties of a pulp fibre-reinforced composite with regenerated cellulose matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gindl, W.; Schöberl, T.; Keckes, J.

    2006-04-01

    Fully bio-based cellulose cellulose composites were produced by partly dissolving beech pulp fibres in lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide (LiCl/DMAc) and subsequent regeneration of matrix cellulose in the presence of undissolved fibres. Compared to cellulose epoxy composites produced from the same fibres, a two-fold increase in tensile strength and elastic modulus was observed for cellulose cellulose composites. From scanning electron microscopy and nanoindentation it is concluded that changes in the fibre cell wall during LiCl/DMAc treatment, improved matrix properties of regenerated cellulose compared to epoxy, and improved fibre matrix adhesion are responsible for the superior properties of cellulose cellulose composites.

  6. Effects of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations on beech leaf litter decomposition, enzyme activities and protein expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Roschitzki, B.; Schmid, E.; Eberl, L.; Hämmerle, I.; Leitner, S.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-11-01

    Microbes are major players in leaf litter decomposition and therefore advances in the understanding of their control on element cycling are of paramount importance. Our aim was to investigate the influence of leaf litter stoichiometry in terms of carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) : phosphorus (P) ratios on the decomposition processes and to track changes in microbial community structures and functions in response to temperature stress treatments. To elucidate how the stoichiometry of beech leaf litter (Fagus sylvatica L.) and stress treatments interactively affect the microbial decomposition processes, a terrestrial microcosm experiment was conducted. Beech litter from different Austrian sites covering C:N ratios from 39 to 61 and C:P ratios from 666 to 1729 were incubated at 15 °C and 60% moisture for six months. Part of the microcosms were then subjected to severe changes in temperature (+30 °C and -15 °C) to monitor the influence of temperature stress. Extracellular enzyme activities were assayed and respiratory activities measured. A semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; unique spectral counting) was employed to investigate the impact of the applied stress treatments in dependency of litter stoichiometry on structure and function of the decomposing community. In litter with narrow C:nutrient (C:N, C:P) ratios, microbial decomposers were most abundant. Cellulase, chitinase, phosphatase and protease activity decreased after heat and freezing treatments. Decomposer communities and specific functions varied with site, i.e. stoichiometry. The applied stress combined with the respective time of sampling evoked changes of enzyme activities and litter pH. Freezing treatments resulted in a decline in residual plant litter material and increased fungal abundance, indicating slightly accelerated decomposition. Overall, a strong effect of litter stoichiometry on microbial community structures and

  7. Systemic AL amyloidosis in a Beech Marten (Martes foina).

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F E; Mignone, W; Ferrero, E; Poggi, M; Biolatti, B; Bollo, E

    2013-10-01

    A wild Beech Marten (Martes foina), was referred for necropsy to the Department of Animal Pathology of the University of Turin (Italy). At gross examination, whitish and firm masses, 10-mm in diameter, were found on the heart and in the kidney. Spleen showed lighter color and greater consistency, and the cut surface of the liver appeared scattered with whitish-yellow coalescing foci homogeneously distributed. Amyloid deposits were present in the perivascular and intercellular spaces of the visceral organs, such as the heart, liver, and kidneys. Amyloid stained positively with Congo red with and without 5% potassium permanganate pretreatment and showed green birefringence observable under polarized light. A diagnosis of systemic AL amyloidosis was made. This is the first description of systemic AL amyloidosis in a wild Stone Marten.

  8. Estimation of beech pyrolysis kinetic parameters by Shuffled Complex Evolution.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanming; Wang, Changjian; Chaos, Marcos; Chen, Ruiyu; Lu, Shouxiang

    2016-01-01

    The pyrolysis kinetics of a typical biomass energy feedstock, beech, was investigated based on thermogravimetric analysis over a wide heating rate range from 5K/min to 80K/min. A three-component (corresponding to hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) parallel decomposition reaction scheme was applied to describe the experimental data. The resulting kinetic reaction model was coupled to an evolutionary optimization algorithm (Shuffled Complex Evolution, SCE) to obtain model parameters. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study in which SCE has been used in the context of thermogravimetry. The kinetic parameters were simultaneously optimized against data for 10, 20 and 60K/min heating rates, providing excellent fits to experimental data. Furthermore, it was shown that the optimized parameters were applicable to heating rates (5 and 80K/min) beyond those used to generate them. Finally, the predicted results based on optimized parameters were contrasted with those based on the literature.

  9. Nitrogen deposition changes ectomycorrhizal communities in Swiss beech forests.

    PubMed

    de Witte, L C; Rosenstock, N P; van der Linde, S; Braun, S

    2017-12-15

    Atmospheric pollution has implications for the health and diversity of temperate forests covering large parts of central Europe. Long-term elevated anthropogenic deposition of nitrogen (N) is driving forest ecosystems from the limitation by N to other nutrients and is found to affect tree health and ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF), which most trees depend on for nutrient uptake. However, the consequence of EMF community changes for trees remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated changes in EMF communities on root tips and in soil of beech forests along a N deposition gradient ranging between 16 and 33kgNha(-1)a(-1), where high N deposition was found to negatively affect tree growth and nutrient levels. The most important factors significantly explaining variation in root tip and mycelium EMF community composition in both root tips and mesh bags were increased N deposition, base saturation, growing season temperature and precipitation. With increasing N deposition, fine root length, EMF root colonization, EMF diversity on root tips and in soil, and production of extramatrical mycelium decreased significantly. Foliar P and potassium (K) were positively associated with increasing EMF diversity and we found EMF community composition to be associated with foliar P and N:P ratio. The decrease in root colonization, mesh bag ingrowth and abundance of the important species Cenococcum geophilum as well as high biomass species with increasing N availability clearly indicate repercussions for belowground carbon allocation, although some indicator species for high N deposition and low foliar P have long mycelia and may reflect a potential optimization of host P uptake. Our study supports the hypothesis that the decrease in nutrient uptake in beech forests across Europe is related to changes in EMF communities and suggests that continued high N deposition changes soil carbon and nutrient cycles, thereby affecting forest ecosystem health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. The status of beech bark disease in the Maritime Provinces of Canada in 1980

    Treesearch

    L.P. Magasi; W.R. Newell

    1983-01-01

    Beech bark dieease first reached North America about a 100 years ago and within a few decades rendered beech an almost useless weed species in the Maritimes. A survey in 1980 to determine the current status of the disease found the scale insect active, though infestations generally light, on over 90% of trees in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island but on only about 50...

  11. Gross nitrogen fluxes in intact beech-soil-microbe systems under experimentally simulated climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Javier; Bilela, Silvija; Gasche Gasche, Rainer; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Bimüller, Carolin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Rennenberg, Heinz; Dannenmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The vulnerability of beech forests of Central Europe to projected climate change conditions is a current matter of debate and concern. In order to investigate the response of N cycling in a typical beech forest to projected climate change conditions, we transplanted small lysimeters with intact beech-soil systems from a slope with N-exposure (representing present day climate conditions) to a slope with S exposure (serving as a warmer and drier model climate for future conditions). Lysimeters transfers within the N exposure served as control. After an equilibration period of 1 year, three isotope labeling/harvest cycles were performed: (1) comparison between N and S slopes under ambient conditions; (2) comparison between N and S slopes after intensified drought at S exposure; (3) rewetting after the drought period. Homogenous triple isotope labeling (15N/13C glutamine, 15NH4+, 15NO3-) in combination with 15N tracing and -pool dilution approaches as well as molecular analyses of nitrogen cycling genes and mycorrhiza morphotyping allowed to simultaneously quantify all N turnover processes in the intact beech-soil-microbe system. Nitrate was the major N source of beech seedlings with little importance of ammonium and no importance of glutamine. Experimental simulation of climate change resulted in significantly reduced gene copies of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in soil (AOB), a dramatic attenuation of microbial gross nitrate production from 252±83 mg N m-2 day-1 for the control treatment to 49±29 mg N m-2 day-1 for the climate change treatment and associated strong declines in soil nitrate concentrations as well as nitrate uptake by microorganisms and beech, which could not be compensated by uptake of ammonium or glutamine. Therefore, N content of beech seedlings was strongly reduced in the climate change treatment. Hence our data provide a microbial mechanism to explain nutritional limitations of beech under higher temperatures and drought and raise questions about

  12. Resting and injury-induced inflamed periosteum contain multiple macrophage subsets that are located at sites of bone growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kylie Anne; Raggatt, Liza-Jane; Millard, Susan; Batoon, Lena; Chiu-Ku Wu, Andy; Chang, Ming-Kang; Hume, David Arthur; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Better understanding of bone growth and regeneration mechanisms within periosteal tissues will improve understanding of bone physiology and pathology. Macrophage contributions to bone biology and repair have been established but specific investigation of periosteal macrophages has not been undertaken. We used an immunohistochemistry approach to characterize macrophages in growing murine bone and within activated periosteum induced in a mouse model of bone injury. Osteal tissue macrophages (osteomacs) and resident macrophages were distributed throughout resting periosteum. In tissues collected from 4-week-old mice, osteomacs were observed intimately associated with sites of periosteal diaphyseal and metaphyseal bone dynamics associated with normal growth. This included F4/80(+)Mac-2(-/low) osteomac association with extended tracks of bone formation (modeling) on diphyseal periosteal surfaces. Although this recapitulated endosteal osteomac characteristics, there was subtle variance in the morphology and spatial organization of periosteal modeling-associated osteomacs, which likely reflects the greater structural complexity of periosteum. Osteomacs, resident macrophages and inflammatory macrophages (F4/80(+)Mac-2(hi)) were associated with the complex bone dynamics occurring within the periosteum at the metaphyseal corticalization zone. These three macrophage subsets were also present within activated native periosteum after bone injury across a 9-day time course that spanned the inflammatory through remodeling bone healing phases. This included osteomac association with foci of endochondral ossification within the activated native periosteum. These observations confirm that osteomacs are key components of both osteal tissues, in spite of salient differences between endosteal and periosteal structure and that multiple macrophage subsets are involved in periosteal bone dynamics.

  13. Sensitivity of Beech Trees to Global Environmental Changes at Most North-Eastern Latitude of Their Occurrence in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Augustaitis, Algirdas; Jasineviciene, Dalia; Girgzdiene, Rasele; Kliucius, Almantas; Marozas, Vitas

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to detect sensitivity of beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) to meteorological parameters and air pollution by acidifying species as well as to surface ozone outside their north-eastern distribution range. Data set since 1981 of Preila EMEP station enabled to establish that hot Summers, cold dormant, and dry and cold first-half of vegetation periods resulted in beech tree growth reduction. These meteorological parameters explained 57% variation in beech tree ring widths. Acidifying species had no significant effect on beech tree growth. Only ozone was among key factors contributing to beech stand productivity. Phytotoxic effect of this pollutant increased explanation rate of beech tree ring variation by 18%, that is, up to 75%. However, due to climate changes the warmer dormant periods alone are not the basis ensuring favourable conditions for beech tree growth. Increase in air temperature in June-August and decrease in precipitation amount in the first half of vegetation period should result in beech tree radial increment reduction. Despite the fact that phytotoxic effect of surface ozone should not increase due to stabilization in its concentration, it is rather problematic to expect better environmental conditions for beech tree growth at northern latitude of their pervasion. PMID:22649321

  14. Using Remote Sensing Technologies to Quantify the Effects of Beech Bark Disease on the Structure, Composition, and Function of a Late-Successional Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart-Haëntjens, E. J.; Ricart, R. D.; Fahey, R. T.; Fotis, A. T.; Gough, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Ecological theory maintains that as forests age, the rate at which carbon (C) is stored declines because C released through organic matter decomposition offsets declining C sequestration in new vegetative growth. Recent observational studies are challenging this long-held hypothesis, with limited evidence suggesting higher-than-expected rates in late-successional forests could be, counterintuitively, tied to canopy structural changes associated with low intensity tree mortality. As forests age, canopy structural complexity may increase when old trees die and form upper canopy gaps that release subcanopy vegetation. This provides one explanation for observations of sustained high production in old forests. Recent studies have found that this increased structural complexity and resource-use efficiency maintain C storage in mid-successional deciduous forests; whether a similar mechanism extends to late-successional forests is unknown. We will present how a slow, moderate disturbance affects the structure and C sequestration of late-successional forests. Our study site is a forest recently infected by Beech Bark Disease (BBD), which will result in the eventual mortality of American beech trees in this late successional forest in Northern Michigan, at the University of Michigan Biological Station. American Beech, Hemlock, Sugar Maple, and White Pine dominate the landscape, with American Beech making up 30% of the canopy trees on average. At the plot scale American Beech is distributed heterogeneously, comprising 1% to 60% of total plot basal area, making it possible to examine the interplay between disturbance severity, canopy structural change, and primary production resilience in this forest. Within each of the 13 plots, species and stem diameter were collected in 1992, 1994, 2014, and 2016, with future remeasurements planned. We will discuss how ground-based lidar coupled with airborne spectral (IR and RGB) imagery are being used to track canopy BBD

  15. Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Antonia F.; Klatt, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage damaged by trauma has a limited capacity to regenerate. Current methods for treating small chondral defects include palliative treatment with arthroscopic debridement and lavage, reparative treatment with marrow stimulation techniques (e.g. microfracture), and restorative treatment, including osteochondral grafting and autologous chondrocyte implantation. Larger defects are treated by osteochondral allografting or total joint replacements. However, the future of treating cartilage defects lies in providing biologic solutions through cartilage regeneration. Laboratory and clinical studies have examined the treatment of larger lesions using tissue engineered cartilage. Regenerated cartilage can be derived from various cell types, including chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells, and pluripotent stem cells. Common scaffolding materials include proteins, carbohydrates, synthetic materials, and composite polymers. Scaffolds may be woven, spun into nanofibers, or configured as hydrogels. Chondrogenesis may be enhanced with the application of chondroinductive growth factors. Finally, bioreactors are being developed to enhance nutrient delivery and provide mechanical stimulation to tissue-engineered cartilage ex vivo. The multi-disciplinary approaches currently being developed to produce cartilage promise to bring the dream of cartilage regeneration in clinical use to reality. PMID:23637149

  16. Divergent habitat filtering of root and soil fungal communities in temperate beech forests

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, Kezia; Schröter, Kristina; Pena, Rodica; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Buscot, François; Polle, Andrea; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2016-01-01

    Distance decay, the general reduction in similarity of community composition with increasing geographical distance, is known as predictor of spatial variation and distribution patterns of organisms. However, changes in fungal communities along environmental gradients are little known. Here we show that distance decays of soil-inhabiting and root-associated fungal assemblages differ, and identify explanatory environmental variables. High-throughput sequencing analysis of fungal communities of beech-dominated forests at three study sites across Germany shows that root-associated fungi are recruited from the soil fungal community. However, distance decay is substantially weaker in the root-associated than in the soil community. Variance partitioning of factors contributing to the observed distance decay patterns support the hypothesis that host trees stabilize the composition of root-associated fungi communities, relative to soil communities. Thus, they not only have selective impacts on associated communities, but also buffer effects of changes in microclimatic and environmental variables that directly influence fungal community composition. PMID:27511465

  17. Divergent habitat filtering of root and soil fungal communities in temperate beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldmann, Kezia; Schröter, Kristina; Pena, Rodica; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Buscot, François; Polle, Andrea; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2016-08-01

    Distance decay, the general reduction in similarity of community composition with increasing geographical distance, is known as predictor of spatial variation and distribution patterns of organisms. However, changes in fungal communities along environmental gradients are little known. Here we show that distance decays of soil-inhabiting and root-associated fungal assemblages differ, and identify explanatory environmental variables. High-throughput sequencing analysis of fungal communities of beech-dominated forests at three study sites across Germany shows that root-associated fungi are recruited from the soil fungal community. However, distance decay is substantially weaker in the root-associated than in the soil community. Variance partitioning of factors contributing to the observed distance decay patterns support the hypothesis that host trees stabilize the composition of root-associated fungi communities, relative to soil communities. Thus, they not only have selective impacts on associated communities, but also buffer effects of changes in microclimatic and environmental variables that directly influence fungal community composition.

  18. Tracking the incorporation of 15N from labeled beech litter into mineral-organic associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, M.; Hatton, P.; Derrien, D.; Lajtha, K.; Zeller, B.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen containing organic compounds are thought to have a role in the complex web of processes that control the turnover time of soil organic matter. The sequential density fractionation technique is increasingly used for the purpose of investigating the association of organic materials with the mineral matrix. Organic materials in the denser fractions (>2.0 kg L-1) typically show 13C NMR signals indicative of carbohydrate and aliphatic structures, an absence of lignin and tannin structures and a narrow C:N ratio, suggesting a microbial origin of organic matter in these fractions. Here we take advantage of a labeling experiment conducted at two different sites in Germany and in France to investigate the incorporation of organic nitrogen into physical fractions of increasing density, representing a proximity gradient to mineral surfaces. 15N labeled beech litter was applied to two acidic forest topsoils 8 and 12 years ago. Although there are differences in the distribution patterns between the two soils, and the majority of the organic nitrogen was recovered in fractions representing organic matter of plant origin and not bound to the mineral matrix, our data clearly show that after a decade, significant amounts of the nitrogen had been incorporated in mineral-organic fractions of supposedly slow turnover. It remains to be shown to which extent the N in the densest fractions was incorporated by soil microbiota and associated with mineral surfaces in organic form or adsorbed to mineral surfaces in inorganic form (NH4+).

  19. Types of ectomycorrhiza of mature beech and spruce at ozone-fumigated and control forest plots.

    PubMed

    Grebenc, Tine; Kraigher, Hojka

    2007-05-01

    In the Kranzberg forest near Freising (Germany) a novel "Free-Air Canopy O3 Exposure" system has been employed for analysing O3-induced responses from sub-cellular to ecosystem levels that are relevant for carbon balance and CO2 demand of 60-year-old beech trees. The below-ground ectomycorrhizal community was studied in two-fold ambient O3 concentrations (five cores per sampling) and in a control plot with an ambient O3 concentration (four cores per sampling). Five samplings were taken throughout two vegetation seasons (2003 and 2004). Types of ectomycorrhiza were determined by their morphological, anatomical and molecular characteristics and quantified by counting. The total number of mycorrhizal fine roots was higher at the fumigated plot as compared with the control site. The numbers of ectomycorrhizal types at the fumigated and control plots were 28 and 26, respectively. Cenococcum geophilum was present in all soil cores at all sampling times with a significant increase in abundance under ozone-fumigated trees. Other mycorrhizal types present at higher abundance at the fumigated than at the control plot were identified as Russula densiflora, R. fellea, R. illota, Tuber puberulum, Lactarius sp. 2 and Russula sp. 2. Some mycorrhizal types were present exclusively at the fumigated plot (Fagirhiza fusca, F. setifera, Lactarius acris, Piceirhiza nigra and Russula sp. 1). A possible ecological role for the abundant types of ectomycorrhiza and their putative application in bio-indication is discussed.

  20. Prescriptions vary in ponderosa regeneration

    Treesearch

    Dale O. Hall

    1969-01-01

    Nonproducing acres and unproductive years are both costly to timberland owners. These costs are reduced by restoring timber stocking with minimum delay. The proper prescription for regeneration can insure fast restocking. But the silviculturist prescribes slash disposal, site preparation, seeding, and planting only after he has carefully examined the site environment...

  1. EARLY REGENERATION DETERMINES LONG‐TERM GRAFT SITE MORPHOLOGY AND FUNCTION AFTER RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT WITH SEMITENDINOSUS‐GRACILIS AUTOGRAFT: A CASE SERIES

    PubMed Central

    Snyder‐Mackler, Lynn; Axe, Michael J.; Buchanan, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Background: The semitendinosus‐gracilis tendon autograft is often used to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament. Tendon regeneration appears to occur for most individuals in the short term, but little is known about the long‐term effects of graft harvest. The purpose of this study was to describe the effect of semitendinosis‐gracilis tendon graft harvest on muscle and tendon morphology at least five years following reconstruction in a case series. Methods: Magnetic resonance images were taken of the knees of three subjects at least five years following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. These subjects represented the different regeneration patterns at the time of return‐to‐sport. Muscle and tendon morphology were analyzed by calculating the volume, peak cross‐sectional area, and length of the knee flexors. Muscle and tendon morphological changes were analyzed individually, and then in combination as defined as a knee flexor group. Results: Muscle and tendon regeneration continued in those tendons that had begun regeneration at the time of return‐to‐sports in two subjects. There was significant additional muscle degeneration in those muscles whose tendons had not regenerated at the time of return‐to‐sports, in the remaining subject. Compensatory hypertrophy of the remaining knee flexors restored the knee flexor group to near preoperative peak cross‐sectional area and volume across the each of the three case subjects. Conclusions: Knee flexor morphology at the time of return‐to‐sports foreshadowed the long‐term outcome in the three studied subjects. Preservation of the tendon sheath in situ may play a role in tendon regeneration. When tendon regeneration did not occur, fatty infiltration of the muscle may be a worst‐case outcome. Semitendinosus‐gracilis muscle synergists demonstrated hypertrophy, perhaps in an effort to compensate for knee flexor group morphology deficits that existed after Semitendinosus gracilis

  2. Leaf litter decomposition in temperate deciduous forest stands with a decreasing fraction of beech (Fagus sylvatica).

    PubMed

    Jacob, Mascha; Viedenz, Karin; Polle, Andrea; Thomas, Frank M

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesised that the decomposition rates of leaf litter will increase along a gradient of decreasing fraction of the European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and increasing tree species diversity in the generally beech-dominated Central European temperate deciduous forests due to an increase in litter quality. We studied the decomposition of leaf litter including its lignin fraction in monospecific (pure beech) stands and in stands with up to five tree genera (Acer spp., Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus excelsior, Tilia spp.) using a litterbag approach. Litter and lignin decomposition was more rapid in stand-representative litter from multispecific stands than in litter from pure beech stands. Except for beech litter, the decomposition rates of species-specific tree litter did not differ significantly among the stand types, but were most rapid in Fraxinus excelsior and slowest in beech in an interspecific comparison. Pairwise comparisons of the decomposition of beech litter with litter of the other tree species (except for Acer platanoides) revealed a "home field advantage" of up to 20% (more rapid litter decomposition in stands with a high fraction of its own species than in stands with a different tree species composition). Decomposition of stand-representative litter mixtures displayed additive characteristics, not significantly more rapid than predicted by the decomposition of litter from the individual tree species. Leaf litter decomposition rates were positively correlated with the initial N and Ca concentrations of the litter, and negatively with the initial C:N, C:P and lignin:N ratios. The results support our hypothesis that the overall decomposition rates are mainly influenced by the chemical composition of the individual litter species. Thus, the fraction of individual tree species in the species composition seems to be more important for the litter decomposition rates than tree species diversity itself.

  3. Differential responses of herbivores and herbivory to management in temperate European beech.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Martin M; Pašalić, Esther; Lange, Markus; Lange, Patricia; Boch, Steffen; Hessenmöller, Dominik; Müller, Jörg; Socher, Stephanie A; Fischer, Markus; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2014-01-01

    Forest management not only affects biodiversity but also might alter ecosystem processes mediated by the organisms, i.e. herbivory the removal of plant biomass by plant-eating insects and other arthropod groups. Aiming at revealing general relationships between forest management and herbivory we investigated aboveground arthropod herbivory in 105 plots dominated by European beech in three different regions in Germany in the sun-exposed canopy of mature beech trees and on beech saplings in the understorey. We separately assessed damage by different guilds of herbivores, i.e. chewing, sucking and scraping herbivores, gall-forming insects and mites, and leaf-mining insects. We asked whether herbivory differs among different forest management regimes (unmanaged, uneven-aged managed, even-aged managed) and among age-classes within even-aged forests. We further tested for consistency of relationships between regions, strata and herbivore guilds. On average, almost 80% of beech leaves showed herbivory damage, and about 6% of leaf area was consumed. Chewing damage was most common, whereas leaf sucking and scraping damage were very rare. Damage was generally greater in the canopy than in the understorey, in particular for chewing and scraping damage, and the occurrence of mines. There was little difference in herbivory among differently managed forests and the effects of management on damage differed among regions, strata and damage types. Covariates such as wood volume, tree density and plant diversity weakly influenced herbivory, and effects differed between herbivory types. We conclude that despite of the relatively low number of species attacking beech; arthropod herbivory on beech is generally high. We further conclude that responses of herbivory to forest management are multifaceted and environmental factors such as forest structure variables affecting in particular microclimatic conditions are more likely to explain the variability in herbivory among beech forest

  4. Differential Responses of Herbivores and Herbivory to Management in Temperate European Beech

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Martin M.; Pašalić, Esther; Lange, Markus; Lange, Patricia; Boch, Steffen; Hessenmöller, Dominik; Müller, Jörg; Socher, Stephanie A.; Fischer, Markus; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Weisser, Wolfgang W.

    2014-01-01

    Forest management not only affects biodiversity but also might alter ecosystem processes mediated by the organisms, i.e. herbivory the removal of plant biomass by plant-eating insects and other arthropod groups. Aiming at revealing general relationships between forest management and herbivory we investigated aboveground arthropod herbivory in 105 plots dominated by European beech in three different regions in Germany in the sun-exposed canopy of mature beech trees and on beech saplings in the understorey. We separately assessed damage by different guilds of herbivores, i.e. chewing, sucking and scraping herbivores, gall-forming insects and mites, and leaf-mining insects. We asked whether herbivory differs among different forest management regimes (unmanaged, uneven-aged managed, even-aged managed) and among age-classes within even-aged forests. We further tested for consistency of relationships between regions, strata and herbivore guilds. On average, almost 80% of beech leaves showed herbivory damage, and about 6% of leaf area was consumed. Chewing damage was most common, whereas leaf sucking and scraping damage were very rare. Damage was generally greater in the canopy than in the understorey, in particular for chewing and scraping damage, and the occurrence of mines. There was little difference in herbivory among differently managed forests and the effects of management on damage differed among regions, strata and damage types. Covariates such as wood volume, tree density and plant diversity weakly influenced herbivory, and effects differed between herbivory types. We conclude that despite of the relatively low number of species attacking beech; arthropod herbivory on beech is generally high. We further conclude that responses of herbivory to forest management are multifaceted and environmental factors such as forest structure variables affecting in particular microclimatic conditions are more likely to explain the variability in herbivory among beech forest

  5. Leaf litter decomposition in temperate deciduous forest stands with a decreasing fraction of beech (Fagus sylvatica)

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Mascha; Viedenz, Karin; Polle, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesised that the decomposition rates of leaf litter will increase along a gradient of decreasing fraction of the European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and increasing tree species diversity in the generally beech-dominated Central European temperate deciduous forests due to an increase in litter quality. We studied the decomposition of leaf litter including its lignin fraction in monospecific (pure beech) stands and in stands with up to five tree genera (Acer spp., Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus excelsior, Tilia spp.) using a litterbag approach. Litter and lignin decomposition was more rapid in stand-representative litter from multispecific stands than in litter from pure beech stands. Except for beech litter, the decomposition rates of species-specific tree litter did not differ significantly among the stand types, but were most rapid in Fraxinus excelsior and slowest in beech in an interspecific comparison. Pairwise comparisons of the decomposition of beech litter with litter of the other tree species (except for Acerplatanoides) revealed a “home field advantage” of up to 20% (more rapid litter decomposition in stands with a high fraction of its own species than in stands with a different tree species composition). Decomposition of stand-representative litter mixtures displayed additive characteristics, not significantly more rapid than predicted by the decomposition of litter from the individual tree species. Leaf litter decomposition rates were positively correlated with the initial N and Ca concentrations of the litter, and negatively with the initial C:N, C:P and lignin:N ratios. The results support our hypothesis that the overall decomposition rates are mainly influenced by the chemical composition of the individual litter species. Thus, the fraction of individual tree species in the species composition seems to be more important for the litter decomposition rates than tree species diversity itself. PMID:20596729

  6. Aphid infestation affecting the biogeochemistry of European beech saplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalzik, B.; Levia, D. F., Jr.; Bischoff, S.; Näthe, K.

    2014-12-01

    Mass outbreaks of herbivore insects are known to perturb the functional properties of forests. However, it is less clear how endemic to moderate aboveground herbivory affects the vertical flow of nutrients from tree canopies to the soil. Here, we report on the effects of low to moderate infestation levels of the woolly beech aphid (Phyllaphis fagi L.) on the nutrient dynamics and hydrology of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). In a potted sapling experiment, we followed the vertical dynamics of nutrients via throughfall (TF), stemflow (SF) and litter leachates (LL) collected over ten weeks underneath infested and uninfested control trees. Aphid infestation amplifies the fluxes of K+, Mn2+ and particulate nitrogen (0.45μm < PN < 500 μm) in TF solution by 42% for K+, 59% for Mn2+ and 13% for PN relative to the control. In contrast, fluxes of NH4-N and SO4-S diminished during peaking aphid abundance by 26 and 16%, respectively. Differences in canopy-derived dissolved nitrogen and carbon compounds, sulfur (S), Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ were < 10%. The effect of aphid abundance on nutrient dynamics was most notable in TF and SF and diminished in LL.Aphid infestation greatly altered the SF fluxes of DOC, K+, Mn2+, DON and sulfur-species, which were significantly concentrated at the tree base by "funneling" the rainfall through the canopy biomass to the trunk. Normalized to one square meter, water and nutrient fluxes were amplified by a factor of up to 200 compared to TF.Imaging of leaf surfaces by scanning electron microscopy exhibited notable differences of the surface morphology and microbiology of control, lightly infested, and heavily infested leaves. This observation might point to an aphid-mediated alteration of the phyllosphere ecology triggering the microbial uptake of NH4-N and SO4-S and its transformation to particulate N by magnified biomass growth of the phyllosphere microflora, consequently changing the chemical partitioning and temporal availability of nitrogen.

  7. Effect of harvesting regime on beech root sprouts and seedlings in a north-central Maine forest long affected by beech bark disease

    Treesearch

    David R. Houston

    2001-01-01

    Forests in Maine often contain many trees severely damaged by the disease. Methods are needed to reduce numbers of susceptible and increase numbers of resistant trees. This paper describes how commonly-used harvesting systems affect the incidence and growth of beech root sprouts and seedlings. Harvest treatments were clearcutting and thinning in winter and summer, 1991...

  8. Assessing native small mammals' responses to an incipient invasion of beech bark disease through changes in seed production of American beech

    Treesearch

    Justin N. Rosemier; Andrew J. Storer

    2011-01-01

    Exotic tree diseases have direct impacts on their host and may have indirect effects on native fauna that rely on host tree species. For example, American beech (Fagus grandifolia [Ehrh.]) is a dominant overstory component throughout its range and, like all tree species, is vulnerable to a broad array of insects and pathogens. These pests include...

  9. FOXP3+ T Cells Recruited to Sites of Sterile Skeletal Muscle Injury Regulate the Fate of Satellite Cells and Guide Effective Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Castiglioni, Alessandra; Basso, Veronica; Vezzoli, Michela; Monno, Antonella; Almada, Albert E.; Mondino, Anna; Wagers, Amy J.; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Muscle injury induces a classical inflammatory response in which cells of the innate immune system rapidly invade the tissue. Macrophages are prominently involved in this response and required for proper healing, as they are known to be important for clearing cellular debris and supporting satellite cell differentiation. Here, we sought to assess the role of the adaptive immune system in muscle regeneration after acute damage. We show that T lymphocytes are transiently recruited into the muscle after damage and appear to exert a pro-myogenic effect on muscle repair. We observed a decrease in the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers after injury in Rag2-/- γ-chain-/- mice, as compared to WT controls, suggesting that T cell recruitment promotes muscle regeneration. Skeletal muscle infiltrating T lymphocytes were enriched in CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ cells. Direct exposure of muscle satellite cells to in vitro induced Treg cells effectively enhanced their expansion, and concurrently inhibited their myogenic differentiation. In vivo, the recruitment of Tregs to acutely injured muscle was limited to the time period of satellite expansion, with possibly important implications for situations in which inflammatory conditions persist, such as muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies. We conclude that the adaptive immune system, in particular T regulatory cells, is critically involved in effective skeletal muscle regeneration. Thus, in addition to their well-established role as regulators of the immune/inflammatory response, T regulatory cells also regulate the activity of skeletal muscle precursor cells, and are instrumental for the proper regeneration of this tissue. PMID:26039259

  10. FOXP3+ T Cells Recruited to Sites of Sterile Skeletal Muscle Injury Regulate the Fate of Satellite Cells and Guide Effective Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Alessandra; Corna, Gianfranca; Rigamonti, Elena; Basso, Veronica; Vezzoli, Michela; Monno, Antonella; Almada, Albert E; Mondino, Anna; Wagers, Amy J; Manfredi, Angelo A; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Muscle injury induces a classical inflammatory response in which cells of the innate immune system rapidly invade the tissue. Macrophages are prominently involved in this response and required for proper healing, as they are known to be important for clearing cellular debris and supporting satellite cell differentiation. Here, we sought to assess the role of the adaptive immune system in muscle regeneration after acute damage. We show that T lymphocytes are transiently recruited into the muscle after damage and appear to exert a pro-myogenic effect on muscle repair. We observed a decrease in the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers after injury in Rag2-/- γ-chain-/- mice, as compared to WT controls, suggesting that T cell recruitment promotes muscle regeneration. Skeletal muscle infiltrating T lymphocytes were enriched in CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ cells. Direct exposure of muscle satellite cells to in vitro induced Treg cells effectively enhanced their expansion, and concurrently inhibited their myogenic differentiation. In vivo, the recruitment of Tregs to acutely injured muscle was limited to the time period of satellite expansion, with possibly important implications for situations in which inflammatory conditions persist, such as muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies. We conclude that the adaptive immune system, in particular T regulatory cells, is critically involved in effective skeletal muscle regeneration. Thus, in addition to their well-established role as regulators of the immune/inflammatory response, T regulatory cells also regulate the activity of skeletal muscle precursor cells, and are instrumental for the proper regeneration of this tissue.

  11. Finders keepers, losers weepers - drought as a modifier of competition between European beech and Norway spruce -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goisser, Michael; Blanck, Christian; Geppert, Uwe; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E. E.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed stands of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) frequently reflect over-yielding, when compared to respective monospecific stands. Over-yielding is attributed to enhanced resource uptake efficiency through niche complementarity alleviating species competition. Under climate change, however, with severe and frequent summer drought, water limitation may become crucial in modifying the competitive interaction between neighboring beech and spruce trees. In view of the demands by silvicultural practice, basic knowledge from experimental field work about competitive versus facilitative interaction in maturing mixed beech-spruce forests is scarce. To this end, we investigate species-specific drought response including underlying mechanisms of species interaction in a maturing group-wise mixed beech-spruce forest, amongst 60 and 53 adult trees of beech and spruce, respectively (spruce 65 ± 2, beech 85 ± 4 years old). Severe and repeated experimental drought is being induced over several years through a stand-scale approach of rain throughfall exclusion (Kranzberg Forest Roof Experiment, KROOF). The experimental design comprises 6 roofed (E, automated, closing only during rain) and 6 control (C) plots with a total area of almost 1800 square meters. In 2015 minimum predawn potentials of -2.16 MPa and -2.26 MPa were reached in E for beech and spruce respectively. At the leaf level, spruce displayed high drought susceptibility reflected by a distinct decrease in both stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 80% each, suggesting isohydric response. Beech rather displayed anisohydry indicated by less pronounced yet significant reduction of stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 55% and 45%, respectively. Under the C regime, a negative species interaction effect on stomatal conductance was found in beech, contrasting with a positive effect in spruce. However, drought reversed the effect of

  12. Soil organic matter dynamics under Beech and Hornbeam as affected by soil biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooijman, A. M.; Cammeraat, L. H.

    2009-04-01

    Organic matter dynamics are highly affected both the soil fauna as well as the source of organic matter, having important consequences for the spatial heterogeneity of organic matter storage and conversion. We studied oldgrowth mixed deciduous forests in Central-Luxemburg on decalcified dolomitic marl, dominated by high-degradable hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) or low-degradable beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). Decomposition was measured both in the laboratory and in the field. Litter decomposition was higher for hornbeam than for beech under laboratory conditions, but especially in the field, which is mainly to be attributed to macro-fauna activity, specifically to earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris and Allolobophora species). We also investigated differences between beech and hornbeam with regard to litter input and habitat conditions. Total litter input was the same, but contribution of beech and hornbeam litter clearly differed between the two species. Also, mass of the ectorganic horizon and soil C:N ratio were significantly higher for beech, which was reflected in clear differences in the development of ectorganic profiles on top of the soil. Under beech a mull-moder was clearly present with a well developed fermentation and litter horizon, whereas under hornbeam all litter is incorporated into the soil, leaving the mineral soil surface bear in late summer (mull-type of horizon). In addition to litter quality, litter decomposition was affected by pH and soil moisture. Both pH and soil moisture were higher under hornbeam than under beech, which may reflect differences in soil development and litter quality effects over longer time scales. Under beech, dense layers of low-degradable litter may prevent erosion, and increase clay eluviation and leaching of base cations, leading to acid and dry conditions, which further decrease litter decay. Under hornbeam, the soil is not protected by a litter layer, and clay eluviation and acidification may be counteracted by erosion

  13. Periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Greenwell, Henry; Fiorellini, Joseph; Giannobile, William; Offenbacher, Steven; Salkin, Leslie; Townsend, Cheryl; Sheridan, Phillip; Genco, Robert J

    2005-09-01

    Untreated periodontal disease leads to tooth loss through destruction of the attachment apparatus and tooth-supporting structures. The goals of periodontal therapy include not only the arrest of periodontal disease progression,but also the regeneration of structures lost to disease where appropriate. Conventional surgical approaches (e.g., flap debridement) continue to offer time-tested and reliable methods to access root surfaces,reduce periodontal pockets, and attain improved periodontal form/architecture. However, these techniques offer only limited potential towards recovering tissues destroyed during earlier disease phases. Recently, surgical procedures aimed at greater and more predictable regeneration of periodontal tissues and functional attachment close to their original level have been developed, analyzed, and employed in clinical practice. This paper provides a review of the current understanding of the mechanisms, cells, and factors required for regeneration of the periodontium and of procedures used to restore periodontal tissues around natural teeth. Targeted audiences for this paper are periodontists and/or researchers with an interest in improving the predictability of regenerative procedures. This paper replaces the version published in 1993.

  14. Kinetic behavior of liquefaction of Japanese beech in subcritical phenol.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Gaurav; Saka, Shiro

    2011-12-01

    Non-catalytic liquefaction of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata) wood in subcritical phenol was investigated using a batch-type reaction vessel. After samples were treated at 160 °C/0.9 MPa-350 °C/4.2 MPa for 3-30 min, they were fractionated into a phenol-soluble portion and phenol-insoluble residues. These residues were then analyzed for their chemical composition. Based on the obtained data, the kinetics for liquefaction was modeled using first-order reaction rate law. Subsequently, the liquefaction rate constants of the major cell wall components including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin were determined. The different kinetic mechanisms were found to exist for lignin and cellulose at two different temperature ranges, lower 160-290 °C and higher 310-350 °C, whereas for hemicellulose, it was only liquefied in the lower temperature range. Thus, the liquefaction behaviors of these major cell wall components highlighted hemicellulose to be the most susceptible to liquefaction, followed by lignin and cellulose.

  15. New approach for vertical bone regeneration using in situ gelling and sustained BMP-2 releasing poly(phosphazene) hydrogel system on peri-implant site with critical defect in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Seo, Bo-Bae; Chang, Hae-Im; Choi, Hyuck; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Lee, Jae-Yeol; Song, Soo-Chang

    2017-03-23

    An injectable hydrogel system with sustained bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) release ability was developed for vertical bone regeneration at peri-implant sites and enhanced osseointegration of dental implants. In three young male beagle dogs, a pair of defects was created on both sides of the mandibular bone. Next, two implants were transplanted into each defect. In situ gelling polymer solutions with or without BMP-2 were applied to cover the implants and mandibular defects. The effects of the in situ gelling and sustained BMP-2 releasing (IGSR) hydrogel system on peri-implant bone regeneration were evaluated by radiologic examination, micro-computed tomography, and histomorphometric analysis. Twelve weeks after the treatment, significant bone generation at the peri-implant site occurred following BMP-2/IGSR hydrogel treatment. Bone volume and mineral density were increased by 1.7- and 1.3-fold, respectively (p < 0.01 and 0.05 vs. control, respectively) for the BMP-2/IGSR hydrogel system. And, 0.57-0.31 mm vertical bone generation was observed at the peri-implant site for the BMP-2/IGSR hydrogel system, while rare vertical bone generation occurred in the control group. The BMP-2/IGSR hydrogel system significantly increased bone to implant contact % between induced bone and existing bone (p < 0.05 and 0.01 vs. control). These vertical bone regeneration and higher osseointegration levels demonstrated the effectiveness of the BMP-2/IGSR hydrogel system. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  16. Preliminary report of ecological factors influencing incidence and severity of beech bark disease in the Appalachian region

    Treesearch

    David P. McCann; William L. MacDonald

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to Cryptococcus fagisuga, a primary component of the beech bark disease (BBD) complex, is heritable. Reportedly about 1-2 percent of American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) are genetically resistant to C. fagisuga. This project is designed to identify environmental factors contributing to BBD...

  17. Filaria martis Gmelin 1790 (Spirurida, Filariidae) affecting beech marten (Martes foina): morphological description and molecular characterisation of the cytochrome oxidase c subunit I.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Domenico; Lia, Riccardo Paolo; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Brianti, Emanuele; Traversa, Donato; Giannetto, Salvatore

    2007-09-01

    Filaria martis causes a poorly known subcutaneous filariosis in mustelids. Few information is available about lesions that F. martis causes in beech martens, on its morphology, biology and the occurrence of the infection. From 1997 to 2006, 29 beech martens from two sites of southern Italy (Sites A and B) have been necropsied. Ectoparasites and nematodes were collected and morphologically identified. A variable region of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) of F. martis has been characterised to compare females presenting caudal tips smooth without spines (i.e. Morphotype 1-Mrph. 1) and with spines (i.e. Mrph. 2). All ticks collected were identified as Haemaphysalis erinacei. Eleven animals from Site A were found infected by F. martis nematodes in subcutaneous tissue in both membranous capsules or free under the inner skin surface. The most important morphological characters of F. martis have been reported and discussed. The molecular analysis showed 100% homology among cox1 sequences from Mrph. 1 and 2 thus indicating that the shape of female posterior edge may vary among specimens of F. martis. The results here presented provide new insights into the biology, ecology and morphological characteristics of this scantly known nematode.

  18. Tissue engineering for periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard T; Conte, Greg; Nishimine, Dee; Dault, Scott

    2005-03-01

    As a result of periodontal regeneration research, a series of clinical techniques have emerged that permit tissue engineering to be performed for more efficient regeneration and repair of periodontal defects and improved implant site development. Historically, periodontal regeneration research has focused on a quest for "magic filler" material. This search has led to the development of techniques utilizing autologous bone and bone marrow, allografts, xenografts, and various man-made bone substitutes. Though these techniques have had limited success, the desire for a more effective regenerative approach has resulted in the development of tissue engineering techniques. Tissue engineering is a relatively new field of reconstructive biology which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biologic mediators to facilitate reconstruction/regeneration of a particular tissue. In periodontology, the concept of tissue engineering had its beginnings with guided tissue regeneration, a mechanical approach utilizing nonresorbable membranes to obtain regeneration in defects. In dental implantology, guided bone regeneration membranes +/- mechanical support are used for bone augmentation of proposed implant placement sites. With the availability of partially purified protein mixture from developing teeth and growth factors from recombinant technology, a new era of tissue engineering whereby biologic mediators can be used for periodontal regeneration. The advantage of recombinant growth factors is this tissue engineering device is consistent in its regenerative capacity, and variations in regenerative response are due to individual healing response and/or poor surgical techniques. In this article, the authors review how tissue engineering has advanced and discuss its impact on the clinical management of both periodontal and osseous defects in preparation for implant placement. An understanding of these new tissue engineering techniques is essential for comprehending today's ever

  19. Humans in the Hoxnian: habitat, context and fire use at Beeches Pit, West Stow, Suffolk, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, R. C.; Gowlett, J. A. J.; Parfitt, S. A.; Bridgland, D. R.; Lewis, S. G.

    2006-07-01

    A Lower Palaeolithic industry at Beeches Pit, West Stow, Suffolk, occurs within an interglacial sequence that immediately overlies glacial deposits, referable to the Anglian Lowestoft Formation. There is strong biostratigraphical evidence from both vertebrates and molluscs that the interglacial represented is the Hoxnian (MIS 11). This conclusion is supported by uranium series dates from carbonate nodules (>400 kyr), TL dates from burnt flint (414 +/- 30 kyr) and a range of amino acid racemisation data. The archaeology consists of flint artefacts of Acheulian character, including many refitting examples. Charred material is abundant in three stratigraphical units and many bones and flints have been burnt, indicating repeated occurrence of fire. Several discrete areas of burnt sediment appear to be hearths. This interpretation is supported by: (1) the intensity of burning (600-800°C) implied by the charred and calcined bones; (2) the intersection of two of the burnt areas, implying separate burning events at slightly different, overlapping locations; (3) the discovery of two burnt flakes that refit onto an adjacent group that are unburnt, indicating that the burning was highly localised; and (4) the spatial distribution of artefacts respects the features interpreted as hearths, suggesting fireside knapping. Fossils associated with the archaeology indicate occupation within closed deciduous forest in a fully temperate climate. Attractions to this unusual environment would have included the fresh water provided by springs, a rich supply of potential food and a prolific source of good quality flint for tool manufacture. The archaeological evidence therefore suggests that the site repeatedly served as an area of focused activities (perhaps a home-base) during much of the interglacial. The upper levels of the sequence provide clear faunal evidence of climatic deterioration during which human occupation and fire use persisted. Biostratigraphical correlations with other

  20. Thermal acclimation of leaf dark respiration of beech seedlings experiencing summer drought in high and low light environments.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Calcerrada, Jesus; Atkin, Owen K; Robson, T Matthew; Zaragoza-Castells, Joana; Gil, Luis; Aranda, Ismael

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about how environmental factors shape the short- and long-term responses of leaf respiration to temperature under field conditions despite the importance of respiration for plant and stand carbon balances. Impacts of water availability and canopy cover on leaf dark respiration (R) and temperature sensitivity were assessed in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings in a sub-Mediterranean population. We studied seedlings established within canopy gaps (39% global site factor; GSF) that were subject to either no watering (unwatered plants; UW) or regular watering (2-10% higher volumetric topsoil water content as summer progressed; W plants) and seedlings established beneath the adjacent understorey (12% GSF). Leaf R rose exponentially with diurnal increases in temperature; the same temperature sensitivity (Q(10): 2.2) was found for understorey and gap plants, irrespective of watering treatment. Respiration estimated at 25 degrees C (R(25)) was lower in the understorey than the gaps and was significantly lower in the unwatered than in the watered gap plants by the end of summer (0.65 versus 0.80 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). R(25) declined with increasing summer temperature in all plants; however, respiration estimated at the prevailing ambient temperature did not change through the summer. There were parallel declines in R(25) and concentrations of starch and soluble sugars with increasing summer temperature for gap plants. We conclude that seasonal shifts in temperature-response curves of beech leaf R occur in both low- and high-light environments; since leaf R decreased with increasing plant water deficit, such shifts are likely to be greater whenever plants experience summer drought compared to scenarios where plants experience high rainfall in summer.

  1. The delayed impact of a summer drought on the carbon and water vapour fluxes exchanged by a European beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longdoz, B.; Gross, P.; Bréda, N.; Granier, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Hesse experimental site is located in a beech homogeneous forest in the North-East of France. It is equipped since 1997 (15 years of measurements) with an eddy covariance system (net ecosystem exchange NEE and ecosystem evapotranspiration ET) and some sensors measuring meteorological and soil environmental factors. In addition regular field campaigns are performed to monitor the trees growth and phenology. The occurrence of a severe drought during 2003 with precipitations equivalent to only 66% of the mean annual value lead to important modification in the ecosystem behaviour. A direct impact on NEE, ET and tree growth was clearly seen when the quantity of extractable water (soil water that can extracted by tree roots) pass below 40% of its maximum. This threshold seems to be similar for different tested European forests. In addition to this disturbance, the lack of carbohydrate storage induced, during the following season, a large reduction of the Leaf Area Index and beech radial growth. This was not the only delayed effect of soil water stress as parameters determining the Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) as the assimilation rate at light saturation or quantum yield were also significantly influenced. When comparing the potential annual GPP (corresponding to the estimation from GPP dependence on climatic and soil conditions where conditions averaged over the 15 measuring years are used), the 2004 was the lowest one over the 1995-2011 period when years impacted by thinning were excluded. This shows the structural consequence of soil drought. The ability of the inter-annual ecosystem models to reproduce these observations is a good quality test for their carbon storage and partitioning components.

  2. Fault-related fluid flow, Beech Mountain thrust sheet, Blue Ridge Province, Tennessee-North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, W.K.; Mora, C.I. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The latest proterozoic Beech Granite is contained within the Beech Mountain thrust sheet (BMTS), part of a middle-late Paleozoic thrust complex located between Mountain City and Grandfather Mountain windows in the western Blue Ridge of TN-NC. At the base of the BMTS, Beech Granite is juxtaposed against lower Paleozoic carbonate and elastics of the Rome Fm. along the Stone Mountain thrust on the southeaster margin of the Mountain City window. At the top of the BMTS, Beech Granite occurs adjacent to Precambrian mafic rocks of the Pumpkin Patch thrust sheet (PPTS). The Beech Granite is foliated throughout the BMTS with mylonitization and localized cataclasis occurring within thrust zones along the upper and lower margins of the BMTS. Although the degree of mylonitization and cataclasis increases towards the thrusts, blocks of relatively undeformed granite also occur within these fault zones. Mylonites and thrusts are recognized as conduits for fluid movement, but the origin of the fluids and magnitude and effects of fluid migration are not well constrained. This study was undertaken to characterize fluid-rock interaction within the Beech Granite and BMTS. Extensive mobility of some elements/compounds within the thrust zones, and the isotopic and mineralogical differences between the thrust zones and interior of the BMTS indicate that fluid flow was focused within the thrust zones. The wide range of elevated temperatures (400--710 C) indicated by qz-fsp fractionations suggest isotopic disequilibrium. Using a more likely temperature range of 300--400 C for Alleghanian deformation, calculated fluid compositions indicate interactions with a mixture of meteoric-hydrothermal and metamorphic water with delta O-18 = 2.6--7.5[per thousand] for the upper thrust zone and 1.3 to 6.2[per thousand] for the lower thrust zone. These ranges are similar to isotopic data reported for other Blue Ridge thrusts and may represent later periods of meteoric water influx.

  3. How climate, migration ability and habitat fragmentation affect the projected future distribution of European beech.

    PubMed

    Saltré, Frédérik; Duputié, Anne; Gaucherel, Cédric; Chuine, Isabelle

    2015-02-01

    Recent efforts to incorporate migration processes into species distribution models (SDMs) are allowing assessments of whether species are likely to be able to track their future climate optimum and the possible causes of failing to do so. Here, we projected the range shift of European beech over the 21st century using a process-based SDM coupled to a phenomenological migration model accounting for population dynamics, according to two climate change scenarios and one land use change scenario. Our model predicts that the climatically suitable habitat for European beech will shift north-eastward and upward mainly because (i) higher temperature and precipitation, at the northern range margins, will increase survival and fruit maturation success, while (ii) lower precipitations and higher winter temperature, at the southern range margins, will increase drought mortality and prevent bud dormancy breaking. Beech colonization rate of newly climatically suitable habitats in 2100 is projected to be very low (1-2% of the newly suitable habitats colonised). Unexpectedly, the projected realized contraction rate was higher than the projected potential contraction rate. As a result, the realized distribution of beech is projected to strongly contract by 2100 (by 36-61%) mainly due to a substantial increase in climate variability after 2050, which generates local extinctions, even at the core of the distribution, the frequency of which prevents beech recolonization during more favourable years. Although European beech will be able to persist in some parts of the trailing edge of its distribution, the combined effects of climate and land use changes, limited migration ability, and a slow life-history are likely to increase its threat status in the near future. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Insect attraction to herbivore-induced beech volatiles under different forest management regimes.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Martin M; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Unsicker, Sybille B

    2014-10-01

    Insect herbivore enemies such as parasitoids and predators are important in controlling herbivore pests. From agricultural systems we know that land-use intensification can negatively impact biological control as an important ecosystem service. The aim of our study was to investigate the importance of management regime for natural enemy pressure and biological control possibilities in forests dominated by European beech. We hypothesize that the volatile blend released from herbivore-infested beech trees functions as a signal, attracting parasitoids and herbivore enemies. Furthermore, we hypothesize that forest management regime influences the composition of species attracted by these herbivore-induced beech volatiles. We installed flight-interception traps next to Lymantria dispar caterpillar-infested young beech trees releasing herbivore-induced volatiles and next to non-infested control trees. Significantly more parasitoids were captured next to caterpillar-infested trees compared to non-infested controls, irrespective of forest type. However, the composition of the trophic guilds in the traps did vary in response to forest management regime. While the proportion of chewing insects was highest in non-managed forests, the proportion of sucking insects peaked in forests with low management and of parasitoids in young, highly managed, forest stands. Neither the number of naturally occurring beech saplings nor herbivory levels in the proximity of our experiment affected the abundance and diversity of parasitoids caught. Our data show that herbivore-induced beech volatiles attract herbivore enemies under field conditions. They further suggest that differences in the structural complexity of forests as a consequence of management regime only play a minor role in parasitoid activity and thus in indirect tree defense.

  5. Release of suppressed oak advance regeneration

    Treesearch

    Dylan Dillaway; Jeffrey W. Stringer

    2006-01-01

    Oaks are not consistently regenerating on intermediate- and high-quality sites due to the lack of well-developed advance regeneration. Studies of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedling cohorts have shown that when grown under well-developed canopies and mid-stories, height growth is suppressed, and seedling mortality increases with time resulting in a sparsely...

  6. Longleaf pine regeneration ecology and methods

    Treesearch

    Dale G. Brockway; Kenneth W. Outcalt; William D. Boyer

    2006-01-01

    Regenerating longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) is key to its long-term sustainable production of forest resources and its perpetuation as the dominant tree species in a variety of important ecosystems ranging from xeric to mesic to hydric site conditions. Early regeneration to problems and the subsequent efforts to overcome these are significant...

  7. Some important physical properties of laminated veneer lumber (Lvl) made from oriental beech and Lombardy poplar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıç, Murat

    2012-09-01

    This study examined some physical characteristics of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) obtained in different compositions from cut veneers of Oriental beech (Fagus Orientalis Lipsky) and Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra) with thicknesses of 4 mm and 5 mm. Five each beech and poplar trees were felled with this objective. The PVAc (Kleiberit 303) and PU (Bizon Timber PU-Max Express) types of adhesive were used in lamination. The air-dry and oven dry densities, cell wall density and porosity, the value of volume density, shrinkage in a tangential and radial direction and volume swelling amounts were determined by preparing the specimens in accordance with the standards.

  8. Regenerator seal

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Leonard C.; Pacala, Theodore; Sippel, George R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  9. Regenerator seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Leonard C. (Inventor); Pacala, Theodore (Inventor); Sippel, George R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  10. Site preparation for wildlife

    Treesearch

    Ralph W. Dimmick

    1989-01-01

    Site preparation-whether for timber and/or wildlife objectives - can influence the quality of wildlife habitat on the site and surrounding forest for the entire rotation period of the regenerated stand. The site preparation you select will help determine the species and numbers of wildlife that use the stand as the stand progresses from regeneration through maturity....

  11. Eddy-covariance methane flux measurements over a European beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentsch, Lydia; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The role of forests in global methane (CH4) turnover is currently not well constrained, partially because of the lack of spatially integrative forest-scale measurements of CH4 fluxes. Soil chamber measurements imply that temperate forests generally act as CH4 sinks. Upscaling of chamber observations to the forest scale is however problematic, if the upscaling is not constrained by concurrent 'top-down' measurements, such as of the eddy-covariance type, which provide sufficient integration of spatial variations and of further potential CH4 flux components within forest ecosystems. Ongoing development of laser absorption-based optical instruments, resulting in enhanced measurement stability, precision and sampling speed, has recently improved the prospects for meaningful eddy-covariance measurements at sites with presumably low CH4 fluxes, hence prone to reach the flux detection limit. At present, we are launching eddy-covariance CH4 measurements at a long-running ICOS flux tower site (Hainich National Park, Germany), located in a semi natural, unmanaged, beech dominated forest. Eddy-covariance measurements will be conducted with a laser spectrometer for parallel CH4, H2Ov and CO2 measurements (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Independent observations of the CO2 flux by the FGGA and a standard Infrared Gas Analyser (LI-7200, LI-COR, USA) will allow to evaluate data quality of measured CH4 fluxes. Here, we want to present first results with a focus on uncertainties of the calculated CH4 fluxes with regard to instrument precision, data processing and site conditions. In future, we plan to compare eddy-covariance flux estimates to side-by-side turbulent flux observations from a novel eddy accumulation system. Furthermore, soil CH4 fluxes will be measured with four automated chambers situated within the tower footprint. Based on a previous soil chamber study at the same site, we expect the Hainich forest site to act as a CH4 sink. However, we hypothesize that our

  12. Biomechanical Stability of Dental Implants in Augmented Maxillary Sites: Results of a Randomized Clinical Study with Four Different Biomaterials and PRF and a Biological View on Guided Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Troedhan; Marcel, Wainwright; Andreas, Kurrek; Izabela, Schlichting

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bone regenerates mainly by periosteal and endosteal humoral and cellular activity, which is given only little concern in surgical techniques and choice of bone grafts for guided bone regeneration. This study investigates on a clinical level the biomechanical stability of augmented sites in maxillary bone when a new class of moldable, self-hardening calcium-phosphate biomaterials (SHB) is used with and without the addition of Platelet Rich Fibrin (aPRF) in the Piezotome-enhanced subperiosteal tunnel-technique (PeSPTT). Material and Methods. 82 patients with horizontal atrophy of anterior maxillary crest were treated with PeSPTT and randomly assigned biphasic (60% HA/40% bTCP) or monophasic (100% bTCP) SHB without or with addition of aPRF. 109 implants were inserted into the augmented sites after 8.3 months and the insertion-torque-value (ITV) measured as clinical expression of the (bio)mechanical stability of the augmented bone and compared to ITVs of a prior study in sinus lifting. Results. Significant better results of (bio)mechanical stability almost by two-fold, expressed by higher ITVs compared to native bone, were achieved with the used biomaterials and more constant results with the addition of aPRF. Conclusion. The use of SHB alone or combined with aPRF seems to be favourable to achieve a superior (bio)mechanical stable restored alveolar bone. PMID:25954758

  13. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  14. The 3Ps of oak regeneration: planning, patience and persistence

    Treesearch

    Dale R. Weigel; Daniel C. Dey; John. Kabrick

    2012-01-01

    Oak regeneration research in the United States has been ongoing in earnest since the late 1950s. Most research has focused on specific silvicultural practices, regeneration processes, site characteristics, and local limiting factors such as deer browsing or interfering species. Research has evaluated the effects of thinning on regeneration development, methods for oak...

  15. The 3 Ps of oak regeneration: planning, persistence, and patience

    Treesearch

    Dale R. Weigel; Daniel C. Dey; John Kabrick

    2012-01-01

    Oak regeneration research in the United States has been ongoing in earnest since the late 1950s. Most research has focused on specific silvicultural practices, regeneration processes, site characteristics, and local limiting factors such as deer browsing or interfering species. Research has evaluated the effects of thinning on regeneration development, methods for oak...

  16. Regeneration of mature Norway spruce stands: early effects of selective cutting and clear cutting on seepage water quality and soil fertility.

    PubMed

    Weis, W; Huber, C; Göttlein, A

    2001-11-10

    The cutting of trees influences element turnover in the forest ecosystem. The reduction of plant uptake, as well as an increased mineralization and nitrification due to higher soil temperature and soil moisture, can lead to considerable losses of nutrients from the main rooting zone. This may result in a reduced soil fertility and a decrease in drinking water quality due to high nitrate concentrations in the seepage water. In Bavaria (Germany) selective cutting is preferred to clear cutting when initiating the regeneration of Norway spruce stands with European beech. This paper summarizes the early effects of both forest management practices on soil fertility and seepage water quality for three different sites. Shown are the concentrations of nitrogen and base cations in the seepage water as well as the water and ion fluxes during the first year after tree cut. Nutrient inputs decreased on thinned plots and even more at clear-cuts. Nitrate concentrations in the seepage water are hardly affected by moderate thinning; however, on clear-cuts, the nitrate concentration increases significantly, and base cations are lost from the upper mineral soil. This effect is less obvious at sites where a dense ground vegetation, which is able to take up excess nitrogen, exists.

  17. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  18. cis-Golgi proteins accumulate near the ER exit sites and act as the scaffold for Golgi regeneration after brefeldin A treatment in tobacco BY-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoko; Uemura, Tomohiro; Shoda, Keiko; Fujimoto, Masaru; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus forms stacks of cisternae in many eukaryotic cells. However, little is known about how such a stacked structure is formed and maintained. To address this question, plant cells provide a system suitable for live-imaging approaches because individual Golgi stacks are well separated in the cytoplasm. We established tobacco BY-2 cell lines expressing multiple Golgi markers tagged by different fluorescent proteins and observed their responses to brefeldin A (BFA) treatment and BFA removal. BFA treatment disrupted cis, medial, and trans cisternae but caused distinct relocalization patterns depending on the proteins examined. Medial- and trans-Golgi proteins, as well as one cis-Golgi protein, were absorbed into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but two other cis-Golgi proteins formed small punctate structures. After BFA removal, these puncta coalesced first, and then the Golgi stacks regenerated from them in the cis-to-trans order. We suggest that these structures have a property similar to the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and function as the scaffold of Golgi regeneration. PMID:22740633

  19. Qualitative survey of five beech damaging Coleoptera (Scolytidae and Lymexylonidae) in Wallonia (Southern Belgium)

    Treesearch

    Jean-Marc Henin; Olivier Huart; Phillipe Lejeune; Jacques Rondeux

    2003-01-01

    In 2000 and 2001, Trypodendron domesticum L. and T. signatum (F.) (Col.: Scolytidae) were one of the main causes of the depreciation of more than 1,600,000 m³ of standing beech trees, Fagus sylvatica L., in Wallonia (Southern Belgium). In 2001, a survey aiming at assessing the range of those indigenous...

  20. Fertilization increases diameter growth of birch-beech-maple trees in New Hampshire

    Treesearch

    L. O. Safford

    1973-01-01

    In a 60-year-old northern hardwood stand treated with lime plus NPK fertilizer, the following increases in average basal area growth rate over untreated trees were observed: sugar maple 128 percent, paper birch 69 percent, yellow birch 51 percent, and beech 20 percent. Magnitude of response was inversely related to relative growth rate of the species. Growth rate...

  1. Trypodendron domesticum and Trypodendron signatum: two scolytid species involved in beech decline in Belgium

    Treesearch

    B. Gaubicher; M. De Proft; J.-C. Gregoire

    2003-01-01

    Xylophagous scolytids (Ambrosia beetles) have long been known to prefer fallen or seriously weakened trees and stumps. They are attracted to this host material by ethanol produced by the fermenting phloem and sapwood. However, these insects have begun aggressively attacking living beeches in Southern Belgium, raising the issue of a possible shift towards primarity....

  2. Differential impacts of calcium and aluminum treatments on sugar maple and American beech growth dynamics

    Treesearch

    Joshua M. Halman; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Christopher F. Hansen; Timothy J. Fahey

    2015-01-01

    Acid deposition induced losses of calcium (Ca) from northeastern forests have had negative effects on forest health for decades, including the mobilization of potentially phytotoxic aluminum (Al) from soils. To evaluate the impact of changes in Ca and Al availability on sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) and American beech (Fagus...

  3. Preharvest manual herbicide treatments for controlling American beech in Central West Virginia

    Treesearch

    Jeffery D. Kochenderfer; James N. Kochenderfer; David A. Warner; Gary W. Miller

    2004-01-01

    Application costs and efficacy were determined for manual preharvest herbicide treatments applied to control American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) that was interfering with the establishment and development of black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) in central West Virginia. The treatments consisted of four levels of basal area...

  4. Comparing monoterpenoid emissions and net photosynthesis of beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) in controlled and natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimpraga, M.; Verbeeck, H.; Demarcke, M.; Joó, É.; Amelynck, C.; Schoon, N.; Dewulf, J.; Van Langenhove, H.; Heinesch, B.; Aubinet, M.; Müller, J.-F.; Steppe, K.

    2011-06-01

    Although biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) only represent a very limited fraction of the plant's carbon (C) budget, they play an important role in atmospheric chemistry for example as a precursor of tropospheric ozone. We performed a study comparing BVOC emissions of European beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) in controlled and natural environmental conditions. A young and adult beech tree was exposed to short-term temperature variations in growth room conditions and in an experimental forest, respectively. This study attempts to clarify how short-term temperature variations between days influenced the ratio between monoterpenoid (MT) emissions and net photosynthesis (Pn). Within a temperature range of 17-27 °C and 13-23 °C, the MT/Pn carbon ratio increased 10-30 fold for the growth room and forest, respectively. An exponential increasing trend between MT/Pn C ratio and air temperature was observed in both conditions. Beech trees re-emitted a low fraction of the assimilated C back into the atmosphere as MT: 0.01-0.12% and 0.01-0.30% with a temperature rise from 17 to 27 °C and 13-23 °C in growth room and forest conditions, respectively. However, the data showed that the MT/Pn C ratio of young and adult beech trees responded significantly to changes in temperature.

  5. Response of beech and oaks to wounds made at different times of the year

    Treesearch

    Dirk Dujesiefken; Walter Liese; Walter Shortle; Rakesh Minocha

    2005-01-01

    Tree care, expecially pruning, is still mostly done in the dormant time. Such treatments expose live inner bark, the vascular cambium, and functioning outer sapwood to harsh external influences followed often by infection of pathogens. Investigations about response reactions of beech and oak to wounding made in different times of the year showed that wound closure was...

  6. Relationship of stump diameter to d.b.h. for American beech in the Northeast

    Treesearch

    Frederick E. Hampf

    1955-01-01

    This is the third report on a series of studies (2, 3) made to show the relationship of stump diameter to diameter breast high (d. b. h.) for commercially important tree species in the Northeast. This report is for American beech (Fagus grandifolia).

  7. ESTIMATING ROOT RESPIRATION IN SPRUCE AND BEECH: DECREASES IN SOIL RESPIRATION FOLLOWING GIRDLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was undertaken to follow seasonal fluxes of CO2 from soil and to estimate the contribution of autotrophic (root + mycorrhizal) to total soil respiration (SR) in a mixed stand of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Matu...

  8. SOIL CO2 EFFLUX FROM ISOTOPICALLY LABELED BEECH AND SPRUCE IN SOUTHERN GERMANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    • Carbon acquisition and transport to roots in forest trees is difficult to quantify and is affected by a number of factors, including micrometeorology and anthropogenic stresses. The canopies of mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) were expose...

  9. Chilocorus stigma (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and other predators of beech scale in central New York

    Treesearch

    Mark Mayer; Douglas C. Allen

    1983-01-01

    The twice-stabbed lady beetle Chilocorus stigma (Say), was studied in two infestations of beech scale, Cryptococccus fagisuga Lind., to elucidate predator biology and to determine the predator's effect on scale populations. C. stigma is univoltine in north-central regions of New York and its seasonal...

  10. SOIL CO2 EFFLUX FROM ISOTOPICALLY LABELED BEECH AND SPRUCE IN SOUTHERN GERMANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    • Carbon acquisition and transport to roots in forest trees is difficult to quantify and is affected by a number of factors, including micrometeorology and anthropogenic stresses. The canopies of mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) were expose...

  11. Characteristics and development of necrophylatic periderms in mature bark of American beech

    Treesearch

    William D. Ostrofsky; Robert O. Blanchard

    1983-01-01

    Investigations were made of necrophylactic peridems which were found to delimit natural and experimentally induced cankers in American beech. Anatomical evidence is presented which supports the hypothesis that the necrophylactic periderm is generated from recent derivatives of the vascular cambium as well as from living cells of the bark tissues present at the time of...

  12. Specificity of Cryptococcus fagisuga and Nectria coccinea association in beech bark disease in Europe

    Treesearch

    R. Perrin

    1983-01-01

    The specificity of the Cryptococcus fagisuga and N. coccinea association is studied by artificial inoculation of 4 species of Nectria: N. coccinea, N. ditissima. N. galligena and N. cinnabarina on bark infested with beech scale. N. coccinea appears to be the most efficient...

  13. Canopy transpiration of pure and mixed forest stands with variable abundance of European beech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, Tobias; Horna, Viviana; Leuschner, Christoph

    2012-06-01

    SummaryThe importance of tree species identity and diversity for biogeochemical cycles in forests is not well understood. In the past, forestry has widely converted mixed forests to pure stands while contemporary forest policy often prefers mixed stands again. However, the hydrological consequences of these changes remain unclear. We tested the hypotheses (i) that significant differences in water use per ground area exist among the tree species of temperate mixed forests and that these differences are more relevant for the amount of stand-level canopy transpiration (Ec) than putative complementarity effects of tree water use, and (ii) that the seasonal patterns of Ec in mixed stands are significantly influenced by the identity of the present tree species. We measured xylem sap flux during 2005 (average precipitation) and 2006 (relatively dry) synchronously in three nearby old-growth forest stands on similar soil differing in the abundance of European beech (pure beech stand, 3-species stand with 70% beech, 5-species stand with <10% beech). In summer 2005 with average rainfall, Ec was 50% higher in the beech-poor 5-species stand than in the two stands with moderate to high beech presence (158 vs. 97 and 101 mm yr-1); in the dry summer 2006, all stands converged toward similar Ec totals (128-139 mm yr-1). Species differences in Ec were large on a sapwood area basis, reflecting a considerable variation in hydraulic architecture and leaf conductance regulation among the co-existing species. Moreover, transpiration per crown projection area (ECA) also differed up to 5-fold among the different species in the mixed stands, probably reflecting contrasting sapwood/crown area ratios. We conclude that Ec is not principally higher in mixed forests than in pure beech stands. However, tree species-specific traits have an important influence on the height of Ec and affect its seasonal variation. Species with a relatively high ECA (notably Tilia) may exhaust soil water reserves

  14. Beech vs. Pine - how different tree species manage their water demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbüchel, Ingo; Dreibrodt, Janek; Simard, Sonia; Güntner, Andreas; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    In north-eastern Germany large parts of the landscape are covered by pine trees. Although beech used to be one of the typical species for the region, today it makes up only a small fraction of the forested area. In order to reinstate a more natural forest composition an effort is made to decrease the coniferous forest in the next 30 years from 70% to 40% while increasing the deciduous forest from 20% to 40%. This will have consequences for the forest water balance that we would like to understand better. In an attempt to capture the complete tree water balance for both species we monitored all relevant hydrologic fluxes in four stands of pure beech and pine (both young and old stands) as well as in eight mixed stands (as part of the TERENO observatory). Extensive measurements of throughfall and stemflow were conducted with 35 rain trough systems, 50 stemflow collectors and tipping buckets. Soil moisture was monitored in 70 depth profiles with a total of 450 sensors ranging from 10 cm down to 200 cm. In combination with soil water potential measurements at 5 depths root water uptake from different depths and hydraulic redistribution between depths could be determined. Sapflux sensors recorded tree water use for 16 trees and groundwater level was monitored at 16 locations. We found that soil moisture conditions under beech were more variable than under pine, especially in the upper 100 cm. This was due to the higher influx of water from stemflow on the one hand and to the more intensive/effective use of soil water by the beech on the other hand. Our sap flux measurements show that beech was able to sustain steady rates of sapflux even under extremely dry soil conditions. While annual average sapflow was twice as high for pines compared to beeches, pine trees were less effective in taking up water from the soil and reduced sap flow considerably during dry phases. We still found the upper 100 cm of soil under pine to be generally wetter than under beech and considered

  15. Assessing regeneration potential

    Treesearch

    Ivan L. Sander

    1989-01-01

    When a regeneration harvest cut is planned for even-aged stands or it is time to make another cut in uneven-aged stands, the first thing to do is assess the regeneration potential. Regeneration potential is the likelihood of being successful in reproducing desired species. You need an assessment to be reasonably sure that regeneration and management objectives can be...

  16. Thirty-two years of change in an old-growth Ohio beech-maple forest.

    PubMed

    Runkle, James R

    2013-05-01

    Old-growth forests dominated by understory-tolerant tree species are among forest types most likely to be in equilibrium. However, documentation of the degree to which they are in equilibrium over decades-long time periods is lacking. Changes in climate, pathogens, and land use all are likely to impact stand characteristics and species composition, even in these forests. Here, 32 years of vegetation changes in an old-growth beech (Fagus grandifolia)-sugar maple (Acer saccharum) forest in Hueston Woods, southwest Ohio, USA, are summarized. These changes involve canopy composition and structure, turnover in snags, and development of vegetation in treefall gaps. Stand basal area and canopy density have changed little in 32 years. However, beech has decreased in canopy importance (49% to 32%) while sugar maple has increased (32% to 47%). Annual mortality was about 1.3% throughout the study period. Mortality rates increased with stem size, but the fraction of larger stems increased due to ingrowth from smaller size classes. Beech was represented by more very large stems than small canopy stems: over time, death of those larger stems with inadequate replacement has caused the decrease in beech importance. Sugar maple was represented by more small canopy stems whose growth has increased its importance. The changes in beech and sugar maple relative importance are hypothesized to be due to forest fragmentation mostly from the early 1800s with some possible additional effects associated with the formation of the state park. Snag densities (12-16 snags/ha) and formation rates (1-3 snags.ha(-1).yr(-1)) remained consistent. The treefall gaps previously studied are closing, with a few, large stems remaining. Death of gap border trees occurs consistently enough to favor species able to combine growth in gaps and survival in the understory.

  17. Seasonal evolution of Biomass Production Efficiency (BPE) of a French beech forest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, L.; Calvaruso, C.; Conil, S.; Turpault, M. P.; Longdoz, B.

    2015-12-01

    With the evolution of ecosystem management and the actual climate change we are facing, there is a need to improve our knowledge of carbon (C) balance and more specifically of C allocation in the plants. In our study, we quantified the seasonal variation of gross primary production (GPP, obtained through eddy covariance measurements) and biomass production (BP, the C fixed into the biomass obtained thanks to inventory campaign) for a 60-year-old even-aged beech stand located in North East of France. We also assessed the seasonal evolution of the BP efficiency (BPE=BP/GPP; Vicca et al., 2012) and its potential determining factors for our site. For 2014, we found a net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of -549 gC m-2, corresponding to a C sequestration. This value breaks down between 1089 gC m-2 for the respiration of the ecosystem and -1639 gC m-2 for the GPP. On the same year, our stand built up 461.6 gC m-2 of tree biomass (leaves, trunk, branches, fine roots), leading to an annual BPE of 0.28, which is within the range of value found on other similar sites. There was a large temporal variation of C allocation to the different parts of the tree biomass during the growth season. Our results show that the growth first happened in the trunk and branches -with a peak value of 74.5 gC m-2 month-1 in May - whereas the fine roots biomass production started later (end of July) and reached a maximum at the end of the growth season (28.49 gC m-2 month-1 for September). The BPE varied also during the year from 0.13 in April to 0.31 in August, where the BP was the same than in July but the cumulated GPP was already decreasing. The seasonal variation may be mainly explained by climatic variations, whereas the shift between woody above-ground biomass and fine roots biomass could be explained by the phenology (linked to physiological mechanisms).

  18. A multi-layer, closed-loop system for continuous measurement of soil CO2 concentrations and its isotopic signature applied in a beech and a pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochheim, Hubert; Wirth, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    We present a setup of measurement devices that allows the application of the soil CO2 gradient approach for CO2 efflux calculation in combination with the analysis of isotopic signature (δ13C). Vertical profiles of CO2 concentrations in air-filled pores of soil were measured using miniature NDIR sensors within a 16-channel closed-loop system where equilibrium with soil air can be achieved using hydrophobic, gas-permeable porous polypropylene tubes circulating gas using peristaltic pumps. A 16-position multiplexer allows the connection to an isotopic CO2 analyser. This setup was applied at two ICP Forest intensive monitoring sites, a beech and a pine forest on sandy soils located in Brandenburg, Germany. CO2 concentrations in air-filled pores of soils were measured on top of soil surface, below the humus layer, and in 10cm, 20cm, 30cm and 100 cm depths every 30 min. At both sites, soil moisture and temperature were measured continuously in the respective soil depths in identical time intervals. Isotopic signatures of soil CO2 was detected by measurement campaigns. After three years of measurements, our results provided evidence for distinct seasonal dynamics and vertical gradients of soil CO2 concentration and δ13C values. Varying impacts of soil temperature and moisture on CO2 concentration were revealed, highlighting its impact on soil physical and soil biological controls. Higher levels of CO2 concentration and a more distinct seasonal dynamics were detected at the beech site compared to the pine site. The collected data provide a suitable database for calculation of CO2 efflux and modelling of soil respiration.

  19. Mechanobiology of skeletal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Carter, D R; Beaupré, G S; Giori, N J; Helms, J A

    1998-10-01

    Skeletal regeneration is accomplished by a cascade of biologic processes that may include differentiation of pluripotential tissue, endochondral ossification, and bone remodeling. It has been shown that all these processes are influenced strongly by the local tissue mechanical loading history. This article reviews some of the mechanobiologic principles that are thought to guide the differentiation of mesenchymal tissue into bone, cartilage, or fibrous tissue during the initial phase of regeneration. Cyclic motion and the associated shear stresses cause cell proliferation and the production of a large callus in the early phases of fracture healing. For intermittently imposed loading in the regenerating tissue: (1) direct intramembranous bone formation is permitted in areas of low stress and strain; (2) low to moderate magnitudes of tensile strain and hydrostatic tensile stress may stimulate intramembranous ossification; (3) poor vascularity can promote chondrogenesis in an otherwise osteogenic environment; (4) hydrostatic compressive stress is a stimulus for chondrogenesis; (5) high tensile strain is a stimulus for the net production of fibrous tissue; and (6) tensile strain with a superimposed hydrostatic compressive stress will stimulate the development of fibrocartilage. Finite element models are used to show that the patterns of tissue differentiation observed in fracture healing and distraction osteogenesis can be predicted from these fundamental mechanobiologic concepts. In areas of cartilage formation, subsequent endochondral ossification normally will proceed, but it can be inhibited by intermittent hydrostatic compressive stress and accelerated by octahedral shear stress (or strain). Later, bone remodeling at these sites can be expected to follow the same mechanobiologic adaptation rules as normal bone.

  20. Demonstration and Validation of a Regenerated-Cellulose Dialysis Membrane Diffusion Sampler for Monitoring Ground Water Quality and Remediation Progress at DoD Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    not equilibrate within 28 days. Equilibration times for selected explosive compounds through dialysis membranes were determined by LeBlanc... MEMBRANE DIFFUSION SAMPLER FOR MONITORING GROUND WATER QUALITY AND REMEDIATION PROGRESS AT DoD SITES (ER-0313) by Thomas E. Imbrigiotta... MEMBRANE DIFFUSION SAMPLER FOR MONITORING GROUND WATER QUALITY AND REMEDIATION PROGRESS AT DOD SITES (ER-0313) 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  1. Modelling ozone effects on adult beech trees through simulation of defence, damage, and repair costs: Implementation of the CASIROZ ozone model in the ANAFORE forest model.

    PubMed

    Deckmyn, G; Op de Beeck, M; Löw, M; Then, C; Verbeeck, H; Wipfler, P; Ceulemans, R

    2007-03-01

    Ozone affects adult trees significantly, but effects on stem growth are hard to prove and difficult to correlate with the primary sites of ozone damage at the leaf level. To simulate ozone effects in a mechanistic way, at a level relevant to forest stand growth, we developed a simple ozone damage and repair model (CASIROZ model) that can be implemented into mechanistic photosynthesis and growth models. The model needs to be parameterized with cuvette measurements on net photosynthesis and dark respiration. As the CASIROZ ozone sub-model calculates effects of the ozone flux, a reliable representation of stomatal conductance and therefore ozone uptake is necessary to allow implementation of the ozone sub-model. In this case study the ozone sub-model was used in the ANAFORE forest model to simulate gas exchange, growth, and allocation. A preliminary run for adult beech (FAGUS SYLVATICA) under different ozone regimes at the Kranzberg forest site (Germany) was performed. The results indicate that the model is able to represent the measured effects of ozone adequately, and to distinguish between immediate and cumulative ozone effects. The results further help to understand ozone effects by distinguishing defence from damage and repair. Finally, the model can be used to extrapolate from the short-term results of the field study to long-term effects on tree growth. The preliminary simulations for the Kranzberg beech site show that, although ozone effects on yearly growth are variable and therefore insignificant when measured in the field, they could become significant at longer timescales (above 5 years, 5 % reduction in growth). The model offers a possible explanation for the discrepancy between the significant effects on photosynthesis (10 to 30 % reductions simulated), and the minor effects on growth. This appears to be the result of the strong competition and slow growth of the Kranzberg forest, and the importance of stored carbon for the adult beech (by buffering

  2. Species composition of regeneration after clearcutting Southern Appalachian hardwoods

    Treesearch

    David L. Loftis

    1989-01-01

    Regeneration after clearcutting of Southern Appalachian hardwood stands varies substantially in species composition not only among sites of different quality and previous-stand composition, but also among sites of similar quality and similar previous-stand composition. Severe competition from less desirable species for available growing space is cOllDlon in regenerated...

  3. Characterization of low molecular weight organic acids from beech wood treated in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kei; Kusaki, Junko; Ehara, Katsunobu; Saka, Shiro

    2005-01-01

    Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume), its cell wall components, and model compounds were treated by supercritical water (380 degrees C, 100 MPa) for 5 s using a batch-type reactor to investigate the production behavior of low molecular weight organic acids. It was found that cellulose and hemicellulose were decomposed to formic acid, pyruvic acid, glycolic acid, acetic acid, and lactic acid, whereas lignin was barely decomposed to such organic acids under the given conditions. However, after prolonged treatment (380 degrees C, 100 MPa, 4 min) of lignin, some organic acids were recovered owing perhaps to the decomposition of the propyl side chain of lignin. It was additionally revealed that the predominant organic acid recovered was acetic acid, which might be derived from the acetyl group of hemicellulose in Japanese beech.

  4. Occurrence, spatial pattern, and influence of atmospheric deposition on top- and subsoil water repellency in a beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Joerg; Böttcher, Jürgen; Krüger, Jiem; Woche, Susanne K.

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that enhanced solute input due to stemflow infiltration causes enhanced soil acidification near the tree base. Infiltration-driven alteration of chemical soil properties like pH, and carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) may also affect soil wettability (quantified as contact angle, CA) with a trend to increased soil water repellency (SWR) with decreased pH. Objective of this study was to analyze the impact of tree location on top- and subsoil wettability and selected soil chemical parameters on two large-scale transects (length  50 m, sampling depths 0.1-0.2 m). The transects were about 50 m apart from each other, time of sampling was in July 2013 and July 2015. To analyze subsoil wettability in the vicinity of selected trees, three transects (lengths =3 m, sampling depths = 0.1 - 2.0 m) were additionally sampled in June 2013. Sampling site is a 100 years old beech forest (Fagus sylvatica L.). Soil type is a well-drained sandy Dystric Cambisol in northern Germany with moderate to locally extended acidification. According to standard statistics, the total variance of chemical soil properties and SWR was independent of stemflow infiltration pattern. Results of spectral variance analyses, however, showed that the spatial variability of acidification (pH, Al content) as well as SWR in the soil horizon close to the surface was strongly affected by the pattern of patches with and without stemflow infiltration on both large-distance transects, no matter if sampling took place in 2013 (mean CA = 40°, SD = 12°) or 2015 (mean CA = 110°, SD = 14°). Regarding subsoil wettability on the smaller transects, CA were always in the range 0° < CA < 90°. A significant impact of the distance to the tree on SWR was observed for none of the transects, indicating that the impact of tree canopy is restricted to surface-near soil layers. Specific chemical surface properties analyzed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed specific chemical alteration of the

  5. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  6. Rapid induction in regenerating liver of RL/IF-1 (an I kappa B that inhibits NF-kappa B, RelB-p50, and c-Rel-p50) and PHF, a novel kappa B site-binding complex.

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, M; Dobrzanski, P; Mohn, K L; Cressman, D E; Hsu, J C; Bravo, R; Taub, R

    1992-01-01

    The liver is one of the few adult tissues that has the capacity to regenerate following hepatectomy or toxic damage. In examining the early growth response during hepatic regeneration, we found that a highly induced immediate-early gene in regenerating liver encodes RL/IF-1 (regenerating liver inhibitory factor) and is the rat homolog of human MAD-3 and probably of chicken pp40. RL/IF-1 has I kappa B activity of broad specificity in that it inhibits the binding of p50-p65 NF-kappa B, c-Rel-p50, and RelB-p50, but not p50 homodimeric NF-kappa B, to kappa B sites. Like RL/IF-1, several members of the NF-kappa B and rel family of transcription factors are immediate-early genes in regenerating liver and mitogen-treated cells. We examined changes in kappa B site binding activity during liver regeneration and discovered a rapidly induced novel kappa B site-binding complex designated PHF [posthepatectomy factor(s)]. PHF is induced over 1,000-fold within minutes posthepatectomy in a protein synthesis-independent manner, with peak activity at 30 min, and is not induced by sham operation. PHF is distinct from p50-p65 NF-kappa B, which is present only in the inactive form in liver posthepatectomy. Although early PHF complexes do not interact strongly with anti-p50 antibodies, PHF complexes present later (3 to 5 h) posthepatectomy react strongly, suggesting that they contain a p50 NF-kappa B subunit. Unlike p50-p65 NF-kappa B, c-Rel-p50, and RelB-p50 complexes, PHF binding to kappa B sites is not inhibited by RL/IF-1. One role of RL/IF-1 in liver regeneration may be to inhibit p50-p65 NF-kappa B activity present in hepatic cells, allowing for the preferential binding of PHF to kappa B sites. Because PHF is induced immediately posthepatectomy in the absence of de novo protein synthesis, PHF could have a role in the regulation of liver-specific immediate-early genes in regenerating liver. Images PMID:1588976

  7. Beech bark disease in West Virginia: status and impact on the Monongahela National Forest

    Treesearch

    Manfred E. Mielke; David R. Houston

    1983-01-01

    Cryptoeoccus fagisuga has infested over 70,000 acres (28,000 ha) of forest in West Virginia. Beech bark disease is causing heavy mortality in two areas of the Monongahela National Forest and additional scattered mortality. In the areas most affected, per-acre losses total 1,369 board feet of sawtimber and 2.67 cords, with a potential loss of 5,697...

  8. Cavities in trees around spring seeps in the maple-beech-birch forest type

    Treesearch

    Andrew B. Carey; William M. Healy

    1981-01-01

    We examined 913 trees of 15 species in the vicinity of eight spring seeps in a second-growth maple-beech-birch forest. We found that 18 percent of the trees had large dead limbs that indicated top rot. We found 37 cavities in 27 trees (3.0 percent). However, only seven cavities were being used by wildlife in September and mice (Peromyscus sp.) used...

  9. Proceedings, I.U.F.R.O. Beech Bark Disease Working Party Conference

    Treesearch

    Forest Service. U.S.

    1983-01-01

    This conference was the first full meeting of the Working Party since its inception at the Beech Bark Disease Colloquium held in Nancy, France in 1979. The meeting from 27 September to 7 October 1982 took the form of a study tour convened at the College of Forestry, University of Maine,with field trips in the Central New England States and New York and concluding at...

  10. Molecular evidence for the presence of Dirofilaria repens in beech marten (Martes foina) from Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Miterpáková, M; Hurníková, Z; Zaleśny, G; Chovancová, B

    2013-09-23

    Herein we present the first finding of Dirofilaria repens, agent of the subcutaneous form of dirofilariosis, in Martes foina. Molecular analyses from the spleen of 3 individuals originated from Tatra National Park, Northern Slovakia, confirmed the presence of D. repens in one of them. Finding of D. repens in beech marten instigates to more intense research on free living carnivores as the potential source of Dirofilaria parasites.

  11. Stand response of 16-year-old upland hardwood regeneration to crop-tree release on a medium quality site in the Southern Appalachians after 24 years

    Treesearch

    W. Henry. McNab

    2010-01-01

    A crop tree release was made in a 16-year-old upland hardwood stand on a medium-quality site using one of two treatments: mechanical or chemical. After 24 years there was no significant difference in stand response between the two treatments as measured by mean increase in stand diameter, basal area, total height, height to base of live...

  12. Artificial regeneration of northern red oak (Quercus rubra) on high quality mesic sites: early results characterizing nursery production, early juvenile growth, and acorn production

    Treesearch

    Paul P. Kormanik; Shi-Jean S. Sung; Taryn L. Kormanik; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Scott E. Schlarbaum; Tom Tibbs

    2002-01-01

    There is intense concern among forest resource managers about the rapid decline in the northern red oak (NRO) component of high quality mesic sites throughout the United States. Currently this versatile oak species, so important for its lumber value as well as its dietary staple status for hundreds of wildlife species, is being replaced by hardwood species that lack...

  13. Demonstration and Validation of a Regenerated Cellulose Dialysis Membrane Diffusion Sampler for Monitoring Ground-Water Quality and Remediation Progress at DoD Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    53 APPENDIX A POINTS OF CONTACT......................................................................... A-1 iii ...Trenton, NJ site that eventually led to this demonstration. Michael Figura of the U.S. Navy supplied well construction information and water quality...meetings. 2.3 REGULATORY DRIVERS This demonstration responds to many DoD requirements, including (1) Navy 1. III .01.k Improved Field Analytical

  14. Specific impacts of beech and Norway spruce on the structure and diversity of the rhizosphere and soil microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Uroz, S.; Oger, P.; Tisserand, E.; Cébron, A.; Turpault, M.-P.; Buée, M.; De Boer, W.; Leveau, J. H. J.; Frey-Klett, P.

    2016-01-01

    The impacts of plant species on the microbial communities and physico-chemical characteristics of soil are well documented for many herbs, grasses and legumes but much less so for tree species. Here, we investigate by rRNA and ITS amplicon sequencing the diversity of microorganisms from the three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota:Fungi) in soil samples taken from the forest experimental site of Breuil-Chenue (France). We discovered significant differences in the abundance, composition and structure of the microbial communities associated with two phylogenetically distant tree species of the same age, deciduous European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and coniferous Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst), planted in the same soil. Our results suggest a significant effect of tree species on soil microbiota though in different ways for each of the three microbial groups. Fungal and archaeal community structures and compositions are mainly determined according to tree species, whereas bacterial communities differ to a great degree between rhizosphere and bulk soils, regardless of the tree species. These results were confirmed by quantitative PCR, which revealed significant enrichment of specific bacterial genera, such as Burkholderia and Collimonas, known for their ability to weather minerals within the tree root vicinity. PMID:27302652

  15. Effect of water availability on leaf water isotopic enrichment in beech seedlings shows limitations of current fractionation models.

    PubMed

    Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Cuntz, Matthias; Offermann, Christine; Siegwolf, Rolf; Saurer, Matthias; Gessler, Arthur

    2009-10-01

    Current models of leaf water enrichment predict that the differences between isotopic enrichment of water at the site of evaporation (Delta(e)) and mean lamina leaf water enrichment (Delta(L)) depend on transpiration rates (E), modulated by the scaled effective length (L) of water isotope movement in the leaf. However, variations in leaf parameters in response to changing environmental conditions might cause changes in the water path and thus L. We measured the diel course of Delta(L) for (18)O and (2)H in beech seedlings under well-watered and water-limited conditions. We applied evaporative enrichment models of increasing complexity to predict Delta(e) and Delta(L), and estimated L from model fits. Water-limited plants showed moderate drought stress, with lower stomatal conductance, E and stem water potential than the control. Despite having double E, the divergence between Delta(e) and Delta(L) was lower in well-watered than in water-limited plants, and thus, L should have changed to counteract differences in E. Indeed, L was about threefold higher in water-limited plants, regardless of the models used. We conclude that L changes with plant water status far beyond the variations explained by water content and other measured variables, thus limiting the use of current evaporative models under changing environmental conditions.

  16. Principles of natural regeneration

    Treesearch

    Paul S. Johnson

    1989-01-01

    To maximize chances of successful regeneration, carefully consider the following regeneration principles. Harvesting alone does not guarantee that the desired species will be established. The conditions required for the initial establishment and early growth of the desired species largely determine what regeneration method you should use and any supplemental treatments...

  17. Comparative phylogeography of two sympatric beeches in subtropical China: Species-specific geographic mosaic of lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Rong; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; López-Pujol, Jordi; Fan, Deng-Mei; Li, De-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    In subtropical China, large-scale phylogeographic comparisons among multiple sympatric plants with similar ecological preferences are scarce, making generalizations about common response to historical events necessarily tentative. A phylogeographic comparison of two sympatric Chinese beeches (Fagus lucida and F. longipetiolata, 21 and 28 populations, respectively) was conducted to test whether they have responded to historical events in a concerted fashion and to determine whether their phylogeographic structure is exclusively due to Quaternary events or it is also associated with pre-Quaternary events. Twenty-three haplotypes were recovered for F. lucida and F. longipetiolata (14 each one and five shared). Both species exhibited a species-specific mosaic distribution of haplotypes, with many of them being range-restricted and even private to populations. The two beeches had comparable total haplotype diversity but F. lucida had much higher within-population diversity than F. longipetiolata. Molecular dating showed that the time to most recent common ancestor of all haplotypes was 6.36 Ma, with most haplotypes differentiating during the Quaternary. [Correction added on 14 October 2013, after first online publication: the timeunit has been corrected to ‘6.36’.] Our results support a late Miocene origin and southwards colonization of Chinese beeches when the aridity in Central Asia intensified and the monsoon climate began to dominate the East Asia. During the Quaternary, long-term isolation in subtropical mountains of China coupled with limited gene flow would have lead to the current species-specific mosaic distribution of lineages. PMID:24340187

  18. Bioorganosolve pretreatments for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of beech wood by ethanolysis and white rot fungi.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hiromichi; Wada, Masanori; Honda, Yoichi; Kuwahara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Takashi

    2003-08-15

    Ethanol was produced by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) from beech wood chips after bioorganosolve pretreatments by ethanolysis and white rot fungi, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, Dichomitus squalens, Pleurotus ostreatus, and Coriolus versicolor. Beech wood chips were pretreated with the white rot fungi for 2-8 weeks without addition of any nutrients. The wood chips were then subjected to ethanolysis to separate them into pulp and soluble fractions (SFs). From the pulp fraction (PF), ethanol was produced by SSF using Saccharomyces cerevisiae AM12 and a commercial cellulase preparation, Meicelase, from Trichoderma viride. Among the four strains, C. subvermispora gave the highest yield on SSF. The yield of ethanol obtained after pretreatment with C. subvermispora for 8 weeks was 0.294 g g(-1) of ethanolysis pulp (74% of theoretical) and 0.176 g g(-1) of beech wood chips (62% of theoretical). The yield was 1.6 times higher than that obtained without the fungal treatments. The biological pretreatments saved 15% of the electricity needed for the ethanolysis.

  19. Long-range transport of beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) pollen to Catalonia (north-eastern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, J.; Alarcón, M.; Avila, A.; Scialabba, E.; Pino, D.

    2008-09-01

    Local and long-range transport of beech ( Fagus sylvatica) pollen was analysed by using 23-year data (1983-2007) at six stations in Catalonia, Spain, and numerical simulations. Back trajectories and synoptic meteorology indicated a consistent north European provenance during beech pollen peak days. Specifically, the area from northern Italy to central Germany was the most probable source, as indicated by a source-receptor model based on back trajectories. For the event with the highest pollen levels (17 May 2004), back trajectories indicated a source in the Vosges (NE France) and the Schwarzwald (SW Germany) regions. By applying a mesoscale model (MM5) to this event, pollen transport could be further refined, allowing its entrance to Catalonia through the lower easternmost pass of the Pyrenees (the Alberes pass, 500 m a.s.l.) to be described. Hourly counts of Fagus pollen allowed the timing of pollen arrival during this episode to be matched with the model results regarding the above-mentioned passage. This study may help to interpret some results of modern beech genetic diversity and contribute to the understanding of paleopalynological records by taking long-range transport into consideration.

  20. Plant-mediated nitrous oxide emissions from beech (Fagus sylvatica) leaves.

    PubMed

    Pihlatie, Mari; Ambus, Per; Rinne, Janne; Pilegaard, Kim; Vesala, Timo

    2005-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission estimates from forest ecosystems are based currently on emission measurements using soil enclosures. Such enclosures exclude emissions via tall plants and trees and may therefore underestimate the whole-ecosystem N2O emissions. Here, we measured plant-mediated N2O emissions from the leaves of potted beech (Fagus sylvatica) seedlings after fertilizing the soil with 15N-labelled ammonium nitrate (15NH4(15)NO3), and after exposing the roots to elevated concentrations of N2O. Ammonium nitrate fertilization induced N2O + 15N2O emissions from beech leaves. Likewise, the foliage emitted N2O after beech roots were exposed to elevated concentrations of N2O. The average N2O emissions from the fertilization and the root exposure experiments were 0.4 and 2.0 microg N m(-2) leaf area h(-1), respectively. Higher than ambient atmospheric concentrations of N2O in the leaves of the forest trees indicate a potential for canopy N2O emissions in the forest. Our experiments demonstrate the existence of a previously overlooked pathway of N2O to the atmosphere in forest ecosystems, and bring about a need to investigate the magnitude of this phenomenon at larger scales.

  1. Above-ground space sequestration determines competitive success in juvenile beech and spruce trees.

    PubMed

    Kozovits, Alessandra R; Matyssek, Rainer; Winkler, J Barbro; Göttlein, Axel; Blaschke, Helmut; Grams, Thorsten E E

    2005-07-01

    A 2-yr phytotron study was conducted to investigate the intra- and inter-specific competitive behaviour of juvenile beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies). Competitiveness was analysed by quantifying the resource budgets that occur along structures and within occupied space of relevance for competitive interaction. Ambient and elevated CO(2) and ozone (O(3)) regimes were applied throughout two growing seasons as stressors for provoking changes in resource budgets, growth and allocation to facilitate the competition analysis. The hypothesis tested was that the ability to sequester space at low structural cost will determine the competitive success. Spruce was a stronger competitor than beech, as displayed by its higher above-ground biomass increments in mixed culture compared with monoculture. A crucial factor in the competitive success of spruce was its ability to enlarge crown volume at low structural costs, supporting the hypothesis. Interspecific competition with spruce resulted in a size-independent readjustment of above-ground allocation in beech (reduced leaf : shoot biomass ratio). The efficient use of resources for above-ground space sequestration proved to be a parameter that quantitatively reflects competitiveness.

  2. Drought as a modifier of interaction between adult beech and spruce - impacts on tree water use, C budgets and biotic interactions above- and belowground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Understanding biotic interactions among tree species with their microbial associates under drought will be crucial for silviculture in meeting ecological challenges of the future. This contribution gives an overview on a project integrating a throughfall-exclusion experiment (TEE) on adult trees with a natural precipitation gradient (PGR) in central European forests. Focus is on drought affecting species interaction above and belowground, including associated ectomycorrhizal (ECM) communities. Study objects are pure and mixed forests dominated by adult European beech and Norway spruce trees (c. 70-years old). At the throughfall-exclusion experiment (TEE), trees are readily accessible via scaffolding and canopy crane (Kranzberg Forest, southern Germany). Effects of experimentally induced, repeated summer drought are assessed with roughly 100 trees assigned to a total of 12 plots (Kranzberg forest ROOF experiment, kroof.wzw.tum.de). The summer drought treatment started in 2014 and was repeated in 2015 and 2106. The focus on species interaction is intensified by a parallel study along a natural precipitation gradient with plot triplets of monocultures and mixed cultures of European beech and Norway spruce at each of the five study sites. Complementary resource use, effects of competitive vs. facilitation and related changes in ECM communities are exemplified for the two tree species of contrasting foliage (i.e. deciduous vs. evergreen) and stomatal sensitivity to drought (i.e. an-isohydric vs. isohydric behavior). At the TEE site, precipitation throughfall was completely excluded from early spring to late fall (i.e. March to November), resulting in pre-dawn leaf water potentials of both beech and spruce as low as -2.5 MPa. Despite significant reductions in growth and rate of photosynthesis by up to 80% under drought, NSC budget of trees was hardly affected. Moreover, phloem functionality, tested as phloem transport velocity through 13C-labeling of recent

  3. Tree Species Composition and Harvest Intensity Affect Herbivore Density and Leaf Damage on Beech, Fagus sylvatica, in Different Landscape Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Mangels, Jule; Blüthgen, Nico; Frank, Kevin; Grassein, Fabrice; Hilpert, Andrea; Mody, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Most forests are exposed to anthropogenic management activities that affect tree species composition and natural ecosystem processes. Changes in ecosystem processes such as herbivory depend on management intensity, and on regional environmental conditions and species pools. Whereas influences of specific forest management measures have already been addressed for different herbivore taxa on a local scale, studies considering effects of different aspects of forest management across different regions are rare. We assessed the influence of tree species composition and intensity of harvesting activities on arthropod herbivores and herbivore-related damage to beech trees, Fagus sylvatica, in 48 forest plots in three regions of Germany. We found that herbivore abundance and damage to beech trees differed between regions and that – despite the regional differences - density of tree-associated arthropod taxa and herbivore damage were consistently affected by tree species composition and harvest intensity. Specifically, overall herbivore damage to beech trees increased with increasing dominance of beech trees – suggesting the action of associational resistance processes – and decreased with harvest intensity. The density of leaf chewers and mines was positively related to leaf damage, and several arthropod groups responded to beech dominance and harvest intensity. The distribution of damage patterns was consistent with a vertical shift of herbivores to higher crown layers during the season and with higher beech dominance. By linking quantitative data on arthropod herbivore abundance and herbivory with tree species composition and harvesting activity in a wide variety of beech forests, our study helps to better understand the influence of forest management on interactions between a naturally dominant deciduous forest tree and arthropod herbivores. PMID:25938417

  4. Beech Fructification and Bank Vole Population Dynamics - Combined Analyses of Promoters of Human Puumala Virus Infections in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Reil, Daniela; Imholt, Christian; Eccard, Jana Anja; Jacob, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of wildlife zoonoses to humans depends, amongst others, on complex interactions of host population ecology and pathogen dynamics within host populations. In Europe, the Puumala virus (PUUV) causes nephropathia epidemica in humans. In this study we investigated complex interrelations within the epidemic system of PUUV and its rodent host, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). We suggest that beech fructification and bank vole abundance are both decisive factors affecting human PUUV infections. While rodent host dynamics are expected to be directly linked to human PUUV infections, beech fructification is a rather indirect predictor by serving as food source for PUUV rodent hosts. Furthermore, we examined the dependence of bank vole abundance on beech fructification. We analysed a 12-year (2001-2012) time series of the parameters: beech fructification (as food resource for the PUUV host), bank vole abundance and human incidences from 7 Federal States of Germany. For the first time, we could show the direct interrelation between these three parameters involved in human PUUV epidemics and we were able to demonstrate on a large scale that human PUUV infections are highly correlated with bank vole abundance in the present year, as well as beech fructification in the previous year. By using beech fructification and bank vole abundance as predictors in one model we significantly improved the degree of explanation of human PUUV incidence. Federal State was included as random factor because human PUUV incidence varies considerably among states. Surprisingly, the effect of rodent abundance on human PUUV infections is less strong compared to the indirect effect of beech fructification. Our findings are useful to facilitate the development of predictive models for host population dynamics and the related PUUV infection risk for humans and can be used for plant protection and human health protection purposes. PMID:26214509

  5. Tree Species Composition and Harvest Intensity Affect Herbivore Density and Leaf Damage on Beech, Fagus sylvatica, in Different Landscape Contexts.

    PubMed

    Mangels, Jule; Blüthgen, Nico; Frank, Kevin; Grassein, Fabrice; Hilpert, Andrea; Mody, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Most forests are exposed to anthropogenic management activities that affect tree species composition and natural ecosystem processes. Changes in ecosystem processes such as herbivory depend on management intensity, and on regional environmental conditions and species pools. Whereas influences of specific forest management measures have already been addressed for different herbivore taxa on a local scale, studies considering effects of different aspects of forest management across different regions are rare. We assessed the influence of tree species composition and intensity of harvesting activities on arthropod herbivores and herbivore-related damage to beech trees, Fagus sylvatica, in 48 forest plots in three regions of Germany. We found that herbivore abundance and damage to beech trees differed between regions and that - despite the regional differences - density of tree-associated arthropod taxa and herbivore damage were consistently affected by tree species composition and harvest intensity. Specifically, overall herbivore damage to beech trees increased with increasing dominance of beech trees - suggesting the action of associational resistance processes - and decreased with harvest intensity. The density of leaf chewers and mines was positively related to leaf damage, and several arthropod groups responded to beech dominance and harvest intensity. The distribution of damage patterns was consistent with a vertical shift of herbivores to higher crown layers during the season and with higher beech dominance. By linking quantitative data on arthropod herbivore abundance and herbivory with tree species composition and harvesting activity in a wide variety of beech forests, our study helps to better understand the influence of forest management on interactions between a naturally dominant deciduous forest tree and arthropod herbivores.

  6. Hamstring Tendon Regeneration After Harvesting: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Suijkerbuijk, Mathijs A M; Reijman, Max; Lodewijks, Susanne J M; Punt, Jorien; Meuffels, Duncan E

    2015-10-01

    Hamstring tendons are often used as autografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, no systematic review has been performed describing consequences such as hamstring tendon regeneration rate and determinants of hamstring tendon regeneration. To summarize the current literature regarding hamstring tendon rate regeneration, the time course of regeneration, and determinants of hamstring regeneration. Systematic review. A search was performed in the Embase, Medline (OvidSP), Web of Science, Cochrane, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases up to June 2014 to identify relevant articles. A study was eligible if it met the following inclusion criteria: tendons were harvested, regeneration at harvest site was assessed, population size was at least 10 human subjects, full-text article was available, and the study design was either a randomized controlled trial, prospective cohort study, retrospective cohort study, or case control study. A risk of bias assessment of the eligible articles was determined. Data describing hamstring tendon regeneration rates were pooled per time period. A total of 18 publications met the inclusion criteria. The mean regeneration rate for the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons was, in all cases, 70% or higher. More than 1 year after harvesting, 79% (median [IQR], 80 [75.5-90]) of the semitendinosus tendons and 72% (median [IQR], 80 [61-88.5]) of the gracilis tendons were regenerated. No significant differences in regeneration rate could be found considering patient sex, age, height, weight, or duration of immobilization. Results did not clearly show whether absence of regeneration disadvantages the subsequent hamstring function. Five studies measured the regeneration rate at different moments in time. Hamstring tendons regenerated in the majority of patients after ACL reconstruction. The majority of the hamstring tendon regeneration was found to occur between 1 month and 1 year after harvest. No significant determinants for

  7. Survival, growth, and acornet production of artificially regenerated northern red oak on two high-quality mesic sites at year seven

    Treesearch

    Paul P. Kormanik; Shi-Jean Susana Sung; Taryn L. Kormanik; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Catharine D. Cook; Tom Tibbs; Scott E. Schlarbaum

    2006-01-01

    Open-pollinated, half-sib northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) 1-0 seedlings were grown under an improved nursery protocol. Minimum seedling grading standards for this test were six first-order lateral roots, 8-cm root-collar diameter, and 0.7-m height. At the Brasstown site on a salvage clearcut in North Georgia, we spot-applied glyphosate herbicide...

  8. Responses of beech and spruce foliage to elevated carbon dioxide, increased nitrogen deposition and soil type

    PubMed Central

    Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine Silvia; Vollenweider, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Although enhanced carbon fixation by forest trees may contribute significantly to mitigating an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), capacities for this vary greatly among different tree species and locations. This study compared reactions in the foliage of a deciduous and a coniferous tree species (important central European trees, beech and spruce) to an elevated supply of CO2 and evaluated the importance of the soil type and increased nitrogen deposition on foliar nutrient concentrations and cellular stress reactions. During a period of 4 years, beech (represented by trees from four different regions) and spruce saplings (eight regions), planted together on either acidic or calcareous forest soil in the experimental model ecosystem chambers, were exposed to single and combined treatments consisting of elevated carbon dioxide (+CO2, 590 versus 374 μL L−1) and elevated wet nitrogen deposition (+ND, 50 versus 5 kg ha−1 a−1). Leaf size and foliage mass of spruce were increased by +CO2 on both soil types, but those of beech by +ND on the calcareous soil only. The magnitude of the effects varied among the tree origins in both species. Moreover, the concentration of secondary compounds (proanthocyanidins) and the leaf mass per area, as a consequence of cell wall thickening, were also increased and formed important carbon sinks within the foliage. Although the species elemental concentrations differed in their response to CO2 fertilization, the +CO2 treatment effect was weakened by an acceleration of cell senescence in both species, as shown by a decrease in photosynthetic pigment and nitrogen concentration, discolouration and stress symptoms at the cell level; the latter were stronger in beech than spruce. Hence, young trees belonging to a species with different ecological niches can show contrasting responses in their foliage size, but similar responses at the cell level, upon exposure to elevated levels of CO2. The soil type and its nutrient supply

  9. Regeneration of periodontal tissues: guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Villar, Cristina C; Cochran, David L

    2010-01-01

    The concept that only fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament or undifferentiated mesenchymal cells have the potential to re-create the original periodontal attachment has been long recognized. Based on this concept, guided tissue regeneration has been applied with variable success to regenerate periodontal defects. Quantitative analysis of clinical outcomes after guided tissue regeneration suggests that this therapy is a successful and predictable procedure to treat narrow intrabony defects and class II mandibular furcations, but offers limited benefits in the treatment of other types of periodontal defects.

  10. Modulation of tissue repair by regeneration enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junsu; Hu, Jianxin; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L; Tornini, Valerie A; Nachtrab, Gregory; Gemberling, Matthew; Goldman, Joseph A; Black, Brian L; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-04-14

    How tissue regeneration programs are triggered by injury has received limited research attention. Here we investigate the existence of enhancer regulatory elements that are activated in regenerating tissue. Transcriptomic analyses reveal that leptin b (lepb) is highly induced in regenerating hearts and fins of zebrafish. Epigenetic profiling identified a short DNA sequence element upstream and distal to lepb that acquires open chromatin marks during regeneration and enables injury-dependent expression from minimal promoters. This element could activate expression in injured neonatal mouse tissues and was divisible into tissue-specific modules sufficient for expression in regenerating zebrafish fins or hearts. Simple enhancer-effector transgenes employing lepb-linked sequences upstream of pro- or anti-regenerative factors controlled the efficacy of regeneration in zebrafish. Our findings provide evidence for 'tissue regeneration enhancer elements' (TREEs) that trigger gene expression in injury sites and can be engineered to modulate the regenerative potential of vertebrate organs.

  11. Primary implant stability in augmented sinuslift-sites after completed bone regeneration: a randomized controlled clinical study comparing four subantrally inserted biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Troedhan, Angelo; Schlichting, Izabela; Kurrek, Andreas; Wainwright, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Implant-Insertion-Torque-Value (ITV) proved to be a significant clinical parameter to predict long term implant success-rates and to decide upon immediate loading. The study evaluated ITVs, when four different and commonly used biomaterials were used in sinuslift-procedures compared to natural subantral bone in two-stage-implant-procedures. The tHUCSL-INTRALIFT-method was chosen for sinuslifting in 155 sinuslift-sites for its minimal invasive transcrestal approach and scalable augmentation volume. Four different biomaterials were inserted randomly (easy-graft CRYSTAL n = 38, easy-graft CLASSIC n = 41, NanoBone n = 42, BioOss n = 34), 2 ccm in each case. After a mean healing period of 8,92 months uniform tapered screw Q2-implants were inserted and Drill-Torque-Values (DTV) and ITV were recorded and compared to a group of 36 subantral sites without need of sinuslifting. DTV/ITV were processed for statistics by ANOVA-tests. Mean DTV/ITV obtained in Ncm were: Control Group 10,2/22,2, Bio-Oss 12,7/26,2, NanoBone 17,5/33,3, easy-graft CLASSIC 20,3/45,9, easy-graft CRYSTAL 23,8/56,6 Ncm, significance-level of differences throughout p < 0,05. Within the limits of this study the results suggest self-hardening solid-block-like bone-graft-materials to achieve significantly better DTV/ITV than loose granulate biomaterials for its suspected improvement of vascularization and mineralization of the subantral scaffold by full immobilization of the augmentation site towards pressure changes in the human sinus at normal breathing. PMID:25073446

  12. Primary implant stability in augmented sinuslift-sites after completed bone regeneration: a randomized controlled clinical study comparing four subantrally inserted biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Troedhan, Angelo; Schlichting, Izabela; Kurrek, Andreas; Wainwright, Marcel

    2014-07-30

    Implant-Insertion-Torque-Value (ITV) proved to be a significant clinical parameter to predict long term implant success-rates and to decide upon immediate loading. The study evaluated ITVs, when four different and commonly used biomaterials were used in sinuslift-procedures compared to natural subantral bone in two-stage-implant-procedures. The tHUCSL-INTRALIFT-method was chosen for sinuslifting in 155 sinuslift-sites for its minimal invasive transcrestal approach and scalable augmentation volume. Four different biomaterials were inserted randomly (easy-graft CRYSTAL n = 38, easy-graft CLASSIC n = 41, NanoBone n = 42, BioOss n = 34), 2 ccm in each case. After a mean healing period of 8,92 months uniform tapered screw Q2-implants were inserted and Drill-Torque-Values (DTV) and ITV were recorded and compared to a group of 36 subantral sites without need of sinuslifting. DTV/ITV were processed for statistics by ANOVA-tests. Mean DTV/ITV obtained in Ncm were: Control Group 10,2/22,2, Bio-Oss 12,7/26,2, NanoBone 17,5/33,3, easy-graft CLASSIC 20,3/45,9, easy-graft CRYSTAL 23,8/56,6 Ncm, significance-level of differences throughout p < 0,05. Within the limits of this study the results suggest self-hardening solid-block-like bone-graft-materials to achieve significantly better DTV/ITV than loose granulate biomaterials for its suspected improvement of vascularization and mineralization of the subantral scaffold by full immobilization of the augmentation site towards pressure changes in the human sinus at normal breathing.

  13. Characterization of active sites, determination of mechanisms of H(2)S, COS and CS(2) sorption and regeneration of ZnO low-temperature sorbents: past, current and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, Alexander; Tatarchuk, Bruce J

    2011-02-28

    The intellectually and technically challenging pursuit of the emerging global environmentally "green" and energy-efficient infrastructure of the 21st century requires the development of a worldwide network of low- to medium-power fuel cell (FC) based portable electric power-generating devices and high-power biomass/clean coal "electric+chemical plants" with zero carbon footprint utilizing integrated coal gasification combined cycle with geologic carbon sequestration (IGCC-GCS) under energy-efficient low-temperature conditions. These emerging technologies require the deep and ultradeep desulfurization of gaseous feeds, since sulfur compounds, especially hydrogen sulfide H(2)S are highly corrosive and poisonous to both technological processes and the environment. Therefore, it is of crucial importance for both academic and industrial research communities to have a solid understanding of the atomic-level structures of active sites and molecular-level mechanisms of surface chemical reactions of the novel deep and ultradeep desulfurization materials, especially desulfurization sorbents. This review critically analyzes the recent literature (last ∼20 years) on the experimental determination of molecular and atomic-level nature of adsorption sites, effects of desulfurization promoters, mechanisms of chemical reactions of H(2)S, COS and CS(2) and physical processes during and upon regeneration of "spent" low-temperature H(2)S sorbents based on ZnO that were developed for desulfurization of fuel reformates, syngas and similar streams. Recent trends in research on the ultradeep H(2)S sorbents are discussed with an impetus on real-time in situ and Operando techniques of instrumental chemical analysis, and the challenges of direct determination of the structure of active sites and of the experimental mechanistic studies in general are described.

  14. Developing of a test procedure to evaluate FCC catalyst regenerability

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, V.L.N.; Debnath, S.; Bao, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    FCC catalyst comprises various active ingredients e.g. Y Zeolites, ZSM-5 and other medium pore Zeolites, active, matrix etc. with wide variation in Zeolite/matrix ratio and pore size distribution. The effect of pore size distribution on the accessibility of the active sites is a subject for intensive research at present. The accessibility of these active sites has a major effect on the overall reaction and regeneration kinetics. Catalyst regenerability is a very important factor particularly for moderate and low temperature regenerators, since it directly effects the CRC (Coke on-Regenerated Catalyst) value. The regenerability of catalyst is critical to minimize the overall catalyst inventory. Unfortunately, till date, there is no suitable laboratory equipment available to test catalyst regenerability.

  15. Guided bone regeneration using individualized ceramic sheets.

    PubMed

    Malmström, J; Anderud, J; Abrahamsson, P; Wälivaara, D-Å; Isaksson, S G; Adolfsson, E

    2016-10-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) describes the use of membranes to regenerate bony defects. A membrane for GBR needs to be biocompatible, cell-occlusive, non-toxic, and mouldable, and possess space-maintaining properties including stability. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe a new method of GBR using individualized ceramic sheets to perfect bone regeneration prior to implant placement; bone regeneration was assessed using traditional histology and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric changes in the bone and soft tissue. Three patients were included. After full-thickness flap reflection, the individualized ceramic sheets were fixed. The sites were left to heal for 7 months. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 7 months postoperative using cone beam computed tomography and 3D optical equipment. Samples of the regenerated bone and soft tissue were collected and analyzed. The bone regenerated in the entire interior volume of all sheets. Bone biopsies revealed newly formed trabecular bone with a lamellar structure. Soft tissue biopsies showed connective tissue with no signs of an inflammatory response. This was considered to be newly formed periosteum. Thus ceramic individualized sheets can be used to regenerate large volumes of bone in both vertical and horizontal directions independent of the bone defect and with good biological acceptance of the material.

  16. De novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of differential gene expression in response to drought in European beech.

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus; Seifert, Sarah; Lübbe, Torben; Leuschner, Christoph; Finkeldey, Reiner

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) genomic resources of this species are still limited. This hampers an understanding of the molecular basis of adaptation to stress. Since beech will most likely be threatened by the consequences of climate change, an understanding of adaptive processes to climate change-related drought stress is of major importance. Here, we used RNA-seq to provide the first drought stress-related transcriptome of beech. In a drought stress trial with beech saplings, 50 samples were taken for RNA extraction at five points in time during a soil desiccation experiment. De novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of differential gene expression revealed 44,335 contigs, and 662 differentially expressed genes between the stress and normally watered control group. Gene expression was specific to the different time points, and only five genes were significantly differentially expressed between the stress and control group on all five sampling days. GO term enrichment showed that mostly genes involved in lipid- and homeostasis-related processes were upregulated, whereas genes involved in oxidative stress response were downregulated in the stressed seedlings. This study gives first insights into the genomic drought stress response of European beech, and provides new genetic resources for adaptation research in this species.

  17. Desiccation and Mortality Dynamics in Seedlings of Different European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Populations under Extreme Drought Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, Andreas; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Cocozza, Claudia; Tognetti, Roberto; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, Ĺubica; Dinca, Lucian; Delzon, Sylvain; Cochard, Hervè; Ræbild, Anders; de Luis, Martin; Cvjetkovic, Branislav; Heiri, Caroline; Müller, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L., hereafter beech), one of the major native tree species in Europe, is known to be drought sensitive. Thus, the identification of critical thresholds of drought impact intensity and duration are of high interest for assessing the adaptive potential of European beech to climate change in its native range. In a common garden experiment with one-year-old seedlings originating from central and marginal origins in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, France, Romania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Spain), we applied extreme drought stress and observed desiccation and mortality processes among the different populations and related them to plant water status (predawn water potential, ΨPD) and soil hydraulic traits. For the lethal drought assessment, we used a critical threshold of soil water availability that is reached when 50% mortality in seedling populations occurs (LD50SWA). We found significant population differences in LD50SWA (10.5–17.8%), and mortality dynamics that suggest a genetic difference in drought resistance between populations. The LD50SWA values correlate significantly with the mean growing season precipitation at population origins, but not with the geographic margins of beech range. Thus, beech range marginality may be more due to climatic conditions than to geographic range. The outcome of this study suggests the genetic variation has a major influence on the varying adaptive potential of the investigated populations. PMID:27379105

  18. Desiccation and Mortality Dynamics in Seedlings of Different European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Populations under Extreme Drought Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Andreas; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Cocozza, Claudia; Tognetti, Roberto; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, Ĺubica; Dinca, Lucian; Delzon, Sylvain; Cochard, Hervè; Ræbild, Anders; de Luis, Martin; Cvjetkovic, Branislav; Heiri, Caroline; Müller, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L., hereafter beech), one of the major native tree species in Europe, is known to be drought sensitive. Thus, the identification of critical thresholds of drought impact intensity and duration are of high interest for assessing the adaptive potential of European beech to climate change in its native range. In a common garden experiment with one-year-old seedlings originating from central and marginal origins in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, France, Romania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Spain), we applied extreme drought stress and observed desiccation and mortality processes among the different populations and related them to plant water status (predawn water potential, ΨPD) and soil hydraulic traits. For the lethal drought assessment, we used a critical threshold of soil water availability that is reached when 50% mortality in seedling populations occurs (LD50SWA). We found significant population differences in LD50SWA (10.5-17.8%), and mortality dynamics that suggest a genetic difference in drought resistance between populations. The LD50SWA values correlate significantly with the mean growing season precipitation at population origins, but not with the geographic margins of beech range. Thus, beech range marginality may be more due to climatic conditions than to geographic range. The outcome of this study suggests the genetic variation has a major influence on the varying adaptive potential of the investigated populations.

  19. Mulching to regenerate a harsh site: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, forbs, grasses, and ferns. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-09-01

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata District, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were planted in an effort to restore the natural forest to what was then pastureland. Douglas-fir seedlings were released from a complex forb-gass-fern plant community by applying very large (10-ft square) and very small (2-foot square) durable mulches one month after planting. In spite of high cost, the promising role of large mulches for establishing fast-growing Douglas-fir seedlings on a harsh site and the increased stability and sustainability that the future trees will bring to the more natural plant community give large mulches a place in the toolkit of ecosystem managers.

  20. Gene therapy for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jeffrey; Sun, Michael H; Kang, Quan; Peng, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Luu, Hue H; Luo, Qing; Park, Jae Yoon; Li, Yien; Haydon, Rex C; He, Tong-Chuan

    2005-04-01

    Efficacious bone regeneration could revolutionize the clinical management of many bone and musculoskeletal disorders. Bone has the unique ability to regenerate and continuously remodel itself throughout life. However, clinical situations arise when bone is unable to heal itself, as with segmental bone loss, fracture non-union, and failed spinal fusion. This leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Current attempts at improved bone healing have been met with limited success, fueling the development of improved techniques. Gene therapy in many ways represents an ideal approach for augmenting bone regeneration. Gene therapy allows specific gene products to be delivered to a precise anatomic location. In addition, the level of transgene expression as well as the duration of expression can be regulated with current techniques. For bone regeneration, the gene of interest should be delivered to the fracture site, expressed at appropriate levels, and then deactivated once the fracture has healed. Delivery of biological factors, mostly bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), has yielded promising results both in animal and clinical studies. There has also been tremendous work on discovering new growth factors and exploring previously defined ones. Finally, significant advances are being made in the delivery systems of the genes, ranging from viral and non-viral vectors to tissue engineering scaffolds. Despite some public hesitation to gene therapy, its use has great potential to expand our ability to treat a variety of human bone and musculoskeletal disorders. It is conceivable that in the near future gene therapy can be utilized to induce bone formation in virtually any region of the body in a minimally invasive manner. As bone biology and gene therapy research progresses, the goal of successful human gene transfer for augmentation of bone regeneration draws nearer.

  1. Influence of xylem ray integrity and degree of polymerization on bending strength of beech wood decayed by Pleurotus ostreatus and Trametes versicolor

    Treesearch

    Ehsan Bari; Reza Oladi; Olaf Schmidt; Carol A. Clausen; Katie Ohno; Darrel D. Nicholas; Mehrdad Ghodskhah Daryaei; Maryam Karim

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this research was to evaluate the influence of xylem ray (XR) and degree of polymerization (DP) of holocellulose in Oriental beech wood (Fagus orientalis Lipsky.) on impact bending strength against two white-rot fungi. Beech wood specimens, exposed to Pleurotus ostreatus and Trametes versicolor, were evaluated for...

  2. Regenerating an Arsenic Removal Iron-Based Adsorptive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The replacement of exhausted, adsorptive media used to remove arsenic from drinking water accounts for approximately 80% of the total operational and maintenance (O/M) costs of this commonly used small system technology. The results of three, full scale system studies of an on-site media regeneration process (Part 1) showed it to be effective in stripping arsenic and other contaminants from the exhausted media. Part 2, of this two part paper, presents information on the performance of the regenerated media to remove arsenic through multiple regeneration cycles (3) and the approximate cost savings of regeneration over media replacement. The results of the studies indicate that regenerated media is very effective in removing arsenic and the regeneration cost is substantially less than the media replacement cost. On site regeneration, therefore, provides small systems with alternative to media replacement when removing arsenic from drinking water using adsorptive media technology. Part 2 of a two part paper on the performance of the regenerated media to remove arsenic through multiple regeneration cycles (3) and the approximate cost savings of regeneration over media replacement.

  3. The neurochemistry of peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Benga, Andreea; Zor, Fatih; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Marinescu, Bogdan; Gorantla, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) can be most disabling, resulting in the loss of sensitivity, motor function and autonomic control in the involved anatomical segment. Although injured peripheral nerves are capable of regeneration, sub-optimal recovery of function is seen even with the best reconstruction. Distal axonal degeneration is an unavoidable consequence of PNI. There are currently few strategies aimed to maintain the distal pathway and/or target fidelity during regeneration across the zone of injury. The current state of the art approaches have been focussed on the site of nerve injury and not on their distal muscular targets or representative proximal cell bodies or central cortical regions. This is a comprehensive literature review of the neurochemistry of peripheral nerve regeneration and a state of the art analysis of experimental compounds (inorganic and organic agents) with demonstrated neurotherapeutic efficacy in improving cell body and neuron survival, reducing scar formation and maximising overall nerve regeneration. PMID:28615804

  4. Desulfurization sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

    1982-07-07

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

  5. Patterns of late spring frost leaf damage and recovery in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in south-eastern Germany based on repeated digital photographs.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Annette; Helm, Raimund; Zang, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Damage by late spring frost is a risk deciduous trees have to cope with in order to optimize the length of their growing season. The timing of spring phenological development plays a crucial role, not only at the species level, but also at the population and individual level, since fresh new leaves are especially vulnerable. For the pronounced late spring frost in May 2011 in Germany, we studied the individual leaf development of 35 deciduous trees (mainly European beech Fagus sylvatica L.) at a mountainous forest site in the Bayerischer Wald National Park using repeated digital photographs. Analyses of the time series of greenness by a novel Bayesian multiple change point approach mostly revealed five change points which almost perfectly matched the expected break points in leaf development: (i) start of the first greening between day of the year (DOY) 108-119 (mean 113), (ii) end of greening, and (iii) visible frost damage after the frost on the night of May 3rd/4th (DOY 123/124), (iv) re-sprouting 19-38 days after the frost, and (v) full maturity around DOY 178 (166-184) when all beech crowns had fully recovered. Since frost damage was nearly 100%, individual susceptibility did not depend on the timing of first spring leaf unfolding. However, we could identify significant patterns in fitness linked to an earlier start of leaf unfolding. Those individuals that had an earlier start of greening during the first flushing period had a shorter period of recovery and started the second greening earlier. Thus, phenological timing triggered the speed of recovery from such an extreme event. The maximum greenness achieved, however, did not vary with leaf unfolding dates. Two mountain ashes (Sorbus aucuparia L.) were not affected by the low temperatures of -5°C. Time series analysis of webcam pictures can thus improve process-based knowledge and provide valuable insights into the link between phenological variation, late spring frost damage, and recovery within one stand.

  6. Regeneration Heat Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    J. Lin

    2003-07-30

    The original project goals were to establish the viability of the proposed gas turbine regenerator concept by performing the following tasks: (1) Perform detailed design of a working model of the regenerator concept. (2) Construct a ''bench-top'' model of the regenerator concept based upon the detail design. (3) Test the bench-top model and gather data to support the concept's viability. The project funding was used to acquire the tools and material to perform the aforementioned tasks.

  7. Symptoms, airway responsiveness, and exposure to dust in beech and oak wood workers

    PubMed Central

    Bohadana, A.; Massin, N.; Wild, P.; Toamain, J.; Engel, S.; Goutet, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the relation between levels of cumulative exposure to wood dust and respiratory symptoms and the occurrence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness among beech and oak workers.
METHODS—114 Male woodworkers from five furniture factories and 13 male unexposed controls were examined. The unexposed control group was supplemented by 200 male historical controls. Statistical analyses were performed excluding and including the historical controls. Dust concentration was measured by personal sampling methods. Cumulative exposure to dust was calculated for each woodworker by multiplying the duration of the work by the intensity of exposure (years.mg/m3). Bronchial hyperresponsiveness was assessed by the methacholine bronchial challenge test. Subjects were labelled methacholine bronchial challenge positive if forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) fell by ⩾20%. The linear dose-response slope was calculated as the last dose divided by the total dose given.
RESULTS—443 Dust samples were collected. The median cumulative exposure to dust was 110 years.mg/m3 with lower and upper quartiles at 70 and 160 years.mg/m3 Overall, no declines in FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC) were found with increasing exposures. A dose-response relation was found between intensity of exposure on the one hand, and sore throat, increased prevalence of positive methacholine bronchial challenge tests, and steeper dose-response slope, on the other.
CONCLUSION—Exposure to oak and beech dust may lead to the development of sore throat and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.


Keywords: bronchial hyperresponsiveness; wood dust; beech; oak PMID:10810114

  8. Water and lipid relations in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds and its effect on storage behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pukacka, S; Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Pukacki, P M; Wójkiewicz, E

    2003-04-07

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds indicate intermediate storage behaviour. Properties of water in seed tissues were studied to understand their requirements during storage conditions. Water sorption isotherms showed that at the same relative humidity (RH) the water content is significantly higher in embryo axes than cotyledons. This tendency maintains also after recalculating the water content for zero amount of lipids in tissues. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) indicated water crystallization exotherms in the embryo axes at moisture content (MC) higher than 29% and 16% in the cotyledons. In order to examine the occurrence of glassy state in the cytoplasm of beech embryos as a function of water content, isolated embryo axes were examined using electron spin resonance (ESR) of nitroxide TEMPO probe located inside axes cells. TEMPO molecules undergo fast reorientations with correlation time varied from 2 x 10(-9) s at 180 K to 2 x 10(-11) s at 315 K. Although the TEMPO molecules label mainly the lipid bilayers of cell membranes, they are sensitive to the dynamics and phase transformation of the cytoplasmic cell interior. The label motion is clearly affected by a transition between liquid and glassy state of the cytoplasm. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) raises from 253 to 293 K when water content decreases from 18% to 8%. Far from T(g) the motion is described by Arrhenius equation with very small activation energy E(a) in the liquid state and is relatively small in the glassy state where E(a)=1.5 kJ/mol for 28% H(2)O and E(a)=4.7 kJ/mol for 8% H(2)O or less. The optimal storage conditions of beech seeds are proposed in the range from 255 K for 15% H(2)O to 280 K for 9% H(2)O.

  9. Flight test evaluation of a separate surface attitude command control system on a Beech 99 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Jenks, G. E.; Roskam, J.; Stone, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/university/industry program was conducted to flight evaluate a potentially low cost separate surface implementation of attitude command in a Beech 99 airplane. Saturation of the separate surfaces was the primary cause of many problems during development. Six experienced professional pilots who made simulated instrument flight evaluations experienced improvements in airplane handling qualities in the presence of turbulence and a reduction in pilot workload. For ride quality, quantitative data show that the attitude command control system results in all cases of airplane motion being removed from the uncomfortable ride region.

  10. Ten-year responses of oak regeneration to prescribed fire

    Treesearch

    Erik Berg; Barry Clinton; Jim Vose; Wayne. Swank

    2011-01-01

    Prescribed fire has proven effective in controlling vegetative competition of oak regeneration across many sites in the southeastern US most fire investigations have been performed in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain. Land managers lake definitive knowledge on how to use prescribed fire to improve long-term oak regeneration success in the southern Appalachians. Several...

  11. Regenerating shortleaf pine in clearcuts in the Missouri Ozark Highlands

    Treesearch

    David Gwaze; Mark Johanson

    2013-01-01

    A shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) regeneration study was established by the Missouri Department of Conservation in 1986 at the Current River Conservation Area. The objective of the study was to compare natural to artificial regeneration methods, and site preparation prescribed burning to bulldozing for shortleaf pine establishment and growth....

  12. Effects of fire and browsing on regeneration of blue oak

    Treesearch

    James W. Bartolome; Mitchel P. McClaran; Barbara H. Allen-Diaz; Jim Dunne; Lawrence D. Ford; Richard B. Standiford; Neil K. McDougald; Larry C. Forero

    2002-01-01

    Blue oaks (Quercus douglasii) are not regenerating well over much of California. The roles of fire and browsing in regeneration are probably significant, but poorly understood. We burned two foothill blue oak woodland sites which contained significant numbers of small trees between 40 and 70 cm tall, then compared height growth over 14 years among 48...

  13. The potential of beech seedlings to adapt to low P availability in soil - plant versus microbial effects on P mobilising potential in the rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Sonia; Frey, Beat; Frossard, Emmanuel; Spohn, Marie; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Luster, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The objective of our work was to investigate to what extent tree seedlings (Fagus sylvatica) are able to adapt the process of P mobilisation in the rhizosphere according to P speciation in the soil. Such mobilisation activity can include root exudation of P mobilising compounds or stimulation of specific P mobilising soil microbes. We hypothesized that Fagus sylvatica seedlings can adapt their own activity based on their P nutritional status and genetic memory of how to react under a given nutritional situation. To test the hypothesis, we set up a cross-growth experiment with beech of different provenances growing in soil from their own provenance site and in soil differing in P availability. Experiments were performed as a greenhouse experiment, with temperature control and natural light, during one vegetation period in rhizoboxes . We used two acidic forest soils, contrasting in P availability, collected at field sites of the German research priority program "Ecosystem Nutrition". Juvenile trees were collected along with the soils at the sites and planted respectively. The occurrence of P mobilising compounds and available P in the rhizosphere and in bulk soil were measured during the active growth season of the plants. In particular, we assessed phosphatase activity, (measured with zymography and plate enzymatic assay at pH 4,6.5, and 11) carboxylates and phosphate (measured by application of ion exchange membranes to specific soil micro zones, and by microdialysis), and pH (mapping with optodes). Plant P nutrition status was assessed by total P, N/P, phosphatase activity, and metabolic (TCA extractable) P in the leaves. The P-nutritional status of the beech provenances differed markedly independent from the P status of the soil where they were actually grown during experiment. In particular, the juvenile trees from the site rich in mineral P were sufficient in P, while those from the P-poor site with mostly organic P, were deficient. Enzymatic activity at the

  14. A new regenerator theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. D.

    The performance of a Stirling Engine regenerator having finite mass and operated under realistic conditions of pressure and flow cycling is analysed. It is shown that cyclic variations in the matrix temperature due to its finite mass cause an increase in the apparent regenerator effectiveness, but a decrease in engine power. Approximate closed-form expressions for both of these effects are deduced.

  15. The art of fin regeneration in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferli, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish fin provides a valuable model to study the epimorphic type of regeneration, whereby the amputated part of the appendage is nearly perfectly replaced. To accomplish fin regeneration, two reciprocally interacting domains need to be established at the injury site, namely a wound epithelium and a blastema. The wound epithelium provides a supporting niche for the blastema, which contains mesenchyme‐derived progenitor cells for the regenerate. The fate of blastemal daughter cells depends on their relative position with respect to the fin margin. The apical compartment of the outgrowth maintains its undifferentiated character, whereas the proximal descendants of the blastema progressively switch from the proliferation program to the morphogenesis program. A delicate balance between self‐renewal and differentiation has to be continuously adjusted during the course of regeneration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of blastema formation, and discusses several studies related to the regulation of growth and morphogenesis during fin regeneration. A wide range of canonical signaling pathways has been implicated during the establishment and maintenance of the blastema. Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in the regulation of cellular plasticity during the transition between differentiation states. Ion fluxes, gap‐junctional communication and protein phosphatase activity have been shown to coordinate proliferation and tissue patterning in the caudal fin. The identification of the downstream targets of the fin regeneration signals and the discovery of mechanisms integrating the variety of input pathways represent exciting future aims in this fascinating field of research. PMID:27499869

  16. The art of fin regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Pfefferli, Catherine; Jaźwińska, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The zebrafish fin provides a valuable model to study the epimorphic type of regeneration, whereby the amputated part of the appendage is nearly perfectly replaced. To accomplish fin regeneration, two reciprocally interacting domains need to be established at the injury site, namely a wound epithelium and a blastema. The wound epithelium provides a supporting niche for the blastema, which contains mesenchyme-derived progenitor cells for the regenerate. The fate of blastemal daughter cells depends on their relative position with respect to the fin margin. The apical compartment of the outgrowth maintains its undifferentiated character, whereas the proximal descendants of the blastema progressively switch from the proliferation program to the morphogenesis program. A delicate balance between self-renewal and differentiation has to be continuously adjusted during the course of regeneration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of blastema formation, and discusses several studies related to the regulation of growth and morphogenesis during fin regeneration. A wide range of canonical signaling pathways has been implicated during the establishment and maintenance of the blastema. Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in the regulation of cellular plasticity during the transition between differentiation states. Ion fluxes, gap-junctional communication and protein phosphatase activity have been shown to coordinate proliferation and tissue patterning in the caudal fin. The identification of the downstream targets of the fin regeneration signals and the discovery of mechanisms integrating the variety of input pathways represent exciting future aims in this fascinating field of research.

  17. Regeneration, tissue injury and the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, James W; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2006-01-01

    The involvement of the immune system in the response to tissue injury has raised the possibility that it might influence tissue, organ or appendage regeneration following injury. One hypothesis that has been discussed is that inflammatory aspects may preclude the occurrence of regeneration, but there is also evidence for more positive roles of immune components. The vertebrate eye is an immunoprivileged site where inflammatory aspects are inhibited by several immunomodulatory mechanisms. In various newt species the ocular tissues such as the lens are regenerative and it has recently been shown that the response to local injury of the lens involves activation of antigen-presenting cells which traffic to the spleen and return to displace and engulf the lens, thereby inducing regeneration from the dorsal iris. The activation of thrombin from prothrombin in the dorsal iris is one aspect of the injury response that is important in the initiation of regeneration. The possible relationships between the immune response and the regenerative response are considered with respect to phylogenetic variation of regeneration in general, and lens regeneration in particular. PMID:17005015

  18. [Resources of regeneration in planarians].

    PubMed

    Sheĭman, I M; Sedel'nikov, Z V; Kreshchenko, N D

    2006-01-01

    We studied the intensity of blastema growth in operated planarians at an early stage of regeneration as a function of the following factors: area of regenerate and its function and number of regeneration foci (volume of regeneration). There was no direct dependence between the intensity of regeneration and the size of regenerating fragment, as well as the volume of regeneration. Some specific features of the early stage of regeneration have been described, which suggest its determinate character. The behavior of neoblasts during formation of blastemas with different localization is discussed.

  19. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Colombo, Gerald V. (Inventor); Jolly, Clifford D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for maintaining continuous, long-term microbial control in the water supply for potable, hygiene, and experimental water for space activities, as well as treatment of water supplies on Earth. The water purification is accomplished by introduction of molecular iodine into the water supply to impart a desired iodine residual. The water is passed through an iodinated anion exchange resin bed. The iodine is bound as I-(sub n) at the anion exchange sites and releases I(sub 2) into the water stream flowing through the bed. The concentration of I(sub 2) in the flowing water gradually decreases and, in the prior art, the ion-exchange bed has had to be replaced. In a preferred embodiment, a bed of iodine crystals is provided with connections for flowing water therethrough to produce a concentrated (substantially saturated) aqueous iodine solution which is passed through the iodinated resin bed to recharge the bed with bound iodine. The bed of iodine crystals is connected in parallel with the iodinated resin bed and is activated periodically (e.g., by timer, by measured flow of water, or by iodine residual level) to recharge the bed. Novelty resides in the capability of inexpensively and repeatedly regenerating the ion-exchange bed in situ.

  20. Ceramic regenerator program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Jerrold E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating an Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) regenerator containing intricate hydraulic passages from a ceramic material in order to allow operation with high temperature combustion gas and to reduce weight as compared with metallic materials was demonstrated. Platelet technology, ceramic tape casting, and multilayer ceramic packaging techniques were used in this fabrication of subscale silicon nitride components. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed to simulate a methane cooled regenerator for an ATR engine. The regenerator vane was designed to operate at realistic service conditions, i.e., 600 psi in a 3500 R (3040 F), 500 fps combustion gas environment. A total of six regenerators were fabricated and tested. The regenerators were shown to be able to withstand internal pressurization to 1575 psi. They were subjected to testing in 500 fps, 3560 R (3100 F) air/propane combustion products and were operated satisfactorily for an excess of 100 hr and 40 thermal cycles which exceeded 2460 R (2000 F).

  1. Specialized progenitors and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reddien, Peter W

    2013-03-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating all body parts. Planarian regeneration requires neoblasts, a population of dividing cells that has been studied for over a century. Neoblast progeny generate new cells of blastemas, which are the regenerative outgrowths at wounds. If the neoblasts comprise a uniform population of cells during regeneration (e.g. they are all uncommitted and pluripotent), then specialization of new cell types should occur in multipotent, non-dividing neoblast progeny cells. By contrast, recent data indicate that some neoblasts express lineage-specific transcription factors during regeneration and in uninjured animals. These observations raise the possibility that an important early step in planarian regeneration is the specialization of neoblasts to produce specified rather than naïve blastema cells.

  2. [Pharynx regeneration in planarians].

    PubMed

    Kreshchenko, N D

    2009-01-01

    The obtained and published data on pharynx regeneration in planarians have been reviewed. Planarians can regenerate from a small body fragment and restore all missing organs including the pharynx. The pharynx is a relatively autonomous organ with a differentiated structure and specialized function. Pharynx regeneration has specific features, and its studies are of considerable theoretical interest. Pharynx regeneration can also be a convenient model to study the molecular mechanisms of regeneration that remain undisclosed. In addition, this model can be used to test biologically active compounds in order to elucidate their effect on morphogenesis. This subject of investigation benefits by a simpler and more adequate analysis as well as a possibility to use large numbers of animals and small quantities of analyzed substances.

  3. Using ecological land types to examine landscape-scale oak regeneration dynamics

    Treesearch

    John M. Kabrick; Eric K. Zenner; Daniel C. Dey; David Gwaze; Randy G. Jensen

    2008-01-01

    The long-standing interest in regenerating oaks stimulated the development of a number of research studies during the past several decades. Most studies have focused on addressing oak regeneration problems and many of these suggested that oak regeneration failures occur where site conditions favor the establishment and growth of competing species that capture the...

  4. Response of planted northern red oak seedlings to regeneration harvesting, Midstory removal, and prescribed burning

    Treesearch

    Stacy L. Clark; Scott E. Schlarbaum; Tara L. Keyser; Callie J. Schweitzer; Marty Spetich; Dean Simon; Gordon S. Warburton

    2016-01-01

    Oak (Quercus) is difficult to naturally regenerate in many mature oak stands on productive sites in the southeastern United States, and artificial regeneration alternatives should be considered. Artificial regeneration can potentially restore or enrich the oak component at the stand level. We examined genetic and silvicultural effects on...

  5. Regeneration responses of oak-dominated stands to thinning and clearcutting in northwestern Pennsylvania

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; L. R. Auchmoody; Russell S. Walters

    1997-01-01

    Regenerating mature oak stands on better sites is difficult on the Allegheny Plateau because of abundant advance regeneration of faster growing competitors. We have observed that oak stands on the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) in northwestern Pennsylvania almost always regenerate to cherry-maple rather than to oak-hickory stands. Such conversion greatly concerns land...

  6. Bolete diversity in two relict forests of the Mexican beech (Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana; Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ramírez, Ernesto Ch; Moreno, Claudia E

    2010-05-01

    The current distribution of the endangered Mexican beech [Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana (Martinez) Little] is restricted to relict isolated populations in small remnants of montane cloud forest in northeastern Mexico, and little is known about its associated biota. We sampled bolete diversity in two of these monospecific forests in the state of Hidalgo, Mexico. We compared alpha diversity, including species richness and ensemble structure, and analyzed beta diversity (dissimilarity in species composition) between forests. We found 26 bolete species, five of which are probably new. Species diversity and evenness were similar between forests. Beta diversity was low, and the similarities of bolete samples from within and between forests were not significantly different. These results support the idea that the two forests share a single bolete ensemble with a common history. In contrast, cumulative species richness differed between the forests, implying that factors other than the mere presence of the host species have contributed to shaping the biodiversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi in relict Mexican beech forests.

  7. Drought effects on allocation of recent carbon: From beech leaves to soil CO2 efflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehr, N. K.; Offermann, C. A.; Gessler, A.; Winkler, J. B.; Buchmann, N. C.; Barnard, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a direct and fast transfer of recently-assimilated carbon from tree canopy to roots and soil microorganisms. However, the response of this carbon flux to environmental conditions remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated drought effects on translocation of recently-assimilated carbon, by pulse-labelling 1.5-year old beech tree mesocosms with 13CO2. During the first week after pulse-labelling, 13C signatures were measured daily in leaves, twigs, coarse and fine root water-soluble and total organic matter, phloem organic matter, soil microbial biomass, as well as in soil CO2 efflux. Drought reduced C assimilation and doubled the residence time of recently-assimilated C in leaf biomass. In phloem organic matter, the 13C label peaked immediately after labelling then decayed exponentially in the control treatment, while under drought the peak occurred 4 days after labelling. In soil microbial biomass, the label peaked 1 day after labelling in the control treatment, whereas under drought no peak was measured. The contribution of recently assimilated C to soil CO2 efflux was decreased by 33% in the drought treatment 2 days after labelling. Thus, our study showed that drought reduced both magnitude and velocity of the coupling between canopy photosynthesis and belowground processes in beech mesocosms. This will likely affect soil biogeochemical cycling, with potential consequences including slower soil nitrogen cycling and changes in carbon sequestration potential under future climate conditions.

  8. Fine Spatial Scale Variation of Soil Microbial Communities under European Beech and Norway Spruce

    PubMed Central

    Nacke, Heiko; Goldmann, Kezia; Schöning, Ingo; Pfeiffer, Birgit; Kaiser, Kristin; Castillo-Villamizar, Genis A.; Schrumpf, Marion; Buscot, François; Daniel, Rolf; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2016-01-01

    The complex interactions between trees and soil microbes in forests as well as their inherent seasonal and spatial variations are poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the effects of major European tree species (Fagus sylvatica L. and Picea abies (L.) Karst) on soil bacterial and fungal communities. Mineral soil samples were collected from different depths (0–10, 10–20 cm) and at different horizontal distances from beech or spruce trunks (0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 m) in early summer and autumn. We assessed the composition of soil bacterial and fungal communities based on 16S rRNA gene and ITS DNA sequences. Community composition of bacteria and fungi was most strongly affected by soil pH and tree species. Different ectomycorrhizal fungi (e.g., Tylospora) known to establish mutualistic associations with plant roots showed a tree species preference. Moreover, bacterial and fungal community composition showed spatial and seasonal shifts in soil surrounding beech and spruce. The relative abundance of saprotrophic fungi was higher at a depth of 0–10 vs. 10–20 cm depth. This was presumably a result of changes in nutrient availability, as litter input and organic carbon content decreased with soil depth. Overall bacterial community composition showed strong variations under spruce with increasing distance from the tree trunks, which might be attributed in part to higher fine root biomass near spruce trunks. Furthermore, overall bacterial community composition was strongly affected by season under deciduous trees. PMID:28066384

  9. Comparative economic and environmental assessment of four beech wood based biorefinery concepts.

    PubMed

    Budzinski, Maik; Nitzsche, Roy

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze four conceptual beech wood based biorefineries generated during process design in terms of environmental and economic criteria. Biorefinery 1 annually converts 400,000 dry metric tons of beech wood into the primary products 41,600t/yr polymer-grade ethylene and 58,520tDM/yr organosolv lignin and the fuels 90,800tDM/yr hydrolysis lignin and 38,400t/yr biomethane. Biorefinery 2 is extended by the product of 58,400t/yr liquid "food-grade" carbon dioxide. Biorefinery 3 produces 69,600t/yr anhydrous ethanol instead of ethylene. Compared to biorefinery 3, biorefinery 4 additionally provides carbon dioxide as product. Biorefinery 3 and 4 seem most promising, since under basic assumptions both criteria, (i) economic effectiveness and (ii) reduction of potential environmental impacts, can be fulfilled. All four alternatives may reduce potential environmental impacts compared to reference systems using the ReCiPe methodology. Economic feasibilities of the analyzed biorefineries are highly sensitive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gap Dynamics and Structure of Two Old-Growth Beech Forest Remnants in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Rugani, Tihomir; Diaci, Jurij; Hladnik, David

    2013-01-01

    Context Due to a long history of intensive forest exploitation, few European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) old-growth forests have been preserved in Europe. Material and Methods We studied two beech forest reserves in southern Slovenia. We examined the structural characteristics of the two forest reserves based on data from sample plots and complete inventory obtained from four previous forest management plans. To gain a better understanding of disturbance dynamics, we used aerial imagery to study the characteristics of canopy gaps over an 11-year period in the Kopa forest reserve and a 20-year period in the Gorjanci forest reserve. Results The results suggest that these forests are structurally heterogeneous over small spatial scales. Gap size analysis showed that gaps smaller than 500 m2 are the dominant driving force of stand development. The percentage of forest area in canopy gaps ranged from 3.2 to 4.5% in the Kopa forest reserve and from 9.1 to 10.6% in the Gorjanci forest reserve. These forests exhibit relatively high annual rates of coverage by newly established (0.15 and 0.25%) and closed (0.08 and 0.16%) canopy gaps. New gap formation is dependant on senescent trees located throughout the reserve. Conclusion We conclude that these stands are not even-sized, but rather unevenly structured. This is due to the fact that the disturbance regime is characterized by low intensity, small-scale disturbances. PMID:23308115

  11. Regenerating the Natural Longleaf Pine Forest

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer

    1979-01-01

    Natural regeneration by the shldterwood system is a reliable, low-cost alternative for existing longleaf pine (Pine palustris Mill.) forests. The system is well suited to the nautral attributes and requirements of the species. It may be attractive to landownders wishing to retain a natural forest and aboid high costs of site preparation and...

  12. Natural regeneration of eastern hemlock: a review

    Treesearch

    Daniel L. Goerlich; Ralph D. Nyland

    2000-01-01

    Successful regeneration of eastern hemlock involves a complex biophysical process that commonly spans many years. Critical factors include a reliable source of seed, a suitable seedbed, a partially shaded environment, and several years of favorable moisture. Surface scarification appears critical as a means of site preparation. Even then, young hemlocks grow slowly,...

  13. Relationship of Species and Site Index to Habitat in the White Mountains of New Hampshire

    Treesearch

    W. B. Leak

    1978-01-01

    Eleven forest habitats, representing distinct differences in soil materials or substrate, were defined for areas of granitic drift in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Beech/sugar maple/yellow birch characterize successional stands on the fine tills and the enriched or cove sites (where white ash also is common). Washed fine till and coarse till are dominated...

  14. Notch Signaling Inhibits Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bejjani, Rachid El; Hammarlund, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many neurons have limited capacity to regenerate their axons after injury. Neurons in the mammalian CNS do not regenerate, and even neurons in the PNS often fail to regenerate to their former targets. This failure is likely due in part to pathways that actively restrict regeneration; however, only a few factors that limit regeneration are known. Here, using single-neuron analysis of regeneration in vivo, we show that Notch/lin-12 signaling inhibits the regeneration of mature C. elegans neurons. Notch signaling suppresses regeneration by acting autonomously in the injured cell to prevent growth cone formation. The metalloprotease and gamma-secretase cleavage events that lead to Notch activation during development are also required for its activity in regeneration. Furthermore, blocking Notch activation immediately after injury improves regeneration. Our results define a novel, post-developmental role for the Notch pathway as a repressor of axon regeneration in vivo. PMID:22284182

  15. Mechanical properties and chemical composition of beech wood exposed for 30 and 120 days to white-rot fungi

    Treesearch

    Ehsan Bari; Hamid Reza Taghiyari; Behbood Mohebby; Carol A. Clausen; Olaf Schmidt; Mohammad Ali Tajick Ghanbary; Mohammad Javad Vaseghi

    2015-01-01

    The effects of exposing specimens of Oriental beech [Fagus sylvatica subsp. orientalis (Lipsky) Greuter and Burdet] to the white-rot fungi Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) Kummer and Trametes versicolor (L.: Fr.) Pilát strain 325 have been studied concerning the mechanical properties and...

  16. Raman spectroscopic investigation of 13CO 2 labeling and leaf dark respiration of Fagus sylvatica L. (European beech).

    PubMed

    Keiner, Robert; Gruselle, Marie-Cécile; Michalzik, Beate; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-03-01

    An important issue, in times of climate change and more extreme weather events, is the investigation of forest ecosystem reactions to these events. Longer drought periods stress the vitality of trees and promote mass insect outbreaks, which strongly affect ecosystem processes and services. Cavity-enhanced Raman gas spectrometry was applied for online multi-gas analysis of the gas exchange rates of O2 and CO2 and the labeling of Fagus sylvatica L. (European beech) seedlings with (13)CO2. The rapid monitoring of all these gases simultaneously allowed for the separation of photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by the beech seedlings and a constant (12)CO2 efflux via respiration and thus for a correction of the measured (12)CO2 concentrations in course of the labeling experiment. The effects of aphid infestation with the woolly beech aphid (Phyllaphis fagi L.) as well as the effect of a drought period on the respirational gas exchange were investigated. A slightly decreased respirational activity of drought-stressed seedlings in comparison to normally watered seedlings was found already for a low drought intensity. Cavity-enhanced Raman gas monitoring of O2, (12)CO2, and (13)CO2 was proven to be a powerful new tool for studying the effect of drought stress and aphid infestation on the respirational activity of European beech seedlings as an example of important forest species in Central Europe.

  17. Impregnation of Scots pine and beech with tannin solutions: effect of viscosity and wood anatomy in wood infiltration.

    PubMed

    Tondi, G; Thevenon, M F; Mies, B; Standfest, G; Petutschnigg, A; Wieland, S

    The impregnation process of Scots pine and beech samples with tannin solutions was investigated. The two materials involved in the process (impregnation solution and wood samples) are studied in depth. Viscosity of mimosa tannin solutions and the anatomical aspect of beech and Scots pine were analysed and correlated. The viscosity of tannin solutions presents a non-newtonian behaviour when its pH level increases, and in the case of addition of hexamine as a hardener, the crosslinking of the flavonoids turns out to be of great importance. During the impregnation of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), the liquid and solid uptakes were monitored while taking into consideration the different conditions of the impregnation process. This method allowed to identify the best conditions needed in order to get a successful preservative uptake for each wooden substrate. The penetration mechanism within the wood of both species was revealed with the aid of a microscopic analysis. Scots pine is impregnated through the tracheids in the longitudinal direction and through parenchyma rays in the radial direction, whereas in beech, the penetration occurs almost completely through longitudinal vessels.

  18. Historical (1749-1899) vs. present-day sugar maple and beech diameter growth in the northeast

    Treesearch

    William B. Leak

    2011-01-01

    Possible environmental impacts in the Northeast from climate change, acid deposition, nutrient depletion, and other factors could retard tree growth and development in the northeastern United States. To gain insight into growth trends before the 20th century, approximately 150 years of radial growth records taken in 1899 on sugar maple and beech were examined and...

  19. DECLINE IN SOIL CO2 EFFLUX FOLLOWING TREE GIRTLING IN MATURE BEECH AND SPRUCE STANDS IN GERMANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were undertaken to estimate the contribution of autotrophic respiration to total soil CO2 efflux in stands of mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Five mature trees of each species were girdled to eliminate carbo...

  20. Contrasting carbon allocation responses of juvenile European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) to competition and ozone.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Wilma; Lehmeier, Christoph Andreas; Winkler, Jana Barbro; Matyssek, Rainer; Edgar Grams, Thorsten Erhard

    2015-01-01

    Allocation of recent photoassimilates of juvenile beech and spruce in response to twice-ambient ozone (2 × O(3)) and plant competition (i.e. intra vs. inter-specific) was examined in a phytotron study. To this end, we employed continuous (13)CO(2)/(12)CO(2) labeling during late summer and pursued tracer kinetics in CO(2) released from stems. In beech, allocation of recent photoassimilates to stems was significantly lowered under 2 × O(3) and increased in spruce when grown in mixed culture. As total tree biomass was not yet affected by the treatments, C allocation reflected incipient tree responses providing the mechanistic basis for biomass partitioning as observed in longer experiments. Compartmental modeling characterized functional properties of substrate pools supplying respiratory C demand. Respiration of spruce appeared to be exclusively supplied by recent photoassimilates. In beech, older C, putatively located in stem parenchyma cells, was a major source of respiratory substrate, reflecting the fundamental anatomical disparity between angiosperm beech and gymnosperm spruce.

  1. The formation of a ligno-suberised layer and necrophylactic periderm in beech bark (Fagus sylvatica L.)

    Treesearch

    Primoz Oven; Niko Torelli; Walter C. Shortle; Martin Zupancic

    1999-01-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) bark was wounded in early April of 1993 and tissue changes followed on days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 84, 112, and 140. In 7 days, tissue at the wound surface became necrotic and discoloured. In 14 days the walls of the parenchyma cells immediately underneath the necrotic tissue became thickened and after 21 days...

  2. Profile distribution and temporal changes of sulphate and nitrate contents and related soil properties under beech and spruce forests.

    PubMed

    Tejnecký, Václav; Bradová, Monika; Borůvka, Luboš; Němeček, Karel; Sebek, Ondřej; Nikodem, Antonín; Zenáhlíková, Jitka; Rejzek, Jan; Drábek, Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of principal inorganic anions in forest soils, originating mainly from acid deposition, strongly influences the forest ecosystem response on acidification. The aim of this study was to describe seasonal and temporal changes of sulphate and nitrate contents and related soil properties under beech and spruce forests in a region heavily impacted by acidification. The Jizera Mountains area (Czech Republic) was chosen as such a representative mountainous soil ecosystem. Soil samples were collected at monthly intervals from April to October during the years 2008-2010 under both beech and spruce stands. Soil samples were collected from surface fermentation (F) and humified (H) organic horizons, humic (A) organo-mineral horizons and subsurface mineral (B) horizons (cambic or spodic). A deionised water extract was applied to unsieved fresh samples and the content of anions in these extracts was determined by ion chromatography (IC). In the studied soil profiles, the lowest amount of SO(4)(2-) was found in the organo-mineral A horizons under both types of vegetation. Under spruce the highest amount of SO(4)(2-) was determined in mineral spodic (B) horizons, where a strong sorption influence of Fe and Al oxy-hydroxides is expected. Under beech the highest amount was observed in the surface organic F horizons (forest floor). The amount of NO(3)(-) is highest in the F horizons and decreases with increasing soil profile depth under both types of vegetation. A significantly higher amount of NO(3)(-) was determined in soils under the beech stand compared to spruce. For both soil environments - under beech and also spruce stands - we have determined a general increase of water-extractable SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) during the whole monitoring period. The behaviour of SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) in the soils is strongly related to the dynamics of soil organic matter and particularly to the DOC.

  3. Advanced cell therapies for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Catarina; Santhagunam, Aruna; Salgueiro, João B; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2015-01-01

    Advanced cell-based therapies are promising approaches for stimulating full regeneration of cartilage lesions. In addition to a few commercially available medicinal products, several clinical and preclinical studies are ongoing worldwide. In preclinical settings, high-quality cartilage tissue has been produced using combination strategies involving stem or progenitor cells, biomaterials, and biomolecules to generate a construct for implantation at the lesion site. Cell numbers and mechanical stimulation of the constructs are not commonly considered, but are important parameters to be evaluated in forthcoming clinical studies. We review current clinical and preclinical studies for advanced therapy cartilage regeneration and evaluate the progress of the field.

  4. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  5. Production of high concentrated cellulosic ethanol by acetone/water oxidized pretreated beech wood.

    PubMed

    Katsimpouras, Constantinos; Kalogiannis, Konstantinos G; Kalogianni, Aggeliki; Lappas, Angelos A; Topakas, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant and inexpensive resource for biofuel production. Alongside its biotechnological conversion, pretreatment is essential to enable efficient enzymatic hydrolysis by making cellulose susceptible to cellulases. Wet oxidation of biomass, such as acetone/water oxidation, that employs hot acetone, water, and oxygen, has been found to be an attractive pretreatment method for removing lignin while producing less degradation products. The remaining enriched cellulose fraction has the potential to be utilized under high gravity enzymatic saccharification and fermentation processes for the cost-competing production of bioethanol. Beech wood residual biomass was pretreated following an acetone/water oxidation process aiming at the production of high concentration of cellulosic ethanol. The effect of pressure, reaction time, temperature, and acetone-to-water ratio on the final composition of the pretreated samples was studied for the efficient utilization of the lignocellulosic feedstock. The optimal conditions were acetone/water ratio 1:1, 40 atm initial pressure of 40 vol% O2 gas, and 64 atm at reaction temperature of 175 °C for 2 h incubation. The pretreated beech wood underwent an optimization step studying the effect of enzyme loading and solids content on the enzymatic liquefaction/saccharification prior to fermentation. In a custom designed free-fall mixer at 50 °C for either 6 or 12 h of prehydrolysis using an enzyme loading of 9 mg/g dry matter at 20 wt% initial solids content, high ethanol concentration of 75.9 g/L was obtained. The optimization of the pretreatment process allowed the efficient utilization of beech wood residual biomass for the production of high concentrations of cellulosic ethanol, while obtaining lignin that can be upgraded towards high-added-value chemicals. The threshold of 4 wt% ethanol concentration that is required for the sustainable bioethanol production was surpassed almost twofold

  6. Air regenerating and conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grishayenkov, B. G.

    1975-01-01

    Various physicochemical methods of regenerating and conditioning air for spacecraft are described with emphasis on conditions which affect efficiency of the system. Life support systems used in closed, hermetically sealed environments are discussed with references to actual application in the Soviet Soyuz and Voskhod manned spacecraft. Temperature and humidity control, removal of carbon dioxide, oxygen regeneration, and removal of bacteria and viruses are among the factors considered.

  7. Air regenerating and conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grishayenkov, B. G.

    1975-01-01

    Various physicochemical methods of regenerating and conditioning air for spacecraft are described with emphasis on conditions which affect efficiency of the system. Life support systems used in closed, hermetically sealed environments are discussed with references to actual application in the Soviet Soyuz and Voskhod manned spacecraft. Temperature and humidity control, removal of carbon dioxide, oxygen regeneration, and removal of bacteria and viruses are among the factors considered.

  8. [Regeneration of the gastric and intestinal mucosas].

    PubMed

    Castrup, H J

    1979-05-10

    The physiological cell renewal of gastrointestinal mucosa is regulated in man as in animal through certain mechanisms with measurable kinetic data. Pathologic mucosal alterations, metabolic disorders, pharmacological agents etc. clearly affect the regenerative processes of the gastrointestinal epithelium. Gastrin and pentagastrin stimulate the growth not only of the parietal cells, but also of the superficial epithelium of the gastric mucosa, whereas secretin does not change cell growth. Glucocorticoid steroids inhibit epithelial regeneration in all parts of the gastrointestinal tract. 5-fluorouracil has a similar effect but acts at a different site in the regeneration cycle. Epithelial cell proliferation of the gastric and intestinal mucosa is likewise inhibited in an uremic condition. In inflammatory changes in the human gastric mucosa epithelial cell hyperproliferation relative to the severity of gastritis and anomalous proliferation within regions of dysplasia can be demonstrated. Foveolary hyperplasia in Ménétrier's disease occurs on the basis of excessive hyperproliferation with displacement of regeneration zones.

  9. A multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial using a new resorbable non-cross-linked collagen membrane for guided bone regeneration at dehisced single implant sites: interim results of a bone augmentation procedure.

    PubMed

    Wessing, Bastian; Urban, Istvan; Montero, Eduardo; Zechner, Werner; Hof, Markus; Alández Chamorro, Javier; Alández Martin, Nuria; Polizzi, Giovanni; Meloni, Silvio; Sanz, Mariano

    2016-12-18

    To compare clinical performance of a new resorbable non-cross-linked collagen membrane, creos xenoprotect (CXP), with a reference membrane (BG) for guided bone regeneration at dehisced implant sites. This randomized controlled clinical trial enrolled patients with expected dehiscence defects following implant placement to restore single teeth in the maxillary and mandibular esthetic zone and premolar area. Implants were placed using a two-stage surgical protocol with delayed loading. Bone augmentation material placed at the implant surface was immobilized with CXP or BG membrane. Soft tissue health was followed during the healing period, and the defect size was measured at reentry and 6 months after implant placement. Of the 49 included patients, 24 were treated with CXP and 25 with BG. Patient characteristics did not differ between the two arms. In the CXP arm, the defect height at implant insertion was (mean ± SD) 5.1 ± 2.1 mm (n = 24) and reduced at reentry by 81% to 1.0 ± 1.3 mm (n = 23). In the BG arm, the defect height at implant insertion was 4.9 ± 1.9 mm (n = 25) and reduced at reentry by 62% to 1.7 ± 2.1 mm (n = 24). Assuming a margin of non-inferiority of 1 mm, CXP was non-inferior to BG. Membrane exposure rate was highest at week 3 in both arms, reaching 16.7% for BG and 8.7% for CXP. The new resorbable non-cross-linked collagen membrane facilitates bone gain to support implant placement in expected dehiscence defects. The observed trend toward higher mean bone gain and lower exposure rate with CXP compared to BG should be further investigated. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical Oral Implants Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Xenopus laevis tadpoles can regenerate neural retina lost after physical excision but cannot regenerate photoreceptors lost through targeted ablation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Damian C; Hamm, Lisa M; Moritz, Orson L

    2013-03-13

    To determine whether the Xenopus laevis retina is capable of regenerating photoreceptor cells lost through apoptotic cell death in an inducible transgenic X. laevis model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Acute rod photoreceptor apoptosis was induced in transgenic X. laevis expressing drug-inducible caspase 9. We subsequently monitored the ability of the retina to regenerate lost photoreceptors in the absence of drug, and in combination with physical injury or ectopic supplementation of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2). Direct activation of caspase 9 in rod photoreceptors resulted in the initiation of apoptosis and complete removal of rod photoreceptors within 4 days. Photoreceptors lost by apoptosis were not replaced over a 4-week recovery time frame. In contrast, physical disruption of rod-ablated retina was repaired by the end of a 3-week time frame, but did not result in rod photoreceptor regeneration other than at the site of injury. Furthermore, ectopic supplementation of FGF2 did not stimulate regeneration of photoreceptors lost by apoptosis. However, FGF2 supplementation increased the rate of regeneration of retina (including rod photoreceptors) in eyes from which retinal tissue was surgically removed. In the X. laevis retina, rod photoreceptors that undergo drug-induced caspase-9-mediated apoptosis are permanently lost and do not regenerate. In contrast, the neural retina (including rod photoreceptors) can regenerate in injured or retinectomized eyes, and this regeneration is promoted by supplementation with FGF2. However, FGF2 does not promote regeneration of rod photoreceptors that are selectively lost by apoptosis.

  11. Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Glenn; Buchanan, Fraser; Marsh, David; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Little, Uel; McCaigue, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal spontaneously. In the case of bone regeneration 3-D scaffolds are used as a framework to guide tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal cells obtained from the patient via biopsy are grown on biomaterials in vitro and then implanted at a desired site in the patient's body. Medical implants that encourage natural tissue regeneration are generally considered more desirable than metallic implants that may need to be removed by subsequent intervention. Numerous polymeric materials, from natural and artificial sources, are under investigation as substitutes for skeletal elements such as cartilage and bone. For bone regeneration, cells (obtained mainly from bone marrow aspirate or as primary cell outgrowths from bone biopsies) can be combined with biodegradable polymeric materials and/or ceramics and absorbed growth factors so that osteoinduction is facilitated together with osteoconduction; through the creation of bioactive rather than bioinert scaffold constructs. Relatively rapid biodegradation enables advantageous filling with natural tissue while loss of polymer strength before mass is disadvantageous. Innovative solutions are required to address this and other issues such as the biocompatibility of material surfaces and the use of appropriate scaffold topography and porosity to influence bone cell gene expression.

  12. Bark vegetation contributes to nitrous oxide (N2O) deposition by mature beech trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacova, Katerina; Maier, Martin; Svobodova, Katerina; Lang, Friederike; Urban, Otmar

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes to the acceleration of the greenhouse effect. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to investigate the natural capability of forest ecosystems to exchange N2O with the atmosphere. While the soils of temperate forests were shown to be a significant natural source of N2O, trees have been so far overlooked in the forest N2O inventories. Trees are known, however, to emit this gas, especially at very high N2O concentration in soil. We determined the N2O fluxes in mature beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) in two upland mountain forests (White Carpathians, CZ; Black Forest, DE) with predominant soil N2O uptake. To understand these fluxes, N2O exchange in photoautotrophic organisms associated with beech stems (lichens, mosses, and algae) was further investigated under laboratory conditions. Fluxes were measured in situ in June and July 2015 using static chamber systems followed by chromatographic and photo-acoustic analyses of N2O concentration changes. In both forests studied, all beech stems deposited N2O from the atmosphere. Such consistent uptake of N2O by stems represents a novel and unique finding which is in the contrast to current limited studies presenting trees as N2O emitters. The mean stem deposition rates were significantly higher in the White Carpathians (-3.8 μg N2O m-2 stem area h-1) than in the Black Forest (-2.3 μg N2O m-2 h-1). The forest floor was a strong sink for N2O (White Carpathians: -111, Black Forest: -81 μg N2O m-2 soil area h-1). The N2O concentration profiles within the soil did not identify any apparent production or consumption processes. Photoautotrophic organisms (lichens, mosses, and algae), largely associated with the bark of studied trees, were collected for further analyses. The detailed incubation experiments revealed that all sampled organisms deposited N2O under the conditions of full rehydration and air temperature of 25˚ C. Their deposition rates per unit area were in the same order of magnitude as

  13. Flight test results for a separate surface stability augmented Beech model 99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenks, G. E.; Henry, H. F.; Roskam, J.

    1977-01-01

    A flight evaluation of a Beech model 99 equipped with an attitude command control system incorporating separate surface stability augmentation (SSSA) was conducted to determine whether an attitude command control system could be implemented using separate surface controls, and to determine whether the handling and ride qualities of the aircraft were improved by the SSSA attitude command system. The results of the program revealed that SSSA is a viable approach to implementing attitude command and also that SSSA has the capability of performing less demanding augmentation tasks such as yaw damping, wing leveling, and pitch damping. The program also revealed that attitude command did improve the pilot rating and ride qualities of the airplane while flying an IFR mission in turbulence. Some disadvantages of the system included the necessity of holding aileron force in a banked turn and excessive stiffness in the pitch axis.

  14. Role of intracellular contents to facilitate supercooling capability in beech (Fagus crenata) xylem parenchyma cells.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Mizuno, Kaoru; Miyaji, Natsuko; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2006-01-01

    In order to find the possible role of intracellular contents in facilitating the supercooling capability of xylem parenchyma cells, changes in the temperature of supercooling levels were compared before and after the release of intracellular substances from beech xylem parenchyma cells by DTA. Various methods were employed to release intracellular substances from xylem parenchyma cells and all resulted in a reduction of supercooling ability. It was concluded that the reduction of supercooling ability primarily resulted from changes of intracellular conditions, including the release of intracellular contents or their mixing with extracellular solutions, rather than due to changes of cell wall structures. It is therefore suggested that any unidentified intracellular contents may function to facilitate supercooling capability in xylem parenchyma cells.

  15. Effect of environmental variables and stand structure on ecosystem respiration components in a Mediterranean beech forest.

    PubMed

    Guidolotti, Gabriele; Rey, Ana; D'Andrea, Ettore; Matteucci, Giorgio; De Angelis, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    The temporal variability of ecosystem respiration (RECO) has been reported to have important effects on the temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange, the net amount of carbon exchanged between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. However, our understanding of ecosystem respiration is rather limited compared with photosynthesis or gross primary productivity, particularly in Mediterranean montane ecosystems. In order to investigate how environmental variables and forest structure (tree classes) affect different respiration components and RECO in a Mediterranean beech forest, we measured soil, stem and leaf CO2 efflux rates with dynamic chambers and RECO by the eddy-covariance technique over 1 year (2007-2008). Ecosystem respiration showed marked seasonal variation, with the highest rates in spring and autumn and the lowest in summer. We found that the soil respiration (SR) was mainly controlled by soil water content below a threshold value of 0.2 m(3) m(-3), above which the soil temperature explained temporal variation in SR. Stem CO2 effluxes were influenced by air temperature and difference between tree classes with higher rates measured in dominant trees than in co-dominant ones. Leaf respiration (LR) varied significantly between the two canopy layers considered. Non-structural carbohydrates were a very good predictor of LR variability. We used these measurements to scale up respiration components to ecosystem respiration for the whole canopy and obtained cumulative amounts of carbon losses over the year. Based on the up-scaled chamber measurements, the relative contributions of soil, stem and leaves to the total annual CO2 efflux were: 56, 8 and 36%, respectively. These results confirm that SR is the main contributor of ecosystem respiration and provided an insight on the driving factors of respiration in Mediterranean montane beech forests.

  16. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka; Holst, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur), European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m-2 s-1), whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or

  17. Forty-two years of change in an old-growth and second-growth beech-maple forest of north central Ohio

    Treesearch

    Natalie R. Pinheiro; P. Charles Goebel; David M. Hix

    2008-01-01

    Using data collected in 1964 and 2006, we examined changes in the composition and structure of a second-growth and old-growth beech-maple forest of Crall Woods, located in Ashland County of north central Ohio. Over the 42 years, the old-growth forest (estimated to be at least 250 years old) experienced a significant shift in species composition as American beech,...

  18. Towards Regeneration of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Yoichi; Larmour, Colleen; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is classified into permanent hyaline cartilage and has significant differences in structure, extracelluar matrix components, gene expression profile, and mechanical property from transient hyaline cartilage found in growth plate. In the process of synovial joint development, articular cartilage is originated from the interzone, developing at the edge of the cartilaginous anlagen, it establishes zonal structure over time and supports smooth movement of the synovial joint through life. The cascade actions of key regulators such as Wnts, GDF5, Erg, and PTHLH coordinate sequential steps of articular cartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes are restrictedly controlled not to differentiate into a hypertrophic stage by autocrine and paracrine factors and extracerllular matrix microenvironment, but retain potential to undergo hypertrophy. The basal calcified zone of articular cartilage is connected with subchondral bone, but not invaded by blood vessels nor replaced by bone, which is highly contrasted with the growth plate. Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capacity, but likely possesses and potentially uses intrinsic stem cell source in the superficial layer, Ranvier’s groove, the intra-articular tissues such as synovium and fat pad, and marrow below the subchondral bone. Considering the biological views on articular cartilage, several important points are raised for regeneration of articular cartilage. We should evaluate the nature of regenerated cartilage as permanent hyaline cartilage and not just hyaline cartilage. We should study how a hypertrophic phenotype of transplanted cells can be lastingly suppressed in regenerating tissue. Further, we should develop the methods and reagents to activate recruitment of intrinsic stem/progenitor cells into the damaged site. PMID:24078496

  19. Belowground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L./Picea abies [L.] Karst).

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Petia S; Andersen, Christian P; Blaschke, Helmut; Matyssek, Rainer; Häberle, Karl-Heinz

    2010-04-01

    The effects of experimentally elevated O(3) on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and delta(13)C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with contrasting rainfall patterns. During humid 2002, soil respiration rate was enhanced under elevated O(3) under beech and spruce, and was related to O(3)-stimulated fine-root production only in beech. During dry 2003, the stimulating effect of O(3) on soil respiration rate vanished under spruce, which was correlated with decreased fine-root production in spruce under drought, irrespective of the O(3) regime. delta(13)C signature of newly formed fine-roots was consistent with the differing g(s) of beech and spruce, and indicated stomatal limitation by O(3) in beech and by drought in spruce. Our study showed that drought can override the stimulating O(3) effects on fine-root dynamics and soil respiration in mature beech and spruce forests.

  20. Seasonal variation in N uptake strategies in the understorey of a beech-dominated N-limited forest ecosystem depends on N source and species.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuyuan; Rennenberg, Heinz; Simon, Judy

    2016-05-01

    In forest ecosystems, species use different strategies to increase their competitive ability for nitrogen (N) acquisition. The acquisition of N by trees is regulated by tree internal and environmental factors including mycorrhizae. In this study, we investigated the N uptake strategies of three co-occurring tree species [European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) and Norway maple (Acer platanoides L.)] in the understorey of a beech-dominated, N-limited forest on calcareous soil over two consecutive seasons. For this purpose, we studied (15)N uptake capacity as well as the allocation to N pools in the fine roots. Our results show that European beech had a higher capacity for both inorganic and organic N acquisition throughout the whole growing season compared with sycamore maple and Norway maple. The higher capacity of N acquisition in beech indicates a better adaption of beech to the understorey conditions of beech forests compared with the seedlings of other tree competitors under N-limited conditions. Despite these differences, all three species preferred organic over inorganic N sources throughout the growing season and showed similar seasonal patterns of N acquisition with an increased N uptake capacity in summer. However, this pattern varied with N source and year indicating that other environmental factors not assessed in this study further influenced N acquisition by the seedlings of the three tree species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Seasonal variation in N uptake strategies in the understorey of a beech-dominated N-limited forest ecosystem depends on N source and species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyuan; Rennenberg, Heinz; Simon, Judy

    2016-01-01

    In forest ecosystems, species use different strategies to increase their competitive ability for nitrogen (N) acquisition. The acquisition of N by trees is regulated by tree internal and environmental factors including mycorrhizae. In this study, we investigated the N uptake strategies of three co-occurring tree species [European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) and Norway maple (Acer platanoides L.)] in the understorey of a beech-dominated, N-limited forest on calcareous soil over two consecutive seasons. For this purpose, we studied 15N uptake capacity as well as the allocation to N pools in the fine roots. Our results show that European beech had a higher capacity for both inorganic and organic N acquisition throughout the whole growing season compared with sycamore maple and Norway maple. The higher capacity of N acquisition in beech indicates a better adaption of beech to the understorey conditions of beech forests compared with the seedlings of other tree competitors under N-limited conditions. Despite these differences, all three species preferred organic over inorganic N sources throughout the growing season and showed similar seasonal patterns of N acquisition with an increased N uptake capacity in summer. However, this pattern varied with N source and year indicating that other environmental factors not assessed in this study further influenced N acquisition by the seedlings of the three tree species. PMID:26786538

  2. Regenerate bone fracture rate following femoral lengthening in paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Burke, N. G.; Cassar-Gheiti, A. J.; Tan, J.; McHugh, G.; O’Neil, B. J.; Noonan, M.; Moore, D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Femoral lengthening using a circular or mono-lateral frame is a commonly used technique. Fracture at the site of the regenerate bone is a major concern especially following removal of the external fixator. This aim of this study was to assess the rate of fracture of the regenerate bone in this single surgeon series of paediatric patients and determine potential risk factors. Methods Retrospective review of all the femoral lengthening performed by the senior author was performed. The medical and physiotherapy notes were reviewed. The gender, age at time of surgery, disease aetiology, total days in the external fixator and length of the new regenerate bone were recorded. Patients who sustained a regenerate fracture were identified. Results A total of 176 femoral lengthening procedures were performed on 108 patients. Eight regenerate fractures occurred in seven patients (4.5%). The mechanism of injury was a fall in five cases and during physiotherapy in three cases. The regenerate fracture occurred a median number of nine days following removal of frame. There was no significant difference between gender, age at time of surgery, total time in external fixator between those who sustained a regenerate fracture and those patients who did not. A significant difference was noted between the amount of lengthening between the ‘regenerate fracture group’ and the ‘no fracture group’ (50 mm vs 38 mm, respectively; p = 0.029). There was no association between disease aetiology and risk of regenerate fracture. Conclusions Femoral lengthening of more than 50 mm increases the risk of a fracture at the regenerate site regardless of the disease aetiology. We recommend avoidance of aggressive physiotherapy for the initial four weeks following external fixator removal. PMID:28828065

  3. Tissue engineering in urothelium regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vaegler, Martin; Maurer, Sabine; Toomey, Patricia; Amend, Bastian; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich

    2015-03-01

    The development of therapeutic treatments to regenerate urothelium, manufacture tissue equivalents or neourethras for in-vivo application is a significant challenge in the field of tissue engineering. Many studies have focused on urethral defects that, in most cases, inadequately address current therapies. This article reviews the primary tissue engineering strategies aimed at the clinical requirements for urothelium regeneration while concentrating on promising investigations in the use of grafts, cellular preparations, as well as seeded or unseeded natural and synthetic materials. Despite significant progress being made in the development of scaffolds and matrices, buccal mucosa transplants have not been replaced. Recently, graft tissues appear to have an advantage over the use of matrices. These therapies depend on cell isolation and propagation in vitro that require, not only substantial laboratory resources, but also subsequent surgical implant procedures. The choice of the correct cell source is crucial when determining an in-vivo application because of the risks of tissue changes and abnormalities that may result in donor site morbidity. Addressing an appropriately-designed animal model and relevant regulatory issues is of fundamental importance for the principal investigators when a therapy using cellular components has been developed for clinical use.

  4. Atlas Regeneration, Inc.

    PubMed

    Makarev, Eugene; Isayev, Olexandr; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Atlas Regeneration is dedicated to the development of novel data-driven solutions for regenerative medicine, adapting proven technologies, and analysis strategies to take a multiomics-wide view of stem cell quality and cell fate design. Our core offering is a global comprehensive map of stem cell differentiation, Universal Signalome Atlas for Regenerative Medicine, reflecting the pathway activation states across all characterized stem cells and their differentiated products. Key applications of Universal Signalome Atlas for Regenerative Medicine will include quality assurance for engineered cell products, and directed regeneration pharmacology, where we will screen and identify compounds that can efficiently convert pluripotent cells into desired subtypes. Another marketable piece of IP is development of specialized signaling pathway analysis systems Regeneration Intelligence which supposed to target the unmet needs of determination and prediction of stem cell signaling pathway activation to govern cell differentiation in specific directions.

  5. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Regeneration**

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X.

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in regenerative medicine, which aims to regenerate and replace lost/dysfunctional tissues or organs. Biomaterials (scaffolds) serve as temporary 3D substrates to guide neo tissue formation and organization. It is often beneficial for a scaffolding material to mimic the characteristics of extracellular matrix (ECM) at the nanometer scale and to induce certain natural developmental or/and wound healing processes for tissue regeneration applications. This article reviews the fabrication and modification technologies for nanofibrous, nanocomposite, and nanostructured drug-delivering scaffolds. ECM-mimicking nanostructured biomaterials have been shown to actively regulate cellular responses including attachment, proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition. Nano-scaled drug delivery systems can be successfully incorporated into a porous 3D scaffold to enhance the tissue regeneration capacity. In conclusion, nano-structured biomateials are a very exciting and rapidly expanding research area, and are providing new enabling technologies for regenerative medicine. PMID:19946357

  6. Bioelectricity and epimorphic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Scott; Rojas-Muñoz, Agustin; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2007-11-01

    All cells have electric potentials across their membranes, but is there really compelling evidence to think that such potentials are used as instructional cues in developmental biology? Numerous reports indicate that, in fact, steady, weak bioelectric fields are observed throughout biology and function during diverse biological processes, including development. Bioelectric fields, generated upon amputation, are also likely to play a key role during vertebrate regeneration by providing the instructive cues needed to direct migrating cells to form a wound epithelium, a structure unique to regenerating animals. However, mechanistic insight is still sorely lacking in the field. What are the genes required for bioelectric-dependent cell migration during regeneration? The power of genetics combined with the use of zebrafish offers the best opportunity for unbiased identification of the molecular players in bioelectricity.

  7. Use of sap flow measurements to validate stomatal functions for mature beech (Fagus sylvatica) in view of ozone uptake calculations.

    PubMed

    Braun, Sabine; Schindler, Christian; Leuzinger, Sebastian

    2010-09-01

    For a quantitative estimate of the ozone effect on vegetation reliable models for ozone uptake through the stomata are needed. Because of the analogy of ozone uptake and transpiration it is possible to utilize measurements of water loss such as sap flow for quantification of ozone uptake. This technique was applied in three beech (Fagus sylvatica) stands in Switzerland. A canopy conductance was calculated from sap flow velocity and normalized to values between 0 and 1. It represents mainly stomatal conductance as the boundary layer resistance in forests is usually small. Based on this relative conductance, stomatal functions to describe the dependence on light, temperature, vapour pressure deficit and soil moisture were derived using multivariate nonlinear regression. These functions were validated by comparison with conductance values directly estimated from sap flow. The results corroborate the current flux parameterization for beech used in the DO3SE model. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Water stress-induced xylem hydraulic failure is a causal factor of tree mortality in beech and poplar

    PubMed Central

    Barigah, Têtè Sévérien; Charrier, Olivia; Douris, Marie; Bonhomme, Marc; Herbette, Stéphane; Améglio, Thierry; Fichot, Régis; Brignolas, Frank; Cochard, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Extreme water stress episodes induce tree mortality, but the physiological mechanisms causing tree death are still poorly understood. This study tests the hypothesis that a potted tree's ability to survive extreme monotonic water stress is determined by the cavitation resistance of its xylem tissue. Methods Two species were selected with contrasting cavitation resistance (beech and poplar), and potted juvenile trees were exposed to a range of water stresses, causing up to 100 % plant death. Key Results The lethal dose of water stress, defined as the xylem pressure inducing 50 % mortality, differed sharply across species (1·75 and 4·5 MPa in poplar and beech, respectively). However, the relationships between tree mortality and the degree of cavitation in the stems were similar, with mortality occurring suddenly when >90 % cavitation had occurred. Conclusions Overall, the results suggest that cavitation resistance is a causal factor of tree mortality under extreme drought conditions. PMID:24081280

  9. Quantifying genetic variations and phenotypic plasticity of leaf phenology and growth for two temperate Fagaceae species (sessile oak and european beech)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzon, Sylvain; Vitasse, Yann; Alberto, Florian; Bresson, Caroline; Kremer, Antoine

    2010-05-01

    Under current climate change, research on inherent adaptive capacities of organisms is crucial to assess future evolutionary changes of natural populations. Genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity constitute adaptative capacities that could allow populations to respond to new environmental conditions. The aim of the present study was (i) to determine whether there are genetic variations among populations from altitudinal gradients using a lowland common garden experiment and (ii) to assess the magnitude of phenotypic plasticity using a reciprocal transplant experiment (5 elevations from 100 to 1600 m asl.) for leaf phenology (flushing and senescence) and growth of two fagaceae species (Fagus sylvatica and Quercus petraea). We found significant differences in phenology among provenances for most species, and evidenced that these among-population differences in phenology were related to annual temperature of the provenance sites for both species. It's noteworthy that, along the same climatic gradient, the species exhibited opposite genetic clines: beech populations from high elevation flushed earlier than those of low elevation, whereas we observed an opposite trend for oak. Finally, we highlighted that both phenology timing and growth rate were highly consistent year to year. The results demonstrated that in spite of the proximity of the populations in their natural area, altitude led to genetic differentiations in their phenology and growth. Moreover, a high phenological plasticity was found for both species. We evidenced that reaction norms of flushing timing to temperature followed linear clinal trends for both species with an average shift of 5.7 days per degree increase. Timing of leaf senescence exhibited hyperbolic trends for beech and no or slight trends for oak. Furthermore, within species, there was no difference in magnitude of phenological plasticity among populations neither for flushing, nor for senescence. Consequently, for both species, the

  10. Patterns of late spring frost leaf damage and recovery in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in south-eastern Germany based on repeated digital photographs

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Annette; Helm, Raimund; Zang, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Damage by late spring frost is a risk deciduous trees have to cope with in order to optimize the length of their growing season. The timing of spring phenological development plays a crucial role, not only at the species level, but also at the population and individual level, since fresh new leaves are especially vulnerable. For the pronounced late spring frost in May 2011 in Germany, we studied the individual leaf development of 35 deciduous trees (mainly European beech Fagus sylvatica L.) at a mountainous forest site in the Bayerischer Wald National Park using repeated digital photographs. Analyses of the time series of greenness by a novel Bayesian multiple change point approach mostly revealed five change points which almost perfectly matched the expected break points in leaf development: (i) start of the first greening between day of the year (DOY) 108–119 (mean 113), (ii) end of greening, and (iii) visible frost damage after the frost on the night of May 3rd/4th (DOY 123/124), (iv) re-sprouting 19–38 days after the frost, and (v) full maturity around DOY 178 (166–184) when all beech crowns had fully recovered. Since frost damage was nearly 100%, individual susceptibility did not depend on the timing of first spring leaf unfolding. However, we could identify significant patterns in fitness linked to an earlier start of leaf unfolding. Those individuals that had an earlier start of greening during the first flushing period had a shorter period of recovery and started the second greening earlier. Thus, phenological timing triggered the speed of recovery from such an extreme event. The maximum greenness achieved, however, did not vary with leaf unfolding dates. Two mountain ashes (Sorbus aucuparia L.) were not affected by the low temperatures of -5°C. Time series analysis of webcam pictures can thus improve process-based knowledge and provide valuable insights into the link between phenological variation, late spring frost damage, and recovery within one

  11. Regeneration alternatives for upland white spruce after buring and logging in interior Alaska

    Treesearch

    R. V. Densmore; G. P. Juday; John C. Zasada

    1999-01-01

    Site-preparation and regeneration methods for white spruce (Picea glaucu (Meench) Voss) were tested near Fairbanks Alaska, on two upland sites which had been burned in a wildfire and salvage logged. After 5 and 10 years, white spruce regeneration did not differ among the four scarification methods but tended to be lower without scarification....

  12. High-throughput and multiplexed regeneration buffer scouting for affinity-based interactions.

    PubMed

    Geuijen, Karin P M; Schasfoort, Richard B; Wijffels, Rene H; Eppink, Michel H M

    2014-06-01

    Affinity-based analyses on biosensors depend partly on regeneration between measurements. Regeneration is performed with a buffer that efficiently breaks all interactions between ligand and analyte while maintaining the active binding site of the ligand. We demonstrated a regeneration buffer scouting using the combination of a continuous flow microspotter with a surface plasmon resonance imaging platform to simultaneously test 48 different regeneration buffers on a single biosensor. Optimal regeneration conditions are found within hours and consume little amounts of buffers, analyte, and ligand. This workflow can be applied to any ligand that is coupled through amine, thiol, or streptavidin immobilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hierarchical signaling transduction of the immune and muscle cell crosstalk in muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjun; Hu, Ping

    2017-08-24

    The muscle regeneration is a complicated bioprocess that involved in many cell types, including necrotic muscle cells, satellite cells, mesenchymal cells, pericytes, immune cells, and other cell types present at the injury site. Immune cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses regulate the progress of muscle regeneration. In this review, we discussed the roles of different immune cells in muscle regeneration. The immune cells regulate muscle regeneration through cytokine production, cell-cell contacts, and general immune environment regulation. We also describe the current known mechanism of how immune cells regulating muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Predicting regeneration establishment with the prognosis model. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, D.E.; Carlson, C.E.

    1993-08-01

    The conifer establishment following regeneration timber harvests is predicted by version 2 of the Regeneration Establishment Model, a submodel of the Prognosis Model. The regeneration model covers 10 species for forests in Montana, central Idaho, and northern Idaho. Most harvest and site preparation methods can be simulated so that alternative treatments can be evaluated. Also included in the model is the influence of western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) on regeneration success. The model predicts the probability of stocking, seedling density, species composition, and seedling heights 2 to 20 years after harvest. The paper describes the study design, equation development, model formulation, and model behavior for the Regeneration Establishment Model.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide primes heart regeneration with a derepression mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Han, Peidong; Zhou, Xiao-Hai; Chang, Nannan; Xiao, Cheng-Lu; Yan, Shouyu; Ren, He; Yang, Xin-Zhuang; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Wu, Qing; Tang, Boyang; Diao, Ju-Peng; Zhu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Chuanmao; Li, Chuan-Yun; Cheng, Heping; Xiong, Jing-Wei

    2014-01-01

    While the adult human heart has very limited regenerative potential, the adult zebrafish heart can fully regenerate after 20% ventricular resection. Although previous reports suggest that developmental signaling pathways such as FGF and PDGF are reused in adult heart regeneration, the underlying intracellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we show that H2O2 acts as a novel epicardial and myocardial signal to prime the heart for regeneration in adult zebrafish. Live imaging of intact hearts revealed highly localized H2O2 (∼30 μM) production in the epicardium and adjacent compact myocardium at the resection site. Decreasing H2O2 formation with the Duox inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) or apocynin, or scavenging H2O2 by catalase overexpression markedly impaired cardiac regeneration while exogenous H2O2 rescued the inhibitory effects of DPI on cardiac regeneration, indicating that H2O2 is an essential and sufficient signal in this process. Mechanistically, elevated H2O2 destabilized the redox-sensitive phosphatase Dusp6 and hence increased the phosphorylation of Erk1/2. The Dusp6 inhibitor BCI achieved similar pro-regenerative effects while transgenic overexpression of dusp6 impaired cardiac regeneration. H2O2 plays a dual role in recruiting immune cells and promoting heart regeneration through two relatively independent pathways. We conclude that H2O2 potentially generated from Duox/Nox2 promotes heart regeneration in zebrafish by unleashing MAP kinase signaling through a derepression mechanism involving Dusp6. PMID:25124925

  16. Regulating activation of transplanted cells controls tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Elliott; Boontheekul, Tanyarut; Mooney, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Current approaches to tissue regeneration are limited by the death of most transplanted cells and/or resultant poor integration of transplanted cells with host tissue. We hypothesized that transplanting progenitor cells within synthetic microenvironments that maintain viability, prevent terminal differentiation, and promote outward migration would significantly enhance their repopulation and regeneration of damaged host tissue. This hypothesis was addressed in the context of muscle regeneration by transplanting satellite cells to muscle laceration sites on a delivery vehicle releasing factors that induce cell activation and migration (hepatocyte growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2) or transplantation on materials lacking factor release. Controls included direct cell injection into muscle, the implantation of blank scaffolds, and scaffolds releasing factors without cells. Injected cells demonstrated a limited repopulation of damaged muscle and led to a slight improvement in muscle regeneration, as expected. Delivery of cells on scaffolds that did not promote migration resulted in no improvement in muscle regeneration. Strikingly, delivery of cells on scaffolds that promoted myoblast activation and migration led to extensive repopulation of host muscle tissue and increased the regeneration of muscle fibers at the wound and the mass of the injured muscle. This previously undescribed strategy for cell transplantation significantly enhances muscle regeneration from transplanted cells and may be broadly applicable to the various tissues and organ systems in which provision and instruction of a cell population competent to participate in regeneration may be clinically useful. PMID:16477029

  17. Regenerating an Arsenic Removal Iron-Based Adsorptive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Adsorptive media technology is a frequently used method of removing arsenic by small water systems because of its simplicity and efficiency. Current practice is to replace the media when it no longer reduces arsenic below the USEPA drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 µg/L. Media replacement typically accounts for approximately 80% of the total operational and maintenance (O/M) costs. This cost can be substantial and cost prohibitive for many small systems. One potential option to reduce the cost is on-site regeneration and reuse of the media. To evaluate the regeneration option, three consecutive regeneration studies were conducted on a full scale 295 gpm arsenic removal adsorptive media system. This paper, of a two part series, describes the regeneration process and its effectiveness to strip the arsenic and other contaminants from an exhausted media. The results of the regeneration studies found that a three step regeneration process of media backwash, caustic regeneration and acid neutralization/conditioning is very effective for stripping arsenic and other contaminants from the exhaustive media of a full scale arsenic removal system This paper, of a two part series, describes the regeneration process and its effectiveness to strip the arsenic and other contaminants from an exhausted media

  18. [Regeneration of airway epithelium].

    PubMed

    Adam, D; Perotin, J-M; Lebargy, F; Birembaut, P; Deslée, G; Coraux, C

    2014-04-01

    Epithelial regeneration is a complex process. It can lead to the remodeling of the airway epithelium as in asthma, COPD or cystic fibrosis. The development of in vivo and in vitro models has allowed the analysis of remodeling mechanisms and showed the role of components of extracellular matrix, proteases, cytokines and growth factors. Airway epithelial progenitors and stems cells have been studied in these models. However, their identification remains difficult. Identification and characterization of airway epithelial progenitor/stem-cells, and a better knowledge of the regeneration process may allow the development of new therapeutic strategies for airway epithelial reconstitution. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of Litter Diversity on Dissolved Organic Matter Release and Soil Carbon Formation in a Mixed Beech Forest

    PubMed Central

    Scheibe, Andrea; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of leaf litter on below ground carbon export and soil carbon formation in order to understand how litter diversity affects carbon cycling in forest ecosystems. 13C labeled and unlabeled leaf litter of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior), characterized by low and high decomposability, were used in a litter exchange experiment in the Hainich National Park (Thuringia, Germany). Litter was added in pure and mixed treatments with either beech or ash labeled with 13C. We collected soil water in 5 cm mineral soil depth below each treatment biweekly and determined dissolved organic carbon (DOC), δ13C values and anion contents. In addition, we measured carbon concentrations and δ13C values in the organic and mineral soil (collected in 1 cm increments) up to 5 cm soil depth at the end of the experiment. Litter-derived C contributes less than 1% to dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected in 5 cm mineral soil depth. Better decomposable ash litter released significantly more (0.50±0.17%) litter carbon than beech litter (0.17±0.07%). All soil layers held in total around 30% of litter-derived carbon, indicating the large retention potential of litter-derived C in the top soil. Interestingly, in mixed (ash and beech litter) treatments we did not find a higher contribution of better decomposable ash-derived carbon in DOM, O horizon or mineral soil. This suggest that the known selective decomposition of better decomposable litter by soil fauna has no or only minor effects on the release and formation of litter-derived DOM and soil organic matter. Overall our experiment showed that 1) litter-derived carbon is of low importance for dissolved organic carbon release and 2) litter of higher decomposability is faster decomposed, but litter diversity does not influence the carbon flow. PMID:25486628

  20. Influence of litter diversity on dissolved organic matter release and soil carbon formation in a mixed beech forest.

    PubMed

    Scheibe, Andrea; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of leaf litter on below ground carbon export and soil carbon formation in order to understand how litter diversity affects carbon cycling in forest ecosystems. 13C labeled and unlabeled leaf litter of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior), characterized by low and high decomposability, were used in a litter exchange experiment in the Hainich National Park (Thuringia, Germany). Litter was added in pure and mixed treatments with either beech or ash labeled with 13C. We collected soil water in 5 cm mineral soil depth below each treatment biweekly and determined dissolved organic carbon (DOC), δ13C values and anion contents. In addition, we measured carbon concentrations and δ13C values in the organic and mineral soil (collected in 1 cm increments) up to 5 cm soil depth at the end of the experiment. Litter-derived C contributes less than 1% to dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected in 5 cm mineral soil depth. Better decomposable ash litter released significantly more (0.50±0.17%) litter carbon than beech litter (0.17±0.07%). All soil layers held in total around 30% of litter-derived carbon, indicating the large retention potential of litter-derived C in the top soil. Interestingly, in mixed (ash and beech litter) treatments we did not find a higher contribution of better decomposable ash-derived carbon in DOM, O horizon or mineral soil. This suggest that the known selective decomposition of better decomposable litter by soil fauna has no or only minor effects on the release and formation of litter-derived DOM and soil organic matter. Overall our experiment showed that 1) litter-derived carbon is of low importance for dissolved organic carbon release and 2) litter of higher decomposability is faster decomposed, but litter diversity does not influence the carbon flow.

  1. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  2. Ionic charge, radius, and potential control root/soil concentration ratios of fifty cationic elements in the organic horizon of a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest podzol.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Germund

    2004-08-15

    The root/organic soil concentration ratio; R/S) of 50 cationic mineral elements was related to their ionic properties, including ionic radius (r), ionic charge (z), and ionic potential (z/r or z2/r). The materials studied were ectomycorrhizal beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) roots and their almost purely organic soil substrate, the O-horizon (mor; raw humus) of a Podzol in South Sweden, developed in a site which has been untouched by forestry or other mechanical disturbance since at least 50 years and located in an area with no local sources of pollution. Elements determined by ICP-AES were aluminium, barium, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium and strontium. Determined by ICP-MS were silver, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, chromium, caesium, copper, dysprosium, erbium, europium, gallium, gadolinium, hafnium, mercury, holmium, indium, lanthanum, lithium, lutetium, niobium, neodymium, nickel, lead, praseodymium, rubidium, scandium, samarium, tin, terbium, thorium, titanium, thallium, thulium, uranium, vanadium, yttrium, ytterbium, zinc and zirconium. The R/S ratios were most clearly related to the ionic potential of the cationic elements studied, which accounted for approximately 60% of the variability in R/S among elements. The ionic charge of an element was more important than the ionic radius. Elements with high ionic charge had low R/S ratios and vice versa. No clear differences in R/S between essential and non-essential plant nutrients were observed, especially when ions of similar charge were compared.

  3. Advantages of masting in European beech: timing of granivore satiation and benefits of seed caching support the predator dispersal hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Rafał; Bogdziewicz, Michał; Wróbel, Aleksandra; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2016-03-01

    The predator satiation and predator dispersal hypotheses provide alternative explanations for masting. Both assume satiation of seed-eating vertebrates. They differ in whether satiation occurs before or after seed removal and caching by granivores (predator satiation and predator dispersal, respectively). This difference is largely unrecognized, but it is demographically important because cached seeds are dispersed and often have a microsite advantage over nondispersed seeds. We conducted rodent exclosure experiments in two mast and two nonmast years to test predictions of the predator dispersal hypothesis in our study system of yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica). Specifically, we tested whether the fraction of seeds removed from the forest floor is similar during mast and nonmast years (i.e., lack of satiation before seed caching), whether masting decreases the removal of cached seeds (i.e., satiation after seed storage), and whether seed caching increases the probability of seedling emergence. We found that masting did not result in satiation at the seed removal stage. However, masting decreased the removal of cached seeds, and seed caching dramatically increased the probability of seedling emergence relative to noncached seeds. European beech thus benefits from masting through the satiation of scatterhoarders that occurs only after seeds are removed and cached. Although these findings do not exclude other evolutionary advantages of beech masting, they indicate that fitness benefits of masting extend beyond the most commonly considered advantages of predator satiation and increased pollination efficiency.

  4. Carbohydrate concentrations in different plant parts of young beech and spruce along a gradient of ozone pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Sabine; Zugmaier, Ulrike; Thomas, Vera; Flückiger, Walter

    Young beech and spruce were grown in pots along a gradient of ozone pollution in Switzerland. Spruce was harvested after one and beech after two seasons and carbohydrate concentrations were measured in different plant fractions. Ozone uptake was calculated as cumulative flux, cumulative flux with thresholds of 1.6 or 3.2 nmol m -2 s -1, or as AOT40. In beech, the monosaccharide concentration in fine roots showed a decreasing trend with increasing ozone, with similar results for all methods used to quantify ozone. In spruce, the concentration of starch decreased in both the thicker root fractions (∅ 1-5 and >5 mm) and stems with increasing ozone, whereas starch concentrations in needles increased with increasing ozone. In the needles, the increase in starch concentration showed the best correlation with cumulative ozone uptake. The defining of the length of the growing season proved to be a crucial parameter in the flux calculations. The results suggest that carbohydrate concentrations may be used as an indicator for ozone impact in spruce.

  5. Model-based analysis of avoidance of ozone stress by stomatal closure in Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata)

    PubMed Central

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Watanabe, Makoto; Inada, Naoki; Koike, Takayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Resistance of plants to ozone stress can be classified as either avoidance or tolerance. Avoidance of ozone stress may be explained by decreased stomatal conductance during ozone exposure because stomata are the principal interface for entry of ozone into plants. In this study, a coupled photosynthesis–stomatal model was modified to test whether the presence of ozone can induce avoidance of ozone stress by stomatal closure. Methods The response of Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata), a representative deciduous tree species, to ozone was studied in a free-air ozone exposure experiment in Japan. Photosynthesis and stomatal conductance were measured under ambient and elevated ozone. An optimization model of stomata involving water, CO2 and ozone flux was tested using the leaf gas exchange data. Key Results The data suggest that there are two phases in the avoidance of ozone stress via stomatal closure for Siebold's beech: (1) in early summer ozone influx is efficiently limited by a reduction in stomatal conductance, without any clear effect on photosynthetic capacity; and (2) in late summer and autumn the efficiency of ozone stress avoidance was decreased because the decrease in stomatal conductance was small and accompanied by an ozone-induced decline of photosynthetic capacity. Conclusions Ozone-induced stomatal closure in Siebold's beech during early summer reduces ozone influx and allows the maximum photosynthetic capacity to be reached, but is not sufficient in older leaves to protect the photosynthetic system. PMID:23904447

  6. Upland Oak Regeneration and Management

    Treesearch

    David L. Loftis

    2004-01-01

    In oak-dominated plant communities and in other communities where oaks are important, the keys to natural regeneration of upland oak components are (1) to ensure presence of competitive regeneration sources, and (2) to provide timely, sufficient release of these sources. Regeneration sources vary significantly among different types of plant communities and disturbance...

  7. Reciprocal trade of Carbon and Nitrogen at the root-fungus interface in ectomycorrhizal beech plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christina; Mayerhofer, Werner; Dietrich, Marlies; Gorka, Stefan; Schintlmeister, Arno; Reipert, Siegfried; Schweiger, Peter; Weidinger, Marieluise; Wiesenbauer, Julia; Martin, Victoria; Richter, Andreas; Woebken, Dagmar

    2017-04-01

    Plants deliver recently assimilated carbon (C) to mycorrhizal fungi, and receive nutrients, such as N and P, in exchange. A reciprocal exchange of C and nutrients between plants and mycorrhizal fungi (i.e., fungi which deliver more nutrients receive more plant C in return and vice versa) has been suggested for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses by some studies, but challenged by others. For ectomycorrhizal associations even less is known on how the exchange of C for nutrients is regulated, and whether it is based on reciprocity, or other controls. The aim of this study was to test the concept of reciprocal rewards between beech (Fagus sylvatica) and their associated ectomycorrhizal fungi on different scales, namely (a) across associations between individual root tips of beech and different fungal partners, and (b) at the subcellular scale at the plant-fungus interface. We exposed young beech trees associated with natural mycorrhizal fungal communities to a 13CO2 atmosphere and added 15N-labelled amino acids to a 'litter compartment', that mycorrhizal hyphae, but not plant roots could access. Plants were harvested within 2 days after application of 15N and less than one day after applying 13CO2. If the trading of C for N was reciprocal, we expect that 13C would be correlated to 15N across individual plant-fungal connections and at the subcellular scale within one mycorrhizal root tip, respectively. We collected individual mycorrhizal root-tips from 8 plants right after harvest, analyzed their 13C and 15N content by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS) and performed ITS sequencing to identify fungal communities associated with individual root tips. Selected mycorrhizal root tips were also prepared for nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) to visualize the spatial distribution of 13C and 15N in cross-sections of mycorrhizal root-tips at the subcellular scale. Our results showed a significant, albeit weak correlation between 13C and 15N across

  8. Regenerator seal design

    DOEpatents

    Eckart, Francis H.

    1982-01-01

    A rotary regenerator disc matrix has a face seal with a cross arm and arcuate rim segments joined by prestress clamps to prestrain the arcuate rim seals so as to compensate seal rim twisting or coning and resultant disc face seal leakage as produced by operating thermal gradients across the seal.

  9. Regenerating Longleaf Pine Naturally

    Treesearch

    Thomas C. Croker; William D. Boyer

    1975-01-01

    Research has developed guides for consistent natural regeneration of longleaf pine by a shelterwood system. Key measures include hardwood control by fire and other means, timely preparatory and seed cuts, seed crop monitoring, seedbed preparation, protection of established seedlings, prompt removal of parent trees when reproduction is adequate, and control of...

  10. Regenerated Fe is tasty!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuester, J.; Twining, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    Bioavailability of nutrients is an essential factor controlling primary productivity in the ocean. In addition to macronutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, availability of the trace element iron unequivocally affects growth rates and community structure of phytoplankton and thereby primary productivity in many ocean regions. External sources of iron such as Aeolian dust, upwelling of Fe-rich waters, and hydrothermal are reduced in high-nutrient low-chlorophyll regions, and most Fe used by phytoplankton has been regenerated by zooplankton. While zooplankton regeneration of Fe was first shown two decades ago, major factors controlling this process such as chemical composition of prey and grazer taxonomy are not well constrained. As pH varies significantly in digestive systems between protozoa and mesozooplankton, we hypothesize that the extent and the bioavailability of regenerated Fe is a function of the digestive physiology. Furthermore, major element components such as silica for diatoms and calcium carbonate for cocolithophores may be able to buffer the pH of digestive systems of different grazer taxa. Such effects may further influence the magnitude and bioavailability of regenerated Fe. In order to constrain the effect of grazer taxonomy and chemical composition of prey on Fe bioavailability, 55Fe-labeled phytoplankton were fed to different grazers and unlabeled phytoplankton were subsequently inoculated to the filtrate of the grazing experiment in the regrowth phase of the experiment, and the uptake of 55Fe into the phytoplankton biomass was monitored over time. A parallel uptake experiment using inorganic 55Fe was used to compare the bioavailability of regenerated and inorganic Fe to the same phytoplankton species. Furthermore, some samples of the inorganic and the regenerated uptake experiments were treated with an oxalate rinse to remove any adsorbed Fe. This allowed us to estimate the adsorption of 55Fe from either source to the cell walls of

  11. Comparison of the carbon stock in forest soil of sessile oak and beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Adrienn; Bene, Zsolt; Bidló, András

    2016-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are the most important carbon sinks. The forest soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle, because the global climate change or the increase of atmospheric CO2 level. We do not have enough data about the carbon stock of soils and its change due to human activities, which have similar value to carbon content of biomass. In our investigation we measured the carbon stock of soil in 10 stands of Quercus petraea and Fagus sylvatica. We took a 1.1 m soil column with soil borer and divided to 11 samples each column. The course organic and root residues were moved. After evaluation, we compared our results with other studies and the carbon stock of forests to each other. Naturally, the amount of SOC was the highest in the topsoil layers. However, we found significant difference between forest stands which stayed on the same homogenous bedrock, but very close to each other (e.g. distance was 1 or 2 km). We detected that different forest utilizations and tree species have an effect on the forest carbon as the litter as well (amount, composition). In summary, we found larger amount (99.1 C t/ha on average) of SOC in soil of stands, where sessile oak were the main stand-forming tree species. The amount of carbon was the least in turkey oak-sessile oak stands (85.4 C t/ha on average). We found the highest SOC (118.3 C t/ha) in the most mixed stand (silver lime-beech-red oak). In the future, it will be very important: How does climate change affect the spread of tree species or on carbon storage? Beech is more sensitive, but even sessile oak. These species are expected to replace with turkey oak, which is less sensitive to drought. Thus, it is possible in the future that we can expect to decrease of forest soil carbon stock capacity, which was confirmed by our experiment. Keywords: carbon sequestration, mitigation, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, litter Acknowledgements: Research is supported by the "Agroclimate.2" (VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034) EU

  12. Landscape and climate controls on spatiotemporal patterns of European beech phenology tracked from Landsat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senf, Cornelius; Pflugmacher, Dirk; Heurich, Marco; Krueger, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Phenology is a key indicator of vegetation response to global climate change, though our understanding of the underlying functional relationships is yet limited. Consequently, we aim at shedding light on the controls on the spatial and temporal patterns of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) phenology by utilizing a novel Landsat based hierarchical modeling approach. We test a variety of landscape and climate controls hypothesised to influence European beech green-up and senescence: 1) The effects of topography (i.e., elevation, slope, aspect, solar radiation) on spatial pattern of green-up and senescence. 2) The effects of spring temperature and winter chilling on temporal patterns of green-up. And 3) The effects of autumn temperature and precipitation on temporal patterns of senescence. Using a Landsat based approach allows us to tackle questions at the landscape-scale, while still covering a long enough time period of 30 years (1985-2015) for testing effects from regional-scale climate variability. Preliminary results indicate strong spatial and temporal variation in phenology. Spatial variation in green-up and senescence is driven by local scale topographic variation, in particular elevation (-2.0 d-100m). Temporal variation indicates a substantial trend towards earlier green-up (-1.0 d-1yr.) and later senescence (+1.6 d-1yr.), resulting in an overall longer vegetation period (+2.6 d-1yr.). Temporal variation in green-up was mostly influenced by regional-scale variations in pre-season minimum temperature (-3.7 d-1°C ), though we found only limited evidence for winter chilling effects. Temporal variation in senescence correlated with minimum autumn temperature (+5.0 d-1°C ) and precipitation (+2.0 d-10mm). Overall season length was controlled by annual mean season temperature with an average increase of +18.0 d-1°C . We also found that those controls were moderated by topography, with higher elevation areas being more sensitive to changes in temperature. Our

  13. Above and below ground carbohydrate allocation differs between ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.).

    PubMed

    Thoms, Ronny; Köhler, Michael; Gessler, Arthur; Gleixner, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    We investigated soluble carbohydrate transport in trees that differed in their phloem loading strategies in order to better understand the transport of photosynthetic products into the roots and the rhizosphere as this knowledge is needed to better understand the respiratory processes in the rhizosphere. We compared beech, which is suggested to use mainly passive loading of transport sugars along a concentration gradient into the phloem, with ash that uses active loading and polymer trapping of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs). We pulse-labeled 20 four-year old European beech and 20 four-year old ash trees with 13CO2 and tracked the fate of the label within different plant compartments. We extracted soluble carbohydrates from leaves, bark of stems and branches, and fine roots, measured their amount and isotopic content and calculated their turnover times. In beech one part of the sucrose was rapidly transported into sink tissues without major exchange with storage pools whereas another part of sucrose was strongly exchanged with unlabeled possibly stored sucrose. In contrast the storage and allocation patterns in ash depended on the identity of the transported sugars. RFO were the most important transport sugars that had highest turnover in all shoot compartments. However, the turnover of RFOs in the roots was uncoupled from the shoot. The only significant relation between sugars in the stem base and in the roots of ash was found for the amount (r2 = 0.50; p = 0.001) and isotopic content (r2 = 0.47; p = 0.01) of sucrose. The negative relation of the amounts suggested an active transport of sucrose into the roots of ash. Sucrose concentration in the root also best explained the concentration of RFOs in the roots suggesting that RFO in the roots of ash may be resynthesized from sucrose. Our results interestingly suggest that in both tree species only sucrose directly entered the fine root system and that in ash RFOs are transported indirectly into the fine

  14. Above and below ground carbohydrate allocation differs between ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.)

    PubMed Central

    Thoms, Ronny; Köhler, Michael; Gessler, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    We investigated soluble carbohydrate transport in trees that differed in their phloem loading strategies in order to better understand the transport of photosynthetic products into the roots and the rhizosphere as this knowledge is needed to better understand the respiratory processes in the rhizosphere. We compared beech, which is suggested to use mainly passive loading of transport sugars along a concentration gradient into the phloem, with ash that uses active loading and polymer trapping of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs). We pulse-labeled 20 four-year old European beech and 20 four-year old ash trees with 13CO2 and tracked the fate of the label within different plant compartments. We extracted soluble carbohydrates from leaves, bark of stems and branches, and fine roots, measured their amount and isotopic content and calculated their turnover times. In beech one part of the sucrose was rapidly transported into sink tissues without major exchange with storage pools whereas another part of sucrose was strongly exchanged with unlabeled possibly stored sucrose. In contrast the storage and allocation patterns in ash depended on the identity of the transported sugars. RFO were the most important transport sugars that had highest turnover in all shoot compartments. However, the turnover of RFOs in the roots was uncoupled from the shoot. The only significant relation between sugars in the stem base and in the roots of ash was found for the amount (r2 = 0.50; p = 0.001) and isotopic content (r2 = 0.47; p = 0.01) of sucrose. The negative relation of the amounts suggested an active transport of sucrose into the roots of ash. Sucrose concentration in the root also best explained the concentration of RFOs in the roots suggesting that RFO in the roots of ash may be resynthesized from sucrose. Our results interestingly suggest that in both tree species only sucrose directly entered the fine root system and that in ash RFOs are transported indirectly into the fine

  15. Regeneration in the hemichordate Ptychodera flava.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Tom; Sasaki, Akane; Uenishi, Gene; Taparra, Kekoa; Arimoto, Asuka; Tagawa, Kuni

    2010-02-01

    When the body of P. flava is severed, the animal has the ability to regenerate its missing anterior or posterior as appropriate. We have focused on anterior regeneration when the head and branchial regions are severed from the body of the worm. After transection, the body wall contracts and heals closed in 2 to 3 days. By the third day a small blastema is evident at the point of closure. The blastema grows rapidly and begins the process of differentiating into a head with a proboscis and collar. At 5 days the blastema has increased greatly in size and differentiated into a central bulb, the forming proboscis, and two lateral crescents, the forming collar. Between 5 and 7 days a mouth opens ventral to the differentiating blastema. Over the next few days the lateral crescents extend to encircle the proboscis and mouth, making a fully formed collar. By 10 to 12 days a new head, sized to fit the worm's body, has grown attached to the severed site. At about this time the animal regains apparently normal burrowing behavior. After the head is formed, a second blastema-like area appears between the new head and the old body and a new branchial region is inserted by regeneration from this blastema over the next 2 to 3 weeks. The regenerating tissues are unpigmented and whitish such that in-situ hybridization can be used to study the expression of genes during the formation of new tissues.

  16. Limb regeneration: a new development?

    PubMed

    Nacu, Eugen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2011-01-01

    Salamander limb regeneration is a classical model of tissue morphogenesis and patterning. Through recent advances in cell labeling and molecular analysis, a more precise, mechanistic understanding of this process has started to emerge. Long-standing questions include to what extent limb regeneration recapitulates the events observed in mammalian limb development and to what extent are adult- or salamander- specific aspects deployed. Historically, researchers studying limb development and limb regeneration have proposed different models of pattern formation. Here we discuss recent data on limb regeneration and limb development to argue that although patterning mechanisms are likely to be similar, cell plasticity and signaling from nerves play regeneration-specific roles.

  17. REGene: a literature-based knowledgebase of animal regeneration that bridge tissue regeneration and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Rotgans, Bronwyn; Wang, Tianfang; Cummins, S. F.

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration is a common phenomenon across multiple animal phyla. Regeneration-related genes (REGs) are critical for fundamental cellular processes such as proliferation and differentiation. Identification of REGs and elucidating their functions may help to further develop effective treatment strategies in regenerative medicine. So far, REGs have been largely identified by small-scale experimental studies and a comprehensive characterization of the diverse biological processes regulated by REGs is lacking. Therefore, there is an ever-growing need to integrate REGs at the genomics, epigenetics, and transcriptome level to provide a reference list of REGs for regeneration and regenerative medicine research. Towards achieving this, we developed the first literature-based database called REGene (REgeneration Gene database). In the current release, REGene contains 948 human (929 protein-coding and 19 non-coding genes) and 8445 homologous genes curated from gene ontology and extensive literature examination. Additionally, the REGene database provides detailed annotations for each REG, including: gene expression, methylation sites, upstream transcription factors, and protein-protein interactions. An analysis of the collected REGs reveals strong links to a variety of cancers in terms of genetic mutation, protein domains, and cellular pathways. We have prepared a web interface to share these regeneration genes, supported by refined browsing and searching functions at http://REGene.bioinfo-minzhao.org/. PMID:26975833

  18. Fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O at two European beech forests: linking soil gas production profiles with soil and stem fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Martin; Machacova, Katerina; Halaburt, Ellen; Haddad, Sally; Urban, Otmar; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    consumption sites of soil gases in the adjacent soil. Soils at both sites took up CH4 and N2O and emitted CO2. Soil gas profiles at the Black Forest showed only CH4 and N2O consumption. CH4 uptake was much larger by the well aerated Black Forest soil than by the loamy-clay soil in the White Carpathians. Here, it was possible to stratify the apparently homogenous site into two plots, one having redoximorphic features in the soil profiles, the other plot without. It seemed that CH4 and N2O were mainly produced in the deeper soil at the plot with temporarily reducing conditions. Beech stems mostly took up N2O from the atmosphere at both sites, whereas CH4 was emitted. The stem CH4 flux was higher for the White Carpathians than for the Black Forest site. Thus, the tree and soil flux of CH4 seems to be affected by soil structure, soil water content and the redox potential in the rooting space. We conclude from our results that trees might provide preferential pathways for greenhouse gases produced in the subsoil thereby enhancing the release of greenhouse gases. Acknowledgement This research was financially supported by the Czech Academy of Sciences and the German Academic Exchange Service within the project "Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from Fagus sylvatica trees" (DAAD-15-03), National Programme for Sustainability I (LO1415) and project DFG (MA 5826/2-1). We would like to thank Marek Jakubik for technical support and Sinikka Paulus for help by field measurements.

  19. Thermal conductivity of the amorphous and nanocrystalline phases of the beech wood biocarbon nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartenko, N. F.; Orlova, T. S.; Parfen'eva, L. S.; Smirnov, B. I.; Smirnov, I. A.

    2014-11-01

    Natural composites (biocarbons) obtained by carbonization of beech wood at different carbonization temperatures T carb in the range of 800-2400°C have been studied using X-ray diffraction. The composites consist of an amorphous matrix and nanocrystallites of graphite and graphene. The volume fractions of the amorphous and nanocrystalline phases as functions of T carb have been determined. Temperature dependences of the phonon thermal conductivity κ( T) of the biocarbons with different temperatures T carb (1000 and 2400°C) have been analyzed in the range of 5-300 K. It has been shown that the behavior of κ( T) of the biocarbon with T carb = 1000°C is controlled by the amorphous phase in the range of 5-50 K and by the nanocrystalline phase in the range of 100-300 K. The character of κ( T) of the biocarbon with T carb = 2400°C is determined by the heat transfer (scattering) in the nanocrystalline phase over the entire temperature range of 5-300 K.

  20. Thermal conductivity at the amorphous-nanocrystalline phase transition in beech wood biocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfen'eva, L. S.; Orlova, T. S.; Smirnov, B. I.; Smirnov, I. A.; Misiorek, H.; Jezowski, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.

    2014-05-01

    High-porosity samples of beech wood biocarbon (BE-C) were prepared by pyrolysis at carbonization temperatures T carb = 650, 1300, and 1600°C, and their resistivity ρ and thermal conductivity κ were studied in the 5-300 and 80-300 K temperature intervals. The experimental results obtained were evaluated by invoking X-ray diffraction data and information on the temperature dependences ρ( T) and κ( T) for BE-C samples prepared at T carb = 800, 1000, and 2400°C, which were collected by the authors earlier. An analysis of the κ( T carb) behavior led to the conclusion that the samples under study undergo an amorphous-nanocrystalline phase transition in the interval 800°C < T carb < 1000°C. Evaluation of the electronic component of the thermal conductivity revealed that the Lorentz number of the sample prepared at T carb = 2400°C exceeds by far the classical Sommerfeld value, which is characteristic of metals and highly degenerate semiconductors.

  1. Specific features of the electrical properties in partially graphitized porous biocarbons of beech wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. V.; Orlova, T. S.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.

    2015-09-01

    The electrical and galvanomagnetic properties of partially graphitized highly porous bioC(Ni) biocarbon matrices produced by pyrolysis (carbonization) of beech wood at temperatures T carb = 850-1600°C in the presence of a Ni-containing catalyst have been studied in comparison with their microstructural features. The temperature dependences of the resistivity, the magnetoresistance, and the Hall coefficient have been measured in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K in magnetic fields to 28 kOe. It has been shown that an additional graphite phase introduction into samples with T carb ≥ 1000°C results in an increase in the carrier mobility by a factor of 2-3, whereas the carrier (hole) concentration remains within ~1020 cm-3, as in biocarbons obtained without catalyst. An analysis of experimental data has demonstrated that the features of the conductivity and magnetoresistance of these samples are described by quantum corrections related to their structural features, i.e., the formation of a globular graphite phase of nano- and submicrometer sizes in the amorphous matrix. The quantum corrections to the conductivity decrease with increasing carbonization temperature, which indicates an increase in the degree of structure ordering and is in good agreement with microstructural data.

  2. Habitat differences influence genetic impacts of human land use on the American beech (Fagus grandifolia).

    PubMed

    Lumibao, Candice Y; McLachlan, Jason S

    2014-01-01

    Natural reforestation after regional forest clearance is a globally common land-use sequence. The genetic recovery of tree populations in these recolonized forests may depend on the biogeographic setting of the landscape, for instance whether they are in the core or in the marginal part of the species' range. Using data from 501 individuals genotyped across 7 microsatellites, we investigated whether regional differences in habitat quality affected the recovery of genetic variation in a wind-pollinated tree species, American beech (Fagus grandifolia) in Massachusetts. We compared populations in forests that were recolonized following agricultural abandonment to those in remnant forests that have only been logged in both central inland and marginal coastal regions. Across all populations in our entire study region, recolonized forests showed limited reduction of genetic diversity as only observed heterozygosity was significantly reduced in these forests (H(O) = 0.520 and 0.590, respectively). Within inland region, this pattern was observed, whereas in the coast, recolonized populations exhibited no reduction in all genetic diversity estimates. However, genetic differentiation among recolonized populations in marginal coastal habitat increased (F(st) logged = 0.072; F(st) secondary = 0.249), with populations showing strong genetic structure, in contrast to inland region. These results indicate that the magnitude of recovery of genetic variation in recolonized populations can vary at different habitats.

  3. Canopy carbon budget of Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata) sapling under free air ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Makoto; Hoshika, Yasutomo; Inada, Naoki; Koike, Takayoshi

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effects of ozone (O3) on the canopy carbon budget, we investigated photosynthesis and respiration of leaves of Siebold's beech saplings under free air O3 exposure (60 nmol mol(-1), during daytime) in relation to the within-canopy light gradient; we then calculated the canopy-level photosynthetic carbon gain (PCG) and respiratory carbon loss (RCL) using a canopy photosynthesis model. Susceptibilities of photosynthesis and respiration to O3 were greater in leaves of upper canopy than in the lower canopy. The canopy net carbon gain (NCG) was reduced by O3 by 12.4% during one growing season. The increased RCL was the main factor for the O3-induced reduction in NCG in late summer, while contributions of the reduced PCG and the increased RCL to the NCG were almost the same in autumn. These results indicate contributions of changes in PCG and RCL under O3 to NCG were different between seasons.

  4. Variation in throughfall deposition across a deciduous beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest edge in Flanders.

    PubMed

    Devlaeminck, Rebecca; De Schrijver, An; Hermy, Martin

    2005-01-20

    Throughfall deposition and canopy exchange of acidifying and eutrophying compounds and major base cations were studied by means of throughfall analysis in a deciduous beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest edge in Belgium over a period of 1 year. Throughfall fluxes of Cl(-), NH(4)(+) and Na(+) were significantly elevated at the forest edge compared to the forest interior. As no edge effect on throughfall water volume could be detected, the observed edge enhancement effects were mainly due to dry deposition and canopy exchange patterns. Indeed, there was an elevated dry deposition of Cl(-), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) up to 50 m from the field/forest border. Within the forest, throughfall and dry deposition of SO(4)(2-) were highly variable and no significant differences were observed between the forest edge and the forest interior. Leaching of K(+) and Ca(2+) was reduced in the forest edge up to a distance of 30 m from the border. The measured nitrogen and acidic depositions far exceeded the current Flemish critical loads with respect to the protection of biodiversity in forests, especially at the forest edge. This points to an urgent need for controlling emissions as well as the need to consider the elevated deposition load in forest edges when calculating the critical loads in forests.

  5. Influence of Climatic Type of Year on Beech and Scots Pine Eustress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubenova, Mariyana; Chikalanov, Alexandre; van Bodegom, Peter; Kattge, Jens; Popova, Silvia; Zlateva, Plamena

    2016-04-01

    The present study deals with the relationships of climate types and the periods with low radial stem growth of black pine and beech locations in Europe. The identification of climatic types (CT) and eustress caused CT, their relative participation in the period of 1901-2009 by locations, the manifestation of main adverse type, led periodically to reduction of tree ring width, as well as the comparison of obtained types by precipitations and the SPI classes were the subjects of investigation. The analyses demonstrated that despite the local differences, the stress impact of dry and wet years, especially if they are accompanied by the cold or hot regimes, is well expressed. The successive changes of climate types at least two years before the eustress year are also relevant. The application of climatic types to study the relationship with trees eustress is more applicable when there are no large deviations in temperatures or precipitations by years and locations. The demonstrated holistic analyses are applicable for the forest areas monitoring and management. Key words Pinus sylvestris L., Fagus sylvatica L., climatic type, SPI, eustress, SPPAM application, SPI

  6. Effects of liming on potential oxalate secretion and iron chelation of beech ectomycorrhizal root tips.

    PubMed

    Rineau, François; Garbaye, Jean

    2010-08-01

    Liming is used to counteract forest decline induced by soil acidification. It consists of Ca and Mg input to forest soil and not only restores tree mineral nutrition but also modifies the availability of nutrients in soil. Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi are involved in mineral nutrient uptake by trees and can recover them through dissolution of mineral surface. Oxalate and siderophore secretion are considered as the main agents of mineral weathering by ECMs. Here, we studied the effects of liming on the potential oxalate secretion and iron complexation by individual beech ECM root tips. Results show that freshly excised Lactarius subdulcis root tips from limed plots presented a high potential oxalate exudation of 177 μM tip(-1) h(-1). As this ECM species distribution is very dense, it is likely that, in the field, oxalate concentrations in the vicinity of its clusters could be very high. This points out that not only extraradical mycelium but also ECM root tips of certain species can contribute significantly to mineral weathering. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) separated potential oxalate production by ECM root tips in limed and untreated plots, and this activity was mainly driven by L. subdulcis ECMs, but NMDS on potential activity of iron mobilization by ECM root tips did not show a difference between limed and untreated plots. As the mean oxalate secretion did not significantly correlated with the mean iron mobilization by ECM morphotype, we conclude that iron complexation was due to either other organic acids or to siderophores.

  7. Dissolution of beech and spruce milled woods in LiCl/DMSO.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguo; Yokoyama, Tomoya; Chang, Hou-Min; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2009-07-22

    A novel solvent system, lithium chloride/dimethyl sulfoxide (LiCl/DMSO), was developed for dissolving milled wood. This system completely dissolved beech and spruce milled woods prepared from the Wiley woods (coarse wood meals prepared by a Wiley mill) by 2 h planetary ball-milling under the milling conditions employed. The dependence of the structural change of lignin on the degree of milling was examined to evaluate the correlation between the dissolution and lignin structure. The nitrobenzene oxidation analyses showed that the 2 h milling caused almost no structural change in the aromatic part of lignin in the milled woods. The ozonation analyses suggested that the decrease of the erythro ratio [erythro/(erythro + threo)] obtained from beta-O-4 structure in lignin is only 0.35% after the 2 h milling. Although the yield decrease of the ozonation products was 9.8% after the 2 h milling, this value was fairly smaller than that after a longer time milling. When it is taken into consideration that the other solvent systems for dissolution of wood meal, which are proposed by Lu and Ralph, require 5 h of milling under the same milling conditions to dissolve the milled woods, it is safely stated that the LiCl/DMSO solvent system completely dissolves milled wood, the lignin of which is structurally less altered and, thus, is expected to provide an improved method for structural analysis of the entire lignin fraction in wood cell wall.

  8. Tissue regeneration with photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Elieza G.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2013-03-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has been widely reported to reduce pain and inflammation and enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration in various settings. LLLT has been noted to have both stimulatory and inhibitory biological effects and these effects have been termed Photobiomodulation (PBM). Several elegant studies have shown the key role of Cytochrome C oxidase and ROS in initiating this process. The downstream biological responses remain to be clearly elucidated. Our work has demonstrated activation of an endogenous latent growth factor complex, TGF-β1, as one of the major biological events in PBM. TGF-β1 has critical roles in various biological processes especially in inflammation, immune responses, wound healing and stem cell biology. This paper overviews some of the studies demonstrating the efficacy of PBM in promoting tissue regeneration.

  9. Trithorax regulates systemic signaling during Drosophila imaginal disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Andrea; Khan, Sumbul Jawed; Smith-Bolton, Rachel K

    2015-10-15

    Although tissue regeneration has been studied in a variety of organisms, from Hydra to humans, many of the genes that regulate the ability of each animal to regenerate remain unknown. The larval imaginal discs of the genetically tractable model organism Drosophila melanogaster have complex patterning, well-characterized development and a high regenerative capacity, and are thus an excellent model system for studying mechanisms that regulate regeneration. To identify genes that are important for wound healing and tissue repair, we have carried out a genetic screen for mutations that impair regeneration in the wing imaginal disc. Through this screen we identified the chromatin-modification gene trithorax as a key regeneration gene. Here we show that animals heterozygous for trithorax are unable to maintain activation of a developmental checkpoint that allows regeneration to occur. This defect is likely to be caused by abnormally high expression of puckered, a negative regulator of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, at the wound site. Insufficient JNK signaling leads to insufficient expression of an insulin-like peptide, dILP8, which is required for the developmental checkpoint. Thus, trithorax regulates regeneration signaling and capacity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Horizontal bone augmentation by means of guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Benic, Goran I; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2014-10-01

    The development of bone augmentation procedures has allowed placement of dental implants into jaw bone areas lacking an amount of bone sufficient for standard implant placement. Thus, the indications for implants have broadened to include jaw regions with bone defects and those with a bone anatomy that is unfavorable for implant anchorage. Of the different techniques, the best documented and the most widely used method to augment bone in localized alveolar defects is guided bone regeneration. A large body of evidence has demonstrated the successful use of guided bone regeneration to regenerate missing bone at implant sites with insufficient bone volume and the long-term success of implants placed simultaneously with, or after, guided bone regeneration. However, the influence of guided bone regeneration on implant survival and success rates, and the long-term stability of the augmented bone, remain unknown. Many of the materials and techniques currently available for bone regeneration of alveolar ridge defects were developed many years ago. Recently, various new materials and techniques have been introduced. Many of them have, however, not been sufficiently documented in clinical studies. The aim of this review was to present the scientific basis of guided bone regeneration and the accepted clinical procedures. A classification of bone defects has been presented, aiming at simplifying the decision-making process regarding the choice of strategy for bone augmentation. Finally, an outlook into actual research and the possible future options related to bone augmentation has been provided.

  11. [Periodontitis and tissue regeneration].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2005-08-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a destructive disease that affects the supporting structures of the teeth including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. If left untreated, patients may lose multiple teeth and extensive prosthetic treatment will be required. In order to re-engineer lost tooth-supporting tissues, various therapeutic modalities have been used clinically. Periodontal regeneration procedures including guided tissue regeneration have achieved substantial effects. However, there are several issues to be solved. They are highly technique-sensitive, applicable to limited cases which are susceptible to treatment, and supposed to have relatively low predictability. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new approaches to improve the predictability and effectiveness of regenerative therapies for periodontal tissues. Recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been introduced to restore lost tissues more effectively where the biological process of healing is mimicked. To achieve this, integration of three key elements is required: progenitor/stem cells, growth factors and the extracellular matrix scaffold. Although it has been shown that implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into periodontal osseous defects induced regeneration of cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone in dogs, further extensive preclinical studies are required. On the other hand, application of growth factors, particularly basic fibroblast growth factor in the treatment of human periodontitis, is promising and is now in clinical trial. Furthermore, the rate of release of growth factor from the scaffold also can profoundly affect the results of tissue engineering strategies and the development of new materials is expected. In addition, as tissue regenerative potential is negatively regulated by aging, the effects of aging have to be clarified to gain complete regeneration.

  12. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  13. Relationships between advance oak regeneration and biotic and abiotic factors.

    PubMed

    Fei, Songlin; Steiner, Kim C

    2008-07-01

    Relationships between advance regeneration of four tree species (red maple (Acer rubrum L.), white oak (Quercus alba L.), chestnut oak (Q. montana Willd.) and northern red oak (Q. rubra L.)) and biotic (non-tree vegetation and canopy composition) and abiotic (soil series and topographic variables) factors were investigated in 52, mature mixed-oak stands in the central Appalachians. Aggregate height was used as a composite measure of regeneration abundance. Analyses were carried out separately for two physiographic provinces. Associations with tree regeneration were found for all biotic and abiotic factors both in partial models and full models. Red maple was abundant on most of the sites, but high red maple abundance was commonly associated with wet north-facing slopes with little or no cover of mountain-laurel (Kalmia latifolia L.) and hay-scented fern (Dennstaedtia punctilobula (Michx.) Moore). Regeneration of the three oak species was greatly favored by the abundance of overstory trees of their own kind. White oak regeneration was most abundant on south-facing, gentle, lower slopes with soils in the Buchanan series. Chestnut oak regeneration was more common on south-facing, steep upper slopes with stony soils. There was a positive association between chestnut oak and huckleberry (Gaylussacia baccata (Wangh.) Koch) cover classes. Northern red oak was more abundant on north-facing wet sites with Hazleton soil, and was associated with low occurrence of mountain-laurel and hay-scented fern.

  14. Regeneration-Type Nerve Electrode Using Bundled Microfluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Kotake, Naoki; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Takeuchi, Shoji

    Neural interface devices that will allow signals from the human nervous system to control external equipment are extremely important for the next generation of prosthetic systems. A novel multichannel regeneration-type nerve electrode designed to record from and stimulate peripheral nerves has been developed to allow the control of artificial hands and to generate artificial sensations. In this study a novel flexible regeneration microelectrode based on the nerve regeneration principle was designed and fabricated using MEMS technologies. The electrode, which was fabricated on a 25-μm-thick Parylene C substrate, has multiple fluidic channels. Each fluidic channel was 100 μm wide × 30 μm high × 1500 μm long and featured multiple electrodes inside them as recording and stimulating sites. They also served as guidance channels for the regenerating axons.

  15. A new biological approach to guided bone and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Marco; Callea, Michele; Yavuz, Izzet; Maglione, Michele

    2013-04-09

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) membranes used for guided bone and tissue regeneration. A patient with insufficient alveolar ridge width in aesthetic zone was enrolled. The patient's blood was centrifuged to obtain PRF membranes. Autogenous bone graft was mixed with bovine hydroxyapatite, PRF particles and applied to fill the defect. Five PRF membranes were placed over the bone mix. After 4 months a cone-beam CT was performed to evaluate bone regeneration. The use of PRF as cover membrane permitted a rapid epithelisation and represented an effective barrier versus epithelial cell penetration. After 4 months the site appeared precociously healed and the bone volume increased. This new approach represents a predictable method of augmenting deficient alveolar ridges. Guided bone regeneration with PRF showed limitation compared with guided bone regeneration using collagen membrane in terms of bone gain. The association of collagen membrane and PRF could be a good association.

  16. Rat liver regeneration following ablation with irreversible electroporation.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Alexander; Bruinsma, Bote G; Jaramillo, Maria; Yarmush, Martin L; Uygun, Basak E

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, irreversible electroporation (IRE) ablation has emerged as a promising tool for the treatment of multiple diseases including hepatic cancer. However, the mechanisms behind the tissue regeneration following IRE ablation have not been investigated. Our results indicate that IRE treatment immediately kills the cells at the treatment site preserving the extracellular architecture, in effect causing in vivo decellularization. Over the course of 4 weeks, progenitor cell differentiation, through YAP and notch pathways, together with hepatocyte expansion led to almost complete regeneration of the ablated liver leading to the formation of hepatocyte like cells at the ablated zone. We did not observe significant scarring or tumor formation at the regenerated areas 6 months post IRE. Our study suggests a new model to study the regeneration of liver when the naïve extracellular matrix is decellularized in vivo with completely preserved extracellular architecture.

  17. Rat liver regeneration following ablation with irreversible electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Bote G.; Jaramillo, Maria; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, irreversible electroporation (IRE) ablation has emerged as a promising tool for the treatment of multiple diseases including hepatic cancer. However, the mechanisms behind the tissue regeneration following IRE ablation have not been investigated. Our results indicate that IRE treatment immediately kills the cells at the treatment site preserving the extracellular architecture, in effect causing in vivo decellularization. Over the course of 4 weeks, progenitor cell differentiation, through YAP and notch pathways, together with hepatocyte expansion led to almost complete regeneration of the ablated liver leading to the formation of hepatocyte like cells at the ablated zone. We did not observe significant scarring or tumor formation at the regenerated areas 6 months post IRE. Our study suggests a new model to study the regeneration of liver when the naïve extracellular matrix is decellularized in vivo with completely preserved extracellular architecture. PMID:26819842

  18. Regeneration of optic nerve fibers of adult mammals.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masami

    2010-09-01

    The pathway from the retina to the brain in mammals provides a well-defined model system for investigation of not only surviving axotomy but also axonal regeneration of injured neurons. Here I introduce our recent works on axonal regeneration in the optic nerve (OpN) of adult cats. Fibers of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) extend beyond the crush site of OpN with injections of a macrophage stimulator (oxidized galectin-1) or a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-39983 or Y-27632) while axonal extension is blocked with injection of saline. Elongation of crushed optic fibers, however, is slowed after 2 weeks. Transplantation of peripheral nerve makes RGCs regenerate their transected axons into a graft but regenerated fibers extend only a few mm in the brain. Effectiveness of combination of the drugs and treatments has to be verified in future.

  19. Analysis of the Function of Apoptosis during Imaginal Wing Disc Regeneration in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Garcia, Sandra; Ahmed, Sara; Baonza, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration is the ability that allows organisms to replace missing organs or lost tissue after injuries. This ability requires the coordinated activity of different cellular processes, including programmed cell death. Apoptosis plays a key role as a source of signals necessary for regeneration in different organisms. The imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster provide a particularly well-characterised model system for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying regeneration. Although it has been shown that signals produced by apoptotic cells are needed for homeostasis and regeneration of some tissues of this organism, such as the adult midgut, the contribution of apoptosis to disc regeneration remains unclear. Using a new method for studying disc regeneration in physiological conditions, we have defined the pattern of cell death in regenerating discs. Our data indicate that during disc regeneration, cell death increases first at the wound edge, but as regeneration progresses dead cells can be observed in regions far away from the site of damage. This result indicates that apoptotic signals initiated in the wound spread throughout the disc. We also present results which suggest that the partial inhibition of apoptosis does not have a major effect on disc regeneration. Finally, our results suggest that during disc regeneration distinct apoptotic signals might be acting simultaneously.

  20. STAT3 accelerates uterine epithelial regeneration in a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Takehiro; Saito-Fujita, Tomoko; Matsuo, Mitsunori; Egashira, Mahiro; Matsumoto, Leona; Haraguchi, Hirofumi; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Furukawa, Katsuko S.; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Although a close connection between uterine regeneration and successful pregnancy in both humans and mice has been consistently observed, its molecular basis remains unclear. We here established a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix (DUM) transplantation. Resected mouse uteri were processed with SDS to make DUMs without any intact cells. DUMs were transplanted into the mouse uteri with artificially induced defects, and all the uterine layers were recovered at the DUM transplantation sites within a month. In the regenerated uteri, normal hormone responsiveness in early pregnancy was observed, suggesting the regeneration of functional uteri. Uterine epithelial cells rapidly migrated and formed a normal uterine epithelial layer within a week, indicating a robust epithelial-regenerating capacity. Stromal and myometrial regeneration occurred following epithelial regeneration. In ovariectomized mice, uterine regeneration of the DUM transplantation was similarly observed, suggesting that ovarian hormones are not essential for this regeneration process. Importantly, the regenerating epithelium around the DUM demonstrated heightened STAT3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation, which was suppressed in uteri of Stat3 conditional knockout mice. These data suggest a key role of STAT3 in the initial step of the uterine regeneration process. The DUM transplantation model is a powerful tool for uterine regeneration research. PMID:27358915

  1. Enhanced simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated beech wood by in situ treatment with the white rot fungus Irpex lacteus in a membrane aerated biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Brethauer, Simone; Robert Lawrence, Shahab; Michael Hans-Peter, Studer

    2017-03-18

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the combination of steam pretreatment and biological treatment with lignin degrading fungal strains in order to enable efficient bioprocessing of beech wood to ethanol. In a sequential process of steam and fungal pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis, Irpex lacteus almost doubled the glucose yield for mildly pretreated beech wood, but could not improve yields for more severely pretreated substrates. However, when simultaneous saccharification and fermentation is combined with in situ I. lacteus treatment, which is enabled by the application of a membrane aerated biofilm reactor, ethanol yields of optimally steam pretreated beech could be improved from 65 to 80%. Generally, in situ fungal treatment during bioprocessing of lignocellulose is an interesting method to harness the versatile abilities of white rot fungi.

  2. Changes in susceptibility of beech (Fagus sylvatica) seedlings towards Phytophthora citricola under the influence of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, F; Raidl, S; Osswald, W F

    2010-04-01

    The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) predicts changes in susceptibility of plants against herbivores with changing resource availability. In the presented study we tested the validity of the GDBH for trees infected with a root pathogen. For this purpose Fagus sylvatica seedlings grown under different atmospheric CO(2)- and soil nitrogen regimes were infected with the root pathogen Phytophthora citricola. High nitrogen supply increased total biomass of beech regardless of the CO(2)-treatment, whereas elevated CO(2) enhanced biomass only in the high nitrogen treatment. The responses of beech under the different growing regimes to the Phytophthora root infection were not in line with the predictions of the GDBH. Enhanced susceptibility of beech against P. citricola was found in seedlings grown under elevated CO(2) and low nitrogen supply. Fifteen months after inoculation these plants were characterized by enhanced water use efficiency, by altered root-shoot ratios, and by enhanced specific root tip densities. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Regeneration complexities of Pinus gerardiana in dry temperate forests of Indian Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Shamet, G S; Mehta, Harsh; Alam, N M; Kaushal, Rajesh; Chaturvedi, O P; Sharma, Navneet; Khaki, B A; Gupta, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    Pinus gerardiana is considered an important species in dry temperate forests of North-Western Indian Himalaya because of its influence on ecological processes and economic dependence of local people in the region. But, large numbers of biotic and abiotic factors have affected P. gerardiana in these forests; hence, there is a crucial need to understand the regeneration dynamics of this tree species. The present investigation was conducted in P. gerardiana forests to understand vegetation pattern and regeneration processes on different sites in the region. Statistical analysis was performed to know variability in growing stock and regeneration on sample plots, while correlation coefficients and regression models were developed to find the relationship between regeneration and site factors. The vegetation study showed dominance of P. gerardiana, which is followed by Cedrus deodara, Pinus wallichiana and Quercus ilex in the region. The growing stock of P. gerardiana showed steep increasing and then steadily declining trend from lower to higher diameter class. The distribution of seedling, sapling, pole and trees was not uniform at different sites and less number of plots in each site were observed to have effective conditions for continuous regeneration, but mostly showed extremely limited regeneration. Regeneration success ranging from 8.44 to 15.93 % was recorded in different sites of the region, which suggests that in different sites regeneration success is influenced by collection of cone for extracting seed, grazing/browsing and physico-chemical properties of soil. Regeneration success showed significant correlation and relationship with most of abiotic and biotic factors. The regeneration success is lower than the requirement of sustainable forest, but varies widely among sites in dry temperate forests of Himalaya. More forest surveys are required to understand the conditions necessary for greater success of P. gerardiana in the region.

  4. How regenerating lymphatics function: lessons from lizard tails.

    PubMed

    Blacker, Helen A; Tsopelas, Chris; Orgeig, Sandra; Daniels, Christopher B; Chatterton, Barry E

    2007-01-01

    Rational treatment of lymphoedema may be improved in the future with a better understanding of the physiological processes involved in the regeneration of new lymphatic vessels (lymphangiogenesis). Many lizard species undergo tail autotomy as a predator escape response and subsequently regenerate nonlymphoedematous tails. Such species may offer novel models for examining lymphangiogenesis. In this lymphoscintigraphic evaluation, three radioactive tracers were employed, (99m)Tc-antimony trisulphide colloid (approximately 10 nm diameter), (99m)Tc-tin fluoride colloid (approximately 2,000 nm; (99m)Tc-TFC), and (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (soluble; (99m)Tc-DTPA), to examine lymphatic function in regenerating tails of the Australian marbled gecko, Christinus marmoratus. Rate of local clearance and velocity of migration were determined in geckos with original tails and at 6, 9, 12, and >24 weeks after autotomy. In original-tailed geckos, the smaller radiocolloid was cleared to a greater extent and had a faster lymph velocity than in geckos with regenerated tails. The same parameters measured for larger particles were greater in early regeneration than later. (99m)Tc-TFC did not migrate from the injection site in fully regenerated and original gecko tails, which indicates that larger particles are increasingly impeded as tail regeneration progresses. Soluble (99m)Tc-DTPA diffused from the injection site extremely rapidly via venous capillaries in all tails, confirming that the slower clearance of the colloids is solely via the lymphatics. Differences in clearance and lymph velocity between differently sized colloids throughout tail regeneration may be influenced by changes in surrounding tissue structure density and the lymphatic vessel porosity. c 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. The production, localization and spreading of reactive oxygen species contributes to the low vitality of long-term stored common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Ewelina; Małecka, Arleta; Bagniewska-Zadworna, Agnieszka; Kalemba, Ewa Marzena

    2015-02-01

    The common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is propagated by seeds, but the seed set is irregular with five to ten years in between crops. It is therefore necessary to store the seeds. However, beech seeds lose germinability during long-term storage. In this study, beech seeds were stored at -10°C under controlled conditions for 2, 5, 8, 11 and 13 years. Our results show that beech seeds lose germinability during storage in proportion to the duration of storage. The decrease in germinability correlated with increased electrolyte leakage and accumulation of superoxide anion radicals, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. Furthermore, a strong positive correlation was observed among the releases of superoxide anion radicals, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. In situ localization showed that superoxide anion radicals and hydrogen peroxide were first detectable in root cap cells. When the seed storage time was extended, the reactive oxygen species fluorescence expanded to more areas of the radicle, reaching the root apical meristem. A storage time-dependent decrease in catalase activity, observed in both embryonic axes and cotyledons, was also positively correlated with germinability. DNA fragmentation was observed in beech seeds during storage and occurred predominantly in embryonic axes stored for 5 years and more. Altogether, these results suggest that the loss of germinability in beech seeds during long-term storage depends on several factors, including strong of reactive oxygen species accumulation accompanied by reduced catalase activity as well as membrane injury and DNA alternations, which may be aging-related and ROS-derived. We suggest that the accumulating reactive oxygen species that spread to the root apical meristem are key factors that affect seed germinability after long-term storage.

  6. Regenerating Water-Sterilizing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine-dispensing resin can be regenerated after iodine content has been depleted, without being removed from water system. Resin is used to make water potable by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Regeneration technique may be come basis of water purifier for very long space missions. Enough crystalline iodine for multiple regenerations during mission can be stored in one small cartridge. Cartridge could be inserted in waterline as necessary on signal from iodine monitor or timer.

  7. Regenerating Water-Sterilizing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine-dispensing resin can be regenerated after iodine content has been depleted, without being removed from water system. Resin is used to make water potable by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Regeneration technique may be come basis of water purifier for very long space missions. Enough crystalline iodine for multiple regenerations during mission can be stored in one small cartridge. Cartridge could be inserted in waterline as necessary on signal from iodine monitor or timer.

  8. Timbre Brownfield Prioritization Tool to support effective brownfield regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pizzol, Lisa; Zabeo, Alex; Klusáček, Petr; Giubilato, Elisa; Critto, Andrea; Frantál, Bohumil; Martinát, Standa; Kunc, Josef; Osman, Robert; Bartke, Stephan

    2016-01-15

    In the last decade, the regeneration of derelict or underused sites, fully or partly located in urban areas (or so called "brownfields"), has become more common, since free developable land (or so called "greenfields") has more and more become a scare and, hence, more expensive resource, especially in densely populated areas. Although the regeneration of brownfield sites can offer development potentials, the complexity of these sites requires considerable efforts to successfully complete their revitalization projects and the proper selection of promising sites is a pre-requisite to efficiently allocate the limited financial resources. The identification and analysis of success factors for brownfield sites regeneration can support investors and decision makers in selecting those sites which are the most advantageous for successful regeneration. The objective of this paper is to present the Timbre Brownfield Prioritization Tool (TBPT), developed as a web-based solution to assist stakeholders responsible for wider territories or clusters of brownfield sites (portfolios) to identify which brownfield sites should be preferably considered for redevelopment or further investigation. The prioritization approach is based on a set of success factors properly identified through a systematic stakeholder engagement procedure. Within the TBPT these success factors are integrated by means of a Multi Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) methodology, which includes stakeholders' requalification objectives and perspectives related to the brownfield regeneration process and takes into account the three pillars of sustainability (economic, social and environmental dimensions). The tool has been applied to the South Moravia case study (Czech Republic), considering two different requalification objectives identified by local stakeholders, namely the selection of suitable locations for the development of a shopping centre and a solar power plant, respectively. The application of the TBPT to

  9. Understanding Urban Regeneration in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candas, E.; Flacke, J.; Yomralioglu, T.

    2016-06-01

    In Turkey, rapid population growth, informal settlements, and buildings and infrastructures vulnerable to natural hazards are seen as the most important problems of cities. Particularly disaster risk cannot be disregarded, as large parts of various cities are facing risks from earthquakes, floods and landslides and have experienced loss of lives in the recent past. Urban regeneration is an important planning tool implemented by local and central governments in order to reduce to disaster risk and to design livable environments for the citizens. The Law on the Regeneration of Areas under Disaster Risk, commonly known as the Urban Regeneration Law, was enacted in 2012 (Law No.6306, May 2012). The regulation on Implementation of Law No. 6306 explains the fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process. The relevant institutions furnished with various authorities such as expropriation, confiscation and changing the type and place of your property which makes urban regeneration projects very important in terms of property rights. Therefore, urban regeneration projects have to be transparent, comprehensible and acceptable for all actors in the projects. In order to understand the urban regeneration process, the legislation and projects of different municipalities in Istanbul have been analyzed. While some steps of it are spatial data demanding, others relate to land values. In this paper an overview of the urban regeneration history and activities in Turkey is given. Fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process are defined, and particularly spatial-data demanding steps are identified.

  10. Brain regeneration in anuran amphibians.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tetsuya; Yoshino, Jun; Kado, Koji; Tochinai, Shin

    2007-02-01

    Urodele amphibians are highly regenerative animals. After partial removal of the brain in urodeles, ependymal cells around the wound surface proliferate, differentiate into neurons and glias and finally regenerate the lost tissue. In contrast to urodeles, this type of brain regeneration is restricted only to the larval stages in anuran amphibians (frogs). In adult frogs, whereas ependymal cells proliferate in response to brain injury, they cannot migrate and close the wound surface, resulting in the failure of regeneration. Therefore frogs, in particular Xenopus, provide us with at least two modes to study brain regeneration. One is to study normal regeneration by using regenerative larvae. In this type of study, the requirement of reconnection between a regenerating brain and sensory neurons was demonstrated. Functional restoration of a regenerated telencephalon was also easily evaluated because Xenopus shows simple responses to the stimulus of a food odor. The other mode is to compare regenerative larvae and non-regenerative adults. By using this mode, it is suggested that there are regeneration-competent cells even in the non-regenerative adult brain, and that immobility of those cells might cause the failure of regeneration. Here we review studies that have led to these conclusions.

  11. Regeneration therapy for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Takashi

    2003-06-01

    Regeneration therapy can be classified into three categories. The first category, in vitro regeneration therapy, makes use of transplanted cultured cells, including embryonic stem (ES) cells, pancreatic precursor cells and beta-cell lines, in conjunction with immunosuppressive therapy or immunoisolation for the treatment of patients with Type 1 diabetes. In the second type of regeneration therapy, ex vivo regeneration therapy, a patient's own cells, such as bone marrow stem cells, are transiently removed and induced to differentiate into beta-cells in vitro. However, at the present time, insulin-producing cells cannot be generated from bone marrow stem cells. In vivo regeneration therapy, the third type of regeneration therapy, enables impaired tissue to regenerate from a patient's own cells in vivo. beta-Cell neogenesis from non-beta-cells, and beta-cell proliferation in vivo have been considered in particular as regeneration therapies for patients with Type 2 diabetes. Regeneration therapy for pancreatic beta-cells can be combined with various other therapeutic strategies, including islet transplantation, cell-based therapy, gene therapy and drug therapy, to promote beta-cell proliferation and neogenesis; it is hoped that these strategies will, in the future, provide a cure for diabetes.

  12. Tree girdling as a tool to study plant-microbe C- and N interactions in beech rhizsophere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenmann, Michael; Simon, Judy; Gasche, Rainer; Pena, Rodica; Polle, Andrea; Rennenberg, Heinz; Papen, Hans

    2010-05-01

    Nitrogen cycling in terrestrial ecosystems is complex since it involves the closely interwoven processes of both N uptake by plants and microbial turnover of a variety of N metabolites. Major interactions between plants and microorganisms involve competition for the same N species, provision of plant nutrients by microorganisms and labile carbon supply to microorganisms by plants via root exudation. Despite these close links between microbial N metabolism and plant N uptake, only few studies tried to overcome isolated views of plant N acquisition or microbial N fluxes. Here we studied competitive patterns of N fluxes in a mountainous beech forest ecosystem between both plants and microorganisms by reducing rhizodeposition by tree girdling. Besides labile C and N pools in soil, we investigated total microbial biomass in soil, microbial N turnover (N mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, microbial immobilization) as well as microbial community structure using denitrifiers and mycorrhizal fungi as model organisms for important functional groups. Furthermore, plant uptake of organic and inorganic N and N metabolite profiles in roots were determined. Surprisingly plants preferred organic over inorganic nitrogen and nitrate over ammonium in all treatments. Microbial N turnover and microbial biomass were in general negatively correlated to plant nitrogen acquisition and plant nitrogen pools, thus indicating strong competition for nitrogen between plants and free living microorganisms. The abundance of the dominant mycorrhizal fungi Cenococcum geophilum was negatively correlated to total soil microbial biomass but positively correlated to glutamine uptake by beech and amino acid concentration in fine roots indicating a significant role of this mycorrhizal fungus in the acquisition of organic N by beech. Tree girdling in general resulted in a decrease of dissolved organic carbon and total microbial biomass in soil while the abundance of Cenococcum geophilum

  13. Transport of soluble carbohydrates in temperate deciduous trees: beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior) in comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoms, Ronny; Köhler, Michael; Gessler, Arthur; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    The structure of phloem cells and the physiology of the transport of soluble carbohydrates in plants are well studied. However, the influence of different phloem un- and uploading strategies on the translocation of carbohydrates in different tree species is largely unknown. Therefore, we conducted a pulse labeling on 20 young trees of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) respectively, using the stable isotope 13C in a temperate deciduous forest in Central Germany. In one growing season each tree species was labeled in a closed transparent plastic chamber with 99% 13CO2 for 5 h. The compound specific δ 13C from carbohydrates in the different compartments leaf, branch, stem and root was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography linked with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HPLC-IRMS). We found that both tree species used sucrose as a transport sugar, but carbohydrates of the raffinose group (RFO) served as main transport sugar in ash trees. This indicate that beech used only the apoplastic loading strategy into the phloem cells while ash trees relied on both, apoplastic and symplastic loading, preferring the latter at the end of the growing season. Furthermore, we observed different transport velocities of labeled sugars in the two species. Here, sucrose in beech and carbohydrates of the RFO in ash were transported fastest, whereas sucrose was constantly slowest in ash trees. The label of carbohydrates was found over 60 day in the roots of both tree species, with the highest δ 13C enrichment in carbohydrates of RFO than in the other sugars. Accordingly, the mean residence time (MRT) and half life time (HLT) of 13C in different compartments were longest for carbohydrates of RFO in roots (25.6 days) and sucrose in stems (14.9 days), while the shortest MRT and HLT for sucrose appeared in beech in all compartments. Our results give evidence that RFO are preferentially transported to the root tissue as an agent against frost

  14. Response of Soil Respiration to Repeated Extreme Events in a Temperate Beech Forest in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, S.; Kobler, J.; Holtermann, C.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Saronjic, N.; Zimmermann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change research predicts an increase in weather extremes like severe droughts and heavy rainfalls in central Europe. Since soil moisture is one of the most important drivers of soil respiration, a change in precipitation regime is likely to influence ecosystem C cycling. During drying of soils, soil microbial activity decreases and dead microbial cells, osmolytes, and semi-decomposed organic matter accumulate. When dry soils are rewetted, this easily-decomposable C leads to a pulse in soil respiration, a phenomenon known as "Birch-effect". In terms of annual soil CO2emissions, it is not clear whether these post-wetting respiration pulses outweigh or even overcompensate preceding drought-induced reductions in soil respiration. To investigate the impact of repeated drought and heavy rainfall events, a two-year precipitation manipulation experiment was conducted in an Austrian beech forest. Experimental plots were covered with transparent roofs to exclude rainfall, and an irrigation system was used to simulate heavy rainfall events. Control plots received natural precipitation. Soil respiration was monitored 3-hourly with an automatic static chamber system connected to an infrared CO2 analyzer. Soil temperature (Tsoil) and volumetric water content (VWC) were recorded with a datalogger. Various statistical models were tested to describe the relationship between soil respiration, Tsoiland VWC. Our results showed that repeated extreme events strongly reduced variation in soil respiration. Droughts significantly reduced soil respiration, and reductions depended on the length of the drought period. Post-wetting respiration pulses did not outweigh drought-induced reductions. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was best described with a Lloyd & Taylor model. Furthermore, in stressed plots VWC became limiting for soil respiration. Overall, our data corroborate the importance of the precipitation regime for soil respiration.

  15. Seasonal variation in functional properties of microbial communities in beech forest soil

    PubMed Central

    Koranda, Marianne; Kaiser, Christina; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Kitzler, Barbara; Sessitsch, Angela; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Substrate quality and the availability of nutrients are major factors controlling microbial decomposition processes in soils. Seasonal alteration in resource availability, which is driven by plants via belowground C allocation, nutrient uptake and litter fall, also exerts effects on soil microbial community composition. Here we investigate if seasonal and experimentally induced changes in microbial community composition lead to alterations in functional properties of microbial communities and thus microbial processes. Beech forest soils characterized by three distinct microbial communities (winter and summer community, and summer community from a tree girdling plot, in which belowground carbon allocation was interrupted) were incubated with different 13C-labeled substrates with or without inorganic N supply and analyzed for substrate use and various microbial processes. Our results clearly demonstrate that the three investigated microbial communities differed in their functional response to addition of various substrates. The winter communities revealed a higher capacity for degradation of complex C substrates (cellulose, plant cell walls) than the summer communities, indicated by enhanced cellulase activities and reduced mineralization of soil organic matter. In contrast, utilization of labile C sources (glucose) was lower in winter than in summer, demonstrating that summer and winter community were adapted to the availability of different substrates. The saprotrophic community established in girdled plots exhibited a significantly higher utilization of complex C substrates than the more plant root associated community in control plots if additional nitrogen was provided. In this study we were able to demonstrate experimentally that variation in resource availability as well as seasonality in temperate forest soils cause a seasonal variation in functional properties of soil microorganisms, which is due to shifts in community structure and physiological adaptations

  16. Relaxed molecular clock provides evidence for long-distance dispersal of Nothofagus (southern beech).

    PubMed

    Knapp, Michael; Stöckler, Karen; Havell, David; Delsuc, Frédéric; Sebastiani, Federico; Lockhart, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    Nothofagus (southern beech), with an 80-million-year-old fossil record, has become iconic as a plant genus whose ancient Gondwanan relationships reach back into the Cretaceous era. Closely associated with Wegener's theory of "Kontinentaldrift", Nothofagus has been regarded as the "key genus in plant biogeography". This paradigm has the New Zealand species as passengers on a Moa's Ark that rafted away from other landmasses following the breakup of Gondwana. An alternative explanation for the current transoceanic distribution of species seems almost inconceivable given that Nothofagus seeds are generally thought to be poorly suited for dispersal across large distances or oceans. Here we test the Moa's Ark hypothesis using relaxed molecular clock methods in the analysis of a 7.2-kb fragment of the chloroplast genome. Our analyses provide the first unequivocal molecular clock evidence that, whilst some Nothofagus transoceanic distributions are consistent with vicariance, trans-Tasman Sea distributions can only be explained by long-distance dispersal. Thus, our analyses support the interpretation of an absence of Lophozonia and Fuscospora pollen types in the New Zealand Cretaceous fossil record as evidence for Tertiary dispersals of Nothofagus to New Zealand. Our findings contradict those from recent cladistic analyses of biogeographic data that have concluded transoceanic Nothofagus distributions can only be explained by vicariance events and subsequent extinction. They indicate that the biogeographic history of Nothofagus is more complex than envisaged under opposing polarised views expressed in the ongoing controversy over the relevance of dispersal and vicariance for explaining plant biodiversity. They provide motivation and justification for developing more complex hypotheses that seek to explain the origins of Southern Hemisphere biota.

  17. Particulate matter in terrestrial solutions: insights from a European beech forest in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, Delphis; Michalzik, Beate; Bischoff, Sebastian; Näthe, Kerstin; Gruselle, Marie-Cecile; Legates, David; Richter, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    Particulate matter (PM) can affect the functional ecology and health of forest ecosystems. Nonetheless, the cycling of particulate matter is usually neglected in studies examining the biogeochemistry of forest ecosystems. The size and shape of PM has been documented to influence both its impaction on forest canopies and its biogeochemical reactivity. So what is the size and shape of PM in bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, and Oa solution? An answer to this question is of prime importance to those wishing to better model the biogeochemistry of forests. This presentation examines the nature of PM in terrestrial solutions from a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in east-central Germany during the leafed and leafless periods. Scanning electron microscopy, image processing, and data analysis permitted quantification of the size and shape of PM in forest solutions. Building upon the work of Levia et al. [2013]* who quantified the diameter distributions of 43,278 individual particulates in bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, and Oa soil solution, this work delves into surface area, roundness, and perimeter of PM in terrestrial solutions. Initial analyses have revealed that there are marked differences in the geometry of PM in bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, and Oa solutions with implications for biogeochemical modeling of PM flux in forests. --------------- * Levia, D.F., Michalzik, B., Bischoff, S., Näthe, K., Legates, D.R., Gruselle, M.C-. and Richter, S. 2013. Measurement and modeling of diameter distributions of particulate matter in terrestrial solutions. Geophysical Research Letters 40(7): 1317-1321. [DOI: 10.1002/grl.50305] Funding note: This work was funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  18. Plant regeneration from callus of apomictic and sexual lines of Paspalum simplex and RFLP analysis of regenerated plants.

    PubMed

    Molinari, L; Busti, A; Calderini, O; Arcioni, S; Pupilli, F

    2003-07-01

    Culture conditions have been established for the induction of callus from different explants of Paspalum simplex. Fast-growing calli were obtained from hypocotyls and roots excised from 5-day-old seedlings on culture medium containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and kinetin. Rapid plant regeneration from both apomictic and sexual lines was achieved when the medium was supplemented with alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid and benzylaminopurine. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the apomixis-controlling region of the regenerated plants showed an absence of restriction site variation for the loci analysed, whereas various degrees of variation were detected for the DNA methylation sites of the same loci.

  19. Regenerable solid imine sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahan; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Fauth, Daniel; Beckman, Eric

    2013-09-10

    Two new classes of amine-based sorbents are disclosed. The first class comprises new polymer-immobilized tertiary amine sorbents; the second class new polymer-bound amine sorbents. Both classes are tailored to facilitate removal of acid anhydrides, especially carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), from effluent gases. The amines adsorb acid anhydrides in a 1:1 molar ratio. Both classes of amine sorbents adsorb in the temperature range from about 20.degree. C. upwards to 90.degree. C. and can be regenerated by heating upwards to 100.degree. C.

  20. Closed end regeneration method

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2006-06-27

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g. metal, enzyme, etc. particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as irons, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  1. Environment, vegetation, and regeneration after timber harvest in the Hungry-Pickett area of southwest Oregon.

    Treesearch

    Joseph N. Graham; Edward W. Murray; Don. Minore

    1982-01-01

    Environmental factors were related to forest regeneration on clearcut and partially cut areas managed by the Bureau of Land Management in the Hungry-Pickett area northwest of Grants Pass, Oregon. The multiple regression equations developed for this study can be used to compare the relative difficulty of regenerating forested sites within the study area. The equations...

  2. User's guide to Version 2 of the Regeneration Establishment Model: Part of the Prognosis Model

    Treesearch

    Dennis E. Ferguson; Nicholas L. Crookston

    1991-01-01

    This publication describes how to use version 2 of the Regeneration Establishment Model, a computer-based simulator that is part of the Prognosis Model for Stand Development. Conifer regeneration is predicted following harvest and site preparation for forests in western Montana, central Idaho, and northern Idaho. The influence of western spruce budworm (Choristoneura...

  3. A suggested approach for design of oak (Quercus L.) regeneration research considering regional differences

    Treesearch

    Daniel C. Dey; Martin A. Spetich; Dale R. Wiegel; Paul S. Johnson; David L. Graney; John M. Kabrick

    2009-01-01

    Research on oak (Quercus L.) regeneration has generally consisted of smallscale studies of treatments designed to favor oak, including consideration of site quality and topographic effects on oak regeneration. However, these experiments have not consistently factored in broader-scale ecological differences found in the eastern United States. Oak...

  4. Natural regeneration following timber harvest in interior cedar-hemlock-white pine forests

    Treesearch

    Dennis E. Ferguson

    1994-01-01

    Natural regeneration of interior cedar-hemlock-white pine forests is usually prompt and abundant. These productive sites support up to 10 commercial timber species. Retrospective examination of cutover forest stands allowed determination of variables that are important predictors of regeneration. This report discusses variables such as habitat type, slope, aspect,...

  5. Oak Advanced Regeneration Following Seasonal Prescribed Fires In Mixed Hardowod Sheleterwood Stands

    Treesearch

    Roderick D. Cooper; David H. van Lear; Patrick H. Brose

    1999-01-01

    Regeneration of oaks (Quercus) on productive upland sites is a long-standing silvicultural problem due to aggressive competition from faster growing indetetminant species. We hypothesized that a single prescribed fire 3-5 years after an initial shelterwood cut would increase the competitive position of oak regeneration. Three productive oak-...

  6. Postfire environmental conditions influence the spatial pattern of regeneration for Pinus ponderosa

    Treesearch

    V. H. Bonnet; Anna Schoettle; W. D. Shepperd

    2005-01-01

    Regeneration of ponderosa pine after fire depends on the patterns of seed availability and the environmental conditions that define safe sites for seedling establishment. A transect approach was applied in 2002 to determine the spatial distribution of regeneration from unburned to burned areas within the landscape impacted by the Jasper Fire of 2000 in the...

  7. Effects of seasonal prescribed fires on hardwood advance regeneration in shelterwood stands

    Treesearch

    Patrick Brose; David Van Lear

    1997-01-01

    Shelterwood harvesting of mature oak (Quercus spp. L.) stands on productive sites often fails because fast-growing intolerant and already established tolerant species outcompete oak reproduction for dominance of the advance regeneration pool. We hypothesized that prescribe fire would improve the competitive position of oak in the advance regeneration...

  8. Growth of California red fir advance regeneration after overstory removal and thinning

    Treesearch

    William W. Oliver

    1985-01-01

    Advance regeneration is common under decadent, old-growth stands of California red fir (Abies magnifica A. Murr.). Intense competition for the site's resources can create sapling stands of poor vigor and advanced age. When competition is reduced by overstory removal and thinning, suppressed advance regeneration has been shown to respond with...

  9. Shelterwood-Strip Harvesting Pattern With Full-Tree Skidding to Regenerate Red Pine

    Treesearch

    John W. Benzie; Z.A. Zasada

    1972-01-01

    Describes a harvesting and regeneration pattern for red pine stands to make efficient use of mechanized full-tree harvesting. The system is not just an engineering operation to extract trees, but a forest management operatioin to harvest mature timber, prepare the site for regeneration, and provide environmental conditions favoring tree growth and multiple-use of the...

  10. Regeneration of desiccants with solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghate, S.R.; Butts, C.L.; Lown, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Saturated silica gel was regenerated with solar energy. This paper describes the experimental set-up for silica gel regeneration and data collection. The regenerated silica gel can be used to dry high moisture in-shell pecans.

  11. Guided orthodontic regeneration: A tool to enhance conventional regenerative techniques in implant surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaitsas, Roberto; Paolone, Maria Giacinta; Paolone, Gaetano

    2015-12-01

    A hopeless upper central incisor was subjected to forced eruption before implant substitution to improve and develop the amount of soft tissue. This involved a GBR to insert the implant and a GTR to regenerate the tissue around the dehiscence of the nearby lateral using a "Guided Orthodontic Regeneration" (GOR) approach. The extrusion was performed esthetically in lingual orthodontics. The GOR technique included a Guided Orthodontic "Bone" Regeneration (GOBR) and a Guided Orthodontic "Soft Tissue" Regeneration (GOTR). This developed a 3D implant site while correcting the osseous defects and increasing the amount of soft tissue, which was used for a subsequent regenerative technique.

  12. The importance of atmospheric deposition, charge and atomic mass to the dynamics of minor and rare elements in developing, ageing, and wilted leaves of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.).

    PubMed

    Tyler, Germund; Olsson, Tommy

    2006-10-01

    The amounts of sixty elements in developing, maturing, senescent and wilting leaves, and in the wintering dead leaves attached to the branches, are reported for a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest on mor Podzol in south Sweden, a site with no local sources of pollution or geological anomalies. The amounts (contents per leaf) of K (potassium), Rb (rubidium), Cs (caesium), Cu (copper) and P (phosphorus) were highest in young leaves, decreasing throughout the growing season and usually in the subsequent winter. The entirely opposite pattern with a continuous, mostly even increase of the amounts was measured with Be (beryllium), Ba (barium), Hg (mercury), Al (aluminium), Tl (thallium), Pb (lead), Bi (bismuth), V (vanadium), W (tungsten), As (arsenic), Sb (antimony), and Se (selenium). Amounts of rare-earth elements and some transition metals, such as Co (cobalt), Ti (titanium), and the actinides Th (thorium) and U (uranium) were more stable during the growing season, after an initial increase in early summer, but increased greatly in the winter. This winter increase in dead attached leaves has to be accounted for by uptake from long-distance transported constituents in dry and wet deposition. It was similar to deposition rate estimates using moss carpets from the same locality. A passive uptake was positively related to ionic charge and atomic mass. However, the amounts of several, mainly non-essential elements, such as Ni (nickel), Sc (scandium), Zr (zirconium), Cr (chromium), Ag (silver), and Cd (cadmium) were not much lower in the young or maturing leaves than in the wintered dead leaves of this deciduous (hardwood) forest and a proportion apparently originated from internal translocation in the trees. Seasonal fluxes or cycling of many of the scarce or rare elements reported here have never been studied before in forest ecosystems.

  13. Effect of a long-term afforestation of pine in a beech domain in NE-Spain revealed by analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girona García, Antonio; Badía-Villas, David; Tomás Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio; Martí-Dalmau, Clara; González-Pérez, José Antonio

    2015-04-01

    The replacement of native beech forests (Fagus sylvatica) by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) afforestation may exert changes in soil properties, particularly in soil organic matter (SOM) [1]. It is known that the products generated by Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) pyrolysis of organic matter are related to their origin [2 and references therein]. Therefore this technique can be used to investigate said changes. In this work, Py-GC/MS is used to study changes in SOM quality surrogated to the effect of the centennial replacement of beech by Scots pine. The soils studied were two acid soil profiles developed on quartzites under a humid climate at an altitude of 1400-1500 masl from Moncayo (Iberian range, NE-Spain). For each soil profile three organic layers (litter: OL, fragmented litter OF and humified litter OH) and the mineral soil horizons (Ah, E, Bhs and C) were sampled. After 100 years since the pine afforestation, differences in the relative abundance of lipids released by pyrolysis were observed in the O-layers ranging from 3.82-7.20% in pine soils and 0.98-1.25% in beech soils. No differences were observed in mineral horizons with depth except for the C horizons where beech lipid content was much higher (21.25%) than in that under pine (1.07%). Both pine and beech soils show similar nitrogen compounds relative contents along the soil profile, increasing from OL to Ah (3.49-9.11% and 2.75-11.73% in beech and pine respectively) with a conspicuous reduction in the E horizon. It is remarkable the absence of nitrogen compounds in beech Bhs and C horizons. The relative content of aromatic compounds in O-layers show opposite trends for beech and pine; an enrichment in aromatic compounds is observed in beech OL layer (12.39%) decreasing to 4.11% in OH layer in contrast, whereas for pine O-layers the aromatic compounds relative abundance was higher in the OH (5.83%) than in the OL layer (2.8%). Mineral Ah and E horizons show similar values in

  14. Nanobiomaterials for neural regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nuan; Tian, Lingling; He, Liumin; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-09-01

    Diseases and disorders associated with nervous system such as injuries by trauma and neurodegeneration are shown to be one of the most serious problems in medicine, requiring innovative strategies to trigger and enhance the nerve regeneration. Tissue engineering aims to provide a highly biomimetic environment by using a combination of cells, materials and suitable biological cues, by which the lost body part may be regenerated or even fully rebuilt. Electrospinning, being able to produce extracellular matrix (ECM)-like nanostructures with great flexibility in design and choice of materials, have demonstrated their great potential for fabrication of nerve tissue engineered scaffolds. The review here begins with a brief description of the anatomy of native nervous system, which provides basic knowledge and ideas for the design of nerve tissue scaffolds, followed by five main parts in the design of electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds including materials selection, structural design, in vitro bioreactor, functionalization and cellular support. Performances of biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous nerve implant devices are also reviewed. Finally, future directions for advanced electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds are discussed.

  15. Nanobiomaterials for neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nuan; Tian, Lingling; He, Liumin; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-01-01

    Diseases and disorders associated with nervous system such as injuries by trauma and neurodegeneration are shown to be one of the most serious problems in medicine, requiring innovative strategies to trigger and enhance the nerve regeneration. Tissue engineering aims to provide a highly biomimetic environment by using a combination of cells, materials and suitable biological cues, by which the lost body part may be regenerated or even fully rebuilt. Electrospinning, being able to produce extracellular matrix (ECM)-like nanostructures with great flexibility in design and choice of materials, have demonstrated their great potential for fabrication of nerve tissue engineered scaffolds. The review here begins with a brief description of the anatomy of native nervous system, which provides basic knowledge and ideas for the design of nerve tissue scaffolds, followed by five main parts in the design of electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds including materials selection, structural design, in vitro bioreactor, functionalization and cellular support. Performances of biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous nerve implant devices are also reviewed. Finally, future directions for advanced electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds are discussed. PMID:27857724

  16. Regenerable Iodine Water-Disinfection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1994-01-01

    Iodinated resin bed for disinfecting water regenerated to extend useful life. Water flows through regeneration bed of crystalline iodine during regeneration. At other times, flow diverted around regeneration bed. Although regeneration cycle manually controlled readily automated to start and stop according to signals from concentration sensors. Further benefit of regeneration is bed provides highly concentrated biocide source when needed. Concentrated biocide used to superiodinate system after contamination from routine maintenance or unexpected introduction of large concentration of microbes.

  17. Regenerable Iodine Water-Disinfection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1994-01-01

    Iodinated resin bed for disinfecting water regenerated to extend useful life. Water flows through regeneration bed of crystalline iodine during regeneration. At other times, flow diverted around regeneration bed. Although regeneration cycle manually controlled readily automated to start and stop according to signals from concentration sensors. Further benefit of regeneration is bed provides highly concentrated biocide source when needed. Concentrated biocide used to superiodinate system after contamination from routine maintenance or unexpected introduction of large concentration of microbes.

  18. Molecular approach to echinoderm regeneration.

    PubMed

    Thorndyke, M C; Chen, W C; Beesley, P W; Patruno, M

    2001-12-15

    Until very recently echinoderm regeneration research and indeed echinoderm research in general has suffered because of the lack of critical mass. In terms of molecular studies of regeneration, echinoderms in particular have lagged behind other groups in this respect. This is in sharp contrast to the major advances achieved with molecular and genetic techniques in the study of embryonic development in echinoderms. The aim of our studies has been to identify genes involved in the process of regeneration and in particular neural regeneration in different echinoderm species. Our survey included the asteroid Asterias rubens and provided evidence for the expression of Hox gene homologues in regenerating radial nerve cords. Present evidence suggests: 1) ArHox1 expression is maintained in intact radial nerve cord and may be upregulated during regeneration. 2) ArHox1 expression may contribute to the dedifferentiation and/or cell proliferation process during epimorphic regeneration. From the crinoid Antedon bifida, we have been successful in cloning a fragment of a BMP2/4 homologue (AnBMP2/4) and analysing its expression during arm regeneration. Here, we discuss the importance of this family of growth factors in several regulatory spheres, including maintaining the identity of pluripotent blastemal cells or as a classic skeletal morphogenic regulator. There is clearly substantial scope for future echinoderm research in the area of molecular biology and certain aspects are discussed in this review.

  19. Effects of thermal water on skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Faga, Angela; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Gregotti, Cesarina; Finotti, Valentina; Nitto, Agnese; Gioglio, Luciana

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study was carried out in an animal (New Zealand white rabbit) wound model to evaluate any effects of a hypotonic, bicarbonate-calcium-magnesium mineral water (Comano thermal water) on skin regeneration, comparing the healing rate of split-thickness skin graft donor sites treated with the thermal water wet dressing versus a standard petrolatum gauze dressing versus a saline solution wet dressing. The study was performed in two steps; an overall of 22 animals were enrolled in the study. The wound healing progress was evaluated both by the surgeons and by the histologists. Sixty-four punch biopsies were examined in all. The histological samples were examined after staining with haematoxylin and eosin, Masson's and orcein staining and under a transmission electron microscope. The data were statistically analysed. The Comano thermal water proved to improve skin regeneration, not only by increasing keratinocyte proliferation and migration but also favourably modulating the regenerated collagen and elastic fibres in the dermis. We propose that the results of the topical treatment with the thermal water could be due to the favourable combination of a local wet environment with an anti-inflammatory action and that the regenerative properties of Comano thermal water observed in rabbits could also be applied for human use.

  20. Drug-induced regeneration in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Strehin, Iossif; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Clark, Lise; Leferovich, John; Messersmith, Phillip B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Whereas amphibians regenerate lost appendages spontaneously, mammals generally form scars over the injury site through the process of wound repair. The MRL mouse strain is an exception among mammals because it shows a spontaneous regenerative healing trait and so can be used to investigate proregenerative interventions in mammals. We report that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a central molecule in the process of regeneration in adult MRL mice. The degradation of HIF-1α protein, which occurs under normoxic conditions, is mediated by prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs). We used the drug 1,4-dihydrophenonthrolin-4-one-3-carboxylic acid (1,4-DPCA), a PHD inhibitor, to stabilize constitutive expression of HIF-1α protein. A locally injectable hydrogel containing 1,4-DPCA was designed to achieve controlled delivery of the drug over 4 to 10 days. Subcutaneous injection of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel into Swiss Webster mice that do not show a regenerative phenotype increased stable expression of HIF-1α protein over 5 days, providing a functional measure of drug release in vivo. Multiple peripheral subcutaneous injections of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel over a 10-day period led to regenerative wound healing in Swiss Webster mice after ear hole punch injury. Increased expression of the HIF-1α protein may provide a starting point for future studies on regeneration in mammals. PMID:26041709

  1. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yilgor, Caglar; Yilgor Huri, Pinar; Huri, Gazi

    2012-01-01

    Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue engineering is a novel promising technique that aims to solve these problems, by producing viable artificial ligament substitutes in the laboratory conditions with the potential of transplantation to the patients with a high success rate. Direct cell and/or growth factor injection to the defect site is another current approach aiming to enhance the repair process of the native tissue. This review summarizes the current approaches in ligament tissue engineering strategies including the use of scaffolds, their modification techniques, as well as the use of bioreactors to achieve enhanced regeneration rates, while also discussing the advances in growth factor and cell therapy applications towards obtaining enhanced ligament regeneration. PMID:22242032

  2. Notch signaling regulates cardiomyocyte proliferation during zebrafish heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Borikova, Asya L; Ben-Yair, Raz; Guner-Ataman, Burcu; MacRae, Calum A; Lee, Richard T; Burns, C Geoffrey; Burns, Caroline E

    2014-01-28

    The human heart's failure to replace ischemia-damaged myocardium with regenerated muscle contributes significantly to the worldwide morbidity and mortality associated with coronary artery disease. Remarkably, certain vertebrate species, including the zebrafish, achieve complete regeneration of amputated or injured myocardium through the proliferation of spared cardiomyocytes. Nonetheless, the genetic and cellular determinants of natural cardiac regeneration remain incompletely characterized. Here, we report that cardiac regeneration in zebrafish relies on Notch signaling. Following amputation of the zebrafish ventricular apex, Notch receptor expression becomes activated specifically in the endocardium and epicardium, but not the myocardium. Using a dominant negative approach, we discovered that suppression of Notch signaling profoundly impairs cardiac regeneration and induces scar formation at the amputation site. We ruled out defects in endocardial activation, epicardial activation, and dedifferentiation of compact myocardial cells as causative for the regenerative failure. Furthermore, coronary endothelial tubes, which we lineage traced from preexisting endothelium in wild-type hearts, formed in the wound despite the myocardial regenerative failure. Quantification of myocardial proliferation in Notch-suppressed hearts revealed a significant decrease in cycling cardiomyocytes, an observation consistent with a noncell autonomous requirement for Notch signaling in cardiomyocyte proliferation. Unexpectedly, hyperactivation of Notch signaling also suppressed cardiomyocyte proliferation and heart regeneration. Taken together, our data uncover the exquisite sensitivity of regenerative cardiomyocyte proliferation to perturbations in Notch signaling.

  3. Photosynthetic traits of Siebold's beech seedlings in changing light conditions by removal of shading trees under elevated CO₂.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Kitaoka, S; Eguchi, N; Watanabe, Y; Satomura, T; Takagi, K; Satoh, F; Koike, T

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain basic information on acclimation capacity of photosynthesis in Siebold's beech seedlings to increasing light intensity under future elevated CO2 conditions. We monitored leaf photosynthetic traits of these seedlings in changing light conditions (before removal of shade trees, the year after removal of shade trees and after acclimation to open conditions) in a 10-year free air CO2 enrichment experiment in northern Japan. Elevated CO2 did not affect photosynthetic traits such as leaf mass per area, nitrogen content and biochemical photosynthetic capacity of chloroplasts (i.e. maximum rate of carboxylation and maximum rate of electron transport) before removal of the shade trees and after acclimation to open conditions; in fact, a higher net photosynthetic rate was maintained under elevated CO2 . However, in the year after removal of the shade trees, there was no increase in photosynthesis rate under elevated CO2 conditions. This was not due to photoinhibition. In ambient CO2 conditions, leaf mass per area and nitrogen content were higher in the year after removal of shade trees than before, whereas there was no increase under elevated CO2 conditions. These results indicate that elevated CO2 delays the acclimation of photosynthetic traits of Siebold's beech seedlings to increasing light intensity.

  4. Determinants of woody species richness in Scot pine and beech forests: climate, forest patch size and forest structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevan, Helena; Lloret, Francisco; Vayreda, Jordi; Terradas, Jaume

    2007-05-01

    We analysed patterns of woody species richness in Pinus sylvestris and Fagus sylvatica forests in Catalonia (NE Spain) from forestry inventory databank in relation to climate and landscape structure. Both types of forests are found within the same climatic range, although they have been managed following somewhat different goals. Overall, woody species richness significantly increased when conditions get closer to the Mediterranean ones, with milder temperatures. Differences between the two types of forests arose when comparing the relationship between richness and forest patch size. Woody species richness increased in pine forests with patch size, while the opposite trend was observed in beech forests. This pattern is explained by the different behaviour of structural canopy properties, since leaf area index and canopy cover showed a steeper increase with increasing forest patch size in Fagus forests than in Pinus ones. Accordingly, richness decreased with canopy cover in Fagus plots, but not in Pinus ones. We suggest that these differences would be related to management history, which may have enhanced the preservation of beech stands in larger forest landscape units.

  5. Diversity and Composition of the Leaf Mycobiome of Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Are Affected by Local Habitat Conditions and Leaf Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Unterseher, Martin; Siddique, Abu Bakar; Brachmann, Andreas; Peršoh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Comparative investigations of plant-associated fungal communities (mycobiomes) in distinct habitats and under distinct climate regimes have been rarely conducted in the past. Nowadays, high-throughput sequencing allows routine examination of mycobiome responses to environmental changes and results at an unprecedented level of detail. In the present study, we analysed Illumina-generated fungal ITS1 sequences from European beech (Fagus sylvatica) originating from natural habitats at two different altitudes in the German Alps and from a managed tree nursery in northern Germany. In general, leaf-inhabiting mycobiome diversity and composition correlated significantly with the origin of the trees. Under natural condition the mycobiome was more diverse at lower than at higher elevation, whereas fungal diversity was lowest in the artificial habitat of the tree nursery. We further identified significant correlation of leaf chlorophylls and flavonoids with both habitat parameters and mycobiome biodiversity. The present results clearly point towards a pronounced importance of local stand conditions for the structure of beech leaf mycobiomes and for a close interrelation of phyllosphere fungi and leaf physiology. PMID:27078859

  6. How adaptable is the hydraulic system of European beech in the face of climate change-related precipitation reduction?

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Bernhard; Knutzen, Florian; Delzon, Sylvain; Jansen, Steven; Müller-Haubold, Hilmar; Burlett, Régis; Clough, Yann; Leuschner, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Climate warming will increase the drought exposure of many forests world-wide. It is not well understood how trees adapt their hydraulic architecture to a long-term decrease in water availability. We examined 23 traits characterizing the hydraulic architecture and growth rate of branches and the dependent foliage of mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees along a precipitation gradient (855-594 mm yr(-1) ) on uniform soil. A main goal was to identify traits that are associated with xylem efficiency, safety and growth. Our data demonstrate for the first time a linear increase in embolism resistance with climatic aridity (by 10%) across populations within a species. Simultaneously, vessel diameter declined by 7% and pit membrane thickness (Tm ) increased by 15%. Although specific conductivity did not change, leaf-specific conductivity declined by 40% with decreasing precipitation. Of eight plant traits commonly associated with embolism resistance, only vessel density in combination with pathway redundancy and Tm were related. We did not confirm the widely assumed trade-off between xylem safety and efficiency but obtained evidence in support of a positive relationship between hydraulic efficiency and growth. We conclude that the branch hydraulic system of beech has a distinct adaptive potential to respond to a precipitation reduction as a result of the environmental control of embolism resistance.

  7. Scaffold Design for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Polo-Corrales, Liliana; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bone grafts is the standard to treat skeletal fractures, or to replace and regenerate lost bone, as demonstrated by the large number of bone graft procedures performed worldwide. The most common of these is the autograft, however, its use can lead to complications such as pain, infection, scarring, blood loss, and donor-site morbidity. The alternative is allografts, but they lack the osteoactive capacity of autografts and carry the risk of carrying infectious agents or immune rejection. Other approaches, such as the bone graft substitutes, have focused on improving the efficacy of bone grafts or other scaffolds by incorporating bone progenitor cells and growth factors to stimulate cells. An ideal bone graft or scaffold should be made of biomaterials that imitate the structure and properties of natural bone ECM, include osteoprogenitor cells and provide all the necessary environmental cues found in natural bone. However, creating living tissue constructs that are structurally, functionally and mechanically comparable to the natural bone has been a challenge so far. This focus of this review is on the evolution of these scaffolds as bone graft substitutes in the process of recreating the bone tissue microenvironment, including biochemical and biophysical cues. PMID:24730250

  8. Engineered matrices for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, Shelley R.; Hu, Yunhua; Pugh, Amy; Brown, Leanna; Nguyen, Jesse T.; Hollinger, Jeffrey O.

    2000-06-01

    Traditional therapies of autografts and allogeneic banked bone can promote reasonable clinical outcome to repair damaged bone. However, under certain conditions the success of these traditional approaches plummets, providing the incentive for researchers to develop clinical alternatives. The evolving field of tissue engineering in the musculoskeletal system attempts to mimic many of the components from the intact, healthy subject. Those components consist of a biologic scaffold, cells, extracellular matrix, and signaling molecules. The bone biomimetic, i.e., an engineered matrix, provides a porous structural architecture for the regeneration and ingrowth of osseous tissue at the site of injury. To further enhance the regenerative cascade, our strategy has involved porous biodegradable scaffolds containing and releasing signaling molecules and providing a suitable environment for cell attachment, growth and differentiation. In addition, the inclusion of genetically modified osteogenic precursor cells has brought the technology closer to developing a tissue-engineered equivalent. The presentation will describe various formulations and the methods utilized to evaluate the clinical utility of these biomimetics.

  9. Heat regeneration of hydroxyapatite/attapulgite composite beads for defluoridation of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Xu, Weihua; Liu, Tengfei; Liu, Jason

    2012-06-30

    Regeneration is one of the key factors in evaluating an adsorbent. A novel heat regeneration method for hydroxyapatite/attapulgite (HAP/ATT) composite beads was studied. The investigation included heat regeneration temperature, regeneration time, and regeneration effects. A possible mechanism for the heat regeneration is described that explains the results of XPS, and SEM with EDAX. Exhausted HAP/ATT composite beads can be regenerated for more than 10 cycles using boiling water or steam. The total capacity increases by 10 times compared to a single defluoridation cycle. The regeneration process involves F(-) ions adsorbed on the surface of the beads to move quickly into the bulk of the HAP through the effect of heating this composite material. The surface active sites are thus re-exposed and the beads recover their fluoride sequestration properties. HAP/ATT composite beads were successfully used for the removal of fluoride from field water taken from a nearby village where fluoride contamination is endemic. Defluoridation and regeneration cycles performed in the same container provide a high efficient and simple operation. No chemical agents are used and no waste products are produced during the heat regeneration process, so this is a nearly zero emission process. This method can easily be up-scaled to a large throughput application.

  10. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  11. Integrins are required for tissue organization and restriction of neurogenesis in regenerating planarians.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, Florian; März, Martin; Meyer, Anna-Wiebke; Reuter, Hanna; Vogg, Matthias C; Stehling, Martin; Mildner, Karina; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Rabert, Franziska; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2017-03-01

    Tissue regeneration depends on proliferative cells and on cues that regulate cell division, differentiation, patterning and the restriction of these processes once regeneration is complete. In planarians, flatworms with high regenerative potential, muscle cells express some of these instructive cues. Here, we show that members of the integrin family of adhesion molecules are required for the integrity of regenerating tissues, including the musculature. Remarkably, in regenerating β1-integrin RNAi planarians, we detected increased numbers of mitotic cells and progenitor cell types, as well as a reduced ability of stem cells and lineage-restricted progenitor cells to accumulate at wound sites. These animals also formed ectopic spheroid structures of neural identity in regenerating heads. Interestingly, those polarized assemblies comprised a variety of neural cells and underwent continuous growth. Our study indicates that integrin-mediated cell adhesion is required for the regenerative formation of organized tissues and for restricting neurogenesis during planarian regeneration. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Integrins are required for tissue organization and restriction of neurogenesis in regenerating planarians

    PubMed Central

    Seebeck, Florian; März, Martin; Meyer, Anna-Wiebke; Reuter, Hanna; Vogg, Matthias C.; Stehling, Martin; Mildner, Karina; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Rabert, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    Tissue regeneration depends on proliferative cells and on cues that regulate cell division, differentiation, patterning and the restriction of these processes once regeneration is complete. In planarians, flatworms with high regenerative potential, muscle cells express some of these instructive cues. Here, we show that members of the integrin family of adhesion molecules are required for the integrity of regenerating tissues, including the musculature. Remarkably, in regenerating β1-integrin RNAi planarians, we detected increased numbers of mitotic cells and progenitor cell types, as well as a reduced ability of stem cells and lineage-restricted progenitor cells to accumulate at wound sites. These animals also formed ectopic spheroid structures of neural identity in regenerating heads. Interestingly, those polarized assemblies comprised a variety of neural cells and underwent continuous growth. Our study indicates that integrin-mediated cell adhesion is required for the regenerative formation of organized tissues and for restricting neurogenesis during planarian regeneration. PMID:28137894

  13. Combined intrinsic and extrinsic neuronal mechanisms facilitate bridging axonal regeneration one year after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Ken; Tsukada, Shingo; Lu, Paul; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Dan; Filbin, Marie T; Blesch, Armin; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2009-10-29

    Despite advances in promoting axonal regeneration after acute spinal cord injury (SCI), elicitation of bridging axon regeneration after chronic SCI remains a formidable challenge. We report that combinatorial therapies administered 6 weeks, and as long as 15 months, after SCI promote axonal regeneration into and beyond a midcervical lesion site. Provision of peripheral nerve conditioning lesions, grafts of marrow stromal cells, and establishment of NT-3 gradients supports bridging regeneration. Controls receiving partial components of the full combination fail to exhibit bridging. Notably, intraneuronal molecular mechanisms recruited by delayed therapies mirror those of acute injury, including activation of transcriptional activators and regeneration-associated genes. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that regeneration is achievable at unprecedented postinjury time points.

  14. Axons with highly branched terminal regions successfully regenerate across spinal midline transections in the adult cat.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; Rose, P Ken

    2011-11-01

    We recently reported that some, but not all, axotomized propriospinal commissural interneurons (PCI) of the adult mammal can regenerate through spinal midsagittal transection injury sites (Fenrich and Rose [2009] J Neurosci 29:12145-12158). In this model, regenerating axons grow through a lesion site surrounded by a dense deposition of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG), which are typically inhibitory to regenerating axons. However, the mechanisms that lead some regenerating axons to grow through spinal cord injury (SCI) sites while others remain trapped in the CSPG zones or retract to their soma remain unknown. As a first step toward elucidating these mechanisms, here we show that the ability of PCI axons to regenerate across a SCI site depends on the branching patterns of their distal terminals. Using 3D reconstruction techniques through multiple serial sections and immunohistochemical analyses, we found that at 7 days postinjury a majority of PCI axons terminated in CSPG zones ipsilateral of the spinal midline. Conversely, at 9 days postinjury some PCI axons had regenerated across the midline, but others terminated outside the CSPG zones near their soma. Furthermore, we show that the most successful regenerators were those with the most extensive branching patterns, whereas those that terminated outside the CSPG zones had terminal regions indistinguishable from dystrophic terminals. Our results demonstrate that the morphological characteristics of regenerating axons play an important role in their ability to regenerate across SCI sites, and that the branching patterns of some regenerating axons are more extensive and have a far greater complexity than previously reported. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Thymus: the next (re)generation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S; Velardi, Enrico; Dudakov, Jarrod A; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2016-05-01

    As the primary site of T-cell development, the thymus plays a key role in the generation of a strong yet self-tolerant adaptive immune response, essential in the face of the potential threat from pathogens or neoplasia. As the importance of the role of the thymus has grown, so too has the understanding that it is extremely sensitive to both acute and chronic injury. The thymus undergoes rapid degeneration following a range of toxic insults, and also involutes as part of the aging process, albeit at a faster rate than many other tissues. The thymus is, however, capable of regenerating, restoring its function to a degree. Potential mechanisms for this endogenous thymic regeneration include keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) signaling, and a more recently described pathway in which innate lymphoid cells produce interleukin-22 (IL-22) in response to loss of double positive thymocytes and upregulation of IL-23 by dendritic cells. Endogenous repair is unable to fully restore the thymus, particularly in the aged population, and this paves the way toward the need for exogenous strategies to help regenerate or even replace thymic function. Therapies currently in clinical trials include KGF, use of the cytokines IL-7 and IL-22, and hormonal modulation including growth hormone administration and sex steroid inhibition. Further novel strategies are emerging in the preclinical setting, including the use of precursor T cells and thymus bioengineering. The use of such strategies offers hope that for many patients, the next regeneration of their thymus is a step closer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Thymus: The Next (Re)Generation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S.; Velardi, Enrico; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary As the primary site of T cell development, the thymus plays a key role in the generation of a strong yet self-tolerant adaptive immune response, essential in the face of the potential threat from pathogens or neoplasia. As the importance of the role of the thymus has grown, so too has the understanding that it is extremely sensitive to both acute and chronic injury. The thymus undergoes rapid degeneration following a range of toxic insults, and also involutes as part of the aging process, albeit at a faster rate than many other tissues. The thymus is, however, capable of regenerating, restoring its function to a degree. Potential mechanisms for this endogenous thymic regeneration include keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) signaling, and a more recently described pathway in which innate lymphoid cells produce interleukin-22 (IL-22) in response to loss of double positive thymocytes and upregulation of IL-23 by dendritic cells. Endogenous repair is unable to fully restore the thymus, particularly in the aged population, and this paves the way towards the need for exogenous strategies to help regenerate or even replace thymic function. Therapies currently in clinical trials include KGF, use of the cytokines IL-7 and IL-22, and hormonal modulation including growth hormone administration and sex steroid inhibition. Further novel strategies are emerging in the pre-clinical setting, including the use of precursor T cells and thymus bioengineering. The use of such strategies offers hope that for many patients, the next regeneration of their thymus is a step closer. PMID:27088907

  17. Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambal

    2013-01-01

    A durable, high-capacity regenerable sorbent can remove CO2 from the breathing loop under a Martian atmosphere. The system design allows near-ambient temperature operation, needs only a small temperature swing, and sorbent regeneration takes place at or above 8 torr, eliminating the potential for Martian atmosphere to leak into the regeneration bed and into the breathing loop. The physical adsorbent can be used in a metabolic, heat-driven TSA system to remove CO2 from the breathing loop of the astronaut and reject it to the Martian atmosphere. Two (or more) alternating sorbent beds continuously scrub and reject CO2 from the spacesuit ventilation loop. The sorbent beds are cycled, alternately absorbing CO2 from the vent loop and rejecting the adsorbed material into the environment at a high CO2 partial pressure (above 8 torr). The system does not need to run the adsorber at cryogenic temperatures, and uses a much smaller temperature swing. The sorbent removes CO2 via a weak chemical interaction. The interaction is strong enough to enable CO2 adsorption even at 3 to 7.6 torr. However, because the interaction between the surface adsorption sites and the CO2 is relatively weak, the heat input needed to regenerate the sorbent is much lower than that for chemical absorbents. The sorbent developed in this project could potentially find use in a large commercial market in the removal of CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants, if regulations are put in place to curb carbon emissions from power plants.

  18. Implication of two different regeneration systems in limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Makanae, Aki; Mitogawa, Kazumasa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Limb regeneration is a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration in urodele amphibians, such as an axolotl. An amputated limb starts regenerating from a remaining stump (proximal) to lost finger tips (distal). In the present case, proximal−distal (PD) reorganization takes place in a regenerating tissue, called a blastema. It has been a mystery how an induced blastema recognizes its position and restores an exact replica of missing parts. Recently, a new experimental system called the accessory limb model (ALM) has been established. The gained ALM phenotypes are demanding to reconsider the reorganization PD positional values. Based on the ALM phenotype, it is reasonable to hypothesize that reorganization of positional values has a certain discontinuity and that two different regeneration systems cooperatively reorganize the PD axis to restore an original structure. In this review, PD axis reestablishments are focused on limb regeneration. Knowledge from ALM studies in axolotls and Xenopus is providing a novel concept of PD axis reorganization in limb regeneration. PMID:27499860

  19. Fast growth may impair regeneration capacity in the branching coral Acropora muricata.

    PubMed

    Denis, Vianney; Guillaume, Mireille M M; Goutx, Madeleine; de Palmas, Stéphane; Debreuil, Julien; Baker, Andrew C; Boonstra, Roxane K; Bruggemann, J Henrich

    2013-01-01

    Regeneration of artificially induced lesions was monitored in nubbins of the branching coral Acropora muricata at two reef-flat sites representing contrasting environments at Réunion Island (21°07'S, 55°32'E). Growth of these injured nubbins was examined in parallel, and compared to controls. Biochemical compositions of the holobiont and the zooxanthellae density were determined at the onset of the experiment, and the photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm ) of zooxanthellae was monitored during the experiment. Acropora muricata rapidly regenerated small lesions, but regeneration rates significantly differed between sites. At the sheltered site characterized by high temperatures, temperature variations, and irradiance levels, regeneration took 192 days on average. At the exposed site, characterized by steadier temperatures and lower irradiation, nubbins demonstrated fast lesion repair (81 days), slower growth, lower zooxanthellae density, chlorophyll a concentration and lipid content than at the former site. A trade-off between growth and regeneration rates was evident here. High growth rates seem to impair regeneration capacity. We show that environmental conditions conducive to high zooxanthellae densities in corals are related to fast skeletal growth but also to reduced lesion regeneration rates. We hypothesize that a lowered regenerative capacity may be related to limited availability of energetic and cellular resources, consequences of coral holobionts operating at high levels of photosynthesis and associated growth.

  20. Fast Growth May Impair Regeneration Capacity in the Branching Coral Acropora muricata

    PubMed Central

    Denis, Vianney; Guillaume, Mireille M. M.; Goutx, Madeleine; de Palmas, Stéphane; Debreuil, Julien; Baker, Andrew C.; Boonstra, Roxane K.; Bruggemann, J. Henrich

    2013-01-01

    Regeneration of artificially induced lesions was monitored in nubbins of the branching coral Acropora muricata at two reef-flat sites representing contrasting environments at Réunion Island (21°07′S, 55°32′E). Growth of these injured nubbins was examined in parallel, and compared to controls. Biochemical compositions of the holobiont and the zooxanthellae density were determined at the onset of the experiment, and the photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) of zooxanthellae was monitored during the experiment. Acropora muricata rapidly regenerated small lesions, but regeneration rates significantly differed between sites. At the sheltered site characterized by high temperatures, temperature variations, and irradiance levels, regeneration took 192 days on average. At the exposed site, characterized by steadier temperatures and lower irradiation, nubbins demonstrated fast lesion repair (81 days), slower growth, lower zooxanthellae density, chlorophyll a concentration and lipid content than at the former site. A trade-off between growth and regeneration rates was evident here. High growth rates seem to impair regeneration capacity. We show that environmental conditions conducive to high zooxanthellae densities in corals are related to fast skeletal growth but also to reduced lesion regeneration rates. We hypothesize that a lowered regenerative capacity may be related to limited availability of energetic and cellular resources, consequences of coral holobionts operating at high levels of photosynthesis and associated growth. PMID:24023627

  1. Below-ground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L. / Picea abies [L.] Karst)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of experimentally elevated O3 on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and δ13C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with cont...

  2. Carbon flux to woody tissues in a beech/spruce forest during summer and in response to chronic O3 exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study compares the dynamics in carbon (C) allocation of adult deciduous beech (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen spruce (Picea abies) during summer and in response to seven-year-long exposure with twice-ambient ozone (O3) concentrations (2 × O3). Focus was on the respira...

  3. Below-ground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L. / Picea abies [L.] Karst)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of experimentally elevated O3 on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and δ13C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with cont...

  4. A unigene set for European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and its use to decipher the molecular mechanisms involved in dormancy regulation.

    PubMed

    Lesur, Isabelle; Bechade, Alison; Lalanne, Céline; Klopp, Christophe; Noirot, Céline; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Kremer, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe; Le Provost, Grégoire

    2015-09-01

    Systematic sequencing is the method of choice for generating genomic resources for molecular marker development and candidate gene identification in nonmodel species. We generated 47,357 Sanger ESTs and 2.2M Roche-454 reads from five cDNA libraries for European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). This tree species of high ecological and economic value in Europe is among the most representative trees of deciduous broadleaf forests. The sequences generated were assembled into 21,057 contigs with MIRA software. Functional annotations were obtained for 85% of these contigs, from the proteomes of four plant species, Swissprot accessions and the Gene Ontology database. We were able to identify 28,079 in silico SNPs for future marker development. Moreover, RNAseq and qPCR approaches identified genes and gene networks regulated differentially between two critical phenological stages preceding vegetative bud burst (the quiescent and swelling buds stages). According to climatic model-based projection, some European beech populations may be endangered, particularly at the southern and eastern edges of the European distribution range, which are strongly affected by current climate change. This first genomic resource for the genus Fagus should facilitate the identification of key genes for beech adaptation and management strategies for preserving beech adaptability.

  5. Carbon flux to woody tissues in a beech/spruce forest during summer and in response to chronic O3 exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study compares the dynamics in carbon (C) allocation of adult deciduous beech (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen spruce (Picea abies) during summer and in response to seven-year-long exposure with twice-ambient ozone (O3) concentrations (2 × O3). Focus was on the respira...

  6. 77 FR 34339 - Yufeng Wei, a/k/a Annie Wei, 165 Beech Street, Belmont, MA 02378; Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Yufeng Wei, a/k/a Annie Wei, 165 Beech Street, Belmont, MA 02378; Order..., Yufeng Wei, a/k/a Annie Wei (``Wei'') was convicted of violating the International Emergency Economic... her conviction. Accordingly, it is hereby ordered I. Until January 28, 2021, Yufeng Wei, a/k/a...

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species in Planarian Regeneration: An Upstream Necessity for Correct Patterning and Brain Formation

    PubMed Central

    Pirotte, Nicky; Stevens, An-Sofie; Fraguas, Susanna; Plusquin, Michelle; Van Roten, Andromeda; Van Belleghem, Frank; Paesen, Rik; Ameloot, Marcel; Cebrià, Francesc; Artois, Tom; Smeets, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Recent research highlighted the impact of ROS as upstream regulators of tissue regeneration. We investigated their role and targeted processes during the regeneration of different body structures using the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, an organism capable of regenerating its entire body, including its brain. The amputation of head and tail compartments induces a ROS burst at the wound site independently of the orientation. Inhibition of ROS production by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) or apocynin (APO) causes regeneration defaults at both the anterior and posterior wound sites, resulting in reduced regeneration sites (blastemas) and improper tissue homeostasis. ROS signaling is necessary for early differentiation and inhibition of the ROS burst results in defects on the regeneration of the nervous system and on the patterning process. Stem cell proliferation was not affected, as indicated by histone H3-P immunostaining, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), in situ hybridization of smedwi-1, and transcript levels of proliferation-related genes. We showed for the first time that ROS modulate both anterior and posterior regeneration in a context where regeneration is not limited to certain body structures. Our results indicate that ROS are key players in neuroregeneration through interference with the differentiation and patterning processes. PMID:26180588

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species in Planarian Regeneration: An Upstream Necessity for Correct Patterning and Brain Formation.

    PubMed

    Pirotte, Nicky; Stevens, An-Sofie; Fraguas, Susanna; Plusquin, Michelle; Van Roten, Andromeda; Van Belleghem, Frank; Paesen, Rik; Ameloot, Marcel; Cebrià, Francesc; Artois, Tom; Smeets, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Recent research highlighted the impact of ROS as upstream regulators of tissue regeneration. We investigated their role and targeted processes during the regeneration of different body structures using the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, an organism capable of regenerating its entire body, including its brain. The amputation of head and tail compartments induces a ROS burst at the wound site independently of the orientation. Inhibition of ROS production by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) or apocynin (APO) causes regeneration defaults at both the anterior and posterior wound sites, resulting in reduced regeneration sites (blastemas) and improper tissue homeostasis. ROS signaling is necessary for early differentiation and inhibition of the ROS burst results in defects on the regeneration of the nervous system and on the patterning process. Stem cell proliferation was not affected, as indicated by histone H3-P immunostaining, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), in situ hybridization of smedwi-1, and transcript levels of proliferation-related genes. We showed for the first time that ROS modulate both anterior and posterior regeneration in a context where regeneration is not limited to certain body structures. Our results indicate that ROS are key players in neuroregeneration through interference with the differentiation and patterning processes.

  9. Costs of rodent control in pine regeneration in California

    Treesearch

    Richard D. Cosens; David Tackle

    1950-01-01

    The control of seed-eating rodents, combined with the proper method of cutting and site preparation, appears essential to get the maximum results of natural seeding of pine. One method of control is by treating the area to be regenerated with lethal bait prior to seedfall. This note describes such a method and costs of treatment for the westside and eastside Sierran...

  10. Preliminary evaluation of operational oak regeneration methods in central Missouri

    Treesearch

    Carrie Steen; Gus Raeker; David. Gwaze

    2011-01-01

    Oak regeneration on mesic upland sites continues to be a major challenge throughout the hardwood forests of eastern North America. Oak forests across northern and central Missouri have been historically maintained through natural and anthropogenic disturbance regimes. This cycle has been interrupted in many areas through fire suppression, high-grading, and intensive...

  11. Migration of cardiomyocytes is essential for heart regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Itou, Junji; Oishi, Isao; Kawakami, Hiroko; Glass, Tiffany J; Richter, Jenna; Johnson, Austin; Lund, Troy C; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2012-11-01

    Adult zebrafish possess a significant ability to regenerate injured heart tissue through proliferation of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, which contrasts with the inability of mammals to do so after the immediate postnatal period. Zebrafish therefore provide a model system in which to study how an injured heart can be repaired. However, it remains unknown what important processes cardiomyocytes are involved in other than partial de-differentiation and proliferation. Here we show that migration of cardiomyocytes to the injury site is essential for heart regeneration. Ventricular amputation induced expression of cxcl12a and cxcr4b, genes encoding a chemokine ligand and its receptor. We found that cxcl12a was expressed in the epicardial tissue and that Cxcr4 was expressed in cardiomyocytes. We show that pharmacological blocking of Cxcr4 function as well as genetic loss of cxcr4b function causes failure to regenerate the heart after ventricular resection. Cardiomyocyte proliferation was not affected but a large portion of proliferating cardiomyocytes remained localized outside the injury site. A photoconvertible fluorescent reporter-based cardiomyocyte-tracing assay demonstrates that cardiomyocytes migrated into the injury site in control hearts but that migration was inhibited in the Cxcr4-blocked hearts. By contrast, the epicardial cells and vascular endothelial cells were not affected by blocking Cxcr4 function. Our data show that the migration of cardiomyocytes into the injury site is regulated independently of proliferation, and that coordination of both processes is necessary for heart regeneration.

  12. Impact of repeated dry-wet cycles on soil CO2 efflux in a beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Sonja; Saronjic, Nermina; Kobler, Johannes; Holtermann, Christian; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Zimmermann, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Climate change research predicts that both frequency and intensity of weather extremes such as severe droughts and heavy rainfall events will increase in mid Europe over the next decades. Because soil moisture is one of the major factors controlling microbially-driven soil processes, a changed moisture regime will impact soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and nutrient cycling. This in turn can lead to feedback effects between altered precipitation and changed soil CO2 fluxes which can intensify climate change. Soil microorganisms can go into a state of dormancy or form inactive cysts to protect themselves from osmotic stress during soil drying. However, severe droughts increase microbial mortality which slows down SOM decomposition and decreases soil CO2 efflux. The rewetting of dry soil, on the other hand, causes large CO2 emissions, which is also known as the "Birch effect". Until today it is not clear whether these CO2 peaks outweigh the drought-induced decrease of total CO2 efflux. To investigate the impact of repeated dry-wet cycles on soil CO2 efflux we are conducting a precipitation manipulation experiment in a temperate Austrian beech forest. Roofs exclude rainfall and simulate drought periods, and heavy rainfall events are simulated with a sprinkler system. We apply repeated dry-wet cycles in two intensities: one treatment receives 6 cycles of 1 month drought followed by 75mm irrigation, and a parallel treatment receives 3 cycles of 2 months drought followed by 150mm irrigation. Soil CO2 efflux is constantly monitored with an automated flux chamber system, and environmental parameters are recorded via dataloggers. Our results show that droughts significantly reduce soil CO2 effluxes, and that the reductions depend on the length of the drought periods, with longer droughts leading to stronger reductions of CO2 effluxes. In the first 24 to 48h after rewetting, CO2 emissions strongly increased, and then slowly decreased again. Soil CO2 efflux was

  13. Black carbon surface oxidation and organic composition of beech-wood soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; Keller, A.; Burtscher, H.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    composition of the BC was approximately constant across all stages of combustion for both fresh and aged samples. These results represent the first time-resolved measurements of in situ BC surface aging and suggest that the surface of beech-wood BC may be modelled as a single chemical species.

  14. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The Microbial Check Valve (MCV) is used on the Space Shuttle to impart an iodine residual to the drinking water to maintain microbial control. Approximately twenty MCV locations have been identified in the Space Station Freedom design, each with a 90-day life. This translates to 2400 replacement units in 30 years of operation. An in situ regeneration concept has been demonstrated that will reduce this replacement requirement to less than 300 units based on data to date. A totally automated system will result in significant savings in crew time, resupply requirements, and replacement costs. An additional feature of the device is the ability to provide a concentrated biocide source (200 mg/liter of I2) that can be used to superiodinate systems routinely or after a microbial upset.

  15. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  16. Augmenter of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2012-07-09

    'Augmenter of liver regeneration' (ALR) (also known as hepatic stimulatory substance or hepatopoietin) was originally found to promote growth of hepatocytes in the regenerating or injured liver. ALR is expressed ubiquitously in all organs, and exclusively in hepatocytes in the liver. ALR, a survival factor for hepatocytes, exhibits significant homology with ERV1 (essential for respiration and viability) protein that is essential for the survival of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ALR comprises 198 to 205 amino acids (approximately 22 kDa), but is post-translationally modified to three high molecular weight species (approximately 38 to 42 kDa) found in hepatocytes. ALR is present in mitochondria, cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. Mitochondrial ALR may be involved in oxidative phosphorylation, but also functions as sulfhydryl oxidase and cytochrome c reductase, and causes Fe/S maturation of proteins. ALR, secreted by hepatocytes, stimulates synthesis of TNF-α, IL-6, and nitric oxide in Kupffer cells via a G-protein coupled receptor. While the 22 kDa rat recombinant ALR does not stimulate DNA synthesis in hepatocytes, the short form (15 kDa) of human recombinant ALR was reported to be equipotent as or even stronger than TGF-α or HGF as a mitogen for hepatocytes. Altered serum ALR levels in certain pathological conditions suggest that it may be a diagnostic marker for liver injury/disease. Although ALR appears to have multiple functions, the knowledge of its role in various organs, including the liver, is extremely inadequate, and it is not known whether different ALR species have distinct functions. Future research should provide better understanding of the expression and functions of this enigmatic molecule.

  17. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  18. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  19. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  20. Allocation of recent photoassimilates in mature European beech and Norway spruce - seasonal variability and responses to experimentally increased tropospheric O3 concentration and long-term drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    This contribution summarizes a series of C allocation studies in maturing European beech and Norway spruce trees at Kranzberg Forest, located in southern Germany. Study objects are 60 to 70 year old trees, readily accessible via scaffoldings and canopy crane. Allocation of recently fixed photoassimilates is assessed either by conventional branch-bag labelling with 99 atom% 13CO2 or whole-tree labeling using 13C-depleted CO2 (isoFACE system). While labeling in branch bags, employed for few hours only, focused on phloem functionality in particular under long-term drought, C labeling of whole tree canopies was employed for up to 20 days, studying allocation of recent photoassimilates from the canopy along branches and stems to roots and soils below ground. In all experiments, dynamics of C allocation were mostly pursued assessing carbon isotopic composition of CO2 efflux from woody tissues which typically reflected isotopic composition of phloem sugars. Effects of severe and long-term summer drought are assessed in an ongoing experiment with roughly 100 trees assigned to a total of 12 plots (kroof.wzw.tum.de). Precipitation throughfall was completely excluded since early spring, resulting in pre-dawn leaf water potentials of both beech and spruce up to -2.2 MPa. The hypothesis was tested that long-term drought affects allocation of recently fixed C to branches and phloem functionality. In the annual course under unstressed conditions, phloem transport speed from the canopy to the stem (breast height) was double in beech compared to spruce, with highest transport velocities in early summer (about 0.51 and 0.26 m/h) and lowest in spring (0.26 and 0.12 m/h for beech and spruce, respectively). After leaf flush in spring, growth respiration of beech trunks was largely supplied by C stores. Recent photoassimilates supplied beech stem growth in early summer and refilled C stores in late summer, whereas seasonality was less pronounced in spruce. The hypothesis that growth