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Sample records for beetle midgut epithelium

  1. The midgut of the silkmoth Bombyx mori is able to recycle molecules derived from degeneration of the larval midgut epithelium.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Romanelli, Davide; Caccia, Silvia; Cappellozza, Silvia; Congiu, Terenzio; Rajagopalan, Muthukumaran; Grimaldi, Annalisa; de Eguileor, Magda; Casartelli, Morena; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The midgut represents the middle part of the alimentary canal and is responsible for nutrient digestion and absorption in insect larva. Despite the growing interest in this organ for different purposes, such as studies on morphogenesis and differentiation, stem cell biology, cell death processes and transport mechanisms, basic information on midgut development is still lacking for a large proportion of insect species. Undoubtedly, this lack of data could hinder the full exploitation of practical applications that involve midgut as their primary target. This may represent in particular a significant problem for Lepidoptera, an insect order that includes some of the most important species of high economic importance. With the aim of overcoming this fragmentation of knowledge, we performed a detailed morphofunctional analysis of the midgut of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, a representative model among Lepidoptera, during its development from the larval up to the adult stage, focusing attention on stem cells. Our data demonstrate stem cell proliferation and differentiation, not only in the larval midgut but also in the pupal and adult midgut epithelium. Moreover, we present evidence for a complex trophic relationship between the dying larval epithelium and the new adult one, which is established during metamorphosis. This study, besides representing the first morphological and functional characterization of the changes that occur in the midgut of a lepidopteron during the transition from the larva to the moth, provides a detailed analysis of the midgut of the adult insect, a stage that has been neglected up to now.

  2. The role of cell death in the midgut epithelium in Filientomon takanawanum (Protura).

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Machida, R; Fukui, M

    2010-02-01

    Midgut epithelium in Filientomon takanawanum is composed of epithelial cells and single, sporadic regenerative cells. In 80% of analyzed specimens midgut epithelial cells, as fat body and gonads, are infected with rickettsia-like microorganism. In non-infected specimens young and completely differentiated epithelial cells are distinguished among epithelial cells. Characteristic for midgut epithelial cells regionalization in organelles distribution is not observed. Autophagy is the sporadic process, but if the cytoplasm of epithelium cells possesses numerous spherites and sporadic autophagosomes, the apoptosis begins. Necrosis is observed sporadically. In the midgut epithelium cells of about 80% of analyzed specimens rickettsia-like microorganisms are observed. The more rickettsia-like microorganisms occur in the cytoplasm, the more autophagosomes are formed, and the process of apoptosis proceeds intensively. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrastructural changes of the midgut epithelium in Isohypsibius granulifer granulifer Thulin, 1928 (Tardigrada: Eutardigrada) during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M; Poprawa, Izabela; Wójtowicz, Maria; Kaczmarek, Lukasz

    2011-04-01

    The midgut epithelium of Isohypsibius granulifer granulifer (Eutardigrada) is composed of columnar digestive cells. At its anterior end, a group of cells with cytoplasm which differs from the cytoplasm of digestive cells is present. Probably, those cells respond to crescent-like cells (midgut regenerative cells) described for some tardigrade species. Their mitotic divisions have not been observed. We analyzed the ultrastructure of midgut digestive cells in relation to five different stages of oogenesis (previtellogenesis, beginning of the vitellogenesis, vitellogenesis--early choriogenesis, vitellogenesis--middle choriogenesis, late choriogenesis). In the midgut epithelium cells, the gradual accumulation of glycogen granules, lipid droplets and structures of varying electron density occurs. During vitellogenesis and choriogenesis, in the cytoplasm of midgut cells we observed the increasing number of organelles which are responsible for the intensive synthesis of lipids, proteins and saccharides such as cisterns of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complexes. At the end of oogenesis, autophagy also intensifies in midgut epithelial cells, which is probably caused by the great amount of reserve material. Midgut epithelium of analyzed species takes part in the yolk precursor synthesis.

  4. The midgut epithelium of aquatic arthropods: a critical target organ in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Barry J; Mackie, Ryan S; Mattingly, Kimberly S; Carlson, Jonathan O; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of aquatic arthropods is emerging as an important and toxicologically relevant organ system for monitoring environmental pollution. The peritrophic matrix of aquatic arthropods, which is secreted by the midgut epithelium cells, is perturbed by copper or cadmium. Molecular biological studies have identified and characterized two midgut genes induced by heavy metals in the midgut epithelium. Many other metal-responsive genes (MRGs) await characterization. One of the MRGs codes for an intestinal mucin, which is critical for protecting the midgut from toxins and pathogens. Another codes for a tubulin gene, which is critical for structure and function of the midgut epithelial cells. Perturbation of expression of either gene could condition aquatic arthropod survivorship. Induction of these MRGs is a more sensitive and rapid indicator of heavy-metal pollution than biological assays. Characterization of genes induced by pollutants could provide mechanistic understanding of fundamental cellular responses to pollutants and insight into determinants of aquatic arthropod population genetic structure and survivorship in nature. PMID:12634118

  5. Small Interfering RNA Pathway Modulates Initial Viral Infection in Midgut Epithelium of Insect after Ingestion of Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hanhong; Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Yuyan; Jiang, Chaoyang; Mao, Qianzhuo; Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous viruses are transmitted in a persistent manner by insect vectors. Persistent viruses establish their initial infection in the midgut epithelium, from where they disseminate to the midgut visceral muscles. Although propagation of viruses in insect vectors can be controlled by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) antiviral pathway, whether the siRNA pathway can control viral dissemination from the midgut epithelium is unknown. Infection by a rice virus (Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus [SRBSDV]) of its incompetent vector (the small brown planthopper [SBPH]) is restricted to the midgut epithelium. Here, we show that the siRNA pathway is triggered by SRBSDV infection in continuously cultured cells derived from the SBPH and in the midgut of the intact insect. Knockdown of the expression of the core component Dicer-2 of the siRNA pathway by RNA interference strongly increased the ability of SRBSDV to propagate in continuously cultured SBPH cells and in the midgut epithelium, allowing viral titers in the midgut epithelium to reach the threshold (1.99 × 109 copies of the SRBSDV P10 gene/μg of midgut RNA) needed for viral dissemination into the SBPH midgut muscles. Our results thus represent the first elucidation of the threshold for viral dissemination from the insect midgut epithelium. Silencing of Dicer-2 further facilitated the transmission of SRBSDV into rice plants by SBPHs. Taken together, our results reveal the new finding that the siRNA pathway can control the initial infection of the insect midgut epithelium by a virus, which finally affects the competence of the virus's vector. IMPORTANCE Many viral pathogens that cause significant global health and agricultural problems are transmitted via insect vectors. The first bottleneck in viral infection, the midgut epithelium, is a principal determinant of the ability of an insect species to transmit a virus. Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) is restricted exclusively to the

  6. Midgut epithelium in molting silkworm: A fine balance among cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Casartelli, Morena; D'Antona, Paola; Montali, Aurora; Romanelli, Davide; Cappellozza, Silvia; Caccia, Silvia; Grimaldi, Annalisa; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-07-01

    The midgut of insects has attracted great attention as a system for studying intestinal stem cells (ISCs) as well as cell death-related processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Among insects, Lepidoptera represent a good model to analyze these cells and processes. In particular, larva-larva molting is an interesting developmental phase since the larva must deal with nutrient starvation and its organs are subjected to rearrangements due to proliferation and differentiation events. Several studies have analyzed ISCs in vitro and characterized key factors involved in their division and differentiation during molt. However, in vivo studies performed during larva-larva transition on these cells, and on the whole midgut epithelium, are fragmentary. In the present study, we analyzed the larval midgut epithelium of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, during larva-larva molting, focusing our attention on ISCs. Moreover, we investigated the metabolic changes that occur in the epithelium and evaluated the intervention of autophagy. Our data on ISCs proliferation and differentiation, autophagy activation, and metabolic and functional activities of the midgut cells shed light on the complexity of this organ during the molting phase.

  7. The midgut of Cephalotes ants (Formicidae: Myrmicinae): ultrastructure of the epithelium and symbiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bution, Murillo L; Caetano, F H

    2010-07-01

    The ultrastructural analysis of the midgut of Cephalotes atratus, C. clypeatus, and C. pusillus reveled that the midgut epithelium lays on a basal lamina and is composed basically of three cell types: digestive cells, regenerative cells, and goblet cells. In these ants, the rough endoplasmic reticulum, in addition to producing digestive enzymes, is involved in the formation of concretions and ion storage in specialized vacuoles present in the midgut. These concretions are spherocrystals and may contribute to stabilize the pH and to maintain symbiotic bacteria found between microvilli. The ultrastructure analysis of these bacteria revealed the presence of a double envelope typical of gram-negative bacteria. For the three species examined, the ultrastructure similarities are conspicuous, suggesting that this may be the pattern for the genus Cephalotes. Details of the relationship between bacteria and microvilli were examined. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrastructural Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. san diego on Midgut Cells of the Cottonwood Leaf Beetle1

    Treesearch

    Leah S. Bauer; Stuart H. Pankratz

    1992-01-01

    Sequential observations of the ultrastructural effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. san diego were made on midgut epithelial cells of the cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F. Larvae imbibed a droplet of B. thuringiensis var. san diego containing endotoxin and live...

  9. Fine structure of the midgut epithelium in the millipede Telodeinopus aoutii (Myriapoda, Diplopoda) with special emphasis on epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Kszuk-Jendrysik, M; Marchewka, A; Poprawa, I

    2017-06-14

    The midgut of millipedes is composed of a simple epithelium that rests on a basal lamina, which is surrounded by visceral muscles and hepatic cells. As the material for our studies, we chose Telodeinopus aoutii (Demange, 1971) (Kenyan millipede) (Diplopoda, Spirostreptida), which lives in the rain forests of Central Africa. This commonly reared species is easy to obtain from local breeders and easy to culture in the laboratory. During our studies, we used transmission and scanning electron microscopes and light and fluorescent microscopes. The midgut epithelium of the species examined here shares similarities to the structure of the millipedes analyzed to date. The midgut epithelium is composed of three types of cells-digestive, secretory, and regenerative cells. Evidence of three types of secretion have been observed in the midgut epithelium: merocrine, apocrine, and microapocrine secretion. The regenerative cells of the midgut epithelium in millipedes fulfill the role of midgut stem cells because of their main functions: self-renewal (the ability to divide mitotically and to maintain in an undifferentiated state) and potency (ability to differentiate into digestive cells). We also confirmed that spot desmosomes are common intercellular junctions between the regenerative and digestive cells in millipedes.

  10. Variant vicilins from a resistant Vigna unguiculata lineage (IT81D-1053) accumulate inside Callosobruchus maculatus larval midgut epithelium.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriel B; Kunz, Daniele; Peres, Tanara V; Leal, Rodrigo B; Uchôa, Adriana F; Samuels, Richard I; Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Carlini, Célia R; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Terra, Walter R; Xavier-Filho, José; Silva, Carlos P

    2014-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that variant vicilins are the main resistance factor of cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata) against attack by the cowpea beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. There is evidence that the toxic properties of these storage proteins may be related to their interaction with glycoproteins and other microvillar membrane constituents along the digestive tract of the larvae. New findings have shown that following interaction with the microvilli, the vicilins are absorbed across the intestinal epithelium and thus reach the internal environment of the larvae. In the present paper we studied the insecticidal activity of the variant vicilins purified from a resistant cowpea variety (IT81D-1053). Bioassays showed that the seeds of this genotype affected larval growth, causing developmental retardation and 100% mortality. By feeding C. maculatus larvae on susceptible and IT81D-1053 derived vicilins (FITC labelled or unlabelled), followed by fluorescence and immunogold cytolocalization, we were able to demonstrate that both susceptible and variant forms are internalized in the midgut cells and migrate inside vesicular structures from the apex to the basal portion of the enterocytes. However, when larvae were fed with the labelled vicilins for 24h and then returned to a control diet, the concentration of the variant form remained relatively high, suggesting that variant vicilins are not removed from the cells at the same rate as the non-variant vicilins. We suggest that the toxic effects of variant vicilins on midgut cells involve the binding of these proteins to the cell surface followed by internalization and interference with the normal physiology of the enterocytes, thereby affecting larval development in vivo.

  11. The Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3A lyses midgut epithelium cells of susceptible insects.

    PubMed

    Yu, C G; Mullins, M A; Warren, G W; Koziel, M G; Estruch, J J

    1997-02-01

    The Vip3A protein is a member of a newly discovered class of vegetative insecticidal proteins with activity against a broad spectrum of lepidopteran insects. Histopathological observations indicate that Vip3A ingestion by susceptible insects such as the black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) causes gut paralysis at concentrations as low as 4 ng/cm2 of diet and complete lysis of gut epithelium cells resulting in larval death at concentrations above 40 ng/cm2. The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis), a nonsusceptible insect, does not develop any pathology upon ingesting Vip3A. While proteolytic processing of the Vip3A protein by midgut fluids obtained from susceptible and nonsusceptible insects is comparable, in vivo immunolocalization studies show that Vip3a binding is restricted to gut cells of susceptible insects. Therefore, the insect host range for Vip3A seems to be determined by its ability to bind gut cells. These results indicate that midgut epithelium cells of susceptible insects are the primary target for the Vip3A insecticidal protein and that their subsequent lysis is the primary mechanism of lethality. Disruption of gut cells appears to be the strategy adopted by the most effective insecticidal proteins.

  12. The fine structure of the midgut epithelium in a centipede, Scolopendra cingulata (Chilopoda, Scolopendridae), with the special emphasis on epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chajec, Lukasz; Sonakowska, Lidia; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M

    2014-01-01

    Scolopendra cingulata has a tube-shaped digestive system that is divided into three distinct regions: fore-, mid- and hindgut. The midgut is lined with a pseudostratified columnar epithelium which is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. Hemocytes also appear between the digestive cells of the midgut epithelium. The ultrastructure of three types of epithelial cells and hemocytes of the midgut has been described with the special emphasis on the role of regenerative cells in the protection of midgut epithelium. The process of midgut epithelium regeneration proceeds due to the ability of regenerative cells to proliferate and differentiate according to a circadian rhythm. The regenerative cells serve as unipotent stem cells that divide in an asymmetric manner. Additionally, two types of hemocytes have been distinguished among midgut epithelial cells. They enter the midgut epithelium from the body cavity. Because of the fact that numerous microorganisms occur in the cytoplasm of midgut epithelial cells, we discuss the role of hemocytes in elimination of pathogens from the midgut epithelium. The studies were conducted with the use of transmission electron microscope and immunofluorescent methods.

  13. Avoidance of antinutritive plant defense: Role of midgut pH in Colorado potato beetle.

    PubMed

    Felton, G W; Workman, J; Duffey, S S

    1992-04-01

    The fate of the tomato foliar phenolic, chlorogenic acid, in the digestive systems of Colorado potato beetleLeptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) andHelicoverpa tea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is compared. In larvalH. zea and other lepidopteran species previously examined, approximately 35-50% of the ingested chlorogenic acid was oxidized in the digestive system by foliar phenolic oxidases (i.e., polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase) from the tomato plant. The oxidized form of chlorogenic acid, chlorogenoquinone, is a potent alkylator of dietary protein and can exert a strong antinutritive effect upon larvae through chemical degradation of essential amino acids. In contrast, inL. decemlineata less than 4% of the ingested dose of chlorogenic acid was bound to protein. In vitro experiments to determine the influence of pH on covalent binding of chlorogenic acid to protein showed that 30-45% less chlorogenic acid bound to protein at pHs representative of the beetle midgut (pH 5.5-6.5) than at a pH representing the lepidopteran midgut (pH 8.5). At an acidic pH, considerably more of the alkylatable functional groups of amino acids (-NH2, -SH) are in the nonreactive, protonated state. Hence, polyphenol oxidases are unlikely to have significant antinutritive effects against the Colorado potato beetle and may not be a useful biochemical source of resistance against this insect. The influence of feeding by larval Colorado potato beetle on foliar polyphenol oxidase activity in tomato foliage and its possible significance to interspecific competition is also considered.

  14. Live imaging of baculovirus infection of midgut epithelium cells: a functional assay of per os infectivity factors.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jingfang; van Lent, Jan W M; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M

    2014-11-01

    The occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) of baculoviruses are responsible for oral infection of insect hosts, whereas budded viruses (BVs) are responsible for systemic infection within the host. The ODV membrane proteins play crucial roles in mediating virus entry into midgut epithelium cells to initiate infection and are important factors in host-range determination. For Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), seven conserved ODV membrane proteins have been shown to be essential for oral infectivity and are called per os infectivity factors (PIFs). Information on the function of the individual PIF proteins in virus entry is limited, partly due to the lack of a good in vitro system for monitoring ODV entry. Here, we constructed a baculovirus with EGFP fused to the nucleocapsid to monitor virus entry into primary midgut epithelium cells ex vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The EGFP-labelled virus showed similar BV virulence and ODV infectivity as WT virus. The ability to bind and enter host cells was then visualized for WT AcMNPV and viruses with mutations in P74 (PIF0), PIF1 or PIF2, showing that P74 is required for ODV binding, whilst PIF1 and PIF2 play important roles in the entry of ODV after binding to midgut cells. This is the first live imaging of ODV entry into midgut cells and complements the genetic and biochemical evidence for the role of PIFs in the oral infection process.

  15. Functional genomics of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) midguts and fat bodies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is a significant coniferous forest pest in western North America. It relies on aggregation pheromones to colonize hosts. Its three major pheromone components, trans-verbenol, exo-brevicomin, and frontalin, are thought to arise via different metabolic pathways, but the enzymes involved have not been identified or characterized. We produced ESTs from male and female midguts and associated fat bodies and used custom oligonucleotide microarrays to study gene expression patterns and thereby made preliminary identification of pheromone-biosynthetic genes. Results Clones from two un-normalized cDNA libraries were directionally sequenced from the 5' end to yield 11,775 ESTs following sequence cleansing. The average read length was 550 nt. The ESTs clustered into 1,201 contigs and 2,833 singlets (4,034 tentative unique genes). The ESTs are broadly distributed among GO functional groups, suggesting they reflect a broad spectrum of the transcriptome. Among the most represented genes are representatives of sugar-digesting enzymes and members of an apparently Scolytid-specific gene family of unknown function. Custom NimbleGen 4-plex arrays representing the 4,034 tentative unique genes were queried with RNA from eleven different biological states representing larvae, pupae, and midguts and associated fat bodies of unfed or fed adults. Quantitative (Real-Time) RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments confirmed that the microarray data accurately reflect expression levels in the different samples. Candidate genes encoding enzymes involved in terminal steps of biosynthetic pathways for exo-brevicomin and frontalin were tentatively identified. Conclusions These EST and microarray data are the first publicly-available functional genomics resources for this devastating forestry pest. PMID:20353591

  16. Functional genomics of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) midguts and fat bodies.

    PubMed

    Aw, Tidiane; Schlauch, Karen; Keeling, Christopher I; Young, Sharon; Bearfield, Jeremy C; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2010-03-30

    The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is a significant coniferous forest pest in western North America. It relies on aggregation pheromones to colonize hosts. Its three major pheromone components, trans-verbenol, exo-brevicomin, and frontalin, are thought to arise via different metabolic pathways, but the enzymes involved have not been identified or characterized. We produced ESTs from male and female midguts and associated fat bodies and used custom oligonucleotide microarrays to study gene expression patterns and thereby made preliminary identification of pheromone-biosynthetic genes. Clones from two un-normalized cDNA libraries were directionally sequenced from the 5' end to yield 11,775 ESTs following sequence cleansing. The average read length was 550 nt. The ESTs clustered into 1,201 contigs and 2,833 singlets (4,034 tentative unique genes). The ESTs are broadly distributed among GO functional groups, suggesting they reflect a broad spectrum of the transcriptome. Among the most represented genes are representatives of sugar-digesting enzymes and members of an apparently Scolytid-specific gene family of unknown function. Custom NimbleGen 4-plex arrays representing the 4,034 tentative unique genes were queried with RNA from eleven different biological states representing larvae, pupae, and midguts and associated fat bodies of unfed or fed adults. Quantitative (Real-Time) RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments confirmed that the microarray data accurately reflect expression levels in the different samples. Candidate genes encoding enzymes involved in terminal steps of biosynthetic pathways for exo-brevicomin and frontalin were tentatively identified. These EST and microarray data are the first publicly-available functional genomics resources for this devastating forestry pest.

  17. Roles and regulation of autophagy and apoptosis in the remodelling of the lepidopteran midgut epithelium during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Davide; Casartelli, Morena; Cappellozza, Silvia; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-09-09

    We previously showed that autophagy and apoptosis occur in the removal of the lepidopteran larval midgut during metamorphosis. However, their roles in this context and the molecular pathways underlying their activation and regulation were only hypothesized. The results of the present study better clarify the timing of the activation of these two processes: autophagic and apoptotic genes are transcribed at the beginning of metamorphosis, but apoptosis intervenes after autophagy. To investigate the mechanisms that promote the activation of autophagy and apoptosis, we designed a set of experiments based on injections of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Our data demonstrate that autophagy is induced at the end of the last larval stage by the 20E commitment peak, while the onset of apoptosis occurs concomitantly with the 20E metamorphic peak. By impairing autophagic flux, the midgut epithelium degenerated faster, and higher caspase activity was observed compared to controls, whereas inhibiting caspase activation caused a severe delay in epithelial degeneration. Our data demonstrate that autophagy plays a pro-survival function in the silkworm midgut during metamorphosis, while apoptosis is the major process that drives the demise of the epithelium. The evidence collected in this study seems to exclude the occurrence of autophagic cell death in this setting.

  18. Roles and regulation of autophagy and apoptosis in the remodelling of the lepidopteran midgut epithelium during metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Davide; Casartelli, Morena; Cappellozza, Silvia; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that autophagy and apoptosis occur in the removal of the lepidopteran larval midgut during metamorphosis. However, their roles in this context and the molecular pathways underlying their activation and regulation were only hypothesized. The results of the present study better clarify the timing of the activation of these two processes: autophagic and apoptotic genes are transcribed at the beginning of metamorphosis, but apoptosis intervenes after autophagy. To investigate the mechanisms that promote the activation of autophagy and apoptosis, we designed a set of experiments based on injections of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Our data demonstrate that autophagy is induced at the end of the last larval stage by the 20E commitment peak, while the onset of apoptosis occurs concomitantly with the 20E metamorphic peak. By impairing autophagic flux, the midgut epithelium degenerated faster, and higher caspase activity was observed compared to controls, whereas inhibiting caspase activation caused a severe delay in epithelial degeneration. Our data demonstrate that autophagy plays a pro-survival function in the silkworm midgut during metamorphosis, while apoptosis is the major process that drives the demise of the epithelium. The evidence collected in this study seems to exclude the occurrence of autophagic cell death in this setting. PMID:27609527

  19. Anopheles Midgut Epithelium Evades Human Complement Activity by Capturing Factor H from the Blood Meal

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ayman; Barroso, Marta; Miettinen, Tiera; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Hematophagous vectors strictly require ingesting blood from their hosts to complete their life cycles. Exposure of the alimentary canal of these vectors to the host immune effectors necessitates efficient counteractive measures by hematophagous vectors. The Anopheles mosquito transmitting the malaria parasite is an example of hematophagous vectors that within seconds can ingest human blood double its weight. The innate immune defense mechanisms, like the complement system, in the human blood should thereby immediately react against foreign cells in the mosquito midgut. A prerequisite for complement activation is that the target cells lack complement regulators on their surfaces. In this work, we analyzed whether human complement is active in the mosquito midgut, and how the mosquito midgut cells protect themselves against complement attack. We found that complement remained active for a considerable time and was able to kill microbes within the mosquito midgut. However, the Anopheles mosquito midgut cells were not injured. These cells were found to protect themselves by capturing factor H, the main soluble inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Factor H inhibited complement on the midgut cells by promoting inactivation of C3b to iC3b and preventing the activity of the alternative pathway amplification C3 convertase enzyme. An interference of the FH regulatory activity by monoclonal antibodies, carried to the midgut via blood, resulted in increased mosquito mortality and reduced fecundity. By using a ligand blotting assay, a putative mosquito midgut FH receptor could be detected. Thereby, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby mosquitoes can tolerate human blood. PMID:25679788

  20. Effects of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Aphanizomenon ovalisporum (cyanobacteria) ingestion on Daphnia magna midgut and associated diverticula epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Isabel C G; Lobo-da-Cunha, Alexandre; Vasconcelos, Vítor M

    2006-11-16

    This article reports a light and electron microscopy investigation of the effects of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Aphanizomenon ovalisporum ingestion on midgut and associated digestive diverticula of Daphnia magna. Additionally, survivorship and growth effects caused by feeding on cyanobacteria were assessed. Three cyanobacteria were used in the experiments: cylindrospermopsin (CYN)-producing C. raciborskii, CYN-producing A. ovalisporum and non-CYN-producing C. raciborskii. In order to discriminate between the alterations due to the low nutritional value of cyanobacteria and toxic effects, a control group was fed on the chlorophyte Ankistrodesmus falcatus and another control group was not fed. In the chlorophyte fed control, the epithelium lining the midgut and associated diverticula is mainly formed by strongly stained cells with an apical microvilli border. Nevertheless, unstained areas in which cell lyses had occurred were also observed. In the unfed control, the unstained areas became predominant due to an increment of cell lyses. All individuals fed on CYN-producing A. ovalisporum and some of those fed on non-CYN-producing C. raciborskii appear similar to the unfed control. However, some individuals fed on non-CYN-producing C. raciborskii showed similarities with the fed control. In contrast, the midgut and digestive diverticula of D. magna fed on CYN-producing C. raciborskii showed a widespread dissociation of epithelial cells, associated with severe intracellular disorganization, but cell lysis was less evident than in controls. These alterations cannot be attributed to CYN, because those effects were not induced by CYN-producing A. ovalisporum. Therefore, data suggest the production of another unidentified active metabolite by CYN-producing C. raciborskii, responsible for the disruption of cell adhesion in the epithelium of D. magna digestive tract. Data also show that the tested cyanobacteria are inadequate as food to D. magna, due to low nutritional

  1. Histochemical study of lectin binding sites in fourth and fifth instar gypsy moth larval midgut epithelium

    Treesearch

    Algimantas P. Valaitis

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, midgut epithelial brush border membrane has membrane-bound glycoconjugates, such as BTR-270 and aminopeptidase N (APN), which function as high affinity binding sites (receptors) for the insecticidal proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). As gypsy...

  2. Effects of neem oil (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) on the replacement of the midgut epithelium in the lacewing Ceraeochrysa claveri during larval-pupal metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Santos, Daniela Carvalho Dos

    2014-06-01

    Larvae of the lacewing Ceraeochrysa claveri were fed on eggs of Diatraeasaccharalis treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1% and 2% throughout the larval period. Pupae obtained from treated larvae were used in the study at five days after the completion of cocoon spinning to investigate the effects of neem oil on the replacement of the midgut epithelium during the larval-pupal transition. We observed that the old larval epithelium was shed into the midgut lumen and transformed into the yellow body. Old cells from the yellow body were destroyed by apoptosis and autophagy and were not affected by neem oil. However, neem oil did affect the new pupal epithelium. Cells from treated pupae showed cellular injuries such as a loss of microvilli, cytoplasmic vacuolization, an increase of glycogen stores, deformation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and dilation of the perinuclear space. Additionally, the neem oil treatment resulted in the release of cytoplasmic protrusions, rupture of the plasma membrane and leakage of cellular debris into the midgut lumen, characteristics of cell death by necrosis. The results indicate that neem oil ingestion affects the replacement of midgut epithelium, causing cytotoxic effects that can alter the organism's physiology due to extensive cellular injuries.

  3. Electrolyte transport pathways induced in the midgut epithelium of Drosophila melanogaster larvae by commensal gut microbiota and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Shubha R; Vazhappilly, Abraham T; Sane, Abhay; D'Silva, Natalie M; Tripathi, Subrata

    2017-01-15

    The digestive tract of larval and adult Drosophila is an excellent analogue of the mammalian gut. Enterocytes of the posterior midgut are separated by septa, with no paracellular path, and therefore perform both immune and transport functions. Using microperfusion electrophysiology, we show that larvae emerging from the embryo into sterile medium have symmetrical apical and basal membrane conductances while larvae emerging into non-sterile medium have apical membranes fivefold more conductive than basal membranes. The channels inserted into the apical membranes could originate in microbiata or host and mediate recognition of microbes. Entomopathogenic cyclic peptide toxins deplete intracellular ions reversibly, forming transient ion channels that do not conduct water, unlike an ionophore like nystatin that depletes ions irreversibly. We show the feasibility of studying the interaction of a single microbial species, or tractable combinatorials of microbial species, with only enterocytes in the primary epithelial barrier. Microbiota colonizing exposed epithelial surfaces are vital for sustenance of metazoan life, but communication between microbiota, epithelial cells and the host immune system is only beginning to be understood. We address this issue in the posterior midgut epithelium of Drosophila larvae where nutrient transport and immune functions are exclusively transcellular. We showed that larvae emerging into a sterile post-embryonic environment have symmetrical apical and basal membranes. In contrast, larvae emerging into non-sterile media, the source of microbiota, have markedly asymmetrical membranes, with apical membrane conductance more than fivefold higher than the basal membrane. As an example of pathogen action, we showed that the entomopathogenic fungal toxin destruxin A (Dx) depleted intracellular ions. Reversibility of action of Dx was verified by bilayer reconstitution in forming transient non-specific channels that conduct ions but not water. Dx

  4. Midgut transcriptome profiling of Anoplophora glabripennis, a lignocellulose degrading Cerambycid beetle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Wood-feeding insects often work in collaboration with microbial symbionts to degrade lignin biopolymers and release glucose and other fermentable sugars from recalcitrant plant cell wall carbohydrates, including cellulose and hemicellulose. Here, we present the midgut transcriptome of la...

  5. Active subsite properties, subsite residues and targeting to lysosomes or midgut lumen of cathepsins L from the beetle Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Ticiane F; Dias, Renata O; de Oliveira, Juliana R; Salinas, Roberto K; Juliano, Maria A; Ferreira, Clelia; Terra, Walter R

    2017-10-01

    Cathepsins L are the major digestive peptidases in the beetle Tenebrio molitor. Two digestive cathepsins L (TmCAL2 and TmCAL3) from it had their 3D structures solved. The aim of this paper was to study in details TmCAL3 specificity and properties and relate them to its 3D structure. Recombinant TmCAL3 was assayed with 64 oligopeptides with different amino acid replacements in positions P2, P1, P1' and P2'. Results showed that TmCAL3 S2 specificity differs from the human enzyme and that its specificities also explain why on autoactivation two propeptide residues remain in the enzyme. Data on free energy of binding and of activation showed that S1 and S2' are mainly involved in substrate binding, S1' acts in substrate binding and catalysis, whereas S2 is implied mainly in catalysis. Enzyme subsite residues were identified by docking with the same oligopeptide used for kinetics. The subsite hydrophobicities were calculated from the efficiency of hydrolysis of different amino acid replacements in the peptide and from docking data. The results were closer for S1 and S2' than for S1' and S2, indicating that the residue subsites that were more involved in transition state binding are different from those binding the substrate seen in docking. Besides TmCAL1-3, there are nine other cathepsins L, most of them more expressed at midgut. They are supposed to be directed to lysosomes by a Drosophila-like Lerp receptor and/or motifs in their prodomains. The mannose 6-phosphate lysosomal sorting machinery is absent from T. molitor transcriptome. Cathepsin L direction to midgut contents seems to depend on overexpression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Epithelium

    MedlinePlus

    The term "epithelium" refers to layers of cells that line hollow organs and glands. It is also those cells that make ... Epithelium. In: Kierszenbaum AL, Tres LL. Histology and Cell Biology - An Introduction to Pathology , 3rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  7. Quantitative metabolome, proteome and transcriptome analysis of midgut and fat body tissues in the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, and insights into pheromone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Christopher I; Li, Maria; Sandhu, Harpreet K; Henderson, Hannah; Yuen, Macaire Man Saint; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) are pests of many forests around the world. The mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a significant pest of western North American pine forests. The MPB is able to overcome the defences of pine trees through pheromone-assisted aggregation that results in a mass attack of host trees. These pheromones, both male and female produced, are believed to be biosynthesized in the midgut and/or fat bodies of these insects. We used metabolite analysis, quantitative proteomics (iTRAQ) and transcriptomics (RNA-seq) to identify proteins and transcripts differentially expressed between sexes and between tissues when treated with juvenile hormone III. Juvenile hormone III induced frontalin biosynthesis in males and trans-verbenol biosynthesis in females, as well as affected the expression of many proteins and transcripts in sex- and tissue-specific ways. Based on these analyses, we identified candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis of frontalin, exo-brevicomin, and trans-verbenol pheromones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. K+ transport in the caterpillar intestine epithelium: role of osmolytes for the K+-secretory capacity of the tobacco hornworm midgut.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Heiko; Wieczorek, Helmut; Zeiske, Wolfgang

    2004-10-01

    The midgut of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, actively secretes potassium ions. This can be measured as short-circuit current (I(sc)) with the midgut mounted in an Ussing chamber and superfused with a high-K(+) saline containing as its major osmolyte 166 mM sucrose. Iso-osmotic substitution of sucrose by non-metabolisable compounds (mannitol, urea, NaCl and the polyethylene glycols 200, 400 and 600) led to a dramatic, though reversible, drop in the current. Acarbose, a specific inhibitor of invertase (sucrase) in vertebrates and insects, had no detectable influence on I(sc). Unexpectedly, after replacing sucrose iso-osmotically with the saccharides glucose, fructose, trehalose or raffinose, the K(+) current could no longer be supported. However, all osmolytes smaller than sucrose (except for NaCl), metabolisable or not, initiated an immediate, quite uniform but transient, increase in I(sc) by about 20%, before its eventual decline far below the control value. Hypo-osmotic treatment by omission of sucrose also transiently increased the K(+) current. Small osmolytes substituted for sucrose caused no transient I(sc) stimulation when the epithelium had been challenged before with hypo-osmolarity; however, the eventual decline in I(sc) could not be prevented. Our data seem inconsistent with a role of sucrose as energiser or simple osmolyte. Rather, we discuss here its possible role as analogous to that of sucrose in lower eukaryotes or plants, as an extra- and/or intracellular "compatible osmolyte" that stabilises structure and/or function of the proteins implicated in K(+) transport.

  9. Genome Sequence of Fusarium Isolate MYA-4552 from the Midgut of Anoplophora glabripennis, an Invasive, Wood-Boring Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Erin D.; Geib, Scott M.; Hoover, Kelli; Carlson, John E.

    2016-01-01

    The Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) is a clade of environmentally ubiquitous fungi that includes plant, animal, and insect associates. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the undescribed species FSSC 6 (isolate MYA-4552), housed in the gut of the wood-boring cerambycid beetle Anoplophora glabripennis. PMID:27445364

  10. Genome sequence of Fusarium isolate MYA-4552 from the midgut of Anoplophora glabripennis, an invasive, wood-boring beetle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) is a clade of environmentally ubiquitous fungi that includes plant, animal and insect associates. Here we report the draft genome sequence of the undescribed species FSSC 6 (isolate MYA-4552), housed in the gut of the wood-boring cerambycid beetle Anoplopho...

  11. Genome Sequence of Fusarium Isolate MYA-4552 from the Midgut of Anoplophora glabripennis, an Invasive, Wood-Boring Beetle.

    PubMed

    Herr, Joshua R; Scully, Erin D; Geib, Scott M; Hoover, Kelli; Carlson, John E; Geiser, David M

    2016-07-21

    The Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) is a clade of environmentally ubiquitous fungi that includes plant, animal, and insect associates. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the undescribed species FSSC 6 (isolate MYA-4552), housed in the gut of the wood-boring cerambycid beetle Anoplophora glabripennis.

  12. Affinity purification and characterization of a biodegradable plastic-degrading enzyme from a yeast isolated from the larval midgut of a stag beetle, Aegus laevicollis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ken; Sakamoto, Hironori; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Tabata, Jun; Watanabe, Takashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Koitabashi, Motoo; Fujii, Takeshi; Tsushima, Seiya; Kitamoto, Hiroko K

    2013-09-01

    Two yeast strains, which have the ability to degrade biodegradable plastic films, were isolated from the larval midgut of a stag beetle, Aegus laevicollis. Both of them are most closely related to Cryptococcus magnus and could degrade biodegradable plastic (BP) films made of poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) effectively. A BP-degrading enzyme was purified from the culture broth of one of the isolated strains employing a newly developed affinity purification method based on the binding action of the enzyme to the substrate (emulsified PBSA) and its subsequent degradative action toward the substrate. Partial amino acid sequences of this enzyme suggested that it belongs to the cutinase family, and thus, the enzyme was named CmCut1. It has a molecular mass of 21 kDa and a degradative activity for emulsified PBSA which was significantly enhanced by the simultaneous presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) at a concentration of about 2.5 mM. Its optimal pH was 7.5, and the optimal temperature was 40 °C. It showed a broad substrate specificity for p-nitrophenyl (pNP)-fatty acid esters ranging from pNP-acetate (C2) to pNP-stearate (C18) and films of PBSA, PBS, poly(ε-caprolactone), and poly(lactic acid).

  13. A unique midgut-associated bacterial community hosted by the cave beetle Cansiliella servadeii (Coleoptera: Leptodirini) reveals parallel phylogenetic divergences from universal gut-specific ancestors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cansiliella servadeii (Coleoptera) is an endemic troglobite living in deep carbonate caves in North-Eastern Italy. The beetle constantly moves and browses in its preferred habitat (consisting in flowing water and moonmilk, a soft speleothem colonized by microorganisms) self-preens to convey material from elytra, legs, and antennae towards the mouth. We investigated its inner and outer microbiota using microscopy and DNA-based approaches. Results Abundant microbial cell masses were observed on the external appendages. Cansiliella’s midgut is fully colonized by live microbes and culture-independent analyses yielded nearly 30 different 16S phylotypes that have no overlap with the community composition of the moonmilk. Many of the lineages, dominated by Gram positive groups, share very low similarity to database sequences. However for most cases, notwithstanding their very limited relatedness with existing records, phylotypes could be assigned to bacterial clades that had been retrieved from insect or other animals’ digestive traits. Conclusions Results suggest a history of remote separation from a common ancestor that harboured a set of gut-specific bacteria whose functions are supposedly critical for host physiology. The phylogenetic and coevolutionary implications of the parallel occurrences of these prokaryotic guilds appear to apply throughout a broad spectrum of animal diversity. Their persistence and conservation underlies a possibly critical role of precise bacterial assemblages in animal-bacteria interactions. PMID:23758657

  14. Two essential peritrophic matrix proteins mediate matrix barrier functions in the insect midgut.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sinu; Kelkenberg, Marco; Begum, Khurshida; Steinfeld, Lea; Williams, Clay E; Kramer, Karl J; Beeman, Richard W; Park, Yoonseong; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2014-06-01

    The peritrophic matrix (PM) in the midgut of insects consists primarily of chitin and proteins and is thought to support digestion and provide protection from abrasive food particles and enteric pathogens. We examined the physiological roles of 11 putative peritrophic matrix protein (PMP) genes of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (TcPMPs). TcPMP genes are differentially expressed along the length of the midgut epithelium of feeding larvae. RNAi of individual PMP genes revealed no abnormal developmental phenotypes for 9 of the 11 TcPMPs. However, RNAi for two PMP genes, TcPMP3 and TcPMP5-B, resulted in depletion of the fat body, growth arrest, molting defects and mortality. In situ permeability assays after oral administration of different-sized FITC-dextran beads demonstrated that the exclusion size of the larval peritrophic matrix (PM) decreases progressively from >2 MDa to <4 kDa from the anterior to the most posterior regions of the midgut. In the median midguts of control larvae, 2 MDa dextrans were completely retained within the PM lumen, whereas after RNAi for TcPMP3 and TcPMP5-B, these dextrans penetrated the epithelium of the median midgut, indicating loss of structural integrity and barrier function of the larval PM. In contrast, RNAi for TcPMP5-B, but not RNAi for TcPMP3, resulted in breakdown of impermeability to 4 and 40 kDa dextrans in the PM of the posterior midgut. These results suggest that specific PMPs are involved in the regulation of PM permeability, and that a gradient of barrier function is essential for survival and fat body maintenance.

  15. Histopathological Effects of Bt and TcdA Insecticidal Proteins on the Midgut Epithelium of Western Corn Rootworm Larvae (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera)

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, Andrew J.; Pence, Heather E.; Li, Huarong; Tan, Sek Yee; Evans, Steven L.; Narva, Kenneth E.

    2017-01-01

    Western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is a major corn pest in the United States, causing annual losses of over $1 billion. One approach to protect against crop loss by this insect is the use of transgenic corn hybrids expressing one or more crystal (Cry) proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis. Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 together comprise a binary insecticidal toxin with specific activity against WCR. These proteins have been developed as insect resistance traits in commercialized corn hybrids resistant to WCR feeding damage. Cry34/35Ab1 is a pore forming toxin, but the specific effects of Cry34/35Ab1 on WCR cells and tissues have not been well characterized microscopically, and the overall histopathology is poorly understood. Using high-resolution resin-based histopathology methods, the effects of Cry34/35Ab1 as well as Cry3Aa1, Cry6Aa1, and the Photorhabdus toxin complex protein TcdA have been directly visualized and documented. Clear symptoms of intoxication were observed for all insecticidal proteins tested, including swelling and sloughing of enterocytes, constriction of midgut circular muscles, stem cell activation, and obstruction of the midgut lumen. These data demonstrate the effects of these insecticidal proteins on WCR midgut cells, and the collective response of the midgut to intoxication. Taken together, these results advance our understanding of the insect cell biology and pathology of these insecticidal proteins, which should further the field of insect resistance traits and corn rootworm management. PMID:28481307

  16. Characterization of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium in the Midgut Epithelium of the Bulrush Bug Chilacis typhae (Heteroptera, Lygaeidae, Artheneinae)▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuechler, Stefan Martin; Dettner, Konrad; Kehl, Siegfried

    2011-01-01

    Many members of the suborder Heteroptera have symbiotic bacteria, which are usually found extracellularly in specific sacs or tubular outgrowths of the midgut or intracellularly in mycetomes. In this study, we describe the second molecular characterization of a symbiotic bacterium in a monophagous, seed-sucking stink bug of the family Lygaeidae (sensu stricto). Chilacis typhae possesses at the end of the first section of the midgut a structure which is composed of circularly arranged, strongly enlarged midgut epithelial cells. It is filled with an intracellular endosymbiont. This “mycetocytic belt” might represent an evolutionarily intermediate stage of the usual symbiotic structures found in stink bugs. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA and the groEL genes showed that the bacterium belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria, and it revealed a phylogenetic relationship with a secondary bacterial endosymbiont of Cimex lectularius and free-living plant pathogens such as Pectobacterium and Dickeya. The distribution and ultrastructure of the rod-shaped Chilacis endosymbiont were studied in adults and nymph stages using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and electron microscopy. The detection of symbionts at the anterior poles of developing eggs indicates that endosymbionts are transmitted vertically. A new genus and species name, “Candidatus Rohrkolberia cinguli,” is proposed for this newly characterized clade of symbiotic bacteria. PMID:21378044

  17. Evaluation of the function of a type I peritrophic matrix as a physical barrier for midgut epithelium invasion by mosquito-borne pathogens in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Kato, Nobutaka; Mueller, Christopher R; Fuchs, Jeremy F; McElroy, Kate; Wessely, Vilena; Higgs, Stephen; Christensen, Bruce M

    2008-10-01

    In addition to modulating blood meal digestion and protecting the midgut epithelial cells from mechanical and chemical damage, a biological function attributed to the mosquito type I peritrophic matrix (PM) is preventing or reducing pathogen invasion, especially from Plasmodium spp. Previously, we demonstrated that chitin is an essential component of the PM and is synthesized de novo in response to blood feeding in Aedes aegypti. Therefore, knocking down chitin synthase expression by RNA interference severely disrupts formation of the PM. Utilizing this artificial manipulation, we determined that the absence of the PM has no effect on the development of Brugia pahangi or on the dissemination of dengue virus. However, infectivity of Plasmodium gallinaceum is lower, as measured by oocyst intensity, when the PM is absent. Our findings also suggest that the PM seems to localize proteolytic enzymes along the periphery of the blood bolus during the first 24 hours after blood feeding. Finally, the absence of the PM does not affect reproductive fitness, as measured by the number and viability of eggs oviposited.

  18. Anopheles Midgut FREP1 Mediates Plasmodium Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Genwei; Niu, Guodong; Franca, Caio M.; Dong, Yuemei; Wang, Xiaohong; Butler, Noah S.; Dimopoulos, George; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Malaria transmission depends on sexual stage Plasmodium parasites successfully invading Anopheline mosquito midguts following a blood meal. However, the molecular mechanisms of Plasmodium invasion of mosquito midguts have not been fully elucidated. Previously, we showed that genetic polymorphisms in the fibrinogen-related protein 1 (FREP1) gene are significantly associated with Plasmodium falciparum infection in Anopheles gambiae, and FREP1 is important for Plasmodium berghei infection of mosquitoes. Here we identify that the FREP1 protein is secreted from the mosquito midgut epithelium and integrated as tetramers into the peritrophic matrix, a chitinous matrix formed inside the midgut lumen after a blood meal feeding. Moreover, we show that the FREP1 can directly bind Plasmodia sexual stage gametocytes and ookinetes. Notably, ablating FREP1 expression or targeting FREP1 with antibodies significantly decreases P. falciparum infection in mosquito midguts. Our data support that the mosquito-expressed FREP1 mediates mosquito midgut invasion by multiple species of Plasmodium parasites via anchoring ookinetes to the peritrophic matrix and enabling parasites to penetrate the peritrophic matrix and the epithelium. Thus, targeting FREP1 can limit malaria transmission. PMID:25991725

  19. Multiple pathways for Plasmodium ookinete invasion of the mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Ghosh, Anil K.; Kanzok, Stefan M.; Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Wang, Sibao; Bongio, Nicholas J.; Kalume, Dario E.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Long, Carole A.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium ookinete invasion of the mosquito midgut is a crucial step of the parasite life cycle but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. Previously, a phage display peptide library screen identified SM1, a peptide that binds to the mosquito midgut epithelium and inhibits ookinete invasion. SM1 was characterized as a mimotope of an ookinete surface enolase and SM1 presumably competes with enolase, the presumed ligand, for binding to a putative midgut receptor. Here we identify a mosquito midgut receptor that binds both SM1 and ookinete surface enolase, termed “enolase-binding protein” (EBP). Moreover, we determined that Plasmodium berghei parasites are heterogeneous for midgut invasion, as some parasite clones are strongly inhibited by SM1 whereas others are not. The SM1-sensitive parasites required the mosquito EBP receptor for midgut invasion whereas the SM1-resistant parasites invaded the mosquito midgut independently of EBP. These experiments provide evidence that Plasmodium ookinetes can invade the mosquito midgut by alternate pathways. Furthermore, another peptide from the original phage display screen, midgut peptide 2 (MP2), strongly inhibited midgut invasion by P. berghei (SM1-sensitive and SM1-resistant) and Plasmodium falciparum ookinetes, suggesting that MP2 binds to a separate, universal receptor for midgut invasion. PMID:24474798

  20. Arylphorin is a mitogen in the Heliothis virescens midgut cell secretome upon Cry1Ac intoxication

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) target cells in the midgut epithelium of susceptible larvae. While the mode of action of Cry toxins has been extensively investigated, the midgut response to Cry intoxication and its regulation are not well ch...

  1. Chitin is a component of the Rhodnius prolixus midgut.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Evelyn S L; Mansur, Juliana F; Justi, Silvia A; Figueira-Mansur, Janaina; Dos Santos, Vivian M; Lopez, Sheila G; Masuda, Hatisaburo; Lara, Flavio A; Melo, Ana C A; Moreira, Monica F

    2016-02-01

    Chitin is an essential component of the peritrophic matrix (PM), which is a structure that lines the insect's gut and protects against mechanical damage and pathogens. Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) does not have a PM, but it has an analogous structure, the perimicrovillar membrane (PMM); chitin has not been described in this structure. Here, we show that chitin is present in the R. prolixus midgut using several techniques. The FTIR spectrum of the KOH-resistant putative chitin-material extracted from the midgut bolus showed peaks characteristic of the chitin molecule at 3500, 1675 and 1085 cm(1). Both the midgut bolus material and the standard chitin NMR spectra showed a peak at 1.88 ppm, which is certainly due to methyl protons in the acetamide a group. The percentages of radioactive N-acetylglucosamine (CPM) incorporated were 2 and 4% for the entire intestine and bolus, respectively. The KOH-resistant putative chitin-material was also extracted and purified from the N-acetylglucosamine radioactive bolus, and the radioactivity was estimated through liquid scintillation. The intestinal CHS cDNA translated sequence was the same as previously described for the R. prolixus cuticle and ovaries. Phenotypic alterations were observed in the midgut of females with a silenced CHS gene after a blood meal, such as retarded blood meal digestion; the presence of fresh blood that remained red nine days after the blood meal; and reduced trachea and hemozoin content compared with the control. Wheat germ agglutinin (a specific probe that detects chitin) labeling proximal to the intestine (crop and midgut) was much lower in females with a silenced CHS gene, especially in the midgut region, where almost no fluorescence signal was detected compared with the control groups. Midguts from females with a CHS gene silenced by dsRNA-CHS and control midguts pre-treated with chitinase showed that the chitin-derived fluorescence signal decreased in the region around the epithelium

  2. Morphology and ultrastructure of the midgut in Piscicola geometra (Annelida, Hirudinea).

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M; Swiątek, Piotr; Kszuk, Michalina; Główczyk, Kinga; Bielecki, Aleksander

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents information on the organization of the midgut and its epithelium ultrastructure in juvenile and adult specimens of Piscicola geometra (Annelida, Hirudinea), a species which is a widespread ectoparasite found on the body and gills and in the mouth of many types of fish. The analysis of juvenile nonfeeding specimens helped in the explanation of all alterations in the midgut epithelium which are connected with digestion. The endodermal portion (midgut) of the digestive system is composed of four regions: the esophagus, the crop, the posterior crop caecum, and the intestine. Their epithelia are formed by flat, cuboidal, or columnar digestive cells; however, single small cells which do not contact the midgut lumen were also observed. The ultrastructure of all of the regions of the midgut are described and discussed with a special emphasis on their functions in the digestion of blood. In P. geometra, the part of the midgut that is devoid of microvilli is responsible for the accumulation of blood, while the epithelium of the remaining part of the midgut, which has a distinct regionalization in the distribution of organelles, plays a role in its absorption and secretion. Glycogen granules in the intestinal epithelium indicate its role in the accumulation of sugar. The comparison of the ultrastructure of midgut epithelium in juvenile and adult specimens suggests that electron-dense granules observed in the apical cytoplasm of digestive cells take part in enzyme accumulation. Numerous microorganisms were observed in the mycetome, which is composed of two large oval diverticles that connect with the esophagus via thin ducts. Similar microorganisms also occurred in the cytoplasm of the epithelium in the esophagus, the crop, the intestine, and in their lumen. Microorganisms were observed both in fed adult and unfed juvenile specimens of P. geometra, which strongly suggests that vertical transmission occurs from parent to offspring.

  3. Cathepsin L participates in the remodeling of the midgut through dissociation of midgut cells and activation of apoptosis via caspase-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui; Lin, Xian-Wu; Xu, Wei-Hua

    2017-03-01

    The larval midgut in holometabolous insects must undergo a remodeling process during metamorphosis to form the pupal-adult midgut. However, the molecular mechanism of larval midgut cell dissociation remains unknown. Here, we show that the expression and activity of Helicoverpa armigera cathepsin L (Har-CatL) are high in the midgut at the mid-late stage of the 6th-instar larvae and are responsive to the upstream hormone ecdysone. Immunocytochemistry shows that signals for Har-CatL-like are localized in midgut cells, and an inhibitor experiment demonstrates that Har-CatL functions in the dissociation of midgut epithelial cells. Mechanistically, Har-CatL can cleave pro-caspase-1 into the mature peptide, thereby increasing the activity of caspase-1, which plays a key role in apoptosis, indicating that Har-CatL is also involved in the apoptosis of midgut cells by activating caspase-1. We believe that this is the first report that Har-CatL regulates the dissociation and apoptosis of the larval midgut epithelium for midgut remodeling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The development of malaria parasites in the mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Bennink, Sandra; Kiesow, Meike J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The mosquito midgut stages of malaria parasites are crucial for establishing an infection in the insect vector and to thus ensure further spread of the pathogen. Parasite development in the midgut starts with the activation of the intraerythrocytic gametocytes immediately after take‐up and ends with traversal of the midgut epithelium by the invasive ookinetes less than 24 h later. During this time period, the plasmodia undergo two processes of stage conversion, from gametocytes to gametes and from zygotes to ookinetes, both accompanied by dramatic morphological changes. Further, gamete formation requires parasite egress from the enveloping erythrocytes, rendering them vulnerable to the aggressive factors of the insect gut, like components of the human blood meal. The mosquito midgut stages of malaria parasites are unprecedented objects to study a variety of cell biological aspects, including signal perception, cell conversion, parasite/host co‐adaptation and immune evasion. This review highlights recent insights into the molecules involved in gametocyte activation and gamete formation as well as in zygote‐to‐ookinete conversion and ookinete midgut exit; it further discusses factors that can harm the extracellular midgut stages as well as the measures of the parasites to protect themselves from any damage. PMID:27111866

  5. Temporal and spatial expression of caudal-type homeobox proteins in the midgut of human embryos

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Wei-Lin; Yuan, Zheng-Wei; Bai, Yu-Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the spatiotemporal expression of caudal-type homeobox genes (CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4) during development of the midgut in human embryos and to explore the possible roles of CDX genes during the morphogenesis of human midgut. Human embryos (n=28) were sectioned serially and sagittally and CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 proteins were detected on the midline from the 5th to 9th weeks of gestation by immunohistochemical staining. Results: CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 proteins were weakly expressed in epithelium and mesenchyme of the midgut in the 6th and 7th weeks of gestation and reached estimated optimal level on the 8th and 9th weeks of gestation. In the 9th week of gestation, immunoreactivities specific to CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 were restricted in epithelium of the midgut. Conclusions: CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 proteins began to express in human midgut in the 6th week of gestation. From the 6th to 9th week of gastation, the expression of CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 proteins gradually increase and exhibited overlapping expression patterns, suggesting that CDX genes may be involved in early development of the epithelium of human midgut. Cross-regulatory interactions may exist among CDX genes with respect to human midgut development. PMID:26884902

  6. Cellulolytic environment in the midgut of the wood-feeding higher termite Nasutitermes takasagoensis.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Gaku; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Hojo, Masaru; Fujita, Ai; Makiya, Hiromi; Miyagi, Mio; Arakawa, Gaku; Arioka, Manabu

    2012-01-01

    Unlike lower termites, xylophagous higher termites thrive on wood without the aid of symbiotic protists. In the higher termite Nasutitermes takasagoensis, both endogenous endo-β-1,4-glucanase and β-glucosidase genes are expressed in the midgut, which is believed to be the main site of cellulose digestion. To further explore the detailed cellulolytic system in the midgut of N. takasagoensis, we performed immunohistochemistry and digital light microscopy to determine distributions of cellulolytic enzymes in the salivary glands and the midgut as well as the total cellulolytic activity in the midgut. Although cellulolytic enzymes were uniformly produced in the midgut epithelium, the concentration of endo-β-1,4-glucanase activity and luminal volume in the midgut were comparable to those of the wood-feeding lower termite Coptotermes formosanus, which digests cellulose with the aid of hindgut protists. However, the size of ingested wood particles was considerably larger in N. takasagoensis than that in C. formosanus. Nevertheless, it is possible that the cellulolytic system in the midgut of N. takasagoensis hydrolyzes highly crystalline cellulose to a certain extent. The glucose produced did not accumulate in the midgut lumen. Therefore, the present study suggests that the midgut of the higher termite provides the necessary conditions for cellulolysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Laminin and the malaria parasite's journey through the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Romanico B G; Lycett, Gareth; Mahairaki, Vassiliki; Siden-Kiamos, Inga; Louis, Christos

    2005-07-01

    During the invasion of the mosquito midgut epithelium, Plasmodium ookinetes come to rest on the basal lamina, where they transform into the sporozoite-producing oocysts. Laminin, one of the basal lamina's major components, has previously been shown to bind several surface proteins of Plasmodium ookinetes. Here, using the recently developed RNAi technique in mosquitoes, we used a specific dsRNA construct targeted against the LANB2 gene (laminin gamma1) of Anopheles gambiae to reduce its mRNA levels, leading to a substantial reduction in the number of successfully developed oocysts in the mosquito midgut. Moreover, this molecular relationship is corroborated by the intimate association of developing P. berghei parasites and laminin in the gut, as observed using confocal microscopy. Our data support the notion of laminin playing a functional role in the development of the malaria parasite within the mosquito midgut.

  8. Receptor mediated endocytosis of vicilin in Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larval midgut epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Daniele; Oliveira, Gabriel B; Uchôa, Adriana F; Samuels, Richard I; Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Silva, Carlos P

    2017-08-01

    The transport of proteins across the intestinal epithelium of insects is still not well understood. There is evidence that vicilin, a major storage protein of cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata), is internalized in larvae of the seed-beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. It has been reported that this vicilin interacts with proteins present in the microvillar membranes of columnar cells along the digestive tract of the larvae. In the present work, we studied the cellular pathway involved in endocytosis of vicilin in larval C. maculatus by employing ex vivo experiments. In the ex vivo approach, we incubated FITC-labelled vicilin with isolated midgut wholemounts in the absence or in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors. The fate of labelled or non-labelled globulins was monitored by confocal microscopy and fluorescence measurement. Our results suggest that the internalization of vicilins is due to receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here we report the identity of a microvillar vicilin-binding protein that was purified using affinity chromatography on a vicilin-sepharose column. The putative vicilin receptor showed high homology to proteins with the CRAL-TRIO domain, specifically the Sec14 superfamily member α-tocopherol transfer protein. The precise mechanism involved in vicilin internalization was defined through the use of specific inhibitors of the endocytosis pathway. The inhibitors filipin III and nystatin significantly inhibited the endocytosis of vicilin, while chlorpromazine and phenylarsine oxide had a much lower effect on endocytosis, suggesting that the endocytic pathway is predominantly mediated by caveolin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Midgut morphological changes and autophagy during metamorphosis in sand flies.

    PubMed

    Malta, Juliana; Heerman, Matthew; Weng, Ju Lin; Fernandes, Kenner M; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2017-03-11

    During metamorphosis, holometabolous insects undergo significant remodeling of their midgut and become able to cope with changes in dietary requirements between larval and adult stages. At this stage, insects must be able to manage and recycle available food resources in order to develop fully into adults, especially when no nutrients are acquired from the environment. Autophagy has been previously suggested to play a crucial role during metamorphosis of the mosquito. Here, we investigate the overall morphological changes of the midgut of the sand fly during metamorphosis and assess the expression profiles of the autophagy-related genes ATG1, ATG6, and ATG8, which are associated with various steps of the autophagic process. Morphological changes in the midgut start during the fourth larval instar, with epithelial degeneration followed by remodeling via the differentiation of regenerative cells in pre-pupal and pupal stages. The changes in the midgut epithelium are paired with the up-regulation of ATG1, ATG6 and ATG8 during the larva-adult transition. Vein, a putative epidermal growth factor involved in regulating epithelial midgut regeneration, is also up-regulated. Autophagy has further been confirmed in sand flies via the presence of autophagosomes residing within the cytoplasmic compartment of the pupal stages. An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of this process should aid the future management of this neglected tropical vector.

  10. Plasmodium ookinetes coopt mammalian plasminogen to invade the mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anil K.; Coppens, Isabelle; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Ploug, Michael; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Ookinete invasion of the mosquito midgut is an essential step for the development of the malaria parasite in the mosquito. Invasion involves recognition between a presumed mosquito midgut receptor and an ookinete ligand. Here, we show that enolase lines the ookinete surface. An antienolase antibody inhibits oocyst development of both Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium falciparum, suggesting that enolase may act as an invasion ligand. Importantly, we demonstrate that surface enolase captures plasminogen from the mammalian blood meal via its lysine motif (DKSLVK) and that this interaction is essential for midgut invasion, because plasminogen depletion leads to a strong inhibition of oocyst formation. Although addition of recombinant WT plasminogen to depleted serum rescues oocyst formation, recombinant inactive plasminogen does not, thus emphasizing the importance of plasmin proteolytic activity for ookinete invasion. The results support the hypothesis that enolase on the surface of Plasmodium ookinetes plays a dual role in midgut invasion: by acting as a ligand that interacts with the midgut epithelium and, further, by capturing plasminogen, whose conversion to active plasmin promotes the invasion process. PMID:21949403

  11. Biological Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis and Associated Toxins against the Asian Longhorned Beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    Treesearch

    Vincent D' amico; John D. Podgwaite; Sara Duke; Sara Duke

    2004-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner var. tenebrionis and B. thuringiensis toxins were assayed against larval and adult Asian longhorned beetles, Anoplophora glabripennis (A. glabripennis). Preliminary in vitro assays showed some toxins to be active on whole midgut preparations in voltage clamp assays and in assays on brush border membrane vesicles formed from midgut...

  12. Degeneration and cell regeneration in the midgut of Podisus nigrispinus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) during post-embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Aparecida das Dores; Fialho, Maria do Carmo Queiroz; Zanuncio, José Cola; Ramalho, Francisco de Souza; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Cell death, proliferation, and differentiation in some developmental stages of insects have been studied in the midgut of ametabolous, which undergo only continuous growth, and holometabolous, which undergo complete metamorphosis. However, in hemimetabolous insects, evolutionarily intermediate between ametabolous and holometabolous, midgut reorganization during the post-embryonic development has been poorly studied. The present study evaluates the post-embryonic development of the midgut of a hemimetabolous insect, Podisus nigrispinus, to test the hypothesis that these insects have programmed cell death and proliferation followed by differentiation of regenerative cells during midgut growth from nymphs to adult. The morphometrical data showed a 6-fold increase in midgut length from the first instar nymph to the adult, which did not result from an increase in the size of the midgut cells, suggesting that the growth of the midgut occurs by an increase in cell number. Cell death was rarely found in the midgut, whereas proliferation of regenerative cells occurred quite frequently. The growth of the midgut of P. nigrispinus appears to result from the proliferation of regenerative cells present in the epithelium; unlike ametabolous and holometabolous insects, the midgut of P. nigrispinus does not undergo extensive remodeling, as shown by the low frequency of digestive cell death.

  13. Insect midgut carboxypeptidases with emphasis on S10 hemipteran and M14 lepidopteran carboxypeptidases.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, C; Rebola, K G O; Cardoso, C; Bragatto, I; Ribeiro, A F; Terra, W R

    2015-04-01

    We compared the whole complement of midgut carboxypeptidases from 10 insects pertaining to five orders based on transcriptomes obtained by deep sequencing and biochemical data. Most of the carboxypeptidases were metallocarboxypeptidases from family M14, with carboxypeptidase A (CPA) predominating over carboxypeptidase B (CPB). They were found in all of the insects studied except for the hemipterans and a bruchid beetle. M14 carboxypeptidases were expressed only in the midgut of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera). The most expressed CPA from this insect (SfCPA) was cloned, sequenced and expressed as a recombinant enzyme. This enzyme was used to generate antibodies used to demonstrate that SfCPA is secreted by an exocytic route. Serine carboxypeptidases from family S10 were found in all of the insects studied here. In S. frugiperda, they are expressed in all tissues besides the midgut, in accordance with their presumed lysosomal role. In the hemipteran Dysdercus peruvianus, S10 carboxypeptidases are expressed only in midgut, suggesting that they are digestive enzymes. This was confirmed by enzyme assays of midgut contents. Furthermore, the substrate specificity of D. peruvianus S10 carboxypeptidases are predicted to be one CPC (preferring hydrophobic residues) and one CPD (preferring basic residues), thus able to hydrolyse the peptides formed by their digestive cathepsin D and cathepsin L, respectively. The role of S10 carboxypeptidases in bruchid beetles are suggested to be the same as in hemipterans. © 2014 The Royal Entomological Society.

  14. The midgut transcriptome of Aedes aegypti fed with saline or protein meals containing chikungunya virus reveals genes potentially involved in viral midgut escape.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shengzhang; Behura, Susanta K; Franz, Alexander W E

    2017-05-15

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the primary vector for medically important arthropod-borne viruses, including chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Following oral acquisition, an arbovirus has to persistently infect several organs in the mosquito before becoming transmissible to another vertebrate host. A major obstacle an arbovirus has to overcome during its infection cycle inside the mosquito is the midgut escape barrier, representing the exit mechanism arboviruses utilize when disseminating from the midgut. To understand the transcriptomic basis of midgut escape and to reveal genes involved in the process, we conducted a comparative transcriptomic analysis of midgut samples from mosquitoes which had received a saline meal (SM) or a protein meal (PM) (not) containing CHIKV. CHIKV which was orally acquired by a mosquito along with a SM or PM productively infected the midgut epithelium and disseminated to secondary tissues. A total of 27 RNA-Seq libraries from midguts of mosquitoes that had received PM or SM (not) containing CHIKV at 1 and 2 days post-feeding were generated and sequenced. Fewer than 80 genes responded differentially to the presence of CHIKV in midguts of mosquitoes that had acquired the virus along with SM or PM. SM feeding induced differential expression (DE) of 479 genes at day 1 and 314 genes at day 2 when compared to midguts of sugarfed mosquitoes. By comparison, PM feeding induced 6029 DE genes at day 1 and 7368 genes at day 2. Twenty-three DE genes encoding trypsins, metalloproteinases, and serine-type endopeptidases were significantly upregulated in midguts of mosquitoes at day 1 following SM or PM ingestion. Two of these genes were Ae. aegypti late trypsin (AeLT) and serine collagenase 1 precursor (AeSP1). In vitro, recombinant AeLT showed strong matrix metalloproteinase activity whereas recombinant AeSP1 did not. By substituting a bloodmeal for SM, we identified midgut-expressed genes not involved in blood or protein digestion. These included genes

  15. Stage-specific distribution of oxidative radicals and antioxidant enzymes in the midgut of Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Natraj; Kodrík, Dalibor; Turanli, Ferit; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2007-01-01

    The titers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) represented by superoxide anion and general peroxides, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), are regulated in the midgut of the Colorado potato beetle (CPB) relative to the gut compartment, developmental stage, and food intake. ROS concentration is low in the potato leaves but it is very high in their digest in insect's anterior midgut. It is proposed that intensive ROS production in this gut region is linked to the processing of allelochemicals. SOD and CAT activities, low oxygen tension, and unidentified redox systems that maintain a slightly reducing milieu in the midgut lumen (pe+pH=6.95 declining to 5.36), obviously contribute to the decrease of ROS concentration along the gut length to a minimum in the wall of posterior midgut region. SOD and CAT activities are higher in the potato leaves than in the midgut tissues but the role of plant enzymes in ROS elimination within the gut lumen remains to be shown. A lower level of ROS and a higher antioxidant potential in the adult than in the larval midgut indicate stage specificity in the management of oxidative stress. The antioxidant defense is high in the diapausing adults that contain no detectable superoxide and about ten times less peroxides than the reproducing adults.

  16. Functional morphology of the midgut of a sandfly as compared to other hematophagous nematocera.

    PubMed

    Rudin, W; Hecker, H

    1982-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of female Lutzomyia longipalpis was investigated by means of electron microscopic morphometry before and during blood digestion. Ultrastructure and cytological changes of the stomach cells upon blood feeding were generally similar to the ones described for Phlebotomus longipes (Gemetchu, 1974) and for mosquitoes (Hecker, 1977). In addition, the quantitative composition of the cells resembled the one of mosquitoes in many respects. Despite some morphological differences in the functional gut cytology, it can be admitted that, in general, digestive processes may run similarly in the midguts of sandflies and mosquitoes.

  17. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  18. Silencing of Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Activates Diverse Immune Pathways to Regulate the Growth of Midgut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Choudhury, Tania P.; Kakani, Parik; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Anopheles mosquito midgut harbors a diverse group of endogenous bacteria that grow extensively after the blood feeding and help in food digestion and nutrition in many ways. Although, the growth of endogenous bacteria is regulated by various factors, however, the robust antibacterial immune reactions are generally suppressed in this body compartment by a heme peroxidase HPX15 crosslinked mucins barrier. This barrier is formed on the luminal side of the midgut and blocks the direct interactions and recognition of bacteria or their elicitors by the immune reactive midgut epithelium. We hypothesized that in the absence of HPX15, an increased load of exogenous bacteria will enormously induce the mosquito midgut immunity and this situation in turn, can easily regulate mosquito-pathogen interactions. In this study, we found that the blood feeding induced AsHPX15 gene in Anopheles stephensi midgut and promoted the growth of endogenous as well as exogenous fed bacteria. In addition, the mosquito midgut also efficiently regulated the number of these bacteria through the induction of classical Toll and Imd immune pathways. In case of AsHPX15 silenced midguts, the growth of midgut bacteria was largely reduced through the induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene, a downstream effector molecule of the JAK/STAT pathway. Interestingly, no significant induction of the classical immune pathways was observed in these midguts. Importantly, the NOS is a well known negative regulator of Plasmodium development, thus, we proposed that the induction of diverged immune pathways in the absence of HPX15 mediated midgut barrier might be one of the strategies to manipulate the vectorial capacity of Anopheles mosquito. PMID:27630620

  19. Densovirus Crosses the Insect Midgut by Transcytosis and Disturbs the Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Gosselin Grenet, A. S.; Castelli, I.; Cermenati, G.; Ravallec, M.; Fiandra, L.; Debaisieux, S.; Multeau, C.; Lautredou, N.; Dupressoir, T.; Li, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Densoviruses are parvoviruses that can be lethal for insects of different orders at larval stages. Although the horizontal transmission mechanisms are poorly known, densoviral pathogenesis usually starts with the ingestion of contaminated food by the host. Depending on the virus, this leads to replication restricted to the midgut or excluding it. In both cases the success of infection depends on the virus capacity to enter the intestinal epithelium. Using the Junonia coenia densovirus (JcDNV) as the prototype virus and the lepidopteran host Spodoptera frugiperda as an interaction model, we focused on the early mechanisms of infection during which JcDNV crosses the intestinal epithelium to reach and replicate in underlying target tissues. We studied the kinetics of interaction of JcDNV with the midgut epithelium and the transport mechanisms involved. Using several approaches, in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro, at molecular and cellular levels, we show that JcDNV is specifically internalized by endocytosis in absorptive cells and then crosses the epithelium by transcytosis. As a consequence, viral entry disturbs the midgut function. Finally, we showed that four mutations on the capsid of JcDNV affect specific recognition by the epithelial cells but not their binding. PMID:24027326

  20. Ultrastructure of the digestive system and the fate of midgut during embryonic development in Porcellio scaber (Crustacea: Isopoda).

    PubMed

    Strus, Jasna; Klepal, Waltraud; Repina, Janja; Tusek-Znidaric, Magda; Milatovic, Masa; Pipan, Ziva

    2008-07-01

    Microscopic anatomy of the digestive system in embryos and larvae of the terrestrial isopod crustacean Porcellio scaber was investigated by light bright field, fluorescence and electron microscopy. During marsupial ontogenetic development the event-dependent staging was used to discriminate the various embryonic stages. At the late embryo stage the differentiation of the ectodermal part of the gut into the complex filtering foregut and the hindgut with absorptive and transporting functions is accomplished. The gut of the marsupial manca larva is fully developed and similar to that of the adult. In early embryos the endodermal midgut gland primordia are filled with yolk and lipid globules. In late embryos the epithelium of paired midgut gland tubes is composed of two cell types; one of them exhibits orange autofluorescence. The endodermal cells located between the foregut and the midgut glands of late embryos form the prospective midgut. The cells have electron dense cytoplasm, abundant glycogen fields, endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosomes and numerous vesicles. In the adults the endodermal cells of the midgut remain only in the midgut gland ducts which connect the midgut glands and the foregut. Details of the cellular ultrastructure and morphogenesis of the ectodermal and endodermal parts of the digestive system during embryonic development of Porcellio scaber provide data for further phylogenetic and comparative studies in peracaridan crustaceans and other arthropods.

  1. Brain-midgut short neuropeptide F mechanism that inhibits digestive activity of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana upon starvation.

    PubMed

    Mikani, Azam; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Takeda, Makio

    2012-03-01

    Immunohistochemical reactivity against short neuropeptide F (sNPF) was observed in the brain-corpus cardiacum and midgut paraneurons of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Four weeks of starvation increased the number of sNPF-ir cells in the midgut epithelium but the refeeding decreased the number in 3h. Dramatic rises in sNPF contents in the midgut epithelium and hemolymph of roaches starved for 4 weeks were confirmed by ELISA. Starvation for 4 weeks reduced α-amylase, protease and lipase activities in the midgut of P. americana but refeeding restored these to high levels. Co-incubation of dissected midgut with sNPF at physiological concentrations inhibited α-amylase, protease and lipase activities. sNPF injection into the hemocoel led to a decrease in α-amylase, protease and lipase activities, whereas PBS injection had no effects. The injection of d-(+)-trehalose and l-proline into the hemocoel of decapitated adult male cockroaches that had been starved for 4 weeks had no effect on these digestive enzymes. However, injection into the hemocoel of head-intact starved cockroaches stimulated digestive activity. Injection of d-(+)-trehalose and l-proline into the lumen of decapitated cockroaches that had been starved for 4 weeks increased enzymes activities and suppressed sNPF in the midgut. Our data indicate that sNPF from the midgut paraneurons suppresses α-amylase, protease and lipase activities during starvation. Injection of d-(+)-trehalose/l-proline into the hemocoel of head-intact starved cockroach decreased the hemolymph sNPF content, which suggests that sNPF could be one of the brain factors, demonstrating brain-midgut interplay in the regulation of digestive activities and possibly nutrition-associated behavioral modifications.

  2. Apoptosis and necrosis during the circadian cycle in the centipede midgut.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Chajec, Ł; Vilimova, J; Tajovský, K

    2016-07-01

    Three types of cells have been distinguished in the midgut epithelium of two centipedes, Lithobius forficatus and Scolopendra cingulata: digestive, secretory, and regenerative cells. According to the results of our previous studies, we decided to analyze the relationship between apoptosis and necrosis in their midgut epithelium and circadian rhythms. Ultrastructural analysis showed that these processes proceed in a continuous manner that is independent of the circadian rhythm in L. forficatus, while in S. cingulata necrosis is activated at midnight. Additionally, the description of apoptosis and necrosis showed no differences between males and females of both species analyzed. At the beginning of apoptosis, the cell cytoplasm becomes electron-dense, apparently in response to shrinkage of the cell. Organelles such as the mitochondria, cisterns of endoplasmic reticulum transform and degenerate. Nuclei gradually assume lobular shapes before the apoptotic cell is discharged into the midgut lumen. During necrosis, however, the cytoplasm of the cell becomes electron-lucent, and the number of organelles decreases. While the digestive cells of about 10 % of L. forficatus contain rickettsia-like pathogens, the corresponding cells in S. cingulata are free of rickettsia. As a result, we can state that apoptosis in L. forficatus is presumably responsible for protecting the organism against infections, while in S. cingulata apoptosis is not associated with the elimination of pathogens. Necrosis is attributed to mechanical damage, and the activation of this process coincides with proliferation of the midgut regenerative cells at midnight in S. cingulata.

  3. Toxoneuron nigriceps parasitization delays midgut replacement in fifth-instar Heliothis virescens larvae.

    PubMed

    Tettamanti, Gianluca; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Pennacchio, Francesco; de Eguileor, Magda

    2008-05-01

    We have analyzed the effects of Toxoneuron nigriceps parasitization on the midgut development of its host Heliothis virescens. In parasitized H. virescens larvae, the midgut epithelium undergoes a complete replacement, which is qualitatively not different to that observed in synchronous unparasitized larvae, with similar temporal profiles of cell death and metabolic activity. However, the whole gut replacement process is significantly delayed in parasitized larvae, with complete differentiation of the new gut epithelium being observed 4 days later than in unparasitized controls. The administration of juvenile hormone before commitment and of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) after commitment delays and fosters, respectively, the replacement process of the midgut epithelium; moreover, the injection of 20E into developmentally arrested and 20E-deficient host last-instar larvae parasitized by T. nigriceps immediately triggers regular gut development. These hormone-based experiments suggest that endocrine alterations in the larval host, induced by T. nigriceps parasitism, are responsible for the temporal alterations in the gut replacement process. The role of this parasitoid-induced developmental change in the host regulation process is discussed.

  4. Intestinal peptides as circulating hormones: release of tachykinin-related peptide from the locust and cockroach midgut.

    PubMed

    Winther, A M; Nässel, D R

    2001-04-01

    Tachykinin-related peptides (TRPs) in the locust Locusta migratoria and the cockroach Leucophaea maderae have stimulatory effects on some muscles that are not innervated by TRP-containing neurons. Thus, these tissues may be affected by circulating TRPs. Here, we have investigated whether the midgut is the source of circulating TRPs. TRP-immunoreactive material in the locust midgut is found only in the endocrine cells of the gut epithelium. In both species of insect, the endocrine cells contain several isoforms of TRPs, as determined by immunocytochemistry and a combination of chromatography (HPLC) and enzyme immunoassay (ELISA). The release of TRPs was investigated by ELISA using isolated midguts of the locust and cockroach. Elevated levels of K(+) in the bathing saline induced the release of TRP from the midgut of both species. To examine the release of TRPs into the circulation in vivo, we measured haemolymph levels of TRPs in fed and starved locusts. The concentration of TRP-immunoreactive material in fed locusts was estimated to be 0.15 nmol l(-1), and this increased approximately fourfold in insects starved for 24 h. In accordance with this observation, the content of TRP-immunoreactive material in the midgut was lower in starved locusts than in fed locusts. Although part of the increased blood concentration of TRPs may be due to reduced blood volume, our data suggest that TRPs are released as hormones from the midgut of the locust and cockroach and that this release may be linked to nutritional status.

  5. Bacteria Associated with the Ectoperitrophic Space in the Midgut of the Larva of the Midge Xylotopus par (Diptera: Chironomidae) †

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Michael G.; Pankratz, H. Stuart; Klug, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    An ectoperitrophic association of bacteria with the midgut of Xylotopus par larvae was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The bacteria attached to the epithelium as a well-defined band in the posterior midgut. They were morphotypically uniform and formed short filaments with endosporelike structures. The consistent presence and well-defined location of the bacteria in a region of the insect digestive tract usually void of microbes indicates a highly evolved symbiotic association, the nature of which is unknown at present. Images PMID:16347026

  6. Perforin-like protein PPLP4 is crucial for mosquito midgut infection by Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Christine C; Bennink, Sandra; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Fischer, Rainer; Pradel, Gabriele

    2015-06-01

    The genomes of Plasmodium parasites encode for five perforin-like proteins, PPLP1-5, and four of them have previously been demonstrated to be involved in disruption of host cell barriers. We now show that the fifth perforin, PPLP4, is crucial for infection of the mosquito vector by Plasmodium falciparum parasites. PPLP4 is expressed in the blood and mosquito midgut stages in granular structures. In gametocytes, PPLP4 expression is specific to the female gender, while ookinetes show a PPLP4 localization at the apical pole. Gene disruption of pplp4 results in no phenotypical change during blood stage replication, gametocyte development or gametogenesis, while mosquitoes fed with PPLP4-deficient gametocytes display a severe reduction in oocyst numbers, and an accumulation of ookinetes in the mosquito midguts was observed. In conclusion, we propose an essential role for PPLP4 in infection of the mosquito midgut, presumably by mediating ookinete traversal through the midgut epithelium. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. RNA-seq analyses of the midgut from blood- and serum-fed Ixodes ricinus ticks

    PubMed Central

    Perner, Jan; Provazník, Jan; Schrenková, Jana; Urbanová, Veronika; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Kopáček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Adult females of the genus Ixodes imbibe blood meals exceeding about 100 times their own weight within 7‒9 days. During this period, ticks internalise components of host blood by endocytic digest cells that line the tick midgut epithelium. Using RNA-seq, we aimed to characterise the midgut transcriptome composition in adult Ixodes ricinus females during early and late phase of engorgement. To address specific adaptations to the haemoglobin-rich diet, we compared the midgut transcriptomes of genetically homogenous female siblings fed either bovine blood or haemoglobin-depleted serum. We noted that tick gut transcriptomes are subject to substantial temporal-dependent expression changes between day 3 and day 8 of feeding. In contrast, the number of transcripts significantly affected by the presence or absence of host red blood cells was low. Transcripts relevant to the processes associated with blood-meal digestion were analysed and involvement of selected encoded proteins in the tick midgut physiology discussed. A total of 7215 novel sequences from I. ricinus were deposited in public databases as an additional outcome of this study. Our results broaden the current knowledge of tick digestive system and may lead to the discovery of potential molecular targets for efficient tick control. PMID:27824139

  8. Synergistic mitotoxicity of chloromethanes and fullerene C60 nanoaggregates in Daphnia magna midgut epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Seke, Mariana; Markelic, Milica; Morina, Arian; Jovic, Danica; Korac, Aleksandra; Milicic, Dragana; Djordjevic, Aleksandar

    2016-12-03

    Adsorption of non-polar compounds by suspended fullerene nanoaggregates (nC60) may enhance their toxicity and affect the fate, transformation, and transport of non-polar compounds in the environment. The potential of stable fullerene nanoaggregates as contaminant carriers in aqueous systems and the influence of chloromethanes (trichloromethane and dichloromethane) were studied on the midgut epithelial cells of Daphnia magna by light and electron microscopy. The size and shape of fullerene nanoaggregates were observed and measured using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy. The nC60 in suspension appeared as a bulk of aggregates of irregular shape with a surface consisting of small clumps 20-30 nm in diameter. The presence of nC60 aggregates was confirmed in midgut lumen and epithelial cells of D. magna. After in vivo acute exposure to chloromethane, light and electron microscopy revealed an extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization with disruption and loss of specific structures of D. magna midgut epithelium (mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, microvilli, peritrophic membrane) and increased appearance of necrotic cells. The degree of observed changes depended on the type of treatment: trichloromethane (TCM) induced the most notable changes, whereas fullerene nanoaggregates alone had no negative effects. Transmission electron microscopy also indicated increased lysosomal degradation and severe peroxidative damages of enterocyte mitochondria following combined exposure to chloromethane and fullerene nanoaggregates. In conclusion, the adsorption of chloromethane by fullerene nanoaggregates enhances their toxicity and induces peroxidative mitochondrial damage in midgut enterocytes.

  9. Mountain Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Gene D. Amman; Mark D. McGregor; Robert E. Jr. Dolph

    1989-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a member of a group of beetles known as bark beetles: Except when adults emerge and attack new trees, the mountain pine beetle completes its life cycle under the bark. The beetle attacks and kills lodgepole, ponderosa, sugar, and western white pines. Outbreaks frequently develop in lodgepole pine stands that...

  10. Pheromone production in bark beetles.

    PubMed

    Blomquist, Gary J; Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Aw, Mory; Song, Minmin; Gorzalski, Andrew; Abbott, Nicole L; Chang, Eric; Tittiger, Claus

    2010-10-01

    The first aggregation pheromone components from bark beetles were identified in 1966 as a mixture of ipsdienol, ipsenol and verbenol. Since then, a number of additional components have been identified as both aggregation and anti-aggregation pheromones, with many of them being monoterpenoids or derived from monoterpenoids. The structural similarity between the major pheromone components of bark beetles and the monoterpenes found in the host trees, along with the association of monoterpenoid production with plant tissue, led to the paradigm that most if not all bark beetle pheromone components were derived from host tree precursors, often with a simple hydroxylation producing the pheromone. In the 1990 s there was a paradigm shift as evidence for de novo biosynthesis of pheromone components began to accumulate, and it is now recognized that most bark beetle monoterpenoid aggregation pheromone components are biosynthesized de novo. The bark beetle aggregation pheromones are released from the frass, which is consistent with the isoprenoid aggregation pheromones, including ipsdienol, ipsenol and frontalin, being produced in midgut tissue. It appears that exo-brevocomin is produced de novo in fat body tissue, and that verbenol, verbenone and verbenene are produced from dietary α-pinene in fat body tissue. Combined biochemical, molecular and functional genomics studies in Ips pini yielded the discovery and characterization of the enzymes that convert mevalonate pathway intermediates to pheromone components, including a novel bifunctional geranyl diphosphate synthase/myrcene synthase, a cytochrome P450 that hydroxylates myrcene to ipsdienol, and an oxidoreductase that interconverts ipsdienol and ipsdienone to achieve the appropriate stereochemistry of ipsdienol for pheromonal activity. Furthermore, the regulation of these genes and their corresponding enzymes proved complex and diverse in different species. Mevalonate pathway genes in pheromone producing male I. pini

  11. The discovery of a novel antagonist - Manduca sexta allatotropin analogue - as an insect midgut active ion transport inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xi-le; Kai, Zhen-Peng; Chamberlin, Mary E; Horodyski, Frank M; Yang, Xin-Ling

    2016-11-01

    The midgut is an important site for both nutrient absorption and ionic regulation in lepidopteran larvae, major pests in agriculture. The larval lepidopteran midgut has become a potent insecticide target over the past few decades. Recent studies have shown that an insect neuropeptide, Manduca sexta allatotropin (Manse-AT), exhibits inhibition of active ion transport (AIT) across the larval midgut epithelium. The full characteristic of the AIT inhibition capacity of Manse-AT is essential to assay. In this study, AIT inhibition across the M. sexta midgut by Manse-AT and its analogues in a range of concentrations was assayed. The structure-activity relationship of Manse-AT was also studied by truncated and alanine-replacement strategies. Our results identified three residues, Thr4, Arg6 and Phe8, as the most important components for activity on the midgut. Replacement of Glu1, Met2 and Met3 reduced the potency of the analogues. The conservative substitution of Gly7 with alanine had little effect on the potency of the analogues. We demonstrated for the first time that Manse-AT (10-13) behaves as a potent antagonist in vitro on active ion transport across the epithelium of the posterior midgut in M. sexta. Structure-activity studies of Manse-AT are useful in developing lead compounds for the design and testing of synthetic antagonists, ultimately to develop potent and specific pest control strategies. Manse-AT (10-13) has been discovered as the first Manse-AT antagonist, with a significant effect and a short sequence compared with other insect neuropeptides. It may be a new potential pest control agent in the future. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Molecular characterization and RNA interference of three midgut aminopeptidase N isozymes from bacillus thuringiensis-susceptible and -resistant strains of sugarcane borer diatraea saccharalis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) proteins located at the midgut epithelium of some lepidopterous species have been implicated as receptors for insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis. cDNAs of three APN isoforms, DsAPN1, DsAPN2, and DsAPN3, from Cry1Ab-susceptible (Cry1Ab-SS) and -resistant (Cry1Ab-...

  13. Identification of Midgut and Salivary Glands as Specific and Distinct Barriers to Efficient Tick-Borne Transmission of Anaplasma marginale▿

    PubMed Central

    Ueti, Massaro W.; Reagan, James O.; Knowles, Donald P.; Scoles, Glen A.; Shkap, Varda; Palmer, Guy H.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the determinants of efficient tick-borne microbial transmission is needed to better predict the emergence of highly transmissible pathogen strains and disease outbreaks. Although the basic developmental cycle of Anaplasma and Ehrlichia spp. within the tick has been delineated, there are marked differences in the ability of specific strains to be efficiently tick transmitted. Using the highly transmissible St. Maries strain of Anaplasma marginale in Dermacentor andersoni as a positive control and two unrelated nontransmissible strains, we identified distinct barriers to efficient transmission within the tick. The Mississippi strain was unable to establish infection at the level of the midgut epithelium despite successful ingestion of infected blood following acquisition feeding on a bacteremic animal host. This inability to colonize the midgut epithelium prevented subsequent development within the salivary glands and transmission. In contrast, A. marginale subsp. centrale colonized the midgut and then the salivary glands, replicating to a titer indistinguishable from that of the highly transmissible St. Maries strain and at least 100 times greater than that previously associated with successful transmission. Nonetheless, A. marginale subsp. centrale was not transmitted, even when a large number of infected ticks was used for transmission feeding. These results establish that there are at least two specific barriers to efficient tick-borne transmission, the midgut and salivary glands, and highlight the complexity of the pathogen-tick interaction. PMID:17420231

  14. Hindsight/RREB-1 functions in both the specification and differentiation of stem cells in the adult midgut of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Baechler, Brittany L.; McKnight, Cameron; Pruchnicki, Porsha C.; Biro, Nicole A.; Reed, Bruce H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adult Drosophila midgut is established during the larval/pupal transition from undifferentiated cells known as adult midgut precursors (AMPs). Four fundamental cell types are found in the adult midgut epithelium: undifferentiated intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their committed daughter cells, enteroblasts (EBs), plus enterocytes (ECs) and enteroendocrine cells (EEs). Using the Drosophila posterior midgut as a model, we have studied the function of the transcription factor Hindsight (Hnt)/RREB-1 and its relationship to the Notch and Egfr signaling pathways. We show that hnt is required for EC differentiation in the context of ISC-to-EC differentiation, but not in the context of AMP-to-EC differentiation. In addition, we show that hnt is required for the establishment of viable or functional ISCs. Overall, our studies introduce hnt as a key factor in the regulation of both the developing and the mature adult midgut. We suggest that the nature of these contextual differences can be explained through the interaction of hnt with multiple signaling pathways. PMID:26658272

  15. Appendiceal mucocoele with midgut malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Hassall, J; Williams, GL; McKain, ES

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malrotation of the midgut and appendiceal mucocoele are both extremely rare pathological conditions in adults. To our knowledge, there are only two reported cases in the English literature with a combination of both conditions. Case History A 65-year-old man presented with a 10-day history of upper abdominal pain associated with abdominal bloating and weight loss. He was otherwise fit and healthy with no significant past medical history. On examination, his abdomen was soft with tenderness and palpable fullness over the left upper quadrant. The initial blood test, chest x-ray and abdominal x-ray demonstrated no significant abnormality. Computed tomography showed a 17cm x 8cm x 6cm elongated cystic mass with possible malrotation of the intestines. Histopathology showed a low grade mucinous tumour of the appendix. At 12 months following surgery, there was no evidence of recurrence or postoperative complications and the patient was discharged from the care of the colorectal team. Conclusions We report a patient with a combination of two rare conditions. This case illustrates how a combination of pathologies can present a challenge to the unwary general surgeon. PMID:27269433

  16. Southern Pine Beetle Competitors

    Treesearch

    Fred M. Stephen

    2011-01-01

    When southern pine beetles mass attack a living pine tree, if colonization is successful the tree dies and its phloem becomes immediately available to a complex of other bark beetles and long-horned beetles, all of which, in order to reproduce, compete for the new resource. In southern pines the phloem-inhabiting guild is composed of the southern pine beetle...

  17. Intestinal obstruction from midgut volvulus after laparoscopic appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Cuadra, S A; Khalife, M E; Char, D J; Wax, M R; Halpern, D

    2002-01-01

    We present the case of a 30-year-old man who developed a small bowel obstruction from an acute midgut volvulus 8 days after undergoing a laparoscopic appendectomy. There was no evidence of congenital malrotation or midgut volvulus on the initial computed tomography (CT) scan or at laparoscopy. Subsequently, a midgut volvulus developed in the absence of congenital malrotation.

  18. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania. PMID:25431778

  19. A lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with midgut surface of Lutzomyia migonei, unlike its homologues, Cratylia floribunda lectin and Canavalia gladiata lectin.

    PubMed

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania.

  20. Discovery of midgut genes for the RNA interference control of corn rootworm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xu; Richtman, Nina M.; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Duncan, Keith E.; Niu, Xiping; Procyk, Lisa A.; Oneal, Meghan A.; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Steimel, Joseph P.; Crane, Virginia C.; Sandahl, Gary; Ritland, Julie L.; Howard, Richard J.; Presnail, James K.; Lu, Albert L.; Wu, Gusui

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new technology for corn rootworm control. This paper presents the discovery of new gene targets - dvssj1 and dvssj2, in western corn rootworm (WCR). Dvssj1 and dvssj2 are orthologs of the Drosophila genes snakeskin (ssk) and mesh, respectively. These genes encode membrane proteins associated with smooth septate junctions (SSJ) which are required for intestinal barrier function. Based on bioinformatics analysis, dvssj1 appears to be an arthropod-specific gene. Diet based insect feeding assays using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting dvssj1 and dvssj2 demonstrate targeted mRNA suppression, larval growth inhibition, and mortality. In RNAi treated WCR, injury to the midgut was manifested by “blebbing” of the midgut epithelium into the gut lumen. Ultrastructural examination of midgut epithelial cells revealed apoptosis and regenerative activities. Transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting dvssj1 show insecticidal activity and significant plant protection from WCR damage. The data indicate that dvssj1 and dvssj2 are effective gene targets for the control of WCR using RNAi technology, by apparent suppression of production of their respective smooth septate junction membrane proteins located within the intestinal lining, leading to growth inhibition and mortality. PMID:27464714

  1. Observations on house fly larvae midgut ultrastructure after Brevibacillus laterosporus ingestion.

    PubMed

    Ruiu, Luca; Satta, Alberto; Floris, Ignazio

    2012-11-01

    The pathological and histopathological course caused by Brevibacillus laterosporus on house fly larvae has been investigated conducting observations on insect behavior and midgut ultrastructure. After dissection and fixation, gut tissues were analyzed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to compare in vivo-treated and non-treated (control) fly specimens. Treated larvae showed extensively reduced feeding and growth rate, then became sluggish and died within 72 h. A progressive midgut epithelium deterioration was observed in treated larvae, compared to the control. Ultrastructural changes consisted of microvilli disruption, cytoplasm vacuolization and general disorganization, endoplasmic reticulum deformation, mitochondria alteration. Deterioration became progressively more dramatic until the infected cells released their content into the gut lumen. Disruption was associated also with midgut muscular sheath and connective tissue. These ultrastructural changes are similar to those widely described for other entomopathogenic bacteria, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, against different insect species. The rapid disruption of cellular fine structure supports a hypothesis based on an interaction of toxins with the epithelial cell membranes reminiscent of the specific B. thuringiensis δ-endotoxins mechanism of action on other insect targets.

  2. Multiple Modes of Action of the Squamocin in the Midgut Cells of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Sérgio Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2016-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins are botanical compounds with good potential for use as insecticides. In the vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae), squamocin (acetogenin) has been reported to be a larvicide and cytotoxic, but the modes of action of this molecule are still poorly understood. This study evaluated the changes in the cell morphology, and in the expression of genes, for autophagy (Atg1 and Atg8), for membrane ion transporter V-ATPase, and for water channel aquaporin-4 (Aqp4) in the midgut of A. aegypti larvae exposed to squamocin from Annona mucosa Jacq. (Annonaceae). Squamocin showed cytotoxic action with changes in the midgut epithelium and digestive cells of A. aegypti larvae, increase in the expression for autophagy gene Atg1 and Atg8, decrease in the expression of V-ATPase, decrease in the expression of Aqp4 gene in LC20 and inhibition of Apq4 genes in the midgut of this vector in LC50. These multiple modes of action for squamocin are described for the first time in insects, and they are important because different sites of action of squamocin from A. mucosa may reduce the possibility of resistance of A. aegypti to this molecule. PMID:27532504

  3. Imidacloprid impairs the post-embryonic development of the midgut in the yellow fever mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, K M; Gonzaga, W G; Pascini, T V; Miranda, F R; Tomé, H V V; Serrão, J E; Martins, G F

    2015-09-01

    The mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae) is a vector for the dengue and yellow fever viruses. As blood digestion occurs in the midgut, this organ constitutes the route of entry of many pathogens. The effects of the insecticide imidacloprid on the survival of St. aegypti were investigated and the sub-lethal effects of the insecticide on midgut development were determined. Third instar larvae were exposed to different concentrations of imidacloprid (0.15, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0 and 15.0 p.p.m.) and survival was monitored every 24 h for 10 days. Midguts from imidacloprid-treated insects at different stages of development were dissected and processed for analyses by transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assays. Imidacloprid concentrations of 3.0 and 15.0 p.p.m. were found to affect midgut development similarly. Digestive cells of the fourth instar larvae (L4) midgut exposed to imidacloprid had more multilamellar bodies, abundantly found in the cell apex, and more electron-lucent vacuoles in the basal region compared with those from untreated insects. Moreover, imidacloprid interfered with the differentiation of regenerative cells, dramatically reducing the number of digestive and endocrine cells and leading to malformation of the midgut epithelium in adults. The data demonstrate that imidacloprid can reduce the survival of mosquitoes and thus indicate its potentially high efficacy in the control of St. aegypti populations.

  4. Genomic Regions Required for Morphogenesis of the Drosophila Embryonic Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Bilder, D.; Scott, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila midgut is an excellent system for studying the cell migration, cell-cell communication, and morphogenetic events that occur in organ formation. Genes representative of regulatory gene families common to all animals, including homeotic, TGFβ, and Wnt genes, play roles in midgut development. To find additional regulators of midgut morphogenesis, we screened a set of genomic deficiencies for midgut phenotypes. Fifteen genomic intervals necessary for proper midgut morphogenesis were identified; three contain genes already known to act in the midgut. Three other genomic regions are required for formation of the endoderm or visceral mesoderm components of the midgut. Nine regions are required for proper formation of the midgut constrictions. The E75 ecdysone-induced gene, which encodes a nuclear receptor superfamily member, is the relevant gene in one region and is essential for proper formation of midgut constrictions. E75 acts downstream of the previously known constriction regulators or in parallel. Temporal hormonal control may therefore work in conjunction with spatial regulation by the homeotic genes in midgut development. Another genomic region is required to activate transcription of the homeotic genes Antp and Scr specifically in visceral mesoderm. The genomic regions identified by this screen provide a map to novel midgut development regulators. PMID:8582615

  5. Notes on midgut ultrastructure of cimex hemipterus (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Dihego Oliveira; Neves, Clóvis Andrade; Mallet, Jacenir Reis dos Santos; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; Zanuncio, José Cola; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2009-05-01

    This work studied the ultrastructure of the midgut cells of Cimex hemipterus Fabricius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae). The midgut of adult insects was analyzed on different days after a bloodmeal, and three anatomical regions with different digestive functions were apparent. In the anterior midgut, the digestive cells had many spherocrystals, lipid inclusions, and glycogen deposits, suggesting a role in water absorption, ion regulation, digestion, and storage of lipids and sugars. The digestive cells in the middle midgut contained secretory granules in the apical cytoplasm, lysosomes, and large amounts of rough endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that this midgut region was active in digestive processes. The posterior midgut contained digestive cells with secretory vesicles, lysosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and spherocrystals, suggesting digestion and ion/water absorption. Also, there was strong evidence that the posterior midgut may be the major site of nutrient absorption. The hematophagous heteropteran groups share many of these blood digestion mechanisms.

  6. Ookinete destruction within the mosquito midgut lumen explains Anopheles albimanus refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum (3D7A) oocyst infection.

    PubMed

    Baton, Luke A; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the central American mosquito vector, Anopheles albimanus, is generally refractory to oocyst infection with allopatric isolates of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. However, the reasons for the refractoriness of A. albimanus to infection with such isolates of P. falciparum are unknown. In the current study, we investigated the infectivity of the P. falciparum clone 3D7A to laboratory-reared A. albimanus and another natural vector of human malaria, Anopheles stephensi. Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes grown in vitro were simultaneously fed to both mosquito species and the progress of malaria infection compared. In 22 independent paired experimental feeds, no mature oocysts were observed on the midguts of A. albimanus 10days after bloodfeeding. In contrast, high levels of oocyst infection were found on the midguts of simultaneously fed A. stephensi. Direct immunofluorescence microscopy and light microscopical examination of Giemsa-stained histological sections were used to identify when the P. falciparum clone 3D7A failed to establish mature oocyst infections in A. albimanus. Similar densities of macrogametes/zygotes, and immature retort-form and mature ookinetes were found within the bloodmeals of both mosquito species. However, in A. albimanus, ookinetes were seldom associated with the peritrophic matrix, and were neither observed in the ectoperitrophic space nor the midgut epithelium. In contrast, ookinetes were frequently observed in these midgut compartments in A. stephensi. Additionally, young oocysts were observed on the midguts of A. stephensi but not A. albimanus 2days after bloodfeeding. Vital staining of the immature retort-form and mature ookinetes found within the luminal bloodmeal, demonstrated that a significantly greater proportion of these malaria parasite stages were non-viable in A. albimanus compared with A. stephensi. Overall, our observations indicate that ookinetes of the P. falciparum clone 3D7

  7. The 3D structure and function of digestive cathepsin L-like proteinases of Tenebrio molitor larval midgut.

    PubMed

    Beton, Daniela; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Farah, Chuck S; Terra, Walter R

    2012-09-01

    Cathepsin L-like proteinases (CAL) are major digestive proteinases in the beetle Tenebrio molitor. Procathepsin Ls 2 (pCAL2) and 3 (pCAL3) were expressed as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, purified and activated under acidic conditions. Immunoblot analyses of different T. molitor larval tissues demonstrated that a polyclonal antibody to pCAL3 recognized pCAL3 and cathepsin L 3 (CAL3) only in the anterior two-thirds of midgut tissue and midgut luminal contents of T. molitor larvae. Furthermore, immunocytolocalization data indicated that pCAL3 occurs in secretory vesicles and microvilli in anterior midgut. Therefore CAL3, like cathepsin L 2 (CAL2), is a digestive enzyme secreted by T. molitor anterior midgut. CAL3 hydrolyses Z-FR-MCA and Z-RR-MCA (typical cathepsin substrates), whereas CAL2 hydrolyses only Z-FR-MCA. Active site mutants (pCAL2C25S and pCAL3C26S) were constructed by replacing the catalytic cysteine with serine to prevent autocatalytic processing. Recombinant pCAL2 and pCAL3 mutants (pCAL2C25S and pCAL3C26S) were prepared, crystallized and their 3D structures determined at 1.85 and 2.1 Å, respectively. While the overall structure of these enzymes is similar to other members of the papain superfamily, structural differences in the S2 subsite explain their substrate specificities. The data also supported models for CAL trafficking to lysosomes and to secretory vesicles to be discharged into midgut contents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of periplocoside X on midgut cells and digestive enzymes activity of the soldiers of red imported fire ant.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zeng, Xin-Nian

    2013-07-01

    The pathological effects of ingested periplocoside X, an insecticidal component isolated from the root of Periploca sepium Bunge, on the midgut epithelial cells of the soldiers of red imported fire ant were studied and the symptom was described. The results showed that periplocoside X could induce a severe, time-dependent cytotoxicity in the midgut epithelial cells. An optical microscopy showed that epithelial cells swelled firstly and then lysed. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that numerous swollen lysosomes were appeared, microvilli were disrupted and sloughed off, and the numbers of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria decreased sharply in earlier stage. Numerous vacuoles were observed in the later stage. Finally, periplocoside X resulted in cell death by cytolysis. Assay of main three digestive enzymes activity indicated that amylase activity was significantly inhibited, but no significant changes were seen for lipase activity and total protease activity. So it is suggested that periplocoside X induced mainly to organic damage of midgut epithelium cells of insect. In all, insect midgut is one of targets for periplocoside X.

  9. Implications for the functions of the four known midgut differentiation factors: An immunohistologic study of Heliothis virescens midgut.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Marcia J; Coronel, Nicholas; Natsukawa, Dai; Takeda, Makio

    2004-05-01

    Antibodies to the peptides that induce differentiation of midgut larval stem cells, the midgut differentiating factors MDF-2, MDF-3, and MDF-4, bind to columnar cells in midgut cultures and in intact midgut of Heliothis virescens, in manners similar to the binding of anti- MDF-1 to those tissues. Antibodies to MDF-2 and MDF-3 also stained droplets in the midgut lumen, suggesting that columnar cells may also release MDF-2- and MDF-3-like cytokines to the lumen. Antibody to MDF-4 exhibited similar staining patterns but also recognized stem and differentiating cells, the presumed targets of peptides that regulate stem cell differentiation. Antibody to MDF-4 also bound to one type of endocrine cell in midgut cultures and in sections of midgut, as well as to the endocrine secretion released both to the midgut lumen and the hemolymph. Antibodies to the MDFs 1, 2, and 3, incubated with cultures of midgut cells, did not appear to prevent differentiation of the stem cells in the cultures but affected viability of mature cells, reflected in increased apoptosis and doubling of the number of differentiating cells compared to controls. Only antibody to MDF-4 induced temporary necrosis and inhibition of population recovery, indicating that MDF4 may be the true differentiation factor. The other MDFs may have additional functions beyond regulation of midgut stem cell differentiation in vivo.

  10. Jeffrey Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Richard H. Smith

    1971-01-01

    The Jeffrey pine beetle (Dendroctonus jeffreyi Hopk.), one of the bark beetles that kill trees by mining between the bark and the wood, is the principal insect enemy of Jeffrey pine. The beetle is of economic importance chiefly in California, where most of the Jeffrey pine grows, and is most destructive in old-growth stands in the timber-producing areas of northeastern...

  11. Side Effects of Neem Oil on the Midgut Endocrine Cells of the Green Lacewing Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, E L; Santos, D C

    2014-04-01

    We described the ultrastructure of Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás) midgut endocrine cells in larva, pupa, and adult, and evaluated the side effects of ingested neem oil, a botanical insecticide obtained from the seeds of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica), on these cells. During the larval period, C. claveri were fed (ad libitum) Diatraea saccharalis (F.) eggs treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1%, or 2%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that two subtypes of endocrine cells, namely granular and vesicular, occurred in the midgut epithelium during the three stages of the life cycle. Both cell types did not reach the midgut lumen and were positioned basally in the epithelium. The endocrine cells did not show extensive infoldings of the basal plasma membrane, and there were numerous secretory granules in the basal region of the cytoplasm. In the granular endocrine cells, the granules were completely filled with a dense matrix. In the vesicular endocrine cells, the main secretory products consisted of haloed vesicles. Ultrastructural examination indicated that only the granular endocrine cells exhibited signs of morphologic changes of cell injury present in all life cycle stages after the larvae were chronically exposed to neem oil by ingestion. The major cellular damage consisted of dilatation and vesiculation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial swelling. Our data suggest that cytotoxic effects on midgut endocrine cells can contribute to a generalized disruption of the physiological processes in this organ due to a general alteration of endocrine function.

  12. Changes in protease activity and Cry3Aa toxin binding in the Colorado potato beetle: implications for insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins

    Treesearch

    Olga Loseva; Mohamed Ibrahim; Mehmet Candas; C. Noah Koller; Leah S. Bauer; Lee A. Jr. Bulla

    2002-01-01

    Widespread commercial use of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins to control pest insects has increased the likelihood for development of insect resistance to this entomopathogen. In this study, we investigated protease activity profiles and toxin-binding capacities in the midgut of a strain of Colorado potato beetle (CPB) that has developed resistance...

  13. Coordinated gene expression for pheromone biosynthesis in the pine engraver beetle, Ips pini (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, Christopher I.; Blomquist, Gary J.; Tittiger, Claus

    In several pine bark beetle species, phloem feeding induces aggregation pheromone production to coordinate a mass attack on the host tree. Male pine engraver beetles, Ips pini (Say) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), produce the monoterpenoid pheromone component ipsdienol de novo via the mevalonate pathway in the anterior midgut upon feeding. To understand how pheromone production is regulated in this tissue, we used quantitative real-time PCR to examine feeding-induced changes in gene expression of seven mevalonate pathway genes: acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, mevalonate 5-diphosphate decarboxylase, isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerase, geranyl-diphosphate synthase (GPPS), and farnesyl-diphosphate synthase (FPPS). In males, expression of all these genes significantly increased upon feeding. In females, the expression of the early mevalonate pathway genes (up to and including the isomerase) increased significantly, but the expression of the later genes (GPPS and FPPS) was unaffected or decreased upon feeding. Thus, feeding coordinately regulates expression of the mevalonate pathway genes necessary for pheromone biosynthesis in male, but not female, midguts. Furthermore, basal mRNA levels were 5- to 41-fold more abundant in male midguts compared to female midguts. This is the first report of coordinated regulation of mevalonate pathway genes in an invertebrate model consistent with their sex-specific role in de novo pheromone biosynthesis.

  14. A Lepidopteran-Specific Gene Family Encoding Valine-Rich Midgut Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  15. Midgut malrotation causing intermittent intestinal obstruction in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Bektasoglu, Huseyin Kazim; Idiz, Ufuk Oguz; Hasbahceci, Mustafa; Yardimci, Erkan; Firat, Yurdakul Deniz; Karatepe, Oguzhan; Muslumanoglu, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    Midgut malrotation is a congenital anomaly of intestinal rotation and fixation that is generally seen in neonatal population. Adult cases are rarely reported. Early diagnosis is crucial to avoid life threatening complications. Here, we present an adulthood case of midgut volvulus as a rare cause of acute abdomen.

  16. Laparoscopic Ileocolic Resection for Crohn's Disease Associated With Midgut Malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Livia; Tema, Giorgia; Porokhnavets, Kristina; Tesauro, Manfredi; Gaspari, Achille L.; Sica, Giuseppe S.

    2014-01-01

    Midgut malrotation is an anomaly of fetal intestinal rotation. Its incidence in adults is rare. A case of midgut malrotation in a 51-year-old man with complicated Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum is presented. Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment are reviewed. Preoperative workup led to correct surgical planning that ultimately allowed a successful laparoscopic resection. PMID:25419109

  17. Schinus terebinthifolius Leaf Extract Causes Midgut Damage, Interfering with Survival and Development of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Procópio, Thamara Figueiredo; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Oliveira, Aline Rafaella Cardoso; Souza, Carolina de Santana; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a leaf extract from Schinus terebinthifolius was evaluated for effects on survival, development, and midgut of A. aegypti fourth instar larvae (L4), as well as for toxic effect on Artemia salina. Leaf extract was obtained using 0.15 M NaCl and evaluated for phytochemical composition and lectin activity. Early L4 larvae were incubated with the extract (0.3–1.35%, w/v) for 8 days, in presence or absence of food. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, hydrolysable tannins, heterosid and aglycone flavonoids, cinnamic acid derivatives, traces of steroids, and lectin activity were detected in the extract, which killed the larvae at an LC50 of 0.62% (unfed larvae) and 1.03% (fed larvae). Further, the larvae incubated with the extract reacted by eliminating the gut content. No larvae reached the pupal stage in treatments at concentrations between 0.5% and 1.35%, while in the control (fed larvae), 61.7% of individuals emerged as adults. The extract (1.0%) promoted intense disorganization of larval midgut epithelium, including deformation and hypertrophy of cells, disruption of microvilli, and vacuolization of cytoplasms, affecting digestive, enteroendocrine, regenerative, and proliferating cells. In addition, cells with fragmented DNA were observed. Separation of extract components by solid phase extraction revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids are involved in larvicidal effect of the extract, being the first most efficient in a short time after larvae treatment. The lectin present in the extract was isolated, but did not show deleterious effects on larvae. The extract and cinnamic acid derivatives were toxic to A. salina nauplii, while the flavonoids showed low toxicity. S. terebinthifolius leaf extract caused damage to the midgut of A. aegypti larvae, interfering with survival and development. The larvicidal effect of the extract can be attributed to cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. The data obtained using A. salina indicates that caution

  18. Damage-Induced Cell Regeneration in the Midgut of Aedes albopictus Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Janeh, Maria; Osman, Dani; Kambris, Zakaria

    2017-01-01

    Mosquito-transmitted diseases cause over one million deaths every year. A better characterization of the vector’s physiology and immunity should provide valuable knowledge for the elaboration of control strategies. Mosquitoes depend on their innate immunity to defend themselves against pathogens. These pathogens are acquired mainly through the oral route, which places the insects’ gut at the front line of the battle. Indeed, the epithelium of the mosquito gut plays important roles against invading pathogens acting as a physical barrier, activating local defenses and triggering the systemic immune response. Therefore, the gut is constantly confronted to stress and often suffers cellular damage. In this study, we show that dividing cells exist in the digestive tract of adult A. albopictus and that these cells proliferate in the midgut after bacterial or chemical damage. An increased transcription of signaling molecules that regulate the EGFR and JAK/STAT pathways was also observed, suggesting a possible involvement of these pathways in the regeneration of damaged guts. This work provides evidence for the presence of regenerative cells in the mosquito guts, and paves the way towards a molecular and cellular characterization of the processes required to maintain mosquito’s midgut homeostasis in both normal and infectious conditions. PMID:28300181

  19. Starvation suppresses cell proliferation that rebounds after refeeding in the midgut of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Takeda, Makio

    2008-02-01

    Starvation affects behavior, development, metabolism, reproduction, and longevity in almost all animals including insects. In the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, we investigated the effect of starvation on organ size and cell proliferation activity of the midgut, over a period of one month, using anti-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), and anti-phospho-histone H3 antibodies. Under starvation conditions, the midgut became clear and fragile while its length and diameter were reduced. Both the rate of BrdU-uptake in the nucleus and the mitotic activity shown by anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody decreased under long starvation up to half that of the continuously fed control. Refeeding restored BrdU-uptake and mitosis that overshot the fed control. When casein, starch, or cooking oil was fed as representative nutrient sources to the starved cockroaches, all restored BrdU-uptake, but non-nutrient, talc, did not. This study supports the hypothesis that P. americana has a homeostatic mechanism to regulate the cell population of the midgut epithelium according to changes in the nutritional environment.

  20. Differential Midgut Attachment of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in the Sand Flies Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) whitmani and Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rodrigo P.; Margonari, Carina; Secundino, Nágila C.; Macêdo, Maria E.; da Costa, Simone M.; Rangel, Elizabeth F.; Pimenta, Paulo F.; Turco, Salvatore J.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between Leishmania and sand flies has been demonstrated in many Old and New World species. Besides the morphological differentiation from procyclic to infective metacyclic promastigotes, the parasite undergoes biochemical transformations in its major surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG). An upregulation of β-glucose residues was previously shown in the LPG repeat units from procyclic to metacyclic phase in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, which has not been reported in any Leishmania species. LPG has been implicated as an adhesion molecule that mediates the interaction with the midgut epithelium of the sand fly in the Subgenus Leishmania. These adaptations were explored for the first time in a species from the Subgenus Viannia, L. (V.) braziliensis with its natural vectors Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) intermedia and Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) whitmani. Using two in vitro binding techniques, phosphoglycans (PGs) derived from procyclic and metacyclic parasites were able to bind to the insect midgut and inhibit L. braziliensis attachment. Interestingly, L. braziliensis procyclic parasite attachment was ∼11-fold greater in the midgut of L. whitmani than in L. intermedia. The epidemiological relevance of L. whitmani as a vector of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ACL) in Brazil is discussed. PMID:20011070

  1. Anopheles gambiae collagen IV genes: cloning, phylogeny and midgut expression associated with blood feeding and Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Gare, D C; Piertney, S B; Billingsley, P F

    2003-07-01

    A prerequisite for understanding the role that mosquito midgut extracellular matrix molecules play in malaria parasite development is proper isolation and characterisation of the genes coding for components of the basal lamina. Here we have identified genes coding for alpha1 and alpha2 chains of collagen IV from the major malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. Conserved sequences in the terminal NC1 domain were used to obtain partial gene sequences of this functional region, and full sequence was isolated from a pupal cDNA library. In a DNA-derived phylogeny, the alpha1 and alpha2 chains cluster with dipteran orthologs, and the alpha2 is ancestral. The expression of collagen alpha1(IV) peaked during the pupal stage of mosquito development, and was expressed continuously in the adult female following a blood meal with a further rise detected in older mosquitoes. Collagen alpha1(IV) is also upregulated when the early oocyst of Plasmodium yoelii was developing within the mosquito midgut and may contribute to a larger wound healing response. A model describing the expression of basal lamina proteins during oocyst development is presented, and we hypothesise that the development of new basal lamina between the oocyst and midgut epithelium is akin to a wound healing process.

  2. Amino acid metabolic signaling influences Aedes aegypti midgut microbiome variability.

    PubMed

    Short, Sarah M; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; MacLeod, Hannah J; Talyuli, Octavio A C; Dimopoulos, George

    2017-07-01

    The mosquito midgut microbiota has been shown to influence vector competence for multiple human pathogens. The microbiota is highly variable in the field, and the sources of this variability are not well understood, which limits our ability to understand or predict its effects on pathogen transmission. In this work, we report significant variation in female adult midgut bacterial load between strains of A. aegypti which vary in their susceptibility to dengue virus. Composition of the midgut microbiome was similar overall between the strains, with 81-92% of reads coming from the same five bacterial families, though we did detect differences in the presence of some bacterial families including Flavobacteriaceae and Entobacteriaceae. We conducted transcriptomic analysis on the two mosquito strains that showed the greatest difference in bacterial load, and found that they differ in transcript abundance of many genes implicated in amino acid metabolism, in particular the branched chain amino acid degradation pathway. We then silenced this pathway by targeting multiple genes using RNA interference, which resulted in strain-specific bacterial proliferation, thereby eliminating the difference in midgut bacterial load between the strains. This suggests that the branched chain amino acid (BCAA) degradation pathway controls midgut bacterial load, though the mechanism underlying this remains unclear. Overall, our results indicate that amino acid metabolism can act to influence the midgut microbiota. Moreover, they suggest that genetic or physiological variation in BCAA degradation pathway activity may in part explain midgut microbiota variation in the field.

  3. Amino acid metabolic signaling influences Aedes aegypti midgut microbiome variability

    PubMed Central

    Short, Sarah M.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; MacLeod, Hannah J.; Talyuli, Octavio A. C.

    2017-01-01

    The mosquito midgut microbiota has been shown to influence vector competence for multiple human pathogens. The microbiota is highly variable in the field, and the sources of this variability are not well understood, which limits our ability to understand or predict its effects on pathogen transmission. In this work, we report significant variation in female adult midgut bacterial load between strains of A. aegypti which vary in their susceptibility to dengue virus. Composition of the midgut microbiome was similar overall between the strains, with 81–92% of reads coming from the same five bacterial families, though we did detect differences in the presence of some bacterial families including Flavobacteriaceae and Entobacteriaceae. We conducted transcriptomic analysis on the two mosquito strains that showed the greatest difference in bacterial load, and found that they differ in transcript abundance of many genes implicated in amino acid metabolism, in particular the branched chain amino acid degradation pathway. We then silenced this pathway by targeting multiple genes using RNA interference, which resulted in strain-specific bacterial proliferation, thereby eliminating the difference in midgut bacterial load between the strains. This suggests that the branched chain amino acid (BCAA) degradation pathway controls midgut bacterial load, though the mechanism underlying this remains unclear. Overall, our results indicate that amino acid metabolism can act to influence the midgut microbiota. Moreover, they suggest that genetic or physiological variation in BCAA degradation pathway activity may in part explain midgut microbiota variation in the field. PMID:28753661

  4. Mesenchymal to epithelial transition during tissue homeostasis and regeneration: Patching up the Drosophila midgut epithelium.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Zeus A; Reiff, Tobias; Dominguez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are responsible for preserving morphology and function of adult tissues. Stem cells divide to self-renew and to generate progenitor cells to sustain cell demand from the tissue throughout the organism's life. Unlike stem cells, the progenitor cells have limited proliferation potential but have the capacity to terminally differentiate and thereby to substitute older or damaged mature cells. Recent findings indicate that adult stem cells can adapt their division kinetics dynamically to match changes in tissue demand during homeostasis and regeneration. However, cell turnover not only requires stem cell division but also needs timed differentiation of the progenitor cells, which has been much less explored. In this Extra View article, we discuss the ability of progenitor cells to actively postpone terminal differentiation in the absence of a local demand and how tissue demand activates terminal differentiation via a conserved mesenchymal-epithelial transition program revealed in our recent EMBO J paper and other published and unpublished data. The extent of the significance of these results is discussed for models of tissue dynamics during both homeostasis and regeneration.

  5. Nosema adaliae sp. nov., a new microsporidian pathogen from the two-spotted lady beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and its relationship to microsporidia that infect other coccinellids.

    PubMed

    Steele, T; Bjørnson, S

    2014-01-01

    The two-spotted lady beetle, Adalia bipunctata L., is a tree-dwelling lady beetle endemic to parts of Europe, Central Asia and North America that is commercially available for aphid control in Europe and North America. Lady beetles host a wide variety of symbionts including parasitoids, viruses, eugregarines, fungi, bacteria, nematodes and microsporidia. Four species of microsporidia have been described from lady beetles, and an undescribed microsporidium was recently isolated from local populations of A. bipunctata in Nova Scotia, Canada. In a previous study, this pathogen prolonged the development of A. bipunctata larvae but had no effect on adult fecundity, longevity or sex ratios. The objective of this study was to formally describe the microsporidium by means of its ultrastructure, tissue pathology and molecular characterization. All stages of the microsporidium were diplokaryotic and developed in direct contact with the host cell cytoplasm. Mature spores measured 4.25±0.09×1.82±0.03μm (SE, n=49, from micrographs) and fresh spores measured 6.10±0.06×3.01±0.05μm (±SE, n=60; range: 5.0-6.9×2.18-3.86μm). The polar filament was isofilar with 10-18 coils that were frequently arranged in a single row. The lamellar polaroplast was not typically visible and spores contained a relatively small posterior vacuole. Both the flight muscles and fat body were heavily infected and a large number of spores were observed within and between the cells of these tissues. The ovaries, developing oocytes, spermatocytes and accessory glands within the testes, midgut epithelium, Malpighian tubules, ileum, colon, and ventral nerve cord were also infected but not as heavily. Connective tissue near the cuticle and surrounding the trachea were lightly infected. The presence of spores in both the alimentary canal and ovaries (particularly within developing oocytes) suggests that the microsporidium can be transmitted per os (horizontally) and transovarially (vertically). Molecular

  6. Update on management of midgut neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mehrvarz Sarshekeh, Amir; Halperin, Daniel M; Dasari, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Midgut neuroendocrine tumors are typically indolent but can be fatal when advanced. They can also cause significant morbidity due to the characteristic carcinoid syndrome. Somatostatin analogs continue to be the mainstay of treatment given their antiproliferative properties, as well as inhibitory effects on hormones that cause carcinoid syndrome. There have been several recent advances in the systemic therapy of these tumors including consolidation of somatostatin analogs as the cornerstone of therapy, completion of pivotal trials with mTOR inhibitors, and the establishment of novel approaches including peptide receptor radionuclide therapy and oral inhibitors of peripheral tryptophan hydroxylase in tumor and symptom control, respectively. In this review article, the recent advances are summarized and an updated approach to management is proposed. PMID:27347369

  7. The Classroom Animal: Flour Beetles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the flour beetle, "Tribolium confusum," and its life cycle, habitat, culturing requirements, and some possible uses of this beetle as a classroom animal. Discusses what children could learn from flour beetles. Explains how to get rid of beetles found in foods at home. (CW)

  8. The Classroom Animal: Flour Beetles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the flour beetle, "Tribolium confusum," and its life cycle, habitat, culturing requirements, and some possible uses of this beetle as a classroom animal. Discusses what children could learn from flour beetles. Explains how to get rid of beetles found in foods at home. (CW)

  9. Mountain pine beetle

    Treesearch

    Ken Gibson; Sandy Kegley; Barbara Bentz

    2009-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) is a member of a group of insects known as bark beetles. Its entire life cycle is spent beneath the bark of host trees, except when adults emerge from brood trees and fly in search of new host trees.

  10. Common Pine Shoot Beetle

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Daniel Kucera; Steven Passoa

    1993-01-01

    The common (or larger) pine shoot beetle, Tomicus (=Blastophagus) piniperda (L.), was discovered near Cleveland, Ohio in July 1992. As of this writing, it is now in six states: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Adults of the common pine shoot beetle are cylindrical and range from 3 to 5 mm in length (about the size of a match head). Their...

  11. Southern Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Robert C. Thatcher; Patrick J. Barry

    1982-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann) is one of pine's most destructive insect enemies in the Southern United States, Mexico, and Central America. Because populations build rapidly to outbreak proportions and large numbers of trees are killed, this insect generates considerable concern among managers of southern pine forests. The beetle...

  12. Carabid Beetles as Parasitoids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The parasitoid habit is uncommon in beetles; only 11 beetle families include parasitoid species. Three tribes of 76 in the Carabidae are known to have species in which larvae are pupal ectoparasitoids: Brachinini, Peleciini, and Lebiini. The first larval instar is the free-living, host-finding stage...

  13. Morphology of the midgut of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae) adult ticks in different feeding stages.

    PubMed

    Remedio, R N; Sampieri, B R; Vendramini, M C R; Souza, N M; Anholeto, L A; Denardo, T A G B; Camargo-Mathias, M I

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cells of ticks are fundamental for their full feeding and reproductive success, besides being considered important sites for the development of pathogens. Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks are known for their great medical and veterinary importance, and for this reason, the knowledge of their intestinal morphology may provide relevant subsidies for the control of these animals, either by direct acaricidal action over these cells or by the production of vaccines. Therefore, this study aimed to describe the midgut morphology of male and female R. sanguineus ticks in different feeding stages, by means of histological analysis. Significant differences were observed between the genders, and such alterations may refer mainly to the distinct demands for nutrients, much higher in females, which need to develop and carry out the egg-laying process. In general, the midgut is coated by a thin muscle layer and presents a pseudostratified epithelium, in which two basic types of cells can be observed, connected to a basal membrane-generative or stem and digestive cells. The latter was classified as follows: residual, deriving from the phase anterior to ecdysis; pinocytic, with vesicles containing liquid or pre-digested components of blood; phagocytic, with entire cells or remnants of nuclear material inside cytoplasmic vesicles; and mature, free in the lumen. Digestion is presumably intracellular and asynchronous and corresponds to a process which starts with the differentiation of generative cells into pinocytic digestive cells, which subsequently start to phagocytize intact blood cells and finally detach from the epithelium, being eliminated with feces.

  14. A peptide with similarity to baculovirus ODV-E66 binds the gut epithelium of Heliothis virescens and impedes infection with Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Wendy O; Rohlfing, Amy; Bonning, Bryony C

    2011-05-01

    Baculoviruses infect their lepidopteran hosts via the midgut epithelium through binding of occlusion-derived virus (ODV) and fusion between the virus envelope and microvillar membranes. To identify genes and sequences that are involved in this process, a random phage display library was screened for peptides that bound to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) derived from the midgut epithelium of Heliothis virescens. Seventeen peptides that bound to BBMV were recovered. Two of these, HV1 and HV2, had sequence similarity to the ODV envelope protein ODV-E66 that is found in five species of alphabaculoviruses. Chemically synthesized versions of HV1 and HV2, and two peptides (AcE66A and AcE66B) derived from similar sequences of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ODV-E66, bound to unfixed cryosections of whole midgut tissues. AcE66A, but not HV1, bound to H. virescens gut BBMV proteins on a far-Western blot. Competition assays with HV1 and purified AcMNPV ODV resulted in decreased mortality of H. virescens larvae at a dose of 1 LD(50), and a significant increase in survival time at higher virus concentrations. These results suggest a role for ODV-E66 in baculovirus infection of lepidopteran larval midgut epithelium.

  15. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor, but is not essential for binding and fusion of occlusion-derived virus to the host midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Wendy O.; Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2011-01-05

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein ODV-E56 is essential for oral infection of larvae of Heliothis virescens. Bioassays with recombinant clones of AcMNPV lacking a functional odv-e56 gene showed that ODV-E56 was required for infectivity of both polyhedra and to a lesser extent, purified ODV. However, binding and fusion assays showed that ODV lacking ODV-E56 bound and fused to midgut cells at levels similar to ODV of wild-type virus. Fluorescence microscopy of midguts from larvae inoculated with ODV-E56-positive and -negative viruses that express GFP indicated that ODV-E56 was required for infection of the midgut epithelium. Purified ODV-E56 bound to several proteins in midgut-derived brush border membrane vesicles, but failed to rescue infectivity of ODV-E56-negative viruses in trans. These results indicate that ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor (pif-5) required for primary midgut infection at a point before or after virion binding and fusion.

  16. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor, but is not essential for binding and fusion of occlusion-derived virus to the host midgut.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Wendy O; Harrison, Robert L; Bonning, Bryony C

    2011-01-05

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein ODV-E56 is essential for oral infection of larvae of Heliothis virescens. Bioassays with recombinant clones of AcMNPV lacking a functional odv-e56 gene showed that ODV-E56 was required for infectivity of both polyhedra and to a lesser extent, purified ODV. However, binding and fusion assays showed that ODV lacking ODV-E56 bound and fused to midgut cells at levels similar to ODV of wild-type virus. Fluorescence microscopy of midguts from larvae inoculated with ODV-E56-positive and -negative viruses that express GFP indicated that ODV-E56 was required for infection of the midgut epithelium. Purified ODV-E56 bound to several proteins in midgut-derived brush border membrane vesicles, but failed to rescue infectivity of ODV-E56-negative viruses in trans. These results indicate that ODV-E56 is a per os infectivity factor (pif-5) required for primary midgut infection at a point before or after virion binding and fusion.

  17. Morpho-functional characterization and esterase patterns of the midgut of Tribolium castaneum Herbst, 1797 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) parasitized by Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinidae).

    PubMed

    Gigliolli, Adriana A Sinópolis; Lapenta, Ana Silva; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, Maria Claudia Colla; Abrahão, Josielle; Conte, Hélio

    2015-09-01

    Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) is a common pest of stored grains and byproducts and is normally infected by Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinidae). The life cycle of this parasite includes the sporozoite, trophozoite, gamont, gametocyte, and oocyst stages, which occur between the epithelium and lumen of the host's midgut. This study aims to describe the morphofunctional alterations in the midgut and determine the esterase patterns in T. castaneum when parasitized by gregarines. To achieve this purpose, midguts of adult insects were isolated, processed, and analysed using light and electron microscopy. We determined total protein content, amylase activity, and the expression and related activities of the esterases by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The midgut of T. castaneum is formed by digestive, regenerative, and endocrine cells. The effects of parasitism on the digestive cells are severe, because the gregarines remain attached to these cells to absorb all the nutrients they need throughout their development. In these cells, the most common alterations observed include expansion and fragmentation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, development of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, changes in mitochondrial cristae, cytoplasmic vacuolization, formation of myelin structures, spherites, large intercellular spaces, autophagic vesicles, expansion of the basal labyrinth, and cytoplasmic protrusions. Deposits of glycogen granules were also observed. Amylase activity was reduced in parasitized insects. Regenerative cells were found in disorganized crypts and did not differentiate into new cells, thus, compromising the restoration of the damaged epithelium. Though few morphological alterations were observed in the endocrine cells, results suggest that the synthesis and/or release of hormones might be impaired. Nine esterases (EST-1 to 9) were identified in the midgut of T. castaneum and were expressed in varying levels in response

  18. Southern Pine Bark Beetle Guild

    Treesearch

    T. Evan Nebeker

    2011-01-01

    Dendroctonus frontalis (southern pine beetle), D. terebrans (black turpentine beetle), Ips avulsus (small southern pine engraver or four-spined engraver), I. grandicollis (five-spined engraver), and I. calligraphus (six-spined engraver) comprise the southern pine bark beetle guild. Often they are found sharing the same hosts in the Southeastern United States. They...

  19. Lady beetles of South Dakota

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lady beetles are one of the most familiar groups of beneficial insects. Farmers and gardeners appreciate them for devouring insect pests. Both adult lady beetles and caterpillar-like juveniles eat pests. Lady beetles are recognizable by their red and orange colors that contrast with black spots and...

  20. [Regeneration of airway epithelium].

    PubMed

    Adam, D; Perotin, J-M; Lebargy, F; Birembaut, P; Deslée, G; Coraux, C

    2014-04-01

    Epithelial regeneration is a complex process. It can lead to the remodeling of the airway epithelium as in asthma, COPD or cystic fibrosis. The development of in vivo and in vitro models has allowed the analysis of remodeling mechanisms and showed the role of components of extracellular matrix, proteases, cytokines and growth factors. Airway epithelial progenitors and stems cells have been studied in these models. However, their identification remains difficult. Identification and characterization of airway epithelial progenitor/stem-cells, and a better knowledge of the regeneration process may allow the development of new therapeutic strategies for airway epithelial reconstitution. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Digestive proteolysis organization in two closely related Tenebrionid beetles: Red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) and confused flour beetle (Tribolium confusum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The spectra of Tribolium castaneum and T. confusum larval digestive peptidases were characterized with respect to the spatial organization of protein digestion in the midgut. The pH of midgut contents in both species increased from 5.6-6.0 in the anterior to 7.0-7.5 in the posterior midgut. However,...

  2. Ultrastructure and immunolocalization of digestive enzymes in the midgut of Podisus nigrispinus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Fialho, Maria do Carmo Q; Terra, Walter R; Moreira, Nathália R; Zanuncio, José C; Serrão, Jose Eduardo

    2013-07-01

    The predatory stinkbug Podisus nigrispinus has been utilized in biological control programs. Its midgut is anatomically divided into anterior, middle and posterior regions, which play different roles in the digestive process. We describe the midgut ultrastructure and the secretion of digestive enzymes in the midgut of P. nigrispinus. Midguts were analyzed with transmission electron microscopy and the digestive enzymes amylase, cathepsin L, aminopeptidase and α-glucosidase were immunolocalized. The ultrastructural features of the digestive cells in the anterior, middle and posterior midgut regions suggest that they play a role in digestive enzyme synthesis, ion and nutrient absorption, storage and excretion. The digestive enzymes have different distribution along the midgut regions of the predator P. nigrispinus. Amylase, aminopeptidase and α-glucosidase occur in three midgut regions, whereas cathepsin L occurs in the middle and posterior midgut regions. The anterior midgut region of P. nigrispinus seems to play a role in water absorption, the middle midgut may be involved in nutrient absorption and the posterior midgut region is responsible for water transport to the midgut lumen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Isolating intestinal stem cells from adult Drosophila midguts by FACS to study stem cell behavior during aging.

    PubMed

    Tauc, Helen M; Tasdogan, Alpaslan; Pandur, Petra

    2014-12-16

    Aging tissue is characterized by a continuous decline in functional ability. Adult stem cells are crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis particularly in tissues that have a high turnover rate such as the intestinal epithelium. However, adult stem cells are also subject to aging processes and the concomitant decline in function. The Drosophila midgut has emerged as an ideal model system to study molecular mechanisms that interfere with the intestinal stem cells' (ISCs) ability to function in tissue homeostasis. Although adult ISCs can be easily identified and isolated from midguts of young flies, it has been a major challenge to study endogenous molecular changes of ISCs during aging. This is due to the lack of a combination of molecular markers suitable to isolate ISCs from aged intestines. Here we propose a method that allows for successful dissociation of midgut tissue into living cells that can subsequently be separated into distinct populations by FACS. By using dissociated cells from the esg-Gal4, UAS-GFP fly line, in which both ISCs and the enteroblast (EB) progenitor cells express GFP, two populations of cells are distinguished based on different GFP intensities. These differences in GFP expression correlate with differences in cell size and granularity and represent enriched populations of ISCs and EBs. Intriguingly, the two GFP-positive cell populations remain distinctly separated during aging, presenting a novel technique for identifying and isolating cell populations enriched for either ISCs or EBs at any time point during aging. The further analysis, for example transcriptome analysis, of these particular cell populations at various time points during aging is now possible and this will facilitate the examination of endogenous molecular changes that occur in these cells during aging.

  4. The Role of Salivary and Intestinal Complement System Inhibitors in the Midgut Protection of Triatomines and Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Veruska Cavalcanti; Assumpção, Jéssica Góes; Cadete, André Miranda; Santos, Vânia Cristina; Cavalcante, Reginaldo Roris; Araújo, Ricardo Nascimento; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo

    2009-01-01

    Saliva of haematophagous arthropods contain biomolecules involved directly or indirectly with the haematophagy process, and among them are encountered some complement system inhibitors. The most obvious function for these inhibitors would be the protection of the midgut against injury by the complement. To investigate this hypothesis, Triatoma brasiliensis nymphs were forced to ingest human serum in conditions in which the protection of midgut by the inhibitors is bypassed. In these conditions, the anterior midgut epithelium was injured by the complement, causing cell death. Once some insects such as Aedes aegypti have no salivary inhibitors, we hypothesized the existence of intestinal inhibitors. The inhibitory activity was investigated in the intestine of A. aegypti as well as in the saliva and intestine of other three triatomine species (T. brasiliensis, T. infestans and Rhodnius prolixus) using an immunological method able to determine the level of deposition of some complement factors (C1q, C3b, or C4b) on the surface of complement activator molecules linked to microplates. This methodology permitted to identify which points along the activation phase of the complement cascade were inhibited. As expected, soluble contents of A. aegypti's intestine was capable to inhibit C3b deposition by the classical and alternative pathways. Saliva or soluble intestinal contents, obtained from triatomines were unable to inhibit C1q deposition by the classical pathway. C4b deposition by the classical pathway was inhibited by the intestinal contents from the three triatomines. On the other hand, only T. brasiliensis saliva inhibited C4b deposition. Both, saliva and intestinal contents from all triatomines were able to inhibit C3b deposition in the classical and alternative pathways. None of the material extracted from the intestinal cell membranes from the triatomines inhibited C3b deposition in the classical pathway. The existence of complement inhibitors may have important

  5. Antennally mediated negative feedback regulation of pheromone production in the pine engraver beetle, Ips pini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzel, Matthew D.; Bearfield, Jeremy C.; Keeling, Christopher I.; McCormack, Colin C.; Blomquist, Gary J.; Tittiger, Claus

    2007-01-01

    Bark beetles use monoterpenoid aggregation pheromones to coordinate host colonization and mating. These chemical signals are produced de novo in midgut cells via the mevalonate pathway, and pheromone production may be regulated by a negative feedback system mediated through the antennae. In this study, we explored the effect of antennectomy on pheromone production and transcript levels of key mevalonate pathway genes in juvenile hormone III-treated male pine engraver beetles, Ips pini (Say). Antennectomized males produced significantly greater amounts of pheromone than podectomized males and those with intact antennae. Likewise, mRNA levels of three mevalonate pathway genes important in pheromone biosynthesis were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and found to be induced to a greater extent with antennectomy, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of pheromone production.

  6. Fz2 and Cdc42 Mediate Melanization and Actin Polymerization but Are Dispensable for Plasmodium Killing in the Mosquito Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Daniel; Hoffmann, Jules A; Levashina, Elena A

    2006-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of the mosquito malaria vector Anopheles is a hostile environment for Plasmodium, with most parasites succumbing to host defenses. This study addresses morphological and ultrastructural features associated with Plasmodium berghei ookinete invasion in Anopheles gambiae midguts to define the sites and possible mechanisms of parasite killing. We show by transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence that the majority of ookinetes are killed in the extracellular space. Dead or dying ookinetes are surrounded by a polymerized actin zone formed within the basal cytoplasm of adjacent host epithelial cells. In refractory strain mosquitoes, we found that formation of this zone is strongly linked to prophenoloxidase activation leading to melanization. Furthermore, we identify two factors controlling both phenomena: the transmembrane receptor frizzled-2 and the guanosine triphosphate–binding protein cell division cycle 42. However, the disruption of actin polymerization and melanization by double-stranded RNA inhibition did not affect ookinete survival. Our results separate the mechanisms of parasite killing from subsequent reactions manifested by actin polymerization and prophenoloxidase activation in the A. gambiae–P. berghei model. These latter processes are reminiscent of wound healing in other organisms, and we propose that they represent a form of wound-healing response directed towards a moribund ookinete, which is perceived as damaged tissue. PMID:17196037

  7. Molecular interactions between Anopheles stephensi midgut cells and Plasmodium berghei: the time bomb theory of ookinete invasion of mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yeon Soo; Thompson, Joanne; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2000-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the interactions between Anopheles stephensi midgut epithelial cells and Plasmodium berghei ookinetes during invasion of the mosquito by the parasite. In this mosquito, P.berghei ookinetes invade polarized columnar epithelial cells with microvilli, which do not express high levels of vesicular ATPase. The invaded cells are damaged, protrude towards the midgut lumen and suffer other characteristic changes, including induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, a substantial loss of microvilli and genomic DNA fragmentation. Our results indicate that the parasite inflicts extensive damage leading to subsequent death of the invaded cell. Ookinetes were found to be remarkably plastic, to secrete a subtilisin-like serine protease and the GPI-anchored surface protein Pbs21 into the cytoplasm of invaded cells, and to be capable of extensive lateral movement between cells. The epithelial damage inflicted is repaired efficiently by an actin purse-string-mediated restitution mechanism, which allows the epithelium to ‘bud off’ the damaged cells without losing its integrity. A new model, the time bomb theory of ookinete invasion, is proposed and its implications are discussed. PMID:11080150

  8. Toxicity of trifluralin herbicide in a representative of the edaphic fauna: histopathology of the midgut of Rhinocricus padbergi (Diplopoda).

    PubMed

    Merlini, Vanessa Vanderléia; Nogarol, Larissa Rosa; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida; Fontanetti, Carmem Silvia

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to use the diplopod Rhinocricus padbergi as test organism to verify the possible toxic effects of the herbicide trifluralin in a representative of the edaphic fauna. Histological and histochemical techniques were applied in the midgut of the animals after exposure to different concentrations of trifluralin for 7 and 90 days (acute and subchronic exposure, respectively). The individuals from the control group did not present alterations to any of the exposures. In the acute exposure, the group exposed to a quarter and half of the field dose presented an accumulation of cytoplasmic granules in the hepatic cells; the field dose group presented an increase in the rate of epithelial renewal and the group exposed to double the field concentration presented an increase in the release of secretory vesicles. The subchronic response was obtained with the field dose and double field dose because the animals from a quarter and half groups did not survive until the end of the experiment. In both groups, the animals presented disruption of the epithelium and higher occurrence of hemocytes among the hepatic cells. The group exposed to double the field dose presented sites of cytoplasmic vacuolization, dilatation of the intercellular space, increase in the epithelial renewal, and release of secretory vesicles. The results alert for a careful use of this herbicide, since it promoted alterations in the midgut cells of the test organism used. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mitochondria in the midgut epithelial cells of sugarcane borer parasitized by Cotesia flavipes (Cameron, 1891).

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, D O; Silva, M D; Gregório, E A

    2010-02-01

    The sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) has been controlled by Cotesia flavipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae); however, very little is known about the effect of the parasitism in the host organs, including the midgut. This work aims to verify mitochondrial alteration in the different midgut epithelial cells of D. saccharalis parasitized by C. flavipes. Midgut fragments (anterior and posterior region) of both non-parasitized and parasitized larvae were processed for transmission electron microscopy. The mitochondria of midgut epithelial cell in the parasitized larvae exhibit morphological alteration, represented by matrix rarefaction and vacuolisation. These mitochondrial alterations are more pronounced in the anterior midgut region during the parasitism process, mainly in the columnar cell.

  10. Midgut microbiota and host immunocompetence underlie Bacillus thuringiensis killing mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Caccia, Silvia; Di Lelio, Ilaria; La Storia, Antonietta; Marinelli, Adriana; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Banyuls, Núria; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan; Gigliotti, Silvia; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used bacterial entomopathogen producing insecticidal toxins, some of which are expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops. Surprisingly, the killing mechanism of B. thuringiensis remains controversial. In particular, the importance of the septicemia induced by the host midgut microbiota is still debated as a result of the lack of experimental evidence obtained without drastic manipulation of the midgut and its content. Here this key issue is addressed by RNAi-mediated silencing of an immune gene in a lepidopteran host Spodoptera littoralis, leaving the midgut microbiota unaltered. The resulting cellular immunosuppression was characterized by a reduced nodulation response, which was associated with a significant enhancement of host larvae mortality triggered by B. thuringiensis and a Cry toxin. This was determined by an uncontrolled proliferation of midgut bacteria, after entering the body cavity through toxin-induced epithelial lesions. Consequently, the hemolymphatic microbiota dramatically changed upon treatment with Cry1Ca toxin, showing a remarkable predominance of Serratia and Clostridium species, which switched from asymptomatic gut symbionts to hemocoelic pathogens. These experimental results demonstrate the important contribution of host enteric flora in B. thuringiensis-killing activity and provide a sound foundation for developing new insect control strategies aimed at enhancing the impact of biocontrol agents by reducing the immunocompetence of the host. PMID:27506800

  11. Midgut microbiota and host immunocompetence underlie Bacillus thuringiensis killing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Di Lelio, Ilaria; La Storia, Antonietta; Marinelli, Adriana; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Banyuls, Núria; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan; Gigliotti, Silvia; Ercolini, Danilo; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2016-08-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used bacterial entomopathogen producing insecticidal toxins, some of which are expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops. Surprisingly, the killing mechanism of B. thuringiensis remains controversial. In particular, the importance of the septicemia induced by the host midgut microbiota is still debated as a result of the lack of experimental evidence obtained without drastic manipulation of the midgut and its content. Here this key issue is addressed by RNAi-mediated silencing of an immune gene in a lepidopteran host Spodoptera littoralis, leaving the midgut microbiota unaltered. The resulting cellular immunosuppression was characterized by a reduced nodulation response, which was associated with a significant enhancement of host larvae mortality triggered by B. thuringiensis and a Cry toxin. This was determined by an uncontrolled proliferation of midgut bacteria, after entering the body cavity through toxin-induced epithelial lesions. Consequently, the hemolymphatic microbiota dramatically changed upon treatment with Cry1Ca toxin, showing a remarkable predominance of Serratia and Clostridium species, which switched from asymptomatic gut symbionts to hemocoelic pathogens. These experimental results demonstrate the important contribution of host enteric flora in B. thuringiensis-killing activity and provide a sound foundation for developing new insect control strategies aimed at enhancing the impact of biocontrol agents by reducing the immunocompetence of the host.

  12. Role of cathepsins D in the midgut of Dysdercus peruvianus.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, André C; Fuzita, Felipe J; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Ferreira, Clélia; Terra, Walter R

    2017-02-01

    Hemipteran ancestors probably lost their digestive serine peptidases on adapting to a plant sap diet. On returning to protein ingestion, these insects start using cathepsin (lysosomal) peptidases as digestive enzymes, from which the less known is cathepsin D. Nine of the ten cathepsin D transcribing genes found in Dysdercus peruvianus midgut are expressed exclusively in this tissue and only DpCatD10 is also expressed in other tissues. The main action of cathepsins D is in the first (V1) (from three, V1-3) midgut regions, where 40% of the total proteolytic activity was assigned to aspartic peptidases with an optimum pH of 3.5. The most expressed cathepsins D were identified in the midgut luminal contents by proteomics. The data indicate that D. peruvianus have kept a lysosomal gene expressed in all tissues and evolved another set of genes with a digestive function restricted to midgut. Digestive cathepsins D apparently complement the action of digestive cathepsin L and they are arguably responsible for the hydrolysis of cysteine peptidase inhibitors known to be present in the cotton seeds eaten by the insect, before they meet cathepsin L.

  13. Adult midgut malrotation presented with acute bowel obstruction and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Akile; Uçar, Bercis İmge; Düzgün, Şükrü Aydın; Bayhan, Zülfü; Zeren, Sezgin; Yaylak, Faik; Şanal, Bekir; Bayhan, Nilüfer Araz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal malrotation refers to the partial or complete failure of rotation of midgut around the superior mesenteric vessels in embryonic life. Arrested midgut rotation results due to narrow-based mesentery and increases the risk of twisting midgut and subsequent obstruction and necrosis. Presentation of case 40 years old female patient admitted to emergency service with acute abdomen and computerized tomography scan showed dilated large and small intestine segments with air-fluid levels and twisted mesentery around superior mesenteric artery and vein indicating “whirpool sign”. Discussion Malrotation in adults is a rare cause of midgut volvulus as though it should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Even though clinical symptoms are obscure, adult patients usually present with vomiting and recurrent abdominal pain due to chronic partial obstruction. Contrast enhanced radiograph has been shown to be the most accurate method. Typical radiological signs are corkscrew sign, which is caused by the dilatation of various duodenal segments at different levels and the relocation of duodenojejunal junction due to jejunum folding. As malrotation commonly causes intestinal obstruction, patients deserve an elective laparotomy. Conclusion Malrotation should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Surgical intervention should be prompt to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:27015011

  14. A regulatory network controls nephrocan expression and midgut patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Juan; Wei, Wei; Saund, Ranajeet S.; Xiang, Ping; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Yi, Yuyin; Alder, Olivia; Lu, Daphne Y. D.; Savory, Joanne G. A.; Krentz, Nicole A. J.; Montpetit, Rachel; Cullum, Rebecca; Hofs, Nicole; Lohnes, David; Humphries, R. Keith; Yamanaka, Yojiro; Duester, Gregg; Saijoh, Yukio; Hoodless, Pamela A.

    2014-01-01

    Although many regulatory networks involved in defining definitive endoderm have been identified, the mechanisms through which these networks interact to pattern the endoderm are less well understood. To explore the mechanisms involved in midgut patterning, we dissected the transcriptional regulatory elements of nephrocan (Nepn), the earliest known midgut specific gene in mice. We observed that Nepn expression is dramatically reduced in Sox17−/− and Raldh2−/− embryos compared with wild-type embryos. We further show that Nepn is directly regulated by Sox17 and the retinoic acid (RA) receptor via two enhancer elements located upstream of the gene. Moreover, Nepn expression is modulated by Activin signaling, with high levels inhibiting and low levels enhancing RA-dependent expression. In Foxh1−/− embryos in which Nodal signaling is reduced, the Nepn expression domain is expanded into the anterior gut region, confirming that Nodal signaling can modulate its expression in vivo. Together, Sox17 is required for Nepn expression in the definitive endoderm, while RA signaling restricts expression to the midgut region. A balance of Nodal/Activin signaling regulates the anterior boundary of the midgut expression domain. PMID:25209250

  15. Aarskog's syndrome with Hirschsprung's disease, midgut malrotation, and dental anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Hassinger, D D; Mulvihill, J J; Chandler, J B

    1980-01-01

    A 23-year-old man with Aarskog's syndrome had Hirschspring's disease, midgut malrotation, a renal cyst, a cartilaginous projection of the pinna, geographic tongue, and dental anomalies. The family history, negative for these features, including several malignancies. Any or all of these features could be considered part of Aarskog's syndrome and may represent anomalies of neural crest development. Images PMID:7401138

  16. Mamestra configurata nucleopolyhedrovirus-A transcriptome from infected host midgut.

    PubMed

    Donly, B Cameron; Theilmann, David A; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Baldwin, Douglas; Erlandson, Martin A

    2014-02-01

    Infection of an insect by a baculovirus occurs in two distinct phases, an initial infection of host midgut by occlusion-derived virions (ODVs) and subsequent systemic infection of other tissues by budded virions (BV). A vast majority of investigations of the infection process have been restricted to cell culture studies using BV that emulate the systemic phase of infection. This is one of the first studies to investigate baculovirus gene expression in ODV infected midgut cells. We have focused on the critical first phase of in vivo infection by Mamestra configurata nucleopolyhedrovirus-A in M. configurata larvae, using qPCR and RNAseq mass sequencing to measure virus gene expression in midgut cells. The earliest genes detected by each method had significant overlap, including known early genes as well as genes unique to MacoNPV-A and genes of unknown function. The RNAseq data also revealed a large range of expression levels across all ORFs, which could not be measured using qPCR. This dataset provides a first whole genome transcriptomic analysis of viral genes required for virus infection in vivo and will provide the basis for functionally analyzing specific genes that may be critical elements in baculovirus midgut infectivity and host range.

  17. Aspen defense chemicals influence midgut bacterial community composition of gypsy moth.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Lindroth, Richard L; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2015-01-01

    Microbial symbionts are becoming increasingly recognized as mediators of many aspects of plant - herbivore interactions. However, the influence of plant chemical defenses on gut associates of insect herbivores is less well understood. We used gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.), and differing trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) genotypes that vary in chemical defenses, to assess the influence of foliar chemistry on bacterial communities of larval midguts. We evaluated the bacterial community composition of foliage, and of midguts of larvae feeding on those leaves, using next-generation high-throughput sequencing. Plant defense chemicals did not influence the composition of foliar communities. In contrast, both phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins affected the bacterial consortia of gypsy moth midguts. The two most abundant operational taxonomic units were classified as Ralstonia and Acinetobacter. The relative abundance of Ralstonia was higher in midguts than in foliage when phenolic glycoside concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when phenolic glycosides were high. In contrast, the relative abundance of Ralstonia was lower in midguts than in foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but higher in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter showed a different relationship with host chemistry, being relatively more abundant in midguts than with foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter tended to have a greater relative abundance in midguts of insects feeding on genotypes with high phenolic glycoside concentrations. These results show that plant defense chemicals influence herbivore midgut communities, which may in turn influence host utilization.

  18. Midgut Microbial Community of Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquito Populations from India

    PubMed Central

    Chandel, Kshitij; Mendki, Murlidhar J.; Parikh, Rasesh Y.; Kulkarni, Girish; Tikar, Sachin N.; Sukumaran, Devanathan; Prakash, Shri; Parashar, Brahma D.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Veer, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus is a ubiquitous species that serves as a major vector for west nile virus and lymphatic filariasis. Ingestion of bloodmeal by females triggers a series of physiological processes in the midgut and also exposes them to infection by these pathogens. The bacteria normally harbored in the midgut are known to influence physiology and can also alter the response to various pathogens. The midgut bacteria in female Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes collected over a large geographical area from India was studied. Examination of 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons from culturable microflora revealed the presence of 83 bacterial species belonging to 31 bacterial genera. All of these species belong to three phyla i.e. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Phylum Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum (37 species), followed by Firmicutes (33 species) and Actinobacteria (13 species). Phylum Proteobacteria, was dominated by members of γ-proteobacteria class. The genus Staphylococcus was the largest genus represented by 11 species whereas Enterobacter was the most prevalent genus and recovered from all the field stations except Leh. Highest bacterial prevalence was observed from Bhuj (22 species) followed by Nagrota (18 species), Masimpur (18 species) and Hathigarh (16 species). Whereas, least species were observed from Leh (8 species). It has been observed that individual mosquito harbor extremely diverse gut bacteria and have very small overlap bacterial taxa in their gut. This variation in midgut microbiota may be one of the factors responsible for variation in disease transmission rates or vector competence within mosquito population. The present data strongly encourage further investigations to verify the potential role of the detected bacteria in mosquito for the transmission of lymphatic filariasis and west nile virus. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study on midgut microbiota of wild Cx. quinquefasciatus from over a

  19. Waves and Water Beetles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Vance A.

    1971-01-01

    Capillary and gravity water waves are related to the position, wavelength, and velocity of an object in flowing water. Water patterns are presented for ships and the whirling beetle with an explanation of how the design affects the objects velocity and the observed water wavelengths. (DS)

  20. Beetles, Biofuel, and Coffee

    SciTech Connect

    Ceja-Navarro, Javier

    2015-05-06

    Berkeley Lab scientist Javier Ceja-Navarro discusses his research on the microbial populations found the guts of insects, specifically the coffee berry borer, which may lead to better pest management and the passalid beetle, which could lead to improved biofuel production.

  1. Waves and Water Beetles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Vance A.

    1971-01-01

    Capillary and gravity water waves are related to the position, wavelength, and velocity of an object in flowing water. Water patterns are presented for ships and the whirling beetle with an explanation of how the design affects the objects velocity and the observed water wavelengths. (DS)

  2. Pine Beetle Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Earth Systems Science Office scientists worked with officials in St. Tammany Parish, La., to detect and battle pine beetle infestation in Fontainebleu State Park. The scientists used a new method of detecting plant stress by using special lenses and modified sensors to detect a change in light levels given off by the plant before the stress is visible to the naked eye.

  3. Western Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Clarence J. Jr. DeMars; Bruce H. Roettgering

    1982-01-01

    The western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte, can aggressively attack and kill ponderosa and Coulter pine trees of all ages and vigor classes that are 6 inches (15 cm) or larger in diameter, including apparently healthy trees. Group killing of trees is common in dense, overstocked stands of pure, even-aged, young sawtimber (fig. 1), but also occurs among...

  4. Southern Pine Beetle II

    Treesearch

    R. N. Coulson; Kier Klepzig

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge base for the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) has increased dramatically since the last comprehensive and interpretative summary (Thatcher and others 1980). This insect continues to be a significant pest affecting the forest environment of the Southern US and adjoining states and it is also the subject of...

  5. Beetles, Biofuel, and Coffee

    ScienceCinema

    Ceja-Navarro, Javier

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientist Javier Ceja-Navarro discusses his research on the microbial populations found the guts of insects, specifically the coffee berry borer, which may lead to better pest management and the passalid beetle, which could lead to improved biofuel production.

  6. Spatial and sex-specific dissection of the Anopheles gambiae midgut transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Warr, Emma; Aguilar, Ruth; Dong, Yuemei; Mahairaki, Vassiliki; Dimopoulos, George

    2007-01-29

    The midgut of hematophagous insects, such as disease transmitting mosquitoes, carries out a variety of essential functions that mostly relate to blood feeding. The midgut of the female malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae is a major site of interactions between the parasite and the vector. Distinct compartments and cell types of the midgut tissue carry out specific functions and vector borne pathogens interact and infect different parts of the midgut. A microarray based global gene expression approach was used to compare transcript abundance in the four major female midgut compartments (cardia, anterior, anterior part of posterior and posterior part of posterior midgut) and between the male and female Anopheles gambiae midgut. Major differences between the female and male midgut gene expression relate to digestive processes and immunity. Each compartment has a distinct gene function profile with the posterior midgut expressing digestive enzyme genes and the cardia and anterior midgut expressing high levels of antimicrobial peptide and other immune gene transcripts. Interestingly, the cardia expressed several known anti-Plasmodium factors. A parallel peptidomic analysis of the cardia identified known mosquito antimicrobial peptides as well as several putative short secreted peptides that are likely to represent novel antimicrobial factors. The A. gambiae sex specific midgut and female midgut compartment specific transcriptomes correlates with their known functions. The significantly greater functional diversity of the female midgut relate to hematophagy that is associated with digestion and nutrition uptake as well as exposes it to a variety of pathogens, and promotes growth of its endogenous microbial flora. The strikingly high proportion of immunity related factors in the cardia tissue most likely serves the function to increase sterility of ingested sugar and blood. A detailed characterization of the functional specificities of the female mosquito midgut and

  7. Thoracoabdominal foregut duplication cyst with respiratory epithelium and alimentary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Ke Ren; Bai, Yu Zuo; Song, Dan; Wang, Weilin

    2010-05-01

    Thoracoabdominal foregut duplication is a rare congenital abnormality. The authors report a case of thoracoabdominal foregut duplication cyst in a 13-year-old male patient. The pathologic report revealed that a thoracic mass with a pseudostratified, ciliated, columnar epithelial lining (respiratory tract epithelium), an abdominal mass with gastric mucosa (alimentary tract epithelium), and the cyst originated from the foregut. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Heme crystallization in the midgut of triatomine insects.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcus F; Gandara, Ana Caroline P; Braga, Cláudia M S; Silva, José R; Mury, Flavia B; Dansa-Petretski, Marílvia; Menezes, Diego; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2007-01-01

    Hemozoin (Hz) is a heme crystal produced by several blood-feeding organisms in order to detoxify free heme released upon hemoglobin (Hb) digestion. Here we show that heme crystallization also occurs in three species of triatomine insects. Ultraviolet-visible and infrared light absorption spectra of insoluble pigments isolated from the midgut of three triatomine species Triatoma infestans, Dipetalogaster maximus and Panstrongylus megistus indicated that all produce Hz. Morphological analysis of T. infestans and D. maximus midguts revealed the close association of Hz crystals to perimicrovillar membranes and also as multicrystalline assemblies, forming nearly spherical structures. Heme crystallization was promoted by isolated perimicrovillar membranes from all three species of triatomine bugs in vitro in heat-sensitive reactions. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that Hz formation is an ancestral adaptation of Triatominae to a blood-sucking habit and that the presence of perimicrovillar membranes plays a central role in this process.

  9. Chitin is a necessary component to maintain the barrier function of the peritrophic matrix in the insect midgut.

    PubMed

    Kelkenberg, Marco; Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In most insects, the peritrophic matrix (PM) partitions the midgut into different digestive compartments, and functions as a protective barrier against abrasive particles and microbial infections. In a previous study we demonstrated that certain PM proteins are essential in maintaining the PM's barrier function and establishing a gradient of PM permeability from the anterior to the posterior part of the midgut which facilitates digestion (Agrawal et al., 2014). In this study, we focused on the effects of a reduction in chitin content on PM permeability in larvae of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Oral administration of the chitin synthesis inhibitor diflubenzuron (DFB) only partially reduced chitin content of the larval PM even at high concentrations. We observed no nutritional effects, as larval growth was unaffected and neutral lipids were not depleted from the fat body. However, the metamorphic molt was disrupted and the insects died at the pharate pupal stage, presumably due to DFB's effect on cuticle formation. RNAi to knock-down expression of the gene encoding chitin synthase 2 in T. castaneum (TcCHS-2) caused a complete loss of chitin in the PM. Larval growth was significantly reduced, and the fat body was depleted of neutral lipids. In situ PM permeability assays monitoring the distribution of FITC dextrans after DFB exposure or RNAi for TcCHS-2 revealed that PM permeability was increased in both cases. RNAi for TcCHS-2, however, led to a higher permeation of the PM by FITC dextrans than DFB treatment even at high doses. Similar effects were observed when the chitin content was reduced by feeding DFB to adult yellow fever mosquitos, Aedes aegypti. We demonstrate that the presence of chitin is necessary for maintaining the PM's barrier function in insects. It seems that the insecticidal effects of DFB are mediated by the disruption of cuticle synthesis during the metamorphic molt rather than by interfering with larval nutrition. However, as DFB

  10. Whole-Genome Expression Analysis in the Third Instar Larval Midgut of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Harrop, Thomas W. R.; Pearce, Stephen L.; Daborn, Phillip J.; Batterham, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Survival of insects on a substrate containing toxic substances such as plant secondary metabolites or insecticides is dependent on the metabolism or excretion of those xenobiotics. The primary sites of xenobiotic metabolism are the midgut, Malpighian tubules, and fat body. In general, gene expression in these organs is reported for the entire tissue by online databases, but several studies have shown that gene expression within the midgut is compartmentalized. Here, RNA sequencing is used to investigate whole-genome expression in subsections of third instar larval midguts of Drosophila melanogaster. The data support functional diversification in subsections of the midgut. Analysis of the expression of gene families that are implicated in the metabolism of xenobiotics suggests that metabolism may not be uniform along the midgut. These data provide a starting point for investigating gene expression and xenobiotic metabolism and other functions of the larval midgut. PMID:25193493

  11. Forest health and bark beetles

    Treesearch

    C. J. Fettig

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, bark beetles have caused significant tree mortality in the Sierra Nevada, rivaling mortality caused by wildfire in some locations. This chapter addresses two important questions: How can managers prepare for and influence levels of bark beetle-caused tree mortality given current forest conditions and future climate uncertainties? and How would the...

  12. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  13. Differential expression of chemosensory-protein genes in midguts in response to diet of Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xin; Qi, Jiangwei; Zhou, Xiaofan; Hu, Mei Ying; Zhong, Guo Hua

    2017-03-22

    While it has been well characterized that chemosensory receptors in guts of mammals have great influence on food preference, much remains elusive in insects. Insect chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are soluble proteins that could deliver chemicals to olfactory and gustatory receptors. Recent studies have identified a number of CSPs expressed in midgut in Lepidoptera insects, which started to reveal their roles in chemical recognition and stimulating appetite in midgut. In this study, we examined expression patterns in midgut of 21 Spodoptera litura CSPs (SlitCSPs) characterized from a previously reported transcriptome, and three CSPs were identified to be expressed highly in midgut. The orthologous relationships between midgut expressed CSPs in S. litura and those in Bombyx mori and Plutella xylostella also suggest a conserved pattern of CSP expression in midgut. We further demonstrated that the expression of midgut-CSPs may change in response to different host plants, and SlitCSPs could bind typical chemicals from host plant in vitro. Overall, our results suggested midgut expressed SlitCSPs may have functional roles, likely contributing to specialization and adaption to different ecosystems. Better knowledge of this critical component of the chemsensation signaling pathways in midguts may improve our understanding of food preference processes in a new perspective.

  14. Tri-trophic effects of transgenic insect-resistant tobacco expressing a protease inhibitor or a biotin-binding protein on adults of the predatory carabid beetle Ctenognathus novaezelandiae.

    PubMed

    Burgess, E P J; Philip, B A; Christeller, J T; Page, N E M; Marshall, R K; Wohlers, M W

    2008-02-01

    Tri-trophic impacts on adult predatory carabid beetles, Ctenognathus novaezelandiae, of insect-resistant transgenic tobacco plants expressing a serine protease inhibitor, bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor (BSTI), or a biotin-binding protein, avidin, were investigated. Both proteins could potentially affect this beetle, since avidin is known to be insecticidal to many beetle species and C. novaezelandiae midguts were shown to contain high levels of trypsin, a protease powerfully inhibited by bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (a BSTI homologue) in vitro. Newly emerged field-collected adult C. novaezelandiae were fed exclusively for 280 days on Spodoptera litura larvae raised either on non-transgenic control, transgenic avidin (55 ppm) or transgenic BSTI (68 ppm) tobacco. Despite this long-term exclusive diet, there was no treatment effect on survival or fecundity and only minor and transient effects on beetles were observed. Data pooled across time and genders showed control-prey-fed beetles weighed 3% more than BSTI-prey-fed beetles and avidin-prey-fed beetles consumed 3-4% fewer prey than control- or BSTI-prey-fed individuals. Females in all treatments gained more mass and survived longer than males. Low exposure to the proteins because of dilution and deactivation within the prey is the most likely explanation for the lack of tri-trophic effects observed. Aditionally, the presence of a digestive chymotrypsin only partially inhibited by BSTI may provide an alternative path for proteolysis.

  15. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  16. The RNA interference pathway affects midgut infection- and escape barriers for Sindbis virus in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The RNA interference (RNAi) pathway acts as an innate antiviral immune response in Aedes aegypti, modulating arbovirus infection of mosquitoes. Sindbis virus (SINV; family: Togaviridae, genus: Alphavirus) is an arbovirus that infects Ae. aegypti in the laboratory. SINV strain TR339 encounters a midgut escape barrier (MEB) during infection of Ae. aegypti. The nature of this barrier is not well understood. To investigate the role of the midgut as the central organ determining vector competence for arboviruses, we generated transgenic mosquitoes in which the RNAi pathway was impaired in midgut tissue of bloodfed females. We used these mosquitoes to reveal effects of RNAi impairment in the midgut on SINV replication, midgut infection and dissemination efficiencies, and mosquito longevity. Results As a novel tool for studying arbovirus-mosquito interactions, we engineered a transgenic mosquito line with an impaired RNAi pathway in the midgut of bloodfed females by silencing expression of the Aa-dcr2 gene. In midgut tissue of the transgenic Carb/dcr16 line, Aa-dcr2 expression was reduced ~50% between 1-7 days post-bloodmeal (pbm) when compared to the recipient mosquito strain. After infection with SINV-TR339EGFP, Aa-dcr2 expression levels were enhanced in both mosquito strains. In the RNAi pathway impaired mosquito strain SINV titers and midgut infection rates were significantly higher at 7 days pbm. There was also a strong tendency for increased virus dissemination rates among the transgenic mosquitoes. Between 7-14 days pbm, SINV was diminished in midgut tissue of the transgenic mosquitoes. Transgenic impairment of the RNAi pathway and/or SINV infection did not affect longevity of the mosquitoes. Conclusions We showed that RNAi impaired transgenic mosquitoes are a useful tool for studying arbovirus-mosquito interactions at the molecular level. Following ingestion by Ae. aegypti, the recombinant SINV-TR339EGFP was confronted with both MEB and a midgut

  17. Transcriptional Profiling of Midgut Immunity Response and Degeneration in the Wandering Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guohua; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xuquan; Guan, Jingmin; Shao, Qimiao; Beerntsen, Brenda T.; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chengshu; Ling, Erjun

    2012-01-01

    Background Lepidoptera insects have a novel development process comprising several metamorphic stages during their life cycle compared with vertebrate animals. Unlike most Lepidoptera insects that live on nectar during the adult stage, the Bombyx mori silkworm adults do not eat anything and die after egg-laying. In addition, the midguts of Lepidoptera insects produce antimicrobial proteins during the wandering stage when the larval tissues undergo numerous changes. The exact mechanisms responsible for these phenomena remain unclear. Principal Findings We used the silkworm as a model and performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the midgut between the feeding stage and the wandering stage. Many genes concerned with metabolism, digestion, and ion and small molecule transportation were down-regulated during the wandering stage, indicating that the wandering stage midgut loses its normal functions. Microarray profiling, qRT-PCR and western blot proved the production of antimicrobial proteins (peptides) in the midgut during the wandering stage. Different genes of the immune deficiency (Imd) pathway were up-regulated during the wandering stage. However, some key genes belonging to the Toll pathway showed no change in their transcription levels. Unlike butterfly (Pachliopta aristolochiae), the midgut of silkworm moth has a layer of cells, indicating that the development of midgut since the wandering stage is not usual. Cell division in the midgut was observed only for a short time during the wandering stage. However, there was extensive cell apoptosis before pupation. The imbalance of cell division and apoptosis probably drives the continuous degeneration of the midgut in the silkworm since the wandering stage. Conclusions This study provided an insight into the mechanism of the degeneration of the silkworm midgut and the production of innate immunity-related proteins during the wandering stage. The imbalance of cell division and apoptosis induces irreversible

  18. Histopathological effects of cypermethrin and Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis on midgut of Chironomus calligraphus larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Lavarías, Sabrina; Arrighetti, Florencia; Siri, Augusto

    2017-06-01

    Pesticides are extensively used for the control of agricultural pests and disease vectors, but they also affect non-target organisms. Cypermethrin (CYP) is a synthetic pyrethroid used worldwide. Otherwise, bioinsecticides like Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) have received great attention as an environmentally benign and desirable alternative. In order to evaluate the toxicity of those pesticides, Chironomus calligraphus was selected due to its high sensitivity to some toxicants. Third and fourth instars larvae were exposed to serial dilutions of CYP and Bti to determine LC50 values. In order to evaluate the potentially histopathological alterations as biomarkers, after 96-h of exposure, live larvae were fixed for histological analysis of the mid region of digestive tract. The 96-h LC50 values were 0.52 and 1.506μg/L for CYP and Bti, respectively. Midgut histological structure of the control group showed a single layer of cubical cells with microvilli in their apical surface and a big central nucleus. The midgut epithelium of larvae exposed to a low concentration of CYP (0.037μg/L) showed secretion activity and vacuolization while at high concentration (0.3μg/L) cells showed a greater disorganization and a more developed fat body. On the other hand, Bti caused progressive histological damage in this tissue. Chironomus calligraphus is sensitive to Bti and CYP toxicity like other Chironomus species. The histopathological alterations could be a valuable tool to assess toxicity mechanism of different pesticides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. exo-Brevicomin biosynthesis in the fat body of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

    PubMed

    Song, Minmin; Gorzalski, Andrew; Nguyen, Trang T; Liu, Xibei; Jeffrey, Christopher; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2014-02-01

    exo-Brevicomin (exo-7-ethyl-5-methyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane) is an important semiochemical for a number of beetle species, including the highly destructive mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae. It also has been found in other insects and even in the African elephant. Despite its significance, little is known about its biosynthesis. In order to fill this gap and to identify new molecular targets for potential pest management methods, we performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of cell cultures and in vitro assays of various D. ponderosae tissues with exo-brevicomin intermediates, analogs, and inhibitors. We confirmed that exo-brevicomin was synthesized by "unfed" males after emerging from the brood tree. Furthermore, in contrast to the paradigm established for biosynthesis of monoterpenoid pheromone components in bark beetles, exo-brevicomin was produced in the fat body, and not in the anterior midgut. The first committed step involves decarboxylation or decarbonylation of ω-3-decenoic acid, which is derived from a longer-chain precursor via β-oxidation, to (Z)-6-nonen-2-ol. This secondary alcohol is converted to the known precursor, (Z)-6-nonen-2-one, and further epoxidized by a cytochrome P450 to 6,7-epoxynonan-2-one. The keto-epoxide is stable at physiological pH, suggesting that its final cyclization to form exo-brevicomin is enzyme-catalyzed. exo-Brevicomin production is unusual in that tissue not derived from ectoderm apparently is involved.

  20. Ultrastructural and Transcriptional Changes in Response to Dietary Lectins in the Hessian Fly Larval Midgut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The midgut is a major interface between phytophagous insects and their host plants. Here we report on ultrastructural and transcriptional changes in response to dietary lectins introduced into the host plant during the 1st instar in the Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), larval midgut. Resul...

  1. Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Wheat Germ Agglutinin and Starvation in Drosophila melanogaster Larval Midgut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One function of plant lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is to serve as defenses against herbivorous insects. The midgut is one critical site affected by dietary lectins. We observed marked cellular, structural, and gene expression changes in the midguts of Drosophila melanogaster third-i...

  2. Midgut transcriptomic response of the gypsy moth, lymantria dispar, to infection with l. dispar and Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedroviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Developmental resistance of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larvae to baculovirus infection consists of both midgut-based and systemic components. To characterize the midgut response of larvae to baculovirus infection and identify larval host genes putatively involved in the midgut component of devel...

  3. Beetle wings are inflatable origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Ren, Jing; Ge, Siqin; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    Beetles keep their wings folded and protected under a hard shell. In times of danger, they must unfold them rapidly in order for them to fly to escape. Moreover, they must do so across a range of body mass, from 1 mg to 10 grams. How can they unfold their wings so quickly? We use high-speed videography to record wing unfolding times, which we relate to the geometry of the network of blood vessels in the wing. Larger beetles have longer unfolding times. Modeling of the flow of blood through the veins successfully accounts for the wing unfolding speed of large beetles. However, smaller beetles have anomalously short unfolding times, suggesting they have lower blood viscosity or higher driving pressure. The use of hydraulics to unfold complex objects may have implications in the design of micro-flying air vehicles.

  4. Brugia malayi microfilariae transport alphaviruses across the mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Turell, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent ingestion of microfilariae (MF) and arboviruses by mosquitoes can enhance mosquito transmission of virus compared to when virus is ingested alone. Within hours of being ingested, MF penetrate the mosquito midgut and introduce virus into mosquito hemocoel, creating a disseminated viral infection much sooner than normal. How virus is actually introduced is not known. In this report, we present experimental evidence that suggests that certain alphaviruses may adhere or otherwise associate with sheathed Brugia malayi MF in the blood of a dually-infected host and that the virus is carried into the mosquito hemocoel by the MF during their penetration of the mosquito midgut. The mechanism of MF enhancement may be more complex than simple leakage of viremic blood into the hemocoel during MF penetration. The affinity of arboviruses to adhere to or otherwise associate with MF may depend on the specific combination of the virus and MF involved in a dual host infection. This in turn may determine the relative importance that MF enhancement has within an arbovirus transmission system. PMID:28222120

  5. Brugia malayi microfilariae transport alphaviruses across the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Jefferson A; Turell, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent ingestion of microfilariae (MF) and arboviruses by mosquitoes can enhance mosquito transmission of virus compared to when virus is ingested alone. Within hours of being ingested, MF penetrate the mosquito midgut and introduce virus into mosquito hemocoel, creating a disseminated viral infection much sooner than normal. How virus is actually introduced is not known. In this report, we present experimental evidence that suggests that certain alphaviruses may adhere or otherwise associate with sheathed Brugia malayi MF in the blood of a dually-infected host and that the virus is carried into the mosquito hemocoel by the MF during their penetration of the mosquito midgut. The mechanism of MF enhancement may be more complex than simple leakage of viremic blood into the hemocoel during MF penetration. The affinity of arboviruses to adhere to or otherwise associate with MF may depend on the specific combination of the virus and MF involved in a dual host infection. This in turn may determine the relative importance that MF enhancement has within an arbovirus transmission system.

  6. Elongated hindguts in desert-living dung beetles (Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) feeding on dry dung pellets or plant litter.

    PubMed

    Holter, Peter; Scholtz, Clarke H

    2013-06-01

    Most adult dung beetles (Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) feed on fresh, wet dung of larger herbivorous or omnivorous mammals. As refractory plant fragments are selected out before ingestion, the food is presumed easily digestible. However, members of the desert-living scarabaeine genus Pachysoma (probably evolved from an ancestor closely related to the wet-dung feeding genus Scarabaeus) select dry dung pellets and/or plant litter. Thus, they ingest a much higher proportion of structural plant material, which nevertheless appears to be digested rather efficiently. This study investigates morphological modifications of the gut for this digestion in adults of eight Pachysoma species, both pellet and litter feeders. To ascertain hypothesized ancestral conditions, four fresh-dung feeding Scarabaeus species were also examined. The latter have the usual dung beetle gut consisting of a long, simple midgut, followed by an equally simple, much shorter hindgut of the same width. Lengths of midguts (M) and hindguts (H) divided by body length (B) for comparison between species of different size are: 4.9-6.3 (M/B) and 0.7-0.8 (H/B), which is normal for dung feeders. In Pachysoma, lengths are 6.3-6.5 (M/B) and 1.0-1.4 (H/B) in pellet feeders, and 4.4-5.0 (M/B) and 2.0-2.5 (H/B) for litter feeders. Hindguts are still morphologically undifferentiated and of midgut width, but clearly longer, particularly in litter feeders. Presumably, plant fragments in the food are digested, at least partly, in the hindgut. If so, the morphological adaptation is unusual: simple elongation rather than the expansion of part of the hindgut, as found in several other plant- or detritus-feeding scarabaeids.

  7. Charles Darwin, beetles and phylogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, Rolf G.; Friedrich, Frank; Leschen, Richard A. B.

    2009-11-01

    Here, we review Charles Darwin’s relation to beetles and developments in coleopteran systematics in the last two centuries. Darwin was an enthusiastic beetle collector. He used beetles to illustrate different evolutionary phenomena in his major works, and astonishingly, an entire sub-chapter is dedicated to beetles in “The Descent of Man”. During his voyage on the Beagle, Darwin was impressed by the high diversity of beetles in the tropics, and he remarked that, to his surprise, the majority of species were small and inconspicuous. However, despite his obvious interest in the group, he did not get involved in beetle taxonomy, and his theoretical work had little immediate impact on beetle classification. The development of taxonomy and classification in the late nineteenth and earlier twentieth century was mainly characterised by the exploration of new character systems (e.g. larval features and wing venation). In the mid-twentieth century, Hennig’s new methodology to group lineages by derived characters revolutionised systematics of Coleoptera and other organisms. As envisioned by Darwin and Ernst Haeckel, the new Hennigian approach enabled systematists to establish classifications truly reflecting evolution. Roy A. Crowson and Howard E. Hinton, who both made tremendous contributions to coleopterology, had an ambivalent attitude towards the Hennigian ideas. The Mickoleit school combined detailed anatomical work with a classical Hennigian character evaluation, with stepwise tree building, comparatively few characters and a priori polarity assessment without explicit use of the outgroup comparison method. The rise of cladistic methods in the 1970s had a strong impact on beetle systematics. Cladistic computer programs facilitated parsimony analyses of large data matrices, mostly morphological characters not requiring detailed anatomical investigations. Molecular studies on beetle phylogeny started in the 1990s with modest taxon sampling and limited DNA data

  8. Charles Darwin, beetles and phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Rolf G; Friedrich, Frank; Leschen, Richard A B

    2009-11-01

    Here, we review Charles Darwin's relation to beetles and developments in coleopteran systematics in the last two centuries. Darwin was an enthusiastic beetle collector. He used beetles to illustrate different evolutionary phenomena in his major works, and astonishingly, an entire sub-chapter is dedicated to beetles in "The Descent of Man". During his voyage on the Beagle, Darwin was impressed by the high diversity of beetles in the tropics, and he remarked that, to his surprise, the majority of species were small and inconspicuous. However, despite his obvious interest in the group, he did not get involved in beetle taxonomy, and his theoretical work had little immediate impact on beetle classification. The development of taxonomy and classification in the late nineteenth and earlier twentieth century was mainly characterised by the exploration of new character systems (e.g. larval features and wing venation). In the mid-twentieth century, Hennig's new methodology to group lineages by derived characters revolutionised systematics of Coleoptera and other organisms. As envisioned by Darwin and Ernst Haeckel, the new Hennigian approach enabled systematists to establish classifications truly reflecting evolution. Roy A. Crowson and Howard E. Hinton, who both made tremendous contributions to coleopterology, had an ambivalent attitude towards the Hennigian ideas. The Mickoleit school combined detailed anatomical work with a classical Hennigian character evaluation, with stepwise tree building, comparatively few characters and a priori polarity assessment without explicit use of the outgroup comparison method. The rise of cladistic methods in the 1970s had a strong impact on beetle systematics. Cladistic computer programs facilitated parsimony analyses of large data matrices, mostly morphological characters not requiring detailed anatomical investigations. Molecular studies on beetle phylogeny started in the 1990s with modest taxon sampling and limited DNA data. This has

  9. Ultrastructure of the gut epithelium in Acheta domesticus after long-term exposure to nanodiamonds supplied with food.

    PubMed

    Karpeta-Kaczmarek, Julia; Augustyniak, Maria; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena

    2016-05-01

    The biosafety of nanoparticles and the potential toxicity of nanopollutants and/or nanowastes are all currently burning issues. The increased use of nanoparticles, including nanodiamonds (ND), entails the real risk of their penetration into food chains, which may result in the contamination of animal and, as a result, human food. Knowledge about changes in the ultrastructure of tissues in organisms that have been exposed to ND is still very limited. The aim of the study was to describe the ultrastructure of the gut epithelium in Acheta domesticus after exposure to different concentrations of ND (0, 20 or 200 μg g(-1) - control, ND20 and ND200 groups, respectively) administered with food over a five-week period. The ultrastructure of the foregut, midgut and hindgut was assessed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). A number of changes in the structure of the gut in crickets that had consumed nanodiamond-contaminated food were observed. The epithelium of the midgut and hindgut were clearly damaged by ND, although the foregut was not affected. A positive relationship between the ND concentration in food and the degree of damage to the structure of epithelial cells was observed. Autophagy, especially mitophagy and reticulophagy, was activated in relation to the appearance of ND particles. A putative ND toxicity mechanizm is proposed. Extreme caution should be maintained when using nanodiamonds on a large scale.

  10. A dynamical model for bark beetle outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Křivan, Vlastimil; Lewis, Mark; Bentz, Barbara J; Bewick, Sharon; Lenhart, Suzanne M; Liebhold, Andrew

    2016-10-21

    Tree-killing bark beetles are major disturbance agents affecting coniferous forest ecosystems. The role of environmental conditions on driving beetle outbreaks is becoming increasingly important as global climatic change alters environmental factors, such as drought stress, that, in turn, govern tree resistance. Furthermore, dynamics between beetles and trees are highly nonlinear, due to complex aggregation behaviors exhibited by beetles attacking trees. Models have a role to play in helping unravel the effects of variable tree resistance and beetle aggregation on bark beetle outbreaks. In this article we develop a new mathematical model for bark beetle outbreaks using an analogy with epidemiological models. Because the model operates on several distinct time scales, singular perturbation methods are used to simplify the model. The result is a dynamical system that tracks populations of uninfested and infested trees. A limiting case of the model is a discontinuous function of state variables, leading to solutions in the Filippov sense. The model assumes an extensive seed-bank so that tree recruitment is possible even if trees go extinct. Two scenarios are considered for immigration of new beetles. The first is a single tree stand with beetles immigrating from outside while the second considers two forest stands with beetle dispersal between them. For the seed-bank driven recruitment rate, when beetle immigration is low, the forest stand recovers to a beetle-free state. At high beetle immigration rates beetle populations approach an endemic equilibrium state. At intermediate immigration rates, the model predicts bistability as the forest can be in either of the two equilibrium states: a healthy forest, or a forest with an endemic beetle population. The model bistability leads to hysteresis. Interactions between two stands show how a less resistant stand of trees may provide an initial toe-hold for the invasion, which later leads to a regional beetle outbreak in the

  11. Predatory beetles feed more pest beetles at rising temperature.

    PubMed

    Frank, Thomas; Bramböck, Martin

    2016-04-15

    Climate warming is a challenge for many plants and animals as they have to respond to rising temperature. Rising temperature was observed to affect herbivores and predators. Activity-density of abundant predatory carabid beetles, which are considered important natural control agents of agricultural pests, was observed to increase at rising temperature. The pollen beetle Meligethes aeneus is one of the most important insect pests in European oilseed rape fields, and its larvae were observed to be important prey to carabid beetles. Therefore, we performed a laboratory experiment to detect whether rising temperature affects the number of pollen beetle larvae killed by five abundant carabids, and larval biomass ingested by carabids. In three climate chambers actual temperature (T1) was compared to temperatures increased by 3 °C (T2) and 5 °C (T3). This is the first study investigating the feeding of carabid predators on an arable pest insect spanning a realistic forecasted climate warming scenario of 3 and 5 °C, thus providing basic knowledge on that neglected research area. We hypothesized that carabids kill more pollen beetle larvae at rising temperature, and biomass intake by carabids increases with rising temperature. Both beetle species and temperature had significant effects on the number of killed Meligethes larvae and larval biomass ingested by carabids. Amara ovata, Harpalus distinguendus and Poecilus cupreus killed significantly more pollen beetle larvae at T2 and T3 compared to T1. Anchomenus dorsalis killed significantly more larvae at T2 than T1, and Harpalus affinis showed no significant differences among temperatures. Biomass intake by A. ovata, H. distinguendus and A. dorsalis was significantly larger at T2 and T3 compared to T1. Biomass intake by H. affinis and P. cupreus did not significantly differ among temperatures. Among the five carabids tested P. cupreus exhibited the highest values for both number of killed larvae and biomass intake. Our lab

  12. Acquisition and structuring of midgut bacterial communities in gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2014-06-01

    Insects are associated with a diversity of bacteria that colonize their midguts. The extent to which these communities reflect maternal transmission, environmental acquisition, and subsequent structuring by the extreme conditions within the insect gut are poorly understood in many species. We used gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) as a model to investigate interactions between egg mass and environmental sources of bacteria on larval midgut communities. Egg masses were collected from several wild and laboratory populations, and the effects of diet, initial egg mass community, and internal host environment were evaluated using 454 16S-rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Wild populations were highly diverse, while laboratory-maintained egg masses were associated with few operational taxonomic units. As larvae developed, their midgut bacterial communities became more similar to each other and the consumed diet despite initial differences in egg mass-associated bacteria. Subsequent experiments revealed that while midgut membership was more similar to bacteria associated with diet than with egg mass-associated bacteria, we were unable to detect distinct, persistent differences attributable to specific host plants. The differences between foliar communities and midgut communities of larvae that ingested them were owing to relative changes in populations of several bacteria phylotypes. We conclude that gypsy moth has a relatively characteristic midgut bacterial community that is reflective of, but ultimately distinct from, its foliar diet. This work demonstrates that environmental acquisition of diverse microbes can lead to similar midgut bacterial assemblages, underscoring the importance of host physiological environment in structuring bacterial communities.

  13. Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Suppresses Midgut Immunity to Support Plasmodium Development

    PubMed Central

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Kakani, Parik; Choudhury, Tania Pal; Kumar, Vikas; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    The heme peroxidase HPX15 is an evolutionary conserved anopheline lineage-specific gene. Previously, we found that this gene is present in the genome of 19 worldwide distributed different species of Anopheles mosquito and its orthologs are absent in other mosquitoes, insects, or human. In addition, 65–99% amino acid identity among these 19 orthologs permitted us to hypothesize that the functional aspects of this gene might be also conserved in different anophelines. In this study, we found that Anopheles stephensi AsHPX15 gene is mainly expressed in the midgut and highly induced after uninfected or Plasmodium berghei-infected blood feeding. RNA interference-mediated silencing of midgut AsHPX15 gene drastically reduced the number of developing P. berghei oocysts. An antiplasmodial gene nitric oxide synthase was induced 13-fold in silenced midguts when compared to the unsilenced controls. Interestingly, the induction of antiplasmodial immunity in AsHPX15-silenced midguts is in absolute agreement with Anopheles gambiae. In A. gambiae, AgHPX15 catalyzes the formation of a dityrosine network at luminal side of the midgut that suppresses the activation of mosquito immunity against the bolus bacteria. Thus, a low-immunity zone created by this mechanism indirectly supports Plasmodium development inside the midgut lumen. These indistinguishable functional behaviors and conserved homology indicates that HPX15 might be a potent target to manipulate the antiplasmodial immunity of the anopheline midgut, and it will open new frontiers in the field of malaria control. PMID:28352267

  14. Compartmentalization of proteinases and amylases in Nauphoeta cinerea midgut.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Gromenko, V A; Rudenskaya, Y A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Zhuzhikov, D P

    2001-12-01

    Compartmentalization of proteinases, amylases, and pH in the midgut of Nauphoeta cinerea Oliv. (Blattoptera:Blaberidae) was studied in order to understand the organization of protein and starch digestion. Total proteolytic activity measured with azocasein was maximal at pH 11.5 both in anterior (AM) and posterior (PM) halves of the midgut, but the bulk of activity (67%) was found in PM. Total AM and PM preparations were fractionated on a Sephadex G-50 column and further analysed by means of activity electrophoresis and specific inhibitors and activators. The major activity in PM was classified as an unusual SH-dependent proteinase with M(r) 24,000 and pH optimum with synthetic substrate BApNA at 10.0. The enzyme was 43-fold activated in the presence of 1 mM DTT, insensitive to synthetic inhibitors of serine (PMSF, TLCK, TPCK) and cysteine (IAA, E-64) proteinases, strongly inhibited by STI, and displayed four active bands on zymograms. In PM, activities of trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like, and cysteine proteinases were observed. Aspartic and metalloproteinases were not detected. In AM, activity of unusual SH-dependent proteinase also dominated and activity of chymotrypsin-like proteinase was observed, but their levels were much lower than in PM. Distribution of amylase activity, exhibiting an optimum at pH 6.0, was quite the opposite. The major part of it (67%) was located in AM. Treatment of amylase preparation with proteinases from AM and PM reduced amylase activity twofold. pH of the midgut contents was 6.0-7.2 in AM, 6.4-7.6 in the first and 8.8-9.3 in the second halves of PM. Thus, pH in AM is in good agreement with the optimal pH of amylase, located in this compartment, but the activity of proteinases, including the ability to degrade amylase, in such an environment is low. Active proteolysis takes place in the second half of PM, where pH of the gut is close to the optimal pH of proteinases. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Southern Pine Beetles Attack Felled Green Timber

    Treesearch

    John C. Moser; Robert A. Sommers; Peter L. Lorio; J. Robert Bridges; Jeffrey J. Witcosky

    1987-01-01

    Southern pine beetles attacked green, uninfested downed trees and logs, as well as nearby standing trees. Beetles infesting horizontal trees and decked logs reproduced sufficiently to indicate that in some circumstances freshly cut, green trees may provide a utilizable resource for beetle populations.

  16. Southern Pine Beetle Behavior and Semiochemistry

    Treesearch

    Brian T. Sullivan

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) feeds both as adults and larvae within the inner bark of pine trees, which invariably die as a result of colonization. Populations of the SPB erupt periodically and produce catastrophic losses of pines, while at other times the beetles persist almost undetectably in the environment. The southern pine beetle has evolved behaviors that...

  17. Southern Pine Beetle Information System (SPBIS)

    Treesearch

    Valli Peacher

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) is the most destructive forest insect in the South. The SPB attacks all species of southern pine, but loblolly and shortleaf are most susceptible. The Southern Pine Beetle Information System (SPBIS) is the computerized database used by the national forests in the Southern Region for tracking individual southern pine beetle infestations....

  18. Where Have All the Beetles Gone?

    Treesearch

    Richard A. Goyer; Kier D. Klepzig

    2002-01-01

    Without a doubt, bark beetles are the most destructive insect pests of Southern pines. Among these, the Southern pine beetle (SPB), Dendroctonus frontalis, isi the most notable and most noticed. During outbreak years, this small, but very aggresive, beetle can cause catastrophic losses.

  19. Predictors of southern pine beetle flight activity

    Treesearch

    John C. Moser; T.R. Dell

    1979-01-01

    An equation based on weather data explained differences in capture counts of pine bark beetles trapped twice weekly for an entire year at a single infestation and contributed to the udnerstanding of some aspects of beetle dynamics. The proportion of the beetles that reached the traps increased with maximum temperature and decreased with heavy rain. Production of adults...

  20. A dynamical model for bark beetle outbreaks

    Treesearch

    Vlastimil Krivan; Mark Lewis; Barbara J. Bentz; Sharon Bewick; Suzanne M. Lenhart; Andrew Liebhold

    2016-01-01

    Tree-killing bark beetles are major disturbance agents affecting coniferous forest ecosystems. The role of environmental conditions on driving beetle outbreaks is becoming increasingly important as global climatic change alters environmental factors, such as drought stress, that, in turn, govern tree resistance. Furthermore, dynamics between beetles and trees...

  1. Mechanical Control of Southern Pine Beetle Infestations

    Treesearch

    Ronald F. Billings

    2011-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of the southern pine beetle (SPB) may affect thousands of acres of commercial pine forests in the Southeastern United States, Mexico, and Central America. Accordingly, this species is the target of more aggressive and effective suppression programs than any other bark beetle pest in the world. The strategy for controlling the southern pine beetle...

  2. Predators of the Southern Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    John D. Reeve

    2011-01-01

    This chapter of the Southern Pine Beetle II reviews the overall influence of predators on southern pine beetle (SPB) population dynamics, as well as recent research on specific predators such as the clerid beetle Thanasimus dubius. Several lines of evidence suggest that predators and other natural enemies generate significant SPB mortality that contributes to outbreak...

  3. Antioxidant defenses in caterpillars: role of the ascorbate-recycling system in the midgut lumen.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, R V; Bumgarner, S L; Roosen, E F; Martin, M M

    2001-04-01

    This study demonstrates that an ascorbate-recycling system in the midgut lumen can act as an effective antioxidant defense in caterpillars that feed on prooxidant-rich foods. In tannin-sensitive larvae of the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria (Lasiocampidae), ingested tannic acid is oxidized in the midgut lumen, generating significant quantities of peroxides, including hydrogen peroxide, which readily diffuses across cell membranes and is a powerful cytotoxin. By contrast, in the tannin-tolerant larvae of the white-marked tussock moth, Orgyia leucostigma (Lymantriidae), tannic acid oxidation and the generation of peroxides are suppressed. The superior defense of O. leucostigma against oxidative stress imposed by the oxidation of ingested polyphenols can be explained by the presence of higher concentrations of ascorbate and glutathione in the midgut lumen. In O. leucostigma at least 50% of the ingested ascorbate present in the anterior midgut is still present in the posterior midgut, whereas in M. disstria, only 10% of the ascorbate is present in the posterior half of the midgut. We propose that the maintenance of higher levels of ascorbate in the midgut lumen of O. leucostigma than in M. disstria is explained by the secretion of glutathione into the midgut lumen by O. leucostigma, thereby forming a complete ascorbate-recycling system. The concentration of glutathione in the midgut lumen of O. leucostigma is 3.5-fold higher than in M. disstria and more than double the concentration in the diet. Our results emphasize the importance of a defensive strategy in herbivorous insects based on the maintenance of conditions in the gut lumen that reduce or eliminate the potential prooxidant behavior of ingested phenols.

  4. Utility of the CT Scan in Diagnosing Midgut Volvulus in Patients with Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Morshedi, Mehdi; Baradaran Jamili, Mohammad; Shafizadeh Barmi, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Symptomatic intestinal malrotation first presenting in the adults is rare. Midgut volvulus is the most common complication of malrotation in the adults. Because of more differential diagnosis, Computed Tomography (CT) scan can play an important role in the evaluation of patients with this abnormality. The whirl pattern around the superior mesenteric artery found on CT scan in patients with midgut volvulus is pathognomonic and diagnostic. We describe a case of intestinal malrotation complicated by midgut volvulus in an adult patient. The preoperative CT findings were pathognomonic. PMID:28182093

  5. Calcium tartrate crystals in the midgut of the grape leafhopper.

    PubMed

    Böll, S; Schmitt, T; Burschka, C; Schreier, P; Schwappach, P; Herrmann, J V

    2005-12-01

    Calcium tartrate crystals were observed in the midgut of grape leafhoppers. This unique compound was found for the first time in insects. The size of the crystals varied strongly between and within individuals with a mean length of 153 +/- 87 microm and a mean width of 71 +/- 46 microm. In addition, the number of crystals per individual showed a broad variation and ranged from 1 to 150 crystals/individual. The occurrence of calcium tartrate crystals as well as the number of crystals per individual followed the same seasonal pattern as seasonal vine leaf concentrations of tartaric acid found in a previous study, indicating that calcium tartrate is formed to neutralize the tartaric acid in the gut system. It further implies that the grape leafhopper, rather than being a pure phloem sucker, employs a mixed feeding strategy to satisfy its demands for calcium uptake.

  6. Population-associated heterogeneity of the digestive Cys protease complement in Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Guay, Jean-Frédéric; Cloutier, Conrad; Michaud, Dominique

    2017-03-04

    Herbivorous insects use complex protease complements to process plant proteins, useful to adjust their digestive functions to the plant diet and to elude the antidigestive effects of dietary protease inhibitors. We here assessed whether basic profiles and diet-related adjustments of the midgut protease complement may vary among populations of the insect herbivore Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata). Two laboratory colonies of this insect were used as models, derived from insect samples collected in potato fields ∼1200km distant from each other in North America. Synchronized 4th-instar larvae reared on potato were kept on this plant, or switched to tomato or eggplant, to compare their midgut cathepsin activities and content of intestain Cys proteases under different diet regimes. Cathepsin D activity, cathepsin L activity, cathepsin B activity and total intestain content shortly after larval molting on potato leaves were about two times lower in one population compared to the other. By comparison, cathepsin D activity, cathepsin B activity, total intestain content and relative abundance of the most prominent intestain families were similar in the two populations after three days regardless of the plant diet, unlike cathepsin L activity and less prominent intestain families showing population-associated variability. Variation in Cys protease profiles translated into the differential efficiency of a Cys protease inhibitor, tomato cystatin SlCYS8, to inhibit cathepsin L activity in midgut extracts of the two insect groups. Despite quantitative differences, SlCYS8 single variants engineered to strongly inhibit Cys proteases showed improved potency against cathepsin L activity of either population. These data suggest the feasibility of designing cystatins to control L. decemlineata that are effective against different populations of this insect. They underline, on the other hand, the practical relevance of considering natural variability of the protease

  7. Comparative Evaluation of the Gut Microbiota Associated with the Below- and Above-Ground Life Stages (Larvae and Beetles) of the Forest Cockchafer, Melolontha hippocastani

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Cordero, Erika; Ping, Liyan; Reichwald, Kathrin; Delb, Horst; Platzer, Mathias; Boland, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of the diversity of bacterial communities in the larval midgut and adult gut of the European forest cockchafer (Melolontha hippocastani) was carried out using approaches that were both dependent on and independent of cultivation. Clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene revealed 150 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that belong to 11 taxonomical classes and two other groups that could be classified only to the phylum level. The most abundant classes were β, δ and γ-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Bacilli, Erysipelotrichi and Sphingobacteria. Although the insect’s gut is emptied in the prepupal stage and the beetle undergoes a long diapause period, a subset of eight taxonomic classes from the aforementioned eleven were found to be common in the guts of diapausing adults and the larval midguts (L2, L3). Moreover, several bacterial phylotypes belonging to these common bacterial classes were found to be shared by the larval midgut and the adult gut. Despite this, the adult gut bacterial community represented a subset of that found in the larvae midgut. Consequently, the midgut of the larval instars contains a more diverse bacterial community compared to the adult gut. On the other hand, after the bacteria present in the larvae were cultivated, eight bacterial species were isolated. Moreover, we found evidence of the active role of some of the bacterial species isolated in food digestion, namely, the presence of amylase and xylanolytic properties. Finally, fluorescence in situ hybridization allowed us to confirm the presence of selected species in the insect gut and through this, their ecological niche as well as the metagenomic results. The results presented here elucidated the heterogeneity of aerobic and facultative bacteria in the gut of a holometabolous insect species having two different feeding habits. PMID:23251574

  8. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  9. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  10. Are stag beetles fungivorous?

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Masahiko; Matsushita, Norihisa; Togashi, Katsumi

    2009-11-01

    Stag beetle larvae generally feed on decaying wood; however, it was unknown whether they can use wood-rotting fungi alone as food. Here, to clarify this, newly hatched larvae of Dorcus rectus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) were reared for 14 days on artificial diets containing a fixed amount of freeze-dried mycelia of the following fungi: Bjerkandera adusta, Trametes versicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus, and Fomitopsis pinicola. The mean incremental gain in larval body mass was greatest on diets containing B. adusta, followed by T. versicolor, P. ostreatus, and F. pinicola. The growth rate of body mass correlated positively with mycelial nitrogen content of the different fungi. It also correlated positively with the mycelial content of B. adusta in the diet. Addition of antibiotics to diets with mycelia nearly halved larval growth, indicating that larvae were able to use fungal mycelia as food without the assistance of associated microbes although the microbes positively affected larval growth. Four newly hatched larvae reared on artificial diets containing B. adusta mycelia developed to the second instar in 21-34 days; and one developed to the third (=final) instar. This study provides evidence that fungi may constitute the bulk of the diet of D. rectus larvae.

  11. Biochemical and cellular characterization of lipophorin-midgut interaction in the hematophagous Panstrongylus megistus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Fruttero, Leonardo L; Rubiolo, Edilberto R; Canavoso, Lilián E

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand the metabolism of dietary lipids in hematophagous insects, we have performed a biochemical and cellular characterization of lipophorin (Lp)-midgut interaction in Panstrongylus megistus, a vector of Chagas' disease. The study was accomplished by solid-phase binding assays or with iodinated Lp ((125)I-Lp), using midgut membranes from fifth instar nymphs after ecdysis and after insects received a blood meal. Results obtained from both physiological conditions indicated that Lp interacted specifically with the midgut, implying the participation of receptors. Binding capacity of lipophorin to membranes was dependent on the amount of membranes added in the system, reaching saturation at 0.1 microg/ml. However, membranes obtained after a blood meal exhibited higher binding activity. Saturation kinetics results using (125)I-Lp suggested a single binding site with high affinity for Lp in the midgut membranes (K(d) = 5.1 +/- 3.6 x 10(-8) M). The unrelated lipoprotein, human LDL, did not compete with Lp for its binding site in the midgut. The binding was dependent on pH and the treatment of membranes with trypsin or heat causes a significant inhibition of the binding. Midgut-Lp interaction was affected by changes in ionic strength and by suramin, but showed no requirement of calcium. Ligand blotting assays revealed two membrane proteins that specifically bound Lp (61 and 45 kDa). At cellular level, Lp binding sites were located mainly at the basal plasma membrane of isolated enterocytes. Labeled Lp with fluorescent probes directed to its proteins or its phospholipids fraction co-localized mainly at the basement membrane of the midgut. In addition, no intracellular Lp was observed at any condition. The lack of an endocytic pathway for Lp in the midgut of P. megistus is analyzed in the context of insect physiology.

  12. The fine structural morphology of the midgut of adult Drosophila: A morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Gartner, L P

    1985-01-01

    The midgut of one day old Drosophilia was examined morphometrically at the electron microscopic level. Results suggest that parenchymal cells, with the exception of basal cells, possess identical functions. Drosophilia midgut cells are smaller than those of other insects studied, and the surface densities of the rER was less, indicating that its protein synthetic activity is also less than that of other insects.

  13. Comparison of midgut bacterial diversity in tropical caterpillars (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) fed on different diets.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Tomás, Adrián A; Sittenfeld, Ana; Uribe-Lorío, Lorena; Chavarría, Felipe; Mora, Marielos; Janzen, Daniel H; Goodman, Robert M; Simon, Holly M

    2011-10-01

    As primary consumers of foliage, caterpillars play essential roles in shaping the trophic structure of tropical forests. The caterpillar midgut is specialized in plant tissue processing; its pH is exceptionally alkaline and contains high concentrations of toxic compounds derived from the ingested plant material (secondary compounds or allelochemicals) and from the insect itself. The midgut, therefore, represents an extreme environment for microbial life. Isolates from different bacterial taxa have been recovered from caterpillar midguts, but little is known about the impact of these microorganisms on caterpillar biology. Our long-term goals are to identify midgut symbionts and to investigate their functions. As a first step, different diet formulations were evaluated for rearing two species of tropical saturniid caterpillars. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers hybridizing broadly to sequences from the bacterial domain, 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed with midgut DNA extracted from caterpillars reared on different diets. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis indicated that bacterial sequences recovered from the midguts of caterpillars fed on foliage were more diverse than those from caterpillars fed on artificial diet. Sequences related to Methylobacterium sp., Bradyrhizobium sp., and Propionibacterium sp. were detected in all caterpillar libraries regardless of diet, but were not detected in a library constructed from the diet itself. Furthermore, libraries constructed with DNA recovered from surface-sterilized eggs indicated potential for vertical transmission of midgut symbionts. Taken together, these results suggest that microorganisms associated with the tropical caterpillar midgut may engage in symbiotic interactions with these ecologically important insects.

  14. Plant Defense Inhibitors Affect the Structures of Midgut Cells in Drosophila melanogaster and Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Murdock, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce proteins such as protease inhibitors and lectins as defenses against herbivorous insects and pathogens. However, no systematic studies have explored the structural responses in the midguts of insects when challenged with plant defensive proteins and lectins across different species. In this study, we fed two kinds of protease inhibitors and lectins to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and alpha-amylase inhibitors and lectins to the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. We assessed the changes in midgut cell structures by comparing them with such structures in insects receiving normal diets or subjected to food deprivation. Using light and transmission electron microscopy in both species, we observed structural changes in the midgut peritrophic matrix as well as shortened microvilli on the surfaces of midgut epithelial cells in D. melanogaster. Dietary inhibitors and lectins caused similar lesions in the epithelial cells but not much change in the peritrophic matrix in both species. We also noted structural damages in the Drosophila midgut after six hours of starvation and changes were still present after 12 hours. Our study provided the first evidence of key structural changes of midguts using a comparative approach between a dipteran and a coleopteran. Our particular observation and discussion on plant–insect interaction and dietary stress are relevant for future mode of action studies of plant defensive protein in insect physiology. PMID:27594789

  15. Analysis of gene expression in the midgut of Bombyx mori during the larval molting stage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Huang, Wuren; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Qiuyun; Zhu, Shoulin; Zhang, Qiaoli; Beerntsen, Brenda T; Song, Hongsheng; Ling, Erjun

    2016-11-03

    Insects can be models for understanding human intestinal infection and pathology. Molting, a special period during which the old insect cuticle is shed and a new one is produced, is crucial for insect development. Holometabolous insects may experience several larva-to-larva moltings to become larger, a pupal molt and adult eclosion to become adults. During the larval molts, they stop feeding and become quiescent. Although the molting larvae become quiescent, it is not known if changes in microbiome, physiology, development and immunity of midguts occur. Transcriptome analysis indicated that functions such as metabolism, digestion, and transport may become reduced due to the downregulated expression of many associated genes. During the molting stage, midguts harbor less microflora and DNA synthesis decreases. Both ecdysone and juvenile hormone in the larval midgut likely degrade after entering the larva-to-larva molting stage. However, at 12 h after ecdysis, the feeding larvae of 5th instars that were injected with 20-hydroxyecdysone entered a molting-like stage, during which changes in midgut morphology, DNA synthesis, gene expression, and microflora exhibited the same patterns as observed in the actual molting state. This study is important for understanding insect midgut physiology, development and immunity during a special development stage when no food is ingested. Although the molting larva becomes immobile and quiescent, we demonstrate that numerous changes occur in midgut morphology, physiology, metabolism and microbiome during this period.

  16. A novel Cph-like gene involved in histogenesis and maintenance of midgut in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Gan, Liping; Zhuo, Weiwei; Li, Juan; Wang, Ying; Sima, Yanghu; Xu, Shiqing

    2013-12-01

    Male-biased silkworm larva resistance is useful for sericulture and lepidopteran pest control. According to previous research, the mechanism underlying this resistance might be related to midgut-specific proteins. A midgut-specific and novel hypothetical cuticular protein-like (Cph-like) gene was cloned, based on sex-disparity serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) libraries of the B. mori midgut. The complete cDNA contained 676 bp and encoded 165 amino acid residues. The gene was located on chromosome 19 and it had only one short 75 bp intron. The Cph-like expression level was downregulated by exogenous 20-hydroxyecdysone or starvation, but upregulated by exogenous methoprene or food intake. Knockdown (siRNA) of the Cph-like gene suppressed the appetite and delayed larval development, while it also degraded enterocytes and damaged the midgut morphology. Furthermore, the male-biased cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) resistance of larvae was decreased. The Cph-like gene is a midgut-specific novel gene in B. mori that may participate in histogenesis and midgut maintenance. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Sequencing, de novo assembly and annotation of a pink bollworm larval midgut transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Tassone, Erica E; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Mathis, John; Nelson, Mark E; Wu, Gusui; Flexner, J Lindsey; Carrière, Yves; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Fabrick, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-22

    The pink bollworm Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) is one of the world's most important pests of cotton. Insecticide sprays and transgenic cotton producing toxins of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are currently used to manage this pest. Bt toxins kill susceptible insects by specifically binding to and destroying midgut cells, but they are not toxic to most other organisms. Pink bollworm is useful as a model for understanding insect responses to Bt toxins, yet advances in understanding at the molecular level have been limited because basic genomic information is lacking for this cosmopolitan pest. Here, we have sequenced, de novo assembled and annotated a comprehensive larval midgut transcriptome from a susceptible strain of pink bollworm. A de novo transcriptome assembly for the midgut of P. gossypiella was generated containing 46,458 transcripts (average length of 770 bp) derived from 39,874 unigenes. The size of the transcriptome is similar to published midgut transcriptomes of other Lepidoptera and includes up to 91 % annotated contigs. The dataset is publicly available in NCBI and GigaDB as a resource for researchers. Foundational knowledge of protein-coding genes from the pink bollworm midgut is critical for understanding how this important insect pest functions. The transcriptome data presented here represent the first large-scale molecular resource for this species, and may be used for deciphering relevant midgut proteins critical for xenobiotic detoxification, nutrient digestion and allocation, as well as for the discovery of protein receptors important for Bt intoxication.

  18. Serratia odorifera a Midgut Inhabitant of Aedes aegypti Mosquito Enhances Its Susceptibility to Dengue-2 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Apte-Deshpande, Anjali; Paingankar, Mandar; Gokhale, Mangesh D.; Deobagkar, Dileep N.

    2012-01-01

    Mosquito midgut plays a crucial role in its vector susceptibility and pathogen interaction. Identification of the sustainable microflora of the midgut environment can therefore help in evaluating its contribution in mosquito-pathogen interaction and in turn vector competence. To understand the bacterial diversity in the midgut of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, we conducted a screening study of the gut microbes of these mosquitoes which were either collected from fields or reared in the laboratory “culture-dependent” approach. This work demonstrated that the microbial flora of larvae and adult Ae. aegypti midgut is complex and is dominated by Gram negative proteobacteria. Serratia odorifera was found to be stably associated in the midguts of field collected and laboratory reared larvae and adult females. The potential influence of this sustainable gut microbe on DENV-2 susceptibility of this vector was evaluated by co-feeding S. odorifera with DENV-2 to adult Ae. aegypti females (free of gut flora). The observations revealed that the viral susceptibility of these Aedes females enhanced significantly as compared to solely dengue-2 fed and another gut inhabitant, Microbacterium oxydans co-fed females. Based on the results of this study we proposed that the enhancement in the DENV-2 susceptibility of Ae. aegypti females was due to blocking of prohibitin molecule present on the midgut surface of these females by the polypeptide of gut inhabitant S. odorifera. PMID:22848375

  19. Midgut of the non-hematophagous mosquito Toxorhynchites theobaldi (Diptera, Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Raquel S. M.; Fernandes, Kenner M.; Martins, Gustavo F.

    2015-01-01

    In most mosquito species, the females require a blood-feeding for complete egg development. However, in Toxorhynchites mosquitoes, the eggs develop without blood-feeding, and both females and males exclusively feed on sugary diets. The midgut is a well-understood organ in blood-feeding mosquitoes, but little is known about it in non-blood-feeding ones. In the present study, the detailed morphology of the midgut of Toxorhynchites theobaldi were investigated using histochemical and ultrastructural methods. The midgut of female and male T. theobaldi adults consists of a long, slender anterior midgut (AMG), and a short, dilated posterior midgut (PMG). The AMG is subdivided into AMG1 (short, with folds) and AMG2 (long, without folds). Nerve branches and enteroendocrine cells are present in AMG and PMG, respectively. Compared with the PMG of blood-feeding female mosquitoes, the PMG of T. theobaldi is smaller; however, in both mosquitoes, PMG seems be the main region of food digestion and absorption, and protein secretion. The epithelial folds present in the AMG of T. theobaldi have not been reported in other mosquitoes; however, the midgut muscle organization and endocrine control of the digestion process are conserved in both T. theobaldi and blood-feeding mosquitoes. PMID:26514271

  20. Plant Defense Inhibitors Affect the Structures of Midgut Cells in Drosophila melanogaster and Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Murdock, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce proteins such as protease inhibitors and lectins as defenses against herbivorous insects and pathogens. However, no systematic studies have explored the structural responses in the midguts of insects when challenged with plant defensive proteins and lectins across different species. In this study, we fed two kinds of protease inhibitors and lectins to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and alpha-amylase inhibitors and lectins to the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. We assessed the changes in midgut cell structures by comparing them with such structures in insects receiving normal diets or subjected to food deprivation. Using light and transmission electron microscopy in both species, we observed structural changes in the midgut peritrophic matrix as well as shortened microvilli on the surfaces of midgut epithelial cells in D. melanogaster. Dietary inhibitors and lectins caused similar lesions in the epithelial cells but not much change in the peritrophic matrix in both species. We also noted structural damages in the Drosophila midgut after six hours of starvation and changes were still present after 12 hours. Our study provided the first evidence of key structural changes of midguts using a comparative approach between a dipteran and a coleopteran. Our particular observation and discussion on plant-insect interaction and dietary stress are relevant for future mode of action studies of plant defensive protein in insect physiology.

  1. Midgut of the non-hematophagous mosquito Toxorhynchites theobaldi (Diptera, Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Godoy, Raquel S M; Fernandes, Kenner M; Martins, Gustavo F

    2015-10-30

    In most mosquito species, the females require a blood-feeding for complete egg development. However, in Toxorhynchites mosquitoes, the eggs develop without blood-feeding, and both females and males exclusively feed on sugary diets. The midgut is a well-understood organ in blood-feeding mosquitoes, but little is known about it in non-blood-feeding ones. In the present study, the detailed morphology of the midgut of Toxorhynchites theobaldi were investigated using histochemical and ultrastructural methods. The midgut of female and male T. theobaldi adults consists of a long, slender anterior midgut (AMG), and a short, dilated posterior midgut (PMG). The AMG is subdivided into AMG1 (short, with folds) and AMG2 (long, without folds). Nerve branches and enteroendocrine cells are present in AMG and PMG, respectively. Compared with the PMG of blood-feeding female mosquitoes, the PMG of T. theobaldi is smaller; however, in both mosquitoes, PMG seems be the main region of food digestion and absorption, and protein secretion. The epithelial folds present in the AMG of T. theobaldi have not been reported in other mosquitoes; however, the midgut muscle organization and endocrine control of the digestion process are conserved in both T. theobaldi and blood-feeding mosquitoes.

  2. The dung beetle dance: an orientation behaviour?

    PubMed

    Baird, Emily; Byrne, Marcus J; Smolka, Jochen; Warrant, Eric J; Dacke, Marie

    2012-01-01

    An interesting feature of dung beetle behaviour is that once they have formed a piece of dung into a ball, they roll it along a straight path away from the dung pile. This straight-line orientation ensures that the beetles depart along the most direct route, guaranteeing that they will not return to the intense competition (from other beetles) that occurs near the dung pile. Before rolling a new ball away from the dung pile, dung beetles perform a characteristic "dance," in which they climb on top of the ball and rotate about their vertical axis. This dance behaviour can also be observed during the beetles' straight-line departure from the dung pile. The aim of the present study is to investigate the purpose of the dung beetle dance. To do this, we explored the circumstances that elicit dance behaviour in the diurnal ball-rolling dung beetle, Scarabaeus (Kheper) nigroaeneus. Our results reveal that dances are elicited when the beetles lose control of their ball or lose contact with it altogether. We also find that dances can be elicited by both active and passive deviations of course and by changes in visual cues alone. In light of these results, we hypothesise that the dung beetle dance is a visually mediated mechanism that facilitates straight-line orientation in ball-rolling dung beetles by allowing them to 1) establish a roll bearing and 2) return to this chosen bearing after experiencing a disturbance to the roll path.

  3. The Dung Beetle Dance: An Orientation Behaviour?

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Emily; Byrne, Marcus J.; Smolka, Jochen; Warrant, Eric J.; Dacke, Marie

    2012-01-01

    An interesting feature of dung beetle behaviour is that once they have formed a piece of dung into a ball, they roll it along a straight path away from the dung pile. This straight-line orientation ensures that the beetles depart along the most direct route, guaranteeing that they will not return to the intense competition (from other beetles) that occurs near the dung pile. Before rolling a new ball away from the dung pile, dung beetles perform a characteristic “dance,” in which they climb on top of the ball and rotate about their vertical axis. This dance behaviour can also be observed during the beetles' straight-line departure from the dung pile. The aim of the present study is to investigate the purpose of the dung beetle dance. To do this, we explored the circumstances that elicit dance behaviour in the diurnal ball-rolling dung beetle, Scarabaeus (Kheper) nigroaeneus. Our results reveal that dances are elicited when the beetles lose control of their ball or lose contact with it altogether. We also find that dances can be elicited by both active and passive deviations of course and by changes in visual cues alone. In light of these results, we hypothesise that the dung beetle dance is a visually mediated mechanism that facilitates straight-line orientation in ball-rolling dung beetles by allowing them to 1) establish a roll bearing and 2) return to this chosen bearing after experiencing a disturbance to the roll path. PMID:22279572

  4. Pine Shoot Beetle Research Update

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Therese M. Poland

    2000-01-01

    Established populations of the pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (L.) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), were first detected in the US in 1992. As of January 2000, T. piniperda was known to be established in 271 counties in 11 US states (IL, IN, MD, MI, NH, NY, OH, PA, VT, WI, WV) and 25 counties in Ontario and 8 counties in Quebec,...

  5. Tree physiology and bark beetles

    Treesearch

    Michael G. Ryan; Gerard Sapes; Anna Sala; Sharon Hood

    2015-01-01

    Irruptive bark beetles usually co-occur with their co-evolved tree hosts at very low (endemic) population densities. However, recent droughts and higher temperatures have promoted widespread tree mortality with consequences for forest carbon, fire and ecosystem services (Kurz et al., 2008; Raffa et al., 2008; Jenkins et al., 2012). In this issue of New Phytologist,...

  6. Predation and bark beetle dynamics

    Treesearch

    John D. Reeve

    1997-01-01

    Bark beetle populations may undergo dramatic fluctuations and are often important pests in coniferous forests.Their dynamics are thought to be primarily driven by factors affecting the resistance of the host tree to attack, i.e., bottom-up forces, while natural enemies are usually assigned a minor role in these systems.I present behavioral experiments that suggest that...

  7. [Blister beetle dermatitis: Dermatitis linearis].

    PubMed

    Dieterle, R; Faulde, M; Erkens, K

    2015-05-01

    Several families of beetles cause toxic reactions on exposed human skin. Cantharidin provokes nearly asymptomatic vesicles and blisters, while pederin leads to itching and burning erythema with vesicles and small pustules, later crusts. Paederi are attracted by fluorescent light especially after rain showers and cause outbreaks in regions with moderate climate. Clinical findings and patient history lead to the diagnosis: dermatitis linearis.

  8. Raising Beetles in a Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackett, Erla

    This guide is designed to provide elementary school teachers with a harmless, inexpensive, clean, odorless, and easy-to-care-for insect-rearing project for the classroom. The following topics are included: (1) instructions for the care and feeding of the beetle larvae; (2) student activities for observing larval characteristics and behavior…

  9. Southern Pine Beetle Field Survey

    Treesearch

    Saul D. Petty

    2011-01-01

    Southern pine beetle (SPB) is one of the most formidable insect pests impacting southern forests. Federal, State, and private forest managers have always dealt with this pest in some capacity. One of the primary requirements for controlling SPB is locating infestations on the ground. Once the infestation has been located, data is collected and used in management...

  10. Midgut Barrier Imparts Selective Resistance to Filarial Worm Infection in Culex pipiens pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Michelle L.; Erickson, Sara M.; Bartholomay, Lyric C.; Christensen, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex thrive in temperate and tropical regions worldwide, and serve as efficient vectors of Bancroftian lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by Wuchereria bancrofti in Asia, Africa, the West Indies, South America, and Micronesia. However, members of this mosquito complex do not act as natural vectors for Brugian LF caused by Brugia malayi, or for the cat parasite B. pahangi, despite their presence in South Asia where these parasites are endemic. Previous work with the Iowa strain of Culex pipiens pipiens demonstrates that it is equally susceptible to W. bancrofti as is the natural Cx. p. pipiens vector in the Nile Delta, however it is refractory to infection with Brugia spp. Here we report that the infectivity barrier for Brugia spp. in Cx. p. pipiens is the mosquito midgut, which inflicts internal and lethal damage to ingested microfilariae. Following per os Brugia exposures, the prevalence of infection is significantly lower in Cx. p. pipiens compared to susceptible mosquito controls, and differs between parasite species with <50% and <5% of Cx. p. pipiens becoming infected with B. pahangi and B. malayi, respectively. When Brugia spp. mf were inoculated intrathoracically to bypass the midgut, larvae developed equally well as in controls, indicating that, beyond the midgut, Cx. p. pipiens is physiologically compatible with Brugia spp. Mf isolated from Cx. p. pipiens midguts exhibited compromised motility, and unlike mf derived from blood or isolated from the midguts of Ae. aegypti, failed to develop when inoculated intrathoracically into susceptible mosquitoes. Together these data strongly support the role of the midgut as the primary infection barrier for Brugia spp. in Cx. p. pipiens. Examination of parasites recovered from the Cx. p. pipiens midgut by vital staining, and those exsheathed with papain, suggest that the damage inflicted by the midgut is subcuticular and disrupts internal tissues. Microscopic studies of these worms

  11. Host suitability and diet mixing influence activities of detoxification enzymes in adult Japanese beetles.

    PubMed

    Adesanya, Adekunle; Liu, Nannan; Held, David W

    2016-05-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450, glutathione S transferase (GST), and carboxylesterase (CoE) activity was measured in guts of the scarab Popillia japonica Newman, after consumption of single or mixed plant diets of previously ranked preferred (rose, Virginia creeper, crape myrtle and sassafras) or non-preferred hosts (boxelder, riverbirch and red oak). The goal of this study was to quantify activities of P450, GST and CoE enzymes in the midgut of adult P. japonica using multiple substrates in response to host plant suitability (preferred host vs non-preferred hosts), and single and mixed diets. Non-preferred hosts were only sparingly fed upon, and as a group induced higher activities of P450, GST and CoE than did preferred hosts. However, enzyme activities for some individual plant species were similar across categories of host suitability. Similarly, beetles tended to have greater enzyme activities after feeding on a mixture of plants compared to a single plant type, but mixing per se does not seem as important as the species represented in the mix. Induction of detoxification enzymes on non-preferred hosts, or when switching between hosts, may explain, in part, the perceived feeding preferences of this polyphagous insect. The potential consequences of induced enzyme activities on the ecology of adult Japanese beetles are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ductal barriers in mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Mark B; Hill, Arnold DK; Hopkins, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Tissue barriers play an integral role in the biology and pathobiology of mammary ductal epithelium. In normal breast physiology, tight and adherens junctions undergo dynamic changes in permeability in response to hormonal and other stimuli, while several of their proteins are directly involved in mammary tumorigenesis. This review describes first the structure of mammary ductal epithelial barriers and their role in normal mammary development, examining the cyclical changes in response to puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. It then examines the role of adherens and tight junctions and the participation of their constituent proteins in mammary tumorigenic functions such as migration, invasion and metastasis. Finally, it discusses the potential of these adhesion proteins as both prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:24665412

  13. The Oryctes virus: its detection, identification, and implementation in biological control of the coconut palm rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Huger, Alois M

    2005-05-01

    In view of the increasing and devastating damage by rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros) to coconut palms in the middle of last century, many efforts were made to find an efficient natural control factor against this pest, which could not be controlled by pesticides. The basic procedures of these monitoring programmes are outlined together with the final detection of a virus disease in oil palm estates in Malaysia in 1963. In extensive laboratory studies, the virus was isolated and identified as the first non-occluded, rod-shaped insect virus, morphologically resembling the baculoviruses. Infection experiments clarified the pathology, histopathology, and virulence of the virus and demonstrated that the virus was extremely virulent to larvae after peroral application. These findings encouraged the first pilot release of virus in 1967 in coconut plantations of Western Samoa where breeding sites were contaminated with virus. Surprisingly, the virus became established in the Samoan rhinoceros beetle populations and spread autonomously throughout the Western Samoan islands. As a consequence, there was a drastic decline of the beetle populations followed by a conspicuous recovery of the badly damaged coconut stands. This unexpected phenomenon could only be explained after it was shown that the adult beetle itself is a very active virus vector and thus was responsible for the efficient autodissemination of the virus. The functioning of the beetle as a 'flying virus factory' is due to the unique cytopathic process developing in the midgut after peroral virus infection. Pathological details of this process are presented. Because of the long-term persistence of the virus in the populations, rhinoceros beetle control is maintained. Incorporation of virus into integrated control measures and successful virus releases in many other countries are recorded.

  14. Regenerative Inflammation: Lessons from Drosophila Intestinal Epithelium in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Panayidou, Stavria; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is widely recognized as a pivotal player in health and disease. Defined cytologically as the infiltration of leukocytes in the lamina propria layer of the intestine, it can damage the epithelium and, on a chronic basis, induce inflammatory bowel disease and potentially cancer. The current view thus dictates that blood cell infiltration is the instigator of intestinal inflammation and tumor-promoting inflammation. This is based partially on work in humans and mice showing that intestinal damage during microbially mediated inflammation activates phagocytic cells and lymphocytes that secrete inflammatory signals promoting tissue damage and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, extensive parallel work in the Drosophila midgut shows that intestinal epithelium damage induces inflammatory signals and growth factors acting mainly in a paracrine manner to induce intestinal stem cell proliferation and tumor formation when genetically predisposed. This is accomplished without any apparent need to involve Drosophila hemocytes. Therefore, recent work on Drosophila host defense to infection by expanding its main focus on systemic immunity signaling pathways to include the study of organ homeostasis in health and disease shapes a new notion that epithelially emanating cytokines and growth factors can directly act on the intestinal stem cell niche to promote “regenerative inflammation” and potentially cancer. PMID:25437036

  15. Digestive proteolysis organization in two closely related Tenebrionid beetles: red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) and confused flour beetle (Tribolium confusum).

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, K S; Elpidina, E N; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B; Kodrik, D; Sehnal, F

    2009-04-01

    The spectra of Tribolium castaneum and T. confusum larval digestive peptidases were characterized with respect to the spatial organization of protein digestion in the midgut. The pH of midgut contents in both species increased from 5.6-6.0 in the anterior to 7.0-7.5 in the posterior midgut. However, the pH optimum of the total proteolytic activity of the gut extract from either insect was pH 4.1. Approximately 80% of the total proteolytic activity was in the anterior and 20% in the posterior midgut of either insect when evaluated in buffers simulating the pH and reducing conditions characteristic for each midgut section. The general peptidase activity of gut extracts from either insect in pH 5.6 buffer was mostly due to cysteine peptidases. In the weakly alkaline conditions of the posterior midgut, the serine peptidase contribution was 31 and 41% in T. castaneum and T. confusum, respectively. A postelectrophoretic peptidase activity assay with gelatin also revealed the important contribution of cysteine peptidases in protein digestion in both Tribolium species. The use of a postelectrophoretic activity assay with p-nitroanilide substrates and specific inhibitors revealed a set of cysteine and serine endopeptidases, 8 and 10 for T. castaneum, and 7 and 9 for T. confusum, respectively. Serine peptidases included trypsin-, chymotrypsin-, and elastase-like enzymes, the latter being for the first time reported in Tenebrionid insects. These data support a complex system of protein digestion in the Tribolium midgut with the fundamental role of cysteine peptidases.

  16. Occurrence of serotonin immunoreactivity in the central nervous system and midgut of adult female Tabanus nigrovittatus (Diptera: Tabanidae).

    PubMed

    Haselton, Aaron T; Yin, Chih-Ming; Stoffolano, John G

    2006-03-01

    Serotonin is an important neuromessenger used in a variety of signaling pathways throughout the animal kingdom. In insects, serotonin has been demonstrated to mediate feeding and feeding-related behaviors. In this study, serotonin antibody was localized in cells and processes throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and midgut of female horse fly Tabanus nigrovittatus Macquart. In the CNS, immunoreactivity was localized in cells and processes throughout the brain and ventral nerve cord. In the midgut, a fine network of immunoreactive processes was observed running along the outer surface of the midgut, with a decrease in innervation toward the posterior region of the midgut.

  17. Morphological alterations induced by boric acid and fipronil in the midgut of worker honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) larvae : Morphological alterations in the midgut of A. mellifera.

    PubMed

    da Silva Cruz, Aline; da Silva-Zacarin, Elaine C M; Bueno, Odair C; Malaspina, Osmar

    2010-04-01

    Morphological alterations, by means of histological and ultrastructural analysis, have been used to determine the effects of boric acid and fipronil on midgut tissues of honeybee worker, Apis mellifera L. larvae. In order to observe possible morphological alterations in the midgut, two groups of bioassays were performed. In the first one, the larvae were chronically treated with different concentrations of boric acid added to the food (1.0, 2.5 and 7.5 mg/g). In the second group, the larvae were fed with diets containing different concentrations of fipronil (0.1 and 1 microg/g) and compared with control groups without these chemical compounds. In the first bioassay, the larvae were collected on day 3 and in the second bioassay on day 4, when the mortality rate obtained in the toxicological bioassay was not very high. The larval midguts were removed and processed for morphological analyses using a light and transmission electron microscopy. We observed cytoplasmic vacuolizations, with the absence of autophagic vacuoles, and chromatinic compacting in most of the cells in the groups treated with pesticides. The morphological alterations were far greater in the larvae treated with boric acid than in the larvae treated with fipronil. Our data suggest that the midgut cell death observed was in response to boric acid and fipronil action. This study significantly improves the understanding of the toxicological effect of these insecticides from the ecotoxicological perspective.

  18. Dispersal of the spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis, and the engraver beetle, Ips perturbatus, in Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Richard A. Werner; Edward H. Holsten

    1997-01-01

    Mark-release-recapture experiments were performed with spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby)) and Ips engraver beetles (Ips perturbatus (Eichhoff)) to determine distance and direction of dispersal. The recapture rate of beetles marked with fluorescent powder was extremely low. Most I. perturbatus...

  19. Oedemerid blister beetle dermatosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, D S; Christmas, T I; Greig, D E

    1990-05-01

    Blister beetle dermatosis is a distinctive vesiculobullous eruption that occurs after contact with three major groups of beetles (Order: Coleoptera). It is caused by a vesicant chemical contained in the body fluids of the beetles. The smallest and least known family is the Oedemeridae. Although there are few references in the medical literature, blister beetle dermatosis caused by oedemerids may be more common and widespread than currently recognized. The best known family is the Meloidae with numerous species worldwide causing blistering. The vesicant chemical in both Oedemeridae and Meloidae is cantharidin. The third group of blister beetles includes species of the genus Paederus (Family: Staphylinidae). The clinicopathologic picture differs because this genus contains a different vesicant agent, pederin. The clinicopathologic features of oedemerid blister beetle dermatosis are described. The world medical and relevant entomologic literature is reviewed.

  20. Early Cretaceous angiosperms and beetle evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Haichun; Jarzembowski, Edmund A

    2013-09-12

    The Coleoptera (beetles) constitute almost one-fourth of all known life-forms on earth. They are also among the most important pollinators of flowering plants, especially basal angiosperms. Beetle fossils are abundant, almost spanning the entire Early Cretaceous, and thus provide important clues to explore the co-evolutionary processes between beetles and angiosperms. We review the fossil record of some Early Cretaceous polyphagan beetles including Tenebrionoidea, Scarabaeoidea, Curculionoidea, and Chrysomeloidea. Both the fossil record and molecular analyses reveal that these four groups had already diversified during or before the Early Cretaceous, clearly before the initial rise of angiosperms to widespread floristic dominance. These four beetle groups are important pollinators of basal angiosperms today, suggesting that their ecological association with angiosperms probably formed as early as in the Early Cretaceous. With the description of additional well-preserved fossils and improvements in phylogenetic analyses, our knowledge of Mesozoic beetle-angiosperm mutualisms will greatly increase during the near future.

  1. Regulation of chitin synthesis in the larval midgut of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Zimoch, L; Hogenkamp, D G; Kramer, K J; Muthukrishnan, S; Merzendorfer, H

    2005-06-01

    In insects, chitin is not only synthesized by ectodermal cells that form chitinous cuticles, but also by endodermal cells of the midgut that secrete a chitinous peritrophic matrix. Using anti-chitin synthase (CHS) antibodies, we previously demonstrated that in the midgut of Manduca sexta, CHS is expressed by two cell types, tracheal cells forming a basal tracheal network and columnar cells forming the apical brush border [Zimoch and Merzendorfer, 2002, Cell Tissue Res. 308, 287-297]. Now, we show that two different genes, MsCHS1 and MsCHS2, encode CHSs of midgut tracheae and columnar cells, respectively. To investigate MsCHS2 expression and activity in the course of the larval development, we monitored chitin synthesis, enzyme levels as well as mRNA amounts. All of the tested parameters were significantly reduced during molting and in the wandering stage when compared to the values obtained from intermolt feeding larvae. By contrast, MsCHS1 appeared to be inversely regulated because its mRNA was detectable only during the molt at the time when tracheal growth occurs at the basal site of the midgut. To further examine midgut chitin synthesis, we measured enzyme activity in crude midgut extracts and different membrane fractions. When we analysed trypsin-mediated proteolytic activation, a phenomenon previously reported for insect and fungal systems, we recognized that midgut chitin synthesis was only activated in crude extracts, but not in the 12,000 g membrane fraction. However, proteolytic activation by trypsin in the 12,000 g membrane fraction could be reconstituted by re-adding a soluble fraction, indicating that limited proteolysis affects an unknown soluble factor, a process that in turn activates chitin synthesis.

  2. An olfactometer for bark beetle parasites.

    PubMed

    Kudon, L H; Berisford, C W

    1981-03-01

    An "H"-type olfactometer was designed and built to test the response of bark beetle parasites to various beetle and tree host odors. The design has several advantages over other types of olfactometers. Strong air currents are not utilized, parasites have free movement in the test chamber, and a concentration gradient of test compound is maintained. Parasites tested in the olfactometer demonstrated strong positive responses to air drawn over logs infested with bark beetle larvae and varied responses to tree host odors.

  3. Natural History of the Southern Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Fred P. Hain; Adrian J. Duehl; Micah J. Gardner; Thomas L. Payne

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) is a tree killer of southern yellow pines. All life stages—eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults—infest the inner bark or phloem tissue of the host tree. Adult beetles overcome the tree’s defenses through a mass-attack phenomenon. They are attracted to the tree by a pheromone system consisting of volatiles produced by the beetles and the host....

  4. Investigation of the midgut structure and ultrastructure in Cimex lectularius and Cimex pipistrelli (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Vilimova, J; Włodarczyk, A; Sonakowska, L; Kamińska, K; Kaszuba, F; Marchewka, A; Sadílek, D

    2017-02-01

    Cimicidae are temporary ectoparasites, which means that they cannot obtain food continuously. Both Cimex species examined here, Cimex lectularius (Linnaeus 1758) and Cimex pipistrelli (Jenyns 1839), can feed on a non-natal host, C. lectularius from humans on bats, C. pipistrelli on humans, but never naturally. The midgut of C. lectularius and C. pipistrelli is composed of three distinct regions-the anterior midgut (AMG), which has a sack-like shape, the long tube-shaped middle midgut (MMG), and the posterior midgut (PMG). The different ultrastructures of the AMG, MMG, and PMG in both of the species examined suggest that these regions must fulfill different functions in the digestive system. Ultrastructural analysis showed that the AMG fulfills the role of storing food and synthesizing and secreting enzymes, while the MMG is the main organ for the synthesis of enzymes, secretion, and the storage of the reserve material. Additionally, both regions, the AMG and MMG, are involved in water absorption in the digestive system of both Cimex species. The PMG is the part of the midgut in which spherites accumulate. The results of our studies confirm the suggestion of former authors that the structure of the digestive tract of insects is not attributed solely to diet but to the basic adaptation of an ancestor.

  5. DNA duplication is essential for the repair of gastrointestinal perforation in the insect midgut

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wuren; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Bing; Beerntsen, Brenda T.; Song, Hongsheng; Ling, Erjun

    2016-01-01

    Invertebrate animals have the capacity of repairing wounds in the skin and gut via different mechanisms. Gastrointestinal perforation, a hole in the human gastrointestinal system, is a serious condition, and surgery is necessary to repair the perforation to prevent an abdominal abscess or sepsis. Here we report the repair of gastrointestinal perforation made by a needle-puncture wound in the silkworm larval midgut. Following insect gut perforation, only a weak immune response was observed because the growth of Escherichia coli alone was partially inhibited by plasma collected at 6 h after needle puncture of the larval midgut. However, circulating hemocytes did aggregate over the needle-puncture wound to form a scab. While, cell division and apoptosis were not observed at the wound site, the needle puncture significantly enhanced DNA duplication in cells surrounding the wound, which was essential to repair the midgut perforation. Due to the repair capacity and limited immune response caused by needle puncture to the midgut, this approach was successfully used for the injection of small compounds (ethanol in this study) into the insect midgut. Consequently, this needle-puncture wounding of the insect gut can be developed for screening compounds for use as gut chemotherapeutics in the future. PMID:26754166

  6. DNA duplication is essential for the repair of gastrointestinal perforation in the insect midgut.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wuren; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Bing; Beerntsen, Brenda T; Song, Hongsheng; Ling, Erjun

    2016-01-12

    Invertebrate animals have the capacity of repairing wounds in the skin and gut via different mechanisms. Gastrointestinal perforation, a hole in the human gastrointestinal system, is a serious condition, and surgery is necessary to repair the perforation to prevent an abdominal abscess or sepsis. Here we report the repair of gastrointestinal perforation made by a needle-puncture wound in the silkworm larval midgut. Following insect gut perforation, only a weak immune response was observed because the growth of Escherichia coli alone was partially inhibited by plasma collected at 6 h after needle puncture of the larval midgut. However, circulating hemocytes did aggregate over the needle-puncture wound to form a scab. While, cell division and apoptosis were not observed at the wound site, the needle puncture significantly enhanced DNA duplication in cells surrounding the wound, which was essential to repair the midgut perforation. Due to the repair capacity and limited immune response caused by needle puncture to the midgut, this approach was successfully used for the injection of small compounds (ethanol in this study) into the insect midgut. Consequently, this needle-puncture wounding of the insect gut can be developed for screening compounds for use as gut chemotherapeutics in the future.

  7. Alterations in the Helicoverpa armigera midgut digestive physiology after ingestion of pigeon pea inducible leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Jadhav, Bhakti R; Giri, Ashok P; Hivrale, Vandana K

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate inducible plant leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is proposed to serve as direct defense in the insect midgut. However, exact functions of inducible plant LAPs in the insect midgut remain to be estimated. In the present investigation, we report the direct defensive role of pigeon pea inducible LAP in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and responses of midgut soluble aminopeptidases and serine proteinases upon LAP ingestion. Larval growth and survival was significantly reduced on the diets supplemented with pigeon pea LAP. Aminopeptidase activities in larvae remain unaltered in presence or absence of inducible LAP in the diet. On the contrary, serine proteinase activities were significantly decreased in the larvae reared on pigeon pea LAP containing diet as compared to larvae fed on diet without LAP. Our data suggest that pigeon pea inducible LAP is responsible for the degradation of midgut serine proteinases upon ingestion. Reduction in the aminopeptidase activity with LpNA in the H. armigera larvae was compensated with an induction of aminopeptidase activity with ApNA. Our findings could be helpful to further dissect the roles of plant inducible LAPs in the direct plant defense against herbivory.

  8. Alterations in the Helicoverpa armigera Midgut Digestive Physiology after Ingestion of Pigeon Pea Inducible Leucine Aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Lomate, Purushottam R.; Jadhav, Bhakti R.; Giri, Ashok P.; Hivrale, Vandana K.

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate inducible plant leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is proposed to serve as direct defense in the insect midgut. However, exact functions of inducible plant LAPs in the insect midgut remain to be estimated. In the present investigation, we report the direct defensive role of pigeon pea inducible LAP in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and responses of midgut soluble aminopeptidases and serine proteinases upon LAP ingestion. Larval growth and survival was significantly reduced on the diets supplemented with pigeon pea LAP. Aminopeptidase activities in larvae remain unaltered in presence or absence of inducible LAP in the diet. On the contrary, serine proteinase activities were significantly decreased in the larvae reared on pigeon pea LAP containing diet as compared to larvae fed on diet without LAP. Our data suggest that pigeon pea inducible LAP is responsible for the degradation of midgut serine proteinases upon ingestion. Reduction in the aminopeptidase activity with LpNA in the H. armigera larvae was compensated with an induction of aminopeptidase activity with ApNA. Our findings could be helpful to further dissect the roles of plant inducible LAPs in the direct plant defense against herbivory. PMID:24098675

  9. Effects of Periplocoside P from Periploca sepium on the Midgut Transmembrane Potential of Mythimna separata Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YingYing; Qi, Zhijun; Qi, Meng; Hu, Zhaonong; Wu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Periplocoside P (PSP) isolated from the root bark of Periploca sepium contains a pregnane glycoside skeleton and possesses high insecticidal properties. Preliminary studies indicated that PSP disrupts epithelial functions in the midgut of lepidopteran larvae. In the present study, we examined the effects of PSP on the apical and basolateral membrane voltages, Va and Vbl, respectively, of cells from (1) midguts isolated from the larvae of the oriental armyworm Mythimna separata that were in vitro incubated with toxins and (2) midguts isolated from M. separata larvae force-fed with PSP. We compared the effects of PSP with the effects of the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ab and inactive periplocoside E (PSE) on the midgut epithelial cells. The results showed that Va rapidly decreased in the presence of PSP in a time- and dose-dependent manner, similar to the effects of Cry1Ab. By contrast, PSE did not affect the Va and Vbl. Additionally, PSP did not influence the Vbl. Given these results, we speculate that PSP may modulate transport mechanisms at the apical membrane of the midgut epithelial cells by inhibiting the V-type H+ ATPase. PMID:27833169

  10. Mod(mdg4) participates in hormonally regulated midgut programmed cell death during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wen; He, Hong-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2012-12-01

    The insect midgut undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) during metamorphosis, but the molecular basis for this phenomenon has not been demonstrated. We report a mod(mdg4) protein [designated as mod(mdg4)1A] that is involved in hormonally regulated insect midgut PCD, from the lepidopteran Helicoverpa armigera. Mod(mdg4)1A is localized in the larval midgut and is highly expressed during metamorphosis. Knockdown of mod(mdg4)1a by feeding dsRNA to the larvae suppressed midgut PCD and delayed metamorphosis. The mechanism is that mod(mdg4)1a knockdown decreased the transcript levels of genes involved in PCD and metamorphosis, but increased the transcript level of inhibitor of apoptosis survivin. The transcript level of mod(mdg4)1a is independently upregulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) or juvenile hormone (JH) analog methoprene. Overlapped 20E and methoprene counteractively regulate the transcript level of mod(mdg4)1a. 20E upregulates the mod(mdg4)1a transcript level not through its nuclear receptor EcRB1. Methoprene upregulates the mod(mdg4)1a transcript level through the juvenile hormone candidate receptor Met. These findings indicate that mod(mdg4)1a participates in midgut PCD and metamorphosis by regulating the transcript levels of a network of genes via different pathways under 20E and JH regulation.

  11. pH control in the midgut of Aedesaegypti under different nutritional conditions.

    PubMed

    Nepomuceno, Denise Barguil; Santos, Vânia Cristina; Araújo, Ricardo Nascimento; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Sant'Anna, Maurício Roberto; Moreira, Luciano Andrade; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo

    2017-09-15

    Aedes aegypti is one of the most important disease vectors in the world. Because their gut is the first site of interaction with pathogens, it is important to understand A. aegypti gut physiology. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of pH control in the midgut of A. aegypti females under different nutritional conditions. We found that unfed females have an acidic midgut (pH ∼6). The midgut of unfed insects is actively maintained at pH 6 regardless of the ingestion of either alkaline or acidic buffered solutions. V-ATPases are responsible for acidification after ingestion of alkaline solutions. In blood-fed females, the abdominal midgut becomes alkaline (pH 7.54), and the luminal pH decreases slightly throughout blood digestion. Only ingested proteins were able to trigger this abrupt increase in abdominal pH. The ingestion of amino acids, even at high concentrations, did not induce alkalinisation. During blood digestion, the thoracic midgut remains acidic, becoming a suitable compartment for carbohydrate digestion, which is in accordance with the higher alpha-glucolytic activity detected in this compartment. Ingestion of blood releases alkalising hormones in the haemolymph, which induce alkalinisation in ex vivo preparations. This study shows that adult A. aegypti females have a very similar gut physiology to that previously described for Lutzomyia longipalpis It is likely that all haematophagous Nematocera exhibit the same type of physiological behaviour. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Exploring the midgut proteome of partially fed female cattle tick (Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus).

    PubMed

    Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Josh, Peter; Zhu, Ying; Pearson, Roger; Gough, Joanne; Colgrave, Michelle L

    2010-02-01

    The continued development of effective anti-tick vaccines remains the most promising prospect for the control of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. A vaccine based on midgut proteins could interfere with successful tick feeding and additionally interfere with midgut developmental stages of Babesia parasites, providing opportunities for the control of both the tick and the pathogens it transmits. Midgut proteins from partially fed adult female cattle ticks were analysed using a combination of 2-DE and gel-free LC-MS/MS. Analysis of the urea-soluble protein fraction resulted in the confident identification of 105 gut proteins, while the PBS-soluble fraction yielded an additional 37 R. microplus proteins. The results show an abundance of proteins involved in mitochondrial ATP synthesis, electron transport chain, protein synthesis, chaperone, antioxidant and protein folding and transport activities in midgut tissues of adult female ticks. Among the novel products identified were clathrin-adaptor protein, which is involved in the assembly of clathrin-coated vesicles, and membrane-associated trafficking proteins such as syntaxin 6 and surfeit 4. The observations allow the formulation of hypotheses regarding midgut physiology and will serve as a basis for future vaccine development and tick-host interaction research. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Unusual coloration in scarabaeid beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, D. J.; van der Berg, N. G.; Prinsloo, L. C.; Hodgkinson, I. J.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the reflection of circularly polarized light from the exocuticle of the scarabaeid beetle Gymnopleurus virens. Reflection spectra are deeply modulated, exhibiting a number of relatively narrow well-defined peaks, which differ from previously studied specimens. By comparing model calculations and electron microscopy work with the recorded spectra, we can propose the presence of specific structural defects responsible for the unusual spectra.

  14. Different Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry1Ab on Midgut Cell Transmembrane Potential of Mythimna separata and Agrotis ipsilon Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Hu, Zhaonong; Wu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins from the Cry1A family demonstrate significantly different toxicities against members of the family Noctuidae for unknown reasons. In this study, membrane potential was measured and analyzed in freshly isolated midgut samples from Mythimna separata and Agrotis ipsilon larvae under oral administration and in vitro incubation with Bt toxin Cry1Ab to elucidate the mechanism of action for further control of these pests. Bioassay results showed that the larvae of M. separata achieved a LD50 of 258.84 ng/larva at 24 h after ingestion; M. separata larvae were at least eightfold more sensitive than A. ipsilon larvae to Cry1Ab. Force-feeding showed that the observed midgut apical-membrane potential (Vam) of M. separata larvae was significantly depolarized from −82.9 ± 6.6 mV to −19.9 ± 7.2 mV at 8 h after ingestion of 1 μg activated Cry1Ab, whereas no obvious changes were detected in A. ipsilon larvae with dosage of 5 μg Cry1Ab. The activated Cry1Ab caused a distinct concentration-dependent depolarization of the apical membrane; Vam was reduced by 50% after 14.7 ± 0.2, 9.8 ± 0.4, and 7.6 ± 0.6 min of treatment with 1, 5, and 10 μg/mL Cry1Ab, respectively. Cry1Ab showed a minimal effect on A. ipsilon larvae even at 20 μg/mL, and Vam decreased by 26.3% ± 2.3% after 15 min. The concentrations of Cry1Ab displayed no significant effect on the basolateral side of the epithelium. The Vam of A. ipsilon (−33.19 ± 6.29 mV, n = 51) was only half that of M. separata (−80.94 ± 6.95 mV, n = 75). The different degrees of sensitivity to Cry1Ab were speculatively associated with various habits, as well as the diverse physiological or biochemical characteristics of the midgut cell membranes. PMID:26694463

  15. Characterization and expression analysis of six chitinase genes from the desert beetle Microdera punctipennis in response to low temperature.

    PubMed

    Lu, X Y; Li, J Q; Liu, X N; Li, X B; Ma, J

    2014-01-01

    Chitinase is responsible for chitin metabolism in a wide range of organisms. However, current knowledge on insect chitinase and their possible functions in relation to low temperature stress is very limited. Six chitinase genes from cold treated desert beetle Microdera punctipennis obtained by RNA-seq technology were characterized, and their expression patterns in different tissues and in response to cold were investigated. Multiple sequence alignment was carried out using ClustalW1.81 and Phylogenetic trees were generated by MEGA5. The expression patterns were studied by quantitative real-time PCR. These genes were belong to three different chitinase groups. Almost all of them were highly expressed in midgut, and some are expressed in fat body or hindgut. Subzero-4 degree C had stronger effect than 4 degree C in inducing chitinase expression. The tissue specific and cold inducible expressions suggest that the chitinases may have diverse functions and play roles in insect cold adaptation.

  16. An unexpected cause of small bowel obstruction in an adult patient: midgut volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Söker, Gökhan; Yılmaz, Cengiz; Karateke, Faruk; Gülek, Bozkurt

    2014-01-01

    The most important complication of intestinal malrotation is midgut volvulus because it may lead to intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. A 29-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain. Ultrasonography (US), colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS), CT and barium studies were carried out. On US and CDUS, twisting of intestinal segments around the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) and alteration of the SMA–SMV relationship were detected. CT demonstrated that the small intestine was making a rotation around the SMA and SMV, which amounted to more than 360°. The upper gastrointestinal barium series revealed a corkscrew appearance of the duodenum and proximal jejunum, which is a pathognomonic finding of midgut volvulus. Prior knowledge of characteristic imaging findings of midgut volvulus is essential in order to reach proper diagnosis and establish proper treatment before the development of intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. PMID:24811563

  17. Some ecological, economic, and social consequences of bark beetle infestations

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Progar; Adris Eglitis; John E. Lundquist

    2009-01-01

    Bark beetles are powerful agents of change in dynamic forest ecosystems. Most assessments of the effects of bark beetle outbreaks have been based on negative impacts on timber production. The positive effects of bark beetle activities are much less well understood. Bark beetles perform vital functions at all levels of scale in forest ecosystems. At the landscape...

  18. Mites associated with bark beetles and their hyperphoretic ophiostomatoid fungi

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Hofstetter; John Moser; Stacy Blomquist

    2014-01-01

    The role that mites play in many ecosystems is often overlooked or ignored. Within bark beetle habitats, more than 100 mite species exist and they have important impacts on community dynamics, ecosystem processes, and biodiversity of bark beetle systems. Mites use bark beetles to access and disperse among beetle-infested trees and the associations may range from...

  19. Competitive interactions among symbiotic fungi of the southern pine beetle

    Treesearch

    Kier D. Klepzig; Richard T. Wilkens

    1997-01-01

    The southern pine beetle, a damaging pest of conifers, is intimately linked to three symbiotic fungi.Two fungi, Ceratocystiopsis ranaculosus and Entomocorticium sp. A, are transported within specialized structures (mycangia) in the beetle exoskeleton and are mutualists of the beetle.A third fungus, Ophiostoma minus, is transported externally on the beetle exoskeleton (...

  20. Cellular internalization and stress response of ingested amorphous silica nanoparticles in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Chandra, Swati; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Chowdhuri, Debapratim Kar

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (aSNPs) are used for various applications including food industry. However, limited in vivo studies are available on absorption/internalization of ingested aSNPs in the midgut cells of an organism. The study aims to examine cellular uptake of aSNPs (<30nm) in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster (Oregon R(+)) owing to similarities between the midgut tissue of this organism and human and subsequently cellular stress response generated by these nanoparticles. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were exposed orally to 1-100μg/mL of aSNPs for 12-36h and oxidative stress (OS), heat shock genes (hsgs), membrane destabilization (Acridine orange/Ethidium Bromide staining), cellular internalization (TEM) and apoptosis endpoints. A significant increase was observed in OS endpoints in the midgut cells of exposed Drosophila in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Significantly increased expression of hsp70 and hsp22 along with caspases activation, membrane destabilization and mitochondrial membrane potential loss was also observed. TEM analysis showed aSNPs-uptake in the midgut cells of exposed Drosophila via endocytic vesicles and by direct membrane penetration. aSNPs after their internalization in the midgut cells of exposed Drosophila larvae show membrane destabilization along with increased cellular stress and cell death. Ingested aSNPs show adverse effects on the cells of GI tract of the exposed organism thus their industrial use as a food-additive may raise concern to human health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Prey digestion in the midgut of the predatory bug Podisus nigrispinus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Fialho, Maria C Q; Moreira, Nathalia R; Zanuncio, José C; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Terra, Walter R; Serrão, José E

    2012-06-01

    Pre-oral digestion is described as the liquefaction of the solid tissues of the prey by secretions of the predator. It is uncertain if pre-oral digestion means pre-oral dispersion of food or true digestion in the sense of the stepwise bond breaking of food polymers to release monomers to be absorbed. Collagenase is the only salivary proteinase, which activity is significant (10%) in relation to Podisus nigrispinus midgut activities. This suggests that pre-oral digestion in P. nigrispinus consists in prey tissue dispersion. This was confirmed by the finding of prey muscles fibers inside P. nigrispinus midguts. Soluble midgut hydrolases from P. nigrispinus were partially purified by ion-exchange chromatography, followed by gel filtration. Two cathepsin L-like proteinases (CAL1 and CAL2) were isolated with the properties: CAL1 (14.7 kDa, pH optimum (pHo) 5.5, km with carbobenzoxy-Phe-Arg-methylcoumarin, Z-FR-MCA, 32 μM); CAL2 (17 kDa, pHo 5.5, km 11 μM Z-FR-MCA). Only a single molecular species was found for the other enzymes with the following properties are: amylase (43 kDa, pHo 5.5, km 0.1% starch), aminopeptidase (125 kDa, pHo 5.5, km 0.11 mM l-Leucine-p-nitroanilide), α-glucosidase (90 kDa, pHo 5.0, km 5mM with p-nitrophenyl α-d-glucoside). CAL molecular masses are probably underestimated due to interaction with the column. Taking into account the distribution of hydrolases along P. nigrispinus midguts, carbohydrate digestion takes place mainly at the anterior midgut, whereas protein digestion occurs mostly in middle and posterior midgut, as previously described in seed- sucker and blood-feeder hemipterans.

  2. Midgut proteinases of Sitotroga cerealella (Oliver) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae): Characterization and relationship to resistance in cereals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Lan.

    1989-01-01

    Midgut proteinases are vital to the insects which digest ingested food in the midgut. Insect midgut proteinases, therefore, have been considered as possible targets for the control of insect pests. Proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors are very attractive for their potential use in developing insect resistant plant varieties via genetic engineering. Sitotroga cerealella is one of the major storage pests of cereals, and no antibiotic resistance in wheat against this insect has been identified to date. A series of diagnostic inhibitors, thiol-reducing agents and a metal-ion chelator were used in the identification of proteinases in crude extracts from S. cerealella larval midguts with both protein and ester substrates. The partial inhibition of proteolytic activity in crude midgut extract toward ({sup 3}H)-methemoglobin by pepstatin A suggested the presence of another proteinase which was sensitive to pepstatin A. The optimum pH range for the proteolytic activity, however, indicated that the major midgut proteinases were not carboxyl proteinases. Two proteinases were successfully purified by a combination of fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. Characterization of the enzymes with the purified enzyme preparations confirmed that the two major proteinases were serine endoproteinases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities respectively. Bioassays were conducted using the artificial seeds to test naturally occurring proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors of potential value. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor had adverse effects on the development of the insect. A predictive model was constructed to evaluate effects of seed resistance in conjunction with other control methods on S. cerealella population dynamics.

  3. Increased centrosome amplification in aged stem cells of the Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joung-Sun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Na, Hyun-Jin; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Kim, Young-Shin; Arking, Robert; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of aged Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of oxidative stressed Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be responsible for abnormal ISC polyploid cells. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be a useful marker for aging stem cells. - Abstract: Age-related changes in long-lived tissue-resident stem cells may be tightly linked to aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. Centrosomes play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. Supernumerary centrosomes are known to be an early event in tumorigenesis and senescence. However, the age-related changes of centrosome duplication in tissue-resident stem cells in vivo remain unknown. Here, using anti-γ-tubulin and anti-PH3, we analyzed mitotic intestinal stem cells with supernumerary centrosomes in the adult Drosophila midgut, which may be a versatile model system for stem cell biology. The results showed increased centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells of aged and oxidatively stressed Drosophila midguts. Increased centrosome amplification was detected by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT in intestinal stem cells/enteroblasts, known to mimic age-related changes including hyperproliferation of intestinal stem cells and hyperplasia in the midgut. Our data show the first direct evidence for the age-related increase of centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells and suggest that the Drosophila midgut is an excellent model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying centrosome amplification in aging adult stem cells in vivo.

  4. Bark beetles in a changing climate

    Treesearch

    John E. Lundquist; Barbara J. Bentz

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade, native bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) have killed billions of trees across millions of hectares of forest from Alaska to Mexico. Although bark beetle infestations are a regular force of natural change in forested ecosystems, several current outbreaks occurring simultaneously across western North America are the largest and most...

  5. Acoustic characteristics of rhinoceros beetle stridulations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stridulation behavior has been reported for adults and larvae of many dynastids. This report describes acoustic recordings and analyses of stridulations by larvae of two Southeastern Asia rhinoceros beetle species and by adults of the coconut rhinoceros beetle. The behavioral context of the strid...

  6. Standard methods for small hive beetle research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small hive beetles, Aethina tumida, are parasites and scavengers of honey bee and other social bee colonies native to sub-Saharan Africa, where they are a minor pest only. In contrast, the beetles can be harmful parasites of European honey bee subspecies. Very rapidly after A. tumida established pop...

  7. Landscape dynamics of mountain pine beetles

    Treesearch

    John E. Lundquist; Robin M. Reich

    2014-01-01

    The magnitude and urgency of current mountain pine beetle outbreaks in the western United States and Canada have resulted in numerous studies of the dynamics and impacts of these insects in forested ecosystems. This paper reviews some of the aspects of the spatial dynamics and landscape ecology of this bark beetle. Landscape heterogeneity influences dispersal patterns...

  8. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) feeding ecology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article reviews some general and applied aspects of the feeding ecology of carabid beetles. General aspects included feeding preferences, prey searching, prey capture, and digestion. Applied aspects included evidence of impact, such as predation of aphids, leafhoppers, flies, beetles and moth...

  9. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) feeding ecology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The article reviews some general and applied aspects of the feeding ecology of carabid beetles. General aspects included feeding preferences, prey searching, prey capture, and digestion. Applied aspects included evidence of impact, such as predation of aphids, leafhoppers, flies, beetles and moths...

  10. Modelling spruce bark beetle infestation probability

    Treesearch

    Paulius Zolubas; Jose Negron; A. Steven Munson

    2009-01-01

    Spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) risk model, based on pure Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) stand characteristics in experimental and control plots was developed using classification and regression tree statistical technique under endemic pest population density. The most significant variable in spruce bark beetle...

  11. Southern Pine Beetle Ecology: Populations within Stands

    Treesearch

    Matthew P. Ayres; Sharon J. Martinson; Nicholas A. Friedenberg

    2011-01-01

    Populations of southern pine beetle (SPB) are typically substructured into local aggregations, each with tens of thousands of individual beetles. These aggregations, known as “spots” because of their appearance during aerial surveys, are the basic unit for the monitoring and management of SPB populations in forested regions. They typically have a maximum lifespan of 1...

  12. Ips Bark Beetles in the South

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Conner; Robert C. Wilkinson

    1983-01-01

    Ips beetles usually attack weakened, dying, or recently felled trees and fresh logging debris. Large numbers Ips may build up when natural events such as lightning storms, ice storms, tornadoes, wildfires, and droughts create large amounts of pine suitable for the breeding of these beetles. Ips populations may also build up following forestry activities, such as...

  13. Book review: Methods for catching beetles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beetles are the most speciose animal group and found in virtually all habitats on Earth. Methods for Catching Beetles is a comprehensive general sourcebook about where and how to collect members of this diverse group. The book makes a compelling case in its Introduction about the value of scientif...

  14. Biological Control of Southern Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Fred M. Stephen; C. Wayne Berisford

    2011-01-01

    Exotic invasive forest insects are frequently managed through classical biological control, which involves searching for, introducing, and establishing their exotic natural enemies. Biological control of native bark beetles, including the southern pine beetle (SPB), has been primarily attempted by conserving and manipulating their natural enemies. Knowledge of the role...

  15. Targeting red-headed flea beetle larvae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Red-headed flea beetle (RHFB), Systena frontalis, is an emerging pest of cranberry that requires significant grower investment in monitoring and repeated applications of insecticides to reduce adult populations. The adult beetles are highly mobile and consume a broad range of host plants whereas t...

  16. Interactions of Root Disease and Bark Beetles

    Treesearch

    George T. Ferrell; J. Richard Parmeter Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Associations between root diseases and bark beetles (Scolytidae) constitute some of the most serious pest complexes affecting forests in North America and elsewhere. The interactive functioning of these pests derives from the following relationships: 1) root diseases predispose trees to bark beetle infestation by lowering resistance, and perhaps...

  17. Guidelines for regenerating southern pine beetle spots

    Treesearch

    J.C.G. Goelz; B.L. Strom; J.P. Barnett; M.A. Sword Sayer

    2012-01-01

    Southern pine forests are of exceptional commercial and ecological importance to the United States, and the southern pine beetle is their most serious insect pest. The southern pine beetle generally kills overstory pines, causing spots of tree mortality that are unpredictable in time and space and frequently disruptive to management activities and goals. The canopy...

  18. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth.

    PubMed

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-05-02

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period.

  19. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth

    PubMed Central

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period. PMID:24785116

  20. Comparative transcriptomics of mountain pine beetle pheromone-biosynthetic tissues and functional analysis of CYP6DE3.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, J A; Petereit, J; Tillett, R L; Jung, K; Fotoohi, M; MacLean, M; Young, S; Schlauch, K; Blomquist, G J; Tittiger, C

    2017-04-20

    The mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is a highly destructive pest of pine forests in western North America. During flight to a new host tree and initiation of feeding, mountain pine beetles release aggregation pheromones. The biosynthetic pathways of these pheromones are sex-specific and localized in the midgut and fat body, but the enzymes involved have not all been identified or characterized. We used a comparative RNA-Seq analysis between fed and unfed male and female MPB midguts and fat bodies to identify candidate genes involved in pheromone biosynthesis. The 13,407 potentially unique transcripts showed clear separation based on feeding state and gender. Gene co-expression network construction and examination using petal identified gene groups that were tightly connected. This, as well as other co-expression and gene ontology analyses, identified all four known pheromone biosynthetic genes, confirmed the tentative identification of four others from a previous study, and suggested nine novel candidates. One cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, CYP6DE3, identified as a possible exo-brevicomin-biosynthetic enzyme in this study, was functionally characterized and likely is involved in resin detoxification rather than pheromone biosynthesis. Our analysis supported previously characterized pheromone-biosynthetic genes involved in exo-brevicomin and frontalin biosynthesis and identified a number of candidate cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and a putative cyclase for further studies. Functional analyses of CYP6DE3 suggest its role in resin detoxification and underscore the limitation of using high-throughput data to tentatively identify candidate genes. Further functional analyses of candidate genes found in this study should lead to the full characterization of MPB pheromone biosynthetic pathways and the identification of molecular targets for possible pest management strategies.

  1. Detection of heparin in the salivary gland and midgut of Aedes togoi.

    PubMed

    Ha, Young-Ran; Oh, So-Ra; Seo, Eun-Seok; Kim, Bo-Heum; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-04-01

    Mosquitoes secrete saliva that contains biological substances, including anticoagulants that counteract a host's hemostatic response and prevent blood clotting during blood feeding. This study aimed to detect heparin, an anticoagulant in Aedes togoi using an immunohistochemical detection method, in the salivary canal, salivary gland, and midgut of male and female mosquitoes. Comparisons showed that female mosquitoes contained higher concentrations of heparin than male mosquitoes. On average, the level of heparin was higher in blood-fed female mosquitoes than in non-blood-fed female mosquitoes. Heparin concentrations were higher in the midgut than in the salivary gland. This indicates presence of heparin in tissues of A. togoi.

  2. Changes in midgut and brain proteins in Morimus funereus larvae depending on nutritive substrate.

    PubMed

    Ilijin, Larisa; Janković-Tomanić, Milena; Mitić, Marija; Vlahović, Milena; Lazarević, Jelica; Perić-Maratuga, Vesna; Prolić, Zlatko; Nenadović, Vera

    2003-01-01

    The response of Morimus funereus larvae to total starvation and refeeding with qualitatively different nutritive substrates (artificial diets supplemented with yeast as a source of B complex vitamins or with a digestibility reducer-tannic acid) was examined in this paper. Refeeding resulted in a compensatory increase of larval growth. Feeding and refeeding with qualitatively different nutritive substrates affected both quality and quantity of midgut and brain proteins. The observed differences suggest the possible switching of enzyme isoforms in M. funereus midgut and changes in synthesis/secretion of neurohormones, depending on food presence and its nutritional value.

  3. Anemomenotatic orientation in beetles and scorpions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsenmair, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    Orientation, by beetles and scorpions, according to wind direction and force are analyzed. Major efforts were made to determine: (1) which physical qualities of the air current influence anemomenotaxis, (2) which physiological mechanism is responsible for such orientation, (3) which sense organs do beetles and scorpions use to perceive wind directions, and (4) what the biological significance of anemomenotaxis in the beetle and scorpion is. Experimental results show that the trichobothria in scorpions perceives wind direction; in the beetle it is perceived by sense organs excited by pendicellus-flagellum joint movements. A compensation mechanism is suggested as the basis for anemomenotactic orientation. It was also suggested that the biological significance of anemomenotaxis in scorpions is space orientation; while in beetles it was found to be part of the appetitive behavior used to search for olfactory sign stimuli.

  4. Early Cretaceous angiosperms and beetle evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Haichun; Jarzembowski, Edmund A.

    2013-01-01

    The Coleoptera (beetles) constitute almost one–fourth of all known life-forms on earth. They are also among the most important pollinators of flowering plants, especially basal angiosperms. Beetle fossils are abundant, almost spanning the entire Early Cretaceous, and thus provide important clues to explore the co-evolutionary processes between beetles and angiosperms. We review the fossil record of some Early Cretaceous polyphagan beetles including Tenebrionoidea, Scarabaeoidea, Curculionoidea, and Chrysomeloidea. Both the fossil record and molecular analyses reveal that these four groups had already diversified during or before the Early Cretaceous, clearly before the initial rise of angiosperms to widespread floristic dominance. These four beetle groups are important pollinators of basal angiosperms today, suggesting that their ecological association with angiosperms probably formed as early as in the Early Cretaceous. With the description of additional well-preserved fossils and improvements in phylogenetic analyses, our knowledge of Mesozoic beetle–angiosperm mutualisms will greatly increase during the near future. PMID:24062759

  5. Comparative cytokeratin distribution patterns in cholesteatoma epithelium.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, E; Sudhoff, H

    2007-01-01

    Cytokeratins (CKs) are known as the intermediate filament proteins of epithelial origin. Their distribution in human epithelia is different according to the type of epithelium, state of growth and differentiation. We used monoclonal mouse antibodies against cytokeratins to study CK expression in the following human tissues: cholesteatoma, middle ear mucosa, glandular epithelium, and meatal ear canal epithelium. Immunohistochemical processing was performed using the labeled steptavidin peroxidase method to demonstrate the presence of CKs in cells of human epidermis. Positive reaction was obtained for CK4, CK34betaE12, CK10, CK14 in skin and cholesteatoma epithelium. However, a more extensive positive reaction with those CKs was observed in cholesteatoma epithelium. Positive immunoreactivity was seen with anti- CK19 in the glandular epithelium. Middle ear mucosa specimens revealed positive immunoreactivity with the antibodies against CK4. The expression of CK4 was definitely positive within the basal layers of the epidermis. The glandular epithelium showed no positive reaction with anti- CK4, anti- CK34betaE12, anti- CK14 and anti-CK10. Immunohistochemistry for CK18 showed no reaction in all examined tissues. Cholesteatoma is known as a proliferative disease in the middle ear which pathogenesis is not completely understood. Keratinocytes express hyperproliferation- associated CKs and after reaching the suprabasal layers they finally undergo apoptosis creating keratinous debris. Cytokeratin expression observed in the epithelium explains proliferative behavior of cholesteatoma which is associated with increased keratinocyte migration. Cytokeratins can be used as potential proliferative markers. It can also allow for searching the usefulness of inhibiting regulators in the treatment of hyperproliferative diseases.

  6. Osmotic regulation of airway reactivity by epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fedan, J S; Yuan, L X; Chang, V C; Viola, J O; Cutler, D; Pettit, L L

    1999-05-01

    Inhalation of nonisotonic solutions can elicit pulmonary obstruction in asthmatic airways. We evaluated the hypothesis that the respiratory epithelium is involved in responses of the airways to nonisotonic solutions using the guinea pig isolated, perfused trachea preparation to restrict applied agents to the mucosal (intraluminal) or serosal (extraluminal) surface of the airway. In methacholine-contracted tracheae, intraluminally applied NaCl or KCl equipotently caused relaxation that was unaffected by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, but was attenuated by removal of the epithelium and Na+ and Cl- channel blockers. Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter and nitric oxide synthase blockers caused a slight inhibition of relaxation, whereas Na+,K+-pump inhibition produced a small potentiation. Intraluminal hyperosmolar KCl and NaCl inhibited contractions in response to intra- or extraluminally applied methacholine, as well as neurogenic cholinergic contractions elicited with electric field stimulation (+/- indomethacin). Extraluminally applied NaCl and KCl elicited epithelium-dependent relaxation (which for KCl was followed by contraction). In contrast to the effects of hyperosmolarity, intraluminal hypo-osmolarity caused papaverine-inhibitable contractions (+/- epithelium). These findings suggest that the epithelium is an osmotic sensor which, through the release of epithelium-derived relaxing factor, can regulate airway diameter by modulating smooth muscle responsiveness and excitatory neurotransmission.

  7. Acute and subchronic exposure of diplopods to substrate containing sewage mud: Tissular responses of the midgut.

    PubMed

    Nogarol, Larissa Rosa; Fontanetti, Carmem Silvia

    2010-04-01

    Several discussions regarding the agricultural use of sewage mud have occurred; however, its use has been questioned due to the risks of soil contamination mainly by metals. Diplopods are saprophagous invertebrates, agile in colonizing several layers of soil. Due to the habit of this group, several researchers have proposed their use in ecotoxicological analyses. This study aimed to expose these invertebrates to substrate containing sewage mud of a STS (Sewage Treatment Station) from São Paulo State, Brazil and analyzed its toxic potential by morphological analysis of the midgut of the diplopod Rhinocricus padbergi, region of the digestive tube where digestion and nutrient absorption occur. The animals were exposed in mud concentrations at 1%, 10% and 50% mixed with soil from the collection site for periods of 7 (acute exposure), 15 (intermediary exposure) and 90 (subchronic exposure) days in each treatment. The animals from the control group did not present alterations at all the exposition times. As an acute response (7 days), it was observed in the animals exposed to mud at 1% and 10% an increase in the epithelial renovation and in the liberation of secretory vesicles of glycoprotein content. In the animals exposed to mud at 50%, the main alteration observed was the increase in the number of cytoplasmatic granules in the fat body cells; the epithelium seemed to be in reorganization process in all the observed individuals, suggesting an intense epithelial renovation. In the intermediary period of exposure (15 days), in the animals exposed to mud at 1% it was observed an increase in the number of haemocytes among the cells of the fat body, distributed both separately and grouped; the animals exposed to mud at 10% presented the same evidence of epithelial renovation observed in the animals exposed for 7 days at a concentration of 50% of mud; it was also observed an increase in the number of haemocytes, which reacted strongly to the PAS technique. Cytoplasmatic

  8. Sequencing, De Novo Assembly and Annotation of the Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Congiu, Leonardo; Lindström, Leena; Piiroinen, Saija; Vidotto, Michele; Grapputo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Background The Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) is a major pest and a serious threat to potato cultivation throughout the northern hemisphere. Despite its high importance for invasion biology, phenology and pest management, little is known about L. decemlineata from a genomic perspective. We subjected European L. decemlineata adult and larval transcriptome samples to 454-FLX massively-parallel DNA sequencing to characterize a basal set of genes from this species. We created a combined assembly of the adult and larval datasets including the publicly available midgut larval Roche 454 reads and provided basic annotation. We were particularly interested in diapause-specific genes and genes involved in pesticide and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) resistance. Results Using 454-FLX pyrosequencing, we obtained a total of 898,048 reads which, together with the publicly available 804,056 midgut larval reads, were assembled into 121,912 contigs. We established a repository of genes of interest, with 101 out of the 108 diapause-specific genes described in Drosophila montana; and 621 contigs involved in insecticide resistance, including 221 CYP450, 45 GSTs, 13 catalases, 15 superoxide dismutases, 22 glutathione peroxidases, 194 esterases, 3 ADAM metalloproteases, 10 cadherins and 98 calmodulins. We found 460 putative miRNAs and we predicted a significant number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (29,205) and microsatellite loci (17,284). Conclusions This report of the assembly and annotation of the transcriptome of L. decemlineata offers new insights into diapause-associated and insecticide-resistance-associated genes in this species and provides a foundation for comparative studies with other species of insects. The data will also open new avenues for researchers using L. decemlineata as a model species, and for pest management research. Our results provide the basis for performing future gene expression and functional analysis in L. decemlineata and improve our

  9. A Multi-omics Approach to Understand the Microbial Transformation of Lignocellulosic Materials in the Digestive System of the Wood-Feeding Beetle Odontotaenius disjunctus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceja Navarro, J. A.; Karaoz, U.; White, R. A., III; Lipton, M. S.; Adkins, J.; Mayali, X.; Blackwell, M.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Brodie, E.; Hao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Odontotaenius disjuctus is a wood feeding beetle that processes large amounts of hardwoods and plays an important role in forest carbon cycling. In its gut, plant material is transformed into simple molecules by sequential processing during passage through the insect's digestive system. In this study, we used multiple 'omics approaches to analyze the distribution of microbial communities and their specific functions in lignocellulose deconstruction within the insect's gut. Fosmid clones were selected and sequenced from a pool of clones based on their expression of plant polymer degrading enzymes, allowing the identification of a wide range of carbohydrate degrading enzymes. Comparison of metagenomes of all gut regions demonstrated the distribution of genes across the beetle gut. Cellulose, starch, and xylan degradation genes were particularly abundant in the midgut and posterior hindgut. Genes involved in hydrogenotrophic production of methane and nitrogenases were more abundant in the anterior hindgut. Assembled contigs were binned into 127 putative genomes representing Bacteria, Archaea, Fungi and Nematodes. Eleven complete genomes were reconstructed allowing to identify linked functions/traits, including organisms with cellulosomes, and a combined potential for cellulose, xylan and starch hydrolysis and nitrogen fixation. A metaproteomic study was conducted to test the expression of the pathways identified in the metagenomic study. Preliminary analyses suggest enrichment of pathways related to hemicellulosic degradation. A complete xylan degradation pathway was reconstructed and GC-MS/MS based metabolomics identified xylobiose and xylose as major metabolite pools. To relate microbial identify to function in the beetle gut, Chip-SIP isotope tracing was conducted with RNA extracted from beetles fed 13C-cellulose. Multiple 13C enriched bacterial groups were detected, mainly in the midgut. Our multi-omics approach has allowed us to characterize the contribution of

  10. Localization of two post-proline cleaving peptidases in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two soluble post-proline cleaving peptidase activities, PPCP1 and PPCP2, were demonstrated in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae with the substrate benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanyl-L-proline p-nitroanilide. Both activities were serine peptidases. PPCP1 was active in acidic buffers, with maximum activit...

  11. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  12. Transcriptome of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transcriptomic profiles of the lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by the biopesticide Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of 49,613 assembled transcript sequences, of which...

  13. Midgut serine proteases and alternative host plant utilization in Pieris brassicae L.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhardwaj, Usha; Kumar, Pawan; Mazumdar-Leighton, Sudeshna

    2015-01-01

    Pieris brassicae L. is a serious pest of cultivated crucifers in several parts of the world. Larvae of P. brassicae also feed prolifically on garden nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L., of the family Tropaeolaceae). Proteolytic digestion was studied in larvae feeding on multiple hosts. Fourth instars were collected from cauliflower fields before transfer onto detached, aerial tissues of selected host plants in the lab. Variable levels of midgut proteases were detected in larvae fed on different hosts using protein substrates (casein and recombinant RBCL cloned from cauliflower) and diagnostic, synthetic substrates. Qualitative changes in midgut trypsin activities and quantitative changes in midgut chymotrypsin activities were implicated in physiological adaptation of larvae transferred to T. majus. Midgut proteolytic activities were inhibited to different extents by serine protease inhibitors, including putative trypsin inhibitors isolated from herbivore-attacked and herbivore-free leaves of cauliflower (CfTI) and T. majus (TpTI). Transfer of larvae to T. majus significantly influenced feeding parameters but not necessarily when transferred to different tissues of the same host. Results obtained are relevant for devising sustainable pest management strategies, including transgenic approaches using genes encoding plant protease inhibitors. PMID:25873901

  14. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Akorli, Jewelna; Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K; Wilson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings.

  15. Determination of pH in Regions of the Midguts of Acaridid Mites

    PubMed Central

    Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The pH of the guts of mites strongly affects their digestive processes. This study was carried out to determine the pH in the guts of 12 species of stored product and house dust mites. Eighteen pH indicators were chosen and offered to the mites in the feeding biotest. Based on the color changes of the indicators, the gut contents of acaridid mites were determined to be within a pH range of 4 to neutral. The gut contents showed a gradient in pH from the anterior to the posterior part. The anterior midgut (ventriculus and caeca) of most species had a pH ranging from 4.5 to 5, or slightly more alkaline for most of the species, while the middle midgut (intercolon/colon) had a pH of 5 to 6. Finally, the pH of the posterior midgut (postcolon) was between 5.5 and 7. Except for Dermatophagoides spp., no remarkable differences in the pH of the gut were observed among the tested species. Dermatophagoides spp. had a more acidic anterior midgut (a pH of 4 to 5) and colon (a pH of 5) with postcolon (a pH of below 6). The results characterizing in vivo conditions in the mite gut offer useful information to study the activity of mite digestive enzymes including their inhibitors and gut microflora. PMID:20572792

  16. Variation in Vector Competence for Dengue Viruses Does Not Depend on Mosquito Midgut Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan; Brown, Heidi E.; Rico-Hesse, Rebeca

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue virus genotypes of Southeast Asian origin have been associated with higher virulence and transmission compared to other genotypes of serotype 2 (DEN-2). We tested the hypothesis that genetic differences in dengue viruses may result in differential binding to the midgut of the primary vector, Aedes aegypti, resulting in increased transmission or vectorial capacity. Methodology/Principal Finding Two strains of each of the four DEN-2 genotypes (Southeast Asian, American, Indian, and West African) were tested to determine their binding affinity for mosquito midguts from two distinct populations (Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico and McAllen, Texas, USA). Our previous studies demonstrated that Southeast Asian viruses disseminated up to 65-fold more rapidly in Ae. aegypti from Texas and were therefore more likely to be transmitted to humans. Results shown here demonstrate that viruses from all four genotypes bind to midguts at the same rate, in a titer-dependent manner. In addition, we show population differences when comparing binding affinity for DEN-2 between the Tapachula and McAllen mosquito colonies. Conclusions If midgut binding potential is the same for all DEN-2 viruses, then viral replication differences in these tissues and throughout the mosquito can thus probably explain the significant differences in dissemination and vector competence. These conclusions differ from the established paradigms to explain mosquito barriers to infection, dissemination, and transmission. PMID:21610852

  17. Bacillus thuringiensis toxins trigger receptor shedding from gypsy moth midgut cells

    Treesearch

    Algimantas P. Valaitis

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the Cry1 insecticidal proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) begins with the processing of these proteins in the larval gut. After proteolytic activation, the Bt toxins bind to specific midgut receptors and insert into the membrane of the gut epithelial cells, causing insect death.

  18. Determination of pH in regions of the midguts of acaridid mites.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The pH of the guts of mites strongly affects their digestive processes. This study was carried out to determine the pH in the guts of 12 species of stored product and house dust mites. Eighteen pH indicators were chosen and offered to the mites in the feeding biotest. Based on the color changes of the indicators, the gut contents of acaridid mites were determined to be within a pH range of 4 to neutral. The gut contents showed a gradient in pH from the anterior to the posterior part. The anterior midgut (ventriculus and caeca) of most species had a pH ranging from 4.5 to 5, or slightly more alkaline for most of the species, while the middle midgut (intercolon/colon) had a pH of 5 to 6. Finally, the pH of the posterior midgut (postcolon) was between 5.5 and 7. Except for Dermatophagoides spp., no remarkable differences in the pH of the gut were observed among the tested species. Dermatophagoides spp. had a more acidic anterior midgut (a pH of 4 to 5) and colon (a pH of 5) with postcolon (a pH of below 6). The results characterizing in vivo conditions in the mite gut offer useful information to study the activity of mite digestive enzymes including their inhibitors and gut microflora.

  19. Barber Pole Sign in CT Angiography, Adult Presentation of Midgut Malrotation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garcelan-Trigo, Juan Arsenio; Tello-Moreno, Manuel; Rabaza-Espigares, Manuel Jesus; Talavera-Martinez, Ildefonso

    2015-01-01

    Adult midgut volvulus is a challenging diagnosis because of its low incidence and nonspecific symptoms. Diagnostic delay and long-term complaints are frequent in this clinical scenario. We reported a patient referred to our diagnostic imaging unit with intermittent abdominal pain, bloating and episodic vomiting for several years. He underwent barium gastrointestinal transit and abdominal ultrasound, which revealed severe gastric dilatation, food retention and slow transit until a depressed duodenojejunal flexure, with malrotation of the midgut and jejunal loops being located in the right upper quadrant. Computed tomography angiography was performed, showing rotation of the small intestine around the mesentery root, suggestive of midgut malrotation. In addition, an abnormal twisted disposition of superior mesenteric artery with corkscrew appearance was seen, shaping the pole-barber sign which was evident in volume rendering three-dimensional reconstructions. The patient underwent scheduled surgical treatment without any complication and had good outcome after hospital discharge and follow-up. Computed tomography plays an important role in evaluation of adult midgut volvulus. In addition, angiographic reconstructions can help us to assess the anatomic disposition of mesenteric vascular supply. Both of these assessments are useful in preoperative management. PMID:26557278

  20. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K.; Wilson, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  1. Characterization of proteinases from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus involved in the generation of antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin is a rich source of biologically active peptides, some of which are potent antimicrobials (hemocidins). A few hemocidins have been purified from the midgut contents of ticks. Nonetheless, how antimicrobials are generated in the tick midgut and their role in immunity is still poorly understood. Here we report, for the first time, the contribution of two midgut proteinases to the generation of hemocidins. Results An aspartic proteinase, designated BmAP, was isolated from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using three chromatographic steps. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that BmAP is restricted to the midgut. The other enzyme is a previously characterized midgut cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase designated BmCL1. Substrate specificities of native BmAP and recombinant BmCL1 were mapped using a synthetic combinatorial peptide library and bovine hemoglobin. BmCL1 preferred substrates containing non-polar residues at P2 subsite and polar residues at P1, whereas BmAP hydrolysed substrates containing non-polar amino acids at P1 and P1'. Conclusions BmAP and BmCL1 generate hemocidins from hemoglobin alpha and beta chains in vitro. We postulate that hemocidins may be important for the control of tick pathogens and midgut flora. PMID:20663211

  2. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  3. THE PERMEABILITY OF RAT TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, R. M.

    1966-01-01

    Permeability barriers must exist in transitional epithelium to prevent the free flow of water from underlying blood capillaries through the epithelium into the hypertonic urine, and such a barrier has now been demonstrated in isolated bladders. This barrier is passive in function and can be destroyed by damaging the luminal surface of the transitional epithelium with sodium hydroxide and 8 M urea solutions, by digesting it with trypsin, lecithinase C, and lecithinase D, or by treating it with lipid solvents such as Triton x 100 and saponin. From this it is concluded that the barrier depends on the integrity of lipoprotein cell membranes. The barrier function is also destroyed by sodium thioglycollate solutions, and electron microscope investigations show that sodium thioglycollate damages the thick asymmetric membrane which limits the luminal face of the superficial squamous cell. Cytochemical staining shows the epithelium to contain disulfide and thiol groups and to have a concentration of these groups at the luminal margin of the superficial cells. It thus appears that the permeability barrier also depends on the presence of disulfide bridges in the epithelium, and it is presumed that these links are located in keratin. Because of the effect of thioglycollates, both on the barrier function and on the morphology of the membrane, it is suggested that keratin may be incorporated in the thick barrier membrane. It is proposed that the cells lining the urinary bladder and ureters should be regarded as a keratinizing epitheluim. PMID:5901498

  4. Fluid absorption in the isolated midgut of adult female yellow fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti)

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Horst; Moffett, David F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transepithelial voltage (Vte) and the volume of isolated posterior midguts of adult female yellow fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti) were monitored. In all experiments, the initial Vte after filling the midgut was lumen negative, but subsequently became lumen positive at a rate of approximately 1 mV min−1. Simultaneously, the midgut volume decreased, indicating spontaneous fluid absorption. When the midguts were filled and bathed with mosquito saline, the average rate of fluid absorption was 36.5±3.0 nl min−1 (N=4, ±s.e.m.). In the presence of theophylline (10 mmol l−1), Vte reached significantly higher lumen-positive values, but the rate of fluid absorption was not affected (N=6). In the presence of NaCN (5 mmol l−1), Vte remained close to 0 mV (N=4) and fluid absorption was reduced (14.4±1.3 nl min−1, N=3, ±s.e.m.). When midguts were filled with buffered NaCl (154 mmol l−1 plus 1 mmol l−1 HEPES) and bathed in mosquito saline with theophylline, fluid absorption was augmented (50.0±5.8 nl min−1, N=12, ±s.e.m.). Concanamycin A (10 µmol l−1), ouabain (1 mmol l−1), and acetazolamide (1 mmol l−1) affected Vte in different ways, but all reduced fluid absorption by 60–70% of the value before addition of the drugs. PMID:25944920

  5. Plasmodium falciparum evades mosquito immunity by disrupting JNK-mediated apoptosis of invaded midgut cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramphul, Urvashi N.; Garver, Lindsey S.; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Canepa, Gaspar E.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, must survive and develop in the mosquito vector to be successfully transmitted to a new host. The Plasmodium falciparum Pfs47 gene is critical for malaria transmission. Parasites that express Pfs47 (NF54 WT) evade mosquito immunity and survive, whereas Pfs47 knockouts (KO) are efficiently eliminated by the complement-like system. Two alternative approaches were used to investigate the mechanism of action of Pfs47 on immune evasion. First, we examined whether Pfs47 affected signal transduction pathways mediating mosquito immune responses, and show that the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is a key mediator of Anopheles gambiae antiplasmodial responses to P. falciparum infection and that Pfs47 disrupts JNK signaling. Second, we used microarrays to compare the global transcriptional responses of A. gambiae midguts to infection with WT and KO parasites. The presence of Pfs47 results in broad and profound changes in gene expression in response to infection that are already evident 12 h postfeeding, but become most prominent at 26 h postfeeding, the time when ookinetes invade the mosquito midgut. Silencing of 15 differentially expressed candidate genes identified caspase-S2 as a key effector of Plasmodium elimination in parasites lacking Pfs47. We provide experimental evidence that JNK pathway regulates activation of caspases in Plasmodium-invaded midgut cells, and that caspase activation is required to trigger midgut epithelial nitration. Pfs47 alters the cell death pathway of invaded midgut cells by disrupting JNK signaling and prevents the activation of several caspases, resulting in an ineffective nitration response that makes the parasite undetectable by the mosquito complement-like system. PMID:25552553

  6. Composition of the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) Midgut Microbiota as Affected by Rearing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Landry, Mathieu; Comeau, André M; Derome, Nicolas; Cusson, Michel; Levesque, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive forest insect pests in Canada. Little is known about its intestinal microbiota, which could play a role in digestion, immune protection, communication and/or development. The present study was designed to provide a first characterization of the effects of rearing conditions on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the C. fumiferana midgut microbiota, using a culture-independent approach. Three diets and insect sources were examined: larvae from a laboratory colony reared on a synthetic diet and field-collected larvae reared on balsam fir or black spruce foliage. Bacterial DNA from the larval midguts was extracted to amplify and sequence the V6-V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene, using the Roche 454 GS-FLX technology. Our results showed a dominance of Proteobacteria, mainly Pseudomonas spp., in the spruce budworm midgut, irrespective of treatment group. Taxonomic diversity of the midgut microbiota was greater for larvae reared on synthetic diet than for those collected and reared on host plants, a difference that is likely accounted for by several factors. A greater proportion of bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes in insects fed artificial diet constituted the main difference between this group and those reared on foliage; within the phylum Proteobacteria, the presence of the genus Bradyrhizobium was also unique to insects reared on artificial diet. Strikingly, a Bray-Curtis analysis showed important differences in microbial diversity among the treatment groups, pointing to the importance of diet and environment in defining the spruce budworm midgut microbiota.

  7. Composition of the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) Midgut Microbiota as Affected by Rearing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Mathieu; Comeau, André M.; Derome, Nicolas; Cusson, Michel; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive forest insect pests in Canada. Little is known about its intestinal microbiota, which could play a role in digestion, immune protection, communication and/or development. The present study was designed to provide a first characterization of the effects of rearing conditions on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the C. fumiferana midgut microbiota, using a culture-independent approach. Three diets and insect sources were examined: larvae from a laboratory colony reared on a synthetic diet and field-collected larvae reared on balsam fir or black spruce foliage. Bacterial DNA from the larval midguts was extracted to amplify and sequence the V6-V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene, using the Roche 454 GS-FLX technology. Our results showed a dominance of Proteobacteria, mainly Pseudomonas spp., in the spruce budworm midgut, irrespective of treatment group. Taxonomic diversity of the midgut microbiota was greater for larvae reared on synthetic diet than for those collected and reared on host plants, a difference that is likely accounted for by several factors. A greater proportion of bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes in insects fed artificial diet constituted the main difference between this group and those reared on foliage; within the phylum Proteobacteria, the presence of the genus Bradyrhizobium was also unique to insects reared on artificial diet. Strikingly, a Bray-Curtis analysis showed important differences in microbial diversity among the treatment groups, pointing to the importance of diet and environment in defining the spruce budworm midgut microbiota. PMID:26636571

  8. Midgut Transcriptome of the Cockroach Periplaneta americana and Its Microbiota: Digestion, Detoxification and Oxidative Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yixi; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    The cockroach, Periplaneta americana, is an obnoxious and notorious pest of the world, with a strong ability to adapt to a variety of complex environments. However, the molecular mechanism of this adaptability is mostly unknown. In this study, the genes and microbiota composition associated with the adaptation mechanism were studied by analyzing the transcriptome and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing of the P. americana midgut, respectively. Midgut transcriptome analysis identified 82,905 unigenes, among which 64 genes putatively involved in digestion (11 genes), detoxification (37 genes) and oxidative stress response (16 genes) were found. Evaluation of gene expression following treatment with cycloxaprid further revealed that the selected genes (CYP6J1, CYP4C1, CYP6K1, Delta GST, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and aminopeptidase) were upregulated at least 2.0-fold at the transcriptional level, and four genes were upregulated more than 10.0-fold. An interesting finding was that three digestive enzymes positively responded to cycloxaprid application. Tissue expression profiles further showed that most of the selected genes were midgut-biased, with the exception of CYP6K1. The midgut microbiota composition was obtained via 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was found to be mainly dominated by organisms from the Firmicutes phylum, among which Clostridiales, Lactobacillales and Burkholderiales were the main orders which might assist the host in the food digestion or detoxification of noxious compounds. The preponderant species, Clostridium cellulovorans, was previously reported to degrade lignocellulose efficiently in insects. The abundance of genes involved in digestion, detoxification and response to oxidative stress, and the diversity of microbiota in the midgut might provide P. americana high capacity to adapt to complex environments.

  9. Constitutive Activation of the Midgut Response to Bacillus thuringiensis in Bt-Resistant Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Martínez, Patricia; Navarro-Cerrillo, Gloria; Caccia, Silvia; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Moar, William J.; Ferré, Juan; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is the most effective microbial control agent for controlling numerous species from different insect orders. The main threat for the long term use of B. thuringiensis in pest control is the ability of insects to develop resistance. Thus, the identification of insect genes involved in conferring resistance is of paramount importance. A colony of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was selected for 15 years in the laboratory for resistance to Xentari™, a B. thuringiensis-based insecticide, reaching a final resistance level of greater than 1,000-fold. Around 600 midgut ESTs were analyzed by DNA-macroarray in order to find differences in midgut gene expression between susceptible and resistant insects. Among the differentially expressed genes, repat and arylphorin were identified and their increased expression was correlated with B. thuringiensis resistance. We also found overlap among genes that were constitutively over-expressed in resistant insects with genes that were up-regulated in susceptible insects after exposure to Xentari™, suggesting a permanent activation of the response to Xentari™ in resistant insects. Increased aminopeptidase activity in the lumen of resistant insects in the absence of exposure to Xentari™ corroborated the hypothesis of permanent activation of response genes. Increase in midgut proliferation has been proposed as a mechanism of response to pathogens in the adult from several insect species. Analysis of S. exigua larvae revealed that midgut proliferation was neither increased in resistant insects nor induced by exposure of susceptible larvae to Xentari™, suggesting that mechanisms other than midgut proliferation are involved in the response to B. thuringiensis by S. exigua larvae. PMID:20862260

  10. Midgut and salivary gland transcriptomes of the arbovirus vector Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Campbell, C L; Vandyke, K A; Letchworth, G J; Drolet, B S; Hanekamp, T; Wilson, W C

    2005-04-01

    Numerous Culicoides spp. are important vectors of livestock or human disease pathogens. Transcriptome information from midguts and salivary glands of adult female Culicoides sonorensis provides new insight into vector biology. Of 1719 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from adult serum-fed female midguts harvested within 5 h of feeding, twenty-eight clusters of serine proteases were derived. Four clusters encode putative iron binding proteins (FER1, FERL, PXDL1, PXDL2), and two clusters encode metalloendopeptidases (MDP6C, MDP6D) that probably function in bloodmeal catabolism. In addition, a diverse variety of housekeeping cDNAs were identified. Selected midgut protease transcripts were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR): TRY1_115 and MDP6C mRNAs were induced in adult female midguts upon feeding, whereas TRY1_156 and CHYM1 were abundant in midguts both before and immediately after feeding. Of 708 salivary gland ESTs analysed, clusters representing two new classes of protein families were identified: a new class of D7 proteins and a new class of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors. Additional cDNAs representing putative immunomodulatory proteins were also identified: 5' nucleotidases, antigen 5-related proteins, a hyaluronidase, a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, mucins and several immune response cDNAs. Analysis by q-PCR showed that all D7 and Kunitz domain transcripts tested were highly enriched in female heads compared with other tissues and were generally absent from males. The mRNAs of two additional protease inhibitors, TFPI1 and TFPI2, were detected in salivary glands of paraffin-embedded females by in situ hybridization.

  11. Induction of mosquitocidal activity in mice immunized with Anopheles gambiae midgut cDNA.

    PubMed

    Foy, B D; Magalhaes, T; Injera, W E; Sutherland, I; Devenport, M; Thanawastien, A; Ripley, D; Cárdenas-Freytag, L; Beier, J C

    2003-04-01

    Vaccines that induce mosquito-killing (mosquitocidal) activity could substantially reduce the transmission of certain mosquito-borne diseases, especially vaccines against African malaria vectors, such as the mosquito Anopheles gambiae. To generate and characterize antimosquito immunity we immunized groups of mice with two individual A. gambiae midgut cDNAs, Ag-Aper1 (a secreted peritrophic matrix protein) and AgMuc1 (a midgut-bound mucin), and an A. gambiae midgut cDNA library from blood-fed mosquitoes. We observed significantly increased mortality among mosquitoes that fed on either the AgMuc1- or the cDNA library-immunized mice compared to that of controls, but no differences were observed among those fed on Ag-Aper1-immunized mice. Analysis of the humoral and cellular immune responses from mice showed that the induced mosquitocidal effect was associated with immune profiles characterized by elevated tumor necrosis factor alpha and gamma interferon cytokine levels and very low antibody titers. Furthermore, an additional immunization of cDNA library-immunized mice with midgut protein shifted immunity toward a Th2-type immune response, characterized by elevated antibody titers and high interleukin-5 and interleukin-10 cytokine levels; importantly, mosquitoes feeding on these mice exhibited no undue mortality. Finally, when immune sera was ingested by mosquitoes through a membrane feeder, no effect on mosquito mortality was observed, indicating that serum factors alone were not responsible for the mosquitocidal effect. Our results demonstrate that mosquitocidal immunity in mice can be consistently generated by midgut cDNA immunization and suggest this cDNA-induced mosquitocidal immunity is cell mediated.

  12. Midgut Transcriptome of the Cockroach Periplaneta americana and Its Microbiota: Digestion, Detoxification and Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yixi; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    The cockroach, Periplaneta americana, is an obnoxious and notorious pest of the world, with a strong ability to adapt to a variety of complex environments. However, the molecular mechanism of this adaptability is mostly unknown. In this study, the genes and microbiota composition associated with the adaptation mechanism were studied by analyzing the transcriptome and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing of the P. americana midgut, respectively. Midgut transcriptome analysis identified 82,905 unigenes, among which 64 genes putatively involved in digestion (11 genes), detoxification (37 genes) and oxidative stress response (16 genes) were found. Evaluation of gene expression following treatment with cycloxaprid further revealed that the selected genes (CYP6J1, CYP4C1, CYP6K1, Delta GST, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and aminopeptidase) were upregulated at least 2.0-fold at the transcriptional level, and four genes were upregulated more than 10.0-fold. An interesting finding was that three digestive enzymes positively responded to cycloxaprid application. Tissue expression profiles further showed that most of the selected genes were midgut-biased, with the exception of CYP6K1. The midgut microbiota composition was obtained via 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was found to be mainly dominated by organisms from the Firmicutes phylum, among which Clostridiales, Lactobacillales and Burkholderiales were the main orders which might assist the host in the food digestion or detoxification of noxious compounds. The preponderant species, Clostridium cellulovorans, was previously reported to degrade lignocellulose efficiently in insects. The abundance of genes involved in digestion, detoxification and response to oxidative stress, and the diversity of microbiota in the midgut might provide P. americana high capacity to adapt to complex environments. PMID:27153200

  13. Transporters involved in glucose and water absorption in the Dysdercus peruvianus (Hemiptera: Pyrrhocoridae) anterior midgut.

    PubMed

    Bifano, Thaís D; Alegria, Thiago G P; Terra, Walter R

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about insect intestinal sugar absorption, in spite of the recent findings, and even less has been published regarding water absorption. The aim of this study was to shed light on putative transporters of water and glucose in the insect midgut. Glucose and water absorptions by the anterior ventriculus of Dysdercus peruvianus midgut were determined by feeding the insects with a glucose and a non-absorbable dye solution, followed by periodical dissection of insects and analysis of ventricular contents. Glucose absorption decreases glucose/dye ratios and water absorption increases dye concentrations. Water and glucose transports are activated (water 50%, glucose 33%) by 50 mM K(2)SO(4) and are inhibited (water 46%, glucose 82%) by 0.2 mM phloretin, the inhibitor of the facilitative hexose transporter (GLUT) or are inhibited (water 45%, glucose 35%) by 0.1 mM phlorizin, the inhibitor of the Na(+)-glucose cotransporter (SGLT). The results also showed that the putative SGLT transports about two times more water relative to glucose than the putative GLUT. These results mean that D. peruvianus uses a GLUT-like transporter and an SGLT-like transporter (with K(+) instead of Na(+)) to absorb dietary glucose and water. A cDNA library from D. peruvianus midgut was screened and we found one sequence homologous to GLUT1, named DpGLUT, and another to a sodium/solute symporter, named DpSGLT. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR studies revealed that DpGLUT and DpSGLTs mRNA were expressed in the anterior midgut, where glucose and water are absorbed, but not in fat body, salivary gland and Malpighian tubules. This is the first report showing the involvement of putative GLUT and SGLT in both water and glucose midgut absorption in insects.

  14. Catalase protects Aedes aegypti from oxidative stress and increases midgut infection prevalence of Dengue but not Zika.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, José Henrique M; Talyuli, Octávio A C; Goncalves, Renata L S; Paiva-Silva, Gabriela Oliveira; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique F; Alvarenga, Patricia Hessab; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2017-04-01

    Digestion of blood in the midgut of Aedes aegypti results in the release of pro-oxidant molecules that can be toxic to the mosquito. We hypothesized that after a blood meal, the antioxidant capacity of the midgut is increased to protect cells against oxidative stress. Concomitantly, pathogens present in the blood ingested by mosquitoes, such as the arboviruses Dengue and Zika, also have to overcome the same oxidative challenge, and the antioxidant program induced by the insect is likely to influence infection status of the mosquito and its vectorial competence. We found that blood-induced catalase mRNA and activity in the midgut peaked 24 h after feeding and returned to basal levels after the completion of digestion. RNAi-mediated silencing of catalase (AAEL013407-RB) reduced enzyme activity in the midgut epithelia, increased H2O2 leakage and decreased fecundity and lifespan when mosquitoes were fed H2O2. When infected with Dengue 4 and Zika virus, catalase-silenced mosquitoes showed no alteration in infection intensity (number of plaque forming units/midgut) 7 days after the infectious meal. However, catalase knockdown reduced Dengue 4, but not Zika, infection prevalence (percent of infected midguts). Here, we showed that blood ingestion triggers an antioxidant response in the midgut through the induction of catalase. This protection facilitates the establishment of Dengue virus in the midgut. Importantly, this mechanism appears to be specific for Dengue because catalase silencing did not change Zika virus prevalence. In summary, our data suggest that redox balance in the midgut modulates mosquito vectorial competence to arboviral infections.

  15. A P-Glycoprotein Is Linked to Resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa Toxin in a Leaf Beetle.

    PubMed

    Pauchet, Yannick; Bretschneider, Anne; Augustin, Sylvie; Heckel, David G

    2016-12-05

    Chrysomela tremula is a polyvoltine oligophagous leaf beetle responsible for massive attacks on poplar trees. This beetle is an important model for understanding mechanisms of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal toxins, because a resistant C. tremula strain has been found that can survive and reproduce on transgenic poplar trees expressing high levels of the Cry3Aa Bt toxin. Resistance to Cry3Aa in this strain is recessive and is controlled by a single autosomal locus. We used a larval midgut transcriptome for C. tremula to search for candidate resistance genes. We discovered a mutation in an ABC protein, member of the B subfamily homologous to P-glycoprotein, which is genetically linked to Cry3Aa resistance in C. tremula. Cultured insect cells heterologously expressing this ABC protein swell and lyse when incubated with Cry3Aa toxin. In light of previous findings in Lepidoptera implicating A subfamily ABC proteins as receptors for Cry2A toxins and C subfamily proteins as receptors for Cry1A and Cry1C toxins, this result suggests that ABC proteins may be targets of insecticidal three-domain Bt toxins in Coleoptera as well.

  16. A P-Glycoprotein Is Linked to Resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa Toxin in a Leaf Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Pauchet, Yannick; Bretschneider, Anne; Augustin, Sylvie; Heckel, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Chrysomela tremula is a polyvoltine oligophagous leaf beetle responsible for massive attacks on poplar trees. This beetle is an important model for understanding mechanisms of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal toxins, because a resistant C. tremula strain has been found that can survive and reproduce on transgenic poplar trees expressing high levels of the Cry3Aa Bt toxin. Resistance to Cry3Aa in this strain is recessive and is controlled by a single autosomal locus. We used a larval midgut transcriptome for C. tremula to search for candidate resistance genes. We discovered a mutation in an ABC protein, member of the B subfamily homologous to P-glycoprotein, which is genetically linked to Cry3Aa resistance in C. tremula. Cultured insect cells heterologously expressing this ABC protein swell and lyse when incubated with Cry3Aa toxin. In light of previous findings in Lepidoptera implicating A subfamily ABC proteins as receptors for Cry2A toxins and C subfamily proteins as receptors for Cry1A and Cry1C toxins, this result suggests that ABC proteins may be targets of insecticidal three-domain Bt toxins in Coleoptera as well. PMID:27929397

  17. Attraction of bark beetle predator, Thanasimus undatulus (Coleoptera: Cleridae), to pheromones of the spruce beetle and two secondary bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; John H. Borden

    1997-01-01

    The bark beetle predator Thanasimus undatulus Say was captured in statistically significant numbers (total catch = 470, 713, and 137) in three field experiments using multiple-funnel traps baited with various combinations of pheromones for the spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby, and the secondary bark beetles ...

  18. Approaches to engineer stability of beetle luciferases.

    PubMed

    Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2012-01-01

    Luciferase enzymes from fireflies and other beetles have many important applications in molecular biology, biotechnology, analytical chemistry and several other areas. Many novel beetle luciferases with promising properties have been reported in the recent years. However, actual and potential applications of wild-type beetle luciferases are often limited by insufficient stability or decrease in activity of the enzyme at the conditions of a particular assay. Various examples of genetic engineering of the enhanced beetle luciferases have been reported that successfully solve or alleviate many of these limitations. This mini-review summarizes the recent advances in development of mutant luciferases with improved stability and activity characteristics. It discusses the common limitations of wild-type luciferases in different applications and presents the efficient approaches that can be used to address these problems.

  19. Polarisation vision: beetles see circularly polarised light.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric J

    2010-07-27

    It has long been known that the iridescent cuticle of many scarab beetles reflects circularly polarised light. It now turns out that scarabs can also see this light, potentially using it as a covert visual signal.

  20. Mite predators of the southern pine beetle

    Treesearch

    John c. Moser

    1975-01-01

    Of 51 mites found with brood of the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis zimmermann, and tested in the laboratory, four are primary candidates for use as natural control agents in reducing field infestations: Histiogaster arborsignis Woodring, Proctolaelaps dendroctoni Lindquist & Hunter, ...

  1. Creosote production from beetle infested timber

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.F.; Maxwell, T.T.

    1982-01-01

    Wood-tar creosote accumulation in stove pipes and chimneys following burning of beetle-killed southern pine, green pine, seasoned hardwood totalled 6.21, 3.21, 4.27 and 3.73 lb/ton DM respectively. Tests showed that accumulation depends more on air supply to the stove than type or moisture content of wood burned. It is suggested that beetle-killed pine should not be rejected as a fuelwood on the basis of creosote production.

  2. Wood-boring beetles in homes

    Treesearch

    V.R. Lewis; S.J. Seybold

    2010-01-01

    Three groups of wood-boring beetles—powderpost, deathwatch, and false powderpost (Table 1)—invade and damage wood furniture as well as structural and decorative wood inside of buildings. The beetle larvae feed in and do most of the damage to wood, and when they reach the adult stage, they emerge through round exit holes, which they create by chewing through the wood...

  3. Asian longhorned beetle complicates the relationship ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Urban foresters routinely emphasise the importance of taxonomic diversity to reduce the vulnerability of tree assemblages to invasive pests, but it is unclear to what extent diversity reduces vulnerability to polyphagous (i.e. generalist) pests. Drawing on field data from seven communities in metropolitan Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, we tested the hypothesis that communities with higher diversity would exhibit lower vulnerability to the polyphagous Asian longhorned beetle, which currently threatens the region. Based on street tree compositions and the beetle?s host preferences, Asian longhorned beetle threatened up to 35.6% of individual street trees and 47.5% of the total basal area across the study area, but we did not see clear connections between taxonomic diversity and beetle vulnerability among study communities. For example, the city of Fairfield was among the least diverse communities but had the lowest proportion of trees vulnerable to Asian longhorned beetle, whereas the city of Wyoming exhibited high diversity and high vulnerability. On the other hand, Forest Park aligned with our original hypothesis, as it was characterised by low diversity and high vulnerability. Our results demonstrate that relatively high taxonomic diversity in street tree assemblages does not necessarily lead to reduced vulnerability to a polyphagous pest. Considering the threats posed by polyphagous pests, selecting a set of relatively pest resistant trees known to perform well in urb

  4. Symbiont diversification in ambrosia beetles: Diversity of fungi associated with exotic scolytine beetles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In virtually every forest habitat, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae, Platypodinae) plant and maintain symbiotic fungus gardens inside dead or dying wood. Some introduced ambrosia beetles aggressively attack live trees and can damage tree crops, lumber, and native woody plant t...

  5. Southern Pine Beetle Handbook: Southern Pine Beetles Can Kill Your Ornamental Pine

    Treesearch

    Robert C. Thatcher; Jack E. Coster; Thomas L. Payne

    1974-01-01

    Southern pine beetles are compulsive eaters. Each year in the South from Texas to Virginia the voracious insects conduct a movable feast across thousands of acres of pine forests. Most trees die soon after the beetles sink their teeth into them.

  6. [Estimation of the biological age in males of the taiga tick (Ixodes persulcatus: Ixodinae) by fat reserves in the midgut].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, L A

    2012-01-01

    Some criteria for the estimation of the biological and calendar age by the fat storage in midgut cells of Ixodes persulcatus males were established on the basis of examination of ticks from the laboratory culture.

  7. Expressions of TRPVs in the cholesteatoma epithelium.

    PubMed

    Do, Ba Hung; Koizumi, Hiroki; Ohbuchi, Toyoaki; Kawaguchi, Rintaro; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2017-10-01

    We have recently proposed a hypothesis that acid leakage through the cholesteatoma epithelium mediates bone resorption in middle ear cholesteatoma. In the present study, we investigated the expressions of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels, which have been shown to play roles in the regulation of epidermal barrier function, in the cholesteatoma epithelium in comparison with the normal skin. Cholesteatoma epithelium and postauricular skin were collected from 17 patients with primary acquired middle ear cholesteatoma who underwent tympanomastoidectomy. Expressions of TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, and TRPV6 were explored by fluorescence immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, and TRPV6 mRNAs were all detected by qRT-PCR both in the skin and cholesteatoma tissue. Immunohistochemical staining showed that TRPV1 and TRPV3 were positive in the viable cell layers of the epidermis of the skin, and only TRPV3 was positive in those of the cholesteatoma epithelium. The immunoreactivity for TRPV3 was significantly weaker in cholesteatoma than in the skin. The lower expression of TRPV3 in cholesteatoma may be one of the mechanisms underlying the increased permeability of this tissue. On the other hand, TRPV1, TRPV4, and TRPV6 are unlikely to be involved in the regulation of epithelial permeability in cholesteatoma.

  8. Do Pine Beetles Fan the Flames in Western Forests?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    As mountain pine beetles damage whole regions of Western forests, some worry that the dead trees left behind have created a tinderbox ready to burn. But do pine beetles really increase fire risk? I...

  9. Molecular phylogeny of beetle associated diplogastrid nematodes suggests host switching rather than nematode-beetle coevolution.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Werner E; Herrmann, Matthias; Sommer, Ralf J

    2009-08-24

    Nematodes are putatively the most species-rich animal phylum. They have various life styles and occur in a variety of habitats, ranging from free-living nematodes in aquatic or terrestrial environments to parasites of animals and plants. The rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most important model organisms in modern biology. Pristionchus pacificus of the family of the Diplogastridae has been developed as a satellite model for comparison to C. elegans. The Diplogastridae, a monophyletic clade within the rhabditid nematodes, are frequently associated with beetles. How this beetle-association evolved and whether beetle-nematode coevolution occurred is still elusive. As a prerequisite to answering this question a robust phylogeny of beetle-associated Diplogastridae is needed. Sequences for the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA and for 12 ribosomal protein encoding nucleotide sequences were collected for 14 diplogastrid taxa yielding a dataset of 5996 bp of concatenated aligned sequences. A molecular phylogeny of beetle-associated diplogastrid nematodes was established by various algorithms. Robust subclades could be demonstrated embedded in a phylogenetic tree topology with short internal branches, indicating rapid ancestral divergences. Comparison of the diplogastrid phylogeny to a comprehensive beetle phylogeny revealed no major congruence and thus no evidence for a long-term coevolution. Reconstruction of the phylogenetic history of beetle-associated Diplogastridae yields four distinct subclades, whose deep phylogenetic divergence, as indicated by short internal branch lengths, shows evidence for evolution by successions of ancient rapid radiation events. The stem species of the Diplogastridae existed at the same time period when the major radiations of the beetles occurred. Comparison of nematode and beetle phylogenies provides, however, no evidence for long-term coevolution of diplogastrid nematodes and their beetle hosts. Instead, frequent

  10. Ookinete-Interacting Proteins on the Microvillar Surface are Partitioned into Detergent Resistant Membranes of Anopheles gambiae Midguts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lipid raft microdomains, a component of detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), are routinely exploited by pathogens during host-cell entry. Multiple membrane-surface proteins mediate Plasmodium ookinete invasion of the Anopheles midgut, a critical step in the parasite life cycle that is successfully targeted by transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV). Given that lipid rafts are a common feature of host-pathogen interactions, we hypothesized that they promote the partitioning of midgut surface proteins and thus facilitate ookinete invasion. In support of this hypothesis, we found that five of the characterized Anopheles TBV candidates, including the leading Anopheles TBV candidate, AgAPN1, are present in Anopheles gambiae DRMs. Therefore, to extend the repertoire of putative midgut ligands that can be targeted by TBVs, we analyzed midgut DRMs by tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 1452 proteins including several markers of DRMs. Since glycosylphosphotidyl inositol (GPI)-anchored proteins partition to DRMs, we characterized the GPI subproteome of An. gambiae midgut brush-border microvilli and found that 96.9% of the proteins identified in the GPI-anchored fractions were also present in DRMs. Our study vastly expands the number of candidate malarial TBV targets for subsequent analysis by the broader community and provides an inferred role for midgut plasmalemma microdomains in ookinete cell invasion. PMID:21905706

  11. Blocking of malaria parasite development in mosquito and fecundity reduction by midgut antibodies in Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Suneja, Amita; Gulia, Monika; Gakhar, S K

    2003-02-01

    Rabbits were immunized three times with extracts of Anopheles stephensi midgut. Immunized rabbits showed a high titer of antibodies when characterized by ELISA. We investigated the effect of anti-mosquito midgut antibodies on mosquito fecundity, longevity, mortality, engorgement, and the development of the malaria parasite in mosquitoes. Fecundity was reduced significantly (38%) and similarly hatchability by about 43.5%. There was no statistically significant effect on mortality, longevity, and engorgement. When the mosquito blood meal contained anti-midgut antibodies, fewer oocysts of Plasmodium vivax developed in the mosquito midgut and the proportion of mosquitoes becoming infected was significantly reduced. We also found that the midgut antibodies inhibit the development and/or translocation of the sporozoites. Antisera raised against midgut of A. stephensi recognized eight polypeptides (110, 92, 70, 45, 38, 29, 15, 13 kDa) by Western blotting. Cross-reactive antigens/epitopes present in other tissues of A. stephensi were also examined both by Western blotting and in vivo ELISA. Together, these observations open an avenue for research toward the development of a vector-based malaria parasite transmission blocking vaccine and/or anti-mosquito vaccine.

  12. The extraembryonic serosa is a frontier epithelium providing the insect egg with a full-range innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Chris G C; Spaink, Herman P; van der Zee, Maurijn

    2014-12-09

    Drosophila larvae and adults possess a potent innate immune response, but the response of Drosophila eggs is poor. In contrast to Drosophila, eggs of the beetle Tribolium are protected by a serosa, an extraembryonic epithelium that is present in all insects except higher flies. In this study, we test a possible immune function of this frontier epithelium using Tc-zen1 RNAi-mediated deletion. First, we show that bacteria propagate twice as fast in serosa-less eggs. Then, we compare the complete transcriptomes of wild-type, control RNAi, and Tc-zen1 RNAi eggs before and after sterile or septic injury. Infection induces genes involved in Toll and IMD-signaling, melanisation, production of reactive oxygen species and antimicrobial peptides in wild-type eggs but not in serosa-less eggs. Finally, we demonstrate constitutive and induced immune gene expression in the serosal epithelium using in situ hybridization. We conclude that the serosa provides insect eggs with a full-range innate immune response.

  13. The extraembryonic serosa is a frontier epithelium providing the insect egg with a full-range innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Chris G C; Spaink, Herman P; van der Zee, Maurijn

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila larvae and adults possess a potent innate immune response, but the response of Drosophila eggs is poor. In contrast to Drosophila, eggs of the beetle Tribolium are protected by a serosa, an extraembryonic epithelium that is present in all insects except higher flies. In this study, we test a possible immune function of this frontier epithelium using Tc-zen1 RNAi-mediated deletion. First, we show that bacteria propagate twice as fast in serosa-less eggs. Then, we compare the complete transcriptomes of wild-type, control RNAi, and Tc-zen1 RNAi eggs before and after sterile or septic injury. Infection induces genes involved in Toll and IMD-signaling, melanisation, production of reactive oxygen species and antimicrobial peptides in wild-type eggs but not in serosa-less eggs. Finally, we demonstrate constitutive and induced immune gene expression in the serosal epithelium using in situ hybridization. We conclude that the serosa provides insect eggs with a full-range innate immune response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04111.001 PMID:25487990

  14. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  15. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  16. Using bacteria to express and display anti-Plasmodium molecules in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Michael A; Moreira, Cristina K; Lampe, David; Lauzon, Carol; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2007-05-01

    Bacteria capable of colonizing mosquito midguts are attractive vehicles for delivering anti-malaria molecules. We genetically engineered Escherichia coli to display two anti-Plasmodium effector molecules, SM1 and phospholipase-A(2), on their outer membrane. Both molecules significantly inhibited Plasmodium berghei development when engineered bacteria were fed to mosquitoes 24h prior to an infective bloodmeal (SM1=41%, PLA2=23%). Furthermore, prevalence and numbers of engineered bacteria increased dramatically following a bloodmeal. However, E. coli survived poorly in mosquitoes. Therefore, Enterobacter agglomerans was isolated from mosquitoes and selected for midgut survival by multiple passages through mosquitoes. After four passages, E. agglomerans survivorship increased from 2 days to 2 weeks. Since E. agglomerans is non-pathogenic and widespread, it is an excellent candidate for paratransgenic control strategies.

  17. Experimental evidence of bark beetle adaptation to a fungal symbiont.

    PubMed

    Bracewell, Ryan R; Six, Diana L

    2015-11-01

    The importance of symbiotic microbes to insects cannot be overstated; however, we have a poor understanding of the evolutionary processes that shape most insect-microbe interactions. Many bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) species are involved in what have been described as obligate mutualisms with symbiotic fungi. Beetles benefit through supplementing their nutrient-poor diet with fungi and the fungi benefit through gaining transportation to resources. However, only a few beetle-fungal symbioses have been experimentally manipulated to test whether the relationship is obligate. Furthermore, none have tested for adaptation of beetles to their specific symbionts, one of the requirements for coevolution. We experimentally manipulated the western pine beetle-fungus symbiosis to determine whether the beetle is obligately dependent upon fungi and to test for fine-scale adaptation of the beetle to one of its symbiotic fungi, Entomocorticium sp. B. We reared beetles from a single population with either a natal isolate of E. sp. B (isolated from the same population from which the beetles originated), a non-natal isolate (a genetically divergent isolate from a geographically distant beetle population), or with no fungi. We found that fungi were crucial for the successful development of western pine beetles. We also found no significant difference in the effects of the natal and non-natal isolate on beetle fitness parameters. However, brood adult beetles failed to incorporate the non-natal fungus into their fungal transport structure (mycangium) indicating adaption by the beetle to particular genotypes of symbiotic fungi. Our results suggest that beetle-fungus mutualisms and symbiont fidelity may be maintained via an undescribed recognition mechanism of the beetles for particular symbionts that may promote particular associations through time.

  18. Research note: the effects of darkling beetles on broiler performance.

    PubMed

    Skewes, P A; Monroe, J L

    1991-04-01

    Six polyvinylchlorine pipe darkling beetle traps were placed in 20 commercial broiler production facilities, and the relative level of beetle infestation was determined from weekly sampling during 4 wk of the growout period. The average number of beetles found at each facility was compared with the following production parameters: mortality, feed conversion, condemnation rate, and production cost. In the 20 commercial broiler flocks evaluated, the level of darkling beetles within the facility was not related to any of the production parameters measured.

  19. Histochemical analysis of the goblet cell matrix in the larval midgut of Manduca sexta

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Lozano, G.; Cajina-Quezada, M.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental analyses were made to histochemically determine the composition of the goblet cell matrix material in the larval midgut of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. Techniques employed following fixation in Carnoy fluid were the periodic acid-Schiff reaction and the alcian blue stain at pH 1.0 and pH 2.5 and following methylation and subsequent saponification. The cumulative evidence suggests that the plug material is an acid mucosubstance.

  20. PINK1 is required for timely cell-type specific mitochondrial clearance during Drosophila midgut metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Lin, Jingjing; Zhang, Minjie; Chen, Kai; Yang, Shengxi; Wang, Qun; Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen; Zhou, Yongjian; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Fei; Yang, Yufeng

    2016-11-15

    Mitophagy is the selective degradation of mitochondria by autophagy, which is an important mitochondrial quality and quantity control process. During Drosophila metamorphosis, the degradation of midgut involves a large change in length and organization, which is mediated by autophagy. Here we noticed a cell-type specific mitochondrial clearance process that occurs in enterocytes (ECs), while most mitochondria remain in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) during metamorphosis. Although PINK1/PARKIN represent the canonical pathway for the elimination of impaired mitochondria in varied pathological conditions, their roles in developmental processes or normal physiological conditions have been less studied. To examine the potential contribution of PINK1 in developmental processes, we monitored the dynamic expression pattern of PINK1 in the midgut development by taking advantage of a newly CRISPR/Cas9 generated knock-in fly strain expressing PINK1-mCherry fusion protein that presumably recapitulates the endogenous expression pattern of PINK1. We disclosed a spatiotemporal correlation between the expression pattern of PINK1 and the mitochondrial clearance or persistence in ECs or ISCs respectively. By mosaic genetic analysis, we then demonstrated that PINK1 and PARKIN function epistatically to mediate the specific timely removal of mitochondria, and are involved in global autophagy in ECs during Drosophila midgut metamorphosis, with kinase-dead PINK1 exerting dominant negative effects. Taken together, our studies concluded that the PINK1/PARKIN is crucial for timely cell-type specific mitophagy under physiological conditions and demonstrated again that Drosophila midgut metamorphosis might serve as an elegant in vivo model to study autophagy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential expression of endogenous plant cell wall degrading enzyme genes in the stick insect (Phasmatodea) midgut.

    PubMed

    Shelomi, Matan; Jasper, W Cameron; Atallah, Joel; Kimsey, Lynn S; Johnson, Brian R

    2014-10-21

    Stick and leaf insects (Phasmatodea) are an exclusively leaf-feeding order of insects with no record of omnivory, unlike other "herbivorous" Polyneoptera. They represent an ideal system for investigating the adaptations necessary for obligate folivory, including plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). However, their physiology and internal anatomy is poorly understood, with limited genomic resources available. We de novo assembled transcriptomes for the anterior and posterior midguts of six diverse Phasmatodea species, with RNA-Seq on one exemplar species, Peruphasma schultei. The latter's assembly yielded >100,000 transcripts, with over 4000 transcripts uniquely or more highly expressed in specific midgut sections. Two to three dozen PCWDE encoding gene families, including cellulases and pectinases, were differentially expressed in the anterior midgut. These genes were also found in genomic DNA from phasmid brain tissue, suggesting endogenous production. Sequence alignments revealed catalytic sites on most PCWDE transcripts. While most phasmid PCWDE genes showed homology with those of other insects, the pectinases were homologous to bacterial genes. We identified a large and diverse PCWDE repertoire endogenous to the phasmids. If these expressed genes are translated into active enzymes, then phasmids can theoretically break plant cell walls into their monomer components independently of microbial symbionts. The differential gene expression between the two midgut sections provides the first molecular hints as to their function in living phasmids. Our work expands the resources available for industrial applications of animal-derived PCWDEs, and facilitates evolutionary analysis of lower Polyneopteran digestive enzymes, including the pectinases whose origin in Phasmatodea may have been a horizontal transfer event from bacteria.

  2. Effects of phoxim on nutrient metabolism and insulin signaling pathway in silkworm midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Fanchi; Hu, Jingsheng; Tian, Jianghai; Xu, Kaizun; Ni, Min; Wang, Binbin; Shen, Weide; Li, Bing

    2016-03-01

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an important economic insect. Each year, poisoning caused by phoxim pesticide leads to huge economic losses in sericulture in China. Silkworm midgut is the major organ for food digestion and nutrient absorption. In this study, we found that the activity and expression of nutrition metabolism-related enzymes were dysregulated in midgut by phoxim exposure. DGE analysis revealed that 40 nutrition metabolism-related genes were differentially expressed. qRT-PCR results indicated that the expression levels of insulin/insulin growth factor signaling (IIS) pathway genes Akt, PI3K, PI3K60, PI3K110, IRS and PDK were reduced, whereas PTEN's expression was significantly increased in the midgut at 24 h after phoxim treatment. However, the transcription levels of Akt, PI3K60, PI3K110, IRS, InR and PDK were elevated and reached the peaks at 48 h, which were 1.48-, 1.35-, 1.21-, 2.24-, 2.89-, and 1.44-fold of those of the control, respectively. At 72 h, the transcription of these genes was reduced. Akt phosphorylation level was increasing along with the growth of silkworms in the control group. However, phoxim treatment led to increased Akt phosphorylation that surged at 24 h but gradually decreased at 48 h and 72 h. The results indicated that phoxim dysregulated the expression of IIS pathway genes and induced abnormal nutrient metabolism in silkworm midgut, which may be the reason of the slow growth of silkworms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Aggregation of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A Toxins upon Binding to Target Insect Larval Midgut Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Arthur I.; Geng, Chaoxian; Wu, Lan

    1999-01-01

    During sporulation, Bacillus thuringiensis produces crystalline inclusions comprised of a mixture of δ-endotoxins. Following ingestion by insect larvae, these inclusion proteins are solubilized, and the protoxins are converted to toxins. These bind specifically to receptors on the surfaces of midgut apical cells and are then incorporated into the membrane to form ion channels. The steps required for toxin insertion into the membrane and possible oligomerization to form a channel have been examined. When bound to vesicles from the midguts of Manduca sexta larvae, the Cry1Ac toxin was largely resistant to digestion with protease K. Only about 60 amino acids were removed from the Cry1Ac amino terminus, which included primarily helix α1. Following incubation of the Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac toxins with vesicles, the preparations were solubilized by relatively mild conditions, and the toxin antigens were analyzed by immunoblotting. In both cases, most of the toxin formed a large, antigenic aggregate of ca. 200 kDa. These toxin aggregates did not include the toxin receptor aminopeptidase N, but interactions with other vesicle components were not excluded. No oligomerization occurred when inactive toxins with mutations in amphipathic helices (α5) and known to insert into the membrane were tested. Active toxins with other mutations in this helix did form oligomers. There was one exception; a very active helix α5 mutant toxin bound very well to membranes, but no oligomers were detected. Toxins with mutations in the loop connecting helices α2 and α3, which affected the irreversible binding to vesicles, also did not oligomerize. There was a greater extent of oligomerization of the Cry1Ac toxin with vesicles from the Heliothis virescens midgut than with those from the M. sexta midgut, which correlated with observed differences in toxicity. Tight binding of virtually the entire toxin molecule to the membrane and the subsequent oligomerization are both important steps in toxicity

  4. Cytotoxic effects of neem oil in the midgut of the predator Ceraeochrysa claveri.

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; Garcia, Ana Silvia Gimenes; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Pinheiro, Patricia Fernanda Felipe; dos Santos, Daniela Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Studies of morphological and ultrastructural alterations in target organs have been useful for evaluating the sublethal effects of biopesticides regarded as safe for non-target organisms in ecotoxicological analyses. One of the most widely used biopesticides is neem oil, and its safety and compatibility with natural enemies have been further clarified through bioassays performed to analyze the effects of indirect exposure by the intake of poisoned prey. Thus, this study examined the cellular response of midgut epithelial cells of the adult lacewing, Ceraeochrysa claveri, to neem oil exposure via intake of neem oil-contaminated prey during the larval stage. C. claveri larvae were fed Diatraea saccharalis eggs treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1% and 2% throughout the larval stage. The adult females obtained from these treatments were used at two ages (newly emerged and at the start of oviposition) in morphological and ultrastructural analyses. Neem oil was found to cause pronounced cytotoxic effects in the adult midgut, such as cell dilation, emission of cytoplasmic protrusions, cell lysis, loss of integrity of the cell cortex, dilation of cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, swollen mitochondria, vesiculated appearance of the Golgi complex and dilated invaginations of the basal labyrinth. Epithelial cells responded to those injuries with various cytoprotective and detoxification mechanisms, including increases in cell proliferation, the number of calcium-containing cytoplasmic granules, and HSP 70 expression, autophagic processes and the development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, but these mechanisms were insufficient for recovery from all of the cellular damage to the midgut. This study demonstrates that neem oil exposure impairs the midgut by causing sublethal effects that may affect the physiological functions of this organ, indicating the importance of studies of different life stages of this species and similar species to evaluate the

  5. Asian Longhorned Beetle - A New Introduction, Pest Alert

    Treesearch

    USDA Forest Service, State and Private Forestry, Northeastern Area; Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

    2008-01-01

    The Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) has been discovered attacking trees in the United States. Tunneling by beetle larvae girdles tree stems and branches. Repeated attacks lead to dieback of the tree crown and, eventually, death of the tree. ALB probably traveled to the United States inside solid wood packing material from China. The beetle has been intercepted at ports...

  6. Non-native lady beetles: a diversity of outcomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Various lady beetle species have expanded their geographic ranges following intentional or accidental introduction and subsequent establishment within new regions. In many cases, this has been accompanied by declines in native lady beetles. Long-term monitoring of lady beetle populat...

  7. Mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Treesearch

    Barbara Bentz

    2008-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is considered one of the most economically important insect species in coniferous forests of western North America. Adult beetles are capable of successfully reproducing in at least 12 North American species of Pinus (Pineacea) from southern British Columbia to northern Baja Mexico. Mountain pine beetle adults...

  8. New data on flea beetle management in cranberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Report of two trials conducted this summer for flea beetle management. The first one, conducted in the greenhouse, compares efficacy of native WI nematodes to chemical insecticides for flea beetle control. In this trial, nematodes provided similar control for flea beetles as both insecticides (Belay...

  9. Phoretic symbionts of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins)

    Treesearch

    Javier E. Mercado; Richard W. Hofstetter; Danielle M. Reboletti; Jose F. Negron

    2014-01-01

    During its life cycle, the tree-killing mountain pine beetle Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins interacts with phoretic organisms such as mites, nematodes, fungi, and bacteria. The types of associations these organisms establish with the mountain pine beetle (MPB) vary from mutualistic to antagonistic. The most studied of these interactions are those between beetle and...

  10. Dosage response mortality of Japanese beetle, masked chafer, and June beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) adults when exposed to experimental and commercially available granules containing Metarhizium brunneum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult beetles of three different white grub species, Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica, June beetle, Phyllophaga spp., and masked chafer, Cyclocephala spp. were exposed to experimental and commercially available granules containing Metarhizium brunneum (Petch) strain F52, to determine susceptibilit...

  11. Quorum-sensing signals in the microbial community of the cabbage white butterfly larval midgut

    PubMed Central

    Borlee, Bradley R; Geske, Grant D; Robinson, Courtney J; Blackwell, Helen E; Handelsman, Jo

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of this study was to examine the role of quorum-sensing (QS) signals in a multispecies microbial community. Toward this aim, we studied QS signals produced by an indigenous member and an invading pathogen of the microbial community of the cabbage white butterfly (CWB) larval midgut (Pieris rapae). As an initial step, we characterized the QS system in Pantoea CWB304, which was isolated from the larval midgut. A luxI homolog, designated panI, is necessary for the production of N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) by Pantoea CWB304. To determine whether AHL signals are exchanged in the alkaline environment of the midgut, we constructed AHL-sensing bioluminescent reporter strains in Pantoea CWB304 and a panI mutant of this strain. In the gut of the CWB larvae, the reporter in an AHL-deficient Pantoea CWB304 detected AHLs when coinoculated with the wild type. To study the role of AHL signals produced by a community invader, we examined pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in CWB larvae. Mortality induced by P. aeruginosa PAO1 was significantly reduced when signaling was interrupted by either a potent chemical inhibitor of QS or mutations in the lasI and rhlI AHL synthases of P. aeruginosa PAO1. These results show that AHLs are exchanged among bacteria in the alkaline gut of CWB larvae and contribute to disease caused by P. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:18650927

  12. Responses of midgut amylases of Helicoverpa armigera to feeding on various host plants.

    PubMed

    Kotkar, Hemlata M; Sarate, Priya J; Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2009-08-01

    Midgut digestive amylases and proteinases of Helicoverpa armigera, a polyphagous and devastating insect pest of economic importance have been studied. We also identified the potential of a sorghum amylase inhibitor against H. armigera midgut amylase. Amylase activities were detected in all the larval instars, pupae, moths and eggs; early instars had lower amylase levels which steadily increased up to the sixth larval instar. Qualitative and quantitative differences in midgut amylases of H. armigera upon feeding on natural and artificial diets were evident. Natural diets were categorized as one or more members of legumes, vegetables, flowers and cereals belonging to different plant families. Amylase activity and isoform patterns varied depending on host plant and/or artificial diet. Artificial diet-fed H. armigera larvae had comparatively high amylase activity and several unique amylase isoforms. Correlation of amylase and proteinase activities of H. armigera with the protein and carbohydrate content of various diets suggested that H. armigera regulates the levels of these digestive enzymes in response to macromolecular composition of the diet. These adjustments in the digestive enzymes of H. armigera may be to obtain better nourishment from the diet and avoid toxicity due to nutritional imbalance. H. armigera, a generalist feeder experiences a great degree of nutritional heterogeneity in its diet. An investigation of the differences in enzyme levels in response to macronutrient balance and imbalance highlight their importance in insect nutrition.

  13. Cytotoxic effects of thiamethoxam in the midgut and malpighian tubules of Africanized Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Catae, Aline Fernanda; Roat, Thaisa Cristina; De Oliveira, Regiane Alves; Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio Ferreira; Malaspina, Osmar

    2014-04-01

    Due to its expansion, agriculture has become increasingly dependent on the use of pesticides. However, the indiscriminate use of insecticides has had additional effects on the environment. These products have a broad spectrum of action, and therefore the insecticide affects not only the pests but also non-target insects such as bees, which are important pollinators of agricultural crops and natural environments. Among the most used pesticides, the neonicotinoids are particularly harmful. One of the neonicotinoids of specific concern is thiamethoxam, which is used on a wide variety of crops and is toxic to bees. Thus, this study aimed to analyze the effects of this insecticide in the midgut and Malpighian tubule cells of Africanized Apis mellifera. Newly emerged workers were exposed until 8 days to a diet containing a sublethal dose of thiamethoxam equal to 1/10 of LC₅₀ (0.0428 ng a.i./l L of diet). The bees were dissected and the organs were processed for transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that thiamethoxam is cytotoxic to midgut and Malpighian tubules. In the midgut, the damage was more evident in bees exposed to the insecticide on the first day. On the eighth day, the cells were ultrastructurally intact suggesting a recovery of this organ. The Malpighian tubules showed pronounced alterations on the eighth day of exposure of bees to the insecticide. This study demonstrates that the continuous exposure to a sublethal dose of thiamethoxam can impair organs that are used during the metabolism of the insecticide.

  14. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season.

  15. Differential Expression Profiles in the Midgut of Triatoma infestans Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Buarque, Diego S.; Braz, Glória R. C.; Martins, Rafael M.; Tanaka-Azevedo, Anita M.; Gomes, Cícera M.; Oliveira, Felipe A. A.; Schenkman, Sergio; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and is transmitted by insects from the Triatominae subfamily. To identify components involved in the protozoan-vector relationship, we constructed and analyzed cDNA libraries from RNA isolated from the midguts of uninfected and T. cruzi-infected Triatoma infestans, which are major vectors of Chagas disease. We generated approximately 440 high-quality Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from each T. infestans midgut cDNA library. The sequences were grouped in 380 clusters, representing an average length of 664.78 base pairs (bp). Many clusters were not classified functionally, representing unknown transcripts. Several transcripts involved in different processes (e.g., detoxification) showed differential expression in response to T. cruzi infection. Lysozyme, cathepsin D, a nitrophorin-like protein and a putative 14 kDa protein were significantly upregulated upon infection, whereas thioredoxin reductase was downregulated. In addition, we identified several transcripts related to metabolic processes or immunity with unchanged expressions, including infestin, lipocalins and defensins. We also detected ESTs encoding juvenile hormone binding protein (JHBP), which seems to be involved in insect development and could be a target in control strategies for the vector. This work demonstrates differential gene expression upon T. cruzi infection in the midgut of T. infestans. These data expand the current knowledge regarding vector-parasite interactions for Chagas disease. PMID:23658688

  16. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against midgut of ixodid tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Mie; Kodama, Michi; Yanase, Haruko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Mulenga, Albert; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Onuma, Misao

    2003-08-14

    There are concerted efforts toward development of tick vaccines to replace current chemical control strategies that have serious limitations [Parasitologia 32 (1990) 145; Infectious Disease Clinics of North America (1999) 209-226]. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to Haemaphysalis longicornis midgut proteins were produced and characterized. Eight antibody-secreting hybridomas were cloned and the mAbs typed as IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b. On immunoblots, all mAbs reacted with a midgut protein band of about 76 kDa. All mAbs uniformly immunogold-stained the surface or epithelial layers of H. longicornis midgut and endosomes. Adult ticks (50%) that fed on an ascitic mouse producing the IgGs developed a red coloration and did not oviposit. As such, the 76 kDa protein that reacted with the mAbs could, therefore, be a potential candidate for tick vaccine development.

  17. Dynamics of midgut microflora and dengue virus impact on life history traits in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Hill, Casey L; Sharma, Avinash; Shouche, Yogesh; Severson, David W

    2014-12-01

    Significant morbidity and potential mortality following dengue virus infection is a re-emerging global health problem. Due to the limited effectiveness of current disease control methods, mosquito biologists have been searching for new methods of controlling dengue transmission. While much effort has concentrated on determining genetic aspects to vector competence, paratransgenetic approaches could also uncover novel vector control strategies. The interactions of mosquito midgut microflora and pathogens may play significant roles in vector biology. However, little work has been done to see how the microbiome influences the host's fitness and ultimately vector competence. Here we investigated the effects of the midgut microbial environment and dengue infection on several fitness characteristics among three strains of the primary dengue virus vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. This included comparisons of dengue infection rates of females with and without their normal midgut flora. According to our findings, few effects on fitness characteristics were evident following microbial clearance or with dengue virus infection. Adult survivorship significantly varied due to strain and in one strain varied due to antibiotic treatment. Fecundity varied in one strain due to microbial clearance by antibiotics but no variation was observed in fertility due to either treatment. We show here that fitness characteristics of Ae. aegypti vary largely between strains, including varying response to microflora presence or absence, but did not vary in response to dengue virus infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Midgut Microbiota of the Malaria Mosquito Vector Anopheles gambiae and Interactions with Plasmodium falciparum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Boissière, Anne; Tchioffo, Majoline T.; Bachar, Dipankar; Abate, Luc; Marie, Alexandra; Nsango, Sandrine E.; Shahbazkia, Hamid R.; Awono-Ambene, Parfait H.; Levashina, Elena A.; Christen, Richard; Morlais, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The susceptibility of Anopheles mosquitoes to Plasmodium infections relies on complex interactions between the insect vector and the malaria parasite. A number of studies have shown that the mosquito innate immune responses play an important role in controlling the malaria infection and that the strength of parasite clearance is under genetic control, but little is known about the influence of environmental factors on the transmission success. We present here evidence that the composition of the vector gut microbiota is one of the major components that determine the outcome of mosquito infections. A. gambiae mosquitoes collected in natural breeding sites from Cameroon were experimentally challenged with a wild P. falciparum isolate, and their gut bacterial content was submitted for pyrosequencing analysis. The meta-taxogenomic approach revealed a broader richness of the midgut bacterial flora than previously described. Unexpectedly, the majority of bacterial species were found in only a small proportion of mosquitoes, and only 20 genera were shared by 80% of individuals. We show that observed differences in gut bacterial flora of adult mosquitoes is a result of breeding in distinct sites, suggesting that the native aquatic source where larvae were grown determines the composition of the midgut microbiota. Importantly, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae in the mosquito midgut correlates significantly with the Plasmodium infection status. This striking relationship highlights the role of natural gut environment in parasite transmission. Deciphering microbe-pathogen interactions offers new perspectives to control disease transmission. PMID:22693451

  19. Ultrastructure of the larval midgut of Bittacus planus (Mecoptera: Bittacidae) and Neopanorpa longiprocessa (Mecoptera: Panorpidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Hua, Bao-Zhen

    2017-08-08

    Bittacidae and Panorpidae are the two largest families in Mecoptera. The larvae of Bittacidae are different from those of Panorpidae in external morphology and habits, and have an interesting habit of spraying the body surface with soil through the anus. However, it remains unknown to date whether the larval midguts are different in structure between the two families. Here the ultrastructure of the larval midguts of the hangingfly Bittacus planus Cheng and the scorpionfly Neopanorpa longiprocessa Hua & Chou were compared using light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. The midguts of both species are simple tubes of single layered epithelia with digestive and regenerative cells but without diverticula. The basal plasma membrane of epithelial cells exhibits infolding in B. planus, but is closely apposed to its basal lamina in N. longiprocessa. Lymph spaces are present between adjacent epithelial cells in B. planus, but are absent in N. longiprocessa. The regenerative cells are scattered among the digestive cells in B. planus, but are aggregated in N. longiprocessa. The longitudinal muscle bands are compact in B. planus, but are sparse in N. longiprocessa. The compact longitudinal muscle bands are likely associated with their soil-spraying habit in Bittacidae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season. PMID:26330094

  1. Dynamics of Midgut Microflora and Dengue Virus Impact on Life History Traits in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Casey L.; Sharma, Avinash; Shouche, Yogesh; Severson, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Significant morbidity and potential mortality following dengue virus infection is a re-emerging global health problem. Due to the limited effectiveness of current disease control methods, mosquito biologists have been searching for new methods of controlling dengue transmission. While much effort has concentrated on determining genetic aspects to vector competence, paratransgenetic approaches could also uncover novel vector control strategies. The interactions of mosquito midgut microflora and pathogens may play significant roles in vector biology. However, little work has been done to see how the microbiome influences the host's fitness and ultimately vector competence. Here we investigated the effects of the midgut microbial environment and dengue infection on several fitness characteristics among three strains of the primary dengue virus vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. This included comparisons of dengue infection rates of females with and without their normal midgut flora. According to our findings, few effects on fitness characteristics were evident following microbial clearance or with dengue virus infection. Adult survivorship significantly varied due to strain and in one strain varied due to antibiotic treatment. Fecundity varied in one strain due to microbial clearance by antibiotics but no variation was observed in fertility due to either treatment. We show here that fitness characteristics of Ae. aegypti vary largely between strains, including varying response to microflora presence or absence, but did not vary in response to dengue virus infection. PMID:25193134

  2. Contrasting diets reveal metabolic plasticity in the tree-killing beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Cerambycidae: Lamiinae).

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Scully, Erin D; Geib, Scott M; Hoover, Kelli

    2016-09-22

    Wood-feeding insects encounter challenging diets containing low protein quantities, recalcitrant carbohydrate sources, and plant defensive compounds. The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is a wood-feeding insect that attacks and kills a diversity of hardwood tree species. We compared gene expression of midguts collected from larvae feeding in a preferred tree, sugar maple, to those consuming a nutrient-rich artificial diet, to identify genes putatively involved in host plant utilization. Anoplophora glabripennis larvae exhibited differential expression of ~3600 genes in response to different diets. Genes with predicted capacity for plant and microbial carbohydrate usage, detoxification, nutrient recycling, and immune-related genes relevant for facilitating interactions with microbial symbionts were upregulated in wood-feeding larvae compared to larvae feeding in artificial diet. Upregulation of genes involved in protein degradation and synthesis was also observed, suggesting that proteins incur more rapid turnover in insects consuming wood. Additionally, wood-feeding individuals exhibited elevated expression of several mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase genes, suggesting increased aerobic respiration compared to diet-fed larvae. These results indicate that A. glabripennis modulates digestive and basal gene expression when larvae are feeding in a nutrient-poor, yet suitable host plant compared to a tractable and nutrient-rich diet that is free of plant defensive compounds.

  3. Contrasting diets reveal metabolic plasticity in the tree-killing beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Cerambycidae: Lamiinae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Charles J.; Scully, Erin D.; Geib, Scott M.; Hoover, Kelli

    2016-09-01

    Wood-feeding insects encounter challenging diets containing low protein quantities, recalcitrant carbohydrate sources, and plant defensive compounds. The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is a wood-feeding insect that attacks and kills a diversity of hardwood tree species. We compared gene expression of midguts collected from larvae feeding in a preferred tree, sugar maple, to those consuming a nutrient-rich artificial diet, to identify genes putatively involved in host plant utilization. Anoplophora glabripennis larvae exhibited differential expression of ~3600 genes in response to different diets. Genes with predicted capacity for plant and microbial carbohydrate usage, detoxification, nutrient recycling, and immune-related genes relevant for facilitating interactions with microbial symbionts were upregulated in wood-feeding larvae compared to larvae feeding in artificial diet. Upregulation of genes involved in protein degradation and synthesis was also observed, suggesting that proteins incur more rapid turnover in insects consuming wood. Additionally, wood-feeding individuals exhibited elevated expression of several mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase genes, suggesting increased aerobic respiration compared to diet-fed larvae. These results indicate that A. glabripennis modulates digestive and basal gene expression when larvae are feeding in a nutrient-poor, yet suitable host plant compared to a tractable and nutrient-rich diet that is free of plant defensive compounds.

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of neutral ceramidase homologue from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Lin, Xian-Wen; Yang, Qiong; Zhang, Yan-Ru; Yuan, Jing-Qun; Lin, Xin-Da; Xu, Ruijuan; Cheng, Jiaan; Mao, Cungui; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2011-07-01

    Ceramidase plays an important role in regulating the metabolism of sphingolipids, such as ceramide, sphingosine (SPH), and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), by controlling the hydrolysis of ceramide. Here we report the cloning and biochemical characterization of a neutral ceramidase from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum which is an important storage pest. The Tribolium castaneum neutral ceramidase (Tncer) is a protein of 696 amino acids. It shares a high degree of similarity in protein sequence to neutral ceramidases from various species. Tncer mRNA levels are higher in the adult stage than in pre-adult stages, and they are higher in the reproductive organs than in head, thorax, and midgut. The mature ovary has higher mRNA levels than the immature ovary. Tncer is localized to the plasma membrane. It uses various ceramides (D-erythro-C(6), C(12), C(16), C(18:1), and C(24:1)-ceramide) as substrates and has an abroad pH optimum for its in vitro activity. Tncer has an optimal temperature of 37 °C for its in vitro activity. Its activity is inhibited by Fe(2+). These results suggest that Tncer has distinct biochemical properties from neutral ceramidases from other species.

  5. Combining Hexanoic Acid Plant Priming with Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Activity against Colorado Potato Beetle

    PubMed Central

    García-Robles, Inmaculada; Ochoa-Campuzano, Camila; Fernández-Crespo, Emma; Camañes, Gemma; Martínez-Ramírez, Amparo C.; González-Bosch, Carmen; García-Agustín, Pilar; Rausell, Carolina; Real, María Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Interaction between insect herbivores and host plants can be modulated by endogenous and exogenous compounds present in the source of food and might be successfully exploited in Colorado potato beetle (CPB) pest management. Feeding tests with CPB larvae reared on three solanaceous plants (potato, eggplant and tomato) resulted in variable larval growth rates and differential susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin as a function of the host plant. An inverse correlation with toxicity was observed in Cry3Aa proteolytic patterns generated by CPB midgut brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from Solanaceae-fed larvae, being the toxin most extensively proteolyzed on potato, followed by eggplant and tomato. We found that CPB cysteine proteases intestains may interact with Cry3Aa toxin and, in CPB BBMV from larvae fed all three Solanaceae, the toxin was able to compete for the hydrolysis of a papain substrate. In response to treatment with the JA-dependent plant inducer Hexanoic acid (Hx), we showed that eggplant reduced OPDA basal levels and both, potato and eggplant induced JA-Ile. CPB larvae feeding on Hx-induced plants exhibited enhanced Cry3Aa toxicity, which correlated with altered papain activity. Results indicated host-mediated effects on B. thuringiensis efficacy against CPB that can be enhanced in combination with Hx plant induction. PMID:23743826

  6. Contrasting diets reveal metabolic plasticity in the tree-killing beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Cerambycidae: Lamiinae)

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Charles J.; Scully, Erin D.; Geib, Scott M.; Hoover, Kelli

    2016-01-01

    Wood-feeding insects encounter challenging diets containing low protein quantities, recalcitrant carbohydrate sources, and plant defensive compounds. The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is a wood-feeding insect that attacks and kills a diversity of hardwood tree species. We compared gene expression of midguts collected from larvae feeding in a preferred tree, sugar maple, to those consuming a nutrient-rich artificial diet, to identify genes putatively involved in host plant utilization. Anoplophora glabripennis larvae exhibited differential expression of ~3600 genes in response to different diets. Genes with predicted capacity for plant and microbial carbohydrate usage, detoxification, nutrient recycling, and immune-related genes relevant for facilitating interactions with microbial symbionts were upregulated in wood-feeding larvae compared to larvae feeding in artificial diet. Upregulation of genes involved in protein degradation and synthesis was also observed, suggesting that proteins incur more rapid turnover in insects consuming wood. Additionally, wood-feeding individuals exhibited elevated expression of several mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase genes, suggesting increased aerobic respiration compared to diet-fed larvae. These results indicate that A. glabripennis modulates digestive and basal gene expression when larvae are feeding in a nutrient-poor, yet suitable host plant compared to a tractable and nutrient-rich diet that is free of plant defensive compounds. PMID:27654346

  7. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of midgut in silkworm infected with Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kun; Deng, Xiang-Yuan; Shang, Meng-Ke; Qin, Guang-Xing; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2017-01-30

    Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) specifically infects the epithelial cells in the midgut of silkworm and causes them to death, which negatively affects the sericulture industry. In order to determine the midgut response at the protein levels to the virus infection, differential proteomes of the silkworm midgut responsive to BmCPV infection were identified with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). 193, 408, 189 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were reliably quantified by iTRAQ analysis in the midgut of BmCPV-infected and control larvae at 24, 48, 72h post infection (hpi) respectively. KEGG enrichment analysis showed that Oxidative phosphorylation, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, steroid hormone biosynthesis were the significant pathways (Q value≤0.05) both at 24 and 48hpi. qRT-PCR was used to further verify gene transcription of 30 DEPs from iTRAQ, showing that the regulations of 24 genes at the transcript level were consistent with those at the proteomic level. Moreover, the cluster analysis of the three time groups showed that there were seven co-regulated DEPs including BGIBMGA002620-PA, which was a putative p62/sequestosome-1 protein in silkworm. It was upregulated at both the mRNA level and the proteomic level and may play an important role in regulating the autophagy and apoptosis (especially apoptosis) induced by BmCPV infection. This was the first report using an iTRAQ approach to analyze proteomes of the silkworm midgut against BmCPV infection, which contributes to understanding the defense mechanisms of silkworm midgut to virus infection. The domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori, is renowned for silk production as well as being a traditional lepidopteron model insect served as a subject for morphological, genetic, physiological, and developmental studies. Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis

  8. Host blood proteins and peptides in the midgut of the tick Dermacentor variabilis contribute to bacterial control.

    PubMed

    Sonenshine, Daniel E; Hynes, Wayne L; Ceraul, Shane M; Mitchell, Robert; Benzine, Tiffany

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial midgut proteins and peptides that result from blood digestion in feeding American dog ticks Dermacentor variabilis (Say) were identified. Midgut extracts from these ticks showed antimicrobial activity against Micrococcus luteus, regardless of whether they were challenged with peptidoglycan, blood meal components, rabbit blood, Bacillus subtilis, Escherischia coli or Borrelia burgdorferi. However, no peptide band co-migrating with defensin was found in midgut extracts from the challenged ticks. Partial purification of the midgut extracts using C(18) Sep Paks and gel electrophoresis showed the presence of 4 distinct bands with rMW 4.1, 5.3, 5.7 and 8.0 kDa identified by tryptic digestion-mass fingerprinting as digestive fragments of rabbit alpha-, beta-, gamma-chain hemoglobin, and rabbit ubiquitin. No evidence of varisin, a defensin previously identified in the hemolymph of D. variabilis, was found in the tryptic digest, although varisin was found in a hemocyte lysate using the same methods. However, varisin transcript was detected in midgut cell lysates. Also present in all midgut samples was a cluster of 3 overlapping bands with rMW 13.0, 14.1 and 14.7 kDa which were identified by tryptic-digestion LC-MS and MALDI-TOF as rabbit alpha- and beta-chain hemoglobin (undigested) and transtherytin. Lysozyme transcript was detected in midgut cell extracts but the peptide was not. Studies done on other tick species demonstrated that hemoglobin digestion resulted in antimicrobial fragments. Antimicrobial hemoglobin fragments (including fragments larger than any reported previously) also were found in D. variabilis, as well as ubiquitin, a peptide known to occur as part of an antimicrobial complex in vertebrate leukocytes. In addition, we noted that Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes were not lysed in the midgut lumen, which would be expected if defensin and lysozyme were active in this location. In this respect, the midgut's response to microbial challenge

  9. Disruption by conophthorin of the kairomonal response of sawyer beetles to bark beetle pheromones.

    PubMed

    Morewood, W D; Simmonds, K E; Gries, R; Allison, J D; Borden, J H

    2003-09-01

    Antennally active nonhost angiosperm bark volatiles were tested for their ability to reduce the response of three common species of coniferophagous wood-boring Cerambycidae to attractant-baited multiple funnel traps in the southern interior of British Columbia. Of the nonhost volatiles tested, only conophthorin was behaviorally active, disrupting the attraction of sawyer beetles, Monochamus spp., to traps baited with the host volatiles alpha-pinene and ethanol and the bark beetle pheromones ipsenol and ipsdienol. Conophthorin did not affect the attraction of sawyer beetles to the host kairomones alpha-pinene and ethanol in the absence of bark beetle pheromones, nor did it have any behavioral effect on adults of Xylotrechus longitarsis, which were not attracted to bark beetle pheromones. These results indicate that conophthorin does not act as a general repellent for coniferophagous Cerambycidae, as it seems to do for many species of Scolytidae, but has the specific activity of disrupting the kairomonal response of sawyer beetles to bark beetle pheromones.

  10. Thermal and water relations of desert beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloudsley-Thompson, J.

    2001-11-01

    The physical problems that living organisms have to contend with in hot deserts are primarily extremes of temperature, low humidity, shortage or absence of free water, and the environmental factors that accentuate these - such as strong winds, sand-storms, lack of shade, rocky and impenetrable soils. Climatic factors are particularly important to smaller animals such as arthropods on account of their relatively enormous surface to volume ratios. Nevertheless, beetles (especially Tenebrionidae and, to a lesser extent, Chrysomelidae) are among the most successful animals of the desert, and are often the only ones to be seen abroad during the day. Similar physical problems are experienced by insects in all terrestrial biomes, but they are much enhanced in the desert. Although climatic extremes are often avoided by burrowing habits coupled with circadian and seasonal activity rhythms, as well as reproductive phenology, several species of desert beetle are nevertheless able to withstand thermal extremes that would rapidly cause the death of most other arthropods including insects. The reactions of desert beetles to heat are largely behavioural whilst their responses to water shortage are primarily physiological. The effects of coloration are not discussed. In addition to markedly low rates of transpiration, desert beetles can also withstand a considerable reduction in the water content of their tissues. The study of desert beetles is important because it illustrates many of the solutions evolved by arthropods to the problems engendered, in an extreme form, by life in all terrestrial environments.

  11. Thermal and water relations of desert beetles.

    PubMed

    Cloudsley-Thompson, J L

    2001-11-01

    The physical problems that living organisms have to contend with in hot deserts are primarily extremes of temperature, low humidity, shortage or absence of free water, and the environmental factors that accentuate these--such as strong winds, sand-storms, lack of shade, rocky and impenetrable soils. Climatic factors are particularly important to smaller animals such as arthropods on account of their relatively enormous surface to volume ratios. Nevertheless, beetles (especially Tenebrionidae and, to a lesser extent, Chrysomelidae) are among the most successful animals of the desert, and are often the only ones to be seen abroad during the day. Similar physical problems are experienced by insects in all terrestrial biomes, but they are much enhanced in the desert. Although climatic extremes are often avoided by burrowing habits coupled with circadian and seasonal activity rhythms, as well as reproductive phenology, several species of desert beetle are nevertheless able to withstand thermal extremes that would rapidly cause the death of most other arthropods including insects. The reactions of desert beetles to heat are largely behavioural whilst their responses to water shortage are primarily physiological. The effects of coloration are not discussed. In addition to markedly low rates of transpiration, desert beetles can also withstand a considerable reduction in the water content of their tissues. The study of desert beetles is important because it illustrates many of the solutions evolved by arthropods to the problems engendered, in an extreme form, by life in all terrestrial environments.

  12. Isolation of midgut escape mutants of two American genotype dengue 2 viruses from Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that American genotype dengue 2 viruses (DENV2) have reduced viral fitness in the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, compared to other DENV2 genotypes. Diminished replication efficiency or inability to efficiently traverse membrane barriers encompassing organs such as the midgut or salivary glands are considered major factors negatively impacting viral fitness in the mosquito. Results We analyzed the vector competence of Ae. aegypti for two American DENV2 strains, QR94 and PR159 originating from Mexico and Puerto-Rico, respectively. Both strains infected mosquito midguts following acquisition of infectious bloodmeals. However, DENV2-QR94 and DENV2-PR159 poorly disseminated from the midgut at 7 or 14 days post-bloodmeal (pbm). We detected one virus isolate, EM33, among 31 DENV2-QR94 infected mosquitoes, and one isolate, EM41, among 121 DENV2-PR159 infected mosquitoes, generating high virus titers in mosquito carcasses at 7 days pbm. In oral challenge experiments, EM33 and EM41 showed midgut dissemination rates of 40-50%. Replication efficiency of EM41 in secondary mosquito tissue was similar to that of a dissemination-competent control strain, whereas the replication efficiency of EM33 was significantly lower than that of the control virus. The genome sequence of DENV2-QR94 encoded seven unique amino acids (aa), which were not found in 100 of the most closely related DENV2 strains. EM33 had one additional aa change, E202K, in the E protein. DENV2-PR159 encoded four unique aa residues, one of them E202K, whereas EM41 had two additional aa substitutions, Q77E in the E protein and E93D in NS3. Conclusions Our results indicate that the midgut of Ae. aegypti acts as a selective sieve for DENV2 in which genetically distinct, dissemination-competent virus variants are rapidly selected from the viral quasispecies to be transmitted to vertebrates. PMID:23937713

  13. Intrinsic Defense Mechanisms of the Intestinal Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Deepshika; Cadwell, Ken

    2016-04-13

    The intestinal epithelium is a single cell layer that facilitates the absorption of nutrients but also provides a tight barrier to prevent pathogen invasion and dissemination of commensal microbes. Specialized epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract achieve this frontline defense by working in concert with lymphoid, myeloid, and stromal cells to secrete an array of factors that limit direct contact between the epithelium and infectious agents. The importance of these mechanisms is underscored by the ability of enteric pathogens to target these mechanisms to achieve invasion and dissemination. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of these intricate molecular and cellular mechanisms adopted by these cells to promote spatial segregation and barrier maintenance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intrinsic Defense Mechanisms of the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ramanan, Deepshika; Cadwell, Ken

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal epithelium is a single cell layer that facilitates the absorption of nutrients but also provides a tight barrier to prevent pathogen invasion and dissemination of commensal microbes. Specialized epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract achieve this front-line defense by working in concert with lymphoid, myeloid, and stromal cells to secrete an array of factors that limit direct contact between the epithelium and infectious agents. The importance of these mechanisms is underscored by the ability of enteric pathogens to target these mechanisms to achieve invasion and dissemination. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of these intricate molecular and cellular mechanisms adopted by these cells to promote spatial segregation and barrier maintenance. PMID:27049583

  15. Lung alveolar epithelium and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Flamein, Florence; Epaud, Ralph; Clement, Annick; Guillot, Loic

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) comprise a group of lung disorders characterized by various levels of inflammation and fibrosis. The current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of ILD strongly suggests a central role of the alveolar epithelium. Following injury, alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may actively participate in the restoration of a normal alveolar architecture through a coordinated process of re-epithelialization, or in the development of fibrosis through a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Complex networks orchestrate EMT leading to changes in cell architecture and behaviour, loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal properties. In the lung, AECs themselves may serve as a source of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by acquiring a mesenchymal phenotype. This review covers recent knowledge on the role of alveolar epithelium in the pathogenesis of ILD. The mechanisms underlying disease progression are discussed, with a main focus on the apoptotic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and the developmental pathway.

  16. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Varner, Victor D; Gleghorn, Jason P; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C; Nelson, Celeste M

    2015-07-28

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo.

  17. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  18. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  19. [Neutrophils and monocytes in gingival epithelium

    PubMed

    Meng, H X; Zheng, L P

    1994-06-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes of gingival epithellium in health gingiva(H),marginal gingivitis(MG),juvenile periodontitis(JP),adult periodontitis(AP) and subgingival bacteria were quantitated and analyzed,The results showed that the numbers of PMN within either pocket epithelium or oral gingival epithelium in JP were significantly lower than in AP and G.The amounts of PMN in AP were much larger than other three groups.Positive correlation between the number of PMN in sulcular pocket epitelium and the motile bacteri of subgingival plaque was demonstrated by correlation analysis.Monocytes mainly presented in deep pocket and junctional epithelum which were stained by NAE method,however very few Langhans cells were seen in these areas.

  20. Airway epithelium stimulates smooth muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Malavia, Nikita K; Raub, Christopher B; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Panettieri, Reynold A; George, Steven C

    2009-09-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air-liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM) using commercially available Transwells. In some co-cultures, the NHBE were repeatedly (x4) scrape-injured. An in vivo model of tracheal injury consisted of gently denuding the tracheal epithelium (x3) of a rabbit over 5 days and then examining the trachea by histology 3 days after the last injury. Our results show that HASM cell number increases 2.5-fold in the presence of NHBE, and 4.3-fold in the presence of injured NHBE compared with HASM alone after 8 days of in vitro co-culture. In addition, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and, more markedly, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration increased in co-culture correlating with enhanced HASM growth. Inhibiting MMP-9 release significantly attenuated the NHBE-dependent HASM proliferation in co-culture. In vivo, the injured rabbit trachea demonstrated proliferation in the smooth muscle (trachealis) region and significant MMP-9 staining, which was absent in the uninjured control. The airway epithelium modulates smooth muscle cell proliferation via a mechanism that involves secretion of soluble mediators including potential smooth muscle mitogens such as IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, but also through a novel MMP-9-dependent mechanism.

  1. Study on Fungal Flora in the Midgut of the Larva and Adult of the Different Populations of the Malaria Vector Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Tajedin, L; Hashemi, J; Abaei, MR; Hosseinpour, L; Rafei, F; Basseri, HR

    2009-01-01

    Background Many microorganisms in midgut of mosquito challenge with their host and also other pathogens present in midgut. The aim of this study was presence of non-pathogens microorganisms like fungal flora which may be crucial on interaction between vectors and pathogens. Methods: Different populations of Anopheles stephensi were reared in insectary and objected to determine fungal flora in their midguts. The midgut paunch of mosquito adults and larvae as well as breading water and larval food samples transferred on Subaru-dextrose agar, in order to detect the environment fungus. Results: Although four fungi, Aspergillus, Rhizopus, Geotrichum and Sacharomyces were found in the food and water, but only Aspiragilus observed in the midgut of larvae. No fungus was found in the midgut of adults. This is the first report on fungal flora in the midgut of the adults and larvae of An. stephensi and possible stadial transmission of fungi from immature stages to adults. Conclusion: The midgut environment of adults is not compatible for survivorship of fungi but the larval midgut may contain few fungi as a host or even pathogen. PMID:22808370

  2. Small hive beetles survive in honeybee prisons by behavioural mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J. D.; Pirk, C. W. W.; Hepburn, H. R.; Kastberger, G.; Elzen, P. J.

    2002-05-01

    We report the results of a simple experiment to determine whether honeybees feed their small hive beetle nest parasites. Honeybees incarcerate the beetles in cells constructed of plant resins and continually guard them. The longevity of incarcerated beetles greatly exceeds their metabolic reserves. We show that survival of small hive beetles derives from behavioural mimicry by which the beetles induce the bees to feed them trophallactically. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at htpp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00114-002-0326-y.

  3. Ground beetles of the Ukraine (Coleoptera, Carabidae).

    PubMed

    Putchkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A review of the ground beetles of the Ukrainian fauna is given. Almost 750 species from 117 genera of Carabidae are known to occur in the Ukraine. Approximately 450 species of ground beetles are registered in the Carpathian region. No less than 300 species of ground beetles are found in the forest zone. Approximately 400 species of Carabidae present in the forest-steppe zone are relatively similar in species composition to those in the forest territories. Some 450 species of Carabidae are inhabitants of the steppe zone. Representatives of many other regions of heterogeneous biotopes such as forest, semi desert, intrazonal, etc. can be found in the steppe areas. The fauna of Carabidae (ca. 100 species) of the lowlands of southern Ukraine (sandy biotopes), situated mostly in the Kherson region, is very peculiar. The fauna of the Crimean mountains contains about 300 species. Conservation measures for the Carabidae are discussed.

  4. Ground beetles of the Ukraine (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    PubMed Central

    Putchkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A review of the ground beetles of the Ukrainian fauna is given. Almost 750 species from 117 genera of Carabidae are known to occur in the Ukraine. Approximately 450 species of ground beetles are registered in the Carpathian region. No less than 300 species of ground beetles are found in the forest zone. Approximately 400 species of Carabidae present in the forest-steppe zone are relatively similar in species composition to those in the forest territories. Some 450 species of Carabidae are inhabitants of the steppe zone. Representatives of many other regions of heterogeneous biotopes such as forest, semi desert, intrazonal, etc. can be found in the steppe areas. The fauna of Carabidae (ca. 100 species) of the lowlands of southern Ukraine (sandy biotopes), situated mostly in the Kherson region, is very peculiar. The fauna of the Crimean mountains contains about 300 species. Conservation measures for the Carabidae are discussed. PMID:21738430

  5. The Effects of Thinning on Beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Cerambycidae) in Bottomland Hardwood Forests

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Warriner; T. Evan Nebeker; Theodor D. Leininger; James S. Meadows

    2002-01-01

    Abstract - The responses of two groups of beetles, ground beetles (Carabidae) and longhorned beetles (Cerambycidae), to a partial cutting technique (thinning) applied to major and minor stream bottom sites in Mississippi were examined. Species diversity of ground beetles and longhorned beetles was greater in thinned stands than unthinned stands two...

  6. Developmental constraints in cave beetles.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Alexandra; Fresneda, Javier; Ribera, Ignacio

    2014-10-01

    In insects, whilst variations in life cycles are common, the basic patterns typical for particular groups remain generally conserved. One of the more extreme modifications is found in some subterranean beetles of the tribe Leptodirini, in which the number of larval instars is reduced from the ancestral three to two and ultimately one, which is not active and does not feed. We analysed all available data on the duration and size of the different developmental stages and compared them in a phylogenetic context. The total duration of development was found to be strongly conserved, irrespective of geographical location, habitat type, number of instars and feeding behaviour of the larvae, with a single alteration of the developmental pattern in a clade of cave species in southeast France. We also found a strong correlation of the size of the first instar larva with adult size, again regardless of geographical location, ecology and type of life cycle. Both results suggest the presence of deeply conserved constraints in the timing and energy requirements of larval development. Past focus on more apparent changes, such as the number of larval instars, may mask more deeply conserved ontogenetic patterns in developmental timing. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Developmental constraints in cave beetles

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Alexandra; Fresneda, Javier; Ribera, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    In insects, whilst variations in life cycles are common, the basic patterns typical for particular groups remain generally conserved. One of the more extreme modifications is found in some subterranean beetles of the tribe Leptodirini, in which the number of larval instars is reduced from the ancestral three to two and ultimately one, which is not active and does not feed. We analysed all available data on the duration and size of the different developmental stages and compared them in a phylogenetic context. The total duration of development was found to be strongly conserved, irrespective of geographical location, habitat type, number of instars and feeding behaviour of the larvae, with a single alteration of the developmental pattern in a clade of cave species in southeast France. We also found a strong correlation of the size of the first instar larva with adult size, again regardless of geographical location, ecology and type of life cycle. Both results suggest the presence of deeply conserved constraints in the timing and energy requirements of larval development. Past focus on more apparent changes, such as the number of larval instars, may mask more deeply conserved ontogenetic patterns in developmental timing. PMID:25354919

  8. Dung beetles and fecal helminth transmission: patterns, mechanisms and questions.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Elizabeth; Gómez, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    Dung beetles are detrivorous insects that feed on and reproduce in the fecal material of vertebrates. This dependency on vertebrate feces implies frequent contact between dung beetles and parasitic helminths with a fecal component to their life-cycle. Interactions between dung beetles and helminths carry both positive and negative consequences for successful parasite transmission, however to date there has been no systematic review of dung beetle-helminth interactions, their epidemiological importance, or their underlying mechanisms. Here we review the observational evidence of beetle biodiversity-helminth transmission relationships, propose five mechanisms by which dung beetles influence helminth survival and transmission, and highlight areas for future research. Efforts to understand how anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity may influence parasite transmission must include the development of detailed, mechanistic understanding of the multiple interactions between free-living and parasitic species within ecological communities. The dung beetle-helminth system may be a promising future model system with which to understand these complex relationships.

  9. Novel organelles in primate retinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, A; Gouras, P

    2016-10-01

    We are investigating age-related changes in organelles in monkey retinal epithelium using transmission and analytic electron microscopy. We previously described a circular organelle in retinal epithelium with a diameter of about 0.5μm. The organelle is unique in containing a single, round vacuole within an otherwise electron dense interior. We suggested that the organelle might be a melanosome with lysosomal properties. We now find that there are two similar organelles with such a single vacuole but which differ in their chemical composition, electron density, cell location and according to age. Epon embedded sections from the macular epithelium of seven monkeys, ranging from 1 to 35 years of age, were examined by transmission electron microscopy. A seven year old monkey was processed for analytic electron microscopy to determine the chemical composition of the organelles. The number and location of the organelles in the retinal epithelium were determined. The chemical composition of these two organelles was different. One of the organelles contained high mole fractions of oxygen and nitrogen and little phosphorous characteristic of melanin; the other had little oxygen and nitrogen and higher mole fractions of phosphorous uncharacteristic of melanin, but more common with lysosomal organelles. The latter had an electron dense rim around the vacuole, a less electron dense interior than the melanin containing organelle and also contained iron. The melanin containing organelle was more common in young monkeys and in the middle third of the cell. The organelle without melanin was more common in old monkeys and localized in the basal third of the cell. Two similarly vacuolated organelles, not identified before in retinal epithelium, differ in their chemical composition. One contains melanin; the other does not. The former is more common in young and the latter more common in old monkeys. This suggests reorganization and or degradation of melanin-containing organelles

  10. Dispersal of the spruce beetle, `dendroctonus rufipennis`, and the engraver beetle, `ips perturbatus`, in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.A.; Holsten, E.H.

    1997-09-01

    Mark-release-recapture experiments were performed with spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby)) and Ips engraver beetles (Ips perturbatus (Eichhoff)) to determine distance and direction of dispersal. The recapture rate of beetles marked with fluorescent powder was extremely low. Most I. perturbatus beetles dispersed up to 30 m from their overwintering sites compared to most D. rufipennis, which dispersed from 90 to 300 m. Ips perturbatus beetles were caught up to 90 m and D. rufipennis up to 600 m from the point of release.

  11. Microbe inhibition by Tribolium flour beetles varies with beetle species, strain, sex, and microbe group.

    PubMed

    Prendeville, Holly R; Stevens, Lori

    2002-06-01

    Tribolium flour beetles produce defensive compounds, including quinones, putatively aimed at deterring predators and inhibiting microbes. Here we examine how effective the defensive secretions of Tribolium confusum and T. castaneum are at inhibiting growth of various microbes and how this varies with species, geographic strain, and sex of the beetles. We explore differences at both the kingdom and species level of common flour microbes in their susceptibility to defensive compounds. Beetle species and strains vary in their ability to inhibit microbial growth. In addition, microbes vary in their sensitivity to the beetles' defense compounds. The capability to suppress microbial growth is likely under stabilizing selection with optimum quinone production varying among populations and may be dependent on several environmental factors including temperature, humidity, and predators.

  12. Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Fungal Associates of Conifer Bark Beetles and their Potential in Bark Beetle Control.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Dineshkumar; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Hammerbacher, Almuth

    2016-09-01

    Conifer bark beetles attack and kill mature spruce and pine trees, especially during hot and dry conditions. These beetles are closely associated with ophiostomatoid fungi of the Ascomycetes, including the genera Ophiostoma, Grosmannia, and Endoconidiophora, which enhance beetle success by improving nutrition and modifying their substrate, but also have negative impacts on beetles by attracting predators and parasites. A survey of the literature and our own data revealed that ophiostomatoid fungi emit a variety of volatile organic compounds under laboratory conditions including fusel alcohols, terpenoids, aromatic compounds, and aliphatic alcohols. Many of these compounds already have been shown to elicit behavioral responses from bark beetles, functioning as attractants or repellents, often as synergists to compounds currently used in bark beetle control. Thus, these compounds could serve as valuable new agents for bark beetle management. However, bark beetle associations with fungi are very complex. Beetle behavior varies with the species of fungus, the stage of the beetle life cycle, the host tree quality, and probably with changes in the emission rate of fungal volatiles. Additional research on bark beetles and their symbiotic associates is necessary before the basic significance of ophiostomatoid fungal volatiles can be understood and their applied potential realized.

  13. Diversity of Cultivable Midgut Microbiota at Different Stages of the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus from Tezpur, India

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Naglot, Ashok; Bora, Ajitabh; Hmuaka, Vanlal; Bhagyawant, Sameer; Gogoi, Hemanta K.; Veer, Vijay; Raju, P. Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are among the most important vectors of arboviral diseases, worldwide. Recent studies indicate that diverse midgut microbiota of mosquitoes significantly affect development, digestion, metabolism, and immunity of their hosts. Midgut microbiota has also been suggested to modulate the competency of mosquitoes to transmit arboviruses, malaria parasites etc. Interestingly, the midgut microbial flora is dynamic and the diversity changes with the development of vectors, in addition to other factors such as species, sex, life-stage, feeding behavior and geographical origin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the midgut bacterial diversity among larva, adult male, sugar fed female and blood fed female Ae. albopictus collected from Tezpur, Northeastern India. Based on colony morphological characteristics, we selected 113 cultivable bacterial isolates for 16S rRNA gene sequence based molecular identification. Of the 113 isolates, we could identify 35 bacterial species belonging to 18 distinct genera under four major phyla, namely Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes accounted for majority (80%) of the species, while phylum Actinobacteria constituted 17% of the species. Bacteroidetes was the least represented phylum, characterized by a single species- Chryseobacterium rhizoplanae, isolated from blood fed individuals. Dissection of midgut microbiota diversity at different developmental stages of Ae. albopictus will be helpful in better understanding mosquito-borne diseases, and for designing effective strategies to manage mosquito-borne diseases. PMID:27941985

  14. Diversity of Cultivable Midgut Microbiota at Different Stages of the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus from Tezpur, India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kamlesh K; Datta, Sibnarayan; Naglot, Ashok; Bora, Ajitabh; Hmuaka, Vanlal; Bhagyawant, Sameer; Gogoi, Hemanta K; Veer, Vijay; Raju, P Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are among the most important vectors of arboviral diseases, worldwide. Recent studies indicate that diverse midgut microbiota of mosquitoes significantly affect development, digestion, metabolism, and immunity of their hosts. Midgut microbiota has also been suggested to modulate the competency of mosquitoes to transmit arboviruses, malaria parasites etc. Interestingly, the midgut microbial flora is dynamic and the diversity changes with the development of vectors, in addition to other factors such as species, sex, life-stage, feeding behavior and geographical origin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the midgut bacterial diversity among larva, adult male, sugar fed female and blood fed female Ae. albopictus collected from Tezpur, Northeastern India. Based on colony morphological characteristics, we selected 113 cultivable bacterial isolates for 16S rRNA gene sequence based molecular identification. Of the 113 isolates, we could identify 35 bacterial species belonging to 18 distinct genera under four major phyla, namely Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes accounted for majority (80%) of the species, while phylum Actinobacteria constituted 17% of the species. Bacteroidetes was the least represented phylum, characterized by a single species- Chryseobacterium rhizoplanae, isolated from blood fed individuals. Dissection of midgut microbiota diversity at different developmental stages of Ae. albopictus will be helpful in better understanding mosquito-borne diseases, and for designing effective strategies to manage mosquito-borne diseases.

  15. Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD-1 and midgut bacteria in larvae of gypsy moth and spruce budworm.

    PubMed

    van Frankenhuyzen, Kees; Liu, Yuehong; Tonon, Amanda

    2010-02-01

    We examined interaction between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD-1 (Foray 48B) and larval midgut bacteria in two lepidopteran hosts, Lymantria dispar and Choristoneura fumiferana. The pathogen multiplied in either moribund (C. fumiferana) or dead (L. dispar) larvae, regardless of the presence of midgut bacteria. Inoculation of L. dispar resulted in a pronounced proliferation of enteric bacteria, which did not contribute to larval death because B. thuringiensis was able to kill larvae in absence of midgut bacteria. Sterile, aureomycin- or ampicillin-treated larvae were killed in a dose-dependent manner but there was no mortality among larvae treated with the antibiotic cocktail used by Broderick et al. (2006, 2009). These results do not support an obligate role of midgut bacteria in insecticidal activity of HD-1. The outcome of experiments on the role of midgut bacteria may be more dependent on which bacterial species are dominant at the time of experimentation than on host species per se. The L. dispar cohorts used in our study had a microflora, that was dominated by Enterococcus and Staphylococcus and lacked Enterobacter. Another factor that can confound experimental results is the disk-feeding method for inoculation, which biases mortality estimates towards the least susceptible portion of the test population. (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Termiticidal lectins from Myracrodruon urundeuva (Anacardiaceae) cause midgut damage when ingested by Nasutitermes corniger (Isoptera: Termitidae) workers.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thâmarah A; Fernandes, Kenner M; Oliveira, Ana Patrícia S; Dornelles, Leonardo P; Martins, Gustavo F; Napoleão, Thiago H; Paiva, Patrícia Mg

    2017-05-01

    Myracrodruon urundeuva is a hardwood tree, and its bark, heartwood and leaf contain lectins (MuBL, MuHL and MuLL respectively) with termiticidal activity against Nasutitermes corniger. In this work, the effects of these lectins on the midgut of N. corniger workers were evaluated. The insects were supplied with an artificial diet containing the lectins at their respective LC50 (previously determined). At 48 h after treatment, the midguts were dissected and fixed for histopathology analyses. Toluidine-blue-stained midguts from lectin-treated workers showed disorganisation, with the presence of debris in the lumen and the absence of brush border. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the numbers of digestive and proliferating cells were lower in lectin-treated individuals than in the control, and caspase-3 staining confirmed the occurrence of cell apoptosis. Enteroendocrine cells were not seen in the treated individuals. The midguts from treated insects showed greater staining for peroxidase than the control, suggesting that the lectins caused oxidative stress. Staining with wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to FITC revealed that the lectins interfered with the integrity of the peritrophic matrix. This study showed that termiticidal lectins from M. urundeuva cause severe injuries, oxidative stress and cell death in the midgut of N. corniger workers. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Beetle and plant density as cues initiating dispersal in two species of adult predaceous diving beetles.

    PubMed

    Yee, Donald A; Taylor, Stacy; Vamosi, Steven M

    2009-05-01

    Dispersal can influence population dynamics, species distributions, and community assembly, but few studies have attempted to determine the factors that affect dispersal of insects in natural populations. Consequently, little is known about how proximate factors affect the dispersal behavior of individuals or populations, or how an organism's behavior may change in light of such factors. Adult predaceous diving beetles are active dispersers and are important predators in isolated aquatic habitats. We conducted interrelated studies to determine how several factors affected dispersal in two common pond-inhabiting species in southern Alberta, Canada: Graphoderus occidentalis and Rhantus sericans. Specifically, we (1) experimentally tested the effect of plant and beetle densities on dispersal probabilities in ponds; (2) surveyed ponds and determined the relationships among beetle densities and plant densities and water depth; and (3) conducted laboratory trials to determine how beetle behavior changed in response to variation in plant densities, conspecific densities, food, and water depth. Our field experiment determined that both species exhibited density dependence, with higher beetle densities leading to higher dispersal probabilities. Low plant density also appeared to increase beetle dispersal. Consistent with our experimental results, densities of R. sericans in ponds were significantly related to plant density and varied also with water depth; G. occidentalis densities did not vary with either factor. In the laboratory, behavior varied with plant density only for R. sericans, which swam at low density but were sedentary at high density. Both species responded to depth, with high beetle densities eliciting beetles to spend more time in deeper water. The presence of food caused opposite responses for G. occidentalis between experiments. Behavioral changes in response to patch-level heterogeneity likely influence dispersal in natural populations and are expected

  18. A catalogue of Lithuanian beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Tamutis, Vytautas; Tamutė, Brigita; Ferenca, Romas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the first complete and updated list of all 3597 species of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) belonging to 92 familiesfound and published in Lithuania until 2011, with comments also provided on the main systematic and nomenclatural changes since the last monographic treatment in two volumes (Pileckis and Monsevičius 1995, 1997). The introductory section provides a general overview of the main features of the territory of Lithuania, the origins and formation of the beetle fauna and their conservation, the faunistic investigations in Lithuania to date revealing the most important stages of the faunistic research process with reference to the most prominent scientists, an overview of their work, and their contribution to Lithuanian coleopteran faunal research. Species recorded in Lithuania by some authors without reliable evidence and requiring further confirmation with new data are presented in a separate list, consisting of 183 species. For the first time, analysis of errors in works of Lithuanian authors concerning data on coleopteran fauna has been conducted and these errors have been corrected. All available published and Internet sources on beetles found in Lithuania have been considered in the current study. Over 630 literature sources on species composition of beetles, their distribution in Lithuania and neighbouring countries, and taxonomic revisions and changes are reviewed and cited. An alphabetical list of these literature sources is presented. After revision of public beetle collections in Lithuania, the authors propose to remove 43 species from the beetle species list of the country on the grounds, that they have been wrongly identified or published by mistake. For reasons of clarity, 19 previously noted but later excluded species are included in the current checklist with comments. Based on faunal data from neighbouring countries, species expected to occur in Lithuania are matnioned. In total 1390 species are attributed to this

  19. Lgr5 regulates the regeneration of lesioned nasal respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Qiang; Li, Peng; Zhang, Feng-Qin; Sun, Shao-Jun; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-12-09

    Nasal respiratory epithelium is a ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium. The cellular components of nasal respiratory epithelium include ciliated cells, goblet cells, and basal cells. Until now, our knowledge in the development of nasal respiratory epithelium is still limited and the cellular mechanism of regeneration is still elusive. In this study, we found that adult stem cell marker leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) is expressed in the mice nasal respiratory epithelium. Both immunostaining and lineage tracing analysis indicated Lgr5 positive cells in the nasal respiratory epithelium are proliferative stem/progenitor cells. Using the Rosa-Tdtomato and Rosa26-DTR mice, we elucidated that Lgr5(+) cells participate in the regeneration of lesioned nasal respiratory epithelium, and this group of cells is necessary in the process of epithelium recovery. Using the in vitro culture system, we observed the formation of spheres from Lgr5(+) cells and these spheres have the capacity to generate other types of cells. Above all, this study reported a group of previously unidentified progenitor/stem cells in nasal respiratory epithelium, unveiling the potential cellular mechanism in nasal respiratory epithelium regeneration.

  20. Defective barrier function in neosquamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Jovov, Biljana; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Orlando, Geraldine S; Djukic, Zorka; Orlando, Roy C

    2013-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common strategy for the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). After RFA, the ablated esophagus heals on acid suppressive therapy, and is re-populated with a stratified squamous epithelium, referred to as "neosquamous epithelium (NSE)." Because the ability of the NSE to protect the underlying tissue from recurrent insult by reflux is unclear, we assessed the barrier function of NSE by comparing it to that of the native upper squamous epithelium (USE) in subjects having undergone RFA. At varying intervals following RFA, the barrier function of NSE and USE were assessed in endoscopic biopsies by light and electron microscopy, and by measurement of electrical resistance (R) and fluorescein flux in mini-Ussing chambers. Chamber results were further compared with results from control biopsies (healthy distal esophagus). A claudin expression profile in the tight junctions (TJs) of NSE and USE was determined using Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Differential expression of claudin-4 between NSE and USE was assayed by immunoblots. USE was histologically normal whereas NSE showed dilated intercellular spaces and marked eosinophilia. NSE was also more permeable than USE and healthy controls, having lower mean R and higher fluorescein fluxes. Abnormally low R values for NSE were unrelated to the time period following RFA (or number of prior RFA sessions), being abnormal even 26 months after RFA. Abnormal permeability in NSE was associated with significantly lower values for claudin-4 and claudin-10 than in USE. NSE commonly exhibits defective barrier function. As this defect will make it vulnerable to injury, inflammation, and destruction by acidic and weakly acidic refluxates, it may in part explain incidences of recurrence of BE following ablation.

  1. Discordant phylogenies suggest repeated host shifts in the Fusarium–Euwallacea ambrosia beetle mutualism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mutualism between xyleborine beetles in the genus Euwallacea (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and members of the Ambrosia Fusarium Clade (AFC) represents one of 11 known independent evolutionary origins of fungiculture by ambrosia beetles. Female Euwallacea beetles transport fusarial symb...

  2. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N.; Martins, Rafael M.; Braz, Gloria R.C.; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  3. Requirement of matrix metalloproteinase-1 for intestinal homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Chung, Hae-Young; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2012-03-10

    Stem cells are tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteolytic enzymes, modulate the turnover of numerous substrates, including cytokine precursors, growth factors, and ECM molecules. However, the roles of MMPs in the regulation of adult stem cells are poorly understood. In the present study, we utilize the Drosophila midgut, which is an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology, to show that Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). The results showed that Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut and that its expression increases with age and with exposure to oxidative stress. Mmp1 knockdown or Timp-overexpressing flies and flies heterozygous for a viable, hypomorphic Mmp1 allele increased ISC proliferation in the gut, as shown by staining with an anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. Reduced Mmp1 levels induced intestinal hyperplasia, and the Mmp1depletion-induced ISC proliferation was rescued by the suppression of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that Mmp1 regulates ISC proliferation through the EGFR signaling pathway. Furthermore, adult gut-specific knockdown and whole-animal heterozygotes of Mmp1 increased additively sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress and shortened lifespan. Our data suggest that Drosophila Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation for maintenance of gut homeostasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1-related ISC proliferation is associated with EGFR signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 in the gut is required for the intestinal homeostasis and longevity.

  4. Origin and dynamic lineage characteristics of the developing Drosophila midgut stem cells.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shigeo; Aghajanian, Patrick; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2016-08-15

    Proliferating intestinal stem cells (ISCs) generate all cell types of the Drosophila midgut, including enterocytes, endocrine cells, and gland cells (e.g., copper cells), throughout the lifetime of the animal. Among the signaling mechanisms controlling the balance between ISC self-renewal and the production of different cell types, Notch (N) plays a pivotal role. In this paper we investigated the emergence of ISCs during metamorphosis and the role of N in this process. Precursors of the Drosophila adult intestinal stem cells (pISCs) can be first detected within the pupal midgut during the first hours after onset of metamorphosis as motile mesenchymal cells. pISCs perform 2-3 rounds of parasynchronous divisions. The first mitosis yields only an increase in pISC number. During the following rounds of mitosis, dividing pISCs give rise to more pISCs, as well as the endocrine cells that populate the midgut of the eclosing fly. Enterocytes do not appear among the pISC progeny until around the time of eclosion. The "proendocrine" gene prospero (pros), expressed from mid-pupal stages onward in pISCs, is responsible to advance the endocrine fate in these cells; following removal of pros, pISCs continue to proliferate, but endocrine cells do not form. Conversely, the onset of N activity that occurs around the stage when pros comes on restricts pros expression among pISCs. Loss of N abrogates proliferation and switches on an endocrine fate among all pISCs. Our results suggest that a switch depending on the activity of N and pros acts at the level of the pISC to decide between continued proliferation and endocrine differentiation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Identification of microRNAs expressed in the midgut of Aedes albopictus during dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianxin; Li, Chunxiao; Zhang, Yingmei; Yan, Ting; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Minghui; Xing, Dan; Dong, Yande; Guo, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Tongyan

    2017-02-03

    The midgut is the first barrier to dengue virus (DENV) infections of mosquitoes and therefore is a major bottleneck for the subsequent development of vector competence. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this barrier are unknown. We constructed three small RNA libraries from the midguts of adult Aedes albopictus females that had been fed on either sugar solution, an uninfected blood meal, or a blood meal infected with DENV-2, and112 conserved microRNAs represented by 173 miRNA sequences were identified, with 34 novel microRNAs predicted by Mireap, RNAfold and Sfold software. In addition, the expression of aal-miR-1174, aal-miR-2951 and aal-miR-956 was confirmed via stem-loop quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Compared with microRNA expression profiles of mosquitoes that had ingested a regular blood meal, 43 microRNAs were upregulated and 4were downregulated in mosquitoes that had ingested a DENV-2-infected blood meal. Among the differentially expressed microRNAs, miR-1767, miR-276-3p, miR-4448 and miR-4728-5p were verified via stem-loop qRT-PCR. Analyses indicated that the changing patterns in miRNA expression during DENV-2 infection were significant and varied at different time points post infection. Most miRNA were upregulated at 24 h but were downregulated at 48 h post DENV-2 intake. The aal-miR-4728-5p was chosen for an in vitro transient transfection assay, and the results show that this miRNA enhances DENV replication in C6/36 cells. This study provides the first information on microRNAs expressed in the midgut of Ae. albopictus and describes species-specific changes in their expression levels following infection by DENV-2.

  6. Restriction of Francisella novicida Genetic Diversity during Infection of the Vector Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Reif, Kathryn E.; Palmer, Guy H.; Crowder, David W.; Ueti, Massaro W.; Noh, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity of pathogens, and interactions between genotypes, can strongly influence pathogen phenotypes such as transmissibility and virulence. For vector-borne pathogens, both mammalian hosts and arthropod vectors may limit pathogen genotypic diversity (number of unique genotypes circulating in an area) by preventing infection or transmission of particular genotypes. Mammalian hosts often act as “ecological filters” for pathogen diversity, where novel variants are frequently eliminated because of stochastic events or fitness costs. However, whether vectors can serve a similar role in limiting pathogen diversity is less clear. Here we show using Francisella novicida and a natural tick vector of Francisella spp. (Dermacentor andersoni), that the tick vector acted as a stronger ecological filter for pathogen diversity compared to the mammalian host. When both mice and ticks were exposed to mixtures of F. novicida genotypes, significantly fewer genotypes co-colonized ticks compared to mice. In both ticks and mice, increased genotypic diversity negatively affected the recovery of available genotypes. Competition among genotypes contributed to the reduction of diversity during infection of the tick midgut, as genotypes not recovered from tick midguts during mixed genotype infections were recovered from tick midguts during individual genotype infection. Mediated by stochastic and selective forces, pathogen genotype diversity was markedly reduced in the tick. We incorporated our experimental results into a model to demonstrate how vector population dynamics, especially vector-to-host ratio, strongly affected pathogen genotypic diversity in a population over time. Understanding pathogen genotypic population dynamics will aid in identification of the variables that most strongly affect pathogen transmission and disease ecology. PMID:25392914

  7. The fossil record and macroevolutionary history of the beetles

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dena M.; Marcot, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Coleoptera (beetles) is the most species-rich metazoan order, with approximately 380 000 species. To understand how they came to be such a diverse group, we compile a database of global fossil beetle occurrences to study their macroevolutionary history. Our database includes 5553 beetle occurrences from 221 fossil localities. Amber and lacustrine deposits preserve most of the beetle diversity and abundance. All four extant suborders are found in the fossil record, with 69% of all beetle families and 63% of extant beetle families preserved. Considerable focus has been placed on beetle diversification overall, however, for much of their evolutionary history it is the clade Polyphaga that is most responsible for their taxonomic richness. Polyphaga had an increase in diversification rate in the Early Cretaceous, but instead of being due to the radiation of the angiosperms, this was probably due to the first occurrences of beetle-bearing amber deposits in the record. Perhaps, most significant is that polyphagan beetles had a family-level extinction rate of zero for most of their evolutionary history, including across the Cretaceous–Palaeogene boundary. Therefore, focusing on the factors that have inhibited beetle extinction, as opposed to solely studying mechanisms that may promote speciation, should be examined as important determinants of their great diversity today. PMID:25788597

  8. Tiger beetle's pursuit of prey depends on distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noest, Robert; Wang, Jane

    2015-03-01

    Tiger beetles are fast predators capable of chasing prey under closed-loop visual guidance. We investigated their control system using high-speed digital recordings of beetles chasing a moving prey dummy in a laboratory arena. Analysis reveals that the beetle uses a proportional control law in which the angular position of the prey relative to the beetle's body axis drives the beetle's angular velocity with a delay of about 28 ms. The system gain is shown to depend on the beetle-prey distance in a pattern indicating three hunting phases over the observed distance domain. We show that to explain this behavior the tiger beetle must be capable of visually determining the distance to its target and using that to adapt the gain in its proportional control law. We will end with a discussion on the possible methods for distance detection by the tiger beetle and focus on two of them. Motion parallax, using the natural head sway induced by the walking gait of the tiger beetle, is shown to have insufficient distance range. However elevation in the field of vision, using the angle with respect to the horizon at which a target is observed, has a much larger distance range and is a prime candidate for the mechanism of visual distance detection in the tiger beetle.

  9. The fossil record and macroevolutionary history of the beetles.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dena M; Marcot, Jonathan D

    2015-04-22

    Coleoptera (beetles) is the most species-rich metazoan order, with approximately 380 000 species. To understand how they came to be such a diverse group, we compile a database of global fossil beetle occurrences to study their macroevolutionary history. Our database includes 5553 beetle occurrences from 221 fossil localities. Amber and lacustrine deposits preserve most of the beetle diversity and abundance. All four extant suborders are found in the fossil record, with 69% of all beetle families and 63% of extant beetle families preserved. Considerable focus has been placed on beetle diversification overall, however, for much of their evolutionary history it is the clade Polyphaga that is most responsible for their taxonomic richness. Polyphaga had an increase in diversification rate in the Early Cretaceous, but instead of being due to the radiation of the angiosperms, this was probably due to the first occurrences of beetle-bearing amber deposits in the record. Perhaps, most significant is that polyphagan beetles had a family-level extinction rate of zero for most of their evolutionary history, including across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary. Therefore, focusing on the factors that have inhibited beetle extinction, as opposed to solely studying mechanisms that may promote speciation, should be examined as important determinants of their great diversity today.

  10. Ecological Impacts of Southern Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Maria D. Tchakerian; Robert N. Coulson

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) is the most important biotic disturbance in southern pine forests and causes extensive changes to the forest environment. In this chapter we provide an overview of the ecological impacts of the SPB on forest conditions (the state of the forest) and on forest resources (uses and values associated with the forest). We define ecological...

  11. Synthesis report on rearing Asian longhorned beetle

    Treesearch

    Melody A. Keena; Ann E. Hajek; Thomas L. M. Dubois; David R. Lance

    2003-01-01

    Since not all research on Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (ALB) can be conducted in China or at North American sites where it is being eradicated, the ability to mass rear the Asian longhorned beetle is critical to rapid progress on research necessary for exclusion, detection, and eradication of this serious pest.

  12. Rove beetle blistering--(Nairobi Eye).

    PubMed

    Williams, A N

    1993-02-01

    'Nairobi Eye' is a condition caused by a blister beetle, Paederus eximius, found in Northern Kenya. It has not previously been described as a hazard for troops exercising in this area. Four cases are described. Recommended management is to wash the contact area initially with soap and water, and to treat subsequent lesions with flamazine.

  13. Risk Assessment for the Southern Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    Andrew Birt

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) causes significant damage (tree mortality) to pine forests. Although this tree mortality has characteristic temporal and spatial patterns, the precise location and timing of damage is to some extent unpredictable. Consequently, although forest managers are able to identify stands that are predisposed to SPB damage, they are unable to...

  14. Systematics of Fusaria associated with Ambrosia beetles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here, I summarize research efforts directed at characterizing ambrosia beetle-associated fusaria, including the species responsible for avocado wilt in Israel (Mendel et al., Phytoparasitica 2012) and branch dieback in California (Eskalen et al., Pl. Dis. 2012). Our multilocus molecular phylogenetic...

  15. Economic Impacts of the Southern Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    John M. Pye; Thomas P. Holmes; Jeffrey P. Prestemon; David N. Wear

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the timber economic impacts of the southern pine beetle (SPB). Although we anticipate that SPB outbreaks cause substantial economic losses to households that consume the nonmarket economic services provided by healthy forests, we have narrowly focused our attention here on changes in values to timber growers and wood-products...

  16. Scymnus (Neopullus) lady beetles from China

    Treesearch

    Michael E. Montgomery; Melody A. Keena

    2011-01-01

    In 1995, we found our first Scymnus (Neopullus) lady beetle in China (Neopullus is a subgenus of Scymnus, the largest genus in the family Coccinellidae). At that time there were just a few known species in the subgenus and very little was known of their biology. By the end of the project, 14...

  17. Cuticle formation and pigmentation in beetles.

    PubMed

    Noh, Mi Young; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Kramer, Karl J; Arakane, Yasuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Adult beetles (Coleoptera) are covered primarily by a hard exoskeleton or cuticle. For example, the beetle elytron is a cuticle-rich highly modified forewing structure that shields the underlying hindwing and dorsal body surface from a variety of harmful environmental factors by acting as an armor plate. The elytron comes in a variety of colors and shapes depending on the coleopteran species. As in many other insect species, the cuticular tanning pathway begins with tyrosine and is responsible for production of a variety of melanin-like and other types of pigments. Tanning metabolism involves quinones and quinone methides, which also act as protein cross-linking agents for cuticle sclerotization. Electron microscopic analyses of rigid cuticles of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, have revealed not only numerous horizontal chitin-protein laminae but also vertically oriented columnar structures called pore canal fibers. This structural architecture together with tyrosine metabolism for cuticle tanning is likely to contribute to the rigidity and coloration of the beetle exoskeleton.

  18. Forest Restoration following Southern Pine Beetle

    Treesearch

    John D. Waldron

    2011-01-01

    Forest restoration is the process of transforming a damaged or unhealthy forest into a healthy one. After the southern pine beetle (SPB) has damaged a forest, it is sometimes, if not most times, necessary to restore that forest. It is important to know the restoration goals, conditions prior to SPB, current conditions, and potential future conditions of the forest...

  19. Bark beetle responses to vegetation management practices

    Treesearch

    Joel D. McMillin; Christopher J. Fettig

    2009-01-01

    Native tree-killing bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) are a natural component of forest ecosystems. Eradication is neither possible nor desirable and periodic outbreaks will occur as long as susceptible forests and favorable climatic conditions co-exist. Recent changes in forest structure and tree composition by natural processes and management...

  20. Chirality determines pheromone activity for flour beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, H. Z.; Mori, K.

    1983-04-01

    Olfactory perception and orientation behaviour of female and male flour beetles ( Tribolium castaneum, T. confusum) to single stereoisomers of their aggregation pheromone revealed maximal receptor potentials and optimal attraction in response to 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal, whereas its optical antipode 4S,8S-(+)-dimethyldecanal was found to be inactive in this respect. Female flour beetles of both species were ≈ 103 times less attracted to 4R,8S-(+)- and 4S,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal than to 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal, while male flour beetles failed to respond to the R,S-(+)- and S,R-(-)-stereoisomers. Pheromone extracts of prothoracic femora from unmated male flour beetles elicited higher receptor potentials in the antennae of females than in those of males. The results suggest that the aggregation pheromone emitted by male T. castaneum as well as male T. confusum has the stereochemical structure of 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyl-decanal, which acts as sex attractant for the females and as aggregant for the males of both species.

  1. Protein expression in the midgut of sugar-fed Aedes albopictus females

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus is a vector for several fatal arboviruses in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. The midgut of the mosquito is the first barrier that pathogens must overcome to establish infection and represents one of the main immunologically active sites of the insect. Nevertheless, little is known about the proteins involved in the defense against pathogens, and even in the processing of food, and the detoxification of metabolites. The identification of proteins exclusively expressed in the midgut is the first step in understanding the complex physiology of this tissue and can provide insight into the mechanisms of pathogen-vector interaction. However, identification of the locally expressed proteins presents a challenge because the Ae. albopictus genome has not been sequenced. Methods In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) was combined with liquid chromatography in line with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and data mining to identify the major proteins in the midgut of sugar-fed Ae. albopictus females. Results Fifty-six proteins were identified by sequence similarity to entries from the Ae. aegypti genome. In addition, two hypothetical proteins were experimentally confirmed. According to the gene ontology analysis, the identified proteins were classified into 16 clusters of biological processes. Use of the STRING database to investigate protein functional associations revealed five functional networks among the identified proteins, including a network for carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, a group associated with ATP production and a network of proteins that interact during detoxification of toxic free radicals, among others. This analysis allowed the assignment of a potential role for proteins with unknown function based on their functional association with other characterized proteins. Conclusion Our findings represent the first proteome map of the Ae. albopictus midgut and denotes the first steps towards the

  2. Preduodenal portal vein in association with midgut malrotation and duodenal web-triple anomaly?

    PubMed

    Singal, Arbinder Kumar; Ramu, Chithra; Paul, Sarah; Matthai, John

    2009-02-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare anomaly in which the portal vein passes anterior to the duodenum rather than posteriorly. Generally asymptomatic, PDPV may rarely cause duodenal obstruction or may coexist with other anomalies. We report a neonate who presented with duodenal obstruction and was found out to have 3 coexisting anomalies, each of which can lead to duodenal obstruction independently-PDPV, midgut malrotation, and duodenal web. A duodenoduodenostomy and a Ladd procedure were done, and the child recovered uneventfully. The mechanism of obstruction, interesting metabolic aberrations observed, outcome, and relevant literature are presented.

  3. Phase 3 Trial of (177)Lu-Dotatate for Midgut Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Strosberg, Jonathan; El-Haddad, Ghassan; Wolin, Edward; Hendifar, Andrew; Yao, James; Chasen, Beth; Mittra, Erik; Kunz, Pamela L; Kulke, Matthew H; Jacene, Heather; Bushnell, David; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Baum, Richard P; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Caplin, Martyn; Lebtahi, Rachida; Hobday, Timothy; Delpassand, Ebrahim; Van Cutsem, Eric; Benson, Al; Srirajaskanthan, Rajaventhan; Pavel, Marianne; Mora, Jaime; Berlin, Jordan; Grande, Enrique; Reed, Nicholas; Seregni, Ettore; Öberg, Kjell; Lopera Sierra, Maribel; Santoro, Paola; Thevenet, Thomas; Erion, Jack L; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Krenning, Eric

    2017-01-12

    Background Patients with advanced midgut neuroendocrine tumors who have had disease progression during first-line somatostatin analogue therapy have limited therapeutic options. This randomized, controlled trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of lutetium-177 ((177)Lu)-Dotatate in patients with advanced, progressive, somatostatin-receptor-positive midgut neuroendocrine tumors. Methods We randomly assigned 229 patients who had well-differentiated, metastatic midgut neuroendocrine tumors to receive either (177)Lu-Dotatate (116 patients) at a dose of 7.4 GBq every 8 weeks (four intravenous infusions, plus best supportive care including octreotide long-acting repeatable [LAR] administered intramuscularly at a dose of 30 mg) ((177)Lu-Dotatate group) or octreotide LAR alone (113 patients) administered intramuscularly at a dose of 60 mg every 4 weeks (control group). The primary end point was progression-free survival. Secondary end points included the objective response rate, overall survival, safety, and the side-effect profile. The final analysis of overall survival will be conducted in the future as specified in the protocol; a prespecified interim analysis of overall survival was conducted and is reported here. Results At the data-cutoff date for the primary analysis, the estimated rate of progression-free survival at month 20 was 65.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50.0 to 76.8) in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group and 10.8% (95% CI, 3.5 to 23.0) in the control group. The response rate was 18% in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group versus 3% in the control group (P<0.001). In the planned interim analysis of overall survival, 14 deaths occurred in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group and 26 in the control group (P=0.004). Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and lymphopenia occurred in 1%, 2%, and 9%, respectively, of patients in the (177)Lu-Dotatate group as compared with no patients in the control group, with no evidence of renal toxic effects during the observed time frame

  4. Total management of short gut secondary to midgut volvulus without prolonged total parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J; MacLean, W C; Kolbach, S; Shermeta, D W

    1978-12-01

    Absorption studies in rats have shown that intestinal adaptation after catastrophic injury can be stimulated by early enteral feeding. Using this concept, we have devised a technique of early initiation and advancement of oral feedings that begins with Cho-Free and Polycose and gradually adds sucrose and MCT in increasing proportions. The increasing complexity and caloric density of this diet provide sufficient nutrition to allow weaning from total parenteral alimentation within 2--3 wk. Our preliminary experience in babies with midgut volvulus, necrotizing enterocolitis, and gastroschisis has been successful and uncomplicated. These patients have demonstrated consistent weight gain and have been spared the complications associated with prolonged parenteral alimentation.

  5. Acute exposure of mercury chloride stimulates the tissue regeneration program and reactive oxygen species production in the Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Xiaochun; Luo, Hongjie; Zhao, Lingling; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We used Drosophila as an animal model to study the digestive tract in response to the exposure of inorganic mercury (HgCl2). We found that after oral administration, mercury was mainly sequestered within the midgut. This resulted in increased cell death, which in turn stimulated the tissue regeneration program, including accelerated proliferation and differentiation of the intestinal stem cells (ISCs). We further demonstrated that these injuries correlate closely with the excessive production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), as vitamin E, an antioxidant reagent, efficiently suppressed the HgCl2-induced phenotypes of midgut and improved the viability. We propose that the Drosophila midgut could serve as a suitable model to study the treatment of acute hydrargyrism on the digestive systems.

  6. Bacillus thuringiensis pore-forming toxins trigger massive shedding of GPI-anchored aminopeptidase N from gypsy moth midgut epithelial cells

    Treesearch

    Algimantas P. Valaitis

    2008-01-01

    The insecticidal Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis strains are pore-forming toxins (PFTs) that bind to the midgut brush border membrane and cause extensive damage to the midgut epithelial cells of susceptible insect larvae. Force-feeding B. thuringiensis PFTs to Lymantria dispar larvae elicited...

  7. Odontogenic potential of post-natal oral mucosal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, E; Itoh, T; Yoshie, H; Satokata, I

    2009-03-01

    A bioengineered tooth would provide a powerful alternative to currently available clinical treatments. Previous experiments have succeeded in bioengineering teeth using tooth germs from animal embryos. However, the ultimate goal is to develop a technology which enables teeth to be regenerated with the use of autologous cells. To pursue this goal, we re-associated the palatal epithelium from young mice with the odontogenic dental mesenchyme and transplanted the re-associated tissues into mouse kidney capsules. Morphologically defined teeth were formed from the re-associated cultured palatal epithelial cell sheets from mice aged up to 4 wks, but no tooth was formed when the palatal epithelium from mice after 2 days of age was directly re-associated. Our results demonstrated that post-natal non-dental oral mucosal epithelium can be used as a substitute for dental epithelium, and that epithelial cell sheet improves the ability of the oral epithelium of older mice to differentiate into dental epithelium.

  8. Ability of transplanted cultured epithelium to respond to dermal papillae.

    PubMed

    Xing, L; Kobayashi, K

    2001-10-01

    Cultured epithelium has been used successfully in the treatment of extensive burns. Regenerated epidermis, however, lacks such as hair follicles and sweat glands that are common in mammalian skin. We attempted to determine whether cultured epithelium could be induced to form hair follicles by dermal papillae, which are most important for the morphogenesis and growth of hair follicles. We cultivated adult rat sole keratinocytes, obtained the cultured epithelium, and prepared recombinants consisting of cultured epithelium and fresh dermal papillae with or without the sole dermis. These recombinants were then transplanted underneath the dermis of the dorsal skin of syngeneic rats or athymic mice. Histologic examination revealed that the transplanted cultured epithelium formed the follicular structures with sebaceous gland-like structure following induction of the dermal papillae, especially when supported by the dermis. We concluded that transplanted cultured epithelium of adult rat sole keratinocytes can respond to growth signals from adult dermal papillae.

  9. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Crava, Cristina M; Jakubowska, Agata K; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity.

  10. Org-1 is required for the diversification of circular visceral muscle founder cells and normal midgut morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Christoph; Frasch, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The T-Box family of transcription factors plays fundamental roles in the generation of appropriate spatial and temporal gene expression profiles during cellular differentiation and organogenesis in animals. In this study we report that the Drosophila Tbx1 orthologue optomotor-blind-related-gene-1 (org-1) exerts a pivotal function in the diversification of circular visceral muscle founder cell identities in Drosophila. In embryos mutant for org-1, the specification of the midgut musculature per se is not affected, but the differentiating midgut fails to form the anterior and central midgut constrictions and lacks the gastric caeca. We demonstrate that this phenotype results from the nearly complete loss of the founder cell specific expression domains of several genes known to regulate midgut morphogenesis, including odd-paired (opa), teashirt (tsh), Ultrabithorax (Ubx), decapentaplegic (dpp) and wingless (wg). To address the mechanisms that mediate the regulatory inputs from org-1 towards Ubx, dpp, and wg in these founder cells we genetically dissected known visceral mesoderm specific cis-regulatory-modules (CRMs) of these genes. The analyses revealed that the activities of the dpp and wg CRMs depend on org-1, the CRMs are bound by Org-1 in vivo and their T-Box binding sites are essential for their activation in the visceral muscle founder cells. We conclude that Org-1 acts within a well-defined signaling and transcriptional network of the trunk visceral mesoderm as a crucial founder cell-specific competence factor, in concert with the general visceral mesodermal factor Biniou. As such, it directly regulates several key genes involved in the establishment of morphogenetic centers along the anteroposterior axis of the visceral mesoderm, which subsequently organize the formation of midgut constrictions and gastric caeca and thereby determine the morphology of the midgut. PMID:23380635

  11. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Crava, Cristina M.; Jakubowska, Agata K.; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity. PMID:25993013

  12. A midgut lysate of the Riptortus pedestris has antibacterial activity against LPS O-antigen-deficient Burkholderia mutants.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ho Am; Seo, Eun Sil; Seong, Min Young; Lee, Bok Luel

    2017-02-01

    Riptortus pedestris, a common pest in soybean fields, harbors a symbiont Burkholderia in a specialized posterior midgut region of insects. Every generation of second nymphs acquires new Burkholderia cells from the environment. We compared in vitro cultured Burkholderia with newly in vivo colonized Burkholderia in the host midgut using biochemical approaches. The bacterial cell envelope of in vitro cultured and in vivo Burkholderia differed in structure, as in vivo bacteria lacked lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen. The LPS O-antigen deficient bacteria had a reduced colonization rate in the host midgut compared with that of the wild-type Burkholderia. To determine why LPS O-antigen-deficient bacteria are less able to colonize the host midgut, we examined in vitro survival rates of three LPS O-antigen-deficient Burkholderia mutants and lysates of five different midgut regions. The LPS O-antigen-deficient mutants were highly susceptible when cultured with the lysate of a specific first midgut region (M1), indicating that the M1 lysate contains unidentified substance(s) capable of killing LPS O-antigen-deficient mutants. We identified a 17 kDa protein from the M1 lysate, which was enriched in the active fractions. The N-terminal sequence of the protein was determined to be a soybean Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor. These data suggest that the 17 kDa protein, which was originated from a main soybean source of the R. pedestris host, has antibacterial activity against the LPS O-antigen deficient (rough-type) Burkholderia.

  13. A GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase is a functional midgut receptor of Cry11Aa toxin in Aedes aegypti larvae

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Luisa E.; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2005-01-01

    A 65 kDa GPI (glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol)-anchored ALP (alkaline phosphatase) was characterized as a functional receptor of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin in Aedes aegypti midgut cells. Two (a 100 kDa and a 65 kDa) GPI-anchored proteins that bound Cry11Aa toxin were preferentially extracted after treatment of BBMV (brush boder membrane vesicles) from Ae. aegypti midgut epithelia with phospholipase C. The 65 kDa protein was further purified by toxin affinity chromatography. The 65 kDa protein showed ALP activity. The peptide-displaying phages (P1.BBMV and P8.BBMV) that bound to the 65 kDa GPI–ALP (GPI-anchored ALP) and competed with the Cry11Aa toxin to bind to BBMV were isolated by selecting BBMV-binding peptide-phages by biopanning. GPI–ALP was shown to be preferentially distributed in Ae. aegypti in the posterior part of the midgut and in the caeca, by using P1.BBMV binding to fixed midgut tissue sections to determine the location of GPI–ALP. Cry11Aa binds to the same regions of the midgut and competed with P1.BBMV and P8.BBMV to bind to BBMV. The importance of this interaction was demonstrated by the in vivo attenuation of Cry11Aa toxicity in the presence of these phages. Our results shows that GPI–ALP is an important receptor molecule involved in Cry11Aa interaction with midgut cells and toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae. PMID:16255715

  14. Floral associations of cyclocephaline scarab beetles.

    PubMed

    Moore, Matthew Robert; Jameson, Mary Liz

    2013-01-01

    The scarab beetle tribe Cyclocephalini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) is the second largest tribe of rhinoceros beetles, with nearly 500 described species. This diverse group is most closely associated with early diverging angiosperm groups (the family Nymphaeaceae, magnoliid clade, and monocots), where they feed, mate, and receive the benefit of thermal rewards from the host plant. Cyclocephaline floral association data have never been synthesized, and a comprehensive review of this ecological interaction was necessary to promote research by updating nomenclature, identifying inconsistencies in the data, and reporting previously unpublished data. Based on the most specific data, at least 97 cyclocephaline beetle species have been reported from the flowers of 58 plant genera representing 17 families and 15 orders. Thirteen new cyclocephaline floral associations are reported herein. Six cyclocephaline and 25 plant synonyms were reported in the literature and on beetle voucher specimen labels, and these were updated to reflect current nomenclature. The valid names of three unavailable plant host names were identified. We review the cyclocephaline floral associations with respect to inferred relationships of angiosperm orders. Ten genera of cyclocephaline beetles have been recorded from flowers of early diverging angiosperm groups. In contrast, only one genus, Cyclocephala, has been recorded from dicot flowers. Cyclocephaline visitation of dicot flowers is limited to the New World, and it is unknown whether this is evolutionary meaningful or the result of sampling bias and incomplete data. The most important areas for future research include: (1) elucidating the factors that attract cyclocephalines to flowers including floral scent chemistry and thermogenesis, (2) determining whether cyclocephaline dicot visitation is truly limited to the New World, and (3) inferring evolutionary relationships within the Cyclocephalini to rigorously test vicarance hypotheses

  15. Floral Associations of Cyclocephaline Scarab Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Matthew Robert; Jameson, Mary Liz

    2013-01-01

    The scarab beetle tribe Cyclocephalini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) is the second largest tribe of rhinoceros beetles, with nearly 500 described species. This diverse group is most closely associated with early diverging angiosperm groups (the family Nymphaeaceae, magnoliid clade, and monocots), where they feed, mate, and receive the benefit of thermal rewards from the host plant. Cyclocephaline floral association data have never been synthesized, and a comprehensive review of this ecological interaction was necessary to promote research by updating nomenclature, identifying inconsistencies in the data, and reporting previously unpublished data. Based on the most specific data, at least 97 cyclocephaline beetle species have been reported from the flowers of 58 plant genera representing 17 families and 15 orders. Thirteen new cyclocephaline floral associations are reported herein. Six cyclocephaline and 25 plant synonyms were reported in the literature and on beetle voucher specimen labels, and these were updated to reflect current nomenclature. The valid names of three unavailable plant host names were identified. We review the cyclocephaline floral associations with respect to inferred relationships of angiosperm orders. Ten genera of cyclocephaline beetles have been recorded from flowers of early diverging angiosperm groups. In contrast, only one genus, Cyclocephala, has been recorded from dicot flowers. Cyclocephaline visitation of dicot flowers is limited to the New World, and it is unknown whether this is evolutionary meaningful or the result of sampling bias and incomplete data. The most important areas for future research include: 1) elucidating the factors that attract cyclocephalines to flowers including floral scent chemistry and thermogenesis, 2) determining whether cyclocephaline dicot visitation is truly limited to the New World, and 3) inferring evolutionary relationships within the Cyclocephalini to rigorously test vicarance hypotheses

  16. Zombie soldier beetles: Epizootics in the goldenrod soldier beetle, Chauliognathus pensylvanicus (Coleoptera: Cantharidae) caused by Eryniopsis lampyridarum (Entomophthoromycotina: Entomophthoraceae).

    PubMed

    Steinkraus, Donald C; Hajek, Ann E; Liebherr, Jim K

    2017-09-01

    Adult goldenrod soldier beetles, Chauliognathus pensylvanicus, were found infected by the fungus Eryniopsis lampyridarum (Entomophthoromycotina) in Arkansas during September - October (1996, 2001, 2015 and 2016). Living and dead infected beetles were found on flowering frost aster, Symphyotrichum pilosum, common boneset, Eupatorium perfoliatum, and Canada goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Live and dead beetles (n=446) were collected in 1996 from S. pilosum flowers and held individually in the laboratory for determination of fungal prevalence. Of the beetles collected, 281 (63%) were males and 165 (37%) were females. A total of 90 beetles were infected with E. lampyridarum, an overall prevalence of 20.2%. Prevalence in males was 19.6% (n=55 infected/281 males total) and prevalence in females was 21.2% (n=35 infected /165 females total). Conidia were produced from 57% of the infected beetles, 23% of the infected beetles produced resting spores, and 20% contained the hyphal body stage. Infected beetles produced either conidia or resting spores but never both in the same host. Post-mortem morphological changes in the hosts due to E. lampyridarum were observed periodically for 24h. Shortly before death, by unknown mechanisms, dying infected beetles tightly clamped their mandibles into flower heads and ca. 15-22h later (between 2400 and 0700h) the fungus caused dead beetles to raise their elytra and expand their metathoracic wings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Epigenetic Regulation of the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Ellen N.; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is an ideal model system for the study of normal and pathological differentiation processes. The mammalian intestinal epithelium is a single cell layer comprised of proliferative crypts and differentiated villi. The crypts contain both proliferating and quiescent stem cell populations that self-renew and produce all the differentiated cell types, which are replaced every 3 to 5 days. The genetics of intestinal development, homeostasis, and disease are well defined, but less is known about the contribution of epigenetics in modulating these processes. Epigenetics refers to heritable phenotypic traits, including gene expression, which are independent of mutations in the DNA sequence. We have known for several decades that human colorectal cancers contain hypomethylated DNA, but the causes and consequences of this phenomenon are not fully understood. In contrast, tumor suppressor gene promoters are often hypermethylated in colorectal cancer, resulting in decreased expression of the associated gene. In this review, we describe the role that epigenetics plays in intestinal homeostasis and disease, with an emphasis on results from mouse models. We highlight the importance of producing and analyzing next-generation sequencing data detailing the epigenome from intestinal stem cell to differentiated intestinal villus cell. PMID:26220502

  18. Transport pathways in rat lingual epithelium.

    PubMed

    Simon, S A; Robb, R; Schiffman, S S

    1988-02-01

    Measurements of ion transport across isolated lingual epithelium of rat were correlated with electrophysiological recordings from taste nerves. At hyperosmotic concentrations of NaCl, sodium ions enter the mucosal membrane of the isolated epithelium partially through an amiloride-inhibitable pathway and exit the serosal membrane through a Na+-K+-ATPase. At hyposmotic concentrations of KCl, potassium ions enter the mucosal membrane through a K+ pathway that is inhibited by 4-aminopyridine and exit at the serosal membrane through a K+ pathway that is inhibited by BaCl2. The inhibition of sodium transport by amiloride and potassium transport by 4-aminopyridine is consistent with previously published electrophysiological recordings from the chorda tympani nerve bundle (CT) and recordings from nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) obtained here. The responses to NaCl are greater than the responses to KCl at equimolar concentrations over the entire concentration range both in epithelial and neural measurements. At hyposmotic concentrations of NaCl the epithelial responses include inward sodium and outward chloride components. Isolated rat tongue is only slightly stimulated by D-glucose or sucrose as are the CT and NTS responses. These data suggest that events in taste transduction can be understood, in part, by measuring the epithelial responses of isolated rat tongue.

  19. Effluxing ABC Transporters in Human Corneal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Mannermaa, Eliisa; Turner, Helen; Häkli, Marika; Wolosin, J. Mario; Tervo, Timo; Honkakoski, Paavo; Urtti, Arto

    2010-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are able to efflux their substrate drugs from the cells. We compared expression of efflux proteins in normal human corneal epithelial tissue, primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCEpiC), and corneal epithelial cell culture model (HCE model) based on human immortal cell line. Expression of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1–6 (MRP1–6) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) was studied using quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Only MRP1, MRP5, and BCRP were expressed in the freshly excised human corneal epithelial tissue. Expression of MRP1 and MRP5 was localized predominantly in the basal cells of the central cornea and limbus. Functional efflux activity was shown in the cell models, but they showed over-expression of most efflux transporters compared to that of normal corneal epithelium. In conclusion, MRP1, MRP5, and BCRP are expressed in the corneal epithelium, but MDR1, MRP2, MRP3, MRP4, and MRP6 are not significantly expressed. HCE cell model and commercially available primary cells deviate from this expression profile. PMID:19623615

  20. Restriction of viral dissemination from the midgut determines incompetence of small brown planthopper as a vector of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Hongyan; Mao, Qianzhuo; Liu, Qifei; Wei, Taiyun

    2012-08-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a fijivirus, is transmitted by the white-backed planthopper in a persistent-propagative manner. In this study, we found that another planthopper species, the small brown planthopper (SBPH), could acquire SRBSDV but not transmit it. To identify the transmission barrier for SRBSDV in SBPHs, sequential infection by SRBSDV in the organs of SBPHs was studied with immunofluorescence for viral antigens. SRBSDV initially entered the epithelial cells of the midgut, then viroplasms, the sites for viral replication, formed in the midgut of viruliferous SBPHs. Furthermore, SRBSDV spread within the midgut, but failed to disseminate from the midgut into the hemocoel or into the salivary glands. All these results indicated that the inability of SBPH to transmit SRBSDV could be due to the restriction of viral dissemination from the midgut of SBPH, which led to the failure of viral spread to the salivary glands for virus transmission.

  1. Glutathione S-transferase in the midgut tissue of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars exposed to dietary cadmium.

    PubMed

    Vlahović, Milena; Ilijin, Larisa; Mrdaković, Marija; Todorović, Dajana; Matić, Dragana; Lazarević, Jelica; Mataruga, Vesna Perić

    2016-06-01

    Activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) in midgut of gypsy moth caterpillars exposed to 10 and 30μg Cd/g dry food was examined. Based on the enzyme reaction through conjugation with glutathione, overall activity remained unaltered after acute and chronic treatment. No-observed-effect-concentration (10μg Cd/g dry food) significantly increased activity only after 3-day recovery following cadmium administration. Almost all comparisons of the indices of phenotypic plasticity revealed statistically significant differences. Despite the facts that GST has important role in xenobiotic biotransformation, our results indicate that this enzyme in insect midgut does not represent the key factor in cadmium detoxification.

  2. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, A R; Thampi, P; Yadav, S; Rawal, U M

    1993-12-01

    The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  3. A structured threshold model for mountain pine beetle outbreak.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mark A; Nelson, William; Xu, Cailin

    2010-04-01

    A vigor-structured model for mountain pine beetle outbreak dynamics within a forest stand is proposed and analyzed. This model explicitly tracks the changing vigor structure in the stand. All model parameters, other than beetle vigor preference, were determined by fitting model components to empirical data. An abrupt threshold for tree mortality to beetle densities allows for model simplification. Based on initial beetle density, model outcomes vary from decimation of the entire stand in a single year, to inability of the beetles to infect any trees. An intermediate outcome involves an initial infestation which subsequently dies out before the entire stand is killed. A model extension is proposed for dynamics of beetle aggregation. This involves a stochastic formulation.

  4. Mosquito ingestion of antibodies against mosquito midgut microbiota improves conversion of ookinetes to oocysts for Plasmodium falciparum, but not P. yoelii

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Jefferson A.; Pumpuni, Charles B.; Beier, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The mosquito midgut is a site of complex interactions between the mosquito, the malaria parasite and the resident bacterial flora. In laboratory experiments, we observed significant enhancement of Plasmodium falciparum oocyst production when Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes were membrane-fed on infected blood containing gametocytes from in vitro cultures mixed with sera from rabbits immunized with A. gambiae midguts. To identify specific mechanisms, we evaluated whether the immune sera was interfering with the usual limiting activity of gram-negative bacteria in An. gambiae midguts. Enhancement of P. falciparum infection rates occurred at some stage between the ookinete and oocyst stage and was associated with greater numbers of oocysts in mosquitoes fed on immune sera. The same immune sera did not affect the sporogonic development of P. yoelii, a rodent malaria parasite. Not only did antibodies in the immune sera recognize several types of midgut-derived gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas spp. and Cedecea spp.), but gentamicin provided in the sugar meal 3 days before an infectious P. falciparum blood meal mixed with immune sera eliminated the enhancing effect. These results suggest that gram-negative bacteria, which normally impair P. falciparum development between the ookinete and oocyst stage, were altered by specific anti-bacterial antibodies produced by immunizing rabbits with non-antibiotic-treated midgut lysates. Because of the differences in developmental kinetics between human and rodent malaria species, the anti-bacterial antibodies had no effect on P. yoelii because their ookinetes leave the midgut much earlier than P. falciparum and so are not influenced as strongly by resident midgut bacteria. While this study highlights the complex interactions occurring between the parasite, mosquito, and midgut microbiota, the ultimate goal is to determine the influence of midgut microbiota on Plasmodium development in anopheline midguts in malaria

  5. Malaria parasite colonisation of the mosquito midgut--placing the Plasmodium ookinete centre stage.

    PubMed

    Angrisano, Fiona; Tan, Yan-Hong; Sturm, Angelika; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Baum, Jake

    2012-05-15

    Vector-borne diseases constitute an enormous burden on public health across the world. However, despite the importance of interactions between infectious pathogens and their respective vector for disease transmission, the biology of the pathogen in the insect is often less well understood than the forms that cause human infections. Even with the global impact of Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malarial disease, no vaccine exists to prevent infection and resistance to all frontline drugs is emerging. Malaria parasite migration through the mosquito host constitutes a major population bottleneck of the lifecycle and therefore represents a powerful, although as yet relatively untapped, target for therapeutic intervention. The understanding of parasite-mosquito interactions has increased in recent years with developments in genome-wide approaches, genomics and proteomics. Each development has shed significant light on the biology of the malaria parasite during the mosquito phase of the lifecycle. Less well understood, however, is the process of midgut colonisation and oocyst formation, the precursor to parasite re-infection from the next mosquito bite. Here, we review the current understanding of cellular and molecular events underlying midgut colonisation centred on the role of the motile ookinete. Further insight into the major interactions between the parasite and the mosquito will help support the broader goal to identify targets for transmission-blocking therapies against malarial disease. Copyright © 2012 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacteria in midguts of field-collected Anopheles albimanus block Plasmodium vivax sporogonic development.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ceron, Lilia; Santillan, Frida; Rodriguez, Mario H; Mendez, Domingo; Hernandez-Avila, Juan E

    2003-05-01

    Bacterial infections were investigated in midguts of insectary and field-collected Anopheles albimanus Weidemann from southern Mexico. Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter amnigenus 2, Enterobacter sp., and Serratia sp. were isolated in field samples obtained in 1998, but only Enterobacter sp. was recovered in field samples of 1997 and no bacteria were isolated from insectary specimens. These bacteria were offered along with Plasmodium vivax infected blood to aseptic insectary An. albimanus, and the number of infected mosquitoes as well as the oocyst densities assessed after 7d. Plasmodium vivax infections in mosquitoes co-infected with En. amnigenus 2, En. cloacae, and S. marcensces were 53, 17, and 210 times, respectively, lower than in control mosquitoes, and the mean oocyst density in mosquitoes co-infected with En. cloacae was 2.5 times lower than in controls. Mortality was 13 times higher in S. marcensces-infected mosquitoes compared with controls. The overall midgut bacterial infection in mosquito field populations may influence P. vivax transmission, and could contribute to explain the annual variations in malaria incidence observed in the area.

  7. Exosome secretion by the parasitic protozoan Leishmania within the sand fly midgut

    PubMed Central

    Atayde, Vanessa Diniz; Suau, Hamide Aslan; Townsend, Shannon; Hassani, Kasra; Kamhawi, Shaden; Olivier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite several studies describing the secretion of exosomes by Leishmania in vitro, observation of their formation and release in vivo has remained a major challenge. Herein, we show that Leishmania constitutively secretes exosomes within the lumen of the sand fly midgut through a mechanism homologous to the mammalian pathway. Through egestion experiments, we demonstrate that Leishmania exosomes are part of the sand fly inoculum and are co-egested with the parasite during the insect’s bite possibly influencing the host infectious process. Indeed, co-inoculation of mice footpads with L. major plus midgut-isolated or in vitro-isolated L. major exosomes resulted in a significant increase in footpad swelling. Notably, co-injections produced exacerbated lesions through overinduction of inflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-17a. Our data indicate that Leishmania exosomes are an integral part of the parasite’s infectious life cycle and propose to add these vesicles to the repertoire of virulence factors associated to vector-transmitted infections. PMID:26565909

  8. West Nile Virus Infection Alters Midgut Gene Expression in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Smartt, Chelsea T.; Richards, Stephanie L.; Anderson, Sheri L.; Erickson, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in gene expression in the midgut of female Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus exposed to blood meals containing 6.8 logs plaque-forming units/mL of West Nile virus (WNV) were studied by fluorescent differential display. Twenty-six different cDNAs exhibited reproducible differences after feeding on infected blood. Of these, 21 cDNAs showed an increase in expression, and 5 showed a decrease in expression as a result of WNV presence in the blood meal. GenBank database searches showed that one clone with increased expression, CQ G12A2, shares 94% identity with a leucine-rich repeat-containing protein from Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and 32% identity to Toll-like receptors from Aedes aegypti. We present the first cDNA clone isolated from female Cx. p. quinquefasciatus midgut tissue whose expression changes on exposure to WNV. This cDNA represents a mosquito gene that is an excellent candidate for interacting with WNV in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and may play a role in disease transmission. PMID:19635880

  9. Malaria parasites form filamentous cell-to-cell connections during reproduction in the mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Ingrid; Sologub, Ludmilla; Williamson, Kim C; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Reininger, Luc; Doerig, Christian; Eksi, Saliha; Kombila, Davy U; Frank, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Physical contact is important for the interaction between animal cells, but it can represent a major challenge for protists like malaria parasites. Recently, novel filamentous cell-cell contacts have been identified in different types of eukaryotic cells and termed nanotubes due to their morphological appearance. Nanotubes represent small dynamic membranous extensions that consist of F-actin and are considered an ancient feature evolved by eukaryotic cells to establish contact for communication. We here describe similar tubular structures in the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum, which emerge from the surfaces of the forming gametes upon gametocyte activation in the mosquito midgut. The filaments can exhibit a length of > 100 μm and contain the F-actin isoform actin 2. They actively form within a few minutes after gametocyte activation and persist until the zygote transforms into the ookinete. The filaments originate from the parasite plasma membrane, are close ended and express adhesion proteins on their surfaces that are typically found in gametes, like Pfs230, Pfs48/45 or Pfs25, but not the zygote surface protein Pfs28. We show that these tubular structures represent long-distance cell-to-cell connections between sexual stage parasites and demonstrate that they meet the characteristics of nanotubes. We propose that malaria parasites utilize these adhesive “nanotubes” in order to facilitate intercellular contact between gametes during reproduction in the mosquito midgut. PMID:21173797

  10. Characterization of a novel cystatin type 2 from Rhipicephalus microplus midgut.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Thyago H S; Lu, Stephen; Gonzalez, Boris R G; Torquato, Ricardo J S; Tanaka, Aparecida S

    2017-09-01

    The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is an exclusive bovine ectoparasite responsible for the transmission of pathogens that decrease meat, leather and milk productions. Cattle vaccination is an alternative to control tick infestations, but the discovery of potential antigens is still a challenge for researchers. Recently, our group performed a midgut transcriptome of engorged R. microplus tick, and out of 800 ESTs sequences one cystatin-coding sequence was identified and named Rmcystatin-4. In order to understand the physiological role of Rmcystatin-4, the aim of this work was the expression, purification and functional characterization of a novel type 2 cystatin from the tick R. microplus. Rmcystatin-4 gene expression was identified mostly in tick midgut suggesting its possible role in blood digestion control. Our data showed that rRmcystatin-4 was successfully expressed in active form using Pichia pastoris system and the purified inhibitor presented high selectivity to BmCl-1 (Ki = 0.046 nM). Moreover, rRmcystatin-4 was able to impaired BmCl-1 activity towards bovine hemoglobin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Contribution of midgut bacteria to blood digestion and egg production in aedes aegypti (diptera: culicidae) (L.)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The insect gut harbors a variety of microorganisms that probably exceed the number of cells in insects themselves. These microorganisms can live and multiply in the insect, contributing to digestion, nutrition, and development of their host. Recent studies have shown that midgut bacteria appear to strengthen the mosquito's immune system and indirectly enhance protection from invading pathogens. Nevertheless, the physiological significance of these bacteria for mosquitoes has not been established to date. In this study, oral administration of antibiotics was employed in order to examine the contribution of gut bacteria to blood digestion and fecundity in Aedes aegypti. Results The antibiotics carbenicillin, tetracycline, spectinomycin, gentamycin and kanamycin, were individually offered to female mosquitoes. Treatment of female mosquitoes with antibiotics affected the lysis of red blood cells (RBCs), retarded the digestion of blood proteins and reduced egg production. In addition, antibiotics did not affect the survival of mosquitoes. Mosquito fertility was restored in the second gonotrophic cycle after suspension of the antibiotic treatment, showing that the negative effects of antibiotics in blood digestion and egg production in the first gonotrophic cycle were reversible. Conclusions The reduction of bacteria affected RBC lysis, subsequently retarded protein digestion, deprived mosquito from essential nutrients and, finally, oocyte maturation was affected, resulting in the production of fewer viable eggs. These results indicate that Ae. aegypti and its midgut bacteria work in synergism to digest a blood meal. Our findings open new possibilities to investigate Ae. aegypti-associated bacteria as targets for mosquito control strategies. PMID:21672186

  12. Malaria parasites form filamentous cell-to-cell connections during reproduction in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Ingrid; Sologub, Ludmilla; Williamson, Kim C; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Reininger, Luc; Doerig, Christian; Eksi, Saliha; Kombila, Davy U; Frank, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele

    2011-04-01

    Physical contact is important for the interaction between animal cells, but it can represent a major challenge for protists like malaria parasites. Recently, novel filamentous cell-cell contacts have been identified in different types of eukaryotic cells and termed nanotubes due to their morphological appearance. Nanotubes represent small dynamic membranous extensions that consist of F-actin and are considered an ancient feature evolved by eukaryotic cells to establish contact for communication. We here describe similar tubular structures in the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum, which emerge from the surfaces of the forming gametes upon gametocyte activation in the mosquito midgut. The filaments can exhibit a length of > 100 μm and contain the F-actin isoform actin 2. They actively form within a few minutes after gametocyte activation and persist until the zygote transforms into the ookinete. The filaments originate from the parasite plasma membrane, are close ended and express adhesion proteins on their surfaces that are typically found in gametes, like Pfs230, Pfs48/45 or Pfs25, but not the zygote surface protein Pfs28. We show that these tubular structures represent long-distance cell-to-cell connections between sexual stage parasites and demonstrate that they meet the characteristics of nanotubes. We propose that malaria parasites utilize these adhesive "nanotubes" in order to facilitate intercellular contact between gametes during reproduction in the mosquito midgut.

  13. Robustness of the bacterial community in the cabbage white butterfly larval midgut.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Courtney J; Schloss, Patrick; Ramos, Yolied; Raffa, Kenneth; Handelsman, Jo

    2010-02-01

    Microbial communities typically vary in composition and structure over space and time. Little is known about the inherent characteristics of communities that govern various drivers of these changes, such as random variation, changes in response to perturbation, or susceptibility to invasion. In this study, we use 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences to describe variation among bacterial communities in the midguts of cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) larvae and examine the influence of community structure on susceptibility to invasion. We compared communities in larvae experiencing the same conditions at different times (temporal variation) or fed different diets (perturbation). The most highly represented phylum was Proteobacteria, which was present in all midgut communities. The observed species richness ranged from six to 15, and the most abundant members affiliated with the genera Methylobacteria, Asaia, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, and Pantoea. Individual larvae subjected to the same conditions at the same time harbored communities that were highly similar in structure and membership, whereas the communities observed within larval populations changed with diet and over time. In addition, structural changes due to perturbation coincided with enhanced susceptibility to invasion by Enterobacter sp. NAB3R and Pantoea stewartii CWB600, suggesting that resistance to invasion is in part governed by community structure. These findings along with the observed conservation of membership at the phylum level, variation in structure and membership at lower taxonomic levels, and its relative simplicity make the cabbage white butterfly larval community an attractive model for studying community dynamics and robustness.

  14. High-frequency conjugative transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to Yersinia pestis in the flea midgut.

    PubMed

    Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Rosso, Marie-Laure; Schwan, Tom G; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2002-10-01

    The acquisition of foreign DNA by horizontal transfer from unrelated organisms is a major source of variation leading to new strains of bacterial pathogens. The extent to which this occurs varies widely, due in part to lifestyle factors that determine exposure to potential donors. Yersinia pestis, the plague bacillus, infects normally sterile sites in its mammalian host, but forms dense aggregates in the non-sterile digestive tract of its flea vector to produce a transmissible infection. Here we show that unrelated co-infecting bacteria in the flea midgut are readily incorporated into these aggregates, and that this close physical contact leads to high-frequency conjugative genetic exchange. Transfer of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from an Escherichia coli donor to Y. pestis occurred in the flea midgut at a frequency of 10-3 after only 3 days of co-infection, and after 4 weeks 95% of co-infected fleas contained an average of 103 antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis transconjugants. Thus, transit in its arthropod vector exposes Y. pestis to favourable conditions for efficient genetic exchange with microbial flora of the flea gut. Horizontal gene transfer in the flea may be the source of antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains recently isolated from plague patients in Madagascar.

  15. Differential protein expression in the midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes induced by the insecticide temephos.

    PubMed

    Games, P D; Alves, S N; Katz, B B; Tomich, J M; Serrão, J E

    2016-09-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors for pathogens of malaria, lymphatic filariasis, dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis. Culex quinquefasciatus Say, 1823 (Diptera: Culicidae) is a known vector of lymphatic filariasis. Its control in Brazil has been managed using the organophosphate temephos. Studies examining the proteins of Cx. quinquefasciatus that are differentially expressed in response to temephos further understanding of the modes of action of the insecticide and may potentially identify resistance factors in the mosquito. In the present study, a comparative proteomic analysis, using 2-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of flight (TOF)/TOF mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics analyses were performed to identify midgut proteins in Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae that were differentially expressed in response to exposure to temephos relative to those in untreated controls. A total of 91 protein spots were differentially expressed; 40 were upregulated and 51 were downregulated by temephos. A total of 22 proteins, predominantly upregulated, were identified as known to play a role in the immune response, whereas the downregulated proteins were involved in energy and protein catabolism. This is the first proteome study of the midgut of Cx. quinquefasciatus and it provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of insecticide-induced responses in the mosquito. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  16. Exosome Secretion by the Parasitic Protozoan Leishmania within the Sand Fly Midgut.

    PubMed

    Atayde, Vanessa Diniz; Aslan, Hamide; Townsend, Shannon; Hassani, Kasra; Kamhawi, Shaden; Olivier, Martin

    2015-11-03

    Despite several studies describing the secretion of exosomes by Leishmania in vitro, observation of their formation and release in vivo has remained a major challenge. Herein, we show that Leishmania constitutively secretes exosomes within the lumen of the sand fly midgut through a mechanism homologous to the mammalian pathway. Through egestion experiments, we demonstrate that Leishmania exosomes are part of the sand fly inoculum and are co-egested with the parasite during the insect's bite, possibly influencing the host infectious process. Indeed, co-inoculation of mice footpads with L. major plus midgut-isolated or in-vitro-isolated L. major exosomes resulted in a significant increase in footpad swelling. Notably, co-injections produced exacerbated lesions through overinduction of inflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-17a. Our data indicate that Leishmania exosomes are an integral part of the parasite's infectious life cycle, and we propose to add these vesicles to the repertoire of virulence factors associated with vector-transmitted infections.

  17. Modulation of Malaria Infection in Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes Exposed to Natural Midgut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tchioffo, Majoline T.; Boissière, Anne; Churcher, Thomas S.; Abate, Luc; Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Nsango, Sandrine E.; Awono-Ambéné, Parfait H.; Christen, Richard; Berry, Antoine; Morlais, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    The development of Plasmodium falciparum within the Anopheles gambiae mosquito relies on complex vector-parasite interactions, however the resident midgut microbiota also plays an important role in mediating parasite infection. In natural conditions, the mosquito microbial flora is diverse, composed of commensal and symbiotic bacteria. We report here the isolation of culturable midgut bacteria from mosquitoes collected in the field in Cameroon and their identification based on the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We next measured the effect of selected natural bacterial isolates on Plasmodium falciparum infection prevalence and intensity over multiple infectious feedings and found that the bacteria significantly reduced the prevalence and intensity of infection. These results contrast with our previous study where the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae positively correlated with P. falciparum infection (Boissière et al. 2012). The oral infection of bacteria probably led to the disruption of the gut homeostasis and activated immune responses, and this pinpoints the importance of studying microbe-parasite interactions in natural conditions. Our results indicate that the effect of bacterial exposure on P. falciparum infection varies with factors from the parasite and the human host and calls for deeper dissection of these parameters for accurate interpretation of bacterial exposure results in laboratory settings. PMID:24324714

  18. Cadmium-binding proteins in midgut gland of freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.; Torreblanca, A.; Medina, J.; Diza-Mayans, J.

    1989-02-01

    Metallothioneins, metal binding proteins, were originally isolated and characterized by Margoshes and Vallee. These proteins have a high affinity for various heavy metals, particularly cadmium and mercury and have extensively been studied in mammals. Metal binding proteins have been observed in a variety of marine invertebrates; however, there is very little information available on metal binding proteins in freshwater invertebrates, and particularly in freshwater crustaceans. Cadmium is an ubiquitous non essential element which possesses high toxicity to aquatic organisms. Cadmium binding proteins observed in invertebrates have similar characteristics to mammalian metallothioneins. In 1978, the American red crayfish appeared in Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields (Valencia, Spain). Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields waters are subjected to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. In previous reports the authors studied the toxicity and accumulation of cadmium on Procambarus clarkii of Albufera Lake. This crayfish shows a high resistance to cadmium and a great accumulation rate of this metal in several tissues, including midgut gland. Since Procambarus clarkii shows a high resistance to cadmium, the presence of cadmium binding proteins (Cd-BP) in midgut gland of these crayfish would be expected. This report describes results on the characterization of Cd-BPs obtained from cadmium exposed crayfish Procambarus clarkii, demonstrating their presence in this freshwater crayfish.

  19. Endozoochory by beetles: a novel seed dispersal mechanism

    PubMed Central

    de Vega, Clara; Arista, Montserrat; Ortiz, Pedro L.; Herrera, Carlos M.; Talavera, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Due in part to biophysical sized-related constraints, insects unlike vertebrates are seldom expected to act as primary seed dispersers via ingestion of fruits and seeds (endozoochory). The Mediterranean parasitic plant Cytinus hypocistis, however, possesses some characteristics that may facilitate endozoochory by beetles. By combining a long-term field study with experimental manipulation, we tested whether C. hypocistis seeds are endozoochorously dispersed by beetles. Methods Field studies were carried out over 4 years on six populations in southern Spain. We recorded the rate of natural fruit consumption by beetles, the extent of beetle movement, beetle behaviour and the relative importance of C. hypocistis fruits in beetle diet. Key Results The tenebrionid beetle Pimelia costata was an important disperser of C. hypocistis seeds, consuming up to 17·5 % of fruits per population. Forty-six per cent of beetles captured in the field consumed C. hypocistis fruits, with up to 31 seeds found in individual beetle frass. An assessment of seeds following passage through the gut of beetles indicated that seeds remained intact and viable and that the proportion of viable seeds from beetle frass was not significantly different from that of seeds collected directly from fruits. Conclusions A novel plant–animal interaction is revealed; endozoochory by beetles may facilitate the dispersal of viable seeds after passage through the gut away from the parent plant to potentially favourable underground sites offering a high probability of germination and establishment success. Such an ecological role has until now been attributed only to vertebrates. Future studies should consider more widely the putative role of fruit and seed ingestion by invertebrates as a dispersal mechanism, particularly for those plant species that possess small seeds. PMID:21303784

  20. The bacterial community of entomophilic nematodes and host beetles.

    PubMed

    Koneru, Sneha L; Salinas, Heilly; Flores, Gilberto E; Hong, Ray L

    2016-05-01

    Insects form the most species-rich lineage of Eukaryotes and each is a potential host for organisms from multiple phyla, including fungi, protozoa, mites, bacteria and nematodes. In particular, beetles are known to be associated with distinct bacterial communities and entomophilic nematodes. While entomopathogenic nematodes require symbiotic bacteria to kill and reproduce inside their insect hosts, the microbial ecology that facilitates other types of nematode-insect associations is largely unknown. To illuminate detailed patterns of the tritrophic beetle-nematode-bacteria relationship, we surveyed the nematode infestation profiles of scarab beetles in the greater Los Angeles area over a five-year period and found distinct nematode infestation patterns for certain beetle hosts. Over a single season, we characterized the bacterial communities of beetles and their associated nematodes using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found significant differences in bacterial community composition among the five prevalent beetle host species, independent of geographical origin. Anaerobes Synergistaceae and sulphate-reducing Desulfovibrionaceae were most abundant in Amblonoxia beetles, while Enterobacteriaceae and Lachnospiraceae were common in Cyclocephala beetles. Unlike entomopathogenic nematodes that carry bacterial symbionts, insect-associated nematodes do not alter the beetles' native bacterial communities, nor do their microbiomes differ according to nematode or beetle host species. The conservation of Diplogastrid nematodes associations with Melolonthinae beetles and sulphate-reducing bacteria suggests a possible link between beetle-bacterial communities and their associated nematodes. Our results establish a starting point towards understanding the dynamic interactions between soil macroinvertebrates and their microbiota in a highly accessible urban environment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Metagenomic Profiling Reveals Lignocellulose Degrading System in a Microbial Community Associated with a Wood-Feeding Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Erin D.; Geib, Scott M.; Hoover, Kelli; Tien, Ming; Tringe, Susannah G.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Chovatia, Mansi; Herr, Joshua R.; Carlson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophoraglabripennis) is an invasive, wood-boring pest that thrives in the heartwood of deciduous tree species. A large impediment faced by A. glabripennis as it feeds on woody tissue is lignin, a highly recalcitrant biopolymer that reduces access to sugars and other nutrients locked in cellulose and hemicellulose. We previously demonstrated that lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose are actively deconstructed in the beetle gut and that the gut harbors an assemblage of microbes hypothesized to make significant contributions to these processes. While lignin degrading mechanisms have been well characterized in pure cultures of white rot basidiomycetes, little is known about such processes in microbial communities associated with wood-feeding insects. The goals of this study were to develop a taxonomic and functional profile of a gut community derived from an invasive population of larval A. glabripennis collected from infested host trees and to identify genes that could be relevant for the digestion of woody tissue and nutrient acquisition. To accomplish this goal, we taxonomically and functionally characterized the A. glabripennis midgut microbiota through amplicon and shotgun metagenome sequencing and conducted a large-scale comparison with the metagenomes from a variety of other herbivore-associated communities. This analysis distinguished the A. glabripennis larval gut metagenome from the gut communities of other herbivores, including previously sequenced termite hindgut metagenomes. Genes encoding enzymes were identified in the A. glabripennis gut metagenome that could have key roles in woody tissue digestion including candidate lignin degrading genes (laccases, dye-decolorizing peroxidases, novel peroxidases and β-etherases), 36 families of glycoside hydrolases (such as cellulases and xylanases), and genes that could facilitate nutrient recovery, essential nutrient synthesis, and detoxification. This community could serve as a

  2. Duplication and Sub/Neofunctionalization of Malvolio, an Insect Homolog of Nramp, in the Subsocial Beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides.

    PubMed

    Mehlferber, Elijah C; Benowitz, Kyle M; Roy-Zokan, Eileen M; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Cunningham, Christopher B; Moore, Allen J

    2017-10-05

    With growing numbers of sequenced genomes, increasing numbers of duplicate genes are being uncovered. Here we examine Malvolio, a gene in the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (Nramp) family, that has been duplicated in the subsocial beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides, which exhibits advanced parental behavior. There is only one copy of Mvl in honey bees and Drosophila, whereas in vertebrates there are two copies that are subfunctionalized. We first compared amino acid sequences for Drosophila, beetles, mice, and humans. We found a high level of conservation between the different species, although there was greater variation in the C-terminal regions. A phylogenetic analysis across multiple insect orders suggested that Mvl has undergone several independent duplications. To examine the potential for different functions where it has been duplicated, we quantified expression levels of Mvl1 and Mvl2 in eight tissues in N. vespilloides We found that while Mvl1 was expressed ubiquitously, albeit at varying levels, expression of Mvl2 was limited to brain and midgut. Because Mvl has been implicated in behavior, we examined expression during different behavioral states that reflected differences in opportunity for social interactions and expression of parental care behaviors. We found differing expression patterns for the two copies, with Mvl1 increasing in expression during resource preparation and feeding offspring, and Mvl2 decreasing in these same states. Given these patterns of expression, along with the protein analysis, we suggest that Mvl in N. vespilloides has experienced sub/neofunctionalization following its duplication, and may be evolving differing and tissue-specific roles in behavior and physiology. Copyright © 2017 Mehlferber et al.

  3. The electrical potential profile of gallbladder epithelium.

    PubMed

    van Os, C H; Slegers, J F

    1975-12-04

    In this study the relative ionic permeabilities of the cell membranes of Necturus gallbladder epithelium have been determined by means of simultaneous measurement of transmural and transmucosal membrane potential differences (PD) and by ionic substitution experiments with sodium, potassium and chloride ions. It is shown that the mucosal membrane is permeable to sodium and to potassium ions. The baso-lateral membrane PD is only sensitive to potassium ions. In both membranes chloride conductance is negligible or absent. The ratio of the resistances of the mucosal and baso-lateral membranes, RM/RS, increases upon reducing the sodium concentration in the mucosal solution. The same ratio decreases when sodium is replaced by potassium which implies a greater potassium than sodium conductance in the mucosal membrane. The relative permeability of the shunt for potassium, sodium and chloride ions is: PK/PNa/PCl=1.81:1.00:0.32. From the results obtained in this study a value for the PK/PNa ratio of the mucosal membrane could be evaluated. This ratio is 2.7. From the same data the magnitude of the electromotive forces generated across the cell membranes could be calculated. The EMF's are -15mV across the mucosal membrane and -81mV across the baso-lateral one. Due to the presence of the low resistance shunt the transmucosal membrane PD is -53.2mV (cell inside negative) and the transmural PD is +2.6mV (serosal side positive). The change in potential profile brought about by the low resistance shunt favors passive entry of Na ions into the cell across the mucosal membrane. Calculations show that this passive Na influx is maximally 64% of the net Na flux estimated from fluid transport measurements. The C-1 conductive of the baso-lateral membrane is too small to allow electrogenic coupling of C1 with Na transport across this membrane. Experiments with rabbit gallbladder epithelium indicate that the membrane properties in this tissue are qualitatively similar to those of Necturus

  4. Identification of Holotrichia oblita midgut proteins that bind to Cry8-like toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis and assembling of H. oblita midgut tissue transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Huang, Ying; Shu, Changlong; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Liu, Chunqing; Song, Fuping; Lai, Jinsheng; Zhang, Jie

    2017-04-07

    The Bacillus thuringiensis strain HBF-18 (CGMCC2070), containing two cry genes (cry8-like and cry8Ga), is toxic to Holotrichia oblita larvae. Both Cry8-like and Cry8Ga proteins are active against this insect pest, while Cry8-like is the more toxic protein. To analyze the binding characteristics of Cry8-like and Cry8Ga proteins to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) in H. oblita larvae, binding assays were conducted with a fluorescent DyLight488-labeled Cry8-like toxin. Results of binding saturation assays demonstrated that Cry8-like binds specifically to binding sites on BBMV from H. oblita and heterologous competition assays revealed that Cry8Ga shared binding sites with Cry8-like. Furthermore, Cry8-like-binding proteins in midgut from H. oblita larvae were identified by pull-down assays, and by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In addition, the H. oblita midgut transcriptome was assembled by high-throughput RNA sequencing and used for identification of Cry8-like binding proteins. Eight Cry8-like-binding proteins were obtained from pull-down assays conducted with BBMV. The LC-MS/MS data of these proteins successfully matched with the H. oblita transcriptome, and the BLASTX results identified five proteins as serine protease, transferrin-like, ATPase catalytic subunit, and actin. These identified Cry8-like-binding proteins were different with those previously confirmed as receptors for Cry1A proteins in lepidopteran insect species such as aminopeptidase, alkaline phosphatase and cadherin.Importance:Holotrichia oblita is one of main soil-dwelling pests in China. The larvae damage the roots of crops, and resulted in significant yield reduction and economic losses. It is difficult to control principally due to its soil living habits. In recent years, some Cry8 toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis were shown to be active against this pest. The study of the mechanism of action of these Cry8 toxins is needed for their effective use in the control

  5. Allozyme gene diversities in some leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Krafsur, E S

    1999-08-01

    Gene diversity at allozyme loci was investigated in the bean leaf beetle, Ceratoma trifurcata Forster; the elm leaf beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola (Muller); the cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta Fabricus; the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte; the southern corn rootworm, also called the spotted cucumber beetle, D. undecimpunctata howardi Baker; the northern corn rootworm, D. barberi Smith and Lawrence; and the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say). Six of these species are economically important pests of crops and display adaptive traits that may correlate with genetic diversity. Gene diversity H(E) in bean leaf beetles was 17.7 +/- 4.0% among 32 loci. In western corn rootworms, H(E) = 4.8 +/- 2.0% among 36 loci, and in spotted cucumber beetles, H(E) = 11.9 +/- 2.7% among 39 loci. Diversity among 27 loci was 10.5 +/- 4.3% in the Colorado potato beetle. The data were compared with gene diversity estimates from other leaf beetle species in which heterozygosities varied from 0.3 to 21% and no correlation was detected among heterozygosities, geographic ranges, or population densities. Distributions of single-locus heterozygosities were consistent with selective neutrality of alleles.

  6. Colorado potato beetle toxins revisited: evidence the beetle does not sequester host plant glycoalkaloids.

    PubMed

    Armer, Christine A

    2004-04-01

    The Colorado potato beetle feeds only on glycoalkaloid-laden solanaceous plants, appears to be toxic to predators, and has aposematic coloration, suggesting the beetle may sequester alkaloids from its host plants. This study tested 4th instars and adults, as well as isolated hemolymph and excrement, to determine if the beetles sequester, metabolize, or excrete alkaloids ingested from their host plants. HPLC analysis showed: that neither the larvae nor the adults sequestered either solanine or chaconine from potato foliage; that any alkaloids in the beetles were at concentrations well below 1 ppm; and that alkaloids were found in the excrement of larvae at approximately the same concentrations as in foliage. Analysis of alkaloids in the remains of fed-upon leaflet halves plus excreta during 24 hr feeding by 4th instars, as compared to alkaloids in the uneaten halves of the leaflets, showed that equal amounts of alkaloids were excreted as were ingested. The aposematic coloration probably warns of a previously-identified toxic dipeptide instead of a plant-derived alkaloid, as the Colorado potato beetle appears to excrete, rather than sequester or metabolize, the alkaloids from its host plants.

  7. iBeetle-Base: a database for RNAi phenotypes in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Dönitz, Jürgen; Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Grossmann, Daniela; Gerischer, Lizzy; Tech, Maike; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    The iBeetle-Base (http://ibeetle-base.uni-goettingen.de) makes available annotations of RNAi phenotypes, which were gathered in a large scale RNAi screen in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (iBeetle screen). In addition, it provides access to sequence information and links for all Tribolium castaneum genes. The iBeetle-Base contains the annotations of phenotypes of several thousands of genes knocked down during embryonic and metamorphic epidermis and muscle development in addition to phenotypes linked to oogenesis and stink gland biology. The phenotypes are described according to the EQM (entity, quality, modifier) system using controlled vocabularies and the Tribolium morphological ontology (TrOn). Furthermore, images linked to the respective annotations are provided. The data are searchable either for specific phenotypes using a complex 'search for morphological defects' or a 'quick search' for gene names and IDs. The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum has become an important model system for insect functional genetics and is a representative of the most species rich taxon, the Coleoptera, which comprise several devastating pests. It is used for studying insect typical development, the evolution of development and for research on metabolism and pest control. Besides Drosophila, Tribolium is the first insect model organism where large scale unbiased screens have been performed.

  8. What is Next in Bark Beetle Phylogeography?

    PubMed

    Avtzis, Dimitrios N; Bertheau, Coralie; Stauffer, Christian

    2012-05-07

    Bark beetle species within the scolytid genera Dendroctonus, Ips, Pityogenes and Tomicus are known to cause extensive ecological and economical damage in spruce and pine forests during epidemic outbreaks all around the world. Dendroctonus ponderosae poses the most recent example having destroyed almost 100,000 km² of conifer forests in North America. The success and effectiveness of scolytid species lies mostly in strategies developed over the course of time. Among these, a complex system of semiochemicals promotes the communication and aggregation on the spot of infestation facilitating an en masse attack against a host tree's defenses; or an association with fungi that evolved either in the form of nutrition (ambrosia fungi) or even by reducing the resistance of host trees (blue-stain fungi). Although often specific to a tree genus or species, some bark beetles are polyphagous and have the ability to switch on to new hosts and extend their host range (i.e., between conifer genera such as Pityogenes chalcographus or even from conifer to deciduous trees as Polygraphus grandiclava). A combination of these capabilities in concert with life history or ecological traits explains why bark beetles are considered interesting subjects in evolutionary studies. Several bark beetle species appear in phylogeographic investigations, in an effort to improve our understanding of their ecology, epidemiology and evolution. In this paper investigations that unveil the phylogeographic history of bark beetles are reviewed. A close association between refugial areas and postglacial migration routes that insects and host trees have followed in the last 15,000 BP has been suggested in many studies. Finally, a future perspective of how next generation sequencing will influence the resolution of phylogeographic patterns in the coming years is presented. Utilization of such novel techniques will provide a more detailed insight into the genome of scolytids facilitating at the same time the

  9. What is Next in Bark Beetle Phylogeography?

    PubMed Central

    Avtzis, Dimitrios N.; Bertheau, Coralie; Stauffer, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Bark beetle species within the scolytid genera Dendroctonus, Ips, Pityogenes and Tomicus are known to cause extensive ecological and economical damage in spruce and pine forests during epidemic outbreaks all around the world. Dendroctonus ponderosae poses the most recent example having destroyed almost 100,000 km2 of conifer forests in North America. The success and effectiveness of scolytid species lies mostly in strategies developed over the course of time. Among these, a complex system of semiochemicals promotes the communication and aggregation on the spot of infestation facilitating an en masse attack against a host tree’s defenses; or an association with fungi that evolved either in the form of nutrition (ambrosia fungi) or even by reducing the resistance of host trees (blue-stain fungi). Although often specific to a tree genus or species, some bark beetles are polyphagous and have the ability to switch on to new hosts and extend their host range (i.e., between conifer genera such as Pityogenes chalcographus or even from conifer to deciduous trees as Polygraphus grandiclava). A combination of these capabilities in concert with life history or ecological traits explains why bark beetles are considered interesting subjects in evolutionary studies. Several bark beetle species appear in phylogeographic investigations, in an effort to improve our understanding of their ecology, epidemiology and evolution. In this paper investigations that unveil the phylogeographic history of bark beetles are reviewed. A close association between refugial areas and postglacial migration routes that insects and host trees have followed in the last 15,000 BP has been suggested in many studies. Finally, a future perspective of how next generation sequencing will influence the resolution of phylogeographic patterns in the coming years is presented. Utilization of such novel techniques will provide a more detailed insight into the genome of scolytids facilitating at the same time the

  10. Barrier function of airway tract epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Shyamala; Comstock, Adam T; Sajjan, Uma S

    2013-01-01

    Airway epithelium contributes significantly to the barrier function of airway tract. Mucociliary escalator, intercellular apical junctional complexes which regulate paracellular permeability and antimicrobial peptides secreted by the airway epithelial cells are the three primary components of barrier function of airway tract. These three components act cooperatively to clear inhaled pathogens, allergens and particulate matter without inducing inflammation and maintain tissue homeostasis. Therefore impairment of one or more of these essential components of barrier function may increase susceptibility to infection and promote exaggerated and prolonged innate immune responses to environmental factors including allergens and pathogens resulting in chronic inflammation. Here we review the regulation of components of barrier function with respect to chronic airways diseases. PMID:24665407

  11. Pigmentation of the Lacrimal Sac Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Jakobiec, Frederick A; Stagner, Anna M; Sutula, Francis C; Freitag, Suzanne K; Yoon, Michael K

    To describe the patterns of the melanocytic populations of 3 cases of lacrimal sac benign melanosis and 1 of atypical primary-acquired sac melanosis with a melanomatous nodule secondary to spread of atypical conjunctival primary-acquired melanosis to the sac. Clinical records, photographs, and paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin and the Fontana reaction were critically reviewed. Additional sections were immunoreacted for melanoma antigen recognized by T cells and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Five nonpigmented pterygia and 4 nonpigmented lacrimal sacs served as controls. Three patients with obstructive dacryocystitis and benign melanosis were African-Americans whose sacs disclosed the presence of nonclustering, melanoma antigen recognized by T cells, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor-positive intraepithelial dendritic melanocytes at all levels of the epithelium. The transferred melanin granules were concentrated in the adlumenal apical region of the epithelial cells. No fusiform melanocytes were found in the lamina propria. The fourth patient, a white, had atypical conjunctival and sac primary-acquired melanosis and conjunctival and sac melanomas. The intraepithelial sac melanocytes in this case were strikingly atypical and profusely distributed in a back to back fashion at all levels of a thickened epithelial layer focally approximating the appearance of a melanoma in situ. Five nonpigmented pterygia and 4 nonpigmented lacrimal sacs served as controls. Each displayed nonnesting dendritic melanocytes of various densities without back to back contact. Low densities of intraepithelial melanocytes were discovered in all controls and therefore represent a normal subpopulation within the conjunctival and lacrimal sacs. Due to the pseudostratification of the sac epithelium, melanocytes can move to higher levels without implying atypia. Benign melanosis is produced by small diffusely distributed individual

  12. Fungal Symbionts of the Spruce Bark Beetle Synthesize the Beetle Aggregation Pheromone 2-Methyl-3-buten-2-ol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Axelsson, Karolin; Krokene, Paal; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin

    2015-09-01

    Tree-killing bark beetles depend on aggregation pheromones to mass-attack their host trees and overwhelm their resistance. The beetles are always associated with phytopathogenic ophiostomatoid fungi that probably assist in breaking down tree resistance, but little is known about if or how much these fungal symbionts contribute to the beetles' aggregation behavior. In this study, we determined the ability of four major fungal symbionts of the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus to produce beetle aggregation pheromones. The fungi were incubated on Norway spruce Picea abies bark, malt agar, or malt agar amended with 0.5% (13)C glucose. Volatiles present in the headspace of each fungus were analyzed for 7 days after incubation using a SPME autosampler coupled to a GC/MS. Two Grosmannia species (G. penicillata and G. europhioides) produced large amounts of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MB), the major component in the beetles' aggregation pheromone blend, when growing on spruce bark or malt agar. Grosmannia europhioides also incorporated (13)C glucose into MB, demonstrating that the fungi can synthesize MB de novo using glucose as a carbon source. This is the first clear evidence that fungal symbionts of bark beetles can produce components in the aggregation pheromone blend of their beetle vectors. This provides new insight into the possible ecological roles of fungal symbionts in bark beetle systems and may deepen our understanding of species interactions and coevolution in these important biological systems.

  13. Lehr's fields of campaniform sensilla in beetles (Coleoptera): functional morphology. III. Modification of elytral mobility or shape in flying beetles.

    PubMed

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Gorb, Stanislav; Radchenko, Vladimir; Gladun, Dmytro

    2015-03-01

    Some flying beetles have peculiar functional properties of their elytra, if compared with the vast majority of beetles. A "typical" beetle covers its pterothorax and the abdomen from above with closed elytra and links closed elytra together along the sutural edges. In the open state during flight, the sutural edges diverge much more than by 90°. Several beetles of unrelated taxa spread wings through lateral incisions on the elytra and turn the elytron during opening about 10-12° (Cetoniini, Scarabaeus, Gymnopleurus) or elevate their elytra without partition (Sisyphus, Tragocerus). The number of campaniform sensilla in their elytral sensory field is diminished in comparison with beetles of closely related taxa lacking that incision. Elytra are very short in rove beetles and in long-horn beetles Necydalini. The abundance of sensilla in brachyelytrous long-horn beetles Necydalini does not decrease in comparison with macroelytrous Cerambycinae. Strong reduction of the sensory field was found in brachyelytrous Staphylinidae. Lastly, there are beetles lacking the linkage of the elytra down the sutural edge (stenoelytry). Effects of stenoelytry were also not uniform: Oedemera and flying Meloidae have the normal amount of sensilla with respect to their body size, whereas the sensory field in the stenoelytrous Eulosia bombyliformis is 5-6 times less than in chafers of the same size but with normally linking broad elytra.

  14. Persistent disruption of ciliated epithelium following paediatric lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Biju; Aurora, Paul; Spencer, Helen; Elliott, Martin; Rutman, Andrew; Hirst, Robert A; O'Callaghan, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    It is unclear whether ciliary function following lung transplantation is normal or not. Our aim was to study the ciliary function and ultrastructure of epithelium above and below the airway anastomosis and the peripheral airway of children following lung transplantation. We studied the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and beat pattern, using high speed digital video imaging and ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy, of bronchial epithelium from above and below the airway anastomosis and the peripheral airway of 10 cystic fibrosis (CF) and 10 non-suppurative lung disease (NSLD) paediatric lung transplant recipients. Compared to epithelium below the anastomosis, the epithelium above the anastomosis in the CF group showed reduced CBF (median (interquartile range): 10.5 (9.0-11.4) Hz versus 7.4 (6.4-9.2) Hz; p<0.01) and increased dyskinesia (median (IQR): 16.5 (12.9-28.2)% versus 42.2 (32.6-56.4)%; p<0.01). In both CF and NSLD groups, compared with epithelium above the anastomosis, the epithelium below the anastomosis showed marked ultrastructural abnormalities (median duration post-transplant 7-12 months). Ciliary dysfunction is a feature of native airway epithelium in paediatric CF lung transplant recipients. The epithelium below the airway anastomosis shows profound ultrastructural abnormalities in both CF and NSLD lung transplant recipients, many months after transplantation.

  15. Challenges and opportunities for tissue-engineering polarized epithelium.

    PubMed

    Paz, Ana C; Soleas, John; Poon, James C H; Trieu, Dennis; Waddell, Thomas K; McGuigan, Alison P

    2014-02-01

    The epithelium is one of the most important tissue types in the body and the specific organization of the epithelial cells in these tissues is important for achieving appropriate function. Since many tissues contain an epithelial component, engineering functional epithelium and understanding the factors that control epithelial maturation and organization are important for generating whole artificial organ replacements. Furthermore, disruption of the cellular organization leads to tissue malfunction and disease; therefore, engineered epithelium could provide a valuable in vitro model to study disease phenotypes. Despite the importance of epithelial tissues, a surprisingly limited amount of effort has been focused on organizing epithelial cells into artificial polarized epithelium with an appropriate structure that resembles that seen in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of epithelial tissue organization and highlight the importance of cell polarization to achieve appropriate epithelium function. We next describe the in vitro models that exist to create polarized epithelium and summarize attempts to engineer artificial epithelium for clinical use. Finally, we highlight the opportunities that exist to translate strategies from tissue engineering other tissues to generate polarized epithelium with a functional structure.

  16. FGF control of E-cadherin targeting in the Drosophila midgut impacts on primordial germ cell motility.

    PubMed

    Parés, Guillem; Ricardo, Sara

    2016-01-15

    Embryo formation requires tight regulation and coordination of adhesion in multiple cell types. By undertaking imaging, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and genetic analysis during posterior midgut morphogenesis in Drosophila, we find a new requirement for the conserved fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathway in the maintenance of epithelial cell adhesion through FGF modulation of zygotic E-cadherin. During Drosophila gastrulation, primordial germ cells (PGCs) are transported with the posterior midgut while it undergoes dynamic cell shape changes. In embryos mutant for the FGF signaling pathway components Branchless and Breathless, zygotic E-cadherin is not targeted to adherens junctions, causing midgut pocket collapse, which impacts on PGC movement. We find that the ventral midline also requires FGF signaling to maintain cell-cell adhesion. We show that FGF signaling regulates the distribution of zygotic E-cadherin during early embryonic development to maintain cell-cell adhesion in the posterior midgut and the ventral midline, a role that is likely crucial in other tissues undergoing active cell shape changes with higher adhesive needs.

  17. Transcriptome of the lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) larval midgut and its response to infection by bacillus thuringiensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transcriptomic profiles of the serious lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, a biopesticide commonly used for its control in nature. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of ...

  18. Morphological abnormalities and cell death in the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) midgut associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    PubMed Central

    Ghanim, Murad; Fattah-Hosseini, Somayeh; Levy, Amit; Cilia, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) is a phloem-limited, gram-negative, fastidious bacterium that is associated with the development of citrus greening disease, also known as Huanglongbing (HLB). CLas is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri, in a circulative manner. Two major barriers to transmission within the insect are the midgut and the salivary glands. We performed a thorough microscopic analysis within the insect midgut following exposure to CLas-infected citrus trees. We observed changes in nuclear architecture, including pyknosis and karyorrhexis as well as changes to the actin cytoskeleton in CLas-exposed midgut cells. Further analyses showed that the changes are likely due to the activation of programmed cell death as assessed by Annexin V staining and DNA fragmentation assays. These results suggest that exposure to CLas-infected trees induces apoptotic responses in the psyllid midgut that should be further investigated. Understanding the adaptive significance of the apoptotic response has the potential to create new approaches for controlling HLB. PMID:27630042

  19. Ecdysone-Induced Receptor Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP52F Regulates Drosophila Midgut Histolysis by Enhancement of Autophagy and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Abirami; Peng, Wen-Hsin; Yu, Ya-Ting; Sang, Tzu-Kang

    2014-01-01

    The rapid removal of larval midgut is a critical developmental process directed by molting hormone ecdysone during Drosophila metamorphosis. To date, it remains unclear how the stepwise events can link the onset of ecdysone signaling to the destruction of larval midgut. This study investigated whether ecdysone-induced expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP52F regulates this process. The mutation of the Ptp52F gene caused significant delay in larval midgut degradation. Transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (TER94), a regulator of ubiquitin proteasome system, was identified as a substrate and downstream effector of PTP52F in the ecdysone signaling. The inducible expression of PTP52F at the puparium formation stage resulted in dephosphorylation of TER94 on its Y800 residue, ensuring the rapid degradation of ubiquitylated proteins. One of the proteins targeted by dephosphorylated TER94 was found to be Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (DIAP1), which was rapidly proteolyzed in cells with significant expression of PTP52F. Importantly, the reduced level of DIAP1 in response to inducible PTP52F was essential not only for the onset of apoptosis but also for the initiation of autophagy. This study demonstrates a novel function of PTP52F in regulating ecdysone-directed metamorphosis via enhancement of autophagic and apoptotic cell death in doomed Drosophila midguts. PMID:24550005

  20. Hemalin, a thrombin inhibitor isolated from a midgut cDNA library from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Min; Zhou, Jinlin; Gong, Haiyan; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Shirafuji, Rika; Battur, Banzragch; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2009-02-01

    A full-length sequence of a thrombin inhibitor (designated as hemalin) from the midgut of parthenogenetic Haemaphysalis longicornis has been identified. Sequence analysis shows that this gene belongs to the Kunitz-type family, containing two Kunitz domains with high homology to boophilin, the thrombin inhibitor from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The recombinant protein expressed in insect cells delayed bovine plasma clotting time and inhibited both thrombin-induced fibrinogen clotting and platelet aggregation. A 20-kDa protein was detected from the midgut lysate with antiserum against recombinant hemalin. The gene is expressed at all stages of the tick except for the egg stage, and hemalin mRNA mainly in the midgut of the female adult tick. Real-time PCR analysis shows that this gene has a distinctly high expression level in the rapid bloodsucking period of the larvae, nymphs, and adults. Disruption of the hemalin gene by RNA interference led to a 2-day extension of the tick blood feeding period, and 27.7% of the RNA-treated ticks did not successfully complete the blood feeding. These findings indicate that the newly identified thrombin inhibitor from the midgut of H. longicornis might play an important role in tick blood feeding.

  1. Amino acids trigger down-regulation of superoxide via TORC pathway in the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Gandara, Ana Caroline P.; Oliveira, José Henrique M.; Nunes, Rodrigo D.; Goncalves, Renata L.S.; Dias, Felipe A.; Hecht, Fabio; Fernandes, Denise C.; Genta, Fernando A.; Laurindo, Francisco R.M.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2016-01-01

    Sensing incoming nutrients is an important and critical event for intestinal cells to sustain life of the whole organism. The TORC is a major protein complex involved in monitoring the nutritional status and is activated by elevated amino acid concentrations. An important feature of haematophagy is that huge amounts of blood are ingested in a single meal, which results in the release of large quantities of amino acids, together with the haemoglobin prosthetic group, haem, which decomposes hydroperoxides and propagates oxygen-derived free radicals. Our previous studies demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were diminished in the mitochondria and midgut of the Dengue fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, immediately after a blood meal. We proposed that this mechanism serves to avoid oxidative damage that would otherwise be induced by haem following a blood meal. Studies also performed in mosquitoes have shown that blood or amino acids controls protein synthesis through TORC activation. It was already proposed, in different models, a link between ROS and TOR, however, little is known about TOR signalling in insect midgut nor about the involvement of ROS in this pathway. Here, we studied the effect of a blood meal on ROS production in the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus. We observed that blood meal amino acids decreased ROS levels in the R. prolixus midgut immediately after feeding, via lowering mitochondrial superoxide production and involving the amino acid-sensing TORC pathway. PMID:26945025

  2. The four serotypes of dengue recognize the same putative receptors in Aedes aegypti midgut and Ae. albopictus cells

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Curiel, Ricardo F; Esquinca-Avilés, Héctor Armando; Tovar, Rosalinda; Díaz-Badillo, Álvaro; Camacho-Nuez, Minerva; Muñoz, María de Lourdes

    2006-01-01

    Background Dengue viruses (DENV) attach to the host cell surface and subsequently enter the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several primary and low affinity co-receptors for this flavivirus have been identified. However, the presence of these binding molecules on the cell surface does not necessarily render the cell susceptible to infection. Determination of which of them serve as bona fide receptors for this virus in the vector may be relevant to treating DENV infection and in designing control strategies. Results (1) Overlay protein binding assay showed two proteins with molecular masses of 80 and 67 kDa (R80 and R67). (2) Specific antibodies against these two proteins inhibited cell binding and infection. (3) Both proteins were bound by all four serotypes of dengue virus. (4) R80 and R67 were purified by affinity chromatography from Ae. aegypti mosquito midguts and from Ae albopictus C6/36 cells. (5) In addition, a protein with molecular mass of 57 kDa was purified by affinity chromatography from the midgut extracts. (6) R80 and R67 from radiolabeled surface membrane proteins of C6/36 cells were immunoprecipitated by antibodies against Ae. aegypti midgut. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that R67 and R80 are receptors for the four serotypes of dengue virus in the midgut cells of Ae. aegypti and in C6/36 Ae. albopictus cells. PMID:17014723

  3. Reciprocal Tripartite Interactions between the Aedes aegypti Midgut Microbiota, Innate Immune System and Dengue Virus Influences Vector Competence

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Jose Luis; Souza-Neto, Jayme; Torres Cosme, Rolando; Rovira, Jose; Ortiz, Alma; Pascale, Juan M.; Dimopoulos, George

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus is one of the most important arboviral pathogens and the causative agent of dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome. It is transmitted between humans by the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, and at least 2.5 billion people are at daily risk of infection. During their lifecycle, mosquitoes are exposed to a variety of microbes, some of which are needed for their successful development into adulthood. However, recent studies have suggested that the adult mosquito's midgut microflora is critical in influencing the transmission of human pathogens. In this study we assessed the reciprocal interactions between the mosquito's midgut microbiota and dengue virus infection that are, to a large extent, mediated by the mosquito's innate immune system. We observed a marked decrease in susceptibility to dengue virus infection when mosquitoes harbored certain field-derived bacterial isolates in their midgut. Transcript abundance analysis of selected antimicrobial peptide genes suggested that the mosquito's microbiota elicits a basal immune activity that appears to act against dengue virus infection. Conversely, the elicitation of the mosquito immune response by dengue virus infection itself influences the microbial load of the mosquito midgut. In sum, we show that the mosquito's microbiota influences dengue virus infection of the mosquito, which in turn activates its antibacterial responses. PMID:22413032

  4. The effects of Bt Cry1Ie toxin on bacterial diversity in the midgut of Apis mellifera ligustica (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hui-Ru; Geng, Li-Li; Li, Yun-He; Wang, Qiang; Diao, Qing-Yun; Zhou, Ting; Dai, Ping-Li

    2016-01-01

    The honey bee has been regarded as a key species in the environmental risk assessment of biotech crops. Here, the potential adverse effects of Cry1Ie toxin on the midgut bacteria of the worker bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) were investigated under laboratory conditions. Newly emerged bees were fed with different concentrations of Cry1Ie toxin syrups (20 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL, and 20 μg/mL), pure sugar syrup, and 48 ppb of imidacloprid syrups, then sampled after 15 and 30 d. We characterized the dominant midgut bacteria and compared the composition and structure of the midgut bacterial community in all samples using the Illumina MiSeq platform targeting the V3–V4 regions of 16S rDNA. No significant differences in the diversity of the midgut bacteria were observed between the five treatments. This work was the first to show the effects of Cry1Ie toxin on honey bees, and our study provided a theoretical basis for the biosafety assessment of transgenic Cry1Ie maize. PMID:27090812

  5. Transepithelial flux of an allotostatin and analogs across the anterior midgut of Manduca sexta larvae in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The transepithelial transport of cydiastatin 4 and analogues across flat sheet preparations of the anterior midgut of larvae of the tobacco hawkmoth moth, Manduca sexta, was investigated using a combination of reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), enzyme linked immunosorbe...

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Strains of Serratia spp. from the Midgut of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Dong; Hill-Clemons, Casey; Carissimo, Guillaume; Yu, Wanqin; Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the annotated draft genome sequences of two strains of Serratia spp., Ag1 and Ag2, isolated from the midgut of two different strains of Anopheles gambiae. The genomes of these two strains are almost identical. PMID:25767231

  7. Biochemical and histological biomarkers in the midgut of Apis mellifera from polluted environment at Beheira Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Saad, Ahmed M Abu; Kheirallah, Dalia A; El-Samad, Lamia M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of organophosphorus (OP) pollutants on oxidative stress and ultrastructural biomarkers in the midgut of the honeybee Apis mellifera collected from three locations that differ in their extent of spraying load with OP insecticides: a weakly anthropised rural site, Bolin which is considered as a reference site; moderately spraying site, El Kaza; and a strongly anthropised urban site, Tiba with a long history of pesticide use. Results showed that high concentrations of chlorpyrifos, malathion, diazinon, chlorpyrifos-methyl, and pirimiphos-methyl were detected in midgut at locations with extensive pesticide spraying. Reduced glutathione content, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase displayed lowest activities in the heavily sprayed location (Tiba). Lipid peroxidation level in the midgut of honeybees in the sprayed locations was found to be significantly higher compared to the reference values. Meanwhile, various ultrastructural abnormalities were observed in the epithelial cells of midgut of honeybees collected from El Kaza and Tiba, included confluent and disorganized microvilli and destruction of their brush border, the cytoplasm with large vacuoles and alteration of cytoplasmic organelles including the presence of swollen mitochondria with lysis of matrices, disruption of limiting membranes, and disintegration of cristae. The nuclei with indented nuclear envelope and disorganized chromatin were observed. These investigated biomarkers indicated that the surveyed honeybees are being under stressful environmental conditions. So, we suggest using those biomarkers in the assessment of environmental quality using honeybees in future monitoring of ecotoxicological studies.

  8. Beetle horns and horned beetles: emerging models in developmental evolution and ecology

    PubMed Central

    Kijimoto, Teiya; Pespeni, Melissa; Beckers, Oliver; Moczek, Armin P.

    2013-01-01

    Many important questions in developmental biology increasingly interface with related questions in other biological disciplines such as evolutionary biology and ecology. In this article, we review and summarize recent progress in the development of horned beetles and beetle horns as study systems amenable to the integration of a wide range of approaches, from gene function analysis in the laboratory to population ecological and behavioral studies in the field. Specifically, we focus on three key questions at the current interface of developmental biology, evolutionary biology and ecology: (1) the developmental mechanisms underlying the origin and diversification of novel, complex traits, (2) the relationship between phenotypic diversification and the diversification of genes and transcriptomes, and (3) the role of behavior as a leader or follower in developmental evolution. For each question we discuss how work on horned beetles is contributing to our current understanding of key issues, as well as highlight challenges and opportunities for future studies. PMID:23799584

  9. Atlas of Iberian water beetles (ESACIB database).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, David; Millán, Andrés; Abellán, Pedro; Picazo, Félix; Carbonell, José A; Ribera, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The ESACIB ('EScarabajos ACuáticos IBéricos') database is provided, including all available distributional data of Iberian and Balearic water beetles from the literature up to 2013, as well as from museum and private collections, PhD theses, and other unpublished sources. The database contains 62,015 records with associated geographic data (10×10 km UTM squares) for 488 species and subspecies of water beetles, 120 of them endemic to the Iberian Peninsula and eight to the Balearic Islands. This database was used for the elaboration of the "Atlas de los Coleópteros Acuáticos de España Peninsular". In this dataset data of 15 additional species has been added: 11 that occur in the Balearic Islands or mainland Portugal but not in peninsular Spain and an other four with mainly terrestrial habits within the genus Helophorus (for taxonomic coherence). The complete dataset is provided in Darwin Core Archive format.

  10. Bronchial epithelium in children: a key player in asthma.

    PubMed

    Carsin, Ania; Mazenq, Julie; Ilstad, Alexandra; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Chanez, Pascal; Gras, Delphine

    2016-06-01

    Bronchial epithelium is a key element of the respiratory airways. It constitutes the interface between the environment and the host. It is a physical barrier with many chemical and immunological properties. The bronchial epithelium is abnormal in asthma, even in children. It represents a key component promoting airway inflammation and remodelling that can lead to chronic symptoms. In this review, we present an overview of bronchial epithelium and how to study it, with a specific focus on children. We report physical, chemical and immunological properties from ex vivo and in vitro studies. The responses to various deleterious agents, such as viruses or allergens, may lead to persistent abnormalities orchestrated by bronchial epithelial cells. As epithelium dysfunctions occur early in asthma, reprogramming the epithelium may represent an ambitious goal to induce asthma remission in children.

  11. [The new era of epithelium-targeted drug development].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoshimi; Nagase, Shotaro; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2014-01-01

    Epithelium plays pivotal roles in biological barrier separating the inside of body and the outside environment. Ninety percent of malignant tumors are derived from epithelium. Most pathological microorganisms invade into the body from mucosal epithelium. Thus, epithelium is potential targets for drug development. Claudins (CLs), a family of tetra-transmembrane protein consisting of over 20 members, are structural and functional components of tight junction-seals in epithelium. Modulation of CL-seals enhanced mucosal absorption of drugs. CLs are often over-expressed in malignant tumors. CL-4 expression is increased in the epithelial cells covering the mucosal immune tissues. Very recently, CLs are also expected to be targets for traumatic brain injury and regenerative therapy. In this review, we overview the past, the present and the future of CLs-targeted drug development.

  12. Integration of Ixodes ricinus genome sequencing with transcriptome and proteome annotation of the naïve midgut.

    PubMed

    Cramaro, Wibke J; Revets, Dominique; Hunewald, Oliver E; Sinner, Regina; Reye, Anna L; Muller, Claude P

    2015-10-28

    In Europe, Ixodes ricinus ticks are the most important vectors of diseases threatening humans, livestock, wildlife and companion animals. Nevertheless, genomic sequence information is missing and functional annotation of transcripts and proteins is limited. This lack of information is restricting studies of the vector and its interactions with pathogens and hosts. Here we present and integrate the first analysis of the I. ricinus genome with the transcriptome and proteome of the unfed I. ricinus midgut. Whole genome sequencing was performed on I. ricinus ticks and the sequences were de novo assembled. In parallel, I. ricinus ticks were dissected and the midgut transcriptome sequenced. Both datasets were integrated by transcript discovery analysis to identify putative genes and genome contigs were screened for homology. An alignment-based and a motif-search-based approach were combined for the annotation of the midgut transcriptome. Additionally, midgut proteins were identified and annotated by mass spectrometry with public databases and the in-house built transcriptome database as references and results were cross-validated. The de novo assembly of 1 billion DNA sequences to a reference genome of 393 Mb length provides an unprecedented insight into the I. ricinus genome. A homology search revealed sequences in the assembled genome contigs homologous to 89% of the I. scapularis genome scaffolds indicating coverage of most genome regions. We identified moreover 6,415 putative genes. More than 10,000 transcripts from naïve midgut were annotated with respect of predicted function and/or cellular localization. By combining an alignment-based with a motif-search-based annotation approach, we doubled the number of annotations throughout all functional categories. In addition, 574 gel spots were significantly identified by mass spectrometry (p<0.05) and 285 distinct proteins expressed in the naïve midgut were annotated functionally and/or for cellular localization. Our

  13. Exploring the mialome of ticks: an annotated catalogue of midgut transcripts from the hard tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Acari: Ixodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jennifer M; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2008-01-01

    Background Ticks are obligate blood feeders. The midgut is the first major region of the body where blood and microbes ingested with the blood meal come in contact with the tick's internal tissues. Little is known about protein expression in the digestive tract of ticks. In this study, for analysis of global gene expression during tick attachment and feeding, we generated and sequenced 1,679 random transcripts (ESTs) from cDNA libraries from the midguts of female ticks at varying stages of feeding. Results Sequence analysis of the 1,679 ESTs resulted in the identification of 835 distinct transcripts, from these, a total of 82 transcripts were identified as proteins putatively directly involved in blood meal digestion, including enzymes involved in oxidative stress reduction/antimicrobial activity/detoxification, peptidase inhibitors, protein digestion (cysteine-, aspartic-, serine-, and metallo-peptidases), cell, protein and lipid binding including mucins and iron/heme metabolism and transport. A lectin-like protein with a high match to lectins in other tick species, allergen-like proteins and surface antigens important in pathogen recognition and/or antimicrobial activity were also found. Furthermore, midguts collected from the 6-day-fed ticks expressed twice as many transcripts involved in bloodmeal processing as midguts from unfed/2-day-fed ticks. Conclusion This tissue-specific transcriptome analysis provides an opportunity to examine the global expression of transcripts in the tick midgut and to compare the gut response to host attachment versus blood feeding and digestion. In contrast to those in salivary glands of other Ixodid ticks, most proteins in the D. variabilis midgut cDNA library were intracellular. Of the total ESTs associated with a function, an unusually large number of transcripts were associated with peptidases, cell, lipid and protein binding, and oxidative stress or detoxification. Presumably, this is consistent with their role in

  14. Water capture by a desert beetle.

    PubMed

    Parker, A R; Lawrence, C R

    2001-11-01

    Some beetles in the Namib Desert collect drinking water from fog-laden wind on their backs. We show here that these large droplets form by virtue of the insect's bumpy surface, which consists of alternating hydrophobic, wax-coated and hydrophilic, non-waxy regions. The design of this fog-collecting structure can be reproduced cheaply on a commercial scale and may find application in water-trapping tent and building coverings, for example, or in water condensers and engines.

  15. Southern Pine Beetle Population Dynamics in Trees

    Treesearch

    Fred M. Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Successful mass attack of a pine tree by the southern pine beetle (SPB) results in the tree’s death and provides opportunity for colonization of the new phloem resource and reproduction by a new generation of SPBs plus hundreds of associated species of insects, mites, fungi, and nematodes. The within-tree portions of the SPB life history can be divided into component...

  16. The Bacterial Community of Entomophilic Nematodes and Host Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Koneru, Sneha L.; Salinas, Heilly; Flores, Gilberto E.; Hong, Ray L.

    2016-01-01

    Insects form the most species-rich lineage of Eukaryotes and each is a potential host for organisms from multiple phyla, including fungi, protozoa, mites, bacteria, and nematodes. In particular, beetles are known to be associated with distinct bacterial communities and entomophilic nematodes. While entomopathogenic nematodes require symbiotic bacteria to kill and reproduce inside their insect hosts, the microbial ecology that facilitates other types of nematode-insect associations is largely unknown. To illuminate detailed patterns of the tritrophic beetle-nematode-bacteria relationship, we surveyed the nematode infestation profiles of scarab beetles in the greater Los Angeles area over a five-year period and found distinct nematode infestation patterns for certain beetle hosts. Over a single season, we characterized the bacterial communities of beetles and their associated nematodes using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found significant differences in bacterial community composition among the five prevalent beetle host species, independent of geographic origin. Anaerobes Synergistaceae and sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrionaceae were most abundant in Amblonoxia beetles, while Enterobacteriaceae and Lachnospiraceae were common in Cyclocephala beetles. Unlike entomopathogenic nematodes that carry bacterial symbionts, insect-associated nematodes do not alter the beetles’ native bacterial communities, nor do their microbiomes differ according to nematode or beetle host species. The conservation of Diplogastrid nematodes associations with Melolonthinae beetles and sulfate-reducing bacteria suggests a possible link between beetle bacterial communities and their associated nematodes. Our results establish a starting point towards understanding the dynamic interactions between soil macroinvertebrates and their microbiota in a highly accessible urban environment. PMID:26992100

  17. The evolution of agriculture in beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae).

    PubMed

    Farrell, B D; Sequeira, A S; O'Meara, B C; Normark, B B; Chung, J H; Jordal, B H

    2001-10-01

    Beetles in the weevil subfamilies Scolytinae and Platypodinae are unusual in that they burrow as adults inside trees for feeding and oviposition. Some of these beetles are known as ambrosia beetles for their obligate mutualisms with asexual fungi--known as ambrosia fungi--that are derived from plant pathogens in the ascomycete group known as the ophiostomatoid fungi. Other beetles in these subfamilies are known as bark beetles and are associated with free-living, pathogenic ophiostomatoid fungi that facilitate beetle attack of phloem of trees with resin defenses. Using DNA sequences from six genes, including both copies of the nuclear gene encoding enolase, we performed a molecular phylogenetic study of bark and ambrosia beetles across these two subfamilies to establish the rate and direction of changes in life histories and their consequences for diversification. The ambrosia beetle habits have evolved repeatedly and are unreversed. The subfamily Platypodinae is derived from within the Scolytinae, near the tribe Scolytini. Comparison of the molecular branch lengths of ambrosia beetles and ambrosia fungi reveals a strong correlation, which a fungal molecular clock suggests spans 60 to 21 million years. Bark beetles have shifted from ancestral association with conifers to angiosperms and back again several times. Each shift to angiosperms is associated with elevated diversity, whereas the reverse shifts to conifers are associated with lowered diversity. The unusual habit of adult burrowing likely facilitated the diversification of these beetle-fungus associations, enabling them to use the biomass-rich resource that trees represent and set the stage for at least one origin of eusociality.

  18. Fluorescence Localization and Comparative Ultrastructural Study of Periplocoside NW from Periploca sepium Bunge in the Midgut of the Oriental Amyworm, Mythimna separata Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mingxing; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Jiwen; Hu, Zhaonong; Wu, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    Periplocoside NW (PSNW) is a novel insecticidal compound isolated from the root bark of Periploca sepium Bunge and has potent stomach toxicity against some insect pests. Previous studies showed that the Mythimna separata larva is sensitive to PSNW, but the Agrotis ispilon larva is insensitive. In this study, preliminary target localization on the midgut of M. separata larvae was conducted via a fluorescence labeling technique. A comparative ultrastructural study on the effects of PSNW on the midguts of M. separata and A. ispilon larvae was performed. Symptom observation results showed that typical stomach toxicity was induced by PSNW in M. separata larvae. Fluorescence localization results showed that PSNW binds to the midgut cells of M. separata larvae. Ultrastructure observations showed destruction of the microvilli, organelle, and cytomembrane in the midgut cells of M. separata larvae, whereas no obvious changes were observed in midgut cells of A. ispilon larvae. These results were consistent with the insecticidal activity of PSNW. Therefore, PSNW might act on the midgut tissues of the insects, and one or more binding sites of PSNW may exist in M. separata larvae midgut cell cytomembranes. PMID:24831268

  19. Humoral responses in Rhodnius prolixus: bacterial feeding induces differential patterns of antibacterial activity and enhances mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides in the midgut

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The triatomine, Rhodnius prolixus, is a major vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. It has a strictly blood-sucking habit in all life stages, ingesting large amounts of blood from vertebrate hosts from which it can acquire pathogenic microorganisms. In this context, the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the midgut of the insect is vital to control possible infection, and to maintain the microbiota already present in the digestive tract. Methods In the present work, we studied the antimicrobial activity of the Rhodnius prolixus midgut in vitro against the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. We also analysed the abundance of mRNAs encoding for defensins, prolixicin and lysozymes in the midgut of insects orally infected by these bacteria at 1 and 7 days after feeding. Results Our results showed that the anterior midgut contents contain a higher inducible antibacterial activity than those of the posterior midgut. We observed that the main AMP encoding mRNAs in the anterior midgut, 7 days after a blood meal, were for lysozyme A, B, defensin C and prolixicin while in the posterior midgut lysozyme B and prolixicin transcripts predominated. Conclusion Our findings suggest that R. prolixus modulates AMP gene expression upon ingestion of bacteria with patterns that are distinct and dependent upon the species of bacteria responsible for infection. PMID:24885969

  20. Innate olfactory preferences in dung beetles.

    PubMed

    Dormont, Laurent; Jay-Robert, Pierre; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Rapior, Sylvie; Lumaret, Jean-Pierre

    2010-09-15

    The effects of insect larval diet on adult olfactory responses to host-plant or food volatiles are still debated. The induction of adult host preferences has been studied in insects with diverse ecologies, including parasitoids, flower-visitors and phytophagous species. We investigated this question for the first time in a coprophagous insect species. Larvae of the French scarab dung beetle Agrilinus constans were reared on four different artificial substrates containing dung from cattle, horse, sheep or wild boar, and responses of imagos to dung volatiles were then behaviourally tested in an olfactometer. We also reported the first analysis of the composition of different mammal dung volatiles. We showed that adult beetles were more attracted to cattle and sheep dung odours, and that larval feeding experience had no effect on the adult olfactory responses to dung volatiles. A second experiment showed that the presence of other insects inside the dung resource affects the process of dung selection by adults. We identified 64 chemical compounds from dung emissions, and showed that dung volatiles clearly differed among different mammal species, allowing olfactory discrimination by dung beetles. Our results suggest that resource selection in coprophagous insects may be based on innate olfactory preferences. Further experiments should examine whether Agrilinus adults can learn new dung odours, and whether larval diet may influence the behaviour of adults in other coprophagous species.

  1. Tenebrio beetles use magnetic inclination compass.

    PubMed

    Vácha, Martin; Drstková, Dana; Půzová, Tereza

    2008-08-01

    Animals that guide directions of their locomotion or their migration routes by the lines of the geomagnetic field use either polarity or inclination compasses to determine the field polarity (the north or south direction). Distinguishing the two compass types is a guideline for estimation of the molecular principle of reception and has been achieved for a number of animal groups, with the exception of insects. A standard diagnostic method to distinguish a compass type is based on reversing the vertical component of the geomagnetic field, which leads to the opposite reactions of animals with two different compass types. In the present study, adults of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor were tested by means of a two-step laboratory test of magnetoreception. Beetles that were initially trained to memorize the magnetic position of the light source preferred, during the subsequent test, this same direction, pursuant geomagnetic cues only. In the following step, the vertical component was reversed between the training and the test. The beetles significantly turned their preferred direction by 180 degrees. Our results brought until then unknown original findings that insects, represented here by the T. molitor species, use-in contrast to another previously researched Arthropod, spiny lobster-the inclination compass.

  2. Tenebrio beetles use magnetic inclination compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vácha, Martin; Drštková, Dana; Půžová, Tereza

    2008-08-01

    Animals that guide directions of their locomotion or their migration routes by the lines of the geomagnetic field use either polarity or inclination compasses to determine the field polarity (the north or south direction). Distinguishing the two compass types is a guideline for estimation of the molecular principle of reception and has been achieved for a number of animal groups, with the exception of insects. A standard diagnostic method to distinguish a compass type is based on reversing the vertical component of the geomagnetic field, which leads to the opposite reactions of animals with two different compass types. In the present study, adults of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor were tested by means of a two-step laboratory test of magnetoreception. Beetles that were initially trained to memorize the magnetic position of the light source preferred, during the subsequent test, this same direction, pursuant geomagnetic cues only. In the following step, the vertical component was reversed between the training and the test. The beetles significantly turned their preferred direction by 180°. Our results brought until then unknown original findings that insects, represented here by the T. molitor species, use—in contrast to another previously researched Arthropod, spiny lobster—the inclination compass.

  3. Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Okabe, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Foldable wings of insects are the ultimate deployable structures and have attracted the interest of aerospace engineering scientists as well as entomologists. Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most sophisticated ways that have right–left asymmetric patterns. However, the specific folding process and the reason for this asymmetry remain unclear. This study reveals how these asymmetric patterns emerge as a result of the folding process of rove beetles. A high-speed camera was used to reveal the details of the wing-folding movement. The results show that these characteristic asymmetrical patterns emerge as a result of simultaneous folding of overlapped wings. The revealed folding mechanisms can achieve not only highly compact wing storage but also immediate deployment. In addition, the right and left crease patterns are interchangeable, and thus each wing internalizes two crease patterns and can be folded in two different ways. This two-way folding gives freedom of choice for the folding direction to a rove beetle. The use of asymmetric patterns and the capability of two-way folding are unique features not found in artificial structures. These features have great potential to extend the design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use. PMID:25368178

  4. Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Okabe, Yoji

    2014-11-18

    Foldable wings of insects are the ultimate deployable structures and have attracted the interest of aerospace engineering scientists as well as entomologists. Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most sophisticated ways that have right-left asymmetric patterns. However, the specific folding process and the reason for this asymmetry remain unclear. This study reveals how these asymmetric patterns emerge as a result of the folding process of rove beetles. A high-speed camera was used to reveal the details of the wing-folding movement. The results show that these characteristic asymmetrical patterns emerge as a result of simultaneous folding of overlapped wings. The revealed folding mechanisms can achieve not only highly compact wing storage but also immediate deployment. In addition, the right and left crease patterns are interchangeable, and thus each wing internalizes two crease patterns and can be folded in two different ways. This two-way folding gives freedom of choice for the folding direction to a rove beetle. The use of asymmetric patterns and the capability of two-way folding are unique features not found in artificial structures. These features have great potential to extend the design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use.

  5. Dengue virus serotype 2 infection alters midgut and carcass gene expression in the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Kathryn A.; Sundararajan, Anitha; Devitt, Nicholas P.; Schilkey, Faye D.; Hansen, Immo A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus is currently an important vector for dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus, and its role in transmission of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) may increase in the future due to its ability to colonize temperate regions. In contrast to Aedes aegypti, the dominant vector of dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus, genetic responses of Ae. albopictus upon infection with an arbovirus are not well characterized. Here we present a study of the changes in transcript expression in Ae. albopictus exposed to dengue virus serotype 2 via feeding on an artificial bloodmeal. Methodology/Principal findings We isolated midguts and midgut-free carcasses of Ae. albopictus fed on bloodmeals containing dengue virus as well as controls fed on virus-free control meals at day 1 and day 5 post-feeding. We confirmed infection of midguts from mosquitoes sampled on day 5 post-feeding via RT-PCR. RNAseq analysis revealed dynamic modulation of the expression of several putative immunity and dengue virus-responsive genes, some of whose expression was verified by qRT-PCR. For example, a serine protease gene was up-regulated in the midgut at 1 day post infection, which may potentially enhance mosquito susceptibility to dengue infection, while 14 leucine-rich repeat genes, previously shown to be involved in mosquito antiviral defenses, were down-regulated in the carcass at 5 days post infection. The number of significantly modulated genes decreased over time in midguts and increased in carcasses. Conclusion/Significance Dengue virus exposure results in the modulation of genes in a time- and site-specific manner. Previous literature on the interaction between mosquitoes and mosquito-borne pathogens suggests that most of the changes that occurred in Ae. albopictus exposed to DENV would favor virus infection. Many genes identified in this study warrant further characterization to understand their role in viral manipulation of and antiviral response of

  6. A Kazal-type inhibitor is modulated by Trypanosoma cruzi to control microbiota inside the anterior midgut of Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Soares, Tatiane S; Buarque, Diego S; Queiroz, Bruna R; Gomes, Cícera M; Braz, Glória R C; Araújo, Ricardo N; Pereira, Marcos H; Guarneri, Alessandra A; Tanaka, Aparecida S

    2015-05-01

    The triatomine insect, Rhodnius prolixus, is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. The parasite must overcome immune response and microbiota to develop inside the midgut of triatomines. In this study, we expressed, purified and characterized a Kazal-type inhibitor from the midgut of R. prolixus, named RpTI, which may be involved in microbiota - T. cruzi interactions. The qPCR showed that the RpTI transcript was primarily expressed in tissues from the intestinal tract and that it was upregulated in the anterior midgut after T. cruzi infection. A 315-bp cDNA fragment encoding the mature protein was cloned into the pPIC9 vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris system. Recombinant RpTI (rRpTI) was purified on a trypsin-Sepharose column and had a molecular mass of 11.5 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. This protein inhibited trypsin (Ki = 0.42 nM), whereas serine proteases from the coagulation cascade were not inhibited. Moreover, trypanocidal assays revealed that rRpTI did not interfere in the viability of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. The RpTI transcript was also knocked down by RNA interference prior to infection of R. prolixus with T. cruzi. The amount of T. cruzi in the anterior midgut was significantly lower in RpTI knockdown insects compared to the non-silenced groups. We also verified that the bacterial load is higher in the anterior midgut of silenced and infected R. prolixus compared to non-silenced and infected insects. Our results suggest that T. cruzi infection increases the expression of RpTI to mediate microbiota modulation and is important for parasite immediately after infection with R. prolixus.

  7. Salinity alters snakeskin and mesh transcript abundance and permeability in midgut and Malpighian tubules of larval mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Jonusaite, Sima; Donini, Andrew; Kelly, Scott P

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the distribution and localization of the septate junction (SJ) proteins snakeskin (Ssk) and mesh in osmoregulatory organs of larval mosquito (Aedes aegypti), as well as their response to altered environmental salt levels. Ssk and mesh transcripts and immunoreactivity were detected in tissues of endodermal origin such as the midgut and Malpighian tubules of A. aegypti larvae, but not in ectodermally derived hindgut and anal papillae. Immunolocalization of Ssk and mesh in the midgut and Malpighian tubules indicated that both proteins are concentrated at regions of cell-cell contact between epithelial cells. Transcript abundance of ssk and mesh was higher in the midgut and Malpighian tubules of brackish water (BW, 30% SW) reared A. aegypti larvae when compared with freshwater (FW) reared animals. Therefore, [(3)H]polyethylene glycol (MW 400Da, PEG-400) flux was examined across isolated midgut and Malpighian tubule preparations as a measure of their paracellular permeability. It was found that PEG-400 flux was greater across the midgut of BW versus FW larvae while the Malpighian tubules of BW-reared larvae had reduced PEG-400 permeability in conjunction with increased Cl(-) secretion compared to FW animals. Taken together, data suggest that Ssk and mesh are found in smooth SJs (sSJs) of larval A. aegypti and that their abundance alters in association with changes in epithelial permeability when larvae reside in water of differing salt content. This latter observation suggests that Ssk and mesh play a role in the homeostatic control of salt and water balance in larval A. aegypti. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dengue virus serotype 2 infection alters midgut and carcass gene expression in the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Hanley, Kathryn A; Sundararajan, Anitha; Devitt, Nicholas P; Schilkey, Faye D; Hansen, Immo A

    2017-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus is currently an important vector for dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus, and its role in transmission of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) may increase in the future due to its ability to colonize temperate regions. In contrast to Aedes aegypti, the dominant vector of dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus, genetic responses of Ae. albopictus upon infection with an arbovirus are not well characterized. Here we present a study of the changes in transcript expression in Ae. albopictus exposed to dengue virus serotype 2 via feeding on an artificial bloodmeal. We isolated midguts and midgut-free carcasses of Ae. albopictus fed on bloodmeals containing dengue virus as well as controls fed on virus-free control meals at day 1 and day 5 post-feeding. We confirmed infection of midguts from mosquitoes sampled on day 5 post-feeding via RT-PCR. RNAseq analysis revealed dynamic modulation of the expression of several putative immunity and dengue virus-responsive genes, some of whose expression was verified by qRT-PCR. For example, a serine protease gene was up-regulated in the midgut at 1 day post infection, which may potentially enhance mosquito susceptibility to dengue infection, while 14 leucine-rich repeat genes, previously shown to be involved in mosquito antiviral defenses, were down-regulated in the carcass at 5 days post infection. The number of significantly modulated genes decreased over time in midguts and increased in carcasses. Dengue virus exposure results in the modulation of genes in a time- and site-specific manner. Previous literature on the interaction between mosquitoes and mosquito-borne pathogens suggests that most of the changes that occurred in Ae. albopictus exposed to DENV would favor virus infection. Many genes identified in this study warrant further characterization to understand their role in viral manipulation of and antiviral response of Ae. albopictus.

  9. Female-specific specialization of a posterior end region of the midgut symbiotic organ in Plautia splendens and allied stinkbugs.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshinari; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Meng, Xian-Ying; Koga, Ryuichi; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-04-01

    Many stinkbugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera) are associated with bacterial symbionts in a posterior region of the midgut. In these stinkbugs, adult females excrete symbiont-containing materials from the anus for transmission of the beneficial symbionts to their offspring. For ensuring the vertical symbiont transmission, a variety of female-specific elaborate traits at the cellular, morphological, developmental, and behavioral levels have been reported from diverse stinkbugs of the families Plataspidae, Urostylididae, Parastrachiidae, etc. Meanwhile, such elaborate female-specific traits for vertical symbiont transmission have been poorly characterized for the largest and economically important stinkbug family Pentatomidae. Here, we investigated the midgut symbiotic system of a pentatomid stinkbug, Plautia splendens. A specific gammaproteobacterial symbiont was consistently present extracellularly in the cavity of numerous crypts arranged in four rows on the midgut fourth section. The symbiont was smeared on the egg surface upon oviposition by adult females, orally acquired by newborn nymphs, and thereby transmitted vertically to the next generation and important for growth and survival of the host insects. We found that, specifically in adult females, several rows of crypts at the posterior end region of the symbiotic midgut were morphologically differentiated and conspicuously enlarged, often discharging the symbiotic bacteria from the crypt cavity to the main tract of the symbiotic midgut. The female-specific enlarged end crypts were also found in other pentatomid stinkbugs Plautia stali and Carbula crassiventris. These results suggest that the enlarged end crypts represent a female-specific specialized morphological trait for vertical symbiont transmission commonly found among stinkbugs of the family Pentatomidae.

  10. Type II fatty acid biosynthesis is essential for Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite development in the midgut of Anopheles mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    van Schaijk, Ben C L; Kumar, T R Santha; Vos, Martijn W; Richman, Adam; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; Li, Tao; Eappen, Abraham G; Williamson, Kim C; Morahan, Belinda J; Fishbaugher, Matt; Kennedy, Mark; Camargo, Nelly; Khan, Shahid M; Janse, Chris J; Sim, Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sauerwein, Robert W; Fidock, David A; Vaughan, Ashley M

    2014-05-01

    The prodigious rate at which malaria parasites proliferate during asexual blood-stage replication, midgut sporozoite production, and intrahepatic development creates a substantial requirement for essential nutrients, including fatty acids that likely are necessary for parasite membrane formation. Plasmodium parasites obtain fatty acids either by scavenging from the vertebrate host and mosquito vector or by producing fatty acids de novo via the type two fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (FAS-II). Here, we study the FAS-II pathway in Plasmodium falciparum, the species responsible for the most lethal form of human malaria. Using antibodies, we find that the FAS-II enzyme FabI is expressed in mosquito midgut oocysts and sporozoites as well as liver-stage parasites but not during the blood stages. As expected, FabI colocalizes with the apicoplast-targeted acyl carrier protein, indicating that FabI functions in the apicoplast. We further analyze the FAS-II pathway in Plasmodium falciparum by assessing the functional consequences of deleting fabI and fabB/F. Targeted deletion or disruption of these genes in P. falciparum did not affect asexual blood-stage replication or the generation of midgut oocysts; however, subsequent sporozoite development was abolished. We conclude that the P. falciparum FAS-II pathway is essential for sporozoite development within the midgut oocyst. These findings reveal an important distinction from the rodent Plasmodium parasites P. berghei and P. yoelii, where the FAS-II pathway is known to be required for normal parasite progression through the liver stage but is not required for oocyst development in the Anopheles mosquito midgut.

  11. Human IGF1 Regulates Midgut Oxidative Stress and Epithelial Homeostasis to Balance Lifespan and Plasmodium falciparum resistance in Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Anna L.; Pietri, Jose E.; Pakpour, Nazzy; Hauck, Eric; Wang, Bo; Glennon, Elizabeth K. K.; Georgis, Martha; Riehle, Michael A.; Luckhart, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) regulates cell death, repair, autophagy, and renewal in response to stress, damage, and pathogen challenge. Therefore, IIS is fundamental to lifespan and disease resistance. Previously, we showed that insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) within a physiologically relevant range (0.013–0.13 µM) in human blood reduced development of the human parasite Plasmodium falciparum in the Indian malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi. Low IGF1 (0.013 µM) induced FOXO and p70S6K activation in the midgut and extended mosquito lifespan, whereas high IGF1 (0.13 µM) did not. In this study the physiological effects of low and high IGF1 were examined in detail to infer mechanisms for their dichotomous effects on mosquito resistance and lifespan. Following ingestion, low IGF1 induced phosphorylation of midgut c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), a critical regulator of epithelial homeostasis, but high IGF1 did not. Low and high IGF1 induced midgut mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis and nitric oxide (NO) synthase gene expression, responses which were necessary and sufficient to mediate IGF1 inhibition of P. falciparum development. However, increased ROS and apoptosis-associated caspase-3 activity returned to baseline levels following low IGF1 treatment, but were sustained with high IGF1 treatment and accompanied by aberrant expression of biomarkers for mitophagy, stem cell division and proliferation. Low IGF1-induced ROS are likely moderated by JNK-induced epithelial cytoprotection as well as p70S6K-mediated growth and inhibition of apoptosis over the lifetime of A. stephensi to facilitate midgut homeostasis and enhanced survivorship. Hence, mitochondrial integrity and homeostasis in the midgut, a key signaling center for IIS, can be targeted to coordinately optimize mosquito fitness and anti-pathogen resistance for improved control strategies for malaria and other vector-borne diseases. PMID:24968248

  12. Female-Specific Specialization of a Posterior End Region of the Midgut Symbiotic Organ in Plautia splendens and Allied Stinkbugs

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Toshinari; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Meng, Xian-Ying; Koga, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Many stinkbugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera) are associated with bacterial symbionts in a posterior region of the midgut. In these stinkbugs, adult females excrete symbiont-containing materials from the anus for transmission of the beneficial symbionts to their offspring. For ensuring the vertical symbiont transmission, a variety of female-specific elaborate traits at the cellular, morphological, developmental, and behavioral levels have been reported from diverse stinkbugs of the families Plataspidae, Urostylididae, Parastrachiidae, etc. Meanwhile, such elaborate female-specific traits for vertical symbiont transmission have been poorly characterized for the largest and economically important stinkbug family Pentatomidae. Here, we investigated the midgut symbiotic system of a pentatomid stinkbug, Plautia splendens. A specific gammaproteobacterial symbiont was consistently present extracellularly in the cavity of numerous crypts arranged in four rows on the midgut fourth section. The symbiont was smeared on the egg surface upon oviposition by adult females, orally acquired by newborn nymphs, and thereby transmitted vertically to the next generation and important for growth and survival of the host insects. We found that, specifically in adult females, several rows of crypts at the posterior end region of the symbiotic midgut were morphologically differentiated and conspicuously enlarged, often discharging the symbiotic bacteria from the crypt cavity to the main tract of the symbiotic midgut. The female-specific enlarged end crypts were also found in other pentatomid stinkbugs Plautia stali and Carbula crassiventris. These results suggest that the enlarged end crypts represent a female-specific specialized morphological trait for vertical symbiont transmission commonly found among stinkbugs of the family Pentatomidae. PMID:25636847

  13. Bacterial Communities and Midgut Microbiota Associated with Mosquito Populations from Waste Tires in East-Central Illinois.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lampman, Richard L; Muturi, Ephantus J

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-microbe interactions tend to influence larval nutrition, immunity, and development, as well as fitness and vectorial capacity of adults. Understanding the role of different bacterial species not only improves our knowledge of the physiological and ecological consequences of these interactions, but also provides the basis for developing novel strategies for controlling mosquito-borne diseases. We used culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques to characterize the bacterial composition and abundance in water and midgut samples of larval and adult females of Aedes japonicus (Theobald), Aedes triseriatus (Say), and Culex restuans (Theobald) collected from waste tires at two wooded study sites in Urbana, IL. The phylum-specific real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay revealed a higher proportion of Actinobacteria and a lower proportion of gamma-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes in water samples and larval midguts compared to adult female midguts. Only 15 of the 57 bacterial species isolated in this study occurred in both study sites. The number of bacterial species was highest in water samples (28 species from Trelease Woods; 25 species from South Farms), intermediate in larval midguts (13 species from Ae. japonicus; 12 species from Ae. triseriatus; 8 species from Cx. restuans), and lowest in adult female midguts (2 species from Ae. japonicus; 3 species from Ae. triseriatus). These findings suggest that the composition and richness of bacterial communities varies both between habitats and among mosquito species and that the reduction in bacteria diversity during metamorphosis is more evident among bacteria detected using the culture-dependent method. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Nutritional Physiology of the Khapra Beetle, Trogoderma granarium Everts (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) Fed on Various Barley Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Seifi, S; Naseri, B; Razmjou, J

    2016-02-01

    The Khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium Everts (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), is known as one of the mostserious pests of grains in many parts of the world. In this study, the effect of nine barley cultivars (‘Bahman’,‘CB-84-10’, ‘Fajr 30’, ‘Makuyi’, ‘Nosrat’, ‘Yousof’, ‘13A1’, ‘18A1’, and ‘19 A1’) and a wheat cultivar (‘MV17’, as a control) was determined on the nutritional indices and digestive enzymatic activity of T. granarium at 33 6 1C,relative humidity of 6565%, and a photoperiod of 14:10 (L:D) h. The highest and lowest values of larval weight gain of sixth instar were detected on wheat (0.757±0.068 mg) and cultivar Bahman (0.342±0.071 mg). Also, T. granarium larvae fed on cultivar Bahman had the lowest value of efficiency of conversion of ingested food(10.90±2.09%) as compared with wheat and other barley cultivars. Also, the highest midgut amylolytic and proteolytic activities of sixth instar were on cultivar Bahman (0.364±0.024 mU/mg and 80.54±1.73 U/mg, respectively)and the lowest activities were on cultivar Nosrat (0.043±0.004 mU/mg and 7.15±0.01 U/mg, respectively).It is concluded that barley cultivar Bahman was the most unsuitable host for feeding of T. granarium.

  15. Trachea Epithelium as a “Canary” for Cigarette Smoking-induced Biologic Phenotype of the Small Airway Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Turetz, Meredith L.; O’Connor, Timothy P.; Tilley, Ann E.; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Salit, Jacqueline; Dang, David; Teater, Matthew; Mezey, Jason; Clark, Andrew G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    The initial site of smoking-induced lung disease is the small airway epithelium, which is difficult and time consuming to sample by fiberoptic bronchoscopy. We developed a rapid, office-based procedure to obtain trachea epithelium without conscious sedation from healthy nonsmokers (n=26) and healthy smokers (n=19, 27 ± 15 pack-yr). Gene expression differences (fold-change >1.5, p<0.01, Benjamini-Hochberg correction) were assessed with Affymetrix microarrays. 1,057 probe sets were differentially expressed in healthy smokers vs nonsmokers, representing >500 genes. Trachea gene expression was compared to an independent group of small airway epithelial samples (n=23 healthy nonsmokers, n=19 healthy smokers, 25 ± 12 pack-yr). The trachea epithelium is more sensitive to smoking, responding with 3-fold more differentially-expressed genes than small airway epithelium. The trachea transcriptome paralleled the small airway epithelium, with 156 of 167 (93%) genes that are significantly upand down-regulated by smoking in the small airway epithelium showing similar direction and magnitude of response to smoking in the trachea. Trachea epithelium can be obtained without conscious sedation, representing a less invasive surrogate “canary” for smoking-induced changes in the small airway epithelium. This should prove useful in epidemiologic studies correlating gene expression with clinical outcome in assessing smoking-induced lung disease. PMID:20443905

  16. Metschnikowia cf. typographi and other pathogens from the bark beetle Ips sexdentatus - Prevalence, histological and ultrastructural evidence, and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Kleespies, Regina G; Lim, Young Woon; Tkaczuk, Cezary; Wrzosek, Marta; Steinwender, Bernhardt M; Wegensteiner, Rudolf

    2017-02-01

    Ips sexdentatus (six-spined engraver beetle) from Austria and Poland were dissected and examined for the presence of pathogens. Specimens collected in Austria were found to contain the ascomycetous fungus Metschnikowia cf. typographi. Infection rates ranged from 3.6% to 26.8% at different collection sites. M. cf. typographi infected midguts were investigated by histological, ultrastructural and molecular techniques. Extraordinary ultrastructural details are shown, such as ascospores with bilateral flattened flanks resembling alar rims at both sides of their attenuating tube-like ends. These have not yet been described in other yeast species. Molecular investigations showed a close phylogenetic relationship to the fungi Metschnikowia agaves and Candida wancherniae. Presence of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana found in Austria was confirmed both morphologically and molecularly. The eugregarine Gregarina typographi was diagnosed most frequently. Infection rates of all I. sexdentatus specimens ranged from 21.4% to 71.9% in Austria and 54.1% to 68.8% in Poland. Other entomopathogenic protists, bacteria, or viruses were not detected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A continuous mass-rearing technique for the southern pine beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    J. Robert Bridges; John C. Moser

    1983-01-01

    Studying the southern pine beetle (SPB), Dendroctonus frontalis zimmermann, during endemic periods is difficult because beetle-infested trees are often hard to locate. This is especially true during the winter months. Studies that require a continuous supply of beetles are often jeopardized by a lack of beetles. During our studies of the...

  18. Proceedings from the Third Workshop on Genetics of Bark Beetles and Associated Microorganisms

    Treesearch

    Barbara Bentz; Anthony Cognato; Kenneth Raffa

    2007-01-01

    These proceedings provide a synopsis of the Third Workshop on Genetics of Bark Beetles and Association Microorganisms, which was held May 20-2, 2006 in Asheville, NC. Twenty- five participants from five countries attended the meeting. The proceedings are structured into four parts: Phylogenetics of Bark Beetles, Population Genetics of Bark Beetles, Bark Beetle Gene...

  19. Ecological interactions of bark beetles with host trees

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Certain species of bark beetles in the insect order Coleoptera, family Curculionidae (formerly Scolytidae) are keystone species in forest ecosystems. However, the tree-killing and woodboring bark and ambrosia beetles are also among the most damaging insects of forest products including lumber, paper...

  20. Interactions among the mountain pine beetle, fires, and fuels

    Treesearch

    Michael J. Jenkins; Justin B. Runyon; Christopher J. Fettig; Wesley G. Page; Barbara J. Bentz

    2014-01-01

    Bark beetle outbreaks and wildfires are principal drivers of change in western North American forests, and both have increased in severity and extent in recent years. These two agents of disturbance interact in complex ways to shape forest structure and composition. For example, mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, epidemics alter forest fuels with...