Science.gov

Sample records for behavioral resistance

  1. Leptin resistance and hippocampal behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Van Doorn, Catherine; Macht, Victoria A; Grillo, Claudia A; Reagan, Lawrence P

    2017-03-04

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin is an important regulator of body weight and metabolism through activation of brain leptin receptors expressed in regions such as the hypothalamus. Beyond these well described and characterized activities of leptin in the hypothalamus, it is becoming increasingly clear that the central activities of leptin extend to the hippocampus. Indeed, leptin receptors are expressed in the hippocampus where these receptors are proposed to mediate various aspects of hippocampal synaptic plasticity that ultimately impact cognitive function. This concept is supported by studies demonstrating that leptin promotes hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, as well as studies indicating that leptin resistance is associated with deficits in hippocampal-dependent behaviors and in the induction of depressive-like behaviors. The effects of leptin on cognitive/behavioral plasticity in the hippocampus may be regulated by direct activation of leptin receptors expressed in the hippocampus; additionally, leptin-mediated activation of synaptic networks that project to the hippocampus may also impact hippocampal-mediated behaviors. In view of these previous observations, the goal of this review will be to discuss the mechanisms through which leptin facilitates cognition and behavior, as well as to dissect the loci at which leptin resistance leads to impairments in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, including the development of cognitive deficits and increased risk of depressive illness in metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

  2. Resistance to extinction and behavioral momentum.

    PubMed

    Nevin, John A

    2012-05-01

    In the metaphor of behavioral momentum, reinforcement is assumed to strengthen discriminated operant behavior in the sense of increasing its resistance to disruption, and extinction is viewed as disruption by contingency termination and reinforcer omission. In multiple schedules of intermittent reinforcement, resistance to extinction is an increasing function of reinforcer rate, consistent with a model based on the momentum metaphor. The partial-reinforcement extinction effect, which opposes the effects of reinforcer rate, can be explained by the large disruptive effect of terminating continuous reinforcement despite its strengthening effect during training. Inclusion of a term for the context of reinforcement during training allows the model to account for a wide range of multiple-schedule extinction data and makes contact with other formulations. The relation between resistance to extinction and reinforcer rate on single schedules of intermittent reinforcement is exactly opposite to that for multiple schedules over the same range of reinforcer rates; however, the momentum model can give an account of resistance to extinction in single as well as multiple schedules. An alternative analysis based on the number of reinforcers omitted to an extinction criterion supports the conclusion that response strength is an increasing function of reinforcer rate during training.

  3. Observations and simulations of resistance switching behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukwon

    This dissertation describes an exploration to understand the electric field driven resistance switching behavior, which are known to be found in many oxide materials. The behavior is characterized as having two different stable states in their current-voltage characteristics. They have gained much attention as candidates for data storage. Although this interesting phenomenon has been studied for decades, the physical mechanism of the behavior is not revealed, yet. To establish our own model, experiments with Cr doped SrZrO3 are carried out and hypothetical models were developed based on the results. Then, computational calculations were done to test the proposed switching mechanism. Experiments are done using metal(top metal)/Cr-SrZrO3/SrRuO 3(bottom metal) heterojunction stacks, which are grown using Pulsed Laser Deposition system. In the structure, thickness and Cr-doping content of SrZrO3 layer were varied while Pt and Ag are used as primary top metal contacts. And top metal layer is also varied with Pt, Ag, Cu, Cr, Mg, and SrRuO3 to see the influence of top metal contact. The heterostructures were found to exhibit non-rectifying IVCs (so-called Space-Charge-Limited Current) which are observed in many other metal-oxide-metal systems. In the experiments of varying Cr-content and thickness of SrZrO 3 layer, a steep increase of resistance with respect to thickness was observed. For high Cr-doping levels, R ∝ t3 was observed, while for low Cr-doping levels an even stronger relationship was observed. The main result of top metal contact experiment was the one that metal contact's chemical identity decides the slope of IVC (resistances), where resistances were found to be correlated with top metal's heat of oxide formation. Especially for Ag top metal contact, which has the lowest absolute value of heat of oxide formation, reversal switching polarity was observed. Such results lead us to believe that the switching behavior is originated by oxygen vacancy motion with

  4. Utilizing Motivational Interviewing to Address Resistant Behaviors in Clinical Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahesh, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Motivational interviewing is presented as an approach to address resistant behaviors in clinical supervision. A case example is used to illustrate the process in which the relational and technical elements of motivational interviewing can be applied to supervisee resistance. Implications for supervisors and researchers are discussed.

  5. Effects of Behavioral History on Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Adam H.; Cirino, Sergio; Mayfield, Kristin H.; da Silva, Stephanie P.; Okouchi, Hiroto; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2005-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether differential resistance to change would occur under identical variable-interval schedules as a function of a differential behavioral history. In Experiment 1, each of 3 pigeons first pecked at different rates under a multiple variable-ratio differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate schedule. In a subsequent condition,…

  6. Resistance to Sexual Coercion Behaviors: A Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmers, Tara M.; Allen, Mike

    Both men and women are faced with relational situations in which sexually coercive behaviors are exercised. Because various studies offer mixed findings, a study utilized meta-analysis to compare men's and women's resistance to sexual coercion. Literature for the investigation was compiled from computer searches using key words such as…

  7. Resistance behavior of Cr-Si-O thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; Musket, R.; Cosandey, F.; Gorla, C.E.; Besser, R.S.; Westerlind, V.; Cobai, G.

    1996-10-23

    Thin coatings of Cr-Si-O are assessed for use as a resistor. The submicron thick films are sputter deposited using a (l-x)Ar-(x)O{sub 2} working gas. Several compacts of metal and oxide powders are commercially prepared for use as the sputter targets. The deposition process yields film compositions which range from 2 to 30 at.% Cr and 20 to 45 at.% Si as measured using Rutherford backscattering. A broad range of resistivities from 10{sup 1} to 10{sup 14}{Omega} cm are found as measured through the film thickness between metal pads deposited onto the Cr-Si-O surface. The film structure and morphology are characterized using transmission electron microscopy from which the resistance behavior can be correlated to the distribution of metallic particles. Thermal aging reveals the metastability of the Cr- Si-O film morphology and resistance behavior.

  8. Observation of Anomalous Resistance Behavior in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanping; Lew, Wen Siang; Liu, Zongwen

    2017-01-01

    Our measurement results have shown that bilayer graphene exhibits an unexpected sharp transition of the resistance value in the temperature region 200 250 K. We argue that this behavior originates from the interlayer ripple scattering effect between the top and bottom ripple graphene layer. The inter-scattering can mimic the Coulomb scattering but is strongly dependent on temperature. The observed behavior is consistent with the theoretical prediction that charged impurities are the dominant scatters in bilayer graphene. The resistance increase with increasing perpendicular magnetic field strongly supports the postulate that magnetic field induces an excitonic gap in bilayer graphene. Our results reveal that the relative change of resistance induced by magnetic field in the bilayer graphene shows an anomalous thermally activated property.

  9. Negative differential resistance and resistance switching behaviors in BaTiO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Jia, C. H. E-mail: wfzhang@henu.edu.cn Chen, X.; Zhang, W. F. E-mail: wfzhang@henu.edu.cn; Chen, Y. H.

    2014-05-28

    The polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) thin films were grown on F-doped SnO{sub 2} substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The devices show a rectification at a small voltage, while bipolar resistive switching (RS) and negative differential resistance (NDR) appear at a large voltage. Furthermore, RS remains and NDR disappears when no positive bias is applied, while both RS and NDR behaviors improve when increasing the positive bias. The electrons trapped/detrapped by interface states at Au/BTO interface are proposed to understand the above behaviors.

  10. Magnetoresistance Behavior of Conducting Filaments in Resistive-Switching NiO with Different Resistance States.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Diyang; Qiao, Shuang; Luo, Yuxiang; Chen, Aitian; Zhang, Pengfei; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Zhong; Guo, Minghua; Chiang, Fu-Kuo; Wu, Jian; Luo, Jianlin; Li, Jianqi; Kokado, Satoshi; Wang, Yayu; Zhao, Yonggang

    2017-03-29

    The resistive switching (RS) effect in various materials has attracted much attention due to its interesting physics and potential for applications. NiO is an important system and its RS effect has been generally explained by the formation/rupture of Ni-related conducting filaments. These filaments are unique since they are formed by an electroforming process, so it is interesting to explore their magnetoresistance (MR) behavior, which can also shed light on unsolved issues such as the nature of the filaments and their evolution in the RS process, and this behavior is also important for multifunctional devices. Here, we focus on MR behavior in NiO RS films with different resistance states. Rich and interesting MR behaviors have been observed, including the normal and anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, which provide new insights into the nature of the filaments and their evolution in the RS process. First-principles calculation reveals the essential role of oxygen migration into the filaments during the RESET process and can account for the experimental results. Our work provides a new avenue for exploration of the conducting filaments in resistive switching materials and is significant for understanding the mechanism of RS effect and multifunctional devices.

  11. Eastern mosquitofish resists invasion by nonindigenous poeciliids through agonistic behaviors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Kevin A.; Hill, Jeffrey E.; Nico, Leo G.

    2012-01-01

    Florida is a hotspot for nonindigenous fishes with over 30 species established, although few of these are small-bodied species. One hypothesis for this pattern is that biotic resistance of native species is reducing the success of small-bodied, introduced fishes. The eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki is common in many freshwater habitats in Florida and although small-bodied (<50 mm), it is a predator and aggressive competitor. We conducted four mesocosm experiments to examine the potential for biotic resistance by eastern mosquitofish to two small-bodied nonindigenous fishes, variable platyfish (Xiphophorus variatus) and swordtail (X. hellerii). Experiments tested: (1) effect of eastern mosquitofish density on adult survival, (2) effect of eastern mosquitofish on a stage-structured population, (3) role of habitat structural complexity on nonindigenous adult survival, and (4) behavioral effects of eastern mosquitofish presence and habitat complexity. Eastern mosquitofish attacked and killed non-native poeciliids with especially strong effects on juveniles of both species. Higher eastern mosquitofish density resulted in greater effects. Predation on swordtails increased with increasing habitat complexity. Eastern mosquitofish also actively drove swordtails from cover, which could expose non-native fish to other predators under field conditions. Our results suggest that eastern mosquitofish may limit invasion success.

  12. Brief behavioral treatment for patients with treatment-resistant insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihui; Wei, Qinling; Wu, Xiaoli; Zhong, Zhiyong; Li, Guanying

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of brief behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTI) in treating patients with treatment-resistant insomnia. Methods Seventy-nine adults with treatment-resistant insomnia were randomly assigned to receive either individualized BBTI (delivered in two in-person sessions and two telephone “booster” sessions, n=40) or sleep hygiene education (n=39). The primary outcome was subjective (sleep diary) measures of self-report symptoms and questionnaire measures of Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), insomnia severity index (ISI), Epworth sleeping scale (ESS), and dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep scale (DBAS). Results The repeated-measures analysis of variance showed significant time effects between pretreatment and posttreatment in the scale ratings of PSQI, ESS, DBAS, ISI, sleep latency (SL), time in bed (TIB), sleep efficiency (SE), and wake after sleep onset (WASO) in both groups and group × time interaction (FPSQI =3.893, FESS =4.500, FDBAS =5.530, FISI =15.070, FSL =8.909, FTIB =7.895, FSE =2.926, and FWASO =2.595). The results indicated significant differences between BBTI and sleep hygiene in change scores of PSQI, ESS, DBAS, ISI, SL, TIB, SE, and WASO. Effect sizes were moderate to large. Conclusion BBTI is a simple and efficacious intervention for chronic insomnia in adults. PMID:27536119

  13. Macro model for stochastic behavior of resistance distribution of magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Gyuhyun; Choi, Juntae; Song, Yunheub

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we fabricated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) samples to observe behavior of resistance variation, and investigated a stochastic behavior model for MTJ resistance from measured real data. We found the relationship between parallel resistance (RP), anti-parallel resistance (RAP), and TMR from the measurements. The variation of barrier thickness affects not only resistance but also TMR. This means that broad RAP distribution is caused by RP distribution. In addition, RAP distribution can be reduced by increasing temperature and bias voltage. We developed a macro model that can evaluate resistance distribution based on the stochastic behavior of MTJ resistance variation from only tox varied. The amount of resistance variation, which is considered with regard to the circuit performance, can be obtained from Δtox designed by designer. In addition, the impact for operating circumstance such as bias and temperature can be considered by using fit equations.

  14. Relations between Children's Levels of Responsiveness and Resistance, Maternal Interaction Behaviors, and Children's Social Behaviors with Peers in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Daniela; Neitzel, Carin

    2017-01-01

    Children's peer relationships have their origins in family relationships. The present study focuses on the relative importance of children's levels of responsiveness and/or resistance during mother-child interactions and tests a model of the direct and indirect relations between mother interaction behaviors and children's social behaviors with…

  15. Electrical resistivity behaviors of liquid Pb-Sn binary alloy in the presence of ultrasonic field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Jianfeng; Li, Haoyu; Le, Qichi; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Wenyi; Bao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Electrical resistivity behaviors of liquid Pb-Sn alloys have been investigated in the presence of ultrasonic field. The process demonstrated significantly that electrical resistivity could reveal the precise influence caused by ultrasound. Details revealed by applying the resistivity measuring approach to the liquid Pb-Sn alloy show that the short ordered structures in the liquid could be modified by ultrasonic irradiation, and the resistivity approach could have application value in the ultrasonic irradiation process on the specific liquid metals and alloys.

  16. Isolated cell behavior drives the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Dudley, Carmel; Vega, Nicole M; Gore, Jeff

    2015-07-29

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is typically quantified by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), which is defined as the minimal concentration of antibiotic that inhibits bacterial growth starting from a standard cell density. However, when antibiotic resistance is mediated by degradation, the collective inactivation of antibiotic by the bacterial population can cause the measured MIC to depend strongly on the initial cell density. In cases where this inoculum effect is strong, the relationship between MIC and bacterial fitness in the antibiotic is not well defined. Here, we demonstrate that the resistance of a single, isolated cell-which we call the single-cell MIC (scMIC)-provides a superior metric for quantifying antibiotic resistance. Unlike the MIC, we find that the scMIC predicts the direction of selection and also specifies the antibiotic concentration at which selection begins to favor new mutants. Understanding the cooperative nature of bacterial growth in antibiotics is therefore essential in predicting the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  17. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors leading to acquired bacterial resistance to antibiotics in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, I. N.; Lamikanra, A.; Edelman, R.

    1999-01-01

    In developing countries, acquired bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is common in isolates from healthy persons and from persons with community-acquired infections. Complex socioeconomic and behavioral factors associated with antibiotic resistance, particularly regarding diarrheal and respiratory pathogens, in developing tropical countries, include misuse of antibiotics by health professionals, unskilled practitioners, and laypersons; poor drug quality; unhygienic conditions accounting for spread of resistant bacteria; and inadequate surveillance. PMID:10081668

  18. Behavioral Avoidance - Will Physiological Insecticide Resistance Level of Insect Strains Affect Their Oviposition and Movement Responses?

    PubMed

    Nansen, Christian; Baissac, Olivier; Nansen, Maria; Powis, Kevin; Baker, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural organisms, such as insect herbivores, provide unique opportunities for studies of adaptive evolutionary processes, including effects of insecticides on movement and oviposition behavior. In this study, Brassica leaves were treated with one of two non-systemic insecticides and exposed to two individual strains (referred to as single or double resistance) of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) (DBM) exhibiting physiological resistance. Behavioral responses by these two strains were compared as part of characterizing the relative effect of levels of physiological resistance on the likelihood of insects showing signs of behavioral avoidance. For each DBM strain, we used choice bioassays to quantify two possible types of behavioral avoidance: 1) females ovipositing predominantly on leaf surfaces without insecticides, and 2) larvae avoiding insecticide-treated leaf surfaces. In three-choice bioassays (leaves with no pesticide, 50% coverage with pesticide, or 100% coverage with pesticide), females from the single resistance DBM strain laid significantly more eggs on water treated leaves compared to leaves with 100% insecticide coverage (both gamma-cyhalothrin and spinetoram). Females from the double resistance DBM strain also laid significantly more eggs on water treated leaves compared to leaves with 100% gamma-cyhalothrin, while moths did not adjust their oviposition behavior in response to spinetoram. Larvae from the single resistance DBM strain showed a significant increase in mobility in response to both insecticides and avoided insecticide-treated portions of leaves when given a choice. On the other hand, DBM larvae from the double resistance strain showed a significant decrease in mobility in response to insecticides, and they did not avoid insecticide-treated portions of leaves when given a choice. Our results suggest that pest populations with physiological resistance may show behavioral avoidance, as resistant females avoided oviposition on

  19. Behavioral Avoidance - Will Physiological Insecticide Resistance Level of Insect Strains Affect Their Oviposition and Movement Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Nansen, Christian; Baissac, Olivier; Nansen, Maria; Powis, Kevin; Baker, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural organisms, such as insect herbivores, provide unique opportunities for studies of adaptive evolutionary processes, including effects of insecticides on movement and oviposition behavior. In this study, Brassica leaves were treated with one of two non-systemic insecticides and exposed to two individual strains (referred to as single or double resistance) of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) (DBM) exhibiting physiological resistance. Behavioral responses by these two strains were compared as part of characterizing the relative effect of levels of physiological resistance on the likelihood of insects showing signs of behavioral avoidance. For each DBM strain, we used choice bioassays to quantify two possible types of behavioral avoidance: 1) females ovipositing predominantly on leaf surfaces without insecticides, and 2) larvae avoiding insecticide-treated leaf surfaces. In three-choice bioassays (leaves with no pesticide, 50% coverage with pesticide, or 100% coverage with pesticide), females from the single resistance DBM strain laid significantly more eggs on water treated leaves compared to leaves with 100% insecticide coverage (both gamma-cyhalothrin and spinetoram). Females from the double resistance DBM strain also laid significantly more eggs on water treated leaves compared to leaves with 100% gamma-cyhalothrin, while moths did not adjust their oviposition behavior in response to spinetoram. Larvae from the single resistance DBM strain showed a significant increase in mobility in response to both insecticides and avoided insecticide-treated portions of leaves when given a choice. On the other hand, DBM larvae from the double resistance strain showed a significant decrease in mobility in response to insecticides, and they did not avoid insecticide-treated portions of leaves when given a choice. Our results suggest that pest populations with physiological resistance may show behavioral avoidance, as resistant females avoided oviposition on

  20. Oppositional Behavior in Urban Schooling: Toward a Theory of Resistance for New Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Early resistance theorists analyzed working class students' oppositional behavior at a time of high availability of viable jobs in manufacturing. They argued that oppositional behavior constituted a rejection of middle class culture motivated by an implicit understanding of the myth of meritocracy. But times have changed. This paper seeks to…

  1. Brief Report: An Experimental Analogue of Consultee "Resistance" Effects on the Consultant's Therapeutic Behavior--A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cautilli, Joseph; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris

    2006-01-01

    This study presents an experimental analogue of resistance in the consultation process. Using an ABAB reversal design, the experimenter measured the ecological effects of teacher resistant behaviors on consultant therapeutic behavior. The study defined therapeutic behaviors as teaching, confronting and problem identification, analysis, and…

  2. Probing behavior of Empoasca vitis (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) on resistant and susceptible cultivars of tea plants.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jin; Han, Bao-Yu; Zhang, Qing-He

    2014-01-01

    Feeding activities of the tea green leafhopper, Empoasca vitis (Gothe) (Homoptera: Cicadellidae), on resistant and susceptible cultivars of tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.) were recorded and analyzed using the direct current electrical penetration graph (EPG) system. Six distinct EPG waveforms characterizing the feeding behavior of the tea green leafhopper, categorized as waveforms A, C, E, S, F, and R, were obtained during the investigation. Duration of passive ingestion, possibly of phloem (E), was the longest among all the probing waveforms on susceptible cultivars, whereas durations of the salivation (S) waveform and stylet work waveform (F) became longer on resistant cultivars. The durations of waveforms S and F on the resistant cultivar Jiandecha were slightly longer than those on the less resistant cultivar Yunguidaye, and both were significantly longer than those on the susceptible cultivars Hangzhoudaye and Zhushan-1. Waveform E was shorter on the resistant cultivar Jiandecha than on the less resistant cultivars Yunguidaye and was significantly shorter than on the susceptible cultivars (Hangzhoudaye and Zhushan-1). It is suggested that E, S, and F are the important waveforms related to leafhopper feeding behavior and tea plant resistance. Based on the results, the resistance levels of tea cultivars against the tea leafhopper can be evaluated quickly by direct current EPG.

  3. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward L; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A

    2013-08-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than what the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the subpopulation that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, that is, increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors and to develop strategies to minimize their effect.

  4. Controlling the Resistive Switching Behavior in Starch-Based Flexible Biomemristors.

    PubMed

    Raeis-Hosseini, Niloufar; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-03-23

    Implementation of biocompatible materials in resistive switching memory (ReRAM) devices provides opportunities to use them in biomedical applications. We demonstrate a robust, nonvolatile, flexible, and transparent ReRAM based on potato starch. We also introduce a biomolecular memory device that has a starch-chitosan composite layer. The ReRAM behavior can be controlled by mixing starch with chitosan in the resistive switching layer. Whereas starch-based biomemory devices which show abrupt changes in current level; the memory device with mixed biopolymers undergoes gradual changes. Both devices exhibit uniform and robust programmable memory properties for nonvolatile memory applications. The explicated source of the bipolar resistive switching behavior is assigned to formation and rupture of carbon-rich filaments. The gradual set/reset behavior in the memory device based on a starch-chitosan mixture makes it suitable for use in neuromorphic devices.

  5. Novel Resistive Switching Behavior in Phase Separated Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hangwen; Ward, T. Zac; Sun, Dali; Snijders, Paul C.; Gai, Zheng; Shen, Jian

    2011-03-01

    Electronic phase separation plays a key role in many novel phenomena in complex materials. Manganites are a prime example of this class of materials and have recently come under increase scrutiny for possible application in resistive random-access memory (RRAM) technology. Here, we will discuss our recent work on spatially confined La5/8-xPrxCa3/8MnO3. We have discovered that it is possible to drive single electronic domain formation/annihilation through electric field pulsing. By measuring the I-V curve, we find such resistive switching is different from normal RRAM mechanisms in manganites and is closely related to the nature of electronic phase separation. These findings open these systems to a new understanding of the nature of electronic phase separation and begin the development of manganites for future applications in RRAM devices. Research sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Solanum Tuber-bearing Species Resistance Behavior Against Nacobbus aberrans

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Eliseo J.; Clausen, Andrea. M.; Franco, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Naccobus aberrans is a major pest of the potato crop in the Andean regions of Argentina, Bolivia, and Perú. It is endemic in northwest Argentina and is also found in lowlands. The resistance of eleven Andean potato landraces and three accessions of the wild tuber-bearing species Solanum acaule, S. infundibuliforme, and S. megistacrolobum were evaluated against a population of N. aberrans from Coctaca, Jujuy province, while Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum ‘Spunta’, ‘Kennebec’, and ‘Frital INTA’ were evaluated against a population from the southeast of Buenos Aires province. The presence, the number of galls, and the number of individuals were recorded. In addition, a reproduction factor was calculated and races were determined. Results showed that the N. aberrans population from Coctaca corresponded to race 2 and the population from the lowlands belonged to the sugar beet group. Landrace Azul, one genotype of S. megistacrolobum, and two genotypes of S. acaule showed resistance towards the race from Coctaca while no infection was recorded in potato cultivars with the Naccobus race from the lowland area. PMID:22661771

  7. Review of insecticide resistance and behavioral avoidance of vectors of human diseases in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Physiological resistance and behavioral responses of mosquito vectors to insecticides are critical aspects of the chemical-based disease control equation. The complex interaction between lethal, sub-lethal and excitation/repellent ('excito-repellent’) properties of chemicals is typically overlooked in vector management and control programs. The development of “physiological” resistance, metabolic and/or target site modifications, to insecticides has been well documented in many insect groups and disease vectors around the world. In Thailand, resistance in many mosquito populations has developed to all three classes of insecticidal active ingredients currently used for vector control with a majority being synthetic-derived pyrethroids. Evidence of low-grade insecticide resistance requires immediate countermeasures to mitigate further intensification and spread of the genetic mechanisms responsible for resistance. This can take the form of rotation of a different class of chemical, addition of a synergist, mixtures of chemicals or concurrent mosaic application of different classes of chemicals. From the gathered evidence, the distribution and degree of physiological resistance has been restricted in specific areas of Thailand in spite of long-term use of chemicals to control insect pests and disease vectors throughout the country. Most surprisingly, there have been no reported cases of pyrethroid resistance in anopheline populations in the country from 2000 to 2011. The precise reasons for this are unclear but we assume that behavioral avoidance to insecticides may play a significant role in reducing the selection pressure and thus occurrence and spread of insecticide resistance. The review herein provides information regarding the status of physiological resistance and behavioral avoidance of the primary mosquito vectors of human diseases to insecticides in Thailand from 2000 to 2011. PMID:24294938

  8. Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior Increases Resistance to Extinction: Clinical Demonstration, Animal Modeling, and Clinical Test of One Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mace, F. Charles; McComas, Jennifer J.; Mauro, Benjamin C.; Progar, Patrick R.; Taylor, Bridget; Ervin, Ruth; Zangrillo, Amanda N.

    2010-01-01

    Basic research with pigeons on behavioral momentum suggests that differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) can increase the resistance of target behavior to change. This finding suggests that clinical applications of DRA may inadvertently increase the persistence of target behavior even as it decreases its frequency. We conducted…

  9. Effects of sol aging on resistive switching behaviors of HfOx resistive memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Sun, Jhen-Kai; Tsao, Che-Chang; Chen, Yu-Ting

    2017-03-01

    This work investigates effects of long-term sol-aging time on sol-gel HfOx resistive random access memories (RRAMs). A nontoxic solvent of ethanol is used to replace toxic 2-methoxyethanol, which is usually used in sol-gel processes. The top electrodes are fabricated by pressing indium balls onto the HfOx surface rather than by using conventional sputtering or evaporation processes. The maximum process temperature is limited to be 100 ℃. Therefore, influences of plasma and high temperature on HfOx film can be avoided. Under this circumstance, effects of sol aging time on the HfOx films can be more clearly studied. The current conduction mechanisms in low and high electric regions of the HfOx RRAM are found to be dominated by Ohmic conduction and trap-filled space charge limited conduction (TF-SCLC), respectively. When the sol aging time increases, the resistive switching characteristic of the HfOx layer becomes unstable and the transition voltage from Ohmic conduction to TF-SCLC is also increased. This suggests that an exceedingly long aging time will give a HfOx film with more defect states. The XPS results are consistent with FTIR analysis and they can further explain the unstable HfOx resistive switching characteristic induced by sol aging.

  10. Modulation of nonlinear resistive switching behavior of a TaOx-based resistive device through interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zongwei; Kang, Jian; Yu, Zhizhen; Fang, Yichen; Ling, Yaotian; Cai, Yimao; Huang, Ru; Wang, Yangyuan

    2017-02-01

    A resistive switching device with inherent nonlinear characteristics through a delicately engineered interfacial layer is an ideal component to be integrated into passive crossbar arrays for the suppression of sneaking current, especially in ultra-dense 3D integration. In this paper, we demonstrated a TaOx-based bipolar resistive switching device with a nearly symmetrical bi-directional nonlinear feature through interface engineering. This was accomplished by introducing an ultra-thin interfacial layer (SiO2-x) with unique features, including a large band gap and a certain level of negative heat of oxide formation between the top electrode (TiN) and resistive layer (TaOx). The devices exhibit excellent nonlinear property under both positive and negative bias. Modulation of the inherent nonlinearity as well as the resistive switching mechanism are comprehensively studied by scrutinizing the results of the experimental control groups and the extensive characterizations including detailed compositional analysis, which suggests that the underlying mechanism of the nonlinear behavior is associatively governed by the serially connected metallic conductive filament and Flower-Nordheim tunneling barrier formed by the SiO2-x interface layer. The proposed device in this work has great potential to be implemented in future massive storage memory applications of high-density selector-free crossbar structure.

  11. Phase transformation induced resistive switching behavior in Al/Cu2Se/Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Shania; Kim, Kihwan; Hur, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Deok-kee

    2017-04-01

    The phase transformation induced resistive switching behavior of an Al/Cu2Se/Pt device was studied. While the device did not demonstrate any resistive switching behavior at room temperature, it exhibited resistive switching behavior at 125 °C, near the transition temperature of copper(I) selenide (Cu2Se) (137 °C), where Cu2Se is known to transform from the monoclinic to superionic phase. The increase in ionic conductivity and structural variations (from ordered to disordered structure) associated with phase transformation were observed to be responsible for the origin of the switching behavior and increase in the on/off resistance ratio near the transition temperature. Thermodynamic calculations showed that a reduction in Gibb’s free energy of nucleation and an increase in the migration speed of the Cu ion associated with the ionic conductivity and order to disorder the transition of the Cu2Se at the transition temperature were the important factors responsible for the reduction in the SET voltages at 155 °C.

  12. Predicting Aerobic versus Resistance Exercise Using the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Angela D.; Rocheleau, Courtney A.

    2002-01-01

    Tested the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in aerobic versus resistance training, investigating relationships between TPB variables, extroversion, and perceived health among college students who completed initial and follow-up measurements and provided reasons for exercise. TPB variables, extroversion, and perceived health collectively accounted…

  13. Nonviolent Resistance: A Treatment for Parents of Children with Acute Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinblatt, Uri; Omer, Haim

    2008-01-01

    Nonviolent resistance (NVR) is a new training model aimed at helping parents deal effectively with their helplessness, isolation, and escalatory interactions with their children. The purpose of this study is to evaluate training in NVR with the parents of children with acute behavior problems. Seventy-three parents (41 families) were randomly…

  14. Behavioral momentum of cocaine self-administration: effects of frequency of reinforcement on resistance to extinction.

    PubMed

    Quick, Stacey L; Shahan, Timothy A

    2009-07-01

    Persistent drug seeking is a defining property of substance abuse and is generally thought to depend, in part, on exposure to drug-associated contexts. Behavioral momentum theory provides a set of methods and a theoretical framework for understanding how stimulus contexts contribute to the persistence of operant behavior. Earlier research has extended behavioral momentum theory to alcohol self-administration, but not to intravenous drug self-administration. This experiment extended behavioral momentum theory to cocaine self-administration by examining the effects of frequency of cocaine reinforcement in a context on resistance to extinction. Rats self-administered 0.32 mg/kg infusions of cocaine in a multiple schedule of reinforcement arranging two distinct contexts. Responding in a Rich context was reinforced by cocaine infusions at a higher frequency (i.e. variable interval 120 s) and in a Lean context at a lower frequency (variable interval 360 s). After establishment of responding in the two contexts, resistance to extinction was examined. Preextinction response rates for cocaine were similar in the Rich and Lean contexts. Nonetheless, relative resistance to extinction was greater in the Rich context than in the Lean context. The difference in resistance to extinction in the two contexts was well described by a quantitative model of behavioral momentum. These results suggest that the frequency of drug reinforcement in a context contributes to the persistence of drug seeking in that context, and that behavioral momentum theory might be useful for understanding how drug-associated contexts contribute to the persistence of drug seeking.

  15. Pulse widths dependence of programming and erasing behaviors for diamond like carbon based resistive switching memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianlong; Xie, Dan; Zhang, Chenhui; Zhang, Xiaowen; Peng, Pinggang; Fu, Di; Qian, He; Ren, Tian-ling; Liu, Litian

    2014-10-01

    We report the influences of pulse widths on the programming and erasing characteristics of diamond-like carbon films based resistive random access memory. The device can be only programmed with pulses wider than 50 ns for SET operations when the pulse voltage is 1.2 V and erased with pulses narrower than 25 ns for RESET operations when the pulse voltage is 0.4 V. The formation, rupture, and re-growth of the conductive sp2-like graphitic filaments are proposed to be responsible for the resistive switching behaviors, based on which the pulse widths dependences on its programming and erasing properties can be further explained.

  16. Effect of chromium doping on the resistivity behavior of gadolinium manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Anchit; Thakur, Rajesh K.; Thakur, Rasna; Okram, G. S.; Gaur, N. K.

    2013-02-01

    Systematic investigation of structure and resistivity behaviour of GdMnO3 with 20% Cr doping has been undertaken that papered by conventional solid state reaction method. Upon Cr doping on the Mn site the lattice parameters and unit cell volume were reduced due to slight difference between the ionic radii of Cr3+ and Mn3+ compare with Pure GdMnO3 (according to JCPDS: 25-0337). The Cr-doped manganites exhibit a large variation in resistivity values. Cr3+ doping makes the material to exhibit a semiconductor behavior, for which the electronic transport can be explained by small polaron hopping (SPH) model.

  17. Behavior patterns of cold-resistant golden spiny mouse Acomys russatus.

    PubMed

    Haim, A

    1991-09-01

    Nesting behavior and food storage were studied in a cold-resistant (CR) population of the golden spiny mouse, Acomys russatus, in Southern Sinai at an altitude of 1600 m. CR-mice, in contrast to cold-sensitive (CS) ones, built nests in which they stored food. Such mice were found to be winter-solitary. These results show that food supply is an essential parameter for the survival of CR-mice during winter. Therefore, it is suggested that food supply rather than energy conservation was the main driving force in the selection of a solitary behavior pattern of CR-mice.

  18. Therapist awareness of client resistance in cognitive-behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kimberley M; Westra, Henny A; Aviram, Adi; Button, Melissa L; Constantino, Michael J; Antony, Martin M

    2015-01-01

    Clients' resistance relates negatively to their retention and outcomes in psychotherapy; thus, it has been increasingly identified as a key process marker in both research and practice. This study compared therapists' postsession ratings of resistance with those of trained observers in the context of 40 therapist-client dyads receiving 15 sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder. Therapist and observer ratings were then examined as correlates of proximal (therapeutic alliance quality and homework compliance) and distal (posttreatment worry severity) outcomes. Although there was reasonable concordance between rater perspectives, observer ratings were highly and consistently related to both proximal and distal outcomes, while therapist ratings were not. These findings underscore the need to enhance therapists' proficiency in identifying important and often covert in-session clinical phenomena such as the cues reflecting resistance and noncollaboration.

  19. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lyte, Mark; Chapel, Ashley; Lyte, Joshua M; Ai, Yongfeng; Proctor, Alexandra; Jane, Jay-Lin; Phillips, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group) and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS) or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7) or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7) for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001). Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to the control

  20. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lyte, Mark; Chapel, Ashley; Lyte, Joshua M.; Ai, Yongfeng; Proctor, Alexandra; Jane, Jay-Lin; Phillips, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group) and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS) or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7) or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7) for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001). Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to the control

  1. Demonstration of Synaptic Behaviors and Resistive Switching Characterizations by Proton Exchange Reactions in Silicon Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-01-01

    We realize a device with biological synaptic behaviors by integrating silicon oxide (SiOx) resistive switching memory with Si diodes. Minimal synaptic power consumption due to sneak-path current is achieved and the capability for spike-induced synaptic behaviors is demonstrated, representing critical milestones for the use of SiO2–based materials in future neuromorphic computing applications. Biological synaptic behaviors such as long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) are demonstrated systematically using a comprehensive analysis of spike-induced waveforms, and represent interesting potential applications for SiOx-based resistive switching materials. The resistive switching SET transition is modeled as hydrogen (proton) release from (SiH)2 to generate the hydrogen bridge defect, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction (proton capture) that re-forms (SiH)2. The experimental results suggest a simple, robust approach to realize programmable neuromorphic chips compatible with large-scale CMOS manufacturing technology. PMID:26880381

  2. Does Drought Increase the Risk of Insects Developing Behavioral Resistance to Systemic Insecticides?

    PubMed

    Khodaverdi, Haleh; Fowles, Trevor; Bick, Emily; Nansen, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Increases in severity and frequency of drought periods, average global temperatures, and more erratic fluctuations in rainfall patterns due to climate change are predicted to have a dramatic impact on agricultural production systems. Insect pest populations in agricultural and horticultural systems are also expected to be impacted, both in terms of their spatial and temporal distributions and in their status as pest species. In this opinion-based article, we discuss how indirect effects of drought may adversely affect the performance of systemic insecticides and also lead to increased risk of insect pests developing behavioral insecticide resistance. We hypothesize that more pronounced drought will decrease uptake and increase the magnitude of nonuniform translocation of systemic insecticides within treated crop plants, and that may have two concurrent consequences: 1) reduced pesticide performance, and 2) increased likelihood of insect pests evolving behavioral insecticide resistance. Under this scenario, pests that can sense and avoid acquisition of lethal dosages of systemic insecticides within crop plants will have a selective advantage. This may lead to selection for insect behavioral avoidance, so that insects predominantly feed and oviposit on portions of crop plants with low concentration of systemic insecticide. Limited research has been published on the effect of environmental variables, including drought, on pesticide performance, but we present and discuss studies that support the hypothesis described above. In addition, we wish to highlight the importance of studying the many ways environmental factors can affect, directly and indirectly, both the performance of insecticides and the risk of target insect pests developing resistance.

  3. Demonstration of Synaptic Behaviors and Resistive Switching Characterizations by Proton Exchange Reactions in Silicon Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Pan, Chih-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-02-01

    We realize a device with biological synaptic behaviors by integrating silicon oxide (SiOx) resistive switching memory with Si diodes. Minimal synaptic power consumption due to sneak-path current is achieved and the capability for spike-induced synaptic behaviors is demonstrated, representing critical milestones for the use of SiO2–based materials in future neuromorphic computing applications. Biological synaptic behaviors such as long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD) and spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) are demonstrated systematically using a comprehensive analysis of spike-induced waveforms, and represent interesting potential applications for SiOx-based resistive switching materials. The resistive switching SET transition is modeled as hydrogen (proton) release from (SiH)2 to generate the hydrogen bridge defect, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction (proton capture) that re-forms (SiH)2. The experimental results suggest a simple, robust approach to realize programmable neuromorphic chips compatible with large-scale CMOS manufacturing technology.

  4. Insulin resistance in brain alters dopamine turnover and causes behavioral disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kleinridders, Andre; Cai, Weikang; Cappellucci, Laura; Ghazarian, Armen; Collins, William R.; Vienberg, Sara G.; Pothos, Emmanuel N.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and insulin resistance are associated with altered brain imaging, depression, and increased rates of age-related cognitive impairment. Here we demonstrate that mice with a brain-specific knockout of the insulin receptor (NIRKO mice) exhibit brain mitochondrial dysfunction with reduced mitochondrial oxidative activity, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation in the striatum and nucleus accumbens. NIRKO mice also exhibit increased levels of monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO A and B) leading to increased dopamine turnover in these areas. Studies in cultured neurons and glia cells indicate that these changes in MAO A and B are a direct consequence of loss of insulin signaling. As a result, NIRKO mice develop age-related anxiety and depressive-like behaviors that can be reversed by treatment with MAO inhibitors, as well as the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, which inhibits MAO activity and reduces oxidative stress. Thus, insulin resistance in brain induces mitochondrial and dopaminergic dysfunction leading to anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, demonstrating a potential molecular link between central insulin resistance and behavioral disorders. PMID:25733901

  5. Nonviolent resistance: a treatment for parents of children with acute behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Weinblatt, Uri; Omer, Haim

    2008-01-01

    Nonviolent resistance (NVR) is a new training model aimed at helping parents deal effectively with their helplessness, isolation, and escalatory interactions with their children. The purpose of this study is to evaluate training in NVR with the parents of children with acute behavior problems. Seventy-three parents (41 families) were randomly assigned to a treatment group and wait-list control group. Measures were taken at pretreatment, posttreatment, and a 1-month follow-up. In comparison with the wait-list group, parents who received training in NVR showed a decrease in parental helplessness and escalatory behaviors, and an increase in perceived social support. The children's negative behaviors as assessed by the parents also decreased significantly.

  6. Nonvolatile conductive filaments resistive switching behaviors in Ag/GaO x /Nb:SrTiO3/Ag structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P. G.; Zhi, Y. S.; Wang, P. C.; Sun, Z. B.; Li, L. H.; An, Y. H.; Guo, D. Y.; Tang, W. H.; Xiao, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    Ag/GaO x /NSTO/Ag structures were fabricated, and the electrical properties measurement results show that the device behaviors a unipolar resistance switching characteristic with bi-stable resistance ratio of three orders. In the positive voltage region, the dominant conducting mechanism of high resistance state obeys Poole-Frenkel emission rules, while in the negative region, that obeys space-charge-limited current mechanism. Both the I- V curves of ON and OFF states and temperature-dependent variation resistances indicate that the unipolar resistance switching behavior can be explained by the formation/rupture of conductive filaments, which composed of oxygen vacancies. The stable switching results demonstrated that the structure can be applied in resistance random access memory devices.

  7. Long-term electrical resistivity monitoring of recharge-induced contaminant plume behavior.

    PubMed

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hubbard, Susan S; Watson, David B; Baker, Gregory S; Peterson, John E; Kowalsky, Michael B; Smith, Meagan; Brooks, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Geophysical measurements, and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data in particular, are sensitive to properties that are related (directly or indirectly) to hydrological processes. The challenge is in extracting information from geophysical data at a relevant scale that can be used to gain insight about subsurface behavior and to parameterize or validate flow and transport models. Here, we consider the use of ERT data for examining the impact of recharge on subsurface contamination at the S-3 ponds of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Tennessee. A large dataset of time-lapse cross-well and surface ERT data, collected at the site over a period of 12 months, is used to study time variations in resistivity due to changes in total dissolved solids (primarily nitrate). The electrical resistivity distributions recovered from cross-well and surface ERT data agrees well, and both of these datasets can be used to interpret spatiotemporal variations in subsurface nitrate concentrations due to rainfall, although the sensitivity of the electrical resistivity response to dilution varies with nitrate concentration. Using the time-lapse surface ERT data interpreted in terms of nitrate concentrations, we find that the subsurface nitrate concentration at this site varies as a function of spatial position, episodic heavy rainstorms (versus seasonal and annual fluctuations), and antecedent rainfall history. These results suggest that the surface ERT monitoring approach is potentially useful for examining subsurface plume responses to recharge over field-relevant scales.

  8. High fat diet produces brain insulin resistance, synaptodendritic abnormalities and altered behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Steven E; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R; Carlson, Gregory C; Browne, Caroline A; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F; Kim, Sangwon F

    2014-07-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS(616)), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors.

  9. High Fat Diet Produces Brain Insulin Resistance, Synaptodendritic Abnormalities and Altered Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Steven E.; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R.; Carlson, Gregory C.; Browne, Carolyn A.; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17 days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8 weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS616), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors. PMID:24686304

  10. Resistive switching behavior in single crystal SrTiO3 annealed by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xinqiang; Shuai, Yao; Wu, Chuangui; Luo, Wenbo; Sun, Xiangyu; Yuan, Ye; Zhou, Shengqiang; Ou, Xin; Zhang, Wanli

    2016-12-01

    Single crystal SrTiO3 (STO) wafers were annealed by XeCl laser (λ = 308 nm) with different fluences of 0.4 J/cm2, 0.6 J/cm2 and 0.8 J/cm2, respectively. Ti/Pt electrodes were sputtered on the surface of STO wafer to form co-planar capacitor-like structures of Pt/Ti/STO/Ti/Pt. Current-Voltage measurements show that the leakage current is enhanced by increasing laser fluence. Resistive switching behavior is only observed in the sample annealed by laser with relatively high fluence after an electro-forming process. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that the amount of oxygen vacancies increases with the increase of laser fluence. This work indicates resistive switching appears when enough oxygen vacancies are generated by the laser, which form conductive filaments under an external electric field.

  11. Does Drought Increase the Risk of Insects Developing Behavioral Resistance to Systemic Insecticides?

    PubMed Central

    Fowles, Trevor; Bick, Emily; Nansen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Increases in severity and frequency of drought periods, average global temperatures, and more erratic fluctuations in rainfall patterns due to climate change are predicted to have a dramatic impact on agricultural production systems. Insect pest populations in agricultural and horticultural systems are also expected to be impacted, both in terms of their spatial and temporal distributions and in their status as pest species. In this opinion-based article, we discuss how indirect effects of drought may adversely affect the performance of systemic insecticides and also lead to increased risk of insect pests developing behavioral insecticide resistance. We hypothesize that more pronounced drought will decrease uptake and increase the magnitude of nonuniform translocation of systemic insecticides within treated crop plants, and that may have two concurrent consequences: 1) reduced pesticide performance, and 2) increased likelihood of insect pests evolving behavioral insecticide resistance. Under this scenario, pests that can sense and avoid acquisition of lethal dosages of systemic insecticides within crop plants will have a selective advantage. This may lead to selection for insect behavioral avoidance, so that insects predominantly feed and oviposit on portions of crop plants with low concentration of systemic insecticide. Limited research has been published on the effect of environmental variables, including drought, on pesticide performance, but we present and discuss studies that support the hypothesis described above. In addition, we wish to highlight the importance of studying the many ways environmental factors can affect, directly and indirectly, both the performance of insecticides and the risk of target insect pests developing resistance. PMID:27551149

  12. Behavioral effects on rats of high strength magnetic fields generated by a resistive electromagnet.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Thomas A; Pittman, David W; Riccardi, Christina; Cassell, Jennifer A; Lockwood, Denesa R; Barranco, Jan M; Kwon, Bumsup; Smith, James C

    2005-10-15

    It has been reported previously that exposure to static high magnetic fields of 7 T or above in superconducting magnets has behavioral effects on rats. In particular, magnetic field exposure acutely but transiently suppressed rearing and induced walking in tight circles; the direction of circular locomotion was dependent on the rats' orientation within the magnet. Furthermore, when magnet exposure was paired with consumption of a palatable, novel solution, rats acquired a persistent taste aversion. In order to confirm these results under more controlled conditions, we exposed rats to static magnetic fields of 4 to 19.4 T in a 189 mm bore, 20 T resistive magnet. By using a resistive magnet, field strengths could be arbitrary varied from -19.4 to 19.4 T within the same bore. Rearing was suppressed after exposure to 4 T and above; circling was observed after 7 T and above. Conditioned taste aversion was acquired after 14 T and above. The effects of the magnetic fields were dependent on orientation. Exposure to +14 T induced counter-clockwise circling, while exposure to -14 T induced clockwise circling. Exposure with the rostral-caudal axis of the rat perpendicular to the magnetic field produced an attenuated behavioral response compared to exposure with the rostral-caudal axis parallel to the field. These results in a single resistive magnet confirm and extend our earlier findings using multiple superconducting magnets. They demonstrate that the behavioral effects of exposure within large magnets are dependent on the magnetic field, and not on non-magnetic properties of the machinery. Finally, the effects of exposure to 4 T are clinically relevant, as 4 T magnetic fields are commonly used in functional MRI assays.

  13. Nonlinear current-voltage behavior of the isolated resistive switching filamentary channels in CuC nanolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Doo-In; Yoon, Jaesik; Kim, Young Moon; Kwon, Se Hun; Kim, Kwang Ho; Park, Ju-Bong; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2011-04-11

    Copper-doped amorphous carbon film was prepared by radio frequency reactive magnetron sputtering and their resistive switching behaviors were studied under a conductive atomic force microscope (cAFM). The repetitive scanning over the same area using cAFM with various bias voltages revealed that most of the isolated conductive paths were involved in resistive switching with asymmetric nonlinear I-V characteristics. The observed I-V behavior of nanoscale filamentary channels indicates that electron transfer mechanism of resistive switching filamentary channel in Pt/CuC/Pt is a tunneling between Cu filamentary channel and electrode through the solid electrolyte rather than conduction through fully connected Cu filamentary channel.

  14. Negative differential resistance behavior in phosphorus-doped armchair graphene nanoribbon junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuhong; Zhang, Daoli Zhang, Jianbing; Miao, Xiangshui; Ye, Cong

    2014-02-21

    In this present work, we investigate the electronic transport properties of phosphorus-doped armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) junctions by employing nonequilibrium Green's functions in combination with the density-function theory. Two phosphorus (P) atoms are considered to substitute the central carbon atom with the different width of AGNRs. The results indicate that the electronic transport behaviors are strongly dependent on the width of the P-doped graphene nanoribbons. The current-voltage characteristics of the doped AGNR junctions reveal an interesting negative differential resistance (NDR) and exhibit three distinct family (3 n, 3 n + 1, 3 n + 2) behaviors. These results display that P doping is a very good way to achieve NDR of the graphene nanoribbon devices.

  15. Effects of low-molecular weight resist components on dissolution behavior of chemically amplified resists for extreme ultraviolet lithography studied by quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuyasu, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2015-03-01

    It is challenging to implement extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography for mass production because the demands for the EUV resist materials are very strict. Under such circumstances, it is important in EUV resist design to clarify the dissolution behavior of the resist film into alkaline developer. In particular, the dissolution in exposed area of resist films is one of the most critical processes. However, the details in dissolution process of EUV resist have not been investigated thus far. In this study, the dissolution of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) polymer and PHS partially-protected with t-butoxycarbonyl group (t-BOC-PHS) with and without additives such as acid generator and amines was studied by using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method. The dissolution behavior of thin films was investigated by varying the exposure dose and the acid generator concentration from the standpoint of a systematic understanding of the effects of each resist component on dissolution kinetics. The dissolution speed became slower with increase of TPS-tf concentration in PHS and t-BOC-PHS. It is important for the EUV resist design to take into account the concentration of undecomposed PAG.

  16. Dietary resistant starch improves selected brain and behavioral functions in adult and aged rodents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, June; Keenan, Michael J; Fernandez-Kim, Sun Ok; Pistell, Paul J; Ingram, Donald K; Li, Bing; Raggio, Anne M; Shen, Li; Zhang, Hanjie; McCutcheon, Kathleen L; Tulley, Richard T; Blackman, Marc R; Keller, Jeffrey N; Martin, Roy J

    2013-11-01

    Resistant starch (RS) is a dietary fiber that exerts multiple beneficial effects. The current study explored the effects of dietary RS on selected brain and behavioral functions in adult and aged rodents. Because glucokinase (GK) expression in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and area postrema of the brainstem is important for brain glucose sensing, GK mRNA was measured by brain nuclei microdissection and PCR. Adult RS-fed rats had a higher GK mRNA than controls in both brain nuclei, an indicator of improved brain glucose sensing. Next, we tested whether dietary RS improve selected behaviors in aged mice. RS-fed aged mice exhibited (i) an increased eating responses to fasting, a behavioral indicator of improvement in aged brain glucose sensing; (ii) a longer latency to fall from an accelerating rotarod, a behavioral indicator of improved motor coordination; and (iii) a higher serum active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Then, GLP-1 receptor null (GLP-1RKO) mice were used to test the role of GLP-1 in brain glucose sensing, and they exhibited impaired eating responses to fasting. We conclude that in rodents (i) dietary RS improves two important indicators of brain function: glucose sensing and motor coordination, and (ii) GLP-1 is important in the optimal feeding response to a fast.

  17. The Model of Motivational Dynamics in Sport: Resistance to Peer Influence, Behavioral Engagement and Disaffection, Dispositional Coping, and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Adam R.; Morley, David; Perry, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The Model of Motivational Dynamics (MMD; Skinner and Pitzer, 2012) infers that peers influence behavioral engagement levels, which in turn is linked to coping and resilience. Scholars, however, are yet to test the MMD among an athletic population. The purpose of this paper was to assess an a priori model that included key constructs from the MMD, such as resistance to peer influence, behavioral engagement and disaffection, coping, and resilience among athletes. Three hundred and fifty-one athletes (male n = 173, female n = 178; Mage = 16.15 years) completed a questionnaire that measured each construct. Our results provide support for the model. In particular, there were positive paths between resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, behavioral engagement and task-oriented coping, and task-oriented coping with resilience. There was also a positive path between resilience and resistance to peer influence, but a negative path from resistance to peer influence to behavioral disaffection. Due to the reported benefits of enhancing resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, researchers could devise sport specific interventions to maximize athletes’ scores in these constructs. PMID:26779107

  18. Bipolar resistive switching behavior of an amorphous Ge₂Sb₂Te₅ thin films with a Te layer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sijung; Eom, Taeyong; Gwon, Taehong; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2015-04-14

    The mechanism of bipolar resistive switching (BRS) of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) thin films sandwiched between inert electrodes (Ti and Pt) was examined. Typical bipolar resistive switching behavior with a high resistance ratio (∼10(3)) and reliable switching characteristics was achieved. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of a conductive Te-filament bridging between the top and bottom electrodes through an amorphous GST matrix. The conduction mechanism analysis showed that the low-resistance state was semiconducting and dominated by band transport, whereas Poole-Frenkel conduction governed the carrier transport in the high-resistance state. Thus, the BRS behavior can be attributed to the formation and rupture of the semiconducting conductive Te bridge through the migration of the Te ions in the amorphous GST matrix under a high electric field. The Te ions are provided by the thin (∼5 nm) Te-rich layer formed at the bottom electrode interface.

  19. Mechanical flexible and electric fatigue resistant behavior of relaxor ferroelectric terpolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fei; Yang, Wei; Yang, Wen

    2009-08-01

    Uniaxial tension and polarization evolution under cyclic electric field are investigated for poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluorethylene-chlorofluoroethylene) terpolymer films prepared by different annealing conditions. The stress-strain behavior of the terpolymer film exhibits that of polymeric elastomers, with its fracture strain reaching 680%. Structure analysis demonstrates that the polymer chains undergo reorientation, and conformational change from nonpolar to polar phase takes place during uniaxial tension. Under cyclic electric field, the terpolymer film exhibits a narrow polarization loop typical of a ferroelectric relaxor. Conformational change from nonpolar to polar phase also occurs upon the electric field, and it reverses to the nonpolar phase when the field is removed. As the cycle number accumulates, the terpolymer film demonstrates excellent resistance to electric fatigue. Compared to the film annealed at 115 °C, the terpolymer film annealed at 100 °C has a larger volume fraction of crystallite/amorphous interfaces and shows better mechanical flexibility as well as electric fatigue resistance. The mechanical flexible and electric fatigue resistant terpolymer films hold promises for many applications, ranging from embedded sensors and actuators to flexible memory devices.

  20. Treatment-resistant depression in adolescents: is the addition of cognitive behavioral therapy of benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Sarah E; Cox, Georgina R; Merry, Sally N

    2011-01-01

    Background Many young people with major depression fail first-line treatments. Treatment-resistant depression has various definitions in the literature but typically assumes nonresponse to medication. In young people, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the recommended first-line intervention, thus the definition of treatment resistance should be expanded. Therefore, our aim was to synthesize the existing evidence of any interventions for treatment-resistant depression, broadly defined, in children and adolescents and to investigate the effectiveness of CBT in this context. Methods We used Cochrane Collaboration methodology, with electronic searches of Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, and the Cochrane Depression Anxiety and Neurosis Group trials registers. Only randomized controlled trials were included, and were assessed for risk of bias. Meta- analysis was undertaken where possible and appropriate. Results Of 953 articles retrieved, four trials were eligible for inclusion. For one study, only the trial registration document was available, because the study was never completed. All other studies were well conducted with a low risk of bias, although one study had a high dropout rate. Two studies assessed the effect of adding CBT to medication. While an assertive trial of antidepressants does appear to lead to benefit, when compared with placebo, there was no significant advantage, in either study, or in a meta-analysis of data from these trials, that clearly demonstrated an additional benefit of CBT. The third trial showed little advantage of a tricyclic antidepressant over placebo in the context of an inpatient admission. Conclusion Few randomized controlled trials have investigated interventions for treatment-resistant depression in young people, and results from these show modest benefit from antidepressants with no additional benefit over medication from CBT. Overall, there is a lack of evidence about effective interventions to treat young people who have failed to

  1. Resistive switching behavior in Lu2O3 thin film for advanced flexible memory applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the resistive switching (RS) behaviors in Lu2O3 thin film for advanced flexible nonvolatile memory applications are investigated. Amorphous Lu2O3 thin films with a thickness of 20 nm were deposited at room temperature by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering on flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate. The structural and morphological changes of the Lu2O3 thin film were characterized by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. The Ru/Lu2O3/ITO flexible memory device shows promising RS behavior with low-voltage operation and small distribution of switching parameters. The dominant switching current conduction mechanism in the Lu2O3 thin film was determined as bulk-controlled space-charge-limited-current with activation energy of traps of 0.33 eV. The oxygen vacancies assisted filament conduction model was described for RS behavior in Lu2O3 thin film. The memory reliability characteristics of switching endurance, data retention, good flexibility, and mechanical endurance show promising applications in future advanced memory. PMID:24387704

  2. Differential reinforcement of alternative behavior increases resistance to extinction: clinical demonstration, animal modeling, and clinical test of one solution.

    PubMed

    Mace, F Charles; McComas, Jennifer J; Mauro, Benjamin C; Progar, Patrick R; Taylor, Bridget; Ervin, Ruth; Zangrillo, Amanda N

    2010-05-01

    Basic research with pigeons on behavioral momentum suggests that differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) can increase the resistance of target behavior to change. This finding suggests that clinical applications of DRA may inadvertently increase the persistence of target behavior even as it decreases its frequency. We conducted three coordinated experiments to test whether DRA has persistence-strengthening effects on clinically significant target behavior and then tested the effectiveness of a possible solution to this problem in both a nonhuman and clinical study. Experiment 1 compared resistance to extinction following baseline rates of reinforcement versus higher DRA rates of reinforcement in a clinical study. Resistance to extinction was substantially greater following DRA. Experiment 2 tested a rat model of a possible solution to this problem. Training an alternative response in a context without reinforcement of the target response circumvented the persistence-strengthening effects of DRA. Experiment 3 translated the rat model into a novel clinical application of DRA. Training an alternative response with DRA in a separate context resulted in lower resistance to extinction than employing DRA in the context correlated with reinforcement of target behavior. The value of coordinated bidirectional translational research is discussed.

  3. Resisting pressure from peers to engage in sexual behavior: What communication strategies do early adolescent Latino Girls use?

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Anne E.; Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Hecht, Michael L.; Hutchison, Janet; Campoe, Kristi

    2015-01-01

    A content analysis of early adolescent (M=12.02 years) Latino girls’ (n=44) responses to open-ended questions imbedded in an electronic survey was conducted to explore strategies girls may use to resist peer pressure with respect to sexual behavior. Analysis yielded 341 codable response units, 74% of which were consistent with the REAL typology (i.e., refuse, explain, avoid, and leave) previously identified in adolescent substance use research. However, strategies reflecting a lack of resistance (11%) and inconsistency with communication competence (e.g., aggression, involving authorities) were also noted (15%). Frequency of particular strategies varied according to offer type, suggesting a variety of strategies may be needed to resist the peer pressure that puts early adolescent girls at risk for engaging in sexual behavior. Findings argue for universality of the REAL typology, building communication competence skills for conflict resolution in dating situations, and including peer resistance strategies in adolescent pregnancy prevention programs. PMID:26146434

  4. Resisting pressure from peers to engage in sexual behavior: What communication strategies do early adolescent Latino Girls use?

    PubMed

    Norris, Anne E; Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Hecht, Michael L; Hutchison, Janet; Campoe, Kristi

    2015-05-01

    A content analysis of early adolescent (M=12.02 years) Latino girls' (n=44) responses to open-ended questions imbedded in an electronic survey was conducted to explore strategies girls may use to resist peer pressure with respect to sexual behavior. Analysis yielded 341 codable response units, 74% of which were consistent with the REAL typology (i.e., refuse, explain, avoid, and leave) previously identified in adolescent substance use research. However, strategies reflecting a lack of resistance (11%) and inconsistency with communication competence (e.g., aggression, involving authorities) were also noted (15%). Frequency of particular strategies varied according to offer type, suggesting a variety of strategies may be needed to resist the peer pressure that puts early adolescent girls at risk for engaging in sexual behavior. Findings argue for universality of the REAL typology, building communication competence skills for conflict resolution in dating situations, and including peer resistance strategies in adolescent pregnancy prevention programs.

  5. Quetiapine add-on therapy improves the depressive behaviors and hippocampal neurogenesis in fluoxetine treatment resistant depressive rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chang, Ting; Chen, Yun-Chun; Zhang, Rui-Guo; Wang, Hua-Ning; Wu, Wen-Jun; Peng, Zheng-Wu; Tan, Qing-Rong

    2013-09-15

    Quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic, may have efficacy as augmentation therapy in treatment resistant depression (TRD), but evidence is limited and the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate whether and how quetiapine can be served as an augmentation agent in fluoxetine treatment resistant depressive rats induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). In this study, the effects of CUMS regimen and antidepressant treatment were assessed by behavioral tests and hippocampal neurogenesis. Approximately 20-30% of depressive rats respond poorly to fluoxetine treatment. In their hippocampus, a significant decrease of neurogenesis was also observed. However, quetiapine add-on therapy significantly improved the depressive behaviors and increased the number of the newborn neurons in the hippocampus of fluoxetine treatment resistant depressive rats. Thus, our results suggest that quetiapine may be used as an augmentation agent in the treatment resistant depression partly mediated by increasing the number of newborn neurons in the hippocampus.

  6. Water-based adhesives with tailored hydrophobic association: dilution resistance and improved setting behavior.

    PubMed

    Dundua, Alexander; Landfester, Katharina; Taden, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Hydrophobic association and stimuli-responsiveness is a powerful tool towards water-based adhesives with strongly improved properties, which is demonstrated based on the example of hydrophobically modified alkali-soluble latexes (HASE) with modulated association. Their rheological properties are highly tunable due to the hydrophobic domains that act as physical crosslinking sites of adjustable interaction strength. Ethanol, propanol, and butanol are used as water-soluble model additives with different hydrophobicity in order to specifically target the association sites and impact the viscoelastic properties and stimuli-responsiveness. The rheological and mechanical property response upon dilution with water can be tailored, and dilution-resistant or even dilution-thickening systems are obtained. The investigations are of high importance for water-based adhesives, as our findings provide insight into general structure-property relationships to improve their setting behavior, especially upon contact with wet substrates.

  7. Oxidation Behavior and Chlorination Treatment to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Behrani, Vikas

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is written in an alternate format. The thesis is composed of a general introduction, two original manuscripts, and a general conclusion. References cited within each chapter are given at the end of each chapter. The general introduction starts with the driving force behind this research, and gives an overview of previous work on boron doped molybdenum silicides, Nb/Nb5Si3 composites, boron modified niobium silicides and molybdenum niobium silicides. Chapter 2 focuses on the oxidation behavior of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 3 contains studies on a novel chlorination technique to improve the oxidation resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 4 summarizes the important results in this study.

  8. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and transport properties of phosphorene nanoribbons: Negative differential resistance behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Ajanta; Singh, Akansha; Sen, Prasenjit; Kibey, Aniruddha; Kshirsagar, Anjali; Kanhere, Dilip G.

    2016-08-01

    Structural, electronic, mechanical, and transport properties of two different types of phosphorene nanoribbons are calculated within the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function formalisms. Armchair nanoribbons turn out to be semiconductors at all widths considered. Zigzag nanoribbons are metallic in their layer-terminated structure, but undergo Peierls-like transition at the edges. Armchair nanoribbons have smaller Young's modulus compared to a monolayer, while zigzag nanoribbons have larger Young's modulus. Edge reconstruction further increases the Young's modulus of zigzag nanoribbons. A two-terminal device made of zigzag nanoribbons show negative differential resistance behavior that is robust with respect to edge reconstruction. We have also calculated the I -V characteristics for two nonzero gate voltages. The results show that the zigzag nanoribbons display strong p -type character.

  9. Deformation behavior, corrosion resistance, and cytotoxicity of Ni-free Zr-based bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Qiu, C L; Chen, Q; Chan, K C; Zhang, S M

    2008-07-01

    Two Ni-free bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) of Zr(60)Nb(5)Cu(22.5)Pd(5)Al(7.5) and Zr(60)Nb(5)Cu(20)Fe(5)Al(10) were successfully prepared by arc-melting and copper mold casting. The thermal stability and crystallization were studied using differential scanning calorimetry. It demonstrates that the two BMGs exhibit very good glass forming ability with a wide supercooled liquid region. A multi-step process of crystallization with a preferential formation of quasicrystals occurred in both BMGs under continuous heating. The deformation behavior of the two BMGs was investigated using quasi-static compression testing. It reveals that the BMGs exhibit not only superior strength but also an extended plasticity. Corrosion behaviors of the BMGs were investigated in phosphate buffered solution by electrochemical polarization. The result shows that the two BMGs exhibit excellent corrosion resistance characterized by low corrosion current densities and wide passive regions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the passive film formed after anodic polarization was highly enriched in zirconium, niobium, and aluminum oxides. This is attributed to the excellent corrosion resistance. Additionally, the potential cytotoxicity of the two Ni-free BMGs was evaluated through cell culture for 1 week followed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and SEM observation. The results indicate that the two Ni-free BMGs exhibit as good biocompatibility as Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and thus show a promising potential for biomedical applications.

  10. Surface working of 304L stainless steel: Impact on microstructure, electrochemical behavior and SCC resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Acharyya, S.G.; Khandelwal, A.; Kain, V.; Kumar, A.; Samajdar, I.

    2012-10-15

    The effect of surface working operations on the microstructure, electrochemical behavior and stress corrosion cracking resistance of 304L stainless steel (SS) was investigated in this study. The material was subjected to (a) solution annealing (b) machining and (c) grinding operations. Microstructural characterization was done using stereo microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. The electrochemical nature of the surfaces in machined, ground and solution annealed condition were studied using potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in borate buffer solution. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of 304L SS in different conditions was studied by exposing the samples to boiling MgCl{sub 2} environment. Results revealed that the heavy plastic deformation and residual stresses present near the surface due to machining and grinding operations make 304L SS electrochemically more active and susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. Ground sample showed highest magnitude of current density in the passive potential range followed by machined and solution annealed 304L SS. Micro-electrochemical studies established that surface working promotes localized corrosion along the surface asperities which could lead to crack initiation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding produce extensive grain fragmentation near the surface of 304L SS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding result in martensitic transformation near the surface of 304L SS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding drastically reduce the SCC resistance of 304L SS in chloride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding make the surface of 304L SS electrochemically much more active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SECM study reveal that preferential dissolution takes place along surface asperities.

  11. Carbide Precipitation Behavior and Wear Resistance of a Novel Roller Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Li, Qiang; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Ligang; Yang, Qingxiang

    2013-06-01

    High speed steel, which contains more alloy elements, cannot be used to manufacture the forged work roll. Therefore, a novel roller steel was designed on the basis of W6Mo5Cr4V2 (M2) steel. In this study, the carbide precipitation behavior and wear resistance of the novel roller steel were investigated. The Fe-C isopleths were calculated by Thermo-Calc to determine the carbide types, which were precipitated at different temperatures. The phase transformation temperatures were measured by differential scanning calorimeter and then the characteristic temperatures were designed. The phase structures quenched from the characteristic temperatures were measured by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The typical microstructures were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy with Energy Disperse Spectroscopy. The hardness and wear resistance of the novel roller steel were measured. The results show that the precipitation temperatures of austenite, MC, M6C, M23C6, and ferrite are 1360, 1340, 1230, 926, and 843 °C respectively. When the specimen is quenched from 1300 °C, only MC precipitates from the matrix. At 1220 °C, MC and M2C precipitate. At 1150 °C, all of MC, M2C and M6C precipitate. Relationship between mass fraction of different phases and temperature were also simulated by Thermo-Calc. The hardness of the novel roller steel is a little lower than that of M2 steel, however, the wear resistance of the novel roller steel is a little higher than that of M2 steel with the increase of wear time.

  12. Resisting Pressure from Peers to Engage in Sexual Behavior: What Communication Strategies Do Early Adolescent Latino Girls Use?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Anne E.; Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Hecht, Michael L.; Hutchison, Janet; Campoe, Kristi

    2015-01-01

    A content analysis of early adolescent X-bar = 12.02 years) Latino girls' (n = 44) responses to open-ended questions embedded in an electronic survey was conducted to explore strategies girls may use to resist peer pressure with respect to sexual behavior. Analysis yielded 341 codable response units, 74% of which were consistent with the REAL…

  13. Directions in Specialized Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Theory and Practice of Two Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sookman, Debbie; Steketee, Gail

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses specialized approaches developed for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who are resistant to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Following a review of theoretical and outcome research, two approaches developed to resolve persistent OCD are described and illustrated. Cognitive therapy (CT) designed to address…

  14. Study of self-compliance behaviors and internal filament characteristics in intrinsic SiOx-based resistive switching memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Ying-Chen; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-01-01

    Self-compliance characteristics and reliability optimization are investigated in intrinsic unipolar silicon oxide (SiOx)-based resistive switching (RS) memory using TiW/SiOx/TiW device structures. The program window (difference between SET voltage and RESET voltage) is dependent on external series resistance, demonstrating that the SET process is due to a voltage-triggered mechanism. The program window has been optimized for program/erase disturbance immunity and reliability for circuit-level applications. The SET and RESET transitions have also been characterized using a dynamic conductivity method, which distinguishes the self-compliance behavior due to an internal series resistance effect (filament) in SiOx-based RS memory. By using a conceptual "filament/resistive gap (GAP)" model of the conductive filament and a proton exchange model with appropriate assumptions, the internal filament resistance and GAP resistance can be estimated for high- and low-resistance states (HRS and LRS), and are found to be independent of external series resistance. Our experimental results not only provide insights into potential reliability issues but also help to clarify the switching mechanisms and device operating characteristics of SiOx-based RS memory.

  15. Drug resistant HIV: Behaviors and characteristics among Los Angeles men who have sex with men with new HIV diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Pamina M.; Javanbakht, Marjan; Bornfleth, Lorelei; Bolan, Robert K.; Lewis Blum, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology of drug resistant HIV has focused on trends and less attention has been given to identification of factors, especially behaviors including substance use, in acquisition of drug-resistant HIV. From 2009 to 2012 The Metromates Study enrolled and followed for one year men who have sex with men (MSM) seeking testing for HIV in a community clinic in Los Angeles assessing those testing positive for acute and recent HIV infection. Behavioral data were collected via Computer-Assisted Self-Interview from 125 classified as newly HIV infected and 91 as chronically infected (newly HIV-diagnosed); specimens were available and viable for resistance testing for 154 of the 216 HIV positives with new diagnoses. In this community clinic we found prevalence of resistance among MSM with new HIV-diagnosis was 19.5% (n = 30/154) with no difference by recency of HIV infection. Sexual partnership characteristics were associated with resistance; those who reported transgendered sex partners had a higher prevalence of resistance as compared to those who did not report transgendered sex partners (40% vs. 17%; p value = 0.04), while those who reported having a main partner had a lower prevalence of drug resistance (12% vs. 24%; p value = 0.07). In multivariable analyses adjusting for HIV recency and antiviral use, reporting a main partner decreased odds [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.34; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13–0.87], reporting a transgendered partnered increased odds (AOR = 3.37; 95% CI 0.95–12.43); and being African American increased odds of drug resistance (AOR = 5.63, 95%CI 1.41–22.38). This suggests African American MSM and TG individuals in Los Angeles represent pockets of exceptional risk that will require special approaches to prevention and care to enhance their own health and reduce their likelihood to support transmission of drug resistance in the US. PMID:28333950

  16. Unipolar resistive switching characteristics and scaling behaviors in La2Mo2O9 thin films for nonvolatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Lin, G. T.; Luo, X.; Wei, R. H.; Zhu, X. B.; Song, W. H.; Dai, J. M.; Sun, Y. P.

    2016-12-01

    La2Mo2O9 (LMO) thin films have been deposited on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by pulsed laser deposition and the resistive switching (RS) characteristics of the Au/LMO/Pt devices has been investigated. The Au/LMO/Pt devices show excellent unipolar RS characteristics with high resistance ratio between high resistance state and low resistance state (LRS), good endurance, and retention performances. The results of temperature dependence of resistance and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggest that the observed RS characteristics can be explained by the formation and rupture of conducting filaments composed of oxygen vacancies. Furthermore, the plot of the reset current (IR) as a function of the third harmonic coefficient (B0) caused by Joule heating during the reset process shows scaling behavior with a power law of I R ∝ B0 - δ . The IR and reset power (PR) can also be scaled to the resistance in LRS (R0), i.e., I R ( P R ) ∝ R0 - α ( β ) . The observed scaling behaviors indicate the importance of the Joule heating for the RS characteristics of Au/LMO/Pt devices. These results demonstrate the potential application of LMO thin film in a nonvolatile memory device.

  17. Deltamethrin-mediated survival, behavior, and oenocyte morphology of insecticide-susceptible and resistant yellow fever mosquitos (Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Marriel, Nadja Biondine; Tomé, Hudson Vaner Ventura; Guedes, Raul Carvalho Narciso; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira

    2016-06-01

    Insecticide use is the prevailing control tactic for the mosquito Aedes aegypti, a vector of several human viruses, which leads to ever-increasing problems of insecticide resistance in populations of this insect pest species. The underlying mechanisms of insecticide resistance may be linked to the metabolism of insecticides by various cells, including oenocytes. Oenocytes are ectodermal cells responsible for lipid metabolism and detoxification. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sublethal effects of deltamethrin on survival, behavior, and oenocyte structure in the immature mosquitoes of insecticide-susceptible and resistant strains of A. aegypti. Fourth instar larvae (L4) of both strains were exposed to different concentrations of deltamethrin (i.e., 0.001, 0.003, 0.005, and 0.007 ppm). After exposure, L4 were subjected to behavioral bioassays. Insecticide effects on cell integrity after deltamethrin exposure (at 0.003 or 0.005 ppm) were assessed by processing pupal oenocytes for transmission electron microscopy or TUNEL reaction. The insecticide resistant L4 survived all the tested concentrations, whereas the 0.007-ppm deltamethrin concentration had lethal effects on susceptible L4. Susceptible L4 were lethargic and exhibited less swimming activity than unexposed larvae, whereas the resistant L4 were hyperexcited following exposure to 0.005 ppm deltamethrin. No sublethal effects and no significant cell death were observed in the oenocytes of either susceptible or resistant insects exposed to deltamethrin. The present study illustrated the different responses of susceptible and resistant strains of A. aegypti following exposure to sublethal concentration of deltamethrin, and demonstrated how the behavior of the immature stage of the two strains varied, as well as oenocyte structure following insecticide exposure.

  18. Men’s Condom Use Resistance: Alcohol Effects on Theory of Planned Behavior Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kelly Cue; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J.; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Danube, Cinnamon L.; Morrison, Diane M.; Norris, Jeanette; George, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study is a novel investigation of 1) the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to predict men’s condom use resistance (CUR; i.e., attempts to avoid condom use with a partner who wants to use one) and 2) the effects of alcohol on endorsement of TPB-CUR constructs. Methods Using an alcohol administration protocol, a between- and within-subjects experiment was conducted with a community sample of 312 young male non-problem drinkers who have sex with women. After assessing endorsement of TPB-CUR constructs (e.g., attitudes, norms, self-efficacy, control, and intentions) in a sober state, beverage condition was experimentally manipulated between subjects and endorsement of TPB-CUR constructs was reassessed. Results Analyses included repeated measures MANOVAs with beverage condition (no alcohol vs. alcohol) as the between-subjects factor and time (pre-beverage vs. post-beverage) as the within-subjects factor. Between-subjects, intoxicated participants reported significantly stronger CUR intentions, more favorable CUR attitudes and normative perceptions, and greater CUR self-efficacy than sober participants. There were significant within-subject changes for CUR intentions, attitudes, normative perceptions, and self-efficacy. Neither between- nor within-subjects effects were found for CUR control. An exploratory multi-group path analysis indicated that the relationships among the TPB-CUR constructs were similar for alcohol and no alcohol groups. Conclusions Findings indicated that alcohol intoxication increased men’s CUR intentions and self-efficacy and led to more positive CUR attitudes and norms, yet had no effect on CUR control. Future research should examine whether there are similar effects of intoxication on TPB constructs related to other sexual risk behaviors. PMID:26348499

  19. Using short vignettes to disentangle perceived capability from motivation: a test using walking and resistance training behaviors.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Williams, David M; Mistry, Chetan D

    2016-07-01

    Self-efficacy is arguably the strongest correlate of physical activity, yet some researchers suggest this is because the construct confounds ability with motivation. We examine a more circumscribed construct, called perceived capability (PC), meant to measure ability but not motivation and propose that the construct will not be related to unskilled physical activities but may be linked to skilled behaviors. The purpose of this paper was to examine whether a PC construct can be stripped of motivation using a vignette approach in both walking and resistance training behaviors. Participants were a random sample of 248 university students, who were then randomly assigned to either answer resistance training or walking behavior questions. Both groups completed a PC measure and reasons for their answer before and after reading a vignette that clarified the phrasing of capability to a literal use of the term. PC was significantly (p < .01) higher post- compared to pre-vignette and the differences were greater (p < .01) for walking than for resistance training. PC had significantly (p < .01) smaller correlations with intention and self-reported behavior post-disambiguation, which resulted in a null relationship with walking but a small correlation with resistance training behavior. When PC was combined with intention to predict behavior, however, there was no significant (p > .05) difference in the amount of variance explained pre- to post-vignette. Thought listing showed that participants did not report capability barriers to walking and over half of the sample construed capability as motivation/other priorities pre-vignette. The findings support use of a vignette approach for researchers who wish to disentangle the assessment of PC from motivation while creating no overall loss in explained variance of physical activity.

  20. THE BEHAVIOR OF TRANSVERSE WAVES IN NONUNIFORM SOLAR FLUX TUBES. I. COMPARISON OF IDEAL AND RESISTIVE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón; Goossens, Marcel

    2013-11-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitously observed in the solar atmosphere. Kink waves are a type of transverse MHD waves in magnetic flux tubes that are damped due to resonant absorption. The theoretical study of kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes is usually based on the simplification that the transverse variation of density is confined to a nonuniform layer much thinner than the radius of the tube, i.e., the so-called thin boundary approximation. Here, we develop a general analytic method to compute the dispersion relation and the eigenfunctions of ideal MHD waves in pressureless flux tubes with transversely nonuniform layers of arbitrary thickness. Results for kink waves are produced and compared with fully numerical resistive MHD eigenvalue computations in the limit of small resistivity. We find that the frequency and resonant damping rate are the same in both ideal and resistive cases. The actual results for thick nonuniform layers deviate from the behavior predicted in the thin boundary approximation and strongly depend on the shape of the nonuniform layer. The eigenfunctions in ideal MHD are very different from those in resistive MHD. The ideal eigenfunctions display a global character regardless of the thickness of the nonuniform layer, while the resistive eigenfunctions are localized around the resonance and are indistinguishable from those of ordinary resistive Alfvén modes. Consequently, the spatial distribution of wave energy in the ideal and resistive cases is dramatically different. This poses a fundamental theoretical problem with clear observational consequences.

  1. Severely Heat Injured Survivors of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888 Display Variable and Heterogeneous Stress Resistance Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gayán, Elisa; Govers, Sander K.; Michiels, Chris W.; Aertsen, Abram

    2016-01-01

    Although minimal food processing strategies aim to eliminate foodborne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms through a combination of mild preservation techniques, little is actually known on the resistance behavior of the small fraction of microorganisms surviving an inimical treatment. In this study, the conduct of severely heat stressed survivors of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888, as an indicator for the low infectious dose foodborne enterohemorrhagic strains, was examined throughout their resuscitation and outgrowth. Despite the fact that these survivors were initially sublethally injured, they were only marginally more sensitive to a subsequent heat treatment and actually much more resistant to a subsequent high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) shock in comparison with unstressed control cells. Throughout further resuscitation, however, their initial HHP resistance rapidly faded out, while their heat resistance increased and surpassed the initial heat resistance of unstressed control cells. Results also indicated that the population eventually emerging from the severely heat stressed survivors heterogeneously consisted of both growing and non-growing cells. Together, these observations provide deeper insights into the particular behavior and heterogeneity of stressed foodborne pathogens in the context of food preservation. PMID:27917163

  2. Temperature dependences of ferroelectricity and resistive switching behavior of epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zeng-Xing; Song, Xiao; Zhao, Li-Na; Li, Zhong-Wen; Lin, Yuan-Bin; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Zhang; Lu, Xu-Bing; Wu, Su-Juan; Gao, Xing-Sen; Yan, Zhi-Bo; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the resistive switching and ferroelectric polarization properties of high-quality epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films in various temperature ranges. The room temperature current-voltage (I-V) curve exhibits a well-established polarization-modulated memristor behavior. At low temperatures (< 253 K), the I-V curve shows an open circuit voltage (OCV), which possibly originates from the dielectric relaxation effects, accompanied with a current hump due to the polarization reversal displacement current. While at relative higher temperatures (> 253 K), the I-V behaviors are governed by both space-charge-limited conduction (SCLC) and Ohmic behavior. The polarization reversal is able to trigger the conduction switching from Ohmic to SCLC behavior, leading to the observed ferroelectric resistive switching. At a temperature of > 298 K, there occurs a new resistive switching hysteresis at high bias voltages, which may be related to defect-mediated effects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51272078 and 51332007), the State Key Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No 2015CB921202), the Guangdong Provincial Universities and Colleges Pearl River Scholar Funded Scheme, China (2014), the International Science & Technology Cooperation Platform Program of Guangzhou, China (Grant No. 2014J4500016), and the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University of China (Grant No. IRT1243).

  3. Effects of sealing treatment on corrosion resistance and degradation behavior of micro-arc oxidized magnesium alloy wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. L.; Han, X.; Xue, F.; Bai, J.; Chu, P. K.

    2013-04-01

    The effects of three different sealing treatments on micro-arc oxidized (MAO) medical magnesium alloy wires using boiling water, zirconia sol-gel, and organic gelatin-hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on the surface morphology, corrosion resistance, and degradation behavior in simulated body fluid (SBF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) are investigated. The treatments involving boiling water or gelatin-HA coating can effectively seal the discharge channels making the surface pores less and smaller. The treatments also improve the corrosion resistance of the MAO magnesium alloy wires, especially the samples with the gelatin-HA coatings which also exhibit reduced degradation in both simulated physiological environments.

  4. Testing the Effectiveness of Intervention Programs on Children's Compliance-Resisting Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillen, Jeffrey S.; And Others

    A study examined the effectiveness of a resistance-based prevention program to increase subjects' ability to comprehend and apply resistance skills. Subjects were 30 participants in kindergarten through third grade. Fifteen subjects received resistance-based prevention training from the We Help Ourselves (WHO) program. The remaining 15 subjects…

  5. Stress-induced enhancement of fear conditioning and sensitization facilitates extinction-resistant and habituation-resistant fear behaviors in a novel animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Corley, Michael J; Caruso, Michael J; Takahashi, Lorey K

    2012-01-18

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by stress-induced symptoms including exaggerated fear memories, hypervigilance and hyperarousal. However, we are unaware of an animal model that investigates these hallmarks of PTSD especially in relation to fear extinction and habituation. Therefore, to develop a valid animal model of PTSD, we exposed rats to different intensities of footshock stress to determine their effects on either auditory predator odor fear extinction or habituation of fear sensitization. In Experiment 1, rats were exposed to acute footshock stress (no shock control, 0.4 mA, or 0.8 mA) immediately prior to auditory fear conditioning training involving the pairing of auditory clicks with a cloth containing cat odor. When presented to the conditioned auditory clicks in the next 5 days of extinction testing conducted in a runway apparatus with a hide box, rats in the two shock groups engaged in higher levels of freezing and head out vigilance-like behavior from the hide box than the no shock control group. This increase in fear behavior during extinction testing was likely due to auditory activation of the conditioned fear state because Experiment 2 demonstrated that conditioned fear behavior was not broadly increased in the absence of the conditioned auditory stimulus. Experiment 3 was then conducted to determine whether acute exposure to stress induces a habituation resistant sensitized fear state. We found that rats exposed to 0.8 mA footshock stress and subsequently tested for 5 days in the runway hide box apparatus with presentations of nonassociative auditory clicks exhibited high initial levels of freezing, followed by head out behavior and culminating in the occurrence of locomotor hyperactivity. In addition, Experiment 4 indicated that without delivery of nonassociative auditory clicks, 0.8 mA footshock stressed rats did not exhibit robust increases in sensitized freezing and locomotor hyperactivity, albeit head out vigilance

  6. Codes of Commitment to Crime and Resistance: Determining Social and Cultural Factors over the Behaviors of Italian Mafia Women.

    PubMed

    Cayli, Baris

    2016-01-02

    This article categorizes thirty-three women in four main Italian Mafia groups and explores social and cultural behaviors of these women. This study introduces the feminist theory of belief and action. The theoretical inquiry investigates the sometimes conflicting behaviors of women when they are subject to systematic oppression. I argue that there is a cultural polarization among the categorized sub-groups. Conservative radicals give their support to the Mafia while defectors and rebels resist the Mafia. After testing the theory, I assert that emancipation of women depends on the strength of their beliefs to perform actions against the Mafiosi culture.

  7. Codes of Commitment to Crime and Resistance: Determining Social and Cultural Factors over the Behaviors of Italian Mafia Women

    PubMed Central

    Cayli, Baris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article categorizes thirty-three women in four main Italian Mafia groups and explores social and cultural behaviors of these women. This study introduces the feminist theory of belief and action. The theoretical inquiry investigates the sometimes conflicting behaviors of women when they are subject to systematic oppression. I argue that there is a cultural polarization among the categorized sub-groups. Conservative radicals give their support to the Mafia while defectors and rebels resist the Mafia. After testing the theory, I assert that emancipation of women depends on the strength of their beliefs to perform actions against the Mafiosi culture. PMID:26806988

  8. Making the best of a bad situation: host partial resistance and bypass of behavioral manipulation by parasites?

    PubMed

    Daoust, Simon P; King, Kayla C; Brodeur, Jacques; Roitberg, Bernard D; Roche, Benjamin; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    With few exceptions, parasitic manipulation dramatically reduces host fitness. That said, evidence of host resistance to behavior-manipulating parasites is scarce. Here, we suggest that the evolution of partial resistance, as well as bypass, to manipulation (PRM and BPM, respectively) represents new, seldom-explored options for parasitized hosts. Natural selection could favor hosts that partially resist certain manipulative dimensions to postpone their death and perform additional reproductive episodes (PRM). Alternatively, manipulated hosts may express novel traits that do not alter the manipulation per se but that alleviate its detrimental fitness consequences (BPM). If effective, PRM and BPM have many implications for the ecology and evolution of hosts and their parasites, especially the evolution of multidimensional manipulations.

  9. Resistive switching behavior of RF magnetron sputtered ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalakshmi, R.; Angappane, S.

    2015-06-24

    The resistive switching characteristics of RF magnetron sputtered zinc oxide thin films have been studied. The x-ray diffraction studies confirm the formation of crystalline ZnO on Pt/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub x}/Si substrate. We have fabricated Cu/ZnO/Pt device using a shadow masking technique for resistive switching study. Our Cu/ZnO/Pt device exhibits a unipolar resistive switching behaviour. The switching observed in our device could be related to oxygen vacancies or Cu ions that generate the conducting filaments responsible for resistive switching. We found HRS to LRS resistance ratio of as high as ∼200 for our Cu/ZnO/Pt device. The higher resistance ratio and stability of Cu/ZnO/Pt device would make our RF magnetron sputtered zinc oxide thin films suitable for non volatile memory applications.

  10. Effect of Al content on impact resistance behavior of Al-Ti-B4C composite fabricated under air atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Liang, Yunhong; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Xiujuan; Ren, Luquan

    2016-12-01

    Reaction behavior, mechanical property and impact resistance of TiC-TiB2/Al composite reacted from Al-Ti-B4C system with various Al content via combination method of combustion synthesis and hot pressed sintering under air was investigated. Al content was the key point to the variation of mechanical property and impact resistance. Increasing Al content could increase the density, strength and toughness of the composite. Due to exorbitant ceramic content, 10wt.% and 20wt.% Al-Ti-B4C composites exhibited poor molding ability and machinability. Flexural strength, fracture toughness, compressive strength and impact toughness of 30-50wt.% Al-Ti-B4C composite were higher than those of Al matrix. The intergranular fracture dispersed and defused impact load and restricted crack extension, enhancing the impact resistance of the composite. The composite with 50wt.% Al content owned highest mechanical properties and impact resistance. The results were useful for the application of TiC-TiB2/Al composite in impact resistance field of ceramic reinforced Al matrix composite.

  11. Differential probing behavior of Blissus insularis (Hemiptera: Blissidae) on resistant and susceptible St. Augustinegrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern chinch bug, Blissus insularis Barber, is a severe pest of St. Augustinegrass throughout the southern United States. Host plant resistance is an environmentally friendly method to manage chinch bug infestations and is increasingly important as the southern chinch bug develops resistance to c...

  12. Effects of three novel resistant black raspberry selections on Amphorophora agathonica feeding behavior and performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host plant resistance is a practical and cost-effective approach for growers to manage insect pests. Recently, three new sources of resistance in black raspberry (selections ORUS 3778-1, ORUS 3817-1, and ORUS 4109-1) against the large raspberry aphid, Amphorophora agathonica, were identified. We stu...

  13. Development of Silica Glass Coatings on 316L SS and Evaluation of its Corrosion Resistance Behavior in Ringer's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, U.; Rajeswari, S.

    2012-12-01

    Sol-gel derived silica glasses have many promising features, including low-temperature preparation as well as chemical and physical stability. Two silica glasses with Si100 and Si80 composition were prepared to understand the factors contributing to the rate of bioactivity. The effects of pH, solution aging temperature, and molar ratio of H2O/tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were studied, and the obtained powder sample was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction studies, and scanning electron microscopy. The synthesized silica glasses were deposited on 316L SS by the spin coating method at the optimized speed of 2000 revolutions per minute. The corrosion resistance behavior of the coatings was determined by (1) open-circuit potential vs time of exposure, (2) electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and (3) cyclic polarization in Ringer's solution. A higher breakdown potential ( E b) and repassivation potential ( E p) value with lower current density was obtained from cyclic polarization. Similar results were observed from impedance analysis with higher charge transfer resistance ( R ct) and lower double layer capacitance ( C dl) indicating the corrosion resistance behavior of the coatings compared with the uncoated 316L stainless steel. From the results, it was observed that both Si100 and Si80 glass coatings had a positive effect on the corrosion resistance behavior. An adhesive strength of 46 MPa and 45 MPa was obtained for the Si100 and Si80 coatings, respectively. An accelerated leach out study was carried out by impressing the potential at their breakdown potential to determine the effect of glass coating for long-term contact between the implant and a normal biological medium.

  14. Modeling and Validation of the Ecological Behavior of Wild-Type Listeria monocytogenes and Stress-Resistant Variants

    PubMed Central

    Metselaar, Karin I.; Abee, Tjakko; den Besten, Heidy M. W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes exhibits a heterogeneous response upon stress exposure which can be partially attributed to the presence of stable stress-resistant variants. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the presence of stress-resistant variants of Listeria monocytogenes and their corresponding trade-offs on population composition under different environmental conditions. A set of stress robustness and growth parameters of the wild type (WT) and an rpsU deletion variant was obtained and used to model their growth behavior under combined mild stress conditions and to model their kinetics under single- and mixed-strain conditions in a simulated food chain. Growth predictions for the WT and the rpsU deletion variant matched the experimental data generally well, although some deviations from the predictions were observed. The data highlighted the influence of the environmental conditions on the ratio between the WT and variant. Prediction of performance in the simulated food chain proved to be challenging. The trend of faster growth and lower stress robustness for the WT than for the rpsU variant in the different steps of the chain was confirmed, but especially for the inactivation steps and the time needed to resume growth after an inactivation step, the experimental data deviated from the model predictions. This report provides insights into the conditions which can select for stress-resistant variants in industrial settings and discusses their potential persistence in food processing environments. IMPORTANCE Listeria monocytogenes exhibits a heterogeneous stress response which can partially be attributed to the presence of genetic variants. These stress-resistant variants survive better under severe conditions but have, on the other hand, a reduced growth rate. To date, the ecological behavior and potential impact of the presence of stress-resistant variants is not fully understood. In this study, we quantitatively assessed growth and inactivation

  15. Unipolar resistive switching behavior of amorphous YCrO{sub 3} films for nonvolatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Yogesh E-mail: rkatiyar@uprrp.edu; Misra, Pankaj; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: rkatiyar@uprrp.edu

    2014-08-28

    Amorphous YCrO{sub 3} (YCO) films were prepared on Pt/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate by pulsed laser deposition in order to investigate resistive switching (RS) phenomenon. The Pt/YCO/Pt device showed stable unipolar RS with resistance ratio of ∼10{sup 5} between low and high resistance states, excellent endurance and retention characteristics, as well as, non-overlapping switching voltages with narrow dispersions. Based on the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature dependent switching characteristics, observed RS was mainly ascribed to the oxygen vacancies. Moreover, current-voltage characteristics of the device in low and high resistance states were described by Ohmic and trap controlled space–charge limited conduction mechanisms, respectively.

  16. Learn to Say Yes! When You Want to Say No! to Create Cooperation Instead of Resistance: Positive Behavior Strategies in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersey, Katharine C.; Masterson, Marie L.

    2011-01-01

    It is human nature to be resistant when someone tells a person no. Children are no exception. Nevertheless, when teachers are frustrated with children's behavior, they may resort to saying no. Often the child responds, "Why?" or resists. What teachers really seek are strategies to help children in preschool and the early primary grades learn how…

  17. Managing Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maag, John W.

    2000-01-01

    This article presents some considerations and ideas for managing students' resistance. They are organized around four topics: the impact of context on behavior, the importance of being comprehensive and nonrestrictive in behavior, the adaptive function of resistant behavior, and the benefit of joining children in their frame of reference.…

  18. Adolescent self-regulation as resilience: resistance to antisocial behavior within the deviant peer context.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Theodore W; Dishion, Thomas J; Connell, Arin M

    2008-02-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that self-regulation serves as a resiliency factor in buffering youth from negative influences of peer deviance in middle to late adolescence. The interactive effects between peer deviance and self-regulation were investigated on change in antisocial behavior from age 17 to 19 years in an ethnically diverse sample of adolescents. A multi-agent construct was created using adolescent, parent, and teacher reports of self-regulation and peer deviance. Results indicated that self-regulation shows convergent validity and covaries as expected with developmental patterns of adolescent antisocial behavior. Self-regulation moderated the association of peer deviance with later self-reported adolescent antisocial behavior after controlling for prior levels of antisocial behavior. The implications of these findings for models for the development of antisocial behaviors and for intervention science are discussed.

  19. Impact of Treatments for Depression on Comorbid Anxiety, Attentional, and Behavioral Symptoms in Adolescents with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Resistant Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Robert C.; Rengasamy, Manivel; Mansoor, Brandon; He, Jiayan; Mayes, Taryn; Emslie, Graham J.; Porta, Giovanna; Clarke, Greg N.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Birmaher, Boris; Keller, Martin B.; Ryan, Neal; Shamseddeen, Wael; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Brent, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relative efficacy of antidepressant medication, alone and in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), on comorbid symptoms of anxiety, attention, and disruptive behavior disorders in participants in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial. Method: Adolescents with selective serotonin…

  20. Corrosion resistance and antithrombogenic behavior of La and Nd ion implanted stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, F. J.; Jin, F. Y.; Liu, Y. W.; Wan, G. J.; Liu, X. M.; Zhao, X. B.; Fu, R. K. Y.; Leng, Y. X.; Huang, N.; Chu, Paul K.

    2006-09-15

    Lanthanide ions such as lanthanum (La) and neodymium (Nd) were implanted into 316 stainless steel samples using metal vapor vacuum arc to improve the surface corrosion resistance and antithrombogenic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that lanthanum and neodymium exist in the +3 oxidation state in the surface layer. The corrosion properties of the implanted and untreated control samples were investigated utilizing electrochemical tests and our results show that La and Nd implantations enhance the surface corrosion resistance. In vitro activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) tests were used to evaluate the antithrombogenic properties. The APTT time of the implanted samples was observed to be prolonged compared to that of the unimplanted stainless steel control. La and Nd ion implantations can be used to improve the surface corrosion resistance and biomedical properties of 316 stainless steels.

  1. Intrinsic and interfacial effect of electrode metals on the resistive switching behaviors of zinc oxide films.

    PubMed

    Xue, W H; Xiao, W; Shang, J; Chen, X X; Zhu, X J; Pan, L; Tan, H W; Zhang, W B; Ji, Z H; Liu, G; Xu, X-H; Ding, J; Li, R-W

    2014-10-24

    Exploring the role of electrode metals on the resistive switching properties of metal electrode/oxide/metal electrode sandwiched structures provides not only essential information to understand the underlying switching mechanism of the devices, but also useful guidelines for the optimization of the switching performance. A systematic study has been performed to investigate the influence of electrodes on the resistive switching characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) films in this contribution, in terms of both the intrinsic and interfacial effects. It has been found that the low-resistance state resistances (Ω(LRS)) of all the investigated devices are below 50 Ω, which can be attributed to the formation of highly conductive channels throughout the ZnO films. On the other hand, the high-resistance state resistances (Ω(HRS)) depend on the electronegativity and ionic size of the employed electrode metals. Devices with electrode metals of high electronegativity and large ionic size possess high Ω(HRS) values, while those with electrode metals of low electronegativity and small ionic size carry low Ω(HRS) values. A similar trend of the set voltages has also been observed, while the reset voltages are all distributed in a narrow range close to ±0.5 V. Moreover, the forming voltages of the switching devices strongly depend on the roughness of the metal/ZnO and/or ZnO/metal interface. The present work provides essential information for better understanding the switching mechanism of zinc oxide based devices, and benefits the rational selection of proper electrode metals for the device performance optimization.

  2. Fault current limiter-predominantly resistive behavior of a BSCCO shielded-core reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, M. G.; Tobin, T. J.; Cha, Y. S.; Hull, J. R.

    2000-06-30

    Tests were conducted to determine the electrical and magnetic characteristics of a superconductor shielded core reactor (SSCR). The results show that a closed-core SSCR is predominantly a resistive device and an open-core SSCR is a hybrid resistive/inductive device. The open-core SSCR appears to dissipate less than the closed-core SSCR. However, the impedance of the open-core SSCR is less than that of the closed-core SSCR. Magnetic and thermal diffusion are believed to be the mechanism that facilitates the penetration of the superconductor tube under fault conditions.

  3. Individual Differences in Resistance-To-Temptation Behavior in Adolescents: An Eysenck Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Voie, Joseph C.

    1973-01-01

    Contrary to Eysenck's predictions, neither introversion-extraversion nor level of anxiety, as measured on two separate scales, correlated significantly with the Resistance-to-Temptation measures, which suggests that conditionability in punishment is associated minimally with level of RTT. (Author)

  4. Quasi-static puncture resistance behaviors of high-strength polyester fabric for soft body armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiu-Shi; Sun, Run-Jun; Tian, Xiao; Yao, Mu; Feng, Yan

    A series of economical and flexible fabrics were prepared using high-strength polyester yarns with different fabric structures, weft density and number of layers. The effect of these factors on quasi-static puncture resistance was comparatively studied. The failure mode of the fabrics was analyzed with SEM photographs. Findings indicate that the structure and the weft density affected the quasi-static puncture resistance property of the fabrics, the plain fabrics had better puncture resistance property than twill and satin fabrics. The max puncture force and puncture energy of the plain fabrics with 160 yarn/10 cm reached the max values which were 107.43 N and 0.44 J, respectively. The number of layers had a linear relationship to quasi-static puncture resistance. The contact pressure and friction of the probe against the fibers were the main hindrance during the quasi-static puncture process and the breakage of the fibers during the penetration was caused by the bend and tensile deformation.

  5. Exaggerated acquisition and resistance to extinction of avoidance behavior in treated heroin-dependent males

    PubMed Central

    Sheynin, Jony; Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Beck, Kevin D.; Servatius, Richard J.; Casbolt, Peter A.; Haber, Paul; Elsayed, Mahmoud; Hogarth, Lee; Myers, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Addiction is often conceptualized as a behavioral strategy for avoiding negative experiences. In rodents, opioid intake has been associated with abnormal acquisition and extinction of avoidance behavior. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these findings would generalize to human opioid-dependent subjects. Method Adults meeting DSM-IV criteria for heroin-dependence and treated with opioid medication (n=27), and healthy controls (n=26), were recruited between March–October 2013 and given a computer-based task to assess avoidance behavior. On this task, subjects controlled a spaceship and could either gain points by shooting an enemy spaceship, or hide in safe areas to avoid on-screen aversive events. Results While groups did not differ on escape responding (hiding) during the aversive event, heroin-dependent males (but not females) made more avoidance responses during a warning signal that predicted the aversive event (ANOVA, sex × group interaction, p=0.007). This group was also slower to extinguish the avoidance response when the aversive event no longer followed the warning signal (p=0.011). This behavioral pattern resulted in reduced opportunity to obtain reward without reducing risk of punishment. Results suggest that differences in avoidance behavior cannot be easily explained by impaired task performance or by exaggerated motor activity in male patients. Conclusion This study provides evidence for abnormal acquisition and extinction of avoidance behavior in opioid-dependent patients. Interestingly, data suggest abnormal avoidance is demonstrated only by male patients. Findings shed light on cognitive and behavioral manifestations of opioid addiction, and may facilitate development of therapeutic approaches to help affected individuals. PMID:27046310

  6. Adolescent alcohol exposure reduces behavioral flexibility, promotes disinhibition, and increases resistance to extinction of ethanol self-administration in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Gass, Justin T; Glen, William Bailey; McGonigal, Justin T; Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Lopez, Marcelo F; Randall, Patrick K; Yaxley, Richard; Floresco, Stan B; Chandler, L Judson

    2014-10-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a brain region that is critically involved in cognitive function and inhibitory control of behavior, and adolescence represents an important period of continued PFC development that parallels the maturation of these functions. Evidence suggests that this period of continued development of the PFC may render it especially vulnerable to environmental insults that impact PFC function in adulthood. Experimentation with alcohol typically begins during adolescence when binge-like consumption of large quantities is common. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated cycles of adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE) exposure (postnatal days 28-42) by vapor inhalation on different aspects of executive functioning in the adult rat. In an operant set-shifting task, AIE-exposed rats exhibited deficits in their ability to shift their response strategy when the rules of the task changed, indicating reduced behavioral flexibility. There were no differences in progressive ratio response for the reinforcer suggesting that AIE did not alter reinforcer motivation. Examination of performance on the elevated plus maze under conditions designed to minimize stress revealed that AIE exposure enhanced the number of entries into the open arms, which may reflect either reduced anxiety and/or disinhibition of exploratory-like behavior. In rats that trained to self-administer ethanol in an operant paradigm, AIE increased resistance to extinction of ethanol-seeking behavior. This resistance to extinction was reversed by positive allosteric modulation of mGluR5 during extinction training, an effect that is thought to reflect promotion of extinction learning mechanisms within the medial PFC. Consistent with this, CDPPB was also observed to reverse the deficits in behavioral flexibility. Finally, diffusion tensor imaging with multivariate analysis of 32 brain areas revealed that while there were no differences in the total brain volume, the volume of

  7. Corrosion resistance and behavior of construction materials exposed to dilute sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures under static conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.

    1994-10-01

    Laboratory investigation has been undertaken to determine the electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of various construction materials in a simulated hydrolysis environment (5 wt % sulfuric acid) at temperatures ranging from 90 to 220C. Tests were performed in an autoclave-type electrochemical cell. The corrosion behavior of the test materials was determined using computer-controlled DC potentiodynamic polarization. Corrosion rates of the test materials were determined using AC impedance techniques. Among the stainless steels tested, only alloy N08026 (Carpenter 20Mo-6) performed satisfactory up to a temperature of 100C. The alloy passivated spontaneously in the environment and corroded at a rate of less than 2 mpy. None of the stainless steels tested could be used at 120{degrees}C or above. A number of nickel-based alloys tested had good corrosion resistance up to 100C, but their corrosion rate exceeded 2 mpy at higher temperatures. Zirconium alloys were satisfactory up to 180C. Only tantalum and a tantalum-niobium alloy were satisfactory up to 220C.

  8. Abnormal Osmotic Avoidance Behavior in C. elegans Is Associated with Increased Hypertonic Stress Resistance and Improved Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine C.; Kim, Heejung; Ditano, Jennifer; Manion, Dacie; King, Benjamin L.; Strange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Protein function is controlled by the cellular proteostasis network. Proteostasis is energetically costly and those costs must be balanced with the energy needs of other physiological functions. Hypertonic stress causes widespread protein damage in C. elegans. Suppression and management of protein damage is essential for optimal survival under hypertonic conditions. ASH chemosensory neurons allow C. elegans to detect and avoid strongly hypertonic environments. We demonstrate that mutations in osm-9 and osm-12 that disrupt ASH mediated hypertonic avoidance behavior or genetic ablation of ASH neurons are associated with enhanced survival during hypertonic stress. Improved survival is not due to altered systemic volume homeostasis or organic osmolyte accumulation. Instead, we find that osm-9(ok1677) mutant and osm-9(RNAi) worms exhibit reductions in hypertonicity induced protein damage in non-neuronal cells suggesting that enhanced proteostasis capacity may account for improved hypertonic stress resistance in worms with defects in osmotic avoidance behavior. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes that play roles in managing protein damage are upregulated in osm-9(ok1677) worms. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work demonstrating that intercellular communication between neuronal and non-neuronal cells plays a critical role in integrating cellular stress resistance with other organismal physiological demands and associated energy costs. PMID:27111894

  9. Annealing behavior of Cu and dilute Cu-alloy films: Precipitation, grain growth, and resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, K.; Gungor, A.; Cabral, C.; Harper, J. M. E.

    2003-08-01

    The impact of 11 alloying elements, namely, Mg, Ti, In, Sn, Al, Ag, Co, Nb, and B, at two nominal concentrations of 1 and 3 at. %, and Ir and W, at only a nominal concentration of 3 at. %, on the resistivity and grain structure of copper was investigated. The films were electron beam evaporated onto thermally oxidized Si wafers and had thicknesses in the range of 420-560 nm. Pure evaporated Cu films were used as controls. Isothermal anneals were carried out at 400 °C for 5 h; constant-heating rate treatments, with no hold at the temperature, were done at 3 °C to 650 and 950 °C. In all cases, annealing resulted in the lowering of resistivity compared with the as-deposited state. Furthermore, annealing to a higher temperature resulted in lower, postannealing, room-temperature resistivity, unless the film agglomerated or showed evidence of solute redissolution. Annealing also resulted in significant growth of grains, except for the Nb- and W-containing films. In addition, the grain sizes for the nominally 3 at. %, 400 °C-annealed films were smaller than those for the nominally 1.0 at. % films. The interesting exceptions in this case were the Co-containing films, which had a larger grain size than the pure Cu film, and which, in addition, exhibited a larger grain size for the film with the higher concentration of Co. After the 400 °C anneal, Cu(0.4B) and Cu(1.0Ag) had the lowest resistivities at 2.0 and 2.1 μΩ cm, respectively, and Cu(2.8Co) showed the largest average grain size at 1080 nm. The resistivity and grain size for the pure Cu film after the same anneal were 2.0 μΩ cm and 790 nm, respectively. Precipitation of a second phase was observed in 8 of 20 alloy films annealed at 400 °C. No alloy film simultaneously showed the combination of a low resistivity and a larger grain size than pure Cu.

  10. Competing mechanisms in the wear resistance behavior of biomineralized rod-like microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar de Obaldia, Enrique; Herrera, Steven; Grunenfelder, Lessa Kay; Kisailus, David; Zavattieri, Pablo

    2016-11-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties observed in biological composite materials relative to those of their individual constituents distinguish them from common engineering materials. Some naturally occurring high-performance ceramics, like the external veneer of the Chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri) tooth, have been shown to have superior hardness and impressive abrasion resistance properties. The mechanical performance of the chiton tooth has been attributed to a hierarchical arrangement of nanostructured magnetite rods surrounded with organic material. While nanoindentation tests provide useful information about the overall performance of this biological composite, understanding the key microstructural features and energy dissipation mechanisms at small scales remains a challenging task. We present a combined experimental/numerical approach to elucidate the role of material deformation in the rods, debonding at the rod interfaces and the influence of energy dissipation mechanisms on the ability of the microstructure to distribute damage under extreme loading conditions. We employ a 3D finite element-based micromechanical model to simulate the nanoindentation tests performed in geological magnetite and cross-sections of the chiton tooth. This proposed model is capable of capturing the inelastic deformation of the rods and the failure of their interfaces, while damage, fracture and fragmentation of the mineralized rods is assessed using a probabilistic function. Our results show that these natural materials achieve their abrasion resistant properties by controlling the interface strength between rods, alleviating the tensile stress on the rods near the indentation tip and therefore decreasing the probability of catastrophic failure without significantly sacrificing resistance to penetration. The understanding of these competing energy dissipating mechanisms provides a path to the prediction of new combination of materials. In turns, these results suggest certain

  11. Age-related changes in pumping mechanical behavior of rat ventricle in terms of systolic elastance and resistance.

    PubMed

    Chang, K C; Peng, Y I; Dai, S H; Tseng, Y Z

    2000-09-01

    Both the maximal systolic elastance (Emax) and the theoretical maximal flow (Qmax) can quantify the systolic mechanical behavior of the ventricular pump. Physically, Emax can reflect the intrinsic contractility of the myocardium as an intact heart. The quantity in (Qmax is inversely related to the internal resistance of the left ventricle. How great the effects of age are on these Emax and Qmax has never been examined, however. This study was to determine the ventricular pumping mechanics in terms of the systolic elastance and resistance in male Fischer rats at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of age. We measured left ventricular (LV) pressure and ascending aortic flow waves using a high-fidelity pressure sensor and an electromagnetic flow probe, respectively. Those two parameters that characterize the systolic pumping mechanics of the left ventricle are obtained by making use of an elastance-resistance model. The basic hemodynamic condition in those animals with different ages is characterized by (i) no significant change in cardiac output and (ii) a decrease in basal heart rate, LV end-systolic pressure, as well as effective arterial volume elastance. Changes that take place in the left ventricle with age include a decline in Emax and an increase in Qmax especially at 24 months. These results demonstrate that the impaired intrinsic contractility of an aging heart may be compensated to some extent by the diminished ventricular internal resistance. Such compensation in aging rats may maintain normal blood flow essential for the metabolic needs of tissues and/or organs before heart dysfunction and failure occur.

  12. Adolescent Self-Regulation as Resilience: Resistance to Antisocial Behavior within the Deviant Peer Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Theodore W.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Connell, Arin M.

    2008-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that self-regulation serves as a resiliency factor in buffering youth from negative influences of peer deviance in middle to late adolescence. The interactive effects between peer deviance and self-regulation were investigated on change in antisocial behavior from age 17 to 19 years in an ethnically diverse sample…

  13. Pedagogical Formation Students' Resistance Behaviors towards Teaching-Learning Processes and Their Moral Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argon, Türkan; Sezen-Gültekin, Gözde

    2016-01-01

    Moral maturity, defined as the competence in moral emotions, thoughts, judgments, attitudes and behaviors, is one of the most important qualities that the would-be teachers at Faculties of Education must possess. Teachers with moral maturity will train students with the qualities of reliability, responsibility, fairness, objectivity, consistency…

  14. Improving the seismic torsional behavior of plan-asymmetric, single-storey, concrete moment resisting buildings with fluid viscous dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rofooei, Fayaz Rahimzadeh; Mohammadzadeh, Sahar

    2016-03-01

    The optimal distribution of fluid viscous dampers (FVD) in controlling the seismic response of eccentric, single-storey, moment resisting concrete structures is investigated using the previously defined center of damping constant (CDC). For this purpose, a number of structural models with different one-way stiffness and strength eccentricities are considered. Extensive nonlinear time history analyses are carried out for various arrangements of FVDs. It is shown that the arrangement of FVDs for controlling the torsional behavior due to asymmetry in the concrete structures is very dependent on the intensity of the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and the extent of the structural stiffness and strength eccentricities. The results indicate that, in the linear range of structural behavior the stiffness eccentricity es which is the main parameter in determining the location of optimal CDC, is found to be less or smaller than the optimal damping constant eccentricity e*d, i.e., |e*d| > |es|. But, in the nonlinear range of structural behavior where the strength eccentricity er is the dominant factor in determining the location of optimal CDC, |e*d| > |er|. It is also concluded that for the majority of the plan-asymmetric, concrete structures considered in this study with er ≠ 0, the optimal CDC approaches the center of mass as er decreases.

  15. Modified Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Severe, Treatment-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in an Adolescent With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Georgina; Murray, Kim; Jassi, Amita

    2016-11-01

    There is a high rate of comorbidity between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Standard cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) protocols have been shown to be less effective in treating OCD in young people with ASD than in typically developing youth. This case study describes the treatment of an adolescent boy with severe, treatment-resistant OCD and ASD using a modified CBT approach. Modifications to a standard evidence-based CBT for OCD protocol included extended psychoeducation about anxiety; regular home-based sessions; and increased involvement of systems, including family and school. Multi-informant outcome data indicated significant improvements in OCD symptoms over the course of treatment with gains being maintained over a 12-month follow-up period. These findings demonstrate the potential efficacy of modified CBT for pediatric OCD in the context of ASD.

  16. In-situ observation of self-regulated switching behavior in WO{sub 3-x} based resistive switching devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, D. S.; Wang, W. X.; Chen, Y. S. Sun, J. R.; Shen, B. G.

    2014-09-15

    The transmittance of tungsten oxides can be adjusted by oxygen vacancy (V{sub o}) concentration due to its electrochromic property. Here, we report an in-situ observation of resistive switching phenomenon in the oxygen-deficient WO{sub 3-x} planar devices. Besides directly identifying the formation/rupture of dark-colored conductive filaments in oxide layer, the stripe-like WO{sub 3-x} device demonstrated self-regulated switching behavior during the endurance testing, resulting in highly consistent switching parameters after a stabilizing process. For very high V{sub o}s mobility was demonstrated in the WO{sub 3-x} film by the pulse experiment, we suggested that the electric-field-induced homogeneous migration of V{sub o}s was the physical origin for such unique switching characteristics.

  17. Mutant Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter in Hodeidah, Yemen: association with parasitologic indices and treatment-seeking behaviors.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Farag, Hoda F; Allam, Amal F; Shawky, Sherine M; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M

    2013-12-01

    Malaria still represents a major health problem in Yemen, particularly in Hodeidah, despite continuing efforts to eliminate it. With the absence of clinically proven vaccines, chemotherapy with antimalarials is still greatly needed. Chloroquine (CQ) has been popular as the drug of choice for malaria control. However, Plasmodium falciparum resistance to CQ has been one of the main obstacles in malaria control and elimination. Although CQ is no longer the recommended antimalarial chemotherapy, it has remained the number one over-the-counter antimalarial drug in many endemic areas, including Yemen, and is still used for self-medication. In addition, promising reports on CQ efficacy reversal in many African countries brought it again into the scene. This has led to a growing interest in the possibility of its re-introduction, particularly with the concerns raised about the parasite resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the present study aimed at analyzing the CQ-associated pfcrt 76T mutation in P. falciparum isolates from patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Hodeidah, west of Yemen. The association of treatment-seeking behaviors and antimalarial drug use with the pfcrt 76T mutant allele was also studied. It was revealed that there is still a sustained high frequency of this molecular marker among parasite isolates associated with younger age, decreased parasite density and the presence of gametocytes in blood. Delay in seeking treatment and frequent use of antimalarials were the behaviors significantly associated with the presence of the pfcrt 76T mutant allele among patients reporting a history of malaria treatment.

  18. Analysis of corrosion resistance behavior of inhibitors in concrete using electrochemical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ha-Won; Saraswathy, Velu

    2006-08-01

    Reinforced concrete is one of the most durable and cost effective construction materials. However, in high chloride environments, it can suffer from corrosion due to chloride induced breakdown of the normal passive layer protecting the reinforcing steel bars inside concrete. One means of protecting embedded steel reinforcement from chloride induced corrosion is the addition of corrosion inhibiting admixtures. In the present investigation, various inhibitors such as sodium nitrite, zinc oxide, mono ethanol amine, diethanolamine, and triethanol amine have been used in concrete in different percentages. Their effectiveness was then studied using various electrochemical techniques such as rapid chloride ion penetration test, open circuit potential measurement, electrochemical impedance measurement, potentiodynamic polarization measurement, and gravimetric weight loss measurement. The results thus obtained indicate that the addition of inhibitors enhances the corrosion resistance properties.

  19. Radiation degradation behavior of chlorine-containing vinyl copolymers. Search for improved electron-beam resists

    SciTech Connect

    Helbert, J.N.; Poindexter, E.H.; Pittman, C.U. Jr.; Chen, C.Y.

    1980-06-01

    Vinyl copolymers with high radiation degradation sensitivity have been synthesized by copolymerizing vinylidene chloride (VDC), CH/sub 2/ = CCl/sub 2/, with methyl methacrylate (MMA), methacrylonitrile, methyl ..cap alpha..-chloroacrylate, and dimethyl itaconate using emulsion techniques. In addition, copolymers of methyl ..cap alpha..-chloroacrylate with methyl methacrylate and poly(..cap alpha..-chloroacrylonitrile) were studied. Introduction of vinylidene chloride into methyl methacrylate polymers caused a sharp increase in G/sub s/ even at relatively low VDC incorporation. Upon 29% VDC incorporation, the G/sub s/ value increased from 1.3 (homopolymer of MMA) to 3.4. G/sub s/ was found to be a linear function of copolymer content for several systems, but G/sub x/ was not. At higher VDC levels, the increase in G/sub s/ was countered by increases in G/sub x/. At lower VDC levels, G/sub x/ was suppressed below the values predicted by a linear G/sub x/ dependence on composition for such systems as VDC/MMA, MCA/MMA, and ..cap alpha..-chloroacrylonitrile/MMA. The VDC/MMA copolymer (29% VDC) gave a sensitivity of 4.0 x 10/sup -5/ C/cm/sup 2/ to electron beam exposure using the 0% unexposed resist thickness loss criterion and is 2 to 3 times more sensitive than PMMA. Poly(..cap alpha..-chloroacrylonitrile) is a negative resist with a sensitivity of 5 x 10/sup -5/ C/cm/sup 2/ using one-micron line images for testing.

  20. Behavior of an improved Zr fuel cladding with oxidation resistant coating under loss-of-coolant accident conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong Jun; Kim, Hyun Gil; Jung, Yang Il; Park, Jung Hwan; Yang, Jae Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates protective coatings for improving the high temperature oxidation resistance of Zr fuel claddings for light water nuclear reactors. FeCrAl alloy and Cr layers were deposited onto Zr plates and tubes using cold spraying. For the FeCrAl/Zr system, a Mo layer was introduced between the FeCrAl coating and the Zr matrix to prevent inter-diffusion at high temperatures. Both the FeCrAl and Cr coatings improved the oxidation resistance compared to that of the uncoated Zr alloy when exposed to a steam environment at 1200 °C. The ballooning behavior and mechanical properties of the coated cladding samples were studied under simulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The coated samples showed higher burst temperatures, lower circumferential strain, and smaller rupture openings compared to the uncoated Zr. Although 4-point bend tests of the coated samples showed a small increase in the maximum load, ring compression tests of a sectioned sample showed increased ductility.

  1. Dependence of Precipitation Behavior and Creep Strength on Cr Content in High Cr Ferritic Heat Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Koji; Morinaga, Masahiko; Hara, Toru; Miki, Kazuhiro; Azuma, Tsukasa; Ishiguro, Toru; Hashizume, Ryokichi

    It is known that high temperature tensile strength increases with increasing Cr content in Cr containing heat resistant steels. Recently, however, it was found that long-term creep strength decreased with increasing Cr content in the heat resistant steels containing 8.5-12%Cr. In this study, precipitation behavior of M23C6 carbide and the Z phase after creep tests was investigated using two kinds of high Cr ferritic steels (9Cr and 10.5Cr). As a result, 10.5Cr steel exhibited larger average particle size of M23C6 than 9Cr steel irrespective of creep stress levels, but the amount of M23C6 carbide was almost the same in both steels. On the other hand, the amount of the Z phase became large in 10.5Cr steel compared with 9Cr steel. These experimental results indicate that high level of Cr content accelerates precipitation and coalescence rate of both M23C6 carbide and the Z phase, resulting in degradation of long term creep strength in 10.5 Cr steel compared to 9Cr steel.

  2. Enhanced superconductivity, Kondo behavior, and negative-curvature resistivity of oxygen-irradiated thin films of aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnecker, E. H. C. P.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; ElMassalami, M.

    2017-02-01

    We followed the evolution of the normal and superconducting properties of Al thin films after each session of various successive oxygen irradiations at ambient temperature. Such irradiated films, similar to the granular ones, exhibit enhanced superconductivity, Kondo behavior, and negative-curvature resistivity. Two distinct roles of oxygen are identified: as a damage-causing projectile and as an implanted oxidizing agent. The former gives rise to the processes involved in the conventional recovery stages. The latter, considered within the context of the Cabrera-Mott model, gives rise to a multistep process which involves charges transfer and creation of stabilized vacancies and charged defects. Based on the outcome of this multistep process, we consider (i) the negative-curvature resistivity as a manifestation of a thermally assisted liberation of trapped electric charges, (ii) the Kondo contribution as a spin-flip scattering from paramagnetic, color-center-type defects, and (iii) the enhancement of Tc as being due to a lattice softening facilitated by the stabilized defects and vacancies. The similarity in the phase diagrams of granular and irradiated films as well as the aging effects are discussed along the same line of reasoning.

  3. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  4. Elevated temperature annealing behaviors of bulk resistivity and space charge density (Neff) of neutron irradiated silicon detectors and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Z., Li

    1996-02-01

    The bulk resistivity of neutron irradiated detector grade silicon material has been measured under the condition of no or low electrical filed (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) after elevated temperature (T = 110°C) anneals (ETA). The ENB resistivity (ρ) for as-irradiated silicon material increases with neutron fluence at low fluences (Φn > 1013 n/cm2). The saturation of the ENB resistivity near the intrinsic value can be explained by the near perfect compensation of all neutron induced deep donors and acceptors in the ENB. After ETA, it has been observed that ρ increases with annealing time for silicon materials irradiated below the saturation and decreases with annealing time for those irradiated after saturation. For those irradiated near the saturation point, ρ increases with annealing time initially and decreases thereafter. This ETA behavior of ρ may be explained by the increase of net acceptor-like deep levels in silicon during the anneal, qualitatively consistent with the observed reverse annealing effect of the space charge density (Neff) in silicon detectors which is an increase of negative space charge density (acceptors) after long term room temperature (RTA) anneal and/or ETA. However, the amount of the increase of net hole concentration (p) of about 5 × 1011 cm-3, corresponding to 20 hours of ETA at 110°C for a fluence of 1.5 × 1014 n/cm2, is still much less than the corresponding increase of Neff of about 1.5 × 1013 cm-3. This suggests that while the ETA restores some of the free carrier concentration (namely holes), there is still a large degree of compensation. The space charge density is still dominated by the deep levels and Neff ≠ p.

  5. A Physiological and Behavioral Mechanism for Leaf Herbivore-Induced Systemic Root Resistance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Matthias; Robert, Christelle A.M.; Marti, Guillaume; Lu, Jing; Doyen, Gwladys R.; Villard, Neil; Barrière, Yves; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Turlings, Ted C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Indirect plant-mediated interactions between herbivores are important drivers of community composition in terrestrial ecosystems. Among the most striking examples are the strong indirect interactions between spatially separated leaf- and root-feeding insects sharing a host plant. Although leaf feeders generally reduce the performance of root herbivores, little is known about the underlying systemic changes in root physiology and the associated behavioral responses of the root feeders. We investigated the consequences of maize (Zea mays) leaf infestation by Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars for the root-feeding larvae of the beetle Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, a major pest of maize. D. virgifera strongly avoided leaf-infested plants by recognizing systemic changes in soluble root components. The avoidance response occurred within 12 h and was induced by real and mimicked herbivory, but not wounding alone. Roots of leaf-infested plants showed altered patterns in soluble free and soluble conjugated phenolic acids. Biochemical inhibition and genetic manipulation of phenolic acid biosynthesis led to a complete disappearance of the avoidance response of D. virgifera. Furthermore, bioactivity-guided fractionation revealed a direct link between the avoidance response of D. virgifera and changes in soluble conjugated phenolic acids in the roots of leaf-attacked plants. Our study provides a physiological mechanism for a behavioral pattern that explains the negative effect of leaf attack on a root-feeding insect. Furthermore, it opens up the possibility to control D. virgifera in the field by genetically mimicking leaf herbivore-induced changes in root phenylpropanoid patterns. PMID:26430225

  6. Cold resistance depends on acclimation and behavioral caste in a temperate ant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modlmeier, Andreas P.; Pamminger, Tobias; Foitzik, Susanne; Scharf, Inon

    2012-10-01

    Adjusting to low temperatures is important for animals living in cold environments. We studied the chill-coma recovery time in temperate ant workers ( Temnothorax nylanderi) from colonies collected in autumn and spring in Germany. We experimentally acclimated these ant colonies to cold temperatures followed by warm temperatures. As expected, cold-acclimated workers recovered faster from freezing temperatures, but subsequent heat acclimation did not change the short recovery times observed after cold acclimation. Hence, either heat acclimation improves cold tolerance, possibly as a general response to stress, or at least it does not negate enhanced cold tolerance following cold acclimation. Colonies collected in spring showed similar cold tolerance levels to cold-acclimated colonies in the laboratory. Next, we compared the chill-coma recovery time of different worker castes and found that exterior workers recovered faster than interior workers. This difference may be related to their more frequent exposure to cold, higher activity level, or distinct physiology. Interior workers were also heavier and showed a higher gaster-to-head ratio and thorax ratio compared to exterior workers. An obvious difference between exterior and interior workers is activity level, but we found no link between activity and cold tolerance. This suggests that physiology rather than behavioral differences could cause the increased cold tolerance of exterior workers. Our study reveals the importance of acclimation for cold tolerance under natural and standardized conditions and demonstrates differences in cold tolerance and body dimensions in monomorphic behavioral castes of an ant.

  7. A Physiological and Behavioral Mechanism for Leaf Herbivore-Induced Systemic Root Resistance.

    PubMed

    Erb, Matthias; Robert, Christelle A M; Marti, Guillaume; Lu, Jing; Doyen, Gwladys R; Villard, Neil; Barrière, Yves; French, B Wade; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Turlings, Ted C J; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Indirect plant-mediated interactions between herbivores are important drivers of community composition in terrestrial ecosystems. Among the most striking examples are the strong indirect interactions between spatially separated leaf- and root-feeding insects sharing a host plant. Although leaf feeders generally reduce the performance of root herbivores, little is known about the underlying systemic changes in root physiology and the associated behavioral responses of the root feeders. We investigated the consequences of maize (Zea mays) leaf infestation by Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars for the root-feeding larvae of the beetle Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, a major pest of maize. D. virgifera strongly avoided leaf-infested plants by recognizing systemic changes in soluble root components. The avoidance response occurred within 12 h and was induced by real and mimicked herbivory, but not wounding alone. Roots of leaf-infested plants showed altered patterns in soluble free and soluble conjugated phenolic acids. Biochemical inhibition and genetic manipulation of phenolic acid biosynthesis led to a complete disappearance of the avoidance response of D. virgifera. Furthermore, bioactivity-guided fractionation revealed a direct link between the avoidance response of D. virgifera and changes in soluble conjugated phenolic acids in the roots of leaf-attacked plants. Our study provides a physiological mechanism for a behavioral pattern that explains the negative effect of leaf attack on a root-feeding insect. Furthermore, it opens up the possibility to control D. virgifera in the field by genetically mimicking leaf herbivore-induced changes in root phenylpropanoid patterns.

  8. Eating-related Behaviors and Appetite During Energy Imbalance in Obese-Prone and Obese-Resistant Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Elizabeth A.; Bechtell, Jaime L.; Vestal, Brian E.; Johnson, Susan L.; Bessesen, Daniel H.; Tregellas, Jason R.; Cornier, Marc-Andre

    2013-01-01

    While the majority of Americans are now overweight, some individuals maintain their weight with minimal effort. This study investigated behavioral differences between 58 individuals recruited as either obese-resistant (OR) or obese-prone (OP) based on self-identification, BMI, and personal/family weight history. Subjects were studied during Eucaloric (EU), Overfed (OF), and Underfed (UF) phases which included a run-in diet, 1 day intervention diet, and a study day. At baseline, subjects completed the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) and Power of Food Scale (PFS). On the study day, ratings of appetite, food appeal and desire, and food cravings were performed in response to a breakfast shake. OF resulted in reduced hunger and food desire while UF resulted in increased hunger and food appeal and desire. While hunger did not differ between groups, OP had higher scores for TFEQ measures (hunger, restraint and disinhibition), higher “hedonic hunger” as measured by the PFS, and greater food cravings and ratings of food appeal and desire. These results suggest that subjective hunger and desire for food change significantly after only one day of over- or underfeeding. Additionally, we found several behavioral differences between groups that are likely to promote weight gain over time in the OP. PMID:23402714

  9. Electrical Resistance Imaging for Evaluation of Soil-Water Behavior in Desert Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, J. R.; Perkins, K. S.; Schmidt, K. M.; Miller, D. M.; Stock, J. D.; Singha, K.

    2009-05-01

    As part of an effort to evaluate habitat types in the Mojave National Preserve, we conducted infiltration/redistribution experiments to investigate unsaturated hydraulic properties and soil-water dynamics. Two investigated locations contrasted sharply in degree of pedogenic development: (1) recently deposited sediments in an active wash and (2) a highly developed soil of late Pleistocene age. Water flow through these materials may be strongly influenced by such features as biotic crusts, vesicular horizons, textural variations, calcic horizons, preferential flow paths, and other forms of vertical and lateral spatial variability. In each location we ponded water in a 1-m-diameter infiltration ring for 2.3 h, generating 1.93 m of infiltration in the active wash and 0.52 m in the Pleistocene soil. Combining input flux data with quantitative knowledge of water content and soil water pressure over space and time provides a basis for estimating soil hydraulic properties. TDR probes and tensiometers, placed outside but within a few m of the infiltration pond at depths to 1.5 m, provided subsurface hydraulic data. In addition to probe measurements, we conducted electrical resistance imaging (ERI) measurements during the infiltration period and for six days of redistribution. Electrodes were in two crossed lines at the surface, 24 in each, at 0.5 m spacing. On each line data were collected over an eight- minute period using a hybrid geometry, with 0 to 6 electrodes skipped between those used for the measurement. Relative change in the inverted resistivities relates to relative change in soil water content. Spatially exhaustive and minimally invasive characterization is valuable because of the extreme difficulty of quantifying soil-moisture distribution over a broad heterogeneous area using a set of individual probes. Soil moisture data directly under the ponded area are especially important, and ERI was our only means for such measurements because probe installation would

  10. Multimodal behavioral treatment of nonrepetitive, treatment-resistant nightmares: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Barry A

    2004-12-01

    A 23-yr.-old young woman presenting with a 17-yr. history of nightmares was treated with a variety of behavioral and self-regulatory techniques. The nightmares were unusual in that they did not have an obviously common theme as in most published reports, and, therefore, did not readily lend themselves to several frequently used techniques. Although previous treatment episodes had not affected the incidence of the nightmares, a combination of relaxation procedures, a mnemonic to increase lucid dreaming, and dream rehearsal upon waking from a nightmare resulted in a sharp decrease in the frequency of nightmares in four sessions. Further improvement was reported over the next nine months as additional techniques were introduced and other problems treated, and was maintained during a 9-mo. follow-up.

  11. Cranberry Resistance to Dodder Parasitism: Induced Chemical Defenses and Behavior of a Parasitic Plant.

    PubMed

    Tjiurutue, Muvari Connie; Sandler, Hilary A; Kersch-Becker, Monica F; Theis, Nina; Adler, Lynn A

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic plants are common in many ecosystems, where they can structure community interactions and cause major economic damage. For example, parasitic dodder (Cuscuta spp.) can cause up to 80-100 % yield loss in heavily infested cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) patches. Despite their ecological and economic importance, remarkably little is known about how parasitic plants affect, or are affected by, host chemistry. To examine chemically-mediated interactions between dodder and its cranberry host, we conducted a greenhouse experiment asking whether: (1) dodder performance varies with cranberry cultivar; (2) cultivars differ in levels of phytohormones, volatiles, or phenolics, and whether such variation correlates with dodder parasitism; (3) dodder parasitism induced changes in phytohormones, volatiles, or phenolics, and whether the level of inducible response varied among cultivars. We used five cranberry cultivars to assess host attractiveness to dodder and dodder performance. Dodder performance did not differ across cultivars, but there were marginally significant differences in host attractiveness to dodder, with fewer dodder attaching to Early Black than to any other cultivar. Dodder parasitism induced higher levels of salicylic acid (SA) across cultivars. Cultivars differed in overall levels of flavonols and volatile profiles, but not phenolic acids or proanthocyanidins, and dodder attachment induced changes in several flavonols and volatiles. While cultivars differed slightly in resistance to dodder attachment, we did not find evidence of chemical defenses that mediate these interactions. However, induction of several defenses indicates that parasitism alters traits that could influence subsequent interactions with other species, thus shaping community dynamics.

  12. Interfacial behavior of resistive switching in ITO-PVK-Al WORM memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcher, T. J.; Woon, K. L.; Wong, W. S.; Chanlek, N.; Nakajima, H.; Saisopa, T.; Songsiriritthigul, P.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the mechanism of resistive switching in a memory device is fundamental in order to improve device performance. The mechanism of current switching in a basic organic write-once read-many (WORM) memory device is investigated by determining the energy level alignments of indium tin oxide (ITO), poly(9-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) and aluminum (Al) using x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, current-voltage characterization and Auger depth profiling. The current switching mechanism was determined to be controlled by the interface between the ITO and the PVK. The electric field applied across the device causes the ITO from the uneven surface of the anode to form metallic filaments through the PVK, causing a shorting effect within the device leading to increased conduction. This was found to be independent of the PVK thickness, although the switch-on voltage was non-linearly dependent on the thickness. The formation of these filaments also caused the destruction of the interfacial dipole at the PVK-Al interface.

  13. Synchronization behavior in linear arrays of negative differential resistance circuit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huidong; Teitsworth, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    We study the electronic transport properties in a linear array of nonlinear circuit elements that exhibit negative differential resistance, and find that state-cluster synchronization emerges when there is heterogeneity in the element properties. This type of synchronization is associated with a non-uniform spatial distribution of total applied voltage across the array elements, as well as the formation of multiple stable branches in computed current-voltage curves for the entire array. Unlike most synchronizing systems studied previously [1], this system possesses coupling between elements that displays both positive and negative feedback depending on the state of each element. An empirical order parameter is defined which quantifies the degree of synchronization. We also find that the degree of synchronization is strongly dependent on the ramping rate of the total applied voltage to the array, with complete synchronization observed in the limit of small ramping rate. This model provides a basis for describing related nonlinear phenomena in more complex electronic structures such as semiconductor superlattices [2]. [1] A. Pikovsky, M. Rosenbaum, and Jürgen Kurths, Synchronization: a universal concept in nonlinear sciences (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2001). [2] M. Rogozia, S. W. Teitsworth, H. T Grahn, and K. H. Ploog, Phys. Rev. B65, 205303 (2002).

  14. Behavior of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in eco-agricultural system: A case study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weixiao; Li, Jianan; Wu, Ying; Xu, Like; Su, Chao; Qian, Yanyun; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Chen, Hong

    2016-03-05

    This study aims to determine abundance and persistence of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in eco-agricultural system (EAS), which starts from swine feces to anaerobic digestion products, then application of anaerobic digestion solid residue (ADSR) and anaerobic digestion liquid residue (ADLR) to the soil to grow ryegrass, one of swine feed. Oxytetracycline had the highest concentration in manure reaching up to 138.7 mg/kg. Most of antibiotics could be effectively eliminated by anaerobic digestion and removal rates ranged from 11% to 86%. ARGs abundance fluctuated within EAS. TetQ had the highest relative abundance and the relative abundance of tetG had the least variation within the system, which indicates that tetG is persistent in the agricultural environment and requires more attention. Compared to the relative abundance in manure, tetC and tetM increased in biogas residue while three ribosomal protection proteins genes (tetO, tetQ, tetW) decreased (p<0.05), with other genes showing no significant change after anaerobic fermentation (p>0.05). Most ARGs in downstream components (soils and fishpond) of EAS showed significantly higher relative abundance than the control agricultural system (p<0.05), except for tetG and sulI.

  15. Preparing Digital Stories through the Inquiry-Based Learning Approach: Its Effect on Prospective Teachers' Resistive Behaviors toward Research and Technology-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavuz Konokman, Gamze; Yanpar Yelken, Tugba

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of preparing digital stories through an inquiry based learning approach on prospective teachers' resistive behaviors toward technology based instruction and conducting research. The research model was convergent parallel design. The sample consisted of 50 prospective teachers who had completed…

  16. Differences in Stylet Penetration Behaviors of Glassy-winged Sharpshooters on Xylella-Resistant Vitis candicans vs. Susceptible Vitis vinifera cv. ‘Chardonnay’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrical penetration graph (EPG) monitoring was used to compare stylet penetration behaviors of glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), a vector of Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), on Xf-resistant Vitis candicans grape vs. susceptible V. vinifera cv. ‘Chardonnay.’ Frequency of occurrence of X waves (represent...

  17. A light-modified ferroelectric resistive switching behavior in Ag/BaMoO{sub 4}/FTO device at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W.X.; Sun, B.; Liu, Y.H.; Wei, L.J.; Li, H.W.; Chen, P.

    2014-12-15

    BaMoO{sub 4} powder was prepared by a facile hydrothermal synthesis. And the BaMoO{sub 4}/FTO device was fabricated by a spin-coated method, in which the thickness of BaMoO{sub 4} layer is about 20 µm. The bipolar resistive switching effect has been observed in Ag/BaMoO{sub 4}/FTO device. Moreover, the resistive switching effect of the device is greatly improved by white light irradiation. The resistive switching behavior is explained by the polarization reversal that changes the charge distribution and modulates the Schottky barriers. - Graphical abstract: We fabricate a resistive switching device based on Ag/BaMoO{sub 4}/FTO, the device shows superior white-light controlled bipolar resistive switching memristive characteristics. - Highlights: • The BaMoO{sub 4} nanosquares powder was prepared by a hydrothermal synthesis. • The resistive switching of the Ag/BaMoO{sub 4}/FTO device was observed for the first time. • It is shown that the resistive switching is greatly improved under the white light irradiation. • The mechanism of resistive switching is attributed to the ferroelectric polarization reversal.

  18. Study of self-compliance behaviors and internal filament characteristics in intrinsic SiO{sub x}-based resistive switching memory

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yao-Feng Zhou, Fei; Chen, Ying-Chen; Lee, Jack C.; Fowler, Burt

    2016-01-18

    Self-compliance characteristics and reliability optimization are investigated in intrinsic unipolar silicon oxide (SiO{sub x})-based resistive switching (RS) memory using TiW/SiO{sub x}/TiW device structures. The program window (difference between SET voltage and RESET voltage) is dependent on external series resistance, demonstrating that the SET process is due to a voltage-triggered mechanism. The program window has been optimized for program/erase disturbance immunity and reliability for circuit-level applications. The SET and RESET transitions have also been characterized using a dynamic conductivity method, which distinguishes the self-compliance behavior due to an internal series resistance effect (filament) in SiO{sub x}-based RS memory. By using a conceptual “filament/resistive gap (GAP)” model of the conductive filament and a proton exchange model with appropriate assumptions, the internal filament resistance and GAP resistance can be estimated for high- and low-resistance states (HRS and LRS), and are found to be independent of external series resistance. Our experimental results not only provide insights into potential reliability issues but also help to clarify the switching mechanisms and device operating characteristics of SiO{sub x}-based RS memory.

  19. Nanocrystalline Si pathway induced unipolar resistive switching behavior from annealed Si-rich SiN{sub x}/SiN{sub y} multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiaofan; Ma, Zhongyuan Yang, Huafeng; Yu, Jie; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Wenping; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ling; Chen, Kunji; Huang, Xinfan; Feng, Duan

    2014-09-28

    Adding a resistive switching functionality to a silicon microelectronic chip is a new challenge in materials research. Here, we demonstrate that unipolar and electrode-independent resistive switching effects can be realized in the annealed Si-rich SiN{sub x}/SiN{sub y} multilayers with high on/off ratio of 10{sup 9}. High resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that for the high resistance state broken pathways composed of discrete nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) exist in the Si nitride multilayers. While for the low resistance state the discrete nc-Si regions is connected, forming continuous nc-Si pathways. Based on the analysis of the temperature dependent I-V characteristics and HRTEM photos, we found that the break-and-bridge evolution of nc-Si pathway is the origin of resistive switching memory behavior. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism of the resistive switching behavior in nc-Si films, opening a way for it to be utilized as a material in Si-based memories.

  20. The oxidation behavior of SiC sintered with Al-B-C and improved oxidation resistance via heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Sixta, Mark

    1997-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of high strength and high toughness SiC, sintered with Al, B, and C (ABC-SiC), was examined. Kinetic data were acquired and the parabolic rate constant for oxidation was determined and compared with literature data on various SiC materials. The role of secondary phases on the oxide morphology was explored. ABC-SiC was compared to commercially available SiC, Hexoloy, and SiC sintered with 10% yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG). Two-step sintering (pre-coarsening) was employed with holds for 48 hours at 600-1,600°C, prior to the typical hot-pressing conditions of 1,900°C for 1 hour, to change the chemistry and reduce the number of bubbles in the silica scale. The effects on the oxide thickness and integrity was examined as a function of the precoarsening heat treatment temperature. Additionally, the hot-pressed ABC-SiC was subjected to heat treatments (anneals) at 1,800°C for 1 hour in nitrogen, Ar, and vacuum environments, and the effects on subsequent oxidation were evaluated. The Ar and vacuum heat treatments dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of ABC-SiC. Finally, reoxidation experiments were performed to try to alter the surface chemistry of the SiC to improve the oxidation resistance. The four-point bend strengths and two-parameter Weibull plots of the most successful heat treatments were compared with the standard ABC-SiC to ensure that significant degradation did not result from altering the processing of the material.

  1. Correlation of proteome-wide changes with social immunity behaviors provides insight into resistance to the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, in the honey bee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disease is a major factor driving the evolution of many organisms. In honey bees, selection for social behavioral responses is the primary adaptive process facilitating disease resistance. One such process, hygienic behavior, enables bees to resist multiple diseases, including the damaging parasitic mite Varroa destructor. The genetic elements and biochemical factors that drive the expression of these adaptations are currently unknown. Proteomics provides a tool to identify proteins that control behavioral processes, and these proteins can be used as biomarkers to aid identification of disease tolerant colonies. Results We sampled a large cohort of commercial queen lineages, recording overall mite infestation, hygiene, and the specific hygienic response to V. destructor. We performed proteome-wide correlation analyses in larval integument and adult antennae, identifying several proteins highly predictive of behavior and reduced hive infestation. In the larva, response to wounding was identified as a key adaptive process leading to reduced infestation, and chitin biosynthesis and immune responses appear to represent important disease resistant adaptations. The speed of hygienic behavior may be underpinned by changes in the antenna proteome, and chemosensory and neurological processes could also provide specificity for detection of V. destructor in antennae. Conclusions Our results provide, for the first time, some insight into how complex behavioural adaptations manifest in the proteome of honey bees. The most important biochemical correlations provide clues as to the underlying molecular mechanisms of social and innate immunity of honey bees. Such changes are indicative of potential divergence in processes controlling the hive-worker maturation. PMID:23021491

  2. Acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance: a multicenter meta-analysis of the spectrum and frequencies, clinical behavior, and phenotypic associations of resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Douglas B.; Menzies, Alexander M.; Zimmer, Lisa; Eroglu, Zeynep; Ye, Fei; Zhao, Shilin; Rizos, Helen; Sucker, Antje; Scolyer, Richard A.; Gutzmer, Ralf; Gogas, Helen; Kefford, Richard F.; Thompson, John F.; Becker, Jürgen C.; Berking, Carola; Egberts, Friederike; Loquai, Carmen; Goldinger, Simone M.; Pupo, Gulietta M.; Hugo, Willy; Kong, Xiangju; Garraway, Levi A.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Long, Georgina V.; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) is a near-universal phenomenon caused by numerous genetic and non-genetic alterations. In this study, we evaluated the spectrum, onset, pattern of progression, and subsequent clinical outcomes associated with specific mechanisms of resistance. Methods We compiled clinical and genetic data from 100 patients with 132 tissue samples obtained at progression on BRAFi therapy from 3 large, previously published studies of BRAFi resistance. These samples were subjected to whole exome sequencing and/or PCR-based genetic testing. Results Among 132 samples, putative resistance mechanisms were identified in 58%, including NRAS or KRAS mutations (20%), BRAF splice variants (16%), BRAFV600E/K amplifications (13%), MEK1/2 mutations (7%), and non-MAPK pathway alterations (11%). Marked heterogeneity was observed within tumors and patients; 18 of 19 patients (95%) with >1 progression biopsy had distinct/unknown drivers of resistance between samples. NRAS mutations were associated with vemurafenib use (p=0.045) and intracranial metastases (p=0.036), and MEK1/2 mutations correlated with hepatic progression (p=0.011). Progression-free survival and overall survival were similar across resistance mechanisms. The median survival after disease progression was 6.9 months, and responses to subsequent BRAF and MEK inhibition were uncommon (2 of 15; 13%). Post-progression outcomes did not correlate with specific acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms. Conclusions This is the first study to systematically characterize the clinical implications of particular acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma largest study to compile the landscape of resistance. Despite marked heterogeneity of resistance mechanisms within patients, NRAS mutations correlated with vemurafenib use and intracranial disease involvement. PMID:26608120

  3. Effects of Prolonged GRP78 Haploinsufficiency on Organ Homeostasis, Behavior, Cancer and Chemotoxic Resistance in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Amy S.; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Rangel, Daisy F.; Navarrete, Gerardo; Cohen, Pinchas; Longo, Valter D.; Chen, Jeannie; Groshen, Susan; Morgan, Todd E.; Dubeau, Louis

    2017-01-01

    GRP78, a multifunctional protein with potent cytoprotective properties, is an emerging therapeutic target to combat cancer development, progression and drug resistance. The biological consequences of prolonged reduction in expression of this essential chaperone which so far has been studied primarily in young mice, was investigated in older mice, as older individuals are likely to be important recipients of anti-GRP78 therapy. We followed cohorts of Grp78+/+ and Grp78+/− male and female mice up to 2 years of age in three different genetic backgrounds and characterized them with respect to body weight, organ integrity, behavioral and memory performance, cancer, inflammation and chemotoxic response. Our results reveal that body weight, organ development and integrity were not impaired in aged Grp78+/− mice. No significant effect on cancer incidence and inflammation was observed in aging mice. Interestingly, our studies detected some subtle differential trends between the WT and Grp78+/− mice in some test parameters dependent on gender and genetic background. Our studies provide the first evidence that GRP78 haploinsufficiency for up to 2 years of age has no major deleterious effect in rodents of different genetic background, supporting the merit of anti-GRP78 drugs in treatment of cancer and other diseases affecting the elderly. PMID:28145503

  4. Effects of Prolonged GRP78 Haploinsufficiency on Organ Homeostasis, Behavior, Cancer and Chemotoxic Resistance in Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Amy S; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Rangel, Daisy F; Navarrete, Gerardo; Cohen, Pinchas; Longo, Valter D; Chen, Jeannie; Groshen, Susan; Morgan, Todd E; Dubeau, Louis

    2017-02-01

    GRP78, a multifunctional protein with potent cytoprotective properties, is an emerging therapeutic target to combat cancer development, progression and drug resistance. The biological consequences of prolonged reduction in expression of this essential chaperone which so far has been studied primarily in young mice, was investigated in older mice, as older individuals are likely to be important recipients of anti-GRP78 therapy. We followed cohorts of Grp78(+/+) and Grp78(+/-) male and female mice up to 2 years of age in three different genetic backgrounds and characterized them with respect to body weight, organ integrity, behavioral and memory performance, cancer, inflammation and chemotoxic response. Our results reveal that body weight, organ development and integrity were not impaired in aged Grp78(+/-) mice. No significant effect on cancer incidence and inflammation was observed in aging mice. Interestingly, our studies detected some subtle differential trends between the WT and Grp78(+/-) mice in some test parameters dependent on gender and genetic background. Our studies provide the first evidence that GRP78 haploinsufficiency for up to 2 years of age has no major deleterious effect in rodents of different genetic background, supporting the merit of anti-GRP78 drugs in treatment of cancer and other diseases affecting the elderly.

  5. Structural Phase Transition Effect on Resistive Switching Behavior of MoS2 -Polyvinylpyrrolidone Nanocomposites Films for Flexible Memory Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Cunxu; Xu, Benhua; Qi, Lin; Jiang, Changjun; Gao, Meizhen; Xue, Desheng

    2016-04-01

    The 2H phase and 1T phase coexisting in the same molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) nanosheets can influence the electronic properties of the materials. The 1T phase of MoS2 is introduced into the 2H-MoS2 nanosheets by two-step hydrothermal synthetic methods. Two types of nonvolatile memory effects, namely write-once read-many times memory and rewritable memory effect, are observed in the flexible memory devices with the configuration of Al/1T@2H-MoS2 -polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/indium tin oxide (ITO)/polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and Al/2H-MoS2 -PVP/ITO/PET, respectively. It is observed that structural phase transition in MoS2 nanosheets plays an important role on the resistive switching behaviors of the MoS2 -based device. It is hoped that our results can offer a general route for the preparation of various promising nanocomposites based on 2D nanosheets of layered transition metal dichalcogenides for fabricating the high performance and flexible nonvolatile memory devices through regulating the phase structure in the 2D nanosheets.

  6. Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Gussev, Maxim N; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

  7. Tensile deformation behavior of spray-deposited FVS0812 heat-resistant aluminum alloy sheet at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Qiqi; Fu Dingfa . E-mail: Fudingfa69@163.com; Deng Xuefeng; Zhang Hui; Chen Zhenhua

    2007-06-15

    The tensile deformation behavior of spray deposited FVS0812 heat-resistant aluminum alloy sheet was studied by uniaxial tension tests at temperatures ranging from 250 deg. C to 450 deg. C and strain rates from 0.001 to 0.1 s{sup -1}. The associated fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the degree of work-hardening increases with decreasing temperature, and exhibits a small decrease with increasing strain rate; the strain rate sensitivity exponent increases with increasing temperature. The flow stress increases with increasing strain rate but decreases with increasing temperature. The total elongations to fracture increase not only with increasing temperature, but also with increasing strain rate, which is in marked contrast with the normal inverse dependence of elongation on the strain rate exhibited by conventional aluminum alloy sheets. The SEM fracture analysis indicates that the dependence of elongation on the strain rate may be due to the presence of a transition from plastic instability at lower strain rates to stable deformation at higher strain rates for fine-grained materials produced by spray deposition.

  8. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe-Cr-Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  9. Prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli on coriander.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Segovia-Cruz, Jesús A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Salas-Rangel, Laura P; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes on coriander was determined. One hundred coriander samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli were determined using the most probable number procedure. Diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to sixteen antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEPs strains by standard test. The behavior of multidrug-resistant DEPs isolated from coriander was determined on coriander leaves and chopped coriander at 25°± 2 °C and 3°± 2 °C. Generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 43 and 7% of samples. Nine DEPs strains were isolated from positive coriander samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, 4%) enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, 2%) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 1%). All isolated DEPs strains exhibited multi-resistance to antibiotics. On inoculated coriander leaves stored at 25°± 2 °C or 3°± 2 °C, no growth was observed for multidrug-resistant DEPs strains. However, multidrug-resistant DEPs strains grew in chopped coriander: after 24 h at 25° ± 2 °C, DEPs strains had grown to approximately 3 log CFU/g. However, at 3°± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence and behavior of multidrug-resistant STEC, ETEC and EPEC on coriander and chopped coriander.

  10. Plant resistance to aphid feeding: behavioral, physiological, genetic and molecular cues regulate aphid host selection and feeding.

    PubMed

    Smith, C Michael; Chuang, Wen-Po

    2014-04-01

    Aphids damage major world food and fiber crops through direct feeding and transmission of plant viruses. Fortunately, the development of many aphid-resistant crop plants has provided both ecological and economic benefits to food production. Plant characters governing aphid host selection often dictate eventual plant resistance or susceptibility to aphid herbivory, and these phenotypic characters have been successfully used to map aphid resistance genes. Aphid resistance is often inherited as a dominant trait, but is also polygenic and inherited as recessive or incompletely dominant traits. Most aphid-resistant cultivars exhibit constitutively expressed defenses, but some cultivars exhibit dramatic aphid-induced responses, resulting in the overexpression of large ensembles of putative aphid resistance genes. Two aphid resistance genes have been cloned. Mi-1.2, an NBS-LRR gene from wild tomato, confers resistance to potato aphid and three Meloidogyne root-knot nematode species, and Vat, an NBS-LRR gene from melon, controls resistance to the cotton/melon aphid and to some viruses. Virulence to aphid resistance genes of plants occurs in 17 aphid species--more than half of all arthropod biotypes demonstrating virulence. The continual appearance of aphid virulence underscores the need to identify new sources of resistance of diverse sequence and function in order to delay or prevent biotype development.

  11. Composition of thin Ta2O5 films deposited by different methods and the effect of humidity on their resistive switching behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannequin, Cedric; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-06-01

    The resistive switching behavior of Cu/Ta2O5/Pt atomic switches, in which the Ta2O5 film was deposited by electron-beam (EB) evaporation and radio-frequency sputtering (SP), was investigated under different relative humidity (RH) levels. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed that both films possess the oxygen-rich composition and higher water absorption capability of EB films. The Cu/Ta2O5-SP/Pt cell showed a stable, nonvolatile switching behavior in the observed RH range, whereas the Cu/Ta2O5-EB/Pt cell exhibited a similar behavior up to 50% RH, but altered from nonvolatile to volatile switching at higher RH levels. The observed volatile switching behavior of the Cu/Ta2O5-EB/Pt cell can be explained by increased ion migration, assisted by absorbed water and/or proton conduction in hydrated environments. The results indicate that the water uptake ability of the matrix film plays a crucial role in determining the resistive switching behavior of oxide-based atomic switches.

  12. Effects of partial interlaminar bonding on impact resistance and loaded-hole behavior of graphite/epoxy quasi-isotropic laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illg, W.

    1986-01-01

    A partial-bonding interlaminar toughening concept was evaluated for resistance to impact and for behavior of a loaded hole. Perforated Mylar sheets were interleaved between all 24 plies of a graphite/epoxy quasi-isotropic lay-up. Specimens were impacted by aluminum spheres while under tensile or compressive loads. Impact-failure thresholds and residual strengths were obtained. Loaded-hole specimens were tested in three configurations that were critical in bearing, shear, or tension. Partial bonding reduced the tensile and compressive strengths of undamaged specimens by about one-third. For impact, partial bonding did not change the threshold for impact failure under tensile preload. However, under compressive preload, partial bonding caused serious degradation of impact resistance. Partial bonding reduced the maximum load-carrying capacity of all three types of loaded-hole specimens. Overall, partial bonding degraded both impact resistance and bearing strength of holes.

  13. Effect of Ultrasonic Vibration on the Behavior of Antifriction and Wear Resistance of Al2O3/Al2O3 Ceramic Friction Pairs Under Oil Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. Y.; Qiao, Y. L.; Zang, Y.; Cui, Q. S.

    The behavior of antifriction and wear resistance of Al2O3/Al2O3 ceramic friction pairs lubricated by four different lubrication oils under ultrasonic vibration was studied. The surface morphologies of wear scare was analyzed by metallographic microscope. The effect mechanism of ultrasonic vibration on frictional pairs under different lubrication oils was discussed. The studied results showed that, ultrasonic vibration would improve the behavior of antifriction and wear resistance of the Al2O3/Al2O3 ceramic friction pairs under various lubrication oils.The improving would be dramaticer when the viscosity of lubrication oil was low. Ultrasonic vibration decreased the friction coefficient and wear volume 12.9% and 38.7% respectively, when the lubrication oil was 6#,the viscosity of which is 39.77 mm2/s. When the lubrication oil was 150BS, the viscosity of which is 549.69 mm2/s, ultrasonic vibration made friction coefficient and wear volume decreased 4.6% and 11.6% respectively.The effect of ultrasonic vibration on the behavior of antifriction and wear resistance of Al2O3/Al2O3 ceramic friction pairs was determined by the formation and the destruction of oil film on the friction surface and the upward floatage created by ultrasonic vibration.

  14. Why Do Children Resist or Obey Their Foster Parents? The Inner Logic of Children's Behavior during Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elly; Doornenbal, Jeannette; Okma, Krista

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses a study of children's perspectives on disciplinary conflicts with their foster parents. Most children accept parental authority, but they also defend their personal autonomy and loyalties to peers. In this study, only birthchildren told real-life stories about fierce resistance to get their own way. Fierce resistance among…

  15. Effect of microstructure on the corrosion and deformation behavior of a newly developed 6Mn-5Cr-1.5Cu corrosion-resistant white iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, P. N. V. R. S. S. V. Prasada; Patwardhan, A. K.; Jain, N. C.

    1993-02-01

    An experimental study has been made of the effect of heat treatment on the transformation behavior of a 4.8 pct Cr white iron, alloyed with 6 pct Mn and 1.5 pct Cu, by employing optical metallography, X-ray diffractometry, and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques, with a view to assess the suitability of the different microstructures in resisting aqueous corrosion. The matrix microstructure in the as-cast condition, comprising pearlite + bainite/martensite, transformed to austenite on heat-treating at all the temperatures between 900 °C and 1050 °C. Increasing the soaking period at each of the heat-treating temperatures led to an increase in the volume fraction and stability of austenite. M3C was the dominant carbide present in the as-cast condition. On heat-treating, different carbides formed: M23C6 carbide was present on heat-treating at 900 °C and 950 °C; on heat-treating at 1000 °C, M7C3 formed and persisted even on heattreating at 1050 °C. The possible formation of M5C2 carbide in the as-cast and heat-treated conditions (900 °C and 950 °C) is also indicated. Dispersed carbides (DC), present in austenite up to 950 °C, mostly comprised M3C and M5C2. On stress relieving of the heat-treated samples, M7C3-type DC also formed. The hardness changes were found to be consistent with the micro-structural changes occurring on heat-treating. The as-cast state was characterized by a reasonable resistance to corrosion in 5 pct NaCl solution. On heat-treating, the corrosion resistance improved over that in the as-cast state. After 4 hours soaking, increasing the temperature from 900 °C to 1050 °C led to an improvement in corrosion resistance. However, after 10 hours soaking, corrosion resistance decreased on increasing the temperature from 900 °C to 950 °C and improved thereafter on increasing the heat-treating temperature. Deformation behavior responded to the microstructure on similar lines as the corrosion behavior. Although in an early stage of

  16. Utilization of a cross-section CAFM to investigate resistive switching behaviors in a Pt/YMnO3/Pt device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ling; Yin, Y. F.; Zhang, W. F.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, the filament mechanism has been proposed to explain the resistive switching (RS) behaviors of metal/oxide/metal (MOM) devices, which are highly regarded as promising candidates for future non-volatile memory applications. The major technical difficulties in filament investigation lie in its tiny size and ambiguous position, which is always embedded in the interface of a MOM device. As a feature of this work, the conductive path formed in the YMnO3 (YMO)/Pt interface during the RS process was directly observed through cross-section conduct atomic force microscopy (CAFM). By the voltage source 2-wire and the current source 4-wire measurements, the RS properties of the YMO/Pt interface and YMO film were further distinguished and studied in a special Pt/YMO/Pt step sample. Moreover, fitting results based on current-voltage curves exhibit the high resistance state (HRS) and low resistance state (LRS), in accordance with the Schottky emission and Ohm’s law, respectively. The resistances of the HRS increase with the temperature decrease, while those of the LRS demonstrate a reverse trend in the same process, indicating semiconductor and metal characteristics, respectively. Combining the results of energy dispersive spectroscopy, the RS mechanism was attributed to the conductive path in association with the Mn vacancies created in the annealing process.

  17. Metallic and semiconducting resistivity behavior of La{sub 1−x}K{sub x}MnO{sub 3} manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Dinesh Khan, E. Varshney, Dinesh

    2014-04-24

    The electrical conduction in both metallic and semiconducting phase of La{sub 1−x}K{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0.05, 0.1, 0.15) is investigated. The phonon frequencies are estimated from the ab initio theory with calibrated Hamiltonian for the atomic interaction between a pair such as Mn–O and La/K–O including van der Walls interaction. The classical electron–phonon model of resistivity, i.e., the Bloch–Gruneisen (BG) model consistently retraces the reported metallic resistivity behavior. The paramagnetic semiconducting nature is discussed with thermal activation, small polaron conduction and Mott’s variable range hopping model. The comparison of experimental data appears favorable with the present analysis.

  18. Microstructure Characterization and Corrosion Resistance Behavior of New Cobalt-Free Maraging Steel Produced Through ESR Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seikh, Asiful H.; Halfa, Hossam; Baig, Muneer; Khan, Sohail M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, two different grades (M23 and M29) of cobalt-free low nickel maraging steel have been produced through electroslag remelting (ESR) process. The corrosion resistance of these ESR steels was investigated in 1 M H2SO4 solution using linear potentiodynamic polarization (LPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The experiments were performed for different immersion time and solution temperature. To evaluate the corrosion resistance of the ESR steels, some significant characterization parameters from LPP and EIS curves were analyzed and compared with that of conventional C250 maraging steel. Irrespective of measurement techniques used, the results show that the corrosion resistance of the ESR steels was higher than the C250 steel. The microstructure of ESR steels was composed of uniform and well-distributed martensite accompanied with little amount of retained austenite in comparison with C250 steel.

  19. Effects of siRNA-mediated silencing of myeloid cell leukelia-1 on the biological behaviors and drug resistance of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo-Pei; Liu, Jin-Lu; Chen, Jun-Qiang; Wang, Zhen; Mao, Yuan-Tian; Chen, Ye-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was to investigate the effects of siRNA mediated silencing of myeloid cell leukelia-1 (Mcl-1) on the biological behaviors and drug resistance of human drug-resistant gastric cancer (GC) cell lines, and to explore the potential mechanisms. Methods: siRNA targeting Mcl-1 mRNA were designed and independently transfected into SGC-7901/VCR and SGC-7901/DDP. Cell proliferation and drug sensitivity were examined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. Cell Invasion and migration abilities were detected by transwell chamber assays. The expressions of drug-resistance-related genes and apoptosis-related proteins were detected by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot assay, respectively. Results: siRNA effectively inhibited the Mcl-1 expression, lowered the proliferation rate (P<0.05), raised the apoptosis rate (P<0.05), and arrested cells in S-phase (P<0.05). After inhibiting Mcl-1, the cell migration and invasion decreased (P<0.05), the resistance to VCR, DDP and 5-Fu was reversed to different extents (P<0.05), TS mRNA expression increased significantly (P<0.05), MDR1 remained unchanged (P>0.05), but DPD and TOP2A decreased significantly (P<0.05). Following Mcl-1 silencing, Bcl-2 was over-expressed in VCR-siRNA group, but the expressions of Fas and survivin reduced markedly (P<0.05); Bcl-2 and Fas expressions decreased significantly in DDP-siRNA group (P<0.05), but survivin expression remained unchanged. Conclusion: Mcl-1 is implicated in the proliferation, invasion, apoptosis and drug resistance of GC cells, and may be a promising target for the therapy of GC. PMID:26807186

  20. Electric field tuning resistance switching behavior of SrRuO3/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 heterostructures at various temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cai; Wu, Lei; Zhang, Chao; Yao, Jinli; Jiang, Changjun

    2016-10-01

    The resistance switching behavior induced by in-plane read current in SrRuO3/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 heterostructures is investigated at different temperatures. With decreasing in-plane read current from 10 mA to 0.01 mA, the symmetrical butterfly-like shape of resistance is gradually converted to an antisymmetrical shape at different temperatures, which is resulted from the enhancement of polarization current effect. Specifically, non-volatile resistance behaviors induced by asymmetric bipolar sweeping of electric field and pulsed electric field are achieved at different temperatures. Our results suggests resistance switching behavior dependence of in-plane read current, which is crucial for further application of complex oxide magnetoelectric and spintronic devices.

  1. Mating behavior and reproductive output in insecticide-resistant and -susceptible strains of the maize weevil (Sitophilus zeamais)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insecticide resistance is the most broadly recognized and well studied ecological problem resulting from intensive insecticide use, which also provides useful evolutionary models of newly adapted phenotypes to changing environments. Two common assumptions in such population-oriented models are the e...

  2. Observation of ovarian cancer stem cell behavior and investigation of potential mechanisms of drug resistance in three-dimensional cell culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junsong; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yunxia; Chen, Dengyu; Yang, Cuiping; Kai, Cai; Wang, Xiaoying; Shi, Fangfang; Dou, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Cancer cells behave differently in a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture compared with in the conventional two-dimensional (2D) one. Accumulated evidences indicate that the characteristics of cancer stem cells (CSCs) are different from common cancer cells due to their ability to produce tumors and resist chemoradiation. The objective of this work was to observe CSC behavior and investigate the potential mechanisms of CSC drug resistance in 3D versus 2D in vitro environment. We first demonstrated that the CD44(+)CD117(+)cells isolated from the human epithelial ovarian cancer HO8910 cell line have the properties of CSCs that revealed faster growth, larger tumorsphere and stronger survival potential in the hypoxic environment in 3D cell culture as well as more powerful tumorigenicity in a xenograft mice than the HO8910 cells. The CD44(+)CD117(+)CSCs also exhibited high chemoresistance to anticancer drugs when the cells were incubated with 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin and carboplatin, respectively in 3D versus 2D environment. This might be associated with the high expression of ABCG2, ABCB1 and the high expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in CD44(+)CD117(+)CSCs. Overall, these results suggest the advantages of using 3D culture model to accurately display CSC behavior in vitro. 3D model may improve the efficacy of screening anticancer drugs for treatment of ovarian CSCs.

  3. Effect of pulsed light treatments on the growth and resistance behavior of Listeria monocytogenes 10403S, Listeria innocua, and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 in a liquid substrate.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Aaron R; Hsu, Lillian; Moraru, Carmen I

    2013-03-01

    Pulsed light (PL) treatment can effectively inactivate a large proportion of contaminating bacteria on surfaces and in clear solutions. An important issue that needs to be investigated is whether repeated exposure to PL treatment causes any changes to the growth and resistance behavior of the bacteria surviving the treatment. To test this, three challenge microorganisms were used: Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Escherichia coli. Cells of the challenge bacteria were treated with either low or high PL doses. Survivors of the PL treatment were enumerated, isolated, regrown, and exposed again to PL treatment. PL inactivation curves were generated for the survivors of each exposure cycle (as well as controls) to examine possible differences induced by repeated treatments. Growth curves of L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, and E. coli isolates recovered from exposure to either 1.1 or 10.1 J/cm(2) were not significantly different from the growth curves of untreated cells. Reduction levels of up to 4 and up to 6 log CFU were obtained after exposure to 1.1 and 10.1 J/cm(2), respectively, both for the controls and the repeatedly treated and recovered isolates. These results show that PL did not significantly change the growth kinetics or resistance to PL of the target microorganisms after up to 10 exposures. These findings have significance for the practical application of PL treatment, as they indicate that this technology does not select for microorganisms with increased resistance.

  4. Corrosion Resistance Behavior of Single-Layer Cathodic Arc PVD Nitride-Base Coatings in 1M HCl and 3.5 pct NaCl Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesina, Akeem Yusuf; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Madhan Kumar, Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of single-layer TiN, CrN, CrAlN, and TiAlN coatings on 304 stainless steel substrate, deposited using state-of-the-art and industrial size cathodic arc PVD machine, were evaluated in 1M HCl and 3.5 pct NaCl solutions. The corrosion behavior of the blank and coated substrates was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance, and potentiodynamic polarization. Bond-coat layers of pure-Ti, pure-Cr, alloyed-CrAl, and alloyed-TiAl for TiN, CrN, CrAlN, and TiAlN coatings were, respectively, first deposited for improved coating adhesion before the actual coating. The average coating thickness was about 1.80 µm. Results showed that the corrosion potentials (E corr) of the coated substrates were shifted to more noble values which indicated improvement of the coated substrate resistance to corrosion susceptibility. The corrosion current densities were lower for all coated substrates as compared to the blank substrate. Similarly, EIS parameters showed that these coatings possessed improved resistance to defects and pores in similar solution compared to the same nitride coatings developed by magnetron sputtering. The charge transfer resistance (R ct) can be ranked in the following order: TiAlN > CrN > TiN > CrAlN in both media except in NaCl solution where R ct of TiN is lowest. While the pore resistance (R po) followed the order: CrAlN > CrN > TiAlN > TiN in HCl solution and TiAlN > CrN > CrAlN > TiN in NaCl solution. It is found that TiAlN coating has the highest protective efficiencies of 79 and 99 pct in 1M HCl and 3.5 pct NaCl, respectively. SEM analysis of the corroded substrates in both media was also presented.

  5. Corrosion Resistance Behavior of Single-Layer Cathodic Arc PVD Nitride-Base Coatings in 1M HCl and 3.5 pct NaCl Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesina, Akeem Yusuf; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Madhan Kumar, Arumugam

    2017-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of single-layer TiN, CrN, CrAlN, and TiAlN coatings on 304 stainless steel substrate, deposited using state-of-the-art and industrial size cathodic arc PVD machine, were evaluated in 1M HCl and 3.5 pct NaCl solutions. The corrosion behavior of the blank and coated substrates was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance, and potentiodynamic polarization. Bond-coat layers of pure-Ti, pure-Cr, alloyed-CrAl, and alloyed-TiAl for TiN, CrN, CrAlN, and TiAlN coatings were, respectively, first deposited for improved coating adhesion before the actual coating. The average coating thickness was about 1.80 µm. Results showed that the corrosion potentials ( E corr) of the coated substrates were shifted to more noble values which indicated improvement of the coated substrate resistance to corrosion susceptibility. The corrosion current densities were lower for all coated substrates as compared to the blank substrate. Similarly, EIS parameters showed that these coatings possessed improved resistance to defects and pores in similar solution compared to the same nitride coatings developed by magnetron sputtering. The charge transfer resistance ( R ct) can be ranked in the following order: TiAlN > CrN > TiN > CrAlN in both media except in NaCl solution where R ct of TiN is lowest. While the pore resistance ( R po) followed the order: CrAlN > CrN > TiAlN > TiN in HCl solution and TiAlN > CrN > CrAlN > TiN in NaCl solution. It is found that TiAlN coating has the highest protective efficiencies of 79 and 99 pct in 1M HCl and 3.5 pct NaCl, respectively. SEM analysis of the corroded substrates in both media was also presented.

  6. Feeding and dispersal behavior of the cotton leafworm, Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), on Bt and non-Bt cotton: implications for evolution and resistance management.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Francisco S; Pachú, Jéssica K S; Lira, Aline C S; Malaquias, José B; Zanuncio, José C; Fernandes, Francisco S

    2014-01-01

    The host acceptance of neonate Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae to Bt cotton plants exerts a strong influence on the potential risk that this pest will develop resistance to Bt cotton. This will also determine the efficiency of management strategies to prevent its resistance such as the "refuge-in-the-bag" strategy. In this study, we assessed the acceptance of neonate A. argillacea larvae to Bt and non-Bt cotton plants at different temperatures during the first 24 h after hatching. Two cotton cultivars were used in the study, one a Bt DP 404 BG (Bollgard) cultivar, and the other, an untransformed isoline, DP 4049 cultivar. There was a greater acceptance by live neonate A. argillacea larvae for the non-Bt cotton plants compared with the Bt cotton plants, especially in the time interval between 18 and 24 h. The percentages of neonate A. argillacea larvae found on Bt or non-Bt plants were lower when exposed to temperatures of 31 and 34 °C. The low acceptance of A. argillacea larvae for Bt cotton plants at high temperatures stimulated the dispersion of A. argillacea larvae. Our results support the hypothesis that the dispersion and/or feeding behavior of neonate A. argillacea larvae is different between Bt and non-Bt cotton. The presence of the Cry1Ac toxin in Bt cotton plants, and its probable detection by the A. argillacea larvae tasting or eating it, increases the probability of dispersion from the plant where the larvae began. These findings may help to understand how the A. argillacea larvae detect the Cry1Ac toxin in Bt cotton and how the toxin affects the dispersion behavior of the larvae over time. Therefore, our results are extremely important for the management of resistance in populations of A. argillacea on Bt cotton.

  7. Feeding and Dispersal Behavior of the Cotton Leafworm, Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), on Bt and Non-Bt Cotton: Implications for Evolution and Resistance Management

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Francisco S.; Pachú, Jéssica K. S.; Lira, Aline C. S.; Malaquias, José B.; Zanuncio, José C.; Fernandes, Francisco S.

    2014-01-01

    The host acceptance of neonate Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae to Bt cotton plants exerts a strong influence on the potential risk that this pest will develop resistance to Bt cotton. This will also determine the efficiency of management strategies to prevent its resistance such as the “refuge-in-the-bag” strategy. In this study, we assessed the acceptance of neonate A. argillacea larvae to Bt and non-Bt cotton plants at different temperatures during the first 24 h after hatching. Two cotton cultivars were used in the study, one a Bt DP 404 BG (Bollgard) cultivar, and the other, an untransformed isoline, DP 4049 cultivar. There was a greater acceptance by live neonate A. argillacea larvae for the non-Bt cotton plants compared with the Bt cotton plants, especially in the time interval between 18 and 24 h. The percentages of neonate A. argillacea larvae found on Bt or non-Bt plants were lower when exposed to temperatures of 31 and 34°C. The low acceptance of A. argillacea larvae for Bt cotton plants at high temperatures stimulated the dispersion of A. argillacea larvae. Our results support the hypothesis that the dispersion and/or feeding behavior of neonate A. argillacea larvae is different between Bt and non-Bt cotton. The presence of the Cry1Ac toxin in Bt cotton plants, and its probable detection by the A. argillacea larvae tasting or eating it, increases the probability of dispersion from the plant where the larvae began. These findings may help to understand how the A. argillacea larvae detect the Cry1Ac toxin in Bt cotton and how the toxin affects the dispersion behavior of the larvae over time. Therefore, our results are extremely important for the management of resistance in populations of A. argillacea on Bt cotton. PMID:25369211

  8. Deletion of GIRK2 Subunit of GIRK Channels Alters the 5-HT1A Receptor-Mediated Signaling and Results in a Depression-Resistant Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Llamosas, Nerea; Bruzos-Cidón, Cristina; Rodríguez, José Julio; Ugedo, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Targeting dorsal raphe 5-HT1A receptors, which are coupled to G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels, has revealed their contribution not only to behavioral and functional aspects of depression but also to the clinical response to its treatment. Although GIRK channels containing GIRK2 subunits play an important role controlling excitability of several brain areas, their impact on the dorsal raphe activity is still unknown. Thus, the goal of the present study was to investigate the involvement of GIRK2 subunit-containing GIRK channels in depression-related behaviors and physiology of serotonergic neurotransmission. Methods: Behavioral, functional, including in vivo extracellular recordings of dorsal raphe neurons, and neurogenesis studies were carried out in wild-type and GIRK2 mutant mice. Results: Deletion of the GIRK2 subunit promoted a depression-resistant phenotype and determined the behavioral response to the antidepressant citalopram without altering hippocampal neurogenesis. In dorsal raphe neurons of GIRK2 knockout mice, and also using GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q, the basal firing rate was higher than that obtained in wild-type animals, although no differences were observed in other firing parameters. 5-HT1A receptors were desensitized in GIRK2 knockout mice, as demonstrated by a lower sensitivity of dorsal raphe neurons to the inhibitory effect of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, and the antidepressant citalopram. Conclusions: Our results indicate that GIRK channels formed by GIRK2 subunits determine depression-related behaviors as well as basal and 5-HT1A receptor-mediated dorsal raphe neuronal activity, becoming alternative therapeutic targets for psychiatric diseases underlying dysfunctional serotonin transmission. PMID:25956878

  9. Resistant starch film-coated microparticles for an oral colon-specific polypeptide delivery system and its release behaviors.

    PubMed

    Situ, Wenbei; Chen, Ling; Wang, Xueyu; Li, Xiaoxi

    2014-04-23

    For the delivery of bioactive components to the colon, an oral colon-specific controlled release system coated with a resistant starch-based film through aqueous dispersion coating process was developed. Starch was modified by a high-temperature-pressure reaction, enzymatic debranching, and retrogradation, resulting in a dramatic increase in the resistibility against enzymatic digestion (meaning the formation of resistant starch, specifically RS3). This increase could be associated with an increase in the relative crystallinity, a greater amount of starch molecular aggregation structure, and the formation of a compact mass fractal structure, resulting from the treatment. The microparticles coated with this RS3 film showed an excellent controlled release property. In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type II diabetic rats, the RS3 film-coated insulin-loaded microparticles exhibited the ability to steadily decrease the plasma glucose level initially and then maintain the plasma glucose level within the normal range for total 14-22 h with different insulin dosages after oral administration; no glycopenia or glycemic fluctuation was observed. Therefore, the potential of this new RS3 film-coated microparticle system has been demonstrated for the accurate delivery of bioactive polypeptides or protein to the colon.

  10. The R-curve behavior and thermal shock resistance for Al2O3 + ZrO2 laminated nanoceramics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei; Hu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Chuan

    2014-05-01

    The properties of thermal shock resistances of Al2O3 + ZrO2 monolayer and laminated ceramics are determined by the indentation method. The relationships between the R-curve, the thermal shock resistance properties and the mechanism of strengthening and toughening are also studied in this paper. The Al2O3 + ZrO2 laminated ceramics have an R-curve feature and a decrease in the sensitivity of the strength to the size of surface cracks. Indentation thermal shock test shows that the critical temperature difference of the Al2O3 + ZrO2 laminated ceramics is 400 degrees C, 150 degrees C higher than that of the monolayer ceramics. Under the condition of the surface compressive stress, the surface fracture appearance is more uneven and the fracture mechanism is different along the interface. The R-curve and thermal shock resistance properties are improved by strengthening the transformation effect resulting from the surface compressive stress.

  11. Resistance to protein and oil fouling of sulfobetaine-grafted Poly(vinylidene Fluoride) hollow fiber membrane and the electrolyte-responsive behavior in NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Bi, Qiu-Yan; Liu, Tian-Yin; Wang, Xiao-Lin

    2012-07-01

    An excellent protein-fouling-resistance performance of the sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF hollow fiber membrane was obtained and the potential of sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF membrane to resist the oil fouling was confirmed in the filtration solution which contained inorganic electrolyte, sodium chloride (NaCl). The electrolyte-responsive behavior of the sulfobetaine-modified PVDF membrane was demonstrated by the filtration of NaCl aqueous solution. The grafting amount of the modified PVDF hollow fiber membrane showed a stable value as 680 μg/cm2. An almost complete coverage of the membrane surface by the grafted sulfobetaine polymer contributed to the high hydrophilicity and membrane strength. The membrane surface became denser and the permeate flux reduced with the increase of NaCl concentration. The cyclic filtration experiment showed that during the filtration of the protein solution with 0.05 mol/L of NaCl, the sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF membrane exhibited an excellent protein-fouling-resistance performance with a high relative flux recovery of 98.2% and a low irreversible fouling extent which was lower 10 times than that of the nascent PVDF hollow fiber membrane. In addition, the sulfobetaine-grafted PVDF hollow fiber membrane showed an oil-fouling-resistance property during the filtration experiment of the oil-in-water emulsion with 0.05 mol/L of NaCl, resulting in an relative flux recovery of about twice that of the nascent PVDF membrane. The results extended the application of poly(sulfobetaine)-g-PVDF hollow fiber membrane in the fields of bio-separation, artificial oil and wastewater treatment.

  12. Questionnaires for outcome expectancy, self-regulation, and behavioral expectation for resistance training among young-old adults: development and preliminary validity.

    PubMed

    Williams, David M; Savla, Jyoti; Davy, Brenda M; Kelleher, Sarah A; Marinik, Elaina L; Winett, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present research was to develop questionnaires to assess outcome expectancy for resistance training (RT), behavioral expectation in the context of perceived barriers to RT, and self-regulation strategies for RT among young-old adults (50-69 years). Measurement development included (a) item generation through elicitation interviews (N = 14) and open-ended questionnaires (N = 56), (b) expert feedback on a preliminary draft of the questionnaires (N = 4), and (c) a quantitative longitudinal study for item-reduction and psychometric analyses (N = 94). Elicitation procedures, expert feedback, and item reduction yielded four questionnaires with a total of 33 items. Positive outcome expectancy (α = .809), negative outcome expectancy (α = .729), behavioral expectation (α = .925), and self-regulation (α = .761) had-with one exception-moderate bivariate associations with two different indicators of self-reported RT behavior at one-month follow-up (r = .298 to .506). The present research provides preliminary support for newly developed questionnaires to facilitate understanding of the psychosocial determinants of RT among young-old adults.

  13. Impact of composition and crystallization behavior of atomic layer deposited strontium titanate films on the resistive switching of Pt/STO/TiN devices

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, N.; Rodenbücher, C.; Szot, K.; Waser, R.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.; Longo, V.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2014-08-14

    The resistive switching (RS) properties of strontium titanate (Sr{sub 1+x}Ti{sub 1+y}O{sub 3+(x+2y)}, STO) based metal-oxide-metal structures prepared from industrial compatible processes have been investigated focusing on the effects of composition, microstructure, and device size. Metastable perovskite STO films were prepared on Pt-coated Si substrates utilizing plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) from cyclopentadienyl-based metal precursors and oxygen plasma at 350 °C, and a subsequent annealing at 600 °C in nitrogen. Films of 15 nm and 12 nm thickness with three different compositions [Sr]/([Sr] + [Ti]) of 0.57 (Sr-rich STO), 0.50 (stoichiometric STO), and 0.46 (Ti-rich STO) were integrated into Pt/STO/TiN crossbar structures with sizes ranging from 100 μm{sup 2} to 0.01 μm{sup 2}. Nano-structural characterizations revealed a clear effect of the composition of the as-deposited STO films on their crystallization behavior and thus on the final microstructures. Local current maps obtained by local-conductivity atomic force microscopy were in good agreement with local changes of the films' microstructures. Correspondingly, also the initial leakage currents of the Pt/STO/TiN devices were affected by the STO compositions and by the films' microstructures. An electroforming process set the Pt/STO/TiN devices into the ON-state, while the forming voltage decreased with increasing initial leakage current. After a RESET process under opposite voltage has been performed, the Pt/STO/TiN devices showed a stable bipolar RS behavior with non-linear current-voltage characteristics for the high (HRS) and the low (LRS) resistance states. The obtained switching polarity and nearly area independent LRS values agree with a filamentary character of the RS behavior according to the valence change mechanism. The devices of 0.01 μm{sup 2} size with a 12 nm polycrystalline stoichiometric STO film were switched at a current compliance of 50 μA with

  14. Efficient spin-filter and negative differential resistance behaviors in FeN4 embedded graphene nanoribbon device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.; Liu, J. B.; Yao, K. L.; Ni, Y.; Wang, S. L.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new device of spintronics by embedding two FeN4 molecules into armchair graphene nanoribbon and sandwiching them between N-doped graphene nanoribbon electrodes. Our first-principle quantum transport calculations show that the device is a perfect spin filter with high spin-polarizations both in parallel configuration (PC) and antiparallel configuration (APC). Moreover, negative differential resistance phenomena are obtained for the spin-down current in PC, and the spin-up and spin-down currents in APC. These transport properties are explained by the bias-dependent evolution of molecular orbitals and the transmission spectra.

  15. Coarsening behavior of MX carbonitrides in type 347H heat-resistant austenitic steel during thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying-hui; Liu, Chen-xi; Liu, Yong-chang; Guo, Qian-ying; Li, Hui-jun

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the growth kinetics of MX (M = metal, X = C/N) nanoprecipitates in type 347H austenitic steel was systematically studied. To investigate the coarsening behavior and the growth mechanism of MX carbonitrides during long-term aging, experiments were performed at 700, 800, 850, and 900°C for different periods (1, 24, 70, and 100 h). The precipitation behavior of carbonitrides in specimens subjected to various aging conditions was explored using carbon replicas and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. The corresponding sizes of MX carbonitrides were measured. The results demonstrates that MX carbonitrides precipitate in type 347H austenitic steel as Nb(C,N). The coarsening rate constant is time-independent; however, an increase in aging temperature results in an increase in coarsening rate of Nb(C,N). The coarsening process was analyzed according to the calculated diffusion activation energy of Nb(C,N). When the aging temperature was 800-900°C, the mean activation energy was 294 kJ·mol-1, and the coarsening behavior was controlled primarily by the diffusion of Nb atoms.

  16. Cooking behavior and starch digestibility of NUTRIOSE® (resistant starch) enriched noodles from sweet potato flour and starch.

    PubMed

    Menon, Renjusha; Padmaja, G; Sajeev, M S

    2015-09-01

    The effect of a resistant starch source, NUTRIOSE® FB06 at 10%, 15% and 20% in sweet potato flour (SPF) and 5% and 10% in sweet potato starch (SPS) in reducing the starch digestibility and glycaemic index of noodles was investigated. While NUTRIOSE (10%) significantly reduced the cooking loss in SPF noodles, this was enhanced in SPS noodles and guar gum (GG) supplementation reduced CL of both noodles. In vitro starch digestibility (IVSD) was significantly reduced in test noodles compared to 73.6g glucose/100g starch in control SPF and 65.9 g in SPS noodles. Resistant starch (RS) was 54.96% for NUTRIOSE (15%)+GG (1%) fortified SPF noodles and 53.3% for NUTRIOSE (5%)+GG (0.5%) fortified SPS noodles, as against 33.8% and 40.68%, respectively in SPF and SPS controls. Lowest glycaemic index (54.58) and the highest sensory scores (4.23) were obtained for noodles with 15% NUTRIOSE+1% GG.

  17. Fermi liquid behavior of the in-plane resistivity in the pseudogap state of YBa2Cu4O8.

    PubMed

    Proust, Cyril; Vignolle, Baptiste; Levallois, Julien; Adachi, S; Hussey, Nigel E

    2016-11-29

    Our knowledge of the ground state of underdoped hole-doped cuprates has evolved considerably over the last few years. There is now compelling evidence that, inside the pseudogap phase, charge order breaks translational symmetry leading to a reconstructed Fermi surface made of small pockets. Quantum oscillations [Doiron-Leyraud N, et al. (2007) Nature 447(7144):565-568], optical conductivity [Mirzaei SI, et al. (2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(15):5774-5778], and the validity of Wiedemann-Franz law [Grissonnache G, et al. (2016) Phys Rev B 93:064513] point to a Fermi liquid regime at low temperature in the underdoped regime. However, the observation of a quadratic temperature dependence in the electrical resistivity at low temperatures, the hallmark of a Fermi liquid regime, is still missing. Here, we report magnetoresistance measurements in the magnetic-field-induced normal state of underdoped YBa2Cu4O8 that are consistent with a T(2) resistivity extending down to 1.5 K. The magnitude of the T(2) coefficient, however, is much smaller than expected for a single pocket of the mass and size observed in quantum oscillations, implying that the reconstructed Fermi surface must consist of at least one additional pocket.

  18. Fermi liquid behavior of the in-plane resistivity in the pseudogap state of YBa2Cu4O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, Cyril; Vignolle, Baptiste; Levallois, Julien; Adachi, S.; Hussey, Nigel E.

    2016-11-01

    Our knowledge of the ground state of underdoped hole-doped cuprates has evolved considerably over the last few years. There is now compelling evidence that, inside the pseudogap phase, charge order breaks translational symmetry leading to a reconstructed Fermi surface made of small pockets. Quantum oscillations [Doiron-Leyraud N, et al. (2007) Nature 447(7144):565-568], optical conductivity [Mirzaei SI, et al. (2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(15):5774-5778], and the validity of Wiedemann-Franz law [Grissonnache G, et al. (2016) Phys Rev B 93:064513] point to a Fermi liquid regime at low temperature in the underdoped regime. However, the observation of a quadratic temperature dependence in the electrical resistivity at low temperatures, the hallmark of a Fermi liquid regime, is still missing. Here, we report magnetoresistance measurements in the magnetic-field-induced normal state of underdoped YBa2Cu4O8 that are consistent with a T2 resistivity extending down to 1.5 K. The magnitude of the T2 coefficient, however, is much smaller than expected for a single pocket of the mass and size observed in quantum oscillations, implying that the reconstructed Fermi surface must consist of at least one additional pocket.

  19. Autistic behavior, behavior analysis, and the gene

    PubMed Central

    Malott, Richard W.

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses the meaning of autism, the etiology of autistic behavior and values, the nature-nurture debate, contingencies vs. genes, and resistance to a behavioral analysis of autism. PMID:22477285

  20. Silicon carbide as an oxidation-resistant high-temperature material. 1: Oxidation and heat corrosion behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, J.

    1981-01-01

    The oxidation and corrosion behavior of SiC (in the form of a SiC powder) and hot-pressed and reaction-bound material were studied. The excellent stability of SiC in an oxidizing atmosphere is due to the development of protective SiO2 coatings. Any changes in these protective layers (e.g., due to impurities, reaction with corrosive media, high porosity of SiC, etc.) lead in most cases to increased rates of oxidation and thus restrict the field of SiC application.

  1. Effects of N/C Ratio on Solidification Behaviors of Novel Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels for Exhaust Components of Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    In order to comply with more stringent environmental and fuel consumption regulations, novel Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels that withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1,323 K (1,050 °C) is urgently demanded from automotive industries. In the current research, the solidification behavior of these alloys with variations of N/C ratio is investigated. Directional solidification methods were carried out to examine the microstructural development in mushy zones. Computational thermodynamic calculations under partial equilibrium conditions were performed to predict the solidification sequence of different phases. Microstructural characterization of the mushy zones indicates that N/C ratio significantly influenced the stability of γ-austenite and the precipitation temperature of NbC/Nb(C,N), thereby altering the solidification path, as well as the morphology and distribution of NbC/Nb(C,N) and γ-ferrite. The solidification sequence of different phases predicted by thermodynamic software agreed well with the experimental results, except the specific precipitation temperatures. The generated data and fundamental understanding will be helpful for the application of computational thermodynamic methods to predict the as-cast microstructure of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant steels.

  2. Effects of N/C Ratio on Solidification Behaviors of Novel Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels for Exhaust Components of Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    In order to comply with more stringent environmental and fuel consumption regulations, novel Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels that withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1,323 K (1,050 °C) is urgently demanded from automotive industries. In the current research, the solidification behavior of these alloys with variations of N/C ratio is investigated. Directional solidification methods were carried out to examine the microstructural development in mushy zones. Computational thermodynamic calculations under partial equilibrium conditions were performed to predict the solidification sequence of different phases. Microstructural characterization of the mushy zones indicates that N/C ratio significantly influenced the stability of γ-austenite and the precipitation temperature of NbC/Nb(C,N), thereby altering the solidification path, as well as the morphology and distribution of NbC/Nb(C,N) and γ-ferrite. The solidification sequence of different phases predicted by thermodynamic software agreed well with the experimental results, except the specific precipitation temperatures. The generated data and fundamental understanding will be helpful for the application of computational thermodynamic methods to predict the as-cast microstructure of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant steels.

  3. Assessment of End-of-Life Behavior of the Surface Modification to Improve Cavitation-Erosion Resistance in the Mercury Target at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2007-06-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of the Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer on annealed or cold-worked substrates of 316LN stainless steel has been examined in mercury using a vibratory horn technique and extended exposure periods intended to expose 'end-of-life' performance characteristics. The Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer tends to remain protective--as evidenced by modest steady-state weight loss and surface roughness increases, only isolated pitting, and limited wetting by mercury--until the protective layer has been thinned by general erosion to about 15-20 {micro}m. Prior to that amount of erosion, the cavitation-erosion resistance of both types of specimens appears defined by the properties of the protective layer. However, after thinning to such a degree, initial breakdown of the protective layer is characterized by increases in both the surface roughness and the number/depth of individual pits across the surface at a rate that is strongly dependent on the substrate condition, with annealed substrates significantly more prone to damage. However, even as the protective properties of the Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer decrease, both weight change and profile development as a function of sonication time suggest a gradual reversion to cavitation-erosion behavior similar to that of untreated substrates.

  4. Weld Growth Mechanisms and Failure Behavior of Three-Sheet Resistance Spot Welds Made of 5052 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Luo, Zhen; Chao, Y. J.; Ao, Sansan; Cui, Xuetuan

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the weld nugget formation in three-sheet aluminum alloy resistance spot welding. The nugget formation process in three equal thickness sheets and three unequal thickness sheets of 5052 aluminum alloy were studied. The results showed that the nugget was initially formed at the workpiece/workpiece interfaces (i.e., both upper interface and lower interface). The two small nuggets then grew along the radial direction and axial direction (welding direction) as the welding time increased. Eventually, the two nuggets fused into one large nugget. During the welding process, the Peltier effect between the Cu-Al caused the shift of the nugget in the welding direction. In addition, the mechanical strength and fracture mode of the weld nuggets at the upper and lower interfaces were also studied using tensile shear specimen configuration. Three failure modes were identified, namely interfacial, mixed, and pullout. The critical welding time and critical nugget diameter corresponding to the transitions of these modes were investigated. Finally, an empirical failure load formula for three-sheet weld similar to two-sheet spot weld was developed.

  5. Unusual behavior in the reactivity of 5-substituted-1H-tetrazoles in a resistively heated microreactor.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Bernhard; Glasnov, Toma N; Razzaq, Tahseen; Goessler, Walter; Roberge, Dominique M; Kappe, C Oliver

    2011-01-01

    The decomposition of 5-benzhydryl-1H-tetrazole in an N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone/acetic acid/water mixture was investigated under a variety of high-temperature reaction conditions. Employing a sealed Pyrex glass vial and batch microwave conditions at 240 °C, the tetrazole is comparatively stable and complete decomposition to diphenylmethane requires more than 8 h. Similar kinetic data were obtained in conductively heated flow devices with either stainless steel or Hastelloy coils in the same temperature region. In contrast, in a flow instrument that utilizes direct electric resistance heating of the reactor coil, tetrazole decomposition was dramatically accelerated with rate constants increased by two orders of magnitude. When 5-benzhydryl-1H-tetrazole was exposed to 220 °C in this type of flow reactor, decomposition to diphenylmethane was complete within 10 min. The mechanism and kinetic parameters of tetrazole decomposition under a variety of reaction conditions were investigated. A number of possible explanations for these highly unusual rate accelerations are presented. In addition, general aspects of reactor degradation, corrosion and contamination effects of importance to continuous flow chemistry are discussed.

  6. Behavior of tetracycline and sulfamethazine with corresponding resistance genes from swine wastewater in pilot-scale constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Liu, Yu-Hong; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Chao-Xiang; Huang, Xu; Zhu, Ge-Fu

    2014-08-15

    Four pilot-scale constructed wetlands (free water surface, SF; horizontal subsurface flow, HSF; vertical subsurface flows with different water level, VSF-L and VSF-H) were operated to assess their ability to remove sulfamethazine (SMZ) and tetracycline (TC) from wastewaters, and to investigate the abundance level of corresponding resistance genes (sulI, sulII, tetM, tetW and tetO) in the CWs. The results indicated that CWs could significantly reduce the concentration of antibiotics in wastewater, and the mass removal rate range of SMZ and TC were respectively 11%-95% and 85%-95% in the four systems on the basis of hydraulic equilibrium; further relatively high removal rate was observed in VSF with low water level. Seasonal condition had a significant effect on SMZ removal in the CWs (especially SMZ in SF), but TC removal in VSFs were not considered to have statistically significant differences in winter and summer. At the end period, the relative abundances of target genes in the CWs showed obvious increases compared to initial levels, ranging from 2.98 × 10(-5) to 1.27 × 10(-1) for sul genes and 4.68 × 10(-6) to 1.54 × 10(-1) for tet genes after treatment, and those abundances showed close relation to both characteristic of wastewater and configuration of CWs.

  7. Unusual behavior in the reactivity of 5-substituted-1H-tetrazoles in a resistively heated microreactor

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, Bernhard; Glasnov, Toma N; Razzaq, Tahseen; Goessler, Walter; Roberge, Dominique M

    2011-01-01

    Summary The decomposition of 5-benzhydryl-1H-tetrazole in an N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone/acetic acid/water mixture was investigated under a variety of high-temperature reaction conditions. Employing a sealed Pyrex glass vial and batch microwave conditions at 240 °C, the tetrazole is comparatively stable and complete decomposition to diphenylmethane requires more than 8 h. Similar kinetic data were obtained in conductively heated flow devices with either stainless steel or Hastelloy coils in the same temperature region. In contrast, in a flow instrument that utilizes direct electric resistance heating of the reactor coil, tetrazole decomposition was dramatically accelerated with rate constants increased by two orders of magnitude. When 5-benzhydryl-1H-tetrazole was exposed to 220 °C in this type of flow reactor, decomposition to diphenylmethane was complete within 10 min. The mechanism and kinetic parameters of tetrazole decomposition under a variety of reaction conditions were investigated. A number of possible explanations for these highly unusual rate accelerations are presented. In addition, general aspects of reactor degradation, corrosion and contamination effects of importance to continuous flow chemistry are discussed. PMID:21647324

  8. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Public Mental Health: Comparison to Treatment as Usual for Treatment -Resistant Depression

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Molly A.; Basco, Monica A.

    2014-01-01

    State mental health systems have been leaders in the implementation of evidence-based approaches to care for individuals with severe mental illness. Numerous case studies of the wide-scale implementation of research-supported models such as Integrated Dual Diagnosis Treatment and Assertive Community Treatment are documented. However, relatively few dissemination efforts have focused on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for individuals with major depression despite evidence indicating its efficacy with this population. A multi-site effectiveness trial of CBT was conducted within the Texas public mental health system. Eighty-three adults with major depression received CBT from community clinicians trained through a workshop and regular consultation with a master clinician. Outcomes were compared to a matched sample of individuals receiving pharmacotherapy. Outcome measures used included the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology and Beck Depression Inventory. Individuals receiving CBT showed greater improvements in depression symptoms than those in the comparison group. Greater pre-treatment symptom severity predicted better treatment response, while the presence of comorbid personality disorders was associated with poorer outcomes. PMID:24692026

  9. Seeking behavior, place conditioning, and resistance to conditioned suppression of feeding in rats intermittently exposed to palatable food.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Sánchez, Clara; Santos, Jeffrey W; Smith, Karen L; Ferragud, Antonio; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    Binge eating disorder is characterized by excessive consumption of highly palatable food within short periods of time accompanied by loss of control over eating. Extensive evidence provides support for the consideration of binge eating disorder as an addiction-like disorder. In this study, we wanted to determine whether rats undergoing an operant binge-like eating procedure could develop maladaptive forms of conditioned feeding behaviors. For this purpose, we trained male rats to self-administer either a sugary, highly palatable diet ("Palatable" rats) or a chow diet ("Chow" rats) for 1 hour a day. After escalation and stabilization of palatable food intake, we tested Chow and Palatable rats in (a) a conditioned place preference test, (b) a second-order schedule of reinforcement, (c) a cue-induced suppression of feeding test. In the conditioned place preference task, Palatable rats spent significantly more time in the compartment that was previously paired with the palatable food, compared to Chow controls. Furthermore, in the second-order schedule of reinforcement task, Palatable rats exhibited active lever responding 4- to 6-fold higher than Chow control rats. Finally, in the cue-induced suppression of feeding test, although Chow control subjects reduced responding by 32% in the presence of the conditioned punishment, Palatable rats persevered in responding despite the aversive cue. These results further characterize this animal model of binge-like eating and provide additional evidence for the addictive properties of highly palatable food.

  10. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in public mental health: comparison to treatment as usual for treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Molly A; Basco, Monica A

    2015-01-01

    State mental health systems have been leaders in the implementation of evidence-based approaches to care for individuals with severe mental illness. Numerous case studies of the wide-scale implementation of research-supported models such as integrated dual diagnosis treatment and assertive community treatment are documented. However, relatively few dissemination efforts have focused on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for individuals with major depression despite evidence indicating its efficacy with this population. A multi-site effectiveness trial of CBT was conducted within the Texas public mental health system. Eighty-three adults with major depression received CBT from community clinicians trained through a workshop and regular consultation with a master clinician. Outcomes were compared to a matched sample of individuals receiving pharmacotherapy. Outcome measures used included the quick inventory of depressive symptomatology and beck depression inventory. Individuals receiving CBT showed greater improvements in depression symptoms than those in the comparison group. Greater pre-treatment symptom severity predicted better treatment response, while the presence of comorbid personality disorders was associated with poorer outcomes.

  11. Effects of two-step homogenization on precipitation behavior of Al{sub 3}Zr dispersoids and recrystallization resistance in 7150 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhanying; Zhao, Gang; Chen, X.-Grant

    2015-04-15

    The effect of two-step homogenization treatments on the precipitation behavior of Al{sub 3}Zr dispersoids was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in 7150 alloys. Two-step treatments with the first step in the temperature range of 300–400 °C followed by the second step at 470 °C were applied during homogenization. Compared with the conventional one-step homogenization, both a finer particle size and a higher number density of Al{sub 3}Zr dispersoids were obtained with two-step homogenization treatments. The most effective dispersoid distribution was attained using the first step held at 300 °C. In addition, the two-step homogenization minimized the precipitate free zones and greatly increased the number density of dispersoids near dendrite grain boundaries. The effect of two-step homogenization on recrystallization resistance of 7150 alloys with different Zr contents was quantitatively analyzed using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. It was found that the improved dispersoid distribution through the two-step treatment can effectively inhibit the recrystallization process during the post-deformation annealing for 7150 alloys containing 0.04–0.09 wt.% Zr, resulting in a remarkable reduction of the volume fraction and grain size of recrystallization grains. - Highlights: • Effect of two-step homogenization on Al{sub 3}Zr dispersoids was investigated by TEM. • Finer and higher number of dispersoids obtained with two-step homogenization • Minimized the precipitate free zones and improved the dispersoid distribution • Recrystallization resistance with varying Zr content was quantified by EBSD. • Effectively inhibit the recrystallization through two-step treatments in 7150 alloy.

  12. Volatile Organic Compounds Induced by Herbivory of the Soybean Looper Chrysodeixis includens in Transgenic Glyphosate-Resistant Soybean and the Behavioral Effect on the Parasitoid, Meteorus rubens.

    PubMed

    Strapasson, Priscila; Pinto-Zevallos, Delia M; Da Silva Gomes, Sandra M; Zarbin, Paulo H G

    2016-08-01

    Transgenic soybean plants (RR) engineered to express resistance to glyphosate harbor a variant of the enzyme EPSPS (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) involved in the shikimic acid pathway, the biosynthetic route of three aromatic amino acids: phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. The insertion of the variant enzyme CP4 EPSPS confers resistance to glyphosate. During the process of genetic engineering, unintended secondary effects are likely to occur. In the present study, we quantified volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted constitutively or induced in response to herbivory by the soybean looper Chrysodeixis includens in transgenic soybean and its isogenic (untransformed) line. Since herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are known to play a role in the recruitment of natural enemies, we assessed whether changes in VOC profiles alter the foraging behavior of the generalist endoparasitic larval parasitoid, Meteorus rubens in the transgenic line. Additionally, we assessed whether there was a difference in plant quality by measuring the weight gain of the soybean looper. In response to herbivory, several VOCs were induced in both the conventional and the transgenic line; however, larger quantities of a few compounds were emitted by transgenic plants. Meteorus rubens females were able to discriminate between the odors of undamaged and C. includens-damaged plants in both lines, but preferred the odors emitted by herbivore-damaged transgenic plants over those emitted by herbivore-damaged conventional soybean plants. No differences were observed in the weight gain of the soybean looper. Our results suggest that VOC-mediated tritrophic interactions in this model system are not negatively affected. However, as the preference of the wasps shifted towards damaged transgenic plants, the results also suggest that genetic modification affects that tritrophic interactions in multiple ways in this model system.

  13. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations and pseudogaplike behavior in Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance and anisotropic resistivity

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, J.; Roy, B.; Tanatar, M. A.; ...

    2015-11-06

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of single-crystalline Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2 (x=0.023, 0.028, 0.033, and 0.059) annealed at 350°C for 7 days. From the observation of a characteristic shape of 75As NMR spectra in the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, as in the case of x=0 (TN=170 K), clear evidence for the commensurate AFM phase transition with the concomitant structural phase transition is observed in x=0.023 (TN=106 K) and x=0.028 (TN=53 K). Through the temperature dependence of the Knight shifts and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1), although stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations are realized in the paramagnetic state as inmore » the case of other iron pnictide superconductors, we found a gradual decrease of the AFM spin fluctuations below a crossover temperature T* that was nearly independent of Co-substitution concentration, and it is attributed to a pseudogaplike behavior in the spin excitation spectra of these systems. The T* feature finds correlation with features in the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity, ρc(T), but not with the in-plane resistivity ρa(T). The temperature evolution of anisotropic stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations is tracked in the paramagnetic and pseudogap phases by the 1/T1 data measured under magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. As a result, based on our NMR data, we have added a pseudogaplike phase to the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2.« less

  14. Resistance to the development of stress-induced behavioral despair in the forced swim test associated with elevated hippocampal Bcl-xl expression.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Galina T; Kalinina, Tatyana S; Berezova, Inna V; Bulygina, Veta V; Dygalo, Nikolay N

    2010-12-01

    Stress may predispose individuals toward depression through down-regulation of neurogenesis and increase in apoptosis in the brain. However, many subjects show high resistance to stress in relation to psychopathology. In the present study, we assessed the possibility that individual-specific patterns of gene expression associated with cell survival and proliferation may be among the molecular factors underlying stress resilience. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), anti-apoptotic B cell lymphoma like X (Bcl-xl) and pro-apoptotic bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) expression were determined in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of rats naturally differed in despair-like behavior in the forced swim test. In the hippocampus, BDNF messenger RNA (mRNA) level was significantly down-regulated 2h after the forced swim test exposure, and at this time point, Bcl-xl mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in stressed than in untested animals. The ratios of hippocampal Bcl-xl to Bax mRNA negatively correlated with the total time spent immobile in the test. When animals were divided in two groups according to immobility responses in two consecutive swim sessions and designated as stress resilient if their immobility time did not increase in the second session as it did in stress sensitive rats, it was found that resilient rats had significantly higher Bcl-xl/Bax ratios in the hippocampus than stress sensitive animals. The data suggest that naturally occurring variations in the Bcl-xl/Bax ratio in the hippocampus may contribute to individual differences in vulnerability to stress-induced depression-like behaviors.

  15. Phase behavior of block copolymers in compressed carbon dioxide and as single domain-layer, nanolithographic etch resists for sub-10 nm pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Curran Matthew

    Diblock copolymers have many interesting properties, which first and foremost include their ability to self-assemble into various ordered, regularly spaced domains with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The work in this dissertation can be logically divided into two parts -- the first and the majority of this work describes the phase behavior of certain block copolymer systems, and the second discusses real applications possible with block copolymer templates. Many compressible fluids have solvent-like properties dependent on fluid pressure and can be used as processing aids similar to liquid solvents. Here, compressed CO2 was shown to swell several thin homopolymer films, including polystyrene and polyisoprene, as measured by high pressure ellipsometry at elevated temperatures and pressures. The ellipsometric technique was modified to produce accurate data at these conditions through a custom pressure vessel design. The order-disorder transition (ODT) temperatures of several poly(styrene-bisoprene) diblock copolymers were also investigated by static birefringence when dilated with compressed CO2. Sorption of CO2 in each copolymer resulted in significant depressions of the ODT temperature as a function of fluid pressure, and the data above was used to estimate the quantitative amount of solvent in each of the diblock copolymers. These depressions were not shown to follow dilution approximation, and showed interesting, exaggerated scaling of the ODT at near-bulk polymer concentrations. The phase behavior of block copolymer surfactants was studied when blended with polymer or small molecule additives capable of selective hydrogen bonds. This work used small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to identify several low molecular weight systems with strong phase separation and ordered domains as small as 2--3 nanometers upon blending. One blend of a commercially-available surfactant with a small molecule additive was further developed and showed promise as a thin-film pattern

  16. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID invests in basic research to understand the biology of microbes, their behavior, and how drug resistance ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  17. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  18. Influence of carbon content on the copper-telluride phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior of carbon alloyed Cu-Te conductive bridge random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Devulder, Wouter De Schutter, Bob; Detavernier, Christophe; Opsomer, Karl; Franquet, Alexis; Meersschaut, Johan; Muller, Robert; Van Elshocht, Sven; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Goux, Ludovic; Belmonte, Attilio

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of the carbon content on the Cu-Te phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior in carbon alloyed Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4} based conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) cells. Carbon alloying of copper-tellurium inhibits the crystallization, while attractive switching behavior is preserved when using the material as Cu-supply layer in CBRAM cells. The phase formation is first investigated in a combinatorial way. With increasing carbon content, an enlargement of the temperature window in which the material stays amorphous was observed. Moreover, if crystalline phases are formed, subsequent phase transformations are inhibited. The electrical switching behavior of memory cells with different carbon contents is then investigated by implementing them in 580 μm diameter dot TiN/Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4}-C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si memory cells. Reliable switching behavior is observed for carbon contents up to 40 at. %, with a resistive window of more than 2 orders of magnitude, whereas for 50 at. % carbon, a higher current in the off state and only a small resistive window are present after repeated cycling. This degradation can be ascribed to the higher thermal and lower drift contribution to the reset operation due to a lower Cu affinity towards the supply layer, leading cycle-after-cycle to an increasing amount of Cu in the switching layer, which contributes to the current. The thermal diffusion of Cu into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under annealing also gives an indication of the Cu affinity of the source layer. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to investigate this migration depth in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} before and after annealing, showing a higher Cu, Te, and C migration for high carbon contents.

  19. The effect of a Ta oxygen scavenger layer on HfO2-based resistive switching behavior: thermodynamic stability, electronic structure, and low-bias transport.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Rungger, Ivan; Zapol, Peter; Nakamura, Hisao; Asai, Yoshihiro; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-03-14

    Reversible resistive switching between high-resistance and low-resistance states in metal-oxide-metal heterostructures makes them very interesting for applications in random access memories. While recent experimental work has shown that inserting a metallic "oxygen scavenger layer" between the positive electrode and oxide improves device performance, the fundamental understanding of how the scavenger layer modifies the heterostructure properties is lacking. We use density functional theory to calculate thermodynamic properties and conductance of TiN/HfO2/TiN heterostructures with and without a Ta scavenger layer. First, we show that Ta insertion lowers the formation energy of low-resistance states. Second, while the Ta scavenger layer reduces the Schottky barrier height in the high-resistance state by modifying the interface charge at the oxide-electrode interface, the heterostructure maintains a high resistance ratio between high- and low-resistance states. Finally, we show that the low-bias conductance of device on-states becomes much less sensitive to the spatial distribution of oxygen removed from the HfO2 in the presence of the Ta layer. By providing a fundamental understanding of the observed improvements with scavenger layers, we open a path to engineer interfaces with oxygen scavenger layers to control and enhance device performance. In turn, this may enable the realization of a non-volatile low-power memory technology with concomitant reduction in energy consumption by consumer electronics and offering significant benefits to society.

  20. Enhanced resistive switching and multilevel behavior in bilayered HfAlO/HfAlO{sub x} structures for non-volatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Faita, F. L.; Silva, J. P. B.; Pereira, M.; Gomes, M. J. M.

    2015-12-14

    In this work, hafnium aluminum oxide (HfAlO) thin films were deposited by ion beam sputtering deposition technique on Si substrate. The presence of oxygen vacancies in the HfAlO{sub x} layer deposited in oxygen deficient environment is evidenced from the photoluminescence spectra. Furthermore, HfAlO(oxygen rich)/HfAlO{sub x}(oxygen poor) bilayer structures exhibit multilevel resistive switching (RS), and the switching ratio becomes more prominent with increasing the HfAlO layer thickness. The bilayer structure with HfAlO/HfAlO{sub x} thickness of 30/40 nm displays the enhanced multilevel resistive switching characteristics, where the high resistance state/intermediate resistance state (IRS) and IRS/low resistance state resistance ratios are ≈10{sup 2} and ≈5 × 10{sup 5}, respectively. The switching mechanisms in the bilayer structures were investigated by the temperature dependence of the three resistance states. This study revealed that the multilevel RS is attributed to the coupling of ionic conduction and the metallic conduction, being the first associated to the formation and rupture of conductive filaments related to oxygen vacancies and the second with the formation of a metallic filament. Moreover, the bilayer structures exhibit good endurance and stability in time.

  1. Interventions for Dealing with Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Dorinda J.

    Basic intervention strategies for dealing with client resistance include psychoanalytic, learning/behavioral, and hypnotic/paradoxical. Psychoanalytic theory views resistance as a way to avoid the anxiety aroused by increasing awareness of unconscious materials and vulnerable areas in the person's life. Resistance is dealt with after it has…

  2. Two regimes behavior in the resistivity of the La 1.85Sr 0.15Cu 1- xLi xO 4 system: A signature of different electronic states for holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, S.; Musa, J. E.; Giordanengo, B.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    The variations of the normal-state resistivity and the superconducting transition temperature Tc of the La 1.85Sr 0.15(Cu 1- xLi x)O 4 system for 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.05 reveal a two regimes behavior, with x ≅ 0.03 being the critical concentration for a transition from a delocalized state, with a reduction of the resistivity values while Tc remains unchanged, to an early stage of a spin compensation process, characterized by Tc suppression without broadening. Disorder at the CuO 2 planes is proposed to be the source of localization and Tc depletion, as supported by fitting of the normal-state curves according to different conduction models.

  3. BRAIN STEM SYSTEMS AND BEHAVIOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BEHAVIOR, BLOOD CIRCULATION), SLEEP, EMOTIONS, BRAIN , STIMULATION (PHYSIOLOGY), HYPOTENSION, BLOOD PRESSURE, RESISTANCE(BIOLOGY), HEART, MUSCLES, RELAXATION(PHYSIOLOGY), CATS, AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM, BLOOD VESSELS, ITALY

  4. The effect of a Ta oxygen scavenger layer on HfO2-based resistive switching behavior: Thermodynamic stability, electronic structure, and low-bias transport

    DOE PAGES

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Rungger, Ivan; Zapol, Peter; ...

    2016-02-15

    Reversible resistive switching between high-resistance and low-resistance states in metal-oxide-metal heterostructures makes them very interesting for applications in random access memories. While recent experimental work has shown that inserting a metallic "oxygen scavenger layer'' between the positive electrode and oxide improves device performance, the fundamental understanding of how the scavenger layer modifies the heterostructure properties is lacking. We use density functional theory to calculate thermodynamic properties and conductance of TiN/HfO2/TiN heterostructures with and without a Ta scavenger layer. First, we show that Ta insertion lowers the formation energy of low-resistance states. Second, while the Ta scavenger layer reduces the Schottkymore » barrier height in the high-resistance state by modifying the interface charge at the oxide-electrode interface, the heterostructure maintains a high resistance ratio between high-and low-resistance states. Lastly, we show that the low-bias conductance of device on-states becomes much less sensitive to the spatial distribution of oxygen removed from the HfO2 in the presence of the Ta layer. By providing a fundamental understanding of the observed improvements with scavenger layers, we open a path to engineer interfaces with oxygen scavenger layers to control and enhance device performance. In turn, this may enable the realization of a non-volatile low-power memory technology with concomitant reduction in energy consumption by consumer electronics and offering significant benefits to society.« less

  5. Structure and optical properties of polycrystalline NiO films and its resistive switching behavior in Au/NiO/Pt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, J. C.; Wang, X. C.; Mi, W. B.; Ding, Y. H.; Yang, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    Structure and optical of polycrystalline NiO films fabricated by reactive sputtering and its resistive switching properties in Au/NiO/Pt structures are investigated. The size of surface uniform pyramid-like islands and average surface roughness increase with the increase of NiO film thickness (t). The NiO films grow with the preferred (111) orientation at 400 °C, but both (100) and (110)-oriented grains exist in the films fabricated at room temperature. Raman results reveal that the crystallinity of the films fabricated at 400 °C becomes good by comparing with that at room temperature. The optical band gap monotonically decreases from 4.44 eV at t=22 nm to 3.55 eV at t=800 nm. The resistance of the Au/NiO/Pt/Ti/glass structures could be switched between two stable states including low and high resistance states. The bipolar endurance performance of the resistive switching remains nondegradable after 200 cycles. The resistive switching can be ascribed to the carrier trapping and detrapping induced by the electric field, which can change the thickness of the depletion layer at Au/NiO interface.

  6. Resistive switching and magnetic behavior of Bi0.8Ba0.2FeO3 / SrRuO3 / SrTiO3 films: role of thickness-dependent strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagadia, Megha; Ravalia, Ashish; Trivedi, Priyanka; Jethva, Sadaf; Katba, Savan; Kuberkar, D. G.

    2016-05-01

    The thickness-dependent resistive switching and magnetic behavior of Bi0.8Ba0.2FeO3/SRO/STO (1 0 0) films have been studied in the context of strain modifications introduced by varying the film thickness. Generation of misfit dislocation results in strain relaxation with an increase in film thickness. All films (50, 100 and 200 nm) show hysteresis in I-V behavior at room temperature with applied voltage V max  =  ±5 V. Fitting of I-V data suggests that trap-controlled SCLC governs the conduction in HRS in the 50 nm film while in the 100 nm and 200 nm films, the charge transport mechanism is ohmic-type throughout the applied field. The ON/OFF switching ratio and current retention performance decrease with an increase in film thickness, suggesting that substrate-induced strain and interface modifications play an important role in governing the resistive switching mechanism in Bi0.8Ba0.2FeO3 films. A film with lower thickness ~50 nm is found to exhibit the highest magnetization which may be attributed to the increase in oxygen vacancies and compressive strain.

  7. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  8. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  9. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  10. Stop Thinking and Start Doing: Switching from Cognitive Therapy to Behavioral Activation in a Case of Chronic Treatment-Resistant Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottonari, Kathryn A.; Roberts, John E.; Thomas, Sherilyn N.; Read, Jennifer P.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent investigations have demonstrated that Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Behavioral Activation (BA) are both efficacious treatments for depression (Butler, Chapman, Forman, & Beck, 2006; Dimidjian et al., 2006; Dobson, 1989; Gloaguen, Cottraux, Cucherat, & Blackburn, 1998; Hollon, Thase, & Markowitz, 2002; Jacobson et al., 1996). This…

  11. Employee Resistance to Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of computers to the work place may cause employee stress. Aggressive, protective, and avoidance behaviors are forms of staff resistance. The development of good training programs will enhance productivity. Suggestions for evaluating computer systems are offered. (DF)

  12. Metabolic Resistance in Bed Bugs

    PubMed Central

    Mamidala, Praveen; Jones, Susan C.; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2011-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects have evolved resistance to various insecticides (organochlorines, pyrethroids, carbamates, etc.) through gene mutations and increased metabolism. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) are hematophagous ectoparasites that are poised to become one of the major pests in households throughout the United States. Currently, C. lectularius has attained a high global impact status due to its sudden and rampant resurgence. Resistance to pesticides is one factor implicated in this phenomenon. Although much emphasis has been placed on target sensitivity, little to no knowledge is available on the role of key metabolic players (e.g., cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases) towards pesticide resistance in C. lectularius. In this review, we discuss different modes of resistance (target sensitivity, penetration resistance, behavioral resistance, and metabolic resistance) with more emphasis on metabolic resistance. PMID:26467498

  13. Behavior of tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole and their corresponding resistance genes in three-dimensional biofilm-electrode reactors with low current.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Song, Hai L; Yang, Xiao L; Long, Xi Z; Liu, Xi; Chen, Tong Q

    2017-03-21

    Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have become major health concerns. In this study, three-dimensional biofilm-electrode reactors (3D-BERs) under low current were designed to assess their performance in removing tetracycline (TC) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) from synthetic wastewater. In addition, the fates of the corresponding ARGs in microbial communities were investigated. The mass removal ratios of TC and SMX by the 3D-BERs were 82.6-97.3% and 72.2-93.2%, respectively. There were obvious increases in the relative abundances of all target genes after ∼2 months. The tet and sul genes were significantly upregulated by high concentrations of antibiotics in the cathode layer, and higher ARG levels were evident in the cathodes than in the anodes. High-throughput sequencing identified Methylotenera, Candidatus Accumulibacter, Limnohabitans, Dechloromonas, Crenothrix, and Caldilinea as the dominant genera in the samples at the end of the experiment, after ∼8 months, and these bacteria potentially exhibited antibiotic resistance. The relative abundances and compositions of the dominant microbial populations changed throughout the course of antibiotic removal in the 3D-BERs.

  14. Diminishing sign anomaly and scaling behavior of the mixed-state Hall resistivity in Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films containing columnar defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budhani, R. C.; Liou, S. H.; Cai, Z. X.

    1993-01-01

    The issues of sign reversal of the Hall voltage and scaling between longitudinal (rho(xx)) and Hall (rho(xy)) resistivities are studied in Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films in which the vortex dynamics is drastically changed by flux pinning at heavy-ion-irradiation-induced linear defects. While the sign anomaly diminishes with increasing defect concentration, the power law rho(xy) is approximately equal to rho(xx) exp beta, beta = 1.85 +/- 0.1, holds even after irradiation. This result shows that the scaling is a universal feature of the mixed state in this system. The sign anomaly, on the other hand, is not consistent with a model that invokes pinning-induced backflow in the vortex core as the mechanism for this effect.

  15. Oxygen loss, semiconductivity, and positive temperature coefficient of resistance behavior in undoped cation-stoichiometric BaTiO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, H.; Cordoncillo, E.; Escribano, P.; Sinclair, D. C.; West, A. R.

    2005-11-01

    Stoichiometric BaTiO3 ceramics fabricated from sol-gel-derived powders and sintered at temperatures <=1100 °C are highly insulating and electrically homogeneous. At higher sintering temperatures, samples gradually lose oxygen and the conductivity increases as a consequence. The latter phenomena are very sensitive to the furnace atmosphere and are partially reversible during cooling when partial reoxidation can occur. This results in ceramics that are often electrically heterogeneous with insulating surfaces or grain boundaries but semiconducting grain cores. In samples that were heated at 1450 °C in N2 and quenched, a positive temperature coefficient of resistance (PTCR) effect was observed, associated with an additional impedance arising from space-charge effects. These results demonstrate that, depending on sample processing, insulating cation-stoichiometric BaTiO3 can instead be semiconducting and under certain circumstances, exhibit a PTCR effect, without the need for donor dopant additives.

  16. Epidemiologic Behavior and Estimation of an Optimal Cut-Off Point for Homeostasis Model Assessment-2 Insulin Resistance: A Report from a Venezuelan Population

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Martínez, María Sofía; Apruzzese, Vanessa; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Gonzalez, Robys; Torres, Yaquelín; Bello, Luis; Añez, Roberto; Chacín, Maricarmen; Toledo, Alexandra; Cabrera, Mayela; Mengual, Edgardo; Ávila, Raquel; López-Miranda, José

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mathematical models such as Homeostasis Model Assessment have gained popularity in the evaluation of insulin resistance (IR). The purpose of this study was to estimate the optimal cut-off point for Homeostasis Model Assessment-2 Insulin Resistance (HOMA2-IR) in an adult population of Maracaibo, Venezuela. Methods. Descriptive, cross-sectional study with randomized, multistaged sampling included 2,026 adult individuals. IR was evaluated through HOMA2-IR calculation in 602 metabolically healthy individuals. For cut-off point estimation, two approaches were applied: HOMA2-IR percentile distribution and construction of ROC curves using sensitivity and specificity for selection. Results. HOMA2-IR arithmetic mean for the general population was 2.21 ± 1.42, with 2.18 ± 1.37 for women and 2.23 ± 1.47 for men (P = 0.466). When calculating HOMA2-IR for the healthy reference population, the resulting p75 was 2.00. Using ROC curves, the selected cut-off point was 1.95, with an area under the curve of 0.801, sensibility of 75.3%, and specificity of 72.8%. Conclusions. We propose an optimal cut-off point of 2.00 for HOMA2-IR, offering high sensitivity and specificity, sufficient for proper assessment of IR in the adult population of our city, Maracaibo. The determination of population-specific cut-off points is needed to evaluate risk for public health problems, such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27379332

  17. Behavioral response of pyrite structured Co0.2Fe0.8S2 nano-wires under high-pressure up to 8 GPa - Mössbauer spectroscopic and electrical resistivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, U.; Sharma, P.; Parthasarathy, G.; Sreedhar, B.

    2016-02-01

    Pyrite-structured Co0.2Fe0.8S2 nano wires with aspect ratio 45:1, synthesized using solution colloid method were studied under high pressure up to 8 GPa using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy (using diamond anvil cell) and electrical resistivity (using tungsten carbide cell) techniques. Room temperature S K-edge XANES studies at INFN-LNF synchrotron beam line signified the changes in the electronic structure owing to Co substitution. Magnetic measurements at 5 K demonstrated disordered ferromagnetic behavior similar to Griffith phase. The value of isomer shift identified Fe in divalent, low spin state corresponding to pyrite structure. Higher value of quadrupole splitting observed at ambient condition was due to large lattice strain and electric field gradient generated by large surface to volume ratio of the nano size of the system. With applied pressure, the value followed the expected trend of increase up to 4.3 GPa, then to decrease till 6.4 GPa. Such change in the trend suggested a phase transition. On decompression to ambient pressure, the system seemed to retain high pressure phase and nano structure. The pressure coefficient of electrical resistivity varying from -0.0454 to -0.166 Ω-cm/GPa across the transition pressure of ~4.5 GPa was sluggish suggesting second order phase transition. The pressure-dependent variations by Mössbauer parameters and electrical resistivity showed identical result. This is the first report of pressure effect on nano sized Co0.2Fe0.8S2. Effect of particle size on transition pressure could not be evaluated due to lack of available reports on bulk system.

  18. QCM-4, a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist ameliorates plasma HPA axis hyperactivity, leptin resistance and brain oxidative stress in depression and anxiety-like behavior in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Devadoss, Thangaraj

    2015-01-02

    Several preclinical studies have revealed antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effect of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. In our earlier study, we have reported the antidepressive-like effect of 3-methoxy-N-p-tolylquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (QCM-4) in obese mice subjected to chronic stress. The present study deals with the biochemical mechanisms associated with depression co-morbid with obesity. Mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks, further subjected for treatment with QCM-4 (1 and 2mg/kg p.o.) and standard antidepressant escitalopram (ESC) (10mg/kg p.o.) for 28 days. Behavioral assays for depression such as sucrose preference test (SPT), forced swim test (FST) and for anxiety such as light and dark test (LDT) and hole board test (HBT) were performed in obese mice. Biochemical assessments including plasma leptin and corticosterone concentration followed by brain oxidative stress parameters malonaldehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were performed. Results confirmed that QCM-4 exhibits antidepressive effect by increasing the sucrose consumption in SPT, reducing immobility time in FST and anxiolytic effect by increasing transitions and time in light chamber in LDT, increasing head dip and crossing score in HBT. Furthermore, QCM-4 attenuated the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity by reducing the plasma corticosterone, reversing altered plasma leptin, restoring the imbalance of brain MDA and GSH concentration. In conclusion, QCM-4 showed antidepressive and anxiolytic effect by reversing the behavioral alterations that were supported by biochemical estimations in obese mice.

  19. Comprehensive study of the abrasive wear and slurry erosion behavior of an expanded system of high chromium cast iron and microstructural modification for enhanced wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Reinaldo Javier

    High chromium cast irons (HCCIs) have been demonstrated to be an effective material for a wide range of applications in aggressive environments, where resistances to abrasion, erosion and erosion-corrosion are required. For instance, machinery and facilities used in mining and extraction in Alberta's oil sands suffer from erosion and erosion-corrosion caused by silica-containing slurries, which create challenges for the reliability and maintenance of slurry pumping systems as well as other processing and handling equipment. Considerable efforts have been made to determine and understand the relationship between microstructural features of the HCCIs and their wear performance, in order to guide the material selection and development for specific service conditions with optimal performance. The focus was previously put on a narrow group of compositions dictated by ASTM A532. However, with recent advances in casting technology, the HCCI compositional range can be significantly expanded, which potentially brings new alloys that can be superior to those which are currently employed. This work consists of three main aspects of study. The first one is the investigation of an expanded system of white irons with their composition ranging from 1 to 6 wt.% C and 5 to 45 wt.% Cr, covering 53 alloys. This work has generated wear and corrosion maps and established correlation between the performance and microstructural features for the alloys. The work was conducted in collaboration with the Materials Development Center of Weir Minerals in Australia, and the results have been collected in a database that is used by the company to guide materials selection for slurry pump components in Alberta oil sands and in other mining operations throughout the world. The second part consists of three case studies on effects of high chromium and high carbon, respectively, on the performance of the HCCIs. The third aspect is the development of an approach to enhance the wear resistance of

  20. Resistance to Disruption in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E.; Neal, Carrie M.; Ahearn, William H.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B.; Dube, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple…

  1. Correlation of Electrical Resistance to CMC Stress-Strain and Fracture Behavior Under High Heat-Flux Thermal and Stress Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory; Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Because SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are under consideration for use as turbine engine hot-section components in extreme environments, it becomes necessary to investigate their performance and damage morphologies under complex loading and environmental conditions. Monitoring of electrical resistance (ER) has been shown as an effective tool for detecting damage accumulation of woven melt-infiltrated SiCSiC CMCs. However, ER change under complicated thermo-mechanical loading is not well understood. In this study a systematic approach is taken to determine the capabilities of ER as a relevant non-destructive evaluation technique for high heat-flux testing, including thermal gradients and localized stress concentrations. Room temperature and high temperature, laser-based tensile tests were conducted in which stress-dependent damage locations were determined using modal acoustic emission (AE) monitoring and compared to full-field strain mapping using digital image correlation (DIC). This information is then compared with the results of in-situ ER monitoring, post-test ER inspection and fractography in order to correlate ER response to convoluted loading conditions and damage evolution.

  2. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets ...

  3. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections caused by such bacteria untreatable. Resistance in tuberculosis (TB) WHO estimates that, in 2014, there were about 480 000 new cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), a form of tuberculosis that is ...

  4. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  5. Whence Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Stephen W.; Metzger, Rosemarie; Swenson, Brian R.; Sawyer, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Antimicrobial resistance results from a complex interaction between pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, antimicrobial pressure, and genes, which together comprise the total body of potential resistance elements. The purpose of this study is to review and evaluate the importance of antimicrobial pressure on the development of resistance in a single surgical intensive care unit. Methods: We reviewed a prospectively collected dataset of all intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections in surgical and trauma patients over a 6-y period at a single hospital. Resistant gram-negative pathogens (rGNR) included those resistant to all aminoglycosides, quinolones, penicillins, cephalosporins, or carbapenems; resistant gram-positive infections (rGPC) included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Each resistant infection was evaluated for prior or concomitant antibiotic use, previous treatment for the same (non-resistant) organism, and concurrent infection with the same organism (genus and species, although not necessarily resistant) in another ICU patient. Results: Three hundred and thirty resistant infections were identified: 237 rGNR and 93 rGPC. Infections with rGNR occurred frequently while receiving antibiotic therapy (65%), including the sensitive form of the subsequent resistant pathogen (42.2%). Infections with rGPC were also likely to occur on antimicrobial therapy (50.6%). Treatment of a different patient for an infection with the same resistant pathogen in the ICU at the time of diagnosis, implying potential patient-to-patient transmission occurred more frequently with rGNR infections (38.8%). Conclusion: Antimicrobial pressure exerts a substantial effect on the development of subsequent infection. Our data demonstrate a high estimated rate of de novo emergence of resistance after treatment, which appears to be more common than patient-to-patient transmission. These data support

  6. RESISTIVITY METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistivity methods were among the first geophysical techniques developed. The basic concept originated with Conrad Schlumberger, who conducted the initial resistivity field tests in Normandy, France during 1912. The resistivity method, employed in its earliest and most conventional form, uses an ex...

  7. Enhanced salt resistance in apple plants overexpressing a Malus vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter gene is associated with differences in stomatal behavior and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Wei, Zhiwei; Liang, Dong; Zhou, Shasha; Li, Yonghong; Liu, Changhai; Ma, Fengwang

    2013-09-01

    High salinity is a major abiotic factor that limits crop production. The dwarfing apple rootstock M.26 is sensitive to such stress. To obtain an apple that is adaptable to saline soils, we transformed this rootstock with a vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, MdNHX1. Differences in salt tolerance between transgenic and wild-type (WT) rootstocks were examined under field conditions. We also compared differences when 'Naganofuji No. 2' apple was grafted onto these transgenic or WT rootstocks. Plants on the transgenic rootstocks grew well during 60 d of mild stress (100 mM NaCl) while the WT exhibited chlorosis, inhibited growth and even death. Compared with the untreated control, the stomatal density was greater in both non-grafted and grafted WT plants exposed to 200 mM NaCl. In contrast, that density was significantly decreased in leaves from grafted transgenic plants. At 200 mM NaCl, net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, and chlorophyll contents were markedly reduced in the WT, whereas the declines in those values were only minor in similarly stressed transgenic plants. Therefore, we conclude that overexpressing plants utilize a better protective mechanism for retaining higher photosynthetic capacity. Furthermore, this contrast in tolerance and adaptability to stress is linked to differences in stomatal behavior and photosynthetic rates.

  8. Resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cag, Yasemin; Caskurlu, Hulya; Fan, Yanyan; Cao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    By definition, the terms sepsis and septic shock refer to a potentially fatal infectious state in which the early administration of an effective antibiotic is the most significant determinant of the outcome. Because of the global spread of resistant bacteria, the efficacy of antibiotics has been severely compromised. S. pneumonia, Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas are the predominant pathogens of sepsis and septic shock. It is common for E. coli, Klebsiella, Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas to be resistant to multiple drugs. Multiple drug resistance is caused by the interplay of multiple resistance mechanisms those emerge via the acquisition of extraneous resistance determinants or spontaneous mutations. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), carbapenemases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and quinolone resistance determinants are typically external and disseminate on mobile genetic elements, while porin-efflux mechanisms are activated by spontaneous modifications of inherited structures. Porin and efflux mechanisms are frequent companions of multiple drug resistance in Acinetobacter and P. aeruginosa, but only occasionally detected among E. coli and Klebsiella. Antibiotic resistance became a global health threat. This review examines the major resistance mechanisms of the leading microorganisms of sepsis. PMID:27713884

  9. CONTROLLING BEHAVIOR CHANGERS' BEHAVIOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MARKLE, DAVID G.

    AN EMERGING METHODOLOGY OF PROGRAMING AVOIDS SOME OF THE UNFORTUNATE EFFECTS ON PROGRAMER BEHAVIOR PRODUCED BY INTERPRETATIONS OF TWO EARLIER METHODOLOGIES. WHILE SKINNERIAN PROGRAMING OFTEN HAS LED TO TRIVIAL PROGRAMS THROUGH PROBLEMS OF APPLICATION OF THE CRITERIA OF SPECIFIED BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES AND LOW ERROR RATES, CROWDERIAN PROGRAMING HAS…

  10. Implementing a patient education intervention about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevention and effect on knowledge and behavior in veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Charlesnika T.; Hill, Jennifer N.; Guihan, Marylou; Chin, Amy; Goldstein, Barry; Richardson, Michael S. A.; Anderson, Vicki; Risa, Kathleen; Kellie, Susan; Cameron, Kenzie A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and effect of a nurse-administered patient educational intervention about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevention on knowledge and behavior of Veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). Design Blinded, block-randomized controlled pilot trial. Setting Two Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) SCI Centers. Participants Veterans were recruited March–September 2010 through referral by a healthcare provider from inpatient, outpatient, and residential care settings. Intervention Thirty participants were randomized to the nurse-administered intervention and 31 to the usual care group. The intervention included a brochure and tools to assist nurses in conducting the education. Outcome measures Pre- and post-intervention measurement of knowledge and behaviors related to MRSA and prevention strategies and feasibility measures related to implementation. Results Participants were primarily male (95.1%), white (63.9%), with tetraplegia (63.9%) and mean age and duration of injury of 64.3 and 20.5 years, respectively. The intervention groups mean knowledge score significantly increased between pre- and post-test (mean change score = 1.70, 95% confidence interval, CI 0.25–3.15) while the usual care groups score did not significantly change (mean change score = 1.45, 95% CI −0.08–2.98). However, the mean knowledge change between intervention and usual care groups was not significantly different (P = 0.81). Overall behavior scores did not significantly differ between treatment groups; however, the intervention group was more likely to report intentions to clean hands (90.0% vs. 64.5%, P = 0.03) and asking providers about MRSA status (46.7% vs. 16.1%, P = 0.01). Nurse educators reported that the quality of the intervention was high and could be implemented in clinical care. Conclusions A targeted educational strategy is feasible to implement in SCI/D clinical practices and may improve some

  11. [Psychological resistances of women to the principal female methods of contraception. Clinical classification].

    PubMed

    Wauty-Dancot, M C; Rucquoy, G

    1975-01-01

    According to the literature and to the experience of the authors gathered at the family department at the Louvain Faculty of Medicine, these psychological resistances may schematically be classified as follows: normative and socio-cultural resistances; medical resistances (wish of pregnancy, personality traits, narcissm, sexual and technical resistances); psychopathological resistances (unspecific neurotic behavior, phobias, hypochondriasis, obsessive-compulsive neurosis, character neurosis); secondary resistances.

  12. Multistate resistive switching in silver nanoparticle films

    PubMed Central

    Sandouk, Eric J; Gimzewski, James K; Stieg, Adam Z

    2015-01-01

    Resistive switching devices have garnered significant consideration for their potential use in nanoelectronics and non-volatile memory applications. Here we investigate the nonlinear current–voltage behavior and resistive switching properties of composite nanoparticle films comprising a large collective of metal–insulator–metal junctions. Silver nanoparticles prepared via the polyol process and coated with an insulating polymer layer of tetraethylene glycol were deposited onto silicon oxide substrates. Activation required a forming step achieved through application of a bias voltage. Once activated, the nanoparticle films exhibited controllable resistive switching between multiple discrete low resistance states that depended on operational parameters including the applied bias voltage, temperature and sweep frequency. The films’ resistance switching behavior is shown here to be the result of nanofilament formation due to formative electromigration effects. Because of their tunable and distinct resistance states, scalability and ease of fabrication, nanoparticle films have a potential place in memory technology as resistive random access memory cells. PMID:27877824

  13. Resistance to disruption in a classroom setting.

    PubMed

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E; Neal, Carrie M; Ahearn, William H; Wheeler, Emily E; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B; Dube, William V

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple variable-interval (VI) 7-s VI 30-s schedule for 6 participants with developmental disabilities. Resistance to disruption was measured by presenting a distracting item. Response rates in the disruption components were compared to within-session response rates in prior baseline components. Results were consistent with the predictions of behavioral momentum theory for 5 of 6 participants.

  14. Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) Are Resistant to a Reserpine-Induced Progressive Model of Parkinson’s Disease: Differences in Motor Behavior, Tyrosine Hydroxylase and α-Synuclein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Anderson H. F. F.; Meurer, Ywlliane S. R.; da Silva, Anatildes F.; Medeiros, André M.; Campêlo, Clarissa L. C.; Abílio, Vanessa C.; Engelberth, Rovena C. G. K.; Cavalcante, Jeferson S.; Izídio, Geison S.; Ribeiro, Alessandra M.; Silva, Regina H.

    2017-01-01

    Reserpine is an irreversible inhibitor of vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) used to study Parkinson’s disease (PD) and screening for antiparkinsonian treatments in rodents. Recently, the repeated treatment with a low-dose of reserpine was proposed as a progressive model of PD. Rats under this treatment show progressive catalepsy behavior, oral movements and spontaneous motor activity decrement. In parallel, compared to Wistar rats, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are resistant to acute reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia. We aimed to assess whether SHR would present differential susceptibility to repeated reserpine-induced deficits in the progressive model of PD. Male Wistar and SHR rats were administered 15 subcutaneously (s.c.) injections of reserpine (0.1 mg/kg) or vehicle, every other day and motor activity was assessed by the catalepsy, oral movements and open field tests. Only reserpine-treated Wistar rats presented increased latency to step down in the catalepsy test and impaired spontaneous activity in the open field. On the other hand, there was an increase in oral movements in both reserpine-treated strains, although with reduced magnitude and latency to instauration in SHR. After a 15-day withdrawn period, both strains recovered from motor impairment, but SHR animals expressed reduced latencies to reach control levels. Finally, we performed immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and α-synuclein (α-syn) 48 h after the last injection or 15 days after withdrawn. Reserpine-treated animals presented a reduction in TH and an increase in α-syn immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra and dorsal striatum (dSTR), which were both recovered after 15 days of withdraw. Furthermore, SHR rats were resistant to reserpine-induced TH decrement in the substantia nigra, and presented reduced immunoreactivity to α-syn in the dSTR relative to Wistar rats, irrespective of treatment. This effect was accompanied by increase of malondaldhyde (MDA) in

  15. Resisting HRD's Resistance to Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierema, Laura L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically illustrate how human resource development (HRD) resists and omits issues of diversity in academic programs, textbooks, and research; analyze the research on HRD and diversity over a ten-year period; discuss HRD's resistance to diversity; and offer some recommendations for a more authentic…

  16. Interface resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkkonen, Juha

    1983-11-01

    Interface resistance is studied by using the Landauer formula which relates the resistance to the quantum mechanical transmission coefficient. A simple rederivation of the Landauer formula is given. Using a step-like potential barrier as a model for the metal-semiconductor contact an analytical expression for the effective Richardson constant is derived. As an other application the grain boundary resistance in polycrystalline semiconductors is studied. The short-range potential fluctuation associated with the grain boundary is described by a rectangular potential barrier. The results for the grain boundary limited mobility cover both the strong and weak scattering regimes.

  17. Resistivity analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bruce, Michael R.; Bruce, Victoria J.; Ring, Rosalinda M.; Cole, Edward Jr. I.; Hawkins, Charles F.; Tangyungong, Paiboon

    2006-06-13

    According to an example embodiment of the present invention a semiconductor die having a resistive electrical connection is analyzed. Heat is directed to the die as the die is undergoing a state-changing operation to cause a failure due to suspect circuitry. The die is monitored, and a circuit path that electrically changes in response to the heat is detected and used to detect that a particular portion therein of the circuit is resistive. In this manner, the detection and localization of a semiconductor die defect that includes a resistive portion of a circuit path is enhanced.

  18. Electrical resistivity anomaly, valence shift of Pr ion, and magnetic behavior in epitaxial (Pr1-yYy)1-xCaxCoO3 thin films under compressive strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, H.; Noda, Y.; Akuzawa, K.; Naito, T.; Ito, A.; Goto, T.; Marysko, M.; Jirak, Z.; Hejtmanek, J.; Nitta, K.

    2017-03-01

    We have fabricated (Pr1-yYy)1-xCaxCoO3 (PYCCO) epitaxial films with various thicknesses by pulsed laser deposition on the SrLaAlO4 (SLAO) substrate that applied an in-plane compressive stress to the film, and investigated the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity, ρ(T), of the films. An anomalous ρ(T) upturn with a broad hysteresis could be clearly observed only for the thinnest film (d = 50 nm), and the ρ(T) anomaly decreased by increasing film thickness, d. The temperature dependence of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra at Pr L2-edge was measured for the films, and the valence states of praseodymium (Pr) ion were determined using the analysis of the XANES spectra. As a result, the average valence of the Pr ion in the d = 50 nm film slightly increases with decreasing temperature from the common value of 3.0+ around room temperature to 3.15+ at 8 K. The valence shift of Pr is thus similar to what was observed on the PYCCO polycrystalline bulks with an abrupt metal-insulator transition, accompanied by a spin-state (SS) transition of Co ions. Furthermore, the low-temperature SQUID measurements evidenced a paramagnetic behavior down to the lowest temperature, which suggests that the dominant part of Co3+ ions in the film grown on the SLAO substrate tends to be in the low spin state characteristic for the insulating ground state. These results strongly suggest that the anomalous ρ(T) upturn in the thin films on the SrLaAlO4 (SLAO) substrate is closely related to the SS transition of Co ions. On the other hand, PYCCO films grown on the LaAlO3 (LAO) substrate that applied an in-plane tensile stress showed no valence shift of Pr ions and developed a long range ferromagnetic order, which points to a complete suppression of the low-temperature transition. The behaviors of the epitaxial films are discussed in terms of the in-plane stress exerted by different substrates and accumulated elastic energy.

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... penicillin was the treatment of choice for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) , a human pathogen that can cause life-threatening ... skin, blood, bone, heart, and other vital organs; S. aureus resistance to penicillin rapidly evolved in the 1950s. ...

  20. Lantibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Draper, Lorraine A; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2015-06-01

    The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry.

  1. Lantibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Lorraine A.; Ross, R. Paul

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry. PMID:25787977

  2. Host plant resistance against tomato spotted wilt virus in peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and its impact on susceptibility to the virus, virus population genetics, and vector feeding behavior and survival.

    PubMed

    Sundaraj, Sivamani; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Culbreath, Albert K; Riley, David G; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-02-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) severely affects peanut production in the southeastern United States. Breeding efforts over the last three decades resulted in the release of numerous peanut genotypes with field resistance to TSWV. The degree of field resistance in these genotypes has steadily increased over time, with recently released genotypes exhibiting a higher degree of field resistance than older genotypes. However, most new genotypes have never been evaluated in the greenhouse or laboratory against TSWV or thrips, and the mechanism of resistance is unknown. In this study, TSWV-resistant and -susceptible genotypes were subjected to TSWV mechanical inoculation. The incidence of TSWV infection was 71.7 to 87.2%. Estimation of TSWV nucleocapsid (N) gene copies did not reveal significant differences between resistant and susceptible genotypes. Parsimony and principal component analyses of N gene nucleotide sequences revealed inconsistent differences between virus isolates collected from resistant and susceptible genotypes and between old (collected in 1998) and new (2010) isolates. Amino acid sequence analyses indicated consistent differences between old and new isolates. In addition, we found evidence for overabundance of nonsynonymous substitutions. However, there was no evidence for positive selection. Purifying selection, population expansion, and differentiation seem to have influenced the TSWV populations temporally rather than positive selection induced by host resistance. Choice and no-choice tests indicated that resistant and susceptible genotypes differentially affected thrips feeding and survival. Thrips feeding and survival were suppressed on some resistant genotypes compared with susceptible genotypes. These findings reveal how TSWV resistance in peanut could influence evolution, epidemiology, and management of TSWV.

  3. Culture and Disability Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Carroll M.

    1983-01-01

    A substantial amount of literature suggests that illness behavior in the United States is a product of a patient's core culture; equally credible findings do not support this contention. Most students and graduates in the health care professions believe that illness and disability behavior are affected by a patient's culture, but they are hard put to find convincing examples of that relationship. In experience with medical students studying the social and cultural bases of illness behavior, with patients who are disabled and with persons who claim disability in the absence of physical disease or disabling psychopathology, I observed no deviant disability behavior that was typical for the members of any cultural group, and no behavior was displayed by the members of one cultural group that was not seen in members of other cultural groups. No cultural stereotypes were upheld. I did find evidence that disability behavior is influenced by personality factors, social situations and the gains derived from the disability status. Evolving concepts of “entitlement,” which are closely related to socioeconomic status, also have a significant influence. The impact of feedback from others in a person's many social and medical subcultures is a more crucial determinant of illness and disability behavior, except in those for whom illness and disability behavior is determined by the limitations imposed by the disease or by a personality structure resistant to cultural expectations and social feedback. PMID:6666106

  4. Quantum criticality and DBI magneto-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiritsis, Elias; Li, Li

    2017-03-01

    We use the DBI action from string theory and holography to study the magneto-resistance at quantum criticality with hyperscaling violation. We find and analyze a rich class of scaling behaviors for the magneto-resistance. A special case describes the scaling results found in pnictides by Hayers et al in 2014 (arXiv:1412.6484).

  5. Androgen resistance.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Deeb, Asma

    2006-12-01

    Androgen resistance causes the androgen insensitivity syndrome in its variant forms and is a paradigm of clinical syndromes associated with hormone resistance. In its complete form, the syndrome causes XY sex reversal and a female phenotype. Partial resistance to androgens is a common cause of ambiguous genitalia of the newborn, but a similar phenotype may result from several other conditions, including defects in testis determination and androgen biosynthesis. The biological actions of androgens are mediated by a single intracellular androgen receptor encoded by a gene on the long arm of the X chromosome. Mutations in this gene result in varying degrees of androgen receptor dysfunction and phenotypes that often show poor concordance with the genotype. Functional characterization and three-dimensional modelling of novel mutant receptors has been informative in understanding the mechanism of androgen action. Management issues in syndromes of androgen insensitivity include decisions on sex assignment, timing of gonadectomy in relation to tumour risk, and genetic and psychological counselling.

  6. Improving Maladaptive Behaviors Using Sensory Integration Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuman, Theresa

    A study examined the use of sensory integration techniques to reduce the maladaptive behaviors that interfered with the learning of nine high school students with mental impairments attending a special school. Maladaptive behaviors identified included rocking, toe walking, echolalia, resistance to change, compulsive behaviors, aggression,…

  7. Resistive Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed text on resistive networks was developed under contract with the United States Office of Education as part of a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is to be used in conjunction with other materials and with other short texts in the series, this one being Number 3. (DH)

  8. The effect of a Ta oxygen scavenger layer on HfO2-based resistive switching behavior: Thermodynamic stability, electronic structure, and low-bias transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Rungger, Ivan; Zapol, Peter; Nakamura, Hisao; Asai, Yoshihiro; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-02-15

    Reversible resistive switching between high-resistance and low-resistance states in metal-oxide-metal heterostructures makes them very interesting for applications in random access memories. While recent experimental work has shown that inserting a metallic "oxygen scavenger layer'' between the positive electrode and oxide improves device performance, the fundamental understanding of how the scavenger layer modifies the heterostructure properties is lacking. We use density functional theory to calculate thermodynamic properties and conductance of TiN/HfO2/TiN heterostructures with and without a Ta scavenger layer. First, we show that Ta insertion lowers the formation energy of low-resistance states. Second, while the Ta scavenger layer reduces the Schottky barrier height in the high-resistance state by modifying the interface charge at the oxide-electrode interface, the heterostructure maintains a high resistance ratio between high-and low-resistance states. Lastly, we show that the low-bias conductance of device on-states becomes much less sensitive to the spatial distribution of oxygen removed from the HfO2 in the presence of the Ta layer. By providing a fundamental understanding of the observed improvements with scavenger layers, we open a path to engineer interfaces with oxygen scavenger layers to control and enhance device performance. In turn, this may enable the realization of a non-volatile low-power memory technology with concomitant reduction in energy consumption by consumer electronics and offering significant benefits to society.

  9. Behavioral dermatology.

    PubMed

    Virga, Vint

    2003-03-01

    The practice of behavioral dermatology encompasses the management of any dermatologic condition for which there is a substantial behavioral or emotional component. Commonly recognized behavioral dermatoses such as acral lick dermatitis, psychogenic alopecia, and hyperesthesia are syndromes rather than discrete diagnoses. Successful patient management is dependent upon integrating physiological, social, and environmental factors which contribute to the clinical manifestation of behavioral dermatoses.

  10. Cell shunt resistance and photovoltaic module performance

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T.J.; Basso, T.S.; Rummel, S.R.

    1996-09-01

    Shunt resistance of cells in photovoltaic modules can affect module power output and could indicate flawed manufacturing processes and reliability problems. The authors describe a two-terminal diagnostic method to directly measure the shunt resistance of individual cells in a series-connected module non-intrusively, without deencapsulation. Peak power efficiency vs. light intensity was measured on a 12-cell, series-connected, single crystalline module having relatively high cell shunt resistances. The module was remeasured with 0.5-, 1-, and 2-ohm resistors attached across each cell to simulate shunt resistances of several emerging technologies. Peak power efficiencies decreased dramatically at lower light levels. Using the PSpice circuit simulator, they verified that cell shunt and series resistances can indeed be responsible for the observed peak power efficiency vs. intensity behavior. They discuss the effect of basic cell diode parameters, i.e., shunt resistance, series resistance, and recombination losses, on PV module performance as a function of light intensity.

  11. The Ritual Dimensions of Resistance: Clowning and Symbolic Inversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaren, Peter L.

    1985-01-01

    Draws upon recent fieldwork in a Catholic junior high school to focus on the ritualized behavior of the "class clown," who resists instruction. Calls upon resistance theorists to strive for more conceptual precision in their articulation of the symbolic dimension of transgressive student behavior by utilizing a more multidisciplinary…

  12. Student Resistance to Schooling: Disconnections with Education in Rural Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Katie A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates student reasons for resisting engagement with school in a rural Appalachian area. The concept of student resistance to school is considered within a White, working-class student population. Through classroom observations, students displaying resistant behaviors were selected to participate in interviews. Coding of interview…

  13. Pre-resistance-welding resistance check

    DOEpatents

    Destefan, Dennis E.; Stompro, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

  14. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information Contact Us Research > NIAID's Role in Research > Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance > Understanding share with facebook share with twitter ... Prevention, Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial ... To prevent antimicrobial resistance, you and your healthcare ...

  15. Behavioral Economics

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Derek D.; Niileksela, Christopher R.; Kaplan, Brent A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, behavioral economics has gained much attention in psychology and public policy. Despite increased interest and continued basic experimental studies, the application of behavioral economics to therapeutic settings remains relatively sparse. Using examples from both basic and applied studies, we provide an overview of the principles comprising behavioral economic perspectives and discuss implications for behavior analysts in practice. A call for further translational research is provided. PMID:25729506

  16. Verbal behavior.

    PubMed

    Michael, J

    1984-11-01

    THE RECENT HISTORY AND CURRENT STATUS OF THE AREA OF VERBAL BEHAVIOR ARE CONSIDERED IN TERMS OF THREE MAJOR THEMATIC LINES: the operant conditioning of adult verbal behavior, learning to be an effective speaker and listener, and developments directly related to Skinner's Verbal Behavior. Other topics not directly related to the main themes are also considered: the work of Kurt Salzinger, ape-language research, and human operant research related to rule-governed behavior.

  17. Behavioral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Sol L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains 18 articles discussing the uses of behavioral medicine in such areas as obesity, smoking, hypertension, and headache. Reviews include discussions of behavioral medicine and insomnia, chronic pain, asthma, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary-prone behavior. Newly emerging topics include gastrointestinal disorders, arthritis,…

  18. Behaviorally Speaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Elias H.; Dutton, Darell W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Consists of two articles focusing on (1) a modern behavioral model that takes cues from Hippocrates' Four Temperaments and (2) use of a behavioral approach to improve the effectiveness of meetings. Lists positive and negative behaviors within the meeting context. (CH)

  19. Multilevel Resistance Programming in Conductive Bridge Resistive Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalanabis, Debayan

    -configurable resistive weights is also discussed. Lastly, Spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) based gradual resistance change behavior in CBRAM device fabricated in back-end-of-line on a CMOS die containing integrate and fire CMOS neuron circuits is demonstrated for the first time which indicates the feasibility of using CBRAM devices as electronic synapses in spiking neural network hardware implementations for non-Boolean neuromorphic computing.

  20. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior.

  1. "Halal-ing" the Child: Reframing Identities of Resistance in an Urban Muslim School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasir, Na'ilah Suad

    2004-01-01

    In this article, Na'ilah Suad Nasir expands the literature on resistance theory by exploring the institutional response to classic "resistant" or "oppositional" student behavior. Using the case of one boy in an urban Muslim school who displays these resistant behaviors, she shows how the ideational artifacts of family and spirituality are enacted…

  2. Making Behavioral Activation More Behavioral

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Jonathan W.; Manos, Rachel C.; Busch, Andrew M.; Rusch, Laura C.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral Activation, an efficacious treatment for depression, presents a behavioral theory of depression--emphasizing the need for clients to contact positive reinforcement--and a set of therapeutic techniques--emphasizing provision of instructions rather than therapeutic provision of reinforcement. An integration of Behavioral Activation with…

  3. Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology

    PubMed Central

    Staats, Arthur W.

    1994-01-01

    Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in chaotic diversity, needing unification (and other things) that cognitivism cannot provide. Behaviorism can, within PB's multilevel framework for connecting and advancing both psychology and behaviorism. PMID:22478175

  4. Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology.

    PubMed

    Staats, A W

    1994-01-01

    Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in chaotic diversity, needing unification (and other things) that cognitivism cannot provide. Behaviorism can, within PB's multilevel framework for connecting and advancing both psychology and behaviorism.

  5. Teleological behaviorism.

    PubMed

    Rachlin, H

    1992-11-01

    A psychological science of efficient causes, using internal mechanisms to explain overt behavior, is distinguished from another psychological science, based on Aristotelian final causes, using external objects and goals to explain overt behavior. Efficient-cause psychology is designed to answer the question of how a particular act is emitted; final-cause psychology is designed to answer the question of why a particular act is emitted. Physiological psychology, modern cognitive psychology, and some parts of behaviorism including Skinnerian behaviorism are efficient-cause psychologies; final-cause psychology, a development of Skinnerian behaviorism, is here called teleological behaviorism. Each of these two conceptions of causality in psychology implies a different view of the mind, hence a different meaning of mental terms.

  6. Behavior modification.

    PubMed

    Pelham, W E; Fabiano, G A

    2000-07-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic and substantially impairing disorder. This means that treatment must also be chronic and substantial. Behavior Modification, and in many cases, the combination of behavior modification and stimulant medication, is a valid, useful treatment for reducing the pervasive impairment experienced by children with ADHD. Based on the research evidence reviewed, behavior modification should be the first line of treatment for children with ADHD.

  7. Coping with Student Resistance to Critical Thinking: What the Psychotherapy Literature Can Tell Us.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Stuart M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Techniques for college teachers to use in managing student resistance to critical thinking include proactive strategies (creating a cooperative environment, establishing rapport, creating high expectations, and countering resistive behavior) and reactive strategies (avoiding personalization of resistance, inviting students to explore resistance,…

  8. Behavioral toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Needleman, H.L.

    1995-09-01

    The new fields of behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology investigate the outcome of specific toxic exposures in humans and animals on learning, memory, and behavioral characteristics. Three important classes of behavioral neurotoxicants are metals, solvents, and pesticides. The clearest data on the deleterious effects of prenatal exposure to toxicants comes from the study of two metals, lead and mercury, and form epidemiological investigations of the effects of alcohol taken during pregnancy. Less complete data are available for two other groups of agents, solvents, and pesticides. What we do know about their effects on the fetal brain is convincing enough to make us demand caution in their distribution. 15 refs.

  9. Behavioral Momentum Theory: Equations and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, John A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral momentum theory provides a quantitative account of how reinforcers experienced within a discriminative stimulus context govern the persistence of behavior that occurs in that context. The theory suggests that all reinforcers obtained in the presence of a discriminative stimulus increase resistance to change, regardless of whether those…

  10. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  11. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  12. EFFECTS OF ELECTRODE RESISTANCE ON THE DIELECTRIC BEHAVIORS OF Au/BaxSr1-xTiO3/La1.1Sr0.9NiO4 CAPACITORS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jie; Liu, Guozhen; Wolfman, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    BaxSr1-xTiO3 (0.1≤x≤0.5) (BST) thin films were prepared on La1.1Sr0.9NiO4 (LSNO)/SrTiO3 (STO) structure by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition (comb-PLD). The capacitances of the Au/BST/LSNO capacitors exhibited strong frequency dependence especially when the applied frequency was higher than 10kHz. On the basis of an equivalent circuit model, we presented a theoretical simulation of the relationships between capacitance and frequency for the capacitors with different electrode serial resistances. Based on the fitting results, the observed strong frequency dependence of the measured capacitance at high frequency in our study could be ascribed to the large serial resistance of 750 Ω for oxide electrode LSNO. Further simulation studies found that large serial resistance (1000 Ω) could result in an apparent deviation from the intrinsic dielectric properties especially at high frequencies (>100kHz) for capacitors with capacitances above 1nF. Our results provide useful information for the design of all-oxide electronic devices.

  13. Behavior Matters

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edwin B.; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Hayman, Laura L.; Kaplan, Robert M.; Nanney, Marilyn S.; Ockene, Judith K.

    2011-01-01

    Behavior has a broad and central role in health. Behavioral interventions can be effectively used to prevent disease, improve management of existing disease, increase quality of life, and reduce healthcare costs. A summary is presented of evidence for these conclusions in cardiovascular disease/diabetes, cancer, and HIV/AIDS as well as with key risk factors: tobacco use, poor diet, physical inactivity, and excessive alcohol consumption. For each, documentation is made of (1) moderation of genetic and other fundamental biological influences by behaviors and social–environmental factors, (2) impacts of behaviors on health, (3) success of behavioral interventions in prevention, (4) disease management, (5) and quality of life, and (6) improvements in the health of populations through behavioral health promotion programs. Evidence indicates the cost effectiveness and value of behavioral interventions, especially relative to other common health services, as well as the value they add in terms of quality of life. Pertinent to clinicians and their patients as well as to health policy and population health, the benefits of behavioral interventions extend beyond impacts on a particular disease or risk factor. Rather, they include broad effects and benefits on prevention, disease management, and well-being across the life span. Among priorities for dissemination research, the application of behavioral approaches is challenged by diverse barriers, including socioeconomic barriers linked to health disparities. However, behavioral approaches including those emphasizing community and social influences appear to be useful in addressing such challenges. In sum, behavioral approaches should have a central place in prevention and health care of the 21st century. PMID:21496745

  14. Aggressive Behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Aggressive Behavior Page Content Article Body My child is sometimes very aggressive. What is the best ... once they are quiet and still reinforces this behavior, so your child learns that time out means “quiet and still.” ...

  15. Behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Camerer, Colin F

    2014-09-22

    Behavioral economics uses evidence from psychology and other social sciences to create a precise and fruitful alternative to traditional economic theories, which are based on optimization. Behavioral economics may interest some biologists, as it shifts the basis for theories of economic choice away from logical calculation and maximization and toward biologically plausible mechanisms.

  16. Making behavioral activation more behavioral.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Jonathan W; Manos, Rachel C; Busch, Andrew M; Rusch, Laura C

    2008-11-01

    Behavioral Activation, an efficacious treatment for depression, presents a behavioral theory of depression--emphasizing the need for clients to contact positive reinforcement--and a set of therapeutic techniques--emphasizing provision of instructions rather than therapeutic provision of reinforcement. An integration of Behavioral Activation with another behavioral treatment, Functional Analytic Psychotherapy, addresses this mismatch. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy provides a process for the therapeutic provision of immediate and natural reinforcement. This article presents this integration and offers theoretical and practical therapist guidelines on its application. Although the integration is largely theoretical, empirical data are presented in its support when available. The article ends with a discussion of future research directions.

  17. A gestalt-experiential perspective on resistance.

    PubMed

    Engle, David; Holiman, Marjorie

    2002-02-01

    The authors present background on the gestalt-experiential understanding of resistance, conceptualized to be either resistance to awareness or resistance to contact. The authors discuss why they do not use the term resistance and describe the phenomena as a client's self-protective attempt to avoid the anxiety necessitated by change. Such resistant behaviors occur outside a client's awareness and often result in an ambivalence or conflict about change. The authors also describe using in-session experiments as a way to engage with the client in exploring such a state of ambivalence or conflict. Finally, they respond to the case studies presented elsewhere in this issue and propose intervention strategies consistent with the gestalt-experiential perspective.

  18. Antibiotic resistance in Chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Rockey, Daniel D

    2010-09-01

    There are few documented reports of antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia and no examples of natural and stable antibiotic resistance in strains collected from humans. While there are several reports of clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to antibiotics, these strains either lost their resistance phenotype in vitro, or lost viability altogether. Differences in procedures for chlamydial culture in the laboratory, low recovery rates of clinical isolates and the unknown significance of heterotypic resistance observed in culture may interfere with the recognition and interpretation of antibiotic resistance. Although antibiotic resistance has not emerged in chlamydiae pathogenic to humans, several lines of evidence suggest they are capable of expressing significant resistant phenotypes. The adept ability of chlamydiae to evolve to antibiotic resistance in vitro is demonstrated by contemporary examples of mutagenesis, recombination and genetic transformation. The isolation of tetracycline-resistant Chlamydia suis strains from pigs also emphasizes their adaptive ability to acquire antibiotic resistance genes when exposed to significant selective pressure.

  19. Behavior change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This brief entry presents the mediating-moderating variable model as a conceptual framework for understanding behavior change in regard to physical activity/exercise and adiposity. The ideas are applied to real world situations....

  20. Investigation of Social Influence Theory's Conception of Client Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppel, George; Kaul, Theodore J.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated the predictions of social influence theory with respect to client resistance to counselor influence. Data offered support for the social influence theory in that subjects' expectations of others' instrumental behavior were lower for those who viewed illegitimate counselors. (Author)

  1. Tuning resistance states by thickness control in an electroforming-free nanometallic complementary resistance random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiang; Lu, Yang; Lee, Jongho; Chen, I-Wei

    2016-01-04

    Tuning low resistance state is crucial for resistance random access memory (RRAM) that aims to achieve optimal read margin and design flexibility. By back-to-back stacking two nanometallic bipolar RRAMs with different thickness into a complementary structure, we have found that its low resistance can be reliably tuned over several orders of magnitude. Such high tunability originates from the exponential thickness dependence of the high resistance state of nanometallic RRAM, in which electron wave localization in a random network gives rise to the unique scaling behavior. The complementary nanometallic RRAM provides electroforming-free, multi-resistance-state, sub-100 ns switching capability with advantageous characteristics for memory arrays.

  2. Drug targeting of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Anna; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Meli, Rosaria

    2015-11-01

    Leptin regulates glucose, lipid and energy homeostasis as well as feeding behavior, serving as a bridge between peripheral metabolically active tissues and the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, this adipocyte-derived hormone, whose circulating levels mirror fat mass, not only exerts its anti-obesity effects mainly modulating the activity of specific hypothalamic neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb), but it also shows pleiotropic functions due to the activation of Ob-Rb in peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, several mechanisms have been suggested to mediate leptin resistance, including obesity-associated hyperleptinemia, impairment of leptin access to CNS and the reduction in Ob-Rb signal transduction effectiveness, among others. During the onset and progression of obesity, the dampening of leptin sensitivity often occurs, preventing the efficacy of leptin replacement therapy from overcoming obesity and/or its comorbidities. This review focuses on obesity-associated leptin resistance and the mechanisms underpinning this condition, to highlight the relevance of leptin sensitivity restoration as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat common obesity and its complications. Interestingly, although promising strategies to counteract leptin resistance have been proposed, these pharmacological approaches have shown limited efficacy or even relevant adverse effects in preclinical and clinical studies. Therefore, the numerous findings from this review clearly indicate a lack of a single and efficacious treatment for leptin resistance, highlighting the necessity to find new therapeutic tools to improve leptin sensitivity, especially in patients with most severe disease profiles.

  3. Metallic behavior and negative differential resistance properties of (InAs){sub n} (n = 2 − 4) molecule cluster junctions via a combined non–equilibrium Green's function and density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Li, Rong; Xu, Yuanlan; Zhang, Jianbing; Miao, Xiangshui; Zhang, Daoli

    2014-06-21

    In this present work, the geometric structures and electronic transport properties of (InAs){sub n} (n = 2, 3, 4) molecule cluster junctions are comparatively investigated using NEGF combined with DFT. Results indicate that all (InAs){sub n} molecule cluster junctions present metallic behavior at the low applied biases ([−2V, 2V]), while NDR appears at a certain high bias range. Our calculation shows that the current of (InAs){sub 4} molecule cluster–based junction is almost the largest at any bias. The mechanisms of the current–voltage characteristics of all the three molecule cluster junctions are proposed.

  4. Temporal Context, Preference, and Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    According to behavioral momentum theory, preference and relative resistance to change in concurrent chains schedules are correlated and reflect the relative conditioned value of discriminative stimuli. In the present study, we explore the generality of this relation by manipulating the temporal context within a concurrent-chains procedure through…

  5. Rodent models of treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Caldarone, Barbara J.; Zachariou, Venetia; King, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is a prevalent and debilitating disorder and a substantial proportion of patients fail to reach remission following standard antidepressant pharmacological treatment. Limited efficacy with currently available antidepressant drugs highlights the need to develop more effective medications for treatment resistant patients and emphasizes the importance of developing better preclinical models that focus on treatment resistant populations. This review discusses methods to adapt and refine rodent behavioral models that are predictive of antidepressant efficacy to identify populations that show reduced responsiveness or are resistant to traditional antidepressants. Methods include separating antidepressant responders from non-responders, administering treatments that render animals resistant to traditional pharmacological treatments, and identifying genetic models that show antidepressant resistance. This review also examines pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments regimes that have been effective in refractory patients and how some of these approaches have been used to validate animal models of treatment-resistant depression. The goals in developing rodent models of treatment-resistant depression are to understand the neurobiological mechanisms involved in antidepressant resistance and to develop valid models to test novel therapies that would be effective in patients that do not respond to traditional monoaminergic antidepressants. PMID:25460020

  6. Changing Resistant Consultees: Functional Assessment Leading to Strategic Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoff, Howard M.

    2013-01-01

    Some consultees resist implementing, or implementing with integrity, effective academic or behavioral interventions that their consultants believe are needed to resolve specific student problems. In order to address consultee resistance, it is recommended that consultants complete functional assessments to determine the underlying reasons for the…

  7. The Idea of Resistance in Education: A Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Joyce King

    This paper discusses resistance in education as expressed in white working-class girls' reactions to sex role socialization, children's play, minority children's behavior in inner city schools, and the resistance of female faculty in institutions of higher education. The paper takes off from issues addressed in some papers presented at a research…

  8. Scratch behaviors in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chen

    2000-10-01

    As part of a large effort toward the fundamental understanding of scratch behaviors in polymeric materials, studies were carried out on a broad range of polymers, with an emphasis on automotive thermoplastic olefins (TPOs). Two types of scratch tests were performed in this research, i.e., Ford constant load and instrumented progressive load scratch tests. A scratch model proposed by Hamilton and Goodman was applied to understand the fundamental mechanics of the scratch process. Several characterization techniques were used to investigate the scratch damage mechanisms in polymers. Both testing results and the scratch model analysis indicate that certain rigidity in polymers is essential to give good scratch resistance. Fundamental understanding of the scratching process in terms of basic material characteristics such as Young's modulus, yield stress, tensile strength, friction coefficient, scratch hardness, penetration recovery and fracture toughness are discussed. Scratch damage investigation, on both surface and subsurface, shows that shear yielding is the main cause of the plastics flow scratch pattern, while tensile tear on the surface and shear induced fracture on the subsurface are the main damage mechanisms in the fracture scratch pattern. This study explains why automotive TPOs are susceptible to scratch under the current scratch test practiced in automotive industry. Shear deformation and fracture behavior in model TPOs are also studied using the Iosipescu shear test. Iosipescu shear deformation in terms of shear stress-strain curves of model TPOs is obtained experimentally. Shear fracture process and damage mechanisms in TPOs are also demonstrated and revealed. Further studies on the scratch damage in TPOs based on the roles of additives and fillers in the scratch behavior are addressed. The effects of phase morphology and toughening mechanisms on scratch behavior in TPOs are also discussed. This research has resulted in an increased understanding of the

  9. New resistivity for high-mobility quantum Hall conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceuen, P. L.; Szafer, A.; Richter, C. A.; Alphenaar, B. W.; Jain, J. K.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements showing dramatic nonlocal behavior in the four-terminal resistances of a high-mobility quantum Hall conductor are presented. These measurements illustrate that the standard definition of the resistivity tensor is inappropriate, but they are in excellent agreement with a new model of the conductor that treats the edge and bulk conducting pathways independently. This model uses a single intensive parameter, analogous to a local resistivity for the bulk channel only, to characterize the system.

  10. Evolutionary consequences of behavioral diversity

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Todd L.; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2016-01-01

    Iterated games provide a framework to describe social interactions among groups of individuals. This body of work has focused primarily on individuals who face a simple binary choice, such as “cooperate” or “defect.” Real individuals, however, can exhibit behavioral diversity, varying their input to a social interaction both qualitatively and quantitatively. Here we explore how access to a greater diversity of behavioral choices impacts the evolution of social dynamics in populations. We show that, in public goods games, some simple strategies that choose between only two possible actions can resist invasion by all multichoice invaders, even while engaging in relatively little punishment. More generally, access to a larger repertoire of behavioral choices results in a more ”rugged” fitness landscape, with populations able to stabilize cooperation at multiple levels of investment. As a result, increased behavioral choice facilitates cooperation when returns on investments are low, but it hinders cooperation when returns on investments are high. Finally, we analyze iterated rock–paper–scissors games, the nontransitive payoff structure of which means that unilateral control is difficult to achieve. Despite this, we find that a large proportion of multichoice strategies can invade and resist invasion by single-choice strategies—so that even well-mixed populations will tend to evolve and maintain behavioral diversity. PMID:27791109

  11. [Strategies to avoid antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Kees, M G

    2013-03-01

    Antibiotics are used very frequently in critically ill patients as a causal and often life-saving treatment; however, the high density of use of broad spectrum antibiotics contributes to a further deterioration in resistance trends, which makes a rational prescription behavior mandatory. This particularly includes measures which lead to the reduction of antibiotic use, i.e. rigorous indications, targeted de-escalation and limited duration. For optimal efficacy of a necessary treatment the integration of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles can be helpful.

  12. Animal studies of addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Ahmed, Serge H

    2013-04-01

    It is increasingly recognized that studying drug taking in laboratory animals does not equate to studying genuine addiction, characterized by loss of control over drug use. This has inspired recent work aimed at capturing genuine addiction-like behavior in animals. In this work, we summarize empirical evidence for the occurrence of several DSM-IV-like symptoms of addiction in animals after extended drug use. These symptoms include escalation of drug use, neurocognitive deficits, resistance to extinction, increased motivation for drugs, preference for drugs over nondrug rewards, and resistance to punishment. The fact that addiction-like behavior can occur and be studied in animals gives us the exciting opportunity to investigate the neural and genetic background of drug addiction, which we hope will ultimately lead to the development of more effective treatments for this devastating disorder.

  13. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, H F

    1988-01-01

    Strains of staphylococci resistant to methicillin were identified immediately after introduction of this drug. Methicillin-resistant strains have unusual properties, the most notable of which is extreme variability in expression of the resistance trait. The conditions associated with this heterogeneous expression of resistance are described. Methicillin resistance is associated with production of a unique penicillin-binding protein (PBP), 2a, which is bound and inactivated only at high concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics. PBP2a appears to be encoded by the mec determinant, which also is unique to methicillin-resistant strains. The relationships between PBP2a and expression of resistance and implications for the mechanism of resistance are discussed. The heterogeneous expression of methicillin resistance by staphylococci poses problems in the detection of resistant strains. Experience with several susceptibility test methods is reviewed and guidelines for performance of these tests are given. Treatment of infections caused by methicillin-resistant staphylococci is discussed. Vancomycin is the treatment of choice. Alternatives have been few because methicillin-resistant strains often are resistant to multiple antibiotics in addition to beta-lactam antibiotics. New agents which are active against methicillin-resistant staphylococci are becoming available, and their potential role in treatment is discussed. Images PMID:3069195

  14. Resistance switching behavior of atomic layer deposited SrTiO3 film through possible formation of Sr2Ti6O13 or Sr1Ti11O20 phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woongkyu; Yoo, Sijung; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Yeu, In Won; Chang, Hye Jung; Choi, Jung-Hae; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Waser, Rainer; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2016-02-01

    Identification of microstructural evolution of nanoscale conducting phase, such as conducting filament (CF), in many resistance switching (RS) devices is a crucial factor to unambiguously understand the electrical behaviours of the RS-based electronic devices. Among the diverse RS material systems, oxide-based redox system comprises the major category of these intriguing electronic devices, where the local, along both lateral and vertical directions of thin films, changes in oxygen chemistry has been suggested to be the main RS mechanism. However, there are systems which involve distinctive crystallographic phases as CF; the Magnéli phase in TiO2 is one of the very well-known examples. The current research reports the possible presence of distinctive local conducting phase in atomic layer deposited SrTiO3 RS thin film. The conducting phase was identified through extensive transmission electron microscopy studies, which indicated that oxygen-deficient Sr2Ti6O13 or Sr1Ti11O20 phase was presumably present mainly along the grain boundaries of SrTiO3 after the unipolar set switching in Pt/TiN/SrTiO3/Pt structure. A detailed electrical characterization revealed that the samples showed typical bipolar and complementary RS after the memory cell was unipolar reset.

  15. Resistance switching behavior of atomic layer deposited SrTiO3 film through possible formation of Sr2Ti6O13 or Sr1Ti11O20 phases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woongkyu; Yoo, Sijung; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Yeu, In Won; Chang, Hye Jung; Choi, Jung-Hae; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Waser, Rainer; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2016-01-01

    Identification of microstructural evolution of nanoscale conducting phase, such as conducting filament (CF), in many resistance switching (RS) devices is a crucial factor to unambiguously understand the electrical behaviours of the RS-based electronic devices. Among the diverse RS material systems, oxide-based redox system comprises the major category of these intriguing electronic devices, where the local, along both lateral and vertical directions of thin films, changes in oxygen chemistry has been suggested to be the main RS mechanism. However, there are systems which involve distinctive crystallographic phases as CF; the Magnéli phase in TiO2 is one of the very well-known examples. The current research reports the possible presence of distinctive local conducting phase in atomic layer deposited SrTiO3 RS thin film. The conducting phase was identified through extensive transmission electron microscopy studies, which indicated that oxygen-deficient Sr2Ti6O13 or Sr1Ti11O20 phase was presumably present mainly along the grain boundaries of SrTiO3 after the unipolar set switching in Pt/TiN/SrTiO3/Pt structure. A detailed electrical characterization revealed that the samples showed typical bipolar and complementary RS after the memory cell was unipolar reset. PMID:26830978

  16. Resisting persuasion by the skin of one's teeth: the hidden success of resisted persuasive messages.

    PubMed

    Tormala, Zakary L; Clarkson, Joshua J; Petty, Richard E

    2006-09-01

    Recent research has suggested that when people resist persuasion they can perceive this resistance and, under specifiable conditions, become more certain of their initial attitudes (e.g., Z. L. Tormala & R. E. Petty, 2002). Within the same metacognitive framework, the present research provides evidence for the opposite phenomenon--that is, when people resist persuasion, they sometimes become less certain of their initial attitudes. Four experiments demonstrate that when people perceive that they have done a poor job resisting persuasion (e.g., they believe they generated weak arguments against a persuasive message), they lose attitude certainty, show reduced attitude-behavioral intention correspondence, and become more vulnerable to subsequent persuasive attacks. These findings suggest that resisted persuasive attacks can sometimes have a hidden yet important success by reducing the strength of the target attitude.

  17. Thermoplastic composite matrices with improved solvent resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve solvent resistance of aromatic thermoplastic polymers, ethynyl-terminated aromatic sulfone polymers (ETS), sulfone/ester polymers (SEPE) containing pendent ethynyl groups, and phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups are synthesized. Cured polysulfones and phenoxy resins containing ethynyl groups on the ends or pendent on the molecules exhibited systematic behavior in solvent resistance, film flexibility, and toughness as a function of crosslink density. The film and composite properties of a cured solvent-resistant ETS were better than those of a commercially available solvent sensitive polysulfone. The study was part of a NASA program to better understand the trade-offs between solvent resistance, processability and mechanical properties which may be useful in designing composite structures for aerospace vehicles.

  18. A mathematical model of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Jacquier, Marine; Soula, Hédi A; Crauste, Fabien

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is often associated with leptin resistance, which leads to a physiological system with high leptin concentration but unable to respond to leptin signals and to regulate food intake. We propose a mathematical model of the leptin-leptin receptors system, based on the assumption that leptin is a regulator of its own receptor activity, and investigate its qualitative behavior. Based on current knowledge and previous models developed for body weight dynamics in rodents, the model includes the dynamics of leptin, leptin receptors and the regulation of food intake and body weight. It displays two stable equilibria, one representing a healthy state and the other one an obese and leptin resistant state. We show that a constant leptin injection can lead to leptin resistance and that a temporal variation in some parameter values influencing food intake can induce a change of equilibrium and a pathway to leptin resistance and obesity.

  19. Behavior subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Saligrama, Venkatesh; Konrad, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Network video cameras, invented in the last decade or so, permit today pervasive, wide-area visual surveillance. However, due to the vast amounts of visual data that such cameras produce human-operator monitoring is not possible and automatic algorithms are needed. One monitoring task of particular interest is the detection of suspicious behavior, i.e., identification of individuals or objects whose behavior differs from behavior usually observed. Many methods based on object path analysis have been developed to date (motion detection followed by tracking and inferencing) but they are sensitive to motion detection and tracking errors and are also computationally complex. We propose a new surveillance method capable of abnormal behavior detection without explicit estimation of object paths. Our method is based on a simple model of video dynamics. We propose one practical implementation of this general model via temporal aggregation of motion detection labels. Our method requires little processing power and memory, is robust to motion segmentation errors, and general enough to monitor humans, cars or any other moving objects in uncluttered as well as highly-cluttered scenes. Furthermore, on account of its simplicity, our method can provide performance guarantees. It is also robust in harsh environments (jittery cameras, rain/snow/fog).

  20. Challenging Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichle, Joe, Ed.; DePaepe, Paris, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The articles in this feature or theme issue describe successful approaches to positive, community-based management of severe challenging behavior. Programs include: a train-the-trainer strategy for inservice training used across the country; the use of student volunteers as community integration facilitators; a school-based intervention project…

  1. Behavior Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Randolph M.

    2010-01-01

    In a perfect world, students would never talk back to school staff and never argue or fight with each other. They would complete all their assigned tasks, and disciplinary actions never would be needed. Unfortunately, people don't live in a perfect world. Student behavior is a daily concern. Teachers continue to refer students to the office as a…

  2. Model Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, John

    2006-01-01

    There are dozens of books and hundreds of resources that address the issue of character development in students: how to raise them to be good people, how to teach them to be good citizens, how to help them to make good decisions. Little is written, however, about the character development of principals and school leaders, whose behavior is a model…

  3. Pneumococcal resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Klugman, K P

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of pneumococci resistant to one or more of the antibiotics penicillin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline appears to be expanding, and there exist foci of resistance to chloramphenicol and rifampin. Multiply resistant pneumococci are being encountered more commonly and are more often community acquired. Factors associated with infection caused by resistant pneumococci include young age, duration of hospitalization, infection with a pneumococcus of serogroup 6, 19, or 23 or serotype 14, and exposure to antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. At present, the most useful drugs for the management of resistant pneumococcal infections are cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, and rifampin. If the strains are susceptible, chloramphenicol may be useful as an alternative, less expensive agent. Appropriate interventions for the control of resistant pneumococcal outbreaks include investigation of the prevalence of resistant strains, isolation of patients, possible treatment of carriers, and reduction of usage of antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. The molecular mechanisms of penicillin resistance are related to the structure and function of penicillin-binding proteins, and the mechanisms of resistance to other agents involved in multiple resistance are being elucidated. Recognition is increasing of the standard screening procedure for penicillin resistance, using a 1-microgram oxacillin disk. PMID:2187594

  4. A study of gas sensing behavior of metal-graphene contact with transfer length method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quanfu; Liu, Weihua; Cao, Guiming; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    The gas sensing behavior of a metal-graphene contact is investigated by transfer length method (TLM). By simultaneously measuring the resistance of all channels in a TLM device, the time evolution of the metal-graphene contact resistance and the graphene sheet resistance are obtained. When the device is exposed to 10 ppm ammonia, the response time of the nickel-graphene contact resistance is only one-third of the pure sheet resistance, and the sensitivity of the contact resistance is about 180% and that of the graphene sheet resistance is 100%. The results of this work indicate that the contact resistance can be an effective gas sensing parameter.

  5. Charge relaxation resistance at atomic scale: An ab initio calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Jian

    2008-06-01

    We report an investigation of ac quantum transport properties of a nanocapacitor from first principles. At low frequencies, the nanocapacitor is characterized by a static electrochemical capacitance Cμ and the charge relaxation resistance Rq . We carry out a first principle calculation within the nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism. In particular, we investigate charge relaxation resistance of a single carbon atom as well as two carbon atoms in a nanocapacitor made of a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) and an alkane chain connected to a bulk Si. The nature of charge relaxation resistance is predicted for this nanocapacitor. Specifically, we find that the charge relaxation resistance shows resonant behavior and it becomes sharper as the distance between plates of nanocapacitor increases. If there is only one transmission channel dominating the charge transport through the nanocapacitor, the charge relaxation resistance Rq is half of resistance quantum h/2e2 . This result shows that the theory of charge relaxation resistance applies at atomic scale.

  6. Teacher Resistance to Frequent Rewards and Praise: Lack of Skill or a Wise Decision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bear, George G.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance and the lack of fidelity or integrity in the use of rewards and praise are commonly cited in the behavioral consultation literature, particularly when teachers are asked to manage student behavior using frequent rewards and praise in a systematic manner. There are multiple potential reasons for resistance and lack of implementation…

  7. Effect of Inquiry-Based Learning Approach on Student Resistance in a Science and Technology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sever, Demet; Guven, Meral

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the resistance behaviors of 7th grade students exhibited during their Science and Technology course teaching-learning processes, and to remove the identified resistance behaviors through teaching-learning processes that were constructed based on the inquiry-based learning approach. In the quasi-experimentally…

  8. The role of poverty in antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Planta, Margaret B

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide problem that has deleterious long-term effects as the development of drug resistance outpaces the development of new drugs. Poverty has been cited by the World Health Organization as a major force driving the development of antimicrobial resistance. In developing countries, factors such as inadequate access to effective drugs, unregulated dispensing and manufacture of antimicrobials, and truncated antimicrobial therapy because of cost are contributing to the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. Within the United States, poverty-driven practices such as medication-sharing, use of "leftover" antibiotics, and the purchase and use of foreign-made drugs of questionable quality are likely contributing to antimicrobial resistance. However, there is currently a dearth of studies in the United States analyzing the socioeconomic and behavioral factors behind antimicrobial resistance in United States communities. Further studies of these factors, with an emphasis on poverty-driven practices, need to be undertaken in order to fully understand the problem of antimicrobial resistance in the United States and to develop effective intervention to combat this problem.

  9. Cell shunt resistance and photovoltaic module performance

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T.J.; Basso, T.S.; Rummel, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    Shunt resistance of cells in photovoltaic modules can affect module power output and could indicate flawed manufacturing processes and reliability problems. The authors describe a two-terminal diagnostic method to directly measure the shunt resistance of individual cells in a series-connected module non-intrusively, without deencapsulation. Peak power efficiency vs. light intensity was measured on a 12-cell, series-connected, single crystalline module having relatively high cell shunt resistances. The module was remeasured with 0.5-, 1-, and 2-ohm resistors attached across each cell to simulate shunt resistances of several emerging technologies. Peak power efficiencies decreased dramatically at lower light levels. Using the PSpice circuit simulator, the authors verified that cell shunt and series resistances can indeed be responsible for the observed peak power efficiency vs. intensity behavior. The authors discuss the effect of basic cell diode parameters, i.e., shunt resistance, series resistance, and recombination losses, on PV module performance as a function of light intensity.

  10. Power to Resist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, Janice

    1975-01-01

    Transferrable drug resistance has been observed in bacteria for over ten years. Concern now is that livestock that have been fed with grain supplemented with antibiotics for growth stimulation will infect humans with potentially dangerous resistant bacteria. (MA)

  11. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced by natural or human activity on the ecology and living organisms. Ecology The study of the relationships and interactions between ... antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial Agents Glossary References Web ...

  12. Flame-resistant textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogg, L. C.; Stringham, R. S.; Toy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Flame resistance treatment for acid resistant polyamide fibers involving photoaddition of fluorocarbons to surface has been scaled up to treat 10 yards of commercial width (41 in.) fabric. Process may be applicable to other low cost polyamides, polyesters, and textiles.

  13. The Effect of Human Behavior on the Design of an Information Retrieval System Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Zhang; Fine, Sara

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on human behavior in the information-seeking process, and identifies behaviors influencing the design of information retrieval system interfaces. Discusses the principles of saturation, concreteness, least resistance, familiarity, stimulation, certainty, simplicity, and following-form. (PEN)

  14. Behavioral parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Stephen; Kushida, Clete A

    2002-10-01

    Sleep is not a static state. During the sleep period, physiologic changes occur throughout the body and brain. This complex, dynamic process can, at times, result in episodes of unusual or undesirable behaviors. These phenomena are called parasomnias. The accurate diagnosis of this group of treatable disorders is important, because they can have a negative impact on sleep, health, and social function. In addition, some of the parasomnias may provide clues to the presence of other underlying pathologic conditions. The parasomnias may be categorized in more than one way, but any attempt to classify such a diverse collection of entities is likely to be somewhat arbitrary. This article discusses the parasomnias according to the classification of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, with emphasis on those characterized by observable behavior. As the understanding of these disorders (and sleep, in general) continues to deepen, new entities and schemes of classification may emerge.

  15. Behavioral factors.

    PubMed

    Zero, D T; Lussi, A

    2006-01-01

    During and after an erosive challenge, behavioral factors play a role in modifying the extent of erosive tooth wear. The manner that dietary acids are introduced into the mouth (gulping, sipping, use of a straw) will affect how long the teeth are in contact with the erosive challenge. The frequency and duration of exposure to an erosive agent is of paramount importance. Night-time exposure (e.g. baby bottle-feeding) to erosive agents may be particularly destructive because of the absence of salivary flow. Health-conscious individuals tend to ingest acidic drinks and juices more frequently and tend to have higher than average oral hygiene. While good oral hygiene is of proven value in the prevention of periodontal disease and dental caries, frequent toothbrushing with abrasive oral hygiene products may enhance erosive tooth wear. Unhealthy lifestyles such as consumption of designer drugs, alcopops and alcohol abuse are other important behavioral factors.

  16. All about Insulin Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 2 All About Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance is a condition that raises your risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 1/15 Toolkit No. 2: All About Insulin Resistance continued J Order the smallest ...

  17. Resisting Mind Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Susan M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    1980-01-01

    Provides conceptual analyses of mind control techniques along with practical advice on how to resist these techniques. The authors stress that effective mind control stems more from everyday social relations than from exotic technological gimmicks. Suggestions are given for resisting persuasion, resisting systems, and challenging the system.…

  18. Grafting for disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary purpose of grafting vegetables worldwide has been to provide resistance to soilborne diseases. The potential loss of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant combined with pathogen resistance to commonly used pesticides will make resistance to soil born pathogens even more important in the futu...

  19. Grafting for disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary purpose of grafting vegetables worldwide has been to provide resistance to soil-borne diseases. The potential loss of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant combined with pathogen resistance to commonly used pesticides will make resistance to soil-borne pathogens even more important in the fu...

  20. Crisis behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Grinspoon, L.

    1984-04-01

    The Department of Defense has rules and procedures to minimize the opportunity for error and improper behavior among those with access to strategic weapons, but no psychiatric screening system can predict with assurance who will or will not behave rationally during a crisis. Personal problems and institutional decision-making pressures may destroy nuclear deterrence. Certain features of military life, including drug and alcohol abuse, heavy responsibility, tension, and group decision making, can destreoy rationality. 12 references.

  1. Behavioral epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Moore, David S

    2017-01-01

    Why do we grow up to have the traits we do? Most 20th century scientists answered this question by referring only to our genes and our environments. But recent discoveries in the emerging field of behavioral epigenetics have revealed factors at the interface between genes and environments that also play crucial roles in development. These factors affect how genes work; scientists now know that what matters as much as which genes you have (and what environments you encounter) is how your genes are affected by their contexts. The discovery that what our genes do depends in part on our experiences has shed light on how Nature and Nurture interact at the molecular level inside of our bodies. Data emerging from the world's behavioral epigenetics laboratories support the idea that a person's genes alone cannot determine if, for example, he or she will end up shy, suffering from cardiovascular disease, or extremely smart. Among the environmental factors that can influence genetic activity are parenting styles, diets, and social statuses. In addition to influencing how doctors treat diseases, discoveries about behavioral epigenetics are likely to alter how biologists think about evolution, because some epigenetic effects of experience appear to be transmissible from generation to generation. This domain of research will likely change how we think about the origins of human nature. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1333. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1333 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  2. OPEC behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo

    This thesis aims to contribute to a further understanding of the real dynamics of OPEC production behavior and its impacts on the world oil market. A literature review in this area shows that the existing studies on OPEC still have some major deficiencies in theoretical interpretation and empirical estimation technique. After a brief background review in chapter 1, chapter 2 tests Griffin's market-sharing cartel model on the post-Griffin time horizon with a simultaneous system of equations, and an innovative hypothesis of OPEC's behavior (Saudi Arabia in particular) is then proposed based on the estimation results. Chapter 3 first provides a conceptual analysis of OPEC behavior under the framework of non-cooperative collusion with imperfect information. An empirical model is then constructed and estimated. The results of the empirical studies in this thesis strongly support the hypothesis that OPEC has operated as a market-sharing cartel since the early 1980s. In addition, the results also provide some support of the theory of non-cooperative collusion under imperfect information. OPEC members collude under normal circumstances and behave competitively at times in response to imperfect market signals of cartel compliance and some internal attributes. Periodic joint competition conduct plays an important role in sustaining the collusion in the long run. Saudi Arabia acts as the leader of the cartel, accommodating intermediate unfavorable market development and punishing others with a tit-for-tat strategy in extreme circumstances.

  3. Adhesion Control between Resist and Photomask Blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Abe, Makoto; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2009-06-01

    Most problems in photomask fabrication such as pattern collapse, haze, and cleaning damage are related to the behavior of surfaces and interfaces of resists, opaque layers, and quartz substrates. Therefore, it is important to control the corresponding surface and interface energies in photomask fabrication processes. In particular, adhesion analysis in microscopic regions is strongly desirable to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. We applied the direct peeling (DP) method with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and measured the adhesion of resist patterns on Cr and quartz surfaces for photomask process optimization. We also studied the effect of tip shape on the reproducibility of adhesion measurements and the dependence of collapse behavior on the resist profile. We measured lateral forces between the resulting collapsed resist pillar and the Cr or the quartz surface before and after the sliding and related these observed lateral forces to the static and kinetic frictional forces, respectively. We also studied the effect of surface modification of the Cr and quartz surfaces with silanization reagents on adhesion measured with the DP method. Resist adhesion could be controlled by surface modification using silanes. We also discuss the relationship between the adhesion observed with the DP method and the properties of the modified surfaces including water contact angles and local adhesive forces measured from force-distance curves with an SPM.

  4. Electrical resistivity of radiation disordered oxide BaNb sub 4 O sub 6

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, S.A.; Goshchitskii, B.N.; Karkin, A.E.; Mirmelstein, A.V.; Voronin, V.I.; Parkhomenko, V.D. ); Zubkov, V.G.; Perelyaev, V.N.; Berger, I.F.; Kontzevaya, I.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The effect of radiation disorder on the electrical resistivity of the metallic non-superconducting BaNb{sub 4}O{sub 6} oxide has been investigated. It is shown that variation of electrical resistivity {rho} of this compound under disorder is typical of metallic systems, i.e. residual resistivity increases linearly with defect concentration while the temperature dependence of {rho} changes slightly. Such a behavior qualitatively differs from the previously observed unusual behavior of HTSC with similar crystal structure.

  5. Role of Behavior Theory in Behavioral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Leonard H.

    1992-01-01

    Defines behavioral medicine as multidisciplinary field that combines research methods from behavioral and biomedical sciences. Examines the role of behavior theory in behavioral medicine. Uses new advances in basic research on learning to illustrate that findings from behavioral science have implications for the field of contemporary behavioral…

  6. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  7. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  8. Behavior Modification in an Elementary School: Problems and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elardo, Richard

    1978-01-01

    Describes the implementation of a token economy as a method of controlling student behavior in an elementary school. Emphasizes student participation and discusses board issues such as teacher resistance to the program and the question of evaluation. (IRT)

  9. Insecticide-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Micks, Don W.

    1960-01-01

    Since the last review of the problem of insecticide-resistance was presented in this journal at the beginning of 1958, resistance has been discovered in 16 new species, and in at least 14 species both the geographical distribution of resistant populations and the types of resistance encountered have increased. In view of the vital importance of finding an answer to this problem, plans were made by WHO early in 1959 for an intensified programme of research. The new review of the situation presented below is a first step in the direction of carrying out this programme. It follows the same plan as the previous review, the first part giving details of the growth of insecticide-resistance, species by species, and the second part outlining the developments that have taken place in research. Fourteen of the species that have newly acquired resistance are anophelines and in thirteen of these resistance is to dieldrin only. Convincing evidence has been obtained in favour of the theory that the emergence of resistance is brought about by selection pressure exerted by the insecticide, and much light has been thrown on the biochemical mechanisms of detoxication. Research on the phenomenon of cross-resistance and on the genes responsible for the inheritance of resistance has continued. In the light of the various findings, it has been possible to make some progress towards the development of new insecticides that are more toxic to the present resistant strains than to normal ones. PMID:20604059

  10. [Rodenticide resistance and consequences].

    PubMed

    Esther, A; Endepols, S; Freise, J; Klemann, N; Runge, M; Pelz, H-J

    2014-05-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides, such as warfarin was first described in 1958. Polymorphisms in the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) gene and respective substitutions of amino acids in the VKOR enzyme are the major cause for rodenticide resistance. Resistant Norway rats in Germany are characterized by the Tyr139Cys genotype, which is spread throughout the northwest of the country. Resistant house mice with the VKOR variants Tyr139Cys, Leu128Ser and Arg12Trp/Ala26Ser/Ala48Thr/Arg61Leu (spretus type) are distributed over a number of locations in Germany. Resistance can reduce management attempts with consequences for stored product protection, hygiene and animal health. Anticoagulants of the first generation (warfarin, chlorophacinone, coumatetralyl) as well as bromadiolone and difenacoum are not an option for the control of resistant Norway rats. The same applies for house mice whereby the tolerance to compounds can be different between local incidences. Due to the higher toxicity and tendency to persist, the most potent anticoagulant rodenticides brodifacoum, flocoumafen and difethialone should be applied but only where resistance is known. In other cases less toxic anticoagulants should be preferred for rodent management in order to mitigate environmental risks. Resistance effects of further VKOR polymorphisms and their combinations, the spread of resistant rats and conditions supporting and reducing resistance should be investigated in order to improve resistance management strategies.

  11. EPA RESISTANCE MONITORING RESEARCH (NCR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2006 resistance management research program was organized around three components: development of resistance monitoring program for Bt corn using remote sensing, standardization of resistance assays, and testing of resistance management models. Each area of research has shown...

  12. Constraints on Hydrothermal Fluid Flow Geometry From Resistivity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, A. G.; McClain, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the behavior of geothermal fluids in the subsurface has applications in several fields. Determining the pathway taken by the fluid and its interaction with the surrounding lithology may help determine the source of both the fluid and the formation that is heating it. This study was designed to use electrical resistivity surveying to determine the geometry of the conduit through which hydrothermal fluid is reaching the surface and creating the Jone’s Fountain of Life hot spring in the Sulfur Creek district, near Wilbur Springs, CA. Bounded by two northwest trending faults, each with associated hot springs, this geothermal spring is not located near a known fault and is buried by alluvium. Resistivity profiles were performed using vertical electrical soundings arranged in a Schlumberger configuration. Several profiles were taken, focusing primarily on the shallow subsurface immediately surrounding the hot spring. Using a 1-dimensional inversion model, a prediction of the resistivity structure of the subsurface was made that matched the measured apparent resistivity. The model depicted a layer of low resistivity near the surface, underlain by a zone of higher resistivity. The base of the low resistivity zone was shallow near the spring, but showed a gradational increase in depth at increasing distances from the hot spring. Furthest away from the spring, the low resistivity zone was also overlain by a layer of higher resistivity. This zone of low resistivity was interpreted to be porous material containing groundwater (aquifer), which lies on top of less porous rock with a higher resistivity (aquatard). The less porous material creates a cone shape around the hot spring, suggesting that it may the result of hydrothermal cementation. The data collected in this study suggests a pipeline structure in the alluvium, though the behavior of the fluid may be different in the basement rock. This could be determined by geophysical investigation of the fluid

  13. Temporal context, preference, and resistance to change.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Thrailkill, Eric A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2011-09-01

    According to behavioral momentum theory, preference and relative resistance to change in concurrent-chains schedules are correlated and reflect the relative conditioned value of discriminative stimuli. In the present study, we explore the generality of this relation by manipulating the temporal context within a concurrent-chains procedure through changes in the duration of the initial links. Consistent with previous findings, preference for a richer terminal link was less extreme with longer initial links across three experiments with pigeons. In Experiment 1, relative resistance to change and preference were related inversely when responding was disrupted with response-independent food presentations during initial links, replicating a previous finding with rats. However, more food was presented with longer initial links, confounding the disrupter and initial-link duration. In Experiment 2, presession feeding was used instead and eliminated the negative relation between relative resistance to change and preference, but relative resistance to change was not sensitive to relative terminal-link reinforcement rates. In Experiment 3, with more extreme relative terminal-link reinforcement rates, increasing initial-link duration similarly decreased preference and relative resistance to change for the richer terminal link. Thus, when conditions of disruption are equal and assessed under the appropriate reinforcement conditions, changes in temporal context impact relative resistance to change and preference similarly.

  14. Bacterial Cheating Limits the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Xiao Chao, Hui; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tatiana; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removal of the antibiotic. The presence of a cooperative mechanism of resistance suggests that a cheater strain - which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic - may be able to take advantage of resistant cells. We find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We use a simple model in conjunction with difference equations to explain the observed population dynamics as a function of cell density and antibiotic concentration. Our experimental difference equations resemble the logistic map, raising the possibility of oscillations or even chaotic dynamics.

  15. Bed bugs evolved unique adaptive strategy to resist pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fang; Gujar, Hemant; Gordon, Jennifer R; Haynes, Kenneth F; Potter, Michael F; Palli, Subba R

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic and post-genomic technologies have facilitated a genome-wide analysis of the insecticide resistance-associated genes in insects. Through bed bug, Cimex lectularius transcriptome analysis, we identified 14 molecular markers associated with pyrethroid resistance. Our studies revealed that most of the resistance-associated genes functioning in diverse mechanisms are expressed in the epidermal layer of the integument, which could prevent or slow down the toxin from reaching the target sites on nerve cells, where an additional layer of resistance (kdr) is possible. This strategy evolved in bed bugs is based on their unique morphological, physiological and behavioral characteristics and has not been reported in any other insect species. RNA interference-aided knockdown of resistance associated genes showed the relative contribution of each mechanism towards overall resistance development. Understanding the complexity of adaptive strategies employed by bed bugs will help in designing the most effective and sustainable bed bug control methods.

  16. Bed bugs evolved unique adaptive strategy to resist pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fang; Gujar, Hemant; Gordon, Jennifer R.; Haynes, Kenneth F.; Potter, Michael F.; Palli, Subba R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic and post-genomic technologies have facilitated a genome-wide analysis of the insecticide resistance-associated genes in insects. Through bed bug, Cimex lectularius transcriptome analysis, we identified 14 molecular markers associated with pyrethroid resistance. Our studies revealed that most of the resistance-associated genes functioning in diverse mechanisms are expressed in the epidermal layer of the integument, which could prevent or slow down the toxin from reaching the target sites on nerve cells, where an additional layer of resistance (kdr) is possible. This strategy evolved in bed bugs is based on their unique morphological, physiological and behavioral characteristics and has not been reported in any other insect species. RNA interference-aided knockdown of resistance associated genes showed the relative contribution of each mechanism towards overall resistance development. Understanding the complexity of adaptive strategies employed by bed bugs will help in designing the most effective and sustainable bed bug control methods. PMID:23492626

  17. Evolution of resistance to quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Vipin C.; Wood, Thomas K.; Kumar, Prasun

    2013-01-01

    The major cause of mortality and morbidity in human beings is bacterial infection. Bacteria have developed resistance to most of the antibiotics primarily due to large scale and “indiscriminate” usage. The need is to develop novel mechanisms to treat bacterial infections. The expression of pathogenicity during bacterial infections is mediated by a cell density dependent phenomenon known as quorum sensing (QS). A wide array of QS systems (QSS) is operative in expressing the virulent behavior of bacterial pathogens. Each QSS may be mediated largely by a few major signals along with others produced in minuscule quantities. Efforts to target signal molecules and their receptors have proved effective in alleviating the virulent behavior of such pathogenic bacteria. These QS inhibitors (QSIs) have been reported to be effective in influencing the pathogenicity without affecting bacterial growth. However, evidence is accumulating that bacteria may develop resistance to QSIs. The big question is whether QSIs will meet the same fate as antibiotics? PMID:24194099

  18. Interspecific nematode signals regulate dispersal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2) of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective ...

  19. Resistance to antifungal therapies.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Banerjee, Atanu; Shah, Abdul Haseeb

    2017-02-28

    The evolution of antifungal resistance among fungal pathogens has rendered the limited arsenal of antifungal drugs futile. Considering the recent rise in the number of nosocomial fungal infections in immunocompromised patients, the emerging clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) has become a matter of grave concern for medical professionals. Despite advances in therapeutic interventions, it has not yet been possible to devise convincing strategies to combat antifungal resistance. Comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antifungal resistance is essential for identification of novel targets that do not promote or delay emergence of drug resistance. The present study discusses features and limitations of the currently available antifungals, mechanisms of antifungal resistance and highlights the emerging therapeutic strategies that could be deployed to combat MDR.

  20. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Yesim; Falk, Pamela; Mayhall, C. Glen

    2000-01-01

    After they were first identified in the mid-1980s, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) spread rapidly and became a major problem in many institutions both in Europe and the United States. Since VRE have intrinsic resistance to most of the commonly used antibiotics and the ability to acquire resistance to most of the current available antibiotics, either by mutation or by receipt of foreign genetic material, they have a selective advantage over other microorganisms in the intestinal flora and pose a major therapeutic challenge. The possibility of transfer of vancomycin resistance genes to other gram-positive organisms raises significant concerns about the emergence of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We review VRE, including their history, mechanisms of resistance, epidemiology, control measures, and treatment. PMID:11023964

  1. Azole-resistant aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Warris, Adilia

    2015-06-01

    Azole-resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus is emerging and is becoming an increasing problem in the management of aspergillosis. Two types of development of resistance have been described; resistance acquired during azole treatment in an individual patient and through environmental exposure to fungicides. The main molecular mechanism of azole resistance in A. fumigatus is explained by mutations in the cyp51A-gene. The environmental route of resistance development is particularly worrying and may affect all patients whether azole exposed or naïve, and whether suffering from acute or chronic aspergillosis. No management guidelines to assist clinicians confronted with azole-resistant aspergillosis are available and pre-clinical and clinical evidence supporting treatment choices is scarce.

  2. Behavior Modification is not...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawney, James W.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Identified are misconceptions of behavior modification procedures according to which behavior modification is connected mistakenly with noncontingent reinforcement, partial change of a teacher's behavior, decelerations of inappropriate behaviors only, dependency producing technology, teacher dominated activity, a single type of classroom…

  3. Insecticide Resistance Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    been a side effect of insect vector control programs since 1914, and insect disease vectors in over 45 countries are resistant to at least one...the CDC and WHO bioassays can be performed on various insects , the remainder of the guide will focus specifically on how to detect resistance in...mosquito vector populations. For a description of how to develop a bioassay for resistance testing in other groups of insects , refer to the following

  4. [Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes].

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan

    2011-04-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes are a group of genetic conditions characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormones. Three syndromes, in which resistance to hormone action is respectively due to mutations in the gene encoding for thyroid hormone receptor TRβ, impaired T4 and T3 transport, and impaired conversion of T4 to T3 mediated by deiodinases. An updated review of each of these forms of resistance is provided, and their pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical approaches are discussed.

  5. Behavior subtraction.

    PubMed

    Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Saligrama, Venkatesh; Konrad, Janusz

    2012-09-01

    Background subtraction has been a driving engine for many computer vision and video analytics tasks. Although its many variants exist, they all share the underlying assumption that photometric scene properties are either static or exhibit temporal stationarity. While this works in many applications, the model fails when one is interested in discovering changes in scene dynamics instead of changes in scene's photometric properties; the detection of unusual pedestrian or motor traffic patterns are but two examples. We propose a new model and computational framework that assume the dynamics of a scene, not its photometry, to be stationary, i.e., a dynamic background serves as the reference for the dynamics of an observed scene. Central to our approach is the concept of an event, which we define as short-term scene dynamics captured over a time window at a specific spatial location in the camera field of view. Unlike in our earlier work, we compute events by time-aggregating vector object descriptors that can combine multiple features, such as object size, direction of movement, speed, etc. We characterize events probabilistically, but use low-memory, low-complexity surrogates in a practical implementation. Using these surrogates amounts to behavior subtraction, a new algorithm for effective and efficient temporal anomaly detection and localization. Behavior subtraction is resilient to spurious background motion, such as due to camera jitter, and is content-blind, i.e., it works equally well on humans, cars, animals, and other objects in both uncluttered and highly cluttered scenes. Clearly, treating video as a collection of events rather than colored pixels opens new possibilities for video analytics.

  6. Carbon Surface Modification for Enhanced Corrosion Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    LTCSS-treated 316L SS, representing a sig- nificant increase in surface hardness over the substrate material (Vickers 300 HV). To give some perspective...behavior of particular interest to the Navy. Comparison of crevice corrosion resistance for untreated 316L SS and LTCSS- treated 316L is presented in...Fig. 2. Crevice corrosion damage on an untreated 316L coupon following one week of crevice exposure is shown in the center of the figure. LTCSS

  7. Understanding and managing resistance.

    PubMed

    Berger, D S

    1998-01-01

    As many as 25 to 45 percent of patients using triple therapy with protease inhibitors will develop resistance due to a change in the genetic HIV code. However, patients who develop resistance may still benefit clinically when protease inhibitors are used in combination with other antiretrovirals. These patients may not have undetectable viral loads although they may have stable T4-cell counts. Resistance does not always lead to disease progression. Newer drugs under development or available through compassionate track programs may benefit people with resistance. DMP-266 (Sustiva) is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that shows promise for these patients. Other drugs in development include Compound 141, 1592, and adefovir.

  8. Meeting the resistance problem

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. W. A.

    1963-01-01

    Because resistance to new insecticides may develop rapidly and cross resistance is often encountered, even between insecticides of different classes, there is a continual demand for the development of new compounds toxic to insects. There is at present a choice between chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus compounds, carbamates, pyrethrins, synthetic pyrethroids and thiocyanates. This paper discusses thoroughly the present status of a large number of insecticides, the cross-resistances between them, and the most effective methods of application. It also examines some of the biochemical mechanisms responsible for resistance and the attempts that have been made to use substances capable of inhibiting these mechanisms as synergists of insecticides.

  9. Effective resist profile control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Yu; Wang, Chien-Wei; Huang, Chun-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yu; Ku, Yao-Ching

    2014-03-01

    To meet Moore's law, resist resolution improvement has become more and more important. However, it is difficult to improve resist resolution and keep vertical sidewall profile. For example, a high contrast hole resist may cause trench scum, due to very T-top profile. This paper reports several concepts for resist profile tuning without losing performance for lithographic factor , including mask error enhancement factor (MEEF), depth of focus (DOF), and critical dimension uniformity (CDU). To quantitative analysis the resist profile improvement, we define a new factor, Scum fail ratio (F/R%) for new techniques evaluation. The new techniques, including floatable additive, floatable PAG, and new monomer, are discussed. From X-SEM and CD-SEM data, former three concepts could improve resist sidewall profile quantitatively evaluated by Scum fail F/R% and keep lithographic factors. In addition, another key factor, resist residue defect, is also discussed. The high contrast resist with higher receding contact angle (RCA) easily generates more residue defect after development. With the new monomer composition, RCA of Resist E is decreased from 54 to 48 degree after development. Therefore, the residue defect is improved one order.

  10. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  11. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  12. TSH resistance revisited.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic defects of hormone receptors are the most common form of end-organ hormone resistance. One example of such defects is TSH resistance, which is caused by biallelic inactivating mutations in the TSH receptor gene (TSHR). TSH, a master regulator of thyroid functions, affects virtually all cellular processes involving thyroid hormone production, including thyroidal iodine uptake, thyroglobulin iodination, reuptake of iodinated thyroglobulin and thyroid cell growth. Resistance to TSH results in defective thyroid hormone production from the neonatal period, namely congenital hypothyroidism. Classically, clinical phenotypes of TSH resistance due to inactivating TSHR mutations were thought to vary depending on the residual mutant receptor activity. Nonfunctional mutations in the two alleles produce severe thyroid hypoplasia with overt hypothyroidism (uncompensated TSH resistance), while hypomorphic mutations in at least one allele produce normal-sized thyroid gland with preserved hormone-producing capacity (compensated TSH resistance). More recently, a new subgroup of TSH resistance (nonclassic TSH resistance) that is characterized by paradoxically high thyroidal iodine uptake has been reported. In this article, the pathophysiology and clinical features of TSH resistance due to inactivating TSHR mutations are reviewed, with particular attention to the nonclassic form.

  13. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the association between insulin resistance and vascular disease, and this has led to wide acceptance of the clustering of hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and obesity as a clinical entity, the metabolic syndrome. While insulin resistance, by promoting dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities, is part of the proatherogenic milieu, it is possible that insulin resistance itself in the vascular wall does not promote atherosclerosis. Recent findings suggest that insulin resistance and atherosclerosis could represent independent and ultimately maladaptive responses to the disruption of cellular homeostasis caused by the excess delivery of fuel. PMID:16823479

  14. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Vikas; Sanchaita, Sinha; Singh, NP

    2010-01-01

    Emergence and spread of Acinetobacter species, resistant to most of the available antimicrobial agents, is an area of great concern. It is now being frequently associated with healthcare associated infections. Literature was searched at PUBMED, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library, using the terms ‘Acinetobacter Resistance, multidrug resistant (MDR), Antimicrobial Therapy, Outbreak, Colistin, Tigecycline, AmpC enzymes, and carbapenemases in various combinations. The terms such as MDR, Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR), and Pan Drug Resistant (PDR) have been used in published literature with varied definitions, leading to confusion in the correlation of data from various studies. In this review various mechanisms of resistance in the Acinetobacter species have been discussed. The review also probes upon the current therapeutic options, including combination therapies available to treat infections due to resistant Acinetobacter species in adults as well as children. There is an urgent need to enforce infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs to prevent the further spread of these resistant Acinetobacter species and to delay the emergence of increased resistance in the bacteria. PMID:20927292

  15. Spectral analysis of turbulent effects on resistivity and the tearing instability. [of plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deeds, D.; Van Hoven, G.

    1988-01-01

    A spectral numerical-simulation code and ancillary diagnostics are used here to analyze the behavior of resistive magnetic tearing in the presence of short-wavelength turbulence. It is found that, in general, the anomalous resistivity defined by Biskamp and Welter (1983) due to short-wavelength turbulence tends to return quickly towards zero even when artificially supported away from zero, and that its effect on tearing-mode behavior is not consistent with its interpretation as a resistivity. The behavior reported by Biskamp and Welter and the behavior observed here are analyzed. It is argued that, while not meaningful as a true resistivity, the anomalous resistivity parameter is a useful diagnostic showing the energy balance of the system.

  16. Behavioral momentum theory: equations and applications.

    PubMed

    Nevin, John A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral momentum theory provides a quantitative account of how reinforcers experienced within a discriminative stimulus context govern the persistence of behavior that occurs in that context. The theory suggests that all reinforcers obtained in the presence of a discriminative stimulus increase resistance to change, regardless of whether those reinforcers are contingent on the target behavior, are noncontingent, or are even contingent on an alternative behavior. In this paper, we describe the equations that constitute the theory and address their application to issues of particular importance in applied settings. The theory provides a framework within which to consider the effects of interventions such as extinction, noncontingent reinforcement, differential reinforcement of alternative behavior, and other phenomena (e.g., resurgence). Finally, the theory predicts some counterintuitive and potentially counterproductive effects of alternative reinforcement, and can serve as an integrative guide for intervention when its terms are identified with the relevant conditions of applied settings.

  17. Some verbal behavior about verbal behavior

    PubMed Central

    Salzinger, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    Beginning with behavior analysts' tendency to characterize verbal behavior as “mere” verbal behavior, the author reviews his own attempt to employ it to influence both his staff and policies of our government. He then describes its role in psychopathology, its effect on speakers in healing themselves and on engendering creativity. The paper ends by calling to our attention the role of verbal behavior in the construction of behavior analysis. PMID:22478393

  18. Antibiotic resistance: a primer and call to action.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel A; M'ikanatha, Nkuchia M; Read, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, discoveries of microorganisms as causes of infections and antibiotics as effective therapeutic agents have contributed to significant gains in public health in many parts of the world. Health agencies worldwide are galvanizing attention toward antibiotic resistance, which is a major threat to public health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013; World Health Organization, 2014). Some life scientists believe that we are approaching the post-antibiotic age (Davies & Davies, 2010). The growing threat of antimicrobial resistance is fueled by complex factors with biological, behavioral, and societal aspects. This primer provides an overview of antibiotic resistance and its growing burden on public health, the biological and behavioral mechanisms that increase antibiotic resistance, and examples of where health communication scholars can contribute to efforts to make our current antibiotic drugs last as long as possible. In addition, we identify compelling challenges for current communication theories and practices.

  19. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance: Daptomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Truc T.; Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction in clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key front-line antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP-resistance (R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP resistance are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have offered novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria. PMID:26495887

  20. [Resistance profile of rilpivirine].

    PubMed

    Imaz, Arkaitz; García, Federico; di Yacovo, Silvana; Llibre, Josep M

    2013-06-01

    Rilpivirine (RPV) is a new second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) approved for use in combination with two nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) as initial therapy in treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected patients with a baseline viral load ≤100,000 copies/mL. RPV is a diarylpyrimidine derivative with potent in vitro activity against multiple HIV-1 variants with resistance mutations to first-generation NNRTI such as K103N. In vitro studies and phase III clinical trials have allowed the identification of 16 mutations associated with resistance to RPV K101E/P, E138A/G/K/Q/R, V179L, Y181C/I/V, Y188L, H221Y, F227C and M230I/L. The risk of virologic failure in patients receiving RPV plus 2 NRTI with plasma viral load ≤ 100,000 copies/mL is low, but a high percentage of patients failing RPV develop resistance mutations to both RPV and NRTI. The most common resistance mutation that emerges in this setting is E138K. This mutation is usually associated with M184I due to a double compensatory effect of this combination, which confers resistance to RPV, as well as to lamivudine and emtricitabine. The emergence of RPV resistance confers cross-resistance to all NNRTI and, importantly, high percentages of cross-resistance to etravirine.

  1. Mold-Resistant Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that one of the surest ways to prevent indoor air quality and mold issues is to use preventive construction materials, discussing typical resistance to dealing with mold problems (usually budget-related) and describing mold-resistant construction, which uses concrete masonry, brick, and stone and is intended to withstand inevitable…

  2. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have emerged not only in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic “attack” is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. “Survival of the fittest” is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  3. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations and pseudogaplike behavior in Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance and anisotropic resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J.; Roy, B.; Tanatar, M. A.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Prozorov, R.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-11-06

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of single-crystalline Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2 (x=0.023, 0.028, 0.033, and 0.059) annealed at 350°C for 7 days. From the observation of a characteristic shape of 75As NMR spectra in the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, as in the case of x=0 (TN=170 K), clear evidence for the commensurate AFM phase transition with the concomitant structural phase transition is observed in x=0.023 (TN=106 K) and x=0.028 (TN=53 K). Through the temperature dependence of the Knight shifts and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1), although stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations are realized in the paramagnetic state as in the case of other iron pnictide superconductors, we found a gradual decrease of the AFM spin fluctuations below a crossover temperature T* that was nearly independent of Co-substitution concentration, and it is attributed to a pseudogaplike behavior in the spin excitation spectra of these systems. The T* feature finds correlation with features in the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity, ρc(T), but not with the in-plane resistivity ρa(T). The temperature evolution of anisotropic stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations is tracked in the paramagnetic and pseudogap phases by the 1/T1 data measured under magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. As a result, based on our NMR data, we have added a pseudogaplike phase to the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2.

  4. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chellat, Mathieu F.; Raguž, Luka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human‐pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last‐resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled “Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow” triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  5. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  6. HIV resistance to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Francois

    2009-11-24

    Similar to all antiretroviral drugs, failure of raltegravir-based treatment regimens to fully supress HIV replication almost invariably results in emergence of HIV resistance to this new drug. HIV resistance to raltegravir is the consequence of mutations located close to the integrase active site, which can be divided into three main evolutionary pathways: the N155H, the Q148R/H/K and the Y143R/C pathways. Each of these primary mutations can be accompanied by a variety of secondary mutations that both increase resistance and compensate for the variable loss of viral replicative capacity that is often associated with primary resistance mutations. One unique property of HIV resistance to raltegravir is that each of these different resistance pathways are mutually exclusive and appear to evolve separately on distinct viral genomes. Resistance is frequently initiated by viruses carrying mutations of the N155H pathway, followed by emergence and further dominance of viral genomes carrying mutations of the Q148R/H/K or of the Y143R/C pathways, which express higher levels of resistance. Even if some natural integrase polymorphisms can be part of this evolution process, these polymorphisms do not affect HIV susceptibility in the absence of primary mutations. Therefore, all HIV-1 subtypes and groups, together with HIV-2, are naturally susceptible to raltegravir. Finally, because interaction of integrase strand transfer inhibitors with the HIV integrase active site is comparable from one compound to another, raltegravir-resistant viruses express significant cross resistance to most other compounds of this new class of antiretroviral drugs.

  7. Echinocandin Resistance in Candida.

    PubMed

    Perlin, David S

    2015-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an important infection concern for patients with underlying immunosuppression. Antifungal therapy is a critical component of patient care, but therapeutic choices are limited due to few drug classes. Antifungal resistance, especially among Candida species, aggravates the problem. The echinocandin drugs (micafungin, anidulafungin, and caspofungin) are the preferred choice to treat a range of candidiasis. They target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which is responsible for the biosynthesis of a major cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failure involves acquisition of resistance, although it is a rare event among most Candida species. However, in some settings, higher-level resistance has been reported among Candida glabrata, which is also frequently resistant to azole drugs, resulting in difficult-to-treat multidrug-resistant strains. The mechanism of echinocandin resistance involves amino acid changes in "hot spot" regions of FKS-encoded subunits of glucan synthase, which decreases the sensitivity of enzyme to drug, resulting in higher minimum inhibitory concentration values. The cellular processes promoting the formation of resistant FKS strains involve complex stress response pathways that yield a variety of adaptive compensatory genetic responses. Standardized broth microdilution techniques can be used to distinguish FKS mutant strains from wild type, but testing C. glabrata with caspofungin should be approached cautiously. Finally, clinical factors that promote echinocandin resistance include prophylaxis, host reservoirs including biofilms in the gastrointestinal tract, and intra-abdominal infections. An understanding of clinical and molecular factors that promote echinocandin resistance is critical to develop better diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies to overcome resistance.

  8. Ethics and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2007-05-01

    This paper reviews the dynamics behind, and ethical issues associated with, the phenomenon of drug resistance. Drug resistance is an important ethical issue partly because of the severe consequences likely to result from the increase in drug resistant pathogens if more is not done to control them. Drug resistance is also an ethical issue because, rather than being a mere quirk of nature, the problem is largely a product of drug distribution. Drug resistance results from the over-consumption of antibiotics by the wealthy; and it, ironically, results from the under-consumption of antibiotics, usually by the poor or otherwise marginalized. In both kinds of cases the phenomenon of drug resistance illustrates why health (care)--at least in the context of infectious disease--should be treated as a (global) public good. The point is that drug resistance involves 'externalities' affecting third parties. When one patient develops a resistant strain of disease because of her over- or under-consumption of medication, this more dangerous malady poses increased risk to others. The propriety of free-market distribution of goods subject to externalities is famously dubious--given that the 'efficiency' rationale behind markets assumes an absence of externalities. Market failure in the context of drug resistance is partly revealed by the fact that no new classes of antibiotics have been developed since 1970. I conclude by arguing that the case of drug resistance reveals additional reasons--to those traditionally appealed to by bioethicists--for treating health care as something special when making policy decisions about its distribution.

  9. Manipulated transformation of filamentary and homogeneous resistive switching on ZnO thin film memristor with controllable multistate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Hsin; Huang, Jian-Shiou; Lai, Chih-Chung; Huang, Hsin-Wei; Lin, Su-Jien; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2013-07-10

    A bias polarity-manipulated transformation from filamentary to homogeneous resistive switching was demonstrated on a Pt/ZnO thin film/Pt device. Two types of switching behaviors, exhibiting different resistive switching characteristics and memory performances were investigated in detail. The detailed transformation mechanisms are systematically proposed. By controlling different compliance currents and RESET-stop voltages, controllable multistate resistances in low resistance states and a high resistance states in the ZnO thin film metal-insulator-metal structure under the homogeneous resistive switching were demonstrated. We believe that findings would open up opportunities to explore the resistive switching mechanisms and performance memristor with multistate storage.

  10. Algebraic nonlinear growth of the resistive kink instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskamp, Dieter

    1991-12-01

    It is derived from a simple model that the resistive kink mode grows algebraically W∝t2 for island size W exceeding the resistive layer width. The model only uses the properties of the linear eigenfunction and of current-sheet reconnection. Because of the geometry of the inflow velocity, the usual quasisingular behavior in the current sheet edge region vanishes. The theory is in quantitative agreement with high-S number numerical simulations.

  11. Linear waves in a resistive plasma with Hall current

    SciTech Connect

    Almaguer, J.A. )

    1992-10-01

    Dispersion relations for the case of a magnetized plasma are determined taking into account the Hall current and a constant resistivity, {eta}, in Ohm's law. It is found that the Hall effect is relevant only for parallel (to the equilibrium magnetic field) wave numbers in the case of uniform plasmas, giving place to a dispersive behavior. In particular, the cases of {eta}{r arrow}0 and small (nonzero) resistivity are discussed.

  12. Behavior therapy and callous-unemotional traits: Effects of a pilot study examining modified behavioral contingencies on child behavior

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Natalie V.; Haas, Sarah M.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Willoughby, Michael T.; Helseth, Sarah A.; Crum, Kathleen I.; Coles, Erika K.; Pelham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The conduct problems of children with callous-unemotional traits (i.e., lack of empathy, guilt/lack of caring behaviors) (CU) are particularly resistant to current behavioral interventions, and it is possible that differential sensitivities to punishment and reward may underlie this resistance. Children with conduct problems and CU (CPCU) are less responsive to behavioral punishment techniques (e.g., time-out), however reward techniques (e.g., earning points for prizes or activities) are effective for reducing conduct problems. This study examined the efficacy of modified behavioral interventions, which de-emphasized punishment (condition B) and emphasized reward techniques (condition C), compared to a standard behavioral intervention (condition A). Interventions were delivered through a Summer Treatment Program over seven weeks with an A-B-A-C-A-BC-A design to a group of eleven children (7–11 years; 91% male). All children were diagnosed with either oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder, in addition to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Results revealed the best treatment response occurred during the low punishment condition, with rates of negative behavior (e.g., aggression, teasing, stealing) increasing over the seven weeks. However, there was substantial individual variability in treatment response, and several children demonstrated improvement during the modified intervention conditions. Future research is necessary to disentangle treatment effects from order effects, and implications of group treatment of CPCU children (i.e., deviancy training) are discussed. PMID:25022772

  13. Behavior therapy and callous-unemotional traits: effects of a pilot study examining modified behavioral contingencies on child behavior.

    PubMed

    Miller, Natalie V; Haas, Sarah M; Waschbusch, Daniel A; Willoughby, Michael T; Helseth, Sarah A; Crum, Kathleen I; Coles, Erika K; Pelham, William E

    2014-09-01

    The conduct problems of children with callous-unemotional (CU) traits (i.e., lack of empathy, lack of guilt/lack of caring behaviors) are particularly resistant to current behavioral interventions, and it is possible that differential sensitivities to punishment and reward may underlie this resistance. Children with conduct problems and CU (CPCU) are less responsive to behavioral punishment techniques (e.g., time-out), whereas reward techniques (e.g., earning points for prizes or activities) are effective for reducing conduct problems. This study examined the efficacy of modified behavioral interventions, which de-emphasized punishment (Condition B) and emphasized reward techniques (Condition C), compared with a standard behavioral intervention (Condition A). Interventions were delivered through a summer treatment program over 7 weeks with an A-B-A-C-A-BC-A design to a group of 11 children (7-11 years; 91% male). All children were diagnosed with either oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder, in addition to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Results revealed the best treatment response occurred during the low-punishment condition, with rates of negative behavior (e.g., aggression, teasing, stealing) increasing over the 7 weeks. However, there was substantial individual variability in treatment response, and several children demonstrated improvement during the modified intervention conditions. Future research is necessary to disentangle treatment effects from order effects, and implications of group treatment of CPCU children (i.e., deviancy training) are discussed.

  14. Engineering of forming-free resistive switching characteristics in ZrO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Gang; Li, Tao; Wang, Chao; Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming

    2015-06-01

    The variation of forming-free resistive switching (RS) characteristics modulated by thermal annealing was investigated in ZrO2 films fabricated by electron beam evaporation. A typical forming-free behavior with pristine resistance comparable to that of the high resistance state (HRS) was observed in the as-deposited devices. Whereas, the resistance was further reduced to a state with initial resistance even lower than the low resistance state (LRS) after annealing in N2 ambient and a larger resistance ratio was verified in the annealed devices. Both devices exhibited stable bipolar RS without any forming step, which has great potential for memory applications. A possible RS mechanism associated with adjusting of oxygen vacancy formation and migration was proposed to explain these distinct forming-free behaviors. It is expected that controllable forming-free characteristics and improved device performance may be obtained by further optimizing the distribution and density of oxygen vacancies via post-annealing.

  15. Resistance switching memory in perovskite oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.B. Liu, J.-M.

    2015-07-15

    The resistance switching behavior has recently attracted great attentions for its application as resistive random access memories (RRAMs) due to a variety of advantages such as simple structure, high-density, high-speed and low-power. As a leading storage media, the transition metal perovskite oxide owns the strong correlation of electrons and the stable crystal structure, which brings out multifunctionality such as ferroelectric, multiferroic, superconductor, and colossal magnetoresistance/electroresistance effect, etc. The existence of rich electronic phases, metal–insulator transition and the nonstoichiometric oxygen in perovskite oxide provides good platforms to insight into the resistive switching mechanisms. In this review, we first introduce the general characteristics of the resistance switching effects, the operation methods and the storage media. Then, the experimental evidences of conductive filaments, the transport and switching mechanisms, and the memory performances and enhancing methods of perovskite oxide based filamentary RRAM cells have been summarized and discussed. Subsequently, the switching mechanisms and the performances of the uniform RRAM cells associating with the carrier trapping/detrapping and the ferroelectric polarization switching have been discussed. Finally, the advices and outlook for further investigating the resistance switching and enhancing the memory performances are given.

  16. Evolution of antibiotic resistance by human and bacterial niche construction.

    PubMed

    Boni, Maciej F; Feldman, Marcus W

    2005-03-01

    Antibiotic treatment by humans generates strong viability selection for antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. The frequency of host antibiotic use often determines the strength of this selection, and changing patterns of antibiotic use can generate many types of behaviors in the population dynamics of resistant and sensitive bacterial populations. In this paper, we present a simple model of hosts dimorphic for their tendency to use/avoid antibiotics and bacterial pathogens dimorphic in their resistance/sensitivity to antibiotic treatment. When a constant fraction of hosts uses antibiotics, the two bacterial strain populations can coexist unless host use-frequency is above a critical value; this critical value is derived as the ratio of the fitness cost of resistance to the fitness cost of undergoing treatment. When strain frequencies can affect host behavior, the dynamics may be analyzed in the light of niche construction. We consider three models underlying changing host behavior: conformism, the avoidance of long infections, and adherence to the advice of public health officials. In the latter two, we find that the pathogen can have quite a strong effect on host behavior. In particular, if antibiotic use is discouraged when resistance levels are high, we observe a classic niche-construction phenomenon of maintaining strain polymorphism even in parameter regions where it would not be expected.

  17. Tribological and corrosion behaviors of carburized AISI 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong-on, Atcharawadi; Boonruang, Chatdanai

    2016-01-01

    AISI 4340 steel is widely used in automotive and aircraft industries as gear components. In such applications, surface hardening processes such as carburizing are required in order to improve the life time of the components. There are many studies showing the tribological behavior of the carburized steel, but the corrosion behavior has not yet been clarified. This paper reports on both tribological and corrosion behaviors of the carburized AISI 4340 steel. Factor associated with carburizing, such as the quantities of deposited carbon, dissolved carbon, and formed Cr23C6 and Fe3C, affect the tribological and corrosion behaviors of the steel by improving hardness, friction, lubrication, and wear resistance; but corrosion resistance is reduced. The dissolved carbon affects the formation of the oxide layer of the carburized steel, by obstructing the continuous oxide layer formation and by decreasing the chromium content of the steel, leading to the decrease in the corrosion resistance of the steel.

  18. Method of stimulus combination impacts resistance to extinction.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Bai, John Y H

    2015-07-01

    Reinforcing an alternative response in the presence of the stimuli governing a target response increases resistance to extinction of target responding, relative to training target responding on its own. Conversely, training alternative and target responses in the presence of different stimuli and combining those stimuli only decreases resistance to extinction of target responding, relative to target responding on its own. The present study assessed how different methods of combining discriminative stimuli influence resistance to extinction of responding in pigeons. As in previous studies, combining stimuli across different keys only decreased resistance to extinction of target responding relative to target responding on its own. In comparison, combining stimuli on the same key initially increased resistance to extinction of target responding, but repeated tests resulted in similar levels of responding as target responding with stimuli combined on separate keys. Moreover, greater overall reinforcement rates produced greater resistance to extinction with both methods of combining stimuli, consistent with behavioral momentum theory. These findings reveal several behavioral processes influence the outcome of combining stimuli--including perceptual processes, discriminative control by contingencies, response competition, and behavioral momentum.

  19. Environmental behavior of actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choppin, G. R.

    2006-01-01

    Since the plutonium concentration in ocean waters is quite low, most of the plutonium deposited in marine waters has been sorbed onto plants and sediments. Actinides in natural waters usually are not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium for long time periods as their solubility and migration behavior is strongly related to the form in which the nuclides are introduced initially into the aquatic system for long time periods. Their solubility depends on pH (hydrolysis), E H (oxidation state), reaction with complexants (e.g., carbonate, phosphate, humic acid, etc.), sorption to surfaces of minerals and/or colloids, etc. The primary variable is the oxidation state of the actinide cation. Actinides can be present in more than one oxidation state which complicates modeling actinide environmental behavior. Np(V)O 2 + and Pu(V)O 2 + are weakly complexing and resistant to hydrolysis and subsequent precipitation, but both can undergo reduction to the IV oxidation state. The solubility of NpO 2 + can be as high as 10-4M, while that of PuO 2 + is more limited as the very low solubility of Pu(OH)4 promotes reduction to Pu(IV). The solubility of hexavalent UO 2 2+ in sea water is limited by hydrolysis, but has a relatively high concentration due to carbonate complexation. Americium(III) hydroxocarbonate, Am(CO3)(OH), is the limiting species for the solubility of Am(III) in sea water. Thorium has a very low solubility due to the formation of Th(OH)4.

  20. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  1. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  2. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  3. Linezolid Resistance in Staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Stefania; Bongiorno, Dafne; Mongelli, Gino; Campanile, Floriana

    2010-06-24

    Linezolid, the first oxazolidinone to be used clinically, is effective in the treatment of infections caused by various Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus. It has been used successfully for the treatment of patients with endocarditis and bacteraemia, osteomyelitis, joint infections and tuberculosis and it is often used for treatment of complicated infections when other therapies have failed. Linezolid resistance in Gram-positive cocci has been encountered clinically as well as in vitro, but it is still a rare phenomenon. The resistance to this antibiotic has been, until now, entirely associated with distinct nucleotide substitutions in domain V of the 23S rRNA genes. The number of mutated rRNA genes depends on the dose and duration of linezolid exposure and has been shown to influence the level of linezolid resistance. Mutations in associated ribosomal proteins also affect linezolid activity. A new phenicol and clindamycin resistance phenotype has recently been found to be caused by an RNA methyltransferase designated Cfr. This gene confers resistance to lincosamides, oxazolidinones, streptogramin A, phenicols and pleuromutilins, decrease the susceptibility of S. aureus to tylosin, to josamycin and spiramycin and thus differs from erm rRNA methylase genes. Research into new oxazolidinones with improved characteristics is ongoing. Data reported in patent applications demonstrated that some oxazolidinone derivatives, also with improved characteristics with respect to linezolid, are presently under study: at least three of them are in an advanced phase of development.

  4. From Behaviorism to Selectionism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Ernest A.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses behaviorism and the gradual shift to a theory of selectionism. Highlights include the development of behaviorism as a part of psychology, including Skinner's theories; varieties of behaviorism, including behavioral analysis; behaviorology in other disciplinary settings; effects of contingencies upon behavior; and the prospects for…

  5. Infliximab and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Francesco; Naty, Saverio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2010-06-01

    Insulin resistance is the most important pathophysiologic feature of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and prediabetic states. TNF-alpha, a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammation-associated insulin resistance during the course of rheumatic diseases. Therapies aimed at neutralizing TNF-alpha, such as the monoclonal antibody infliximab, represent a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatic diseases and allow to obtain significant results in terms of control of the inflammatory process. In this article we reviewed the scientific evidence published in the literature about a potential role of TNF-alpha blockade in improving insulin resistance in non-diabetic rheumatic patients.

  6. Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An exercise device 10 is particularly well suited for use in low gravity environments, and includes a frame 12 with plurality of resistance elements 30,82 supported in parallel on the frame. A load transfer member 20 is moveable relative to the frame for transferring the applied force to the free end of each captured resistance element. Load selection template 14 is removably secured both to the load transfer member, and a plurality of capture mechanisms engage the free end of corresponding resistance elements. The force applying mechanism 53 may be a handle, harness or other user interface for applying a force to move the load transfer member.

  7. Predicting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Baquero, Fernando; Andersson, Dan I

    2007-12-01

    The treatment of bacterial infections is increasingly complicated because microorganisms can develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. This article discusses the information that is required to predict when antibiotic resistance is likely to emerge in a bacterial population. Indeed, the development of the conceptual and methodological tools required for this type of prediction represents an important goal for microbiological research. To this end, we propose the establishment of methodological guidelines that will allow researchers to predict the emergence of resistance to a new antibiotic before its clinical introduction.

  8. Insulin resistance influences central opioid activity in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berent-Spillson, Alison; Love, Tiffany; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Sowers, MaryFran; Persad, Carol C; Pennington, Kathryn P; Eyvazaddeh, Aimee D; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Smith, Yolanda R

    2011-06-30

    This pilot study describes a relationship between insulin resistance and μ-opioid neurotransmission in limbic appetite and mood-regulating regions in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), suggesting that insulin-opioid interactions may contribute to behavioral and reproductive pathologies of PCOS. We found that [1] patients with PCOS who are insulin-resistant (n = 7) had greater limbic μ-opioid receptor availability (nondisplaceable binding potential) than controls (n = 5); [2] receptor availability was correlated with severity of insulin resistance; and [3] receptor availability normalized after insulin-regulating treatment.

  9. Polystyrene negative resist for high-resolution electron beam lithography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We studied the exposure behavior of low molecular weight polystyrene as a negative tone electron beam lithography (EBL) resist, with the goal of finding the ultimate achievable resolution. It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists. Such dense patterns can be achieved both at 20 and 5 keV beam energies using different developers. In addition to its ultra-high resolution capability, polystyrene is a simple and low-cost resist with easy process control and practically unlimited shelf life. It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA. With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern. PMID:21749679

  10. Noise on resistive switching: a Fokker-Planck approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, G. A.; Grosz, D. F.; Fierens, P. I.

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of internal and external noise on the phenomenon of resistive switching. We consider a non-harmonic external driving signal and provide a theoretical framework to explain the observed behavior in terms of the related Fokker-Planck equations. It is found that internal noise causes an enhancement of the resistive contrast and that noise proves to be advantageous when considering short driving pulses. In the case of external noise, however, noise only has the effect of degrading the resistive contrast. Furthermore, we find a relationship between the noise amplitude and the driving signal pulsewidth that constrains the persistence of the resistive state. In particular, results suggest that strong and short driving pulses favor a longer persistence time, an observation that may find applications in the field of high-integration high-speed resistive memory devices.

  11. Mechanisms of drug resistance: daptomycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tran, Truc T; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-09-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction into clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key frontline antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP resistance (DAP-R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP-R are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have provided novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope, such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria.

  12. Electro-dewatering of activated sludge: Electrical resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Conrardy, Jean-Baptiste; Vaxelaire, Jean; Olivier, Jérémy

    2016-09-01

    The significant risk of ohmic heating and the high electric energy consumption at terminal stages of the dewatering are two problems that hamper the development of the electro-dewatering (EDW) technology. In the future prospect of studying these two issues, it is important to provide and analyse quantitative data relative to the behavior of the electric resistance in EDW. It was the main goal of this study. It showed that the electric resistance of the complete system (cake + filter cloth) depended on the cake dryness. It increased sharply when the solids content exceeded around 45%.The solids loading also influenced the apparent resistance at the beginning of the process. The electric resistance of the filter cloth represented about 20% of the total resistance. It remained relatively constant over the process except at the terminal stage where it generally increased sharply. The use of conductive filter, such as metallic cloth, enabled to decrease the electric resistance and reduce the energy consumption of the process. The electric resistance decreased across the cake from the anode to the cathode. This behavior may be explained by several phenomena such as the ions migration and their interaction with the solid, the decrease of dry solids content from the anode to the cathode and the gas presence at the anode (due to electrolysis reaction).

  13. Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, J. M.; Foxx, R. M.; Jacobson, J. W.; Green, G.; Mulick, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the origins and characteristics of the positive behavior support (PBS) movement and examines those features in the context of the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA). We raise a number of concerns about PBS as an approach to delivery of behavioral services and its impact on how ABA is viewed by those in human services. We…

  14. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially sleep apnea; and cigarette smoking. Does sleep matter? Yes. Studies show that untreated sleep problems, especially ... a severe form of insulin resistance may have dark patches of skin, usually on the back of ...

  15. MCR: modern colistin resistance.

    PubMed

    Caniaux, I; van Belkum, A; Zambardi, G; Poirel, L; Gros, M F

    2017-03-01

    Recently, plasmid-mediated and, therefore, transferable bacterial polymyxin resistance was discovered in strains from both humans and animals. Such a trait may widely spread geographically, while simultaneously crossing microbial species barriers. This may ultimately render the "last resort" polymyxin antibiotics therapeutically useless. Colistin is currently used to treat infections caused by Gram-negative carbapenemase producers and colistin resistance may lead to practical pan-antibiotic resistance. We here analyzed the medical and diagnostic consequences of (emerging) colistin resistance and propose pathways toward adequate diagnostics for timely detection of both asymptomatic carriage and infection. Culture-based testing using chromogenic and selective media for screening clinical (and veterinary) specimens may constitute key tools for that purpose. Relevant molecular tests are also discussed.

  16. Helical Emg Effective Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, V. K.; Zharinov, E. I.; Busin, V. N.; Grinevich, B. E.; Sokolova, O. V.; Smirnova, G. N.; Klimushkin, K. N.

    2004-11-01

    The efficiency of explosive-magnetic system operation depends on the magnetic flux losses produced under circuit deformation. Losses primarily arise from circuit ohmic resistance and flux pocketing due to the disturbed continuity of helix wires deformation. This is because of technological faults in fabrication and potential electric breakdowns resulting from the voltage overload in the generator circuit. Since it is rather difficult to identify each type of loss mentioned, all soles are expressed as the effective resistance of the circuit, Reff. The EMG-160 multi-sectional helical generator with a 760 mm long helix having an inner diameter of 160 mm is considered as an example. EMG-160 initial conductance was 34 μH and the final inductance was 25 nH. The effective resistance of the circuit was calculated for this experiment. The method of determining the effective resistance allows estimation of EMG efficiency at all stages of generator operation.

  17. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  18. [Resistance to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús Silva

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major public health problem around the world causing high rates of morbi-mortality and economic problems in hospital settings. Major bacterial causing nosocomial infections are: extended-spectrum beta-lactameses (ESBL) producing enterobacteria, methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, metallo fl-lactamases (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus spp, Acinetobacter baumani. This last bacteria is not very often isolated in hospital settings yet, but it is multi-resistance pathogen causing high mortality. Helicobacter pylori, which is not a nosocomial pathogen but is associated to gastric diseases (from gastritis to gastric cancer). Infections prevention, to obtain an accuracy diagnostic and effective treatment, use antibiotic wisely and pathogen dissemination prevention (hand washing), are important steps to control the bacterial resistance.

  19. On the theory of behavioral mechanics.

    PubMed

    Dzendolet, E

    1999-12-01

    The Theory of Behavioral Mechanics is the behavioral analogue of Newton's laws of motion, with the rate of responding in operant conditioning corresponding to physical velocity. In an earlier work, the basic relation between rate of responding and sessions under two FI schedules and over a range of commonly used session values had been shown to be a power function. Using that basic relation, functions for behavioral acceleration, mass, and momentum are derived here. Data from other laboratories also support the applicability of a power function to VI schedules. A particular numerical value is introduced here to be the standard reference value for the behavioral force under the VI-60-s schedule. This reference allows numerical values to be calculated for the behavioral mass and momentum of individual animals. A comparison of the numerical values of the momenta of two animals can be used to evaluate their relative resistances to change, e.g., to extinction, which is itself viewed as a continuously changing behavioral force being imposed on the animal. This overall numerical approach allows behavioral force-values to be assigned to various experimental conditions such as the evaluation of the behavioral force of a medication dosage.

  20. CELLULAR RESISTANCE TO INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Mackaness, G. B.

    1962-01-01

    The mouse was found to be natively susceptible to Listeria monocytogenes. Its susceptibility was attributed to the capacity of the organism to survive and multiplying in host macrophages. During the first 3 days of a primary infection the bacterial populations of spleen and liver were found to increase at a constant rate. On the 4th day of infection the host became hypersensitive to Listeria antigens and at the same time bacterial growth ceased. A rapid inactivation of the organism ensued. Convalescent mice were resistant to challenge, but no protective factor could be found in their serum. Histological evidence suggested that acquired resistance was the result of a change occurring in the host's mononuclear phagocytes. When challenged in vitro, the macrophages of convalescent mice were found to resist infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria-resistant cells appeared during the course of infection at a time which corresponded with the development of the antibacterial mechanism in the spleen. They persisted for as long as the antibacterial mechanism remained intact in this organ. This period of absolute resistance to Listeria lasted about 3 weeks. Thereafter, the host remained hypersensitive but unable to inactivate a challenge inoculum of Listeria. However, it remained capable of producing an accelerated response to reinfection. This was thought to depend upon an ability to generate a new population of resistant cells from a residuum of specifically sensitized macrophages or macrophage precursors still surviving in the tissues as a result of the immunological activation which occurred during the primary infection. PMID:14467923

  1. Behavior modification with culturally deprived school children: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Wasik, B H; Senn, K; Welch, R H; Cooper, B R

    1969-01-01

    Techniques of behavior modification were employed with two second-grade Negro girls in a demonstration school for culturally deprived children to increase the girls' appropriate classroom behaviors. A classification system that provided for continuous categorization of behavior was used to code the children's behavior in two classroom situations. Data were also taken on the type, duration, and frequency of the teachers' verbal interactions. The study included four conditions: Baseline, Modification I, Postmodification, and Modification II. The treatment variable was positive social reinforcement-attention and approval contingent upon desirable classroom behaviors-which was presented, withheld, or withdrawn (timeout from social reinforcement). Withholding of social reinforcement was contingent upon inappropriate attention-getting behaviors. Timeout from social reinforcement was contingent upon behaviors classified as aggressive and resistive. After 25 days of Modification I, desirable behavior increased markedly for each girl. The teachers were then asked to return to their Baseline level of performance. The resultant behaviors demonstrated that for one girl, behavior was still primarily under the control of the treatment contingencies. For the second child, many desirable behaviors that had increased in frequency during Modification I remained high, but inappropriate behaviors increased. When treatment was reinstated, the amount of time spent in desirable behaviors increased and remained high for both girls. Three checks during the three months following data collection showed that these behaviors continued to remain high.

  2. [Behaviors of maricultured hybrid sturgeon].

    PubMed

    Wu, Changwen; Jiang, Chengguo; Chen, Guoye

    2006-02-01

    The study on the behaviors of hybrid sturgeon under mariculture conditions showed that hybrid sturgeon had a stronger endurance to the exposure in air, with 100% and 74.1% of livability after 1 h and 3 h exposure, respectively. The feeding habit of hybrid sturgeon could be domesticated, i.e., all kinds of vegetal proteinic food could be used as feedstuff. Hybrid sturgeon also had a strong hunger resistance. An obvious ingestion rhythm was observed, with two peaks in the morning and evening when breeding in cement pool, and during slack tide and tidal stand when breeding in deep water cage. At the two peaks, the ingestion exceeded 50% of that in the whole day. The hybrid sturgeon in cement pool had the habit of hiding during the day and coming out at night, while that in deep water cage stayed at the base in riptide and swam in slack tide. Hybrid sturgeon had a weaker resistance to riptide and wave than American red snapper, but a stronger resistance than yellow croaker. Hybrid sturgeon could quickly adapt the surroundings, and be a good species to mariculture in deep water cage. The appropriate size of hybrid sturgeon bred in deep water cage should be about 400 g.

  3. Behavioral technology and behavioral ecology1

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Edwin P.

    1974-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis, as a special case of behavioral technology, is discussed from the standpoint of behavioral ecology. The ecological orientation and its emphasis upon system-like interdependencies among environment, organism, and behavior are presented. The widespread possibilities for unintended effects of simple interventions provide the context for evaluating effective behavioral technology and calling for cooperation between the technologist and ecologist. Such cooperation, in the form of mutual and cooperative research efforts, should come naturally for the technologist and ecologist, because they share some fundamental values and assumptions, and each has much to offer the other. Several areas of such cooperative effort are spelled out. PMID:4465371

  4. Behavioral Health & Performance

    NASA Video Gallery

    Summary of the Behavioral Health and Performance Operations Group’s work including an overview of astronaut selection, behavioral health services provided to astronauts, the psychological aspects o...

  5. The Universal Influence of Contact Resistance on the Efficiency of a Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, Rasmus

    2015-08-01

    The influence of electrical and thermal contact resistance on the efficiency of a segmented thermoelectric generator is investigated. We consider 12 different segmented p-legs and 12 different segmented n-legs, using eight different p-type and eight different n-type thermoelectric materials. For all systems, a universal influence of both the electrical and thermal contact resistance is observed on the leg's efficiency, when the systems are analyzed in terms of the contribution of the contact resistance to the total resistance of the leg. The results are compared with the analytical model of Min and Rowe. In order for the efficiency not to decrease by more than 20%, the contact electrical resistance should be less than 30% of the total leg resistance for zero thermal contact resistance, while the thermal contact resistance should be less than 20% for zero electrical contact resistance. The universal behavior also allowed the maximum tolerable contact resistance for a segmented system to be found, i.e., the resistance at which a leg of only the high-temperature thermoelectric material has the same efficiency as the segmented leg with a contact resistance at the interface. If, e.g., segmentation increases the efficiency by 30%, then an electrical contact resistance of 30% or a thermal contact resistance of 20% can be tolerated.

  6. LAYERED CERAMICS: Processing and Mechanical Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Helen M.

    1997-08-01

    Recent progress in the field of mechanical behavior of layered ceramics is reviewed. Several processing techniques are described with reference to the fabrication of ceramic laminates. These include tape-casting, centrifugal casting, slip-casting, electrophoretic deposition (EPD), and the production of fibrous monolith materials. The review discusses various laminar design approaches for achieving improvements in strength, toughness, work of fracture, R-Curve behavior, and contact damage resistance. Examples of effective strategies include manipulation of residual stresses, the incorporation of weak interlayers to induce crack deflection, and promotion of synergistic effects between layer materials that exhibit intrinsically different responses.

  7. Persistence and resistance to extinction in the domestic dog: Basic research and applications to canine training.

    PubMed

    Hall, Nathaniel J

    2017-04-06

    This review summarizes the research investigating behavioral persistence and resistance to extinction in the dog. The first part of this paper reviews Behavioral Momentum Theory and its applications to Applied Behavior Analysis and training of pet dogs with persistent behavioral problems. I also highlight how research on Behavioral Momentum Theory can be applied to the training of detection dogs in an attempt to enhance detection performance in the presence of behavioral disruptors common in operational settings. In the second part of this review, I highlight more basic research on behavioral persistence with dogs, and how breed differences and experiences with humans as alternative sources of reinforcement can influence dogs' resistance to extinction of a target behavior. Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Momentum Theory have important applications for behavioral treatments to reduce the persistence of problem behavior in dogs and for the development of enhanced training methods that enhance the persistence of working dogs. Dogs can also be leveraged as natural models of stereotypic behavior and for exploring individual differences in behavioral persistence by evaluating breed and environmental variables associated with differences in canine persistance.

  8. Antibiotic resistance: Italian awareness survey 2016.

    PubMed

    Prigitano, Anna; Romanò, Luisa; Auxilia, Francesco; Castaldi, Silvana; Tortorano, Anna M

    2017-03-09

    Antimicrobial resistance has become a public health priority worldwide. The WHO conducted a survey concerning the personal use of antibiotics, knowledge of appropriate use and awareness of the issue of resistance. A similar survey was conducted in Italy involving 666 young university students and 131 seniors attending courses of the University of the third age. Antibiotics seem to be taken with moderate frequency and appropriately: 30% of respondents took them in the past six months and 94% took these drugs only prescribed by a doctor, in the correct dose and for the proper duration. Notable confusion concerning the conditions treatable with antibiotics was detected (only 30% indicated gonorrhea, and 30-40% believed that antibiotics should be employed for fever, cold, and flu), while 94% of participants seemed aware of the problem of antibiotic resistance. Most of the respondents identified the behaviors that can reduce the phenomenon of resistance (regular handwashing and use of antibiotics only when prescribed and needed). The results of our survey, that involved people of high level of instruction and living in urban areas of northern regions, cannot be extended to all the Italian population. However, they provide valid elements to promote initiatives aimed to a more aware use of antibiotics.

  9. Insecticide resistance and vector control.

    PubMed Central

    Brogdon, W. G.; McAllister, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Insecticide resistance has been a problem in all insect groups that serve as vectors of emerging diseases. Although mechanisms by which insecticides become less effective are similar across all vector taxa, each resistance problem is potentially unique and may involve a complex pattern of resistance foci. The main defense against resistance is close surveillance of the susceptibility of vector populations. We describe the mechanisms of insecticide resistance, as well as specific instances of resistance emergence worldwide, and discuss prospects for resistance management and priorities for detection and surveillance. PMID:9866736

  10. Effect of non-lattice oxygen on ZrO2-based resistive switching memory.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Yi-Peng; Lin, Huei-Bo; Lin, Chu-Hsuan

    2012-03-14

    ZrO2-based resistive switching memory has attracted much attention according to its possible application in the next-generation nonvolatile memory. The Al/ZrO2/Pt resistive switching memory with bipolar resistive switching behavior is revealed in this work. The thickness of the ZrO2 film is only 20 nm. The device yield improved by the non-lattice oxygen existing in the ZrO2 film deposited at room temperature is firstly proposed. The stable resistive switching behavior and the long retention time with a large current ratio are also observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the resistive switching mechanism agrees with the formation and rupture of a conductive filament in the ZrO2 film. In addition, the Al/ZrO2/Pt resistive switching memory is also possible for application in flexible electronic equipment because it can be fully fabricated at room temperature.

  11. Antiplatelet resistance in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Topçuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Ay, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Although the exact prevalence of antiplatelet resistance in ischemic stroke is not known, estimates about the two most widely used antiplatelet agents – aspirin and clopidogrel – suggest that the resistance rate is high, irrespective of the definition used and parameters measured. Inadequate antiplatelet responsiveness correlates with an increased risk of recurrent ischemic vascular events in patients with stroke and acute coronary syndrome. It is not currently known whether tailoring antiplatelet therapy based on platelet function test results translates into a more effective strategy to prevent secondary vascular events after stroke. Large-scale clinical trials using a universally accepted definition and standardized measurement techniques for antiplatelet resistance are needed to demonstrate whether a ‘platelet-function test-guided antiplatelet treatment’ strategy translates into improved stroke care. This article gives an overview of the clinical importance of laboratory antiplatelet resistance, describes the challenges for platelet-function test-guided antiplatelet treatment and discusses practical issues about the management of patients with aspirin and/or clopidogrel resistance. PMID:21306212

  12. Unfolding-resistant Translocase Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Dagda, Ruben K.; Barwacz, Chris A.; Cribbs, J. Thomas; Strack, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) consists of scaffolding (A), catalytic (C), and variable (B, B’, and B”) subunits. Variable subunits dictate subcellular localization and substrate specificity of the PP2A holoenzyme. The Bβ regulatory subunit gene is mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 12, and one of its splice variants, Bβ2, targets PP2A to mitochondria to promote apoptosis in PC12 cells. Here, we report that Bβ2 is localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane by a novel mechanism, combining a cryptic mitochondrial import signal with a structural arrest domain. Scanning mutagenesis demonstrates that basic and hydrophobic residues mediate mitochondrial association and the proapoptotic activity of Bβ2. When fused to green fluorescent protein, the N terminus of Bβ2 acts as a cleavable mitochondrial import signal. Surprisingly, full-length Bβ2 is not detectably cleaved and is retained at the outer mitochondrial membrane, even though it interacts with the TOM22 import receptor, as shown by luciferase complementation in intact cells. Mutations that open the C-terminal β-propeller of Bβ2 facilitate mitochondrial import, indicating that this rigid fold acts as a stop-transfer domain by resisting the partial unfolding step prerequisite for matrix translocation. Because hybrids of prototypical import and β-propeller domains recapitulate this behavior, we predict the existence of other similarly localized proteins and a selection against highly stable protein folds in the mitochondrial matrix. This unfolding-resistant targeting to the mitochondrial translocase is necessary but not sufficient for the proapoptotic activity of Bβ2, which also requires association with the rest of the PP2A holoenzyme. PMID:15923182

  13. Listening to Rap: Cultures of Crime, Cultures of Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Julian; Asbridge, Mark; Wortley, Scot

    2009-01-01

    This research compares representations of rap music with the self-reported criminal behavior and resistant attitudes of the music's core audience. Our database is a large sample of Toronto high school students (n = 3,393) from which we identify a group of listeners, whose combination of musical likes and dislikes distinguish them as rap univores.…

  14. Stalking Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in Common Vegetables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, David; Boeke, Caroline; Josowitz, Rebecca; Loya, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    The study developed a simple experimental protocol for studying antibiotic resistant bacteria that will allow students to determine the proportion of such bacteria found on common fruit and vegetable crops. This protocol can open up the world of environmental science and show how human behavior can dramatically alter ecosystems.

  15. Pharmacological Management of Treatment-Resistant Pediatric Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Emslie, Graham; March, John

    2005-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presents with treatment-resistant symptoms of major depression. This is his first episode of depression, initially treated with 200 mg sertraline for 12 weeks with no significant benefit. The severe depression has shown a partial response to weekly cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and fluoxetine, which was titrated up to 60 mg…

  16. Resistance and Its Consequences: The Street Culture of Punks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Stephen W.

    1989-01-01

    Explores the street life of an adolescent subculture through field study of the Canadian West Coast punk rock subculture. Demonstrates through observation of the members, their behavior and attitudes, and the reactions of others to them, that their activities both represent, and are consequences of, resistance to the dominant order. (Author/JS)

  17. Resistive Oxygen Gas Sensors for Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Moos, Ralf; Izu, Noriya; Rettig, Frank; Reiß, Sebastian; Shin, Woosuck; Matsubara, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Resistive oxygen sensors are an inexpensive alternative to the classical potentiometric zirconia oxygen sensor, especially for use in harsh environments and at temperatures of several hundred °C or even higher. This device-oriented paper gives a historical overview on the development of these sensor materials. It focuses especially on approaches to obtain a temperature independent behavior. It is shown that although in the past 40 years there have always been several research groups working concurrently with resistive oxygen sensors, novel ideas continue to emerge today with respect to improvements of the sensor response time, the temperature dependence, the long-term stability or the manufacture of the devices themselves using novel techniques for the sensitive films. Materials that are the focus of this review are metal oxides; especially titania, titanates, and ceria-based formulations. PMID:22163805

  18. Mechanistic interplay between ceramide and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Reali, Federico; Morine, Melissa J.; Kahramanoğulları, Ozan; Raichur, Suryaprakash; Schneider, Hans-Christoph; Crowther, Daniel; Priami, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    Recent research adds to a growing body of literature on the essential role of ceramides in glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling, while the mechanistic interplay between various components of ceramide metabolism remains to be quantified. We present an extended model of C16:0 ceramide production through both the de novo synthesis and the salvage pathways. We verify our model with a combination of published models and independent experimental data. In silico experiments of the behavior of ceramide and related bioactive lipids in accordance with the observed transcriptomic changes in obese/diabetic murine macrophages at 5 and 16 weeks support the observation of insulin resistance only at the later phase. Our analysis suggests the pivotal role of ceramide synthase, serine palmitoyltransferase and dihydroceramide desaturase involved in the de novo synthesis and the salvage pathways in influencing insulin resistance versus its regulation. PMID:28112248

  19. Multiwavelength videomicrofluorometry for multiparametric investigations of multidrug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchi, Emmanuelle; Salmon, Jean-Marie; Vigo, Jean; Viallet, Pierre M.

    1996-05-01

    A major problem in the cancer chemotherapy is the development of resistance to a whole range of drugs not only similar to the drugs used for resistance induction but also to some functionally and structurally unrelated. It's one of the multifactorial causes of failure of chemotherapy. Thus it appears essential to evaluate the multi-drug resistance (MDR) in living cells populations to: detect the MDR phenotype, to discriminate between resistant and sensitive cells, to identify mechanisms which are involved in the induction or the reversion of resistance and to study the cytotoxic process. Such a challenge implies the use of multiparametric approach that has been possible using a protocol involving microfluorometry connected to numerical image analysis on single living cells. This protocol relays on the correlation existing between the decreased intracellular accumulation of some fluorescent probes such as Hoechst 33342 (Ho342) and Rhodamine 123 (R123) in resistant cells. The simultaneous estimation of the fluorescence intensities of these probes has required the use of a third probe, the Nile Red, for cell contour delineation. The analysis of parameters related to Ho342 and R123 allows the discrimination of sensitive and resistant cells. So the multiparametric approach using multi-wavelength image analysis, which appears to be a powerful technique, has allowed us to show on human lymphoblastoid CCRF-CEM cells lines that the cytotoxic effects could be different depending on the cell resistance or on the cytotoxic drug used: Adriamycine, Vinblastine and the different cell behavior could be used for cell differentiation.

  20. Basic Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrabian, Albert

    This monograph examines the component parts of behavior modification, initially defining the problem behavior and drawing a difference between specific observable behaviors (the focus of behavior modification), and the interest of Freudian and similar psychologies in unobservable internal processes. Instrumental learning related to shaping in…

  1. Management of behavioral symptoms in progressive degenerative dementias.

    PubMed

    Volicer, Ladislav; Hurley, Ann C

    2003-09-01

    Management of behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and other progressive degenerative dementias poses continuous challenge to both family and professional caregivers. Behavioral symptoms are complex in nature and require that caregivers understand their presumed causes and intervene appropriately using validated caregiving techniques. Unfortunately, confusing terminology hampers improvement in management techniques. This review attempts to clarify terminology and specifically the behavioral symptoms "agitation" and "resistiveness to care" that require different management techniques. Several conceptual frameworks for behavioral symptoms of dementia are presented. These frameworks include behavioral models, a psychiatric model, and a comprehensive model that combines both behavioral and psychiatric strategies. Using precise terminology consistently and providing care based on a conceptual framework will facilitate the education of caregivers in appropriate techniques for management of behavioral symptoms of dementias.

  2. Light-controlled resistive switching memory of multiferroic BiMnO3 nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bai; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-03-14

    A multiferroic BiMnO3 nanowire array was prepared using a hydrothermal process and its resistive switching memory behaviors were further investigated. The prominent ferroelectricity can be well controlled by white-light illumination, thus offering an excellent light-controlled resistive switching memory device using a Ag/BiMnO3/Ti structure at room temperature.

  3. Testing a Model of Resistance to Peer Pressure among Mexican-Origin Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamaca, Mayra Y.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the factors associated with resistance to peer pressure toward antisocial behaviors among a sample of Mexican-origin adolescents (n=564) living in a large Southwestern city in the U.S. A model examining the influence of generational status, emotional autonomy from parents, and self-esteem on resistance to peer pressure was…

  4. Contextual Influences on Resistance to Disruption in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lionello-DeNolf, Karen; Dube, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Training context can influence resistance to disruption under differing reinforcement schedules. With nonhumans, when relatively lean and rich reinforcement schedules are experienced in the context of a multiple schedule, greater resistance is found in the rich than the lean component, as described by behavioral momentum theory. By contrast, when…

  5. Overcoming Resistance with Fractals. A New Way to Teach Elementary Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, W. K.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Students construct a Sierpinski gasket from resistors and measure its resistance as a function of size. Provides a brief review of what it means geometrically for the Sierpinski gasket to be fractal, followed by an explanation of how to analyze the electrical resistance on a gasket to find its fractal behavior. (MVL)

  6. Resistance fluctuations in insulating silicon films with superconducting nanoprecipitates - superconductor-to-metal or vortex matter phase transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heera, V.; Fiedler, J.; Skorupa, W.

    2015-11-01

    Silicon films with Ga-rich nanoprecipitates are superconductors or insulators in dependence on their normal state resistance. Even in the insulating state of the film superconducting nanoprecipitates exist below the critical temperature of 7 K and determine its complex transport behavior. In this range sometimes large, random resistance jumps appear that are accompanied by little temperature changes. The resistance fluctuates between a well-defined low-resistance value and a broader band of higher resistances. Jumps to higher resistance are associated with a temperature decrease and vice versa. We present experimental results on these fluctuations and suppose a first order phase transition in the film as probable origin.

  7. Stimulus-reinforcer relations established during training determine resistance to extinction and relapse via reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Bai, John Y H; Jonas Chan, C K; Elliffe, Douglas; Podlesnik, Christopher A

    2016-11-01

    The baseline rate of a reinforced target response decreases with the availability of response-independent sources of alternative reinforcement; however, resistance to disruption and relapse increases. Because many behavioral treatments for problem behavior include response-dependent reinforcement of alternative behavior, the present study assessed whether response-dependent alternative reinforcement also decreases baseline response rates but increases resistance to extinction and relapse. We reinforced target responding at equal rates across two components of a multiple schedule with pigeons. We compared resistance to extinction and relapse via reinstatement of (1) a target response trained concurrently with a reinforced alternative response in one component with (2) a target response trained either concurrently or in separate components from the alternative response across conditions. Target response rates trained alone in baseline were higher but resistance to extinction and relapse via reinstatement tests were greater after training concurrently with the alternative response. In another assessment, training target and alternative responding together, but separating them during extinction and reinstatement tests, produced equal resistance to extinction and relapse. Together, these findings are consistent with behavioral momentum theory-operant response-reinforcer relations determined baseline response rates but Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relations established during training determined resistance to extinction and relapse. These findings imply that reinforcing alternative behavior to treat problem behavior could initially reduce rates but increase persistence.

  8. Role of nutrition in preventing insulin resistance in children.

    PubMed

    Blasetti, Annalisa; Franchini, Simone; Comegna, Laura; Prezioso, Giovanni; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Nutrition during prenatal, early postnatal and pubertal period is crucial for the development of insulin resistance and its consequences. During prenatal period fetal environment and nutrition seems to interfere with metabolism programming later in life. The type of dietary carbohydrates, glycemic index, protein, fat and micronutrient content in maternal nutrition could influence insulin sensitivity in the newborn. The effects of lactation on metabolism and nutritional behavior later in life have been studied. Dietary habits and quality of diet during puberty could prevent the onset of a pathological insulin resistance through an adequate distribution of macro- and micronutrients, a diet rich in fibers and vegetables and poor in saturated fats, proteins and sugars. We want to overview the latest evidences on the risk of insulin resistance later in life due to both nutritional behaviors and components during the aforementioned periods of life, following a chronological outline from fetal development to adolescence.

  9. Virus resistance in orchids.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kah Wee; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Chan, Ming-Tsair

    2014-11-01

    Orchid plants, Phalaenopsis and Dendrobium in particular, are commercially valuable ornamental plants sold worldwide. Unfortunately, orchid plants are highly susceptible to viral infection by Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) and Odotoglossum ringspot virus (ORSV), posing a major threat and serious economic loss to the orchid industry worldwide. A major challenge is to generate an effective method to overcome plant viral infection. With the development of optimized orchid transformation biotechnological techniques and the establishment of concepts of pathogen-derived resistance (PDR), the generation of plants resistant to viral infection has been achieved. The PDR concept involves introducing genes that is(are) derived from the virus into the host plant to induce RNA- or protein-mediated resistance. We here review the fundamental mechanism of the PDR concept, and illustrate its application in protecting against viral infection of orchid plants.

  10. Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

    2005-06-15

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

  11. Antimicrobial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marilyn; Silley, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of our current understanding of the mechanisms associated with the development of antimicrobial drug resistance, international differences in definitions of resistance, ongoing efforts to track shifts in drug susceptibility, and factors that can influence the selection of therapeutic intervention. The latter presents a matrix of complex variables that includes the mechanism of drug action, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of the antimicrobial agent in the targeted patient population, the pharmacodynamics (PD) of the bacterial response to the antimicrobial agent, the PK/PD relationship that will influence dose selection, and the integrity of the host immune system. Finally, the differences between bacterial tolerance and bacterial resistance are considered, and the potential for non-traditional anti-infective therapies is discussed.

  12. Insecticide Resistance in Fleas

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Fleas are the major ectoparasite of cats, dogs, and rodents worldwide and potential vectors of animal diseases. In the past two decades the majority of new control treatments have been either topically applied or orally administered to the host. Most reports concerning the development of insecticide resistance deal with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis felis. Historically, insecticide resistance has developed to many of the insecticides used to control fleas in the environment including carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Product failures have been reported with some of the new topical treatments, but actual resistance has not yet been demonstrated. Failures have often been attributed to operational factors such as failure to adequately treat the pet and follow label directions. With the addition of so many new chemistries additional monitoring of flea populations is needed. PMID:26999217

  13. Solvent resistant copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A solvent resistant copolyimide was prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with a diaimine blend comprising, based on the total amount of the diamine blend, about 75 to 90 mole percent of 3,4'-oxydianiline and about 10 to 25 mole percent p-phenylene diamine. The solvent resistant copolyimide had a higher glass transition temperature when cured at 350.degree. , 371.degree. and 400.degree. C. than LaRC.TM.-IA. The composite prepared from the copolyimide had similar mechanical properties to LaRC.TM.-IA. Films prepared from the copolyimide were resistant to immediate breakage when exposed to solvents such as dimethylacetamide and chloroform. The adhesive properties of the copolyimide were maintained even after testing at 23.degree., 150.degree., 177.degree. and 204.degree. C.

  14. Mathematical principles of reinforcement and resistance to change.

    PubMed

    Nevin, John A.

    2003-04-28

    Although Killeen's mathematical principles of reinforcement (MPR) apply to the asymptotic rate of a free operant after extended exposure to a single schedule of reinforcement, they can be extended to resistance to change in multiple schedules via alterations in the parameter representing the activating effects of reinforcers. MPR's predictions of resistance to change in relation to reinforcer rate on variable-interval (VI) schedules are empirically correct and agree with behavioral momentum theory (BMT). However, both MPR and BMT encounter problems in accounting for the effects of delayed reinforcement on resistance to change, relative to immediate reinforcement at the same rate. Further problems are raised by differences in resistance to change between variable-ratio (VR) and variable-interval performances maintained by the same reinforcer rate. With both delayed versus immediate reinforcement and variable-ratio versus variable-interval reinforcement, differential resistance to change is negatively correlated with the log ratios of baseline response rates when reinforcer rates are equated. Cases where resistance to change varies despite equated reinforcer rates, and the correlations among behavioral measures, provide challenges and opportunities for both MPR and BMT.

  15. [Individual behavioral and autonomic response to emotional stress in humans].

    PubMed

    Ukraintseva, Iu V; Berlov, D N; Rusalova, M N

    2006-01-01

    Healthy subjects (n = 53) performed a sound version of the proof-reading test under normal conditions and in the state of emotional stress. Stress resistance was evaluated by the overall number of errors. The propensity to active or passive response to stress was evaluated by the number of "false alarms" and signal omissions. The reaction pattern to emotional stress in stress-resistant subjects, irrespective of their behavioral features, consisted in an increase in sympathetic effects on the cardiac rhythm and a decrease in the reaction time to significant signals. In subjects with low stress resistance, no statistically significant changes in the level of sympathetic tone and reaction time were revealed in the state of stress. Subjects with active behavioral response to stress, irrespective of their level of stress resistance, were characterized by aggressiveness, boldness and independence. Subjects with passive response to stress were inclined to conformism, dependence, and passivity.

  16. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  17. Flame Resistant Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solimide manufactured by Imi-Tech Corporation, is a lightweight fire resistant material produced under a manufacturing process that allows it to be uniformly foamed. Can be produced in a variety of densities and structural configurations and remains resilient under exposure to temperatures ranging from minus 300 to plus 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Is resistant to open flame and generates virtually no smoke or toxic by-products. Used in aircraft for its superior damping characteristics, lighter weight and fire barrier properties, it's also applicable to ships and surface transportation systems such as transit cars, trains, buses and automobiles.

  18. Endless Resistance. Endless Antibiotics?

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2016-01-01

    The practice of medicine was profoundly transformed by the introduction of the antibiotics (compounds isolated from Nature) and the antibacterials (compounds prepared by synthesis) for the control of bacterial infection. As a result of the extraordinary success of these compounds over decades of time, a timeless biological activity for these compounds has been presumed. This presumption is no longer. The inexorable acquisition of resistance mechanisms by bacteria is retransforming medical practice. Credible answers to this dilemma are far better recognized than they are being implemented. In this perspective we examine (and in key respects, reiterate) the chemical and biological strategies being used to address the challenge of bacterial resistance. PMID:27746889

  19. Induction, contrast, and resistance to extinction1

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, G. S.

    1968-01-01

    The resistance of responding to extinction after variable-interval reinforcement in one of two components of a multiple schedule of reinforcement was (1) greater, when responding in the second component was reinforced on a variable-interval schedule than when responding there was extinguished, (2) not reduced, by a more rapid decrease in the rate of responding than occurs in ordinary extinction in the second component, and, (3) increased, by the occurrence of positive behavioral contrast before the beginning of extinction. PMID:5672253

  20. Panel resonant behavior of wind turbine blades.

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Joshua A.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2010-03-01

    The principal design drivers in the certification of wind turbine blades are ultimate strength, fatigue resistance, adequate tip-tower clearance, and buckling resistance. Buckling resistance is typically strongly correlated to both ultimate strength and fatigue resistance. A composite shell with spar caps forms the airfoil shape of a blade and reinforcing shear webs are placed inside the blade to stiffen the blade in the flap-wise direction. The spar caps are dimensioned and the shear webs are placed so as to add stiffness to unsupported panel regions and reduce their length. The panels are not the major flap-wise load carrying element of a blade; however, they must be designed carefully to avoid buckling while minimizing blade weight. Typically, buckling resistance is evaluated by consideration of the load-deflection behavior of a blade using finite element analysis (FEA) or full-scale static testing of blades under a simulated extreme loading condition. The focus of this paper is on the use of experimental modal analysis to measure localized resonances of the blade panels. It can be shown that the resonant behavior of these panels can also provide a means to evaluate buckling resistance by means of analytical or experimental modal analysis. Further, panel resonances have use in structural health monitoring by observing changes in modal parameters associated with panel resonances, and use in improving panel laminate model parameters by correlation with test data. In recent modal testing of wind turbine blades, a set of panel modes were measured. This paper will report on the findings of these tests and accompanying numerical and analytical modeling efforts aimed at investigating the potential uses of panel resonances for blade evaluation, health monitoring, and design.

  1. [Resistance risk, cross-resistance and biochemical resistance mechanism of Laodelphax striatellus to buprofezin].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xu-lian; Liu, Jin; Li, Xu-ke; Chi, Jia-jia; Liu, Yong-jie

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the resistance development law and biochemical resistance mechanism of Laodelphax striatellus to buprofezin, spraying rice seedlings was used to continuously screen resistant strains of L. striatellus and dipping rice seedlings was applied to determine the toxicity and cross-resistance of L. striatellus to insecticides. After 32-generation screening with buprofezin, L. striatellus developed 168.49 folds resistance and its reality heritability (h2) was 0.11. If the killing rate was 80%-90%, L. striatellus was expected to develop 10-fold resistance to buprofezin only after 5 to 6 generations breeding. Because the actual reality heritability of field populations was usually lower than that of the resistant strains, the production of field populations increasing with 10-fold resistance would need much longer time. The results of cross-resistance showed that resistant strain had high level cross-resistance with thiamethoxam and imidacloprid, low level cross-resistance with acetamiprid, and no cross-resistance with pymetrozine and chlorpyrifos. The activity of detoxification enzymes of different strains and the syergism of synergist were measured. The results showed that cytochrome P450 monooxygenase played a major role in the resistance of L. striatellus to buprofezin, the esterase played a minor role and the GSH-S-transferase had no effect. Therefore, L. striatellus would have high risk to develop resistance to buprofezin when used in the field and might be delayed by using pymetrozine and chlorpyrifos.

  2. Advances in pneumococcal antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hoon

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance and serotypes in Streptococcus pneumoniae have been evolving with the widespread use of antibiotics and the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). Particularly, among various types of antimicrobial resistance, macrolide resistance has most remarkably increased in many parts of the world, which has been reported to be >70% among clinical isolates from Asian countries. Penicillin resistance has dramatically decreased among nonmeningeal isolates due to the changes in resistance breakpoints, although resistance to other β-lactams such as cefuroxime has increased. Multidrug resistance became a serious concern in the treatment of invasive pneumococcal diseases, especially in Asian countries. After PCV7 vaccination, serotype 19A has emerged as an important cause of invasive pneumococcal diseases which was also associated with increasing prevalence of multidrug resistance in pneumococci. Widespread use of PCV13, which covers additional serotypes 3, 6A and 19A, may contribute to reduce the clonal spread of drug-resistant 19A pneumococci.

  3. Resist development modeling for OPC accuracy improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yongfa; Zavyalova, Lena; Zhang, Yunqiang; Zhang, Charlie; Lucas, Kevin; Falch, Brad; Croffie, Ebo; Li, Jianliang; Melvin, Lawrence; Ward, Brian

    2009-03-01

    A precise lithographic model has always been a critical component for the technique of Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) since it was introduced a decade ago [1]. As semiconductor manufacturing moves to 32nm and 22nm technology nodes with 193nm wafer immersion lithography, the demand for more accurate models is unprecedented to predict complex imaging phenomena at high numerical aperture (NA) with aggressive illumination conditions necessary for these nodes. An OPC model may comprise all the physical processing components from mask e-beam writing steps to final CDSEM measurement of the feature dimensions. In order to provide a precise model, it is desired that every component involved in the processing physics be accurately modeled using minimum metrology data. In the past years, much attention has been paid to studying mask 3-D effects, mask writing limitations, laser spectrum profile, lens pupil polarization/apodization, source shape characterization, stage vibration, and so on. However, relatively fewer studies have been devoted to modeling of the development process of resist film though it is an essential processing step that cannot be neglected. Instead, threshold models are commonly used to approximate resist development behavior. While resist models capable of simulating development path are widely used in many commercial lithography simulators, the lack of this component in current OPC modeling lies in the fact that direct adoption of those development models into OPC modeling compromises its capability of full chip simulation. In this work, we have successfully incorporated a photoresist development model into production OPC modeling software without sacrificing its full chip capability. The resist film development behavior is simulated in the model to incorporate observed complex resist phenomena such as surface inhibition, developer mass transport, HMDS poisoning, development contrast, etc. The necessary parameters are calibrated using metrology data

  4. Geminivirus Management: Disease Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Begomoviruses are a major constraint for tomato production in many parts of the subtropic and tropics; and the most efficient way to increase tomato production is to use resistant cultivars in association with an IPM program. The Middle East (MERC) and a Guatemalan (CDR) project involved involved d...

  5. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  6. Overcoming Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Ted H.; Balka, Don S.; Miles, Ruth Harbin

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to change is a major obstacle in developing and implementing effective instructional programs, yet it is rarely considered, discussed, or addressed. The school leaders who are responsible for improvement frequently feel that their efforts are being blocked or thwarted. For the most part, they are correct, but they may not realize that…

  7. Resistance Management Research Status

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term sustainability of genetically modified corn expressing Bt relies on the validity of assumptions underlying IRM models used by the EPA and the ability of EPA to monitor, detect and react to insect resistance when it develops. The EPA is developing a multi-tiered approac...

  8. Antimicrobial Resistance in Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Thanner, Sophie; Drissner, David; Walsh, Fiona

    2016-04-19

    In this article, the current knowledge and knowledge gaps in the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in livestock and plants and importance in terms of animal and human health are discussed. Some recommendations are provided for generation of the data required in order to develop risk assessments for AMR within agriculture and for risks through the food chain to animals and humans.

  9. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli are common in animals because of the use of fluoroquinolones as therapeutic agents in animal husbandry, particularly in chickens and other poultry. Campylobacter is a commensal in poultry, and therefore, poultry and poultry products are the...

  10. A Drude Resistance Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresser, Miles J.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using a "bed of nails" (array of nails on a board) as a resistance demonstration where steel balls pass through the lattice of nails like electrons through metal. Although weaknesses of Drude's electrical conduction model are noted, the activity is recommended since it clearly illustrates drift velocity. (DH)

  11. Wear resistant valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A valve which is resistant to wear caused by particles trapped between the valve seat and the valve member or poppet when the valve closes, including an outlet for directing washing fluid at the valve seat and/or sealing face of the poppet and means for supplying pressured fluid to the outlet at the time when the valve is closing.

  12. Selective leptin resistance revisited.

    PubMed

    Mark, Allyn L

    2013-09-15

    In addition to effects on appetite and metabolism, leptin influences many neuroendocrine and physiological systems, including the sympathetic nervous system. Building on my Carl Ludwig Lecture of the American Physiological Society, I review the sympathetic and cardiovascular actions of leptin. The review focuses on a critical analysis of the concept of selective leptin resistance (SLR) and the role of leptin in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension in both experimental animals and humans. We introduced the concept of SLR in 2002 to explain how leptin might increase blood pressure (BP) in obese states, such as diet-induced obesity (DIO), that are accompanied by partial leptin resistance. This concept, analogous to selective insulin resistance in the metabolic syndrome, holds that in several genetic and acquired models of obesity, there is preservation of the renal sympathetic and pressor actions of leptin despite attenuation of the appetite and weight-reducing actions. Two potential overlapping mechanisms of SLR are reviewed: 1) differential leptin molecular signaling pathways that mediate selective as opposed to universal leptin action and 2) brain site-specific leptin action and resistance. Although the phenomenon of SLR in DIO has so far focused on preservation of sympathetic and BP actions of leptin, consideration should be given to the possibility that this concept may extend to preservation of other actions of leptin. Finally, I review perplexing data on the effects of leptin on sympathetic activity and BP in humans and its role in human obesity-induced hypertension.

  13. Penetration resistant barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, William R.; Mead, Keith E.; Street, Henry K.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a barrier for resisting penetration by such as hand tools and oxy-acetylene cutting torches. The barrier comprises a layer of firebrick, which is preferably epoxy impregnated sandwiched between inner and outer layers of steel. Between the firebrick and steel are layers of resilient rubber-like filler.

  14. Erosion resistant coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falco, L.; Cushini, A.

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring the resistance of materials to erosion is examined and a scheme for standardization of the test parameters is described. Current materials being used for protecting aircraft parts from erosion are surveyed, their chief characteristics being given. The superior properties of urethane coatings are pointed out. The complete cycle for painting areas subject to erosion is described.

  15. Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) is a geophysical method originally developed within the mining industry where it has been used for decades to explore for and characterize subsurface mineral deposits. It is one of the oldest geophysical methods with the first documented usag...

  16. Behavior Management: Examining the Functions of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alstot, Andrew E.; Alstot, Crystal D.

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate student behavior is essential for the success of a physical education lesson. Despite using effective proactive management strategies, teachers may need to also use reactive techniques to reduce problem behaviors by applying suitable consequences. For these consequences to be effective, they must be aligned with the function, or cause,…

  17. Behaviorism and Cognitivism in Behavior Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levis, Donald J.

    The movement within behavior therapy to introduce cognitive terms, constructs, and techniques reflects and involves an extension of the pervasive cognitive movement within the experimental field and the long-standing cognitive approach of many clinicians. Modern day attacks on behaviorism by cognitivists have been almost exclusively geared to the…

  18. Resistivity scaling and electron relaxation times in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Kristof; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim; Tőkei, Zsolt

    2014-08-14

    We study the resistivity scaling in nanometer-sized metallic wires due to surface roughness and grain-boundaries, currently the main cause of electron scattering in nanoscaled interconnects. The resistivity has been obtained with the Boltzmann transport equation, adopting the relaxation time approximation of the distribution function and the effective mass approximation for the conducting electrons. The relaxation times are calculated exactly, using Fermi's golden rule, resulting in a correct relaxation time for every sub-band state contributing to the transport. In general, the relaxation time strongly depends on the sub-band state, something that remained unclear with the methods of previous work. The resistivity scaling is obtained for different roughness and grain-boundary properties, showing large differences in scaling behavior and relaxation times. Our model clearly indicates that the resistivity is dominated by grain-boundary scattering, easily surpassing the surface roughness contribution by a factor of 10.

  19. Genes and social behavior.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Gene E; Fernald, Russell D; Clayton, David F

    2008-11-07

    What genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of neural circuits and molecular pathways in the brain that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate brain activity? Here, we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key "vectors of influence" that link genes, the brain, and social behavior: (i) Social information alters gene expression in the brain to influence behavior, and (ii) genetic variation influences brain function and social behavior. We also discuss how evolutionary changes in genomic elements influence social behavior and outline prospects for a systems biology of social behavior.

  20. Pressure dependence of the resistivity of Ce/sub 3/Al

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.M.; Chen, Y.Y.; Thompson, J.D.; Borges, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ce/sub 3/Al was prepared from very high purity cerium. The resistivity at various pressures show a structural transition near 100/sup 0/K at zero pressure. This antiferromagnetic heavy fermion behavior evolves smoothly towards nonmagnetic large T/sub K/ (slightly overweight fermion) behavior as the pressure is raised. 3 figs. (DLC)

  1. Why Do People Resist Healthcare It? Literature Analysis, Model Testing, and Refinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samhan, Bahae

    2016-01-01

    Health Information Technology (HIT) has the potential of improving the overall performance of healthcare organizations. However, there are worldwide evidence of HIT resistance and avoidance behaviors. IS researchers have provided valuable insights about these behaviors towards IT in general. Very limited work has aimed to explain these behaviors…

  2. Evaluating Pilose, a Cultigen of Gossypium hirsutum, as a Source of Resistance to Cotton Fleahopper (Hemiptera: Miridae).

    PubMed

    McLoud, Laura Ann; Knutson, Allen; Campos-Figueroa, Manuel; Smith, C Wayne; Hague, Steven

    2015-08-01

    Cotton fleahopper (Pseudatomoscelis seriatus Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is a piercing-sucking insect that has emerged as a major pest of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in Texas. Cotton fleahoppers feed on floral buds, commonly referred to as squares, causing damage and abscission, and subsequent yield loss. Previous studies indicate that plant resistance to cotton fleahopper is present in upland cotton, but the mechanism of resistance remains undetermined. In this study, Pilose, a cultigen of G. hirsutum, was examined as a source of resistance to cotton fleahopper, focusing on mechanism of resistance and heritability of the resistance trait. Results indicated that the resistance trait in Pilose is heritable and that pubescence is causative of resistance or that the resistance trait may be tightly linked to genes controlling pubescence. Behavioral assays indicated nonpreference as a mode of resistance in plants with dense pubescence.

  3. The intrinsic resistance of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gang, Zhang; Jie, Feng

    2016-10-20

    Antibiotic resistance is often considered to be a trait acquired by previously susceptible bacteria, on the basis of which can be attributed to the horizontal acquisition of new genes or the occurrence of spontaneous mutation. In addition to acquired resistance, bacteria have a trait of intrinsic resistance to different classes of antibiotics. An intrinsic resistance gene is involved in intrinsic resistance, and its presence in bacterial strains is independent of previous antibiotic exposure and is not caused by horizontal gene transfer. Recently, interest in intrinsic resistance genes has increased, because these gene products not only may provide attractive therapeutic targets for development of novel drugs that rejuvenate the activity of existing antibiotics, and but also might predict future emergence of resistant pathogens if they become mobilized. In the present review, we summarize the conventional examples of intrinsic resistance, including the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or lack of drug targets. We also demonstrate that transferases and enzymes involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes confer intrinsic resistance in Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. We present as well information on the cryptic intrinsic resistance genes that do not confer resistance to their native hosts but are capable of conferring resistance when their expression levels are increased and the activation of the cryptic genes. Finally, we discuss that intrinsic genes could be the origin of acquired resistance, especially in the genus Acinetobacter.

  4. Fracture behavior of ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Lupascu, Doru C.; Lynch, Christopher S.

    1999-06-01

    Piezoelectric actuators are key components in many smart structures applications. Long term reliability of these actuators becomes increasingly important as research makes the transition to commercial applications. Fracture toughness is a material parameter that measures a material's resistance to crack propagation. This is perhaps, one of the most important parameters for reliable device design. This paper reviews recent work by the authors on fracture behavior of ferroelectric ceramics. Vickers indentation data were used to determine the fracture toughness of a coarse and a fine grained PZT and two compositions of PLZT. R-curve data were obtained for two compositions of PLZT. The R-curve data presented here were generated using four point bend specimens with controlled surface flaws. The R-curve results compare favorably with the Vickers indentation data. A comparison of the R-curves for a ferroelectric composition of PLZT and a quadratic electrostrictive composition of PLZT demonstrate the contribution of domain reorientation to the toughening process.

  5. A review of control methods and resistance mechanisms in stored-product insects.

    PubMed

    Boyer, S; Zhang, H; Lempérière, G

    2012-04-01

    This review describes the major stored-product insect species and their resistance to insecticides. The economic importance of the control of those pests is highlighted with a loss of more than one billion US dollars per year worldwide. A detailed common description of species resistance throughout the world has been developed, and we observed 28 recurrent studied species involved in resistance cases disseminated on the five continents. The different mechanisms, including behavioral resistance, were studied particularly on Oryzaephilus surinamensis. The role of detoxifying enzymes and studies on the genetic resistance, involving the kdr mutation mechanisms and the transmission of the genes of resistance, are also described. A chapter clarifying definitions on cross and multiple resistance is enclosed.

  6. Confirmation of resistance to herbicides and evaluation of resistance levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As cases of resistance to herbicides escalate worldwide, there is increasing demand from growers to test for weed resistance and how to manage it. Scientists have developed resistance testing protocols for numerous herbicides and weed species. Growers need immediate answers and scientists are faced ...

  7. Are Sewage Treatment Plants Promoting Antibiotic Resistance?

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction 1.1. How bacteria exhibit resistance 1.1.1. Resistance to -lactams 1.1.2. Resistance to sulphonamides and trimethoprim 1.1.3. Resistance to macrolides 1.1.4. Resistance to fluoroquinolones 1.1.5. Resistance to tetracyclines 1.1.6. Resistance to nitroimidaz...

  8. Effects of uniaxial pressure and annealing on the resistivity of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, T.; Nakajima, M.; Kihou, K.; Tomioka, Y.; Ito, T.; Lee, C. H.; Kito, H.; Iyo, A.; Eisaki, H.; Kakeshita, T.; Uchida, S.

    2011-05-01

    Single crystals of underdoped Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 were detwinned by applying uniaxial pressure. The anisotropic in-plane resistivity was measured using the Montgomery method without releasing pressure. The resistivity along the a-axis shows metallic behavior down to 5 K, while the resistivity along the b-axis shows an insulator-like behavior in some temperature range. Annealing the sample radically reduces the residual resistivity for x=0, and at the same time the anisotropy becomes much smaller at low temperatures.

  9. Understanding consumer decisions using behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Zandstra, Elizabeth H; Miyapuram, Krishna P; Tobler, Philippe N

    2013-01-01

    Consumers make many decisions in everyday life involving finances, food, and health. It is known from behavioral economics research that people are often driven by short-term gratification, that is, people tend to choose the immediate, albeit smaller reward. But choosing the delayed reward, that is, delaying the gratification, can actually be beneficial. How can we motivate consumers to resist the "now" and invest in their future, leading to sustainable or healthy habits? We review recent developments from behavioral and neuroimaging studies that are relevant for understanding consumer decisions. Further, we present results from our field research that examined whether we can increase the perceived value of a (delayed) environmental benefit using tailored communication, that is, change the way it is framed. More specifically, we investigated whether we can boost the value of an abstract, long-term "green" claim of a product by expressing it as a concrete, short-term benefit. This is a new application area for behavioral economics.

  10. Forming-free bipolar resistive switching in nonstoichiometric ceria films

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of forming-free bipolar resistive switching in a Zr/CeO x /Pt device was investigated. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis indicated the formation of a ZrO y layer at the Zr/CeO x interface. X-ray diffraction studies of CeO x films revealed that they consist of nano-polycrystals embedded in a disordered lattice. The observed resistive switching was suggested to be linked with the formation and rupture of conductive filaments constituted by oxygen vacancies in the CeO x film and in the nonstoichiometric ZrO y interfacial layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study confirmed the presence of oxygen vacancies in both of the said regions. In the low-resistance ON state, the electrical conduction was found to be of ohmic nature, while the high-resistance OFF state was governed by trap-controlled space charge-limited mechanism. The stable resistive switching behavior and long retention times with an acceptable resistance ratio enable the device for its application in future nonvolatile resistive random access memory (RRAM). PMID:24467984

  11. Forming-free bipolar resistive switching in nonstoichiometric ceria films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Muhammad; Huang, Chun-Yang; Panda, Debashis; Hung, Chung-Jung; Tsai, Tsung-Ling; Jieng, Jheng-Hong; Lin, Chun-An; Chand, Umesh; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmed, Ejaz; Talib, Ijaz; Nadeem, Muhammad Younus; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of forming-free bipolar resistive switching in a Zr/CeO x /Pt device was investigated. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis indicated the formation of a ZrO y layer at the Zr/CeO x interface. X-ray diffraction studies of CeO x films revealed that they consist of nano-polycrystals embedded in a disordered lattice. The observed resistive switching was suggested to be linked with the formation and rupture of conductive filaments constituted by oxygen vacancies in the CeO x film and in the nonstoichiometric ZrO y interfacial layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study confirmed the presence of oxygen vacancies in both of the said regions. In the low-resistance ON state, the electrical conduction was found to be of ohmic nature, while the high-resistance OFF state was governed by trap-controlled space charge-limited mechanism. The stable resistive switching behavior and long retention times with an acceptable resistance ratio enable the device for its application in future nonvolatile resistive random access memory (RRAM).

  12. Urinary Phthalates and Increased Insulin Resistance in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Spanier, Adam J.; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Attina, Teresa M.; Blustein, Jan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) is an environmental chemical commonly found in processed foods. Phthalate exposures, in particular to DEHP, have been associated with insulin resistance in adults, but have not been studied in adolescents. METHODS: Using cross-sectional data from 766 fasting 12- to 19-year-olds in the 2003–2008 NHANES, we examined associations of phthalate metabolites with continuous and categorical measures of homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). RESULTS: Controlling for demographic and behavioral factors, diet, continuous age, BMI category, and urinary creatinine, for each log (roughly threefold) increase in DEHP metabolites, a 0.27 increase (95% confidence interval 0.14–0.40; P < .001) in HOMA-IR was identified. Compared with the first tertile of DEHP metabolite in the study population (14.5% insulin resistant), the third tertile had 21.6% prevalence (95% confidence interval 17.2%–26.0%; P = .02). Associations persisted despite controlling for bisphenol A, another endocrine-disrupting chemical commonly found in foods, and HOMA-IR and insulin resistance were not significantly associated with metabolites of lower molecular weight phthalates commonly found in cosmetics and other personal care products. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary DEHP concentrations were associated with increased insulin resistance in this cross-sectional study of adolescents. This study cannot rule out the possibility that insulin-resistant children ingest food with higher phthalate content, or that insulin-resistant children excrete more DEHP. PMID:23958772

  13. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  14. Moving Forward: Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tincani, Matt

    2007-01-01

    A controversy has emerged about the relationship between positive behavior support and applied behavior analysis. Some behavior analysts suggest that positive behavior support and applied behavior analysis are the same (e.g., Carr & Sidener, 2002). Others argue that positive behavior support is harmful to applied behavior analysis (e.g., Johnston,…

  15. Retroviral superinfection resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nethe, Micha; Berkhout, Ben; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C

    2005-01-01

    The retroviral phenomenon of superinfection resistance (SIR) defines an interference mechanism that is established after primary infection, preventing the infected cell from being superinfected by a similar type of virus. This review describes our present understanding of the underlying mechanisms of SIR established by three characteristic retroviruses: Murine Leukaemia Virus (MuLV), Foamy Virus (FV), and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). In addition, SIR is discussed with respect to HIV superinfection of humans. MuLV resistant mice exhibit two genetic resistance traits related to SIR. The cellular Fv4 gene expresses an Env related protein that establishes resistance against MuLV infection. Another mouse gene (Fv1) mediates MuLV resistance by expression of a sequence that is distantly related to Gag and that blocks the viral infection after the reverse transcription step. FVs induce two distinct mechanisms of superinfection resistance. First, expression of the Env protein results in SIR, probably by occupancy of the cellular receptors for FV entry. Second, an increase in the concentration of the viral Bet (Between-env-and-LTR-1-and-2) protein reduces proviral FV gene expression by inhibition of the transcriptional activator protein Tas (Transactivator of spumaviruses). In contrast to SIR in FV and MuLV infection, the underlying mechanism of SIR in HIV-infected cells is poorly understood. CD4 receptor down-modulation, a major characteristic of HIV-infected cells, has been proposed to be the main mechanism of SIR against HIV, but data have been contradictory. Several recent studies report the occurrence of HIV superinfection in humans; an event associated with the generation of recombinant HIV strains and possibly with increased disease progression. The role of SIR in protecting patients from HIV superinfection has not been studied so far. The phenomenon of SIR may also be important in the protection of primates that are vaccinated with live attenuated simian

  16. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Basic Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Page Surveillance Trends and Treatment Challenges Laboratory Issues Antibiotic resistance (AR) is the ability of bacteria to ...

  17. Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Can ... spp. So, what can we do to prevent antibiotic resistance in healthcare settings? Patients, healthcare providers, healthcare ...

  18. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure Page Content Article Body Teens are more likely ... time they had intercourse. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure “The pressure on teenagers to have sex is ...

  19. Galileo's Trajectory with Mild Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of Galileo's classical trajectory that persists in a simple resistance model is noted. The resistive model provides a case study for the classroom analysis of limiting behaviour of an implicitly defined function. (Contains 1 note.)

  20. MDRO - Multidrug-Resistant Organisms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazards (Lack of) PPE Slips/Trips/Falls Stress Tuberculosis Universal Precautions Workplace Violence Use of Medical Lasers ... PRSP - Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR) TB is covered in HealthCare Wide Hazards ...

  1. Behavioral Objectives?-No!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Bill L.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses his reasons for objecting to the use of behavioral objectives in education. Article is in response to Robert Blake's article on Behavioral Objectives and the Teaching of English" in English Education, Winter 1971. (RB)

  2. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  3. Behavioral Assessment: Questionnaires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, C. Chrisman

    1980-01-01

    This is a general discussion of the validity, reliability, function, and format of questionnaires designed to measure problem behavior, noncompliance, anxiety, social interaction, hyperactivity, drug use, and sexual behavior. Commonly used questionnaires are cited. (CP)

  4. Countercontrol in behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Delprato, Dennis J.

    2002-01-01

    Countercontrol is a functional class of behavior that is part of Skinner's analysis of social behavior. Countercontrol refers to behavioral episodes comprised of socially mediated aversive controlling conditions and escape or avoidance responses that do not reinforce, and perhaps even punish, controllers' responses. This paper suggests that neglect of countercontrol in modern behavior analysis is unfortunate because the concept applies to interpersonal and social relations the fundamental operant principle that human behavior is both controlled and controlling—humans are not passive and inflexible. Countercontrol is addressed here in terms of conceptual status, contemporary developments in behavior analysis, its importance in a behavior-analytic approach to freedom and cultural design, applications, and research. The main conclusion is that Skinner's formulation of counter-control is scientifically supported and worthy of increased prominence in behavior analysis. PMID:22478386

  5. Child Behavior Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... a death in the family may cause a child to act out. Behavior disorders are more serious. ... The behavior is also not appropriate for the child's age. Warning signs can include Harming or threatening ...

  6. Bridging Humanism and Behaviorism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Lily

    1980-01-01

    Humanistic behaviorism may provide the necessary bridge between behaviorism and humanism. Perhaps the most humanistic approach to teaching is to learn how certain changes will help students and how these changes can be accomplished. (Author/MLF)

  7. Humanism vs. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Madeline

    1977-01-01

    Author argues that humanism and behaviorism are not necessarily exclusive of one another, and that principles of behaviorism, when thoughtfully applied, can lead to the achievement of humanistic goals. (RW)

  8. Behaviorism and Neuroscience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of behaviorism's methods and theories on theory and research in the neurosciences is examined, partly in light of John B. Watson's 1913 essay. An attempt is made to reconcile classical behaviorism and modern cognitive psychology and neuroscience. (SLD)

  9. Thin film deposition of metal oxides in resistance switching devices: electrode material dependence of resistance switching in manganite films.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshihiro; Homma, Kohei; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-02-15

    The electric-pulse-induced resistance switching in layered structures composed of polycrystalline Pr1-xCaxMnO3 (PCMO) sandwiched between Pt bottom electrode and top electrodes of various metals (metal/PCMO/Pt) was studied by direct current current-voltage (I-V) measurements and alternating current impedance spectroscopy. The I-V characteristics showed nonlinear, asymmetric, and hysteretic behavior in PCMO-based devices with top electrode of Al, Ni, and Ag, while no hysteretic behavior was observed in Au/PCMO/Pt devices. The PCMO-based devices with hysteretic I-V curves exhibited an electric-pulse-induced resistance switching between high and low resistance states. Impedance spectroscopy was employed to study the origin of the resistance switching. From comparison of the impedance spectra between the high and low resistance states, the resistance switching in the PCMO-based devices was mainly due to the resistance change in the interface between the film and the electrode. The electronic properties of the devices showed stronger correlation with the oxidation Gibbs free energy than with the work function of the electrode metal, which suggests that the interface impedance is due to an interfacial oxide layer of the electrode metal. The interface component observed by impedance spectroscopy in the Al/PCMO/Pt device might be due to Al oxide layer formed by oxidation of Al top electrode. It is considered that the interfacial oxide layer plays a dominant role in the bipolar resistance switching in manganite film-based devices.

  10. Behavioral Momentum: Translational Research in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Dube, William V.; Ahearn, William H.; Lionello-DeNolf, Karen; McIlvane, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral momentum theory (Nevin, 1992, Nevin & Grace, 2000) describes the relation between the characteristic level of reinforcement within a context and behavioral resistance to change within that context. This paper will describe the multiple-schedule-disrupter paradigm for basic behavioral momentum research and illustrate it with two representative examples from the literature with non-human subjects. The remainder of the paper will provide a review of translational research in human populations with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) employing the multiple-schedule-disrupter paradigm and closely related variations. The results of this research show that the reinforcer-rate effects predicted by behavioral momentum theory are widely replicated in IDD populations. The intended audience for this paper is the practitioner interested in learning about the current status of translational research in behavioral momentum as a foundation for considering ways in which behavioral momentum theory may be relevant to clinical issues. PMID:20936093

  11. Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, J.M; Foxx, Richard M; Jacobson, John W; Green, Gina; Mulick, James A

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the origins and characteristics of the positive behavior support (PBS) movement and examines those features in the context of the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA). We raise a number of concerns about PBS as an approach to delivery of behavioral services and its impact on how ABA is viewed by those in human services. We also consider the features of PBS that have facilitated its broad dissemination and how ABA might benefit from emulating certain practices of the PBS movement. PMID:22478452

  12. Antibacterial resistance: an emerging 'zoonosis'?

    PubMed

    Labro, Marie-Thérèse; Bryskier, Jean-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Antibacterial resistance is a worldwide threat, and concerns have arisen about the involvement of animal commensal and pathogenic bacteria in the maintenance and spread of resistance genes. However, beyond the facts related to the occurrence of resistant microorganisms in food, food-producing animals and companion animals and their transmission to humans, it is important to consider the vast environmental 'resistome', the selective pathways underlying the emergence of antibacterial resistance and how we can prepare answers for tomorrow.

  13. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  14. Bacterial cheating limits the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Hui Xiao; Datta, Manoshi; Yurtsev, Eugene; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain--which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic--may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we experimentally find that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors found in nature.

  15. Reproductive and developmental costs of deltamethrin resistance in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Germano, Mónica Daniela; Inés Picollo, María

    2015-06-01

    Effective chemical control relies on reducing vector population size. However, insecticide selection pressure is often associated with the development of resistant populations that reduce control success. In treated areas, these resistant individuals present an adaptive advantage due to enhanced survival. Resistance can also lead to negative effects when the insecticide pressure ceases. In this study, the biological effects of deltamethrin resistance were assessed in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans. The length of each developmental stage and complete life cycle, mating rate, and fecundity were evaluated. Susceptible and resistant insects presented similar mating rates. A reproductive cost of resistance was expressed as a lower fecundity in the resistant colony. Developmental costs in the resistant colony were in the form of a shortening of the second and third nymph stage duration and an extension of the fifth stage. A maternal effect of deltamethrin resistance is suggested as these effects were identified in resistant females and their progeny independently of the mated male's deltamethrin response. Our results suggest the presence of pleiotropic effects of deltamethrin resistance. Possible associations of these characters to other traits such as developmental delays and behavioral resistance are discussed.

  16. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  17. String resistance detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. Daniel (Inventor); Davies, Francis J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system are disclosed for determining individual string resistance in a network of strings when the current through a parallel connected string is unknown and when the voltage across a series connected string is unknown. The method/system of the invention involves connecting one or more frequency-varying impedance components with known electrical characteristics to each string and applying a frequency-varying input signal to the network of strings. The frequency-varying impedance components may be one or more capacitors, inductors, or both, and are selected so that each string is uniquely identifiable in the output signal resulting from the frequency-varying input signal. Numerical methods, such as non-linear regression, may then be used to resolve the resistance associated with each string.

  18. Stress corrosion resistant fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A family of high performance aerospace fasteners made from corrosion resistant alloys for use in applications where corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking are of major concern are discussed. The materials discussed are mainly A-286, Inconel 718, MP35N and MP159. Most of the fasteners utilize cold worked and aged materials to achieve the desired properties. The fasteners are unique in that they provide a combination of high strength and immunity to stress corrosion cracking not previously attainable. A discussion of fastener stress corrosion failures is presented including a review of the history and a description of the mechanism. Case histories are presented to illustrate the problems which can arise when material selection is made without proper regard for the environmental conditions. Mechanical properties and chemical compositions are included for the fasteners discussed. Several aspects of the application of high performance corrosion resistant fasteners are discussed including galvanic compatibility and torque-tension relationships.

  19. Teachers and Behavioral Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Sherman

    A survey of 406 elementary, middle and secondary school teachers attending the 1973 summer session at Northern Illinois University was conducted to determine their familiarity with and exposure to behavioral objectives, their involvement in writing and using behavioral objectives, and their opinion of the effect of behavioral objectives on student…

  20. Behavioral Objectives for English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoellner, Robert

    1972-01-01

    A review-critique of On Writing Behavioral Objectives for English, by John Maxwell and Anthony Lovat, in which behavioral objectives theory is dominated by a stimulus-response rather than a stimulus-response-reinforcement psychology. The reviewer questions whether behavioral objectives can be applied accurately and without distortion of meanings,…