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Sample records for belt iron atoms

  1. Quantitative Geometric Descriptions of the Belt Iron Atoms of the Iron-Molybdenum Cofactor of Nitrogenase and Synthetic Iron(II) Model Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Javier; Cirera, Jordi; Smith, Jeremy M.; Lachicotte, Rene J.; Flaschenriem, Christine J.; Alvarez, Santiago; Holland, Patrick L.

    2009-01-01

    Six of the seven iron atoms in the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase display an unusual geometry, which is distorted from the tetrahedral geometry that is most common in iron-sulfur clusters. This distortion pulls the iron along one C3 axis of the tetrahedron toward a trigonal pyramid. The trigonal pyramidal coordination geometry is rare in four-coordinate transition metal complexes. In order to document this geometry in a systematic fashion in iron(II) chemistry, we have synthesized a range of four-coordinate iron(II) complexes that vary from tetrahedral to trigonal pyramidal. Continuous shape measures are used for a quantitative comparison of the stereochemistry of the Fe atoms in the iron-molybdenum cofactor with those of the presently and previously reported model complexes, as well as with those in polynuclear iron-sulfur compounds. This understanding of the iron coordination geometry is expected to assist in the design of synthetic models for intermediates in the nitrogenase catalytic cycle. PMID:17198413

  2. Atomic environments in iron meteorites using EXAFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressey, G.; Dent, A. J.; Dobson, B.; Evans, A.; Greaves, G. N.; Henderson, C. M. B.; Hutchison, R.; Jenkins, R. N.; Thompson, S. P.; Zhu, R.

    1989-01-01

    Extended x ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is observed as a modulation on the high energy side of an x ray absorption edge. It occurs when the photo-ejected electron wave is scattered by neighboring atoms in a solid, and interference occurs between the outgoing and scattered waves. The result is that the absorption spectrum carries a signature that is characteristic of the identity and disposition of scattering atoms around the absorbing atom. Therefore, it may be shown that the Fourier transform of the normalized EXAFS can provide detailed information about the immediate environment of specific atoms in a solid and is ideally suited to the study of cosmic dusts. A study of cosmic dust was initiated using EXAFS and other techniques. The simplest type of cosmic material, namely iron meteorites, was investigated.

  3. The Iron Project: Atomic Data for the Iron Peak Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, A. K.; Zhang, H. L.; Nahar, S. N.; Bautista, M. A.

    1996-05-01

    Emission and absorption lines from Iron ions are of great importance as diagnostics for a large variety of objects and in most wavelength ranges, from the X-ray and extreme UV up to the far IR. The IRON Project is an international collaboration devoted to the study of atomic processes and the calculation of collisional and radiative data for ions of the iron-peak elements for applications in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The ab initio atomic calculations are carried out in the close-coupling approximation, using the R-matrix method and a package of codes developed for the Opacity Project and extended to include relativistic effects in the Breit-Pauli approximation. Parameters for many of the atomic processes of importance in astrophysics are calculated: (i) photoionization cross sections, (ii) total e-ion recombination rates including both the radiative and di-electr onic recombination processes, (iii) collision strengths, and (iv) radiative transition probabilities. Selected results will be presented for Fe I, Fe II, Fe III, Fe IV, Fe V, Fe XXII, Fe XXV, and Ni II. Of particular interest are the results for the low ionization stages of Iron: Fe I,II, and III, for which the new photoionization cross sections and corresponding recombination rates, both computed in a self-consistent manner for the first time, differ from the data currently in use in astrophysical models by up to several orders of magnitude. Also, at Ohio State, a parallelized version of the R-matrix codes has been developed for the massively parallel machine Cray T3D, thus enhancing the computational capabilities needed for such extensive calculations. The work is supported partially by the U.S. National Science Foundation (PHY-9421898), the NASA LTSA program (NAGW-3315) and the NASA ADP program (NAS5-32643).

  4. Magnetic conveyor belt for transporting and merging trapped atom clouds.

    PubMed

    Hänsel, W; Reichel, J; Hommelhoff, P; Hänsch, T W

    2001-01-22

    We demonstrate an integrated magnetic device which transports cold atoms near a surface with very high positioning accuracy. Time-dependent currents in a lithographic conductor pattern create a moving chain of potential wells; atoms are transported in these wells while remaining confined in all three dimensions. We achieve mean fluxes up to 10(6) s(-1) with a negligible heating rate. An extension of this device allows merging of atom clouds by unification of two Ioffe-Pritchard potentials. The unification, which we demonstrate experimentally, can be performed without loss of phase space density. This novel, all-magnetic atom manipulation offers exciting perspectives, such as trapped-atom interferometry.

  5. Transport of atoms in a quantum conveyor belt

    SciTech Connect

    Browaeys, A.; Haeffner, H.; McKenzie, C.; Rolston, S. L.; Helmerson, K.; Phillips, W. D.

    2005-11-15

    We have performed experiments using a three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate of sodium atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice to explore some unusual properties of band structure. In particular, we investigate the loading of a condensate into a moving lattice and find nonintuitive behavior. We also revisit the behavior of atoms, prepared in a single quasimomentum state, in an accelerating lattice. We generalize this study to a cloud whose atoms have a large quasimomentum spread, and show that the cloud behaves differently from atoms in a single Bloch state. Finally, we compare our findings with recent experiments performed with fermions in an optical lattice.

  6. Magnetorheological Fluids with Carbonyl and Water Atomized Iron Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombard, Antonio J. F.; Teodoro, João Victor R.

    Our aim in this work was to propose the use of a ternary blend of two carbonyl iron powder CIP, mixed with water atomized iron powder (WAIP), to reduce the off-state viscosity, without prejudice of MRF performance in terms of yield stress and torque output. The idea of mix water atomized iron powder with carbonyl iron powder is not new. The US Pat. # 5,900,184 by Weiss et al. (1999) describes that a binary blend, half-to-half, can reduces the viscosity of MRF in the absence of magnetic field, and increase the torque output under field.

  7. The Algoma-type iron-formations of the Nigerian metavolcano-sedimentary schist belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mücke, A.; Annor, A.; Neumann, U.

    1996-01-01

    Field relationships as well as petrographical and geochemical considerations form the basis of a model for the origin of the protoliths of the iron-formations and the associated phyllitic host rock of the Palaeoproterozoic schist belts of northern Nigeria. The iron-formations which consist of both the magnetite-subfacies and silicatefacies occur as relatively small, sporadic tabular bodies throughout the belts. They are concordantly interbanded with metasedimentary phyllites with which they share common metamorphic and deformational imprints. The iron-formations have high contents of Mn, Ca, Fe and P2O5 and low concentrations of alkalis (Na,K, Rb) Ba and Sr, Ti, Al and Si, whereas the phyllite exhibits exactly the opposite character. These results and other features (e.g. the composition of tourmaline in the phyllite and the occurrence of hydroclastic Cr-Mn-spinel and sulphides in the iron-formation) indicate a supply of materials from two different sources to the marine basin of Nigeria probably during Birimian time: slow but continuous deposition of continentally derived material of pelitic to psammitic composition; and rapid, sometimes intermittent, sporadic pulses of submarine-volcanic exhalations. During regional metamorphism (probably of Eburnian age) at greenschist to lower amphibolite fades conditions, the continental materials were transformed into phyllites and the mudstone-like sediments derived from volcanic exhalations into iron-formations. In the northern Nigerian schist belts two types of metamorphic parageneses in the iron-formations are recognized, both with various subtypes and without transitions between these two facies: (1) silicate-rich parageneses without magnetite (silicatefacies) and (2) magnetite-rich parageneses (magnetite-subfacies). In contrast to these parageneses, the iron-formations in the higher-grade metamorphic terrains of central Nigeria turn out to be hematitic (hematite-subfacies), and are derived from magnetite-bearing iron

  8. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael D.; Smith, Jeremy M.

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  9. Studying Iron Mineralogy to Understand Redox Conditions in the Mesoproterozoic Belt Basin, USA Using Complementary Microscopic, Spectroscopic, and Magnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Webb, S.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Fischer, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of iron chemistry and mineralogy over time provide a valuable tool for studying paleoenvironments, but questions still remain as to the redox character of Proterozoic basins after the rise of oxygen. To evaluate the mechanisms of iron mineralization in Proterozoic samples, we developed an approach that pairs the microscale textural techniques of light microscopy, magnetic scanning microscopy, and (synchrotron-based) microprobe x-ray spectroscopy with sensitive bulk rock magnetic experiments. Samples were collected from stratigraphic sections across the ~1.4 Ga lower Belt Group, Belt Supergroup, MT and ID, USA with a focus on excellently preserved sedimentary rocks, but also including those altered by a variety of diagenetic, metamorphic, and metasomatic events. Results show that even in the best-preserved parts of the Belt Basin, late diagenetic and/or metasomatic fluids affected (in some cases very mildly) the primary iron phases as evidenced by prevalent post-depositional alterations such as rare base metal sulfides. In more heavily altered rocks, the appearance of pyrrhotite and other minerals signaled transformations in iron mineralogy through metamorphism and metasomatism. Despite these secondary phases crystallizing in an open fluid-rich system, primary records of redox chemistry were preserved in the recrystallized early diagenetic framboidal pyrite and (sub)micron-sized detrital magnetite grains. Detrital magnetite is not the most abundant iron-bearing phase in any of the samples (typically <0.01 wt%), but is widely observed in both proximal and deeper basin facies, illustrating an important detrital flux of iron to the basin and a highly reactive iron source for early diagenetic pyrite. Based on our analyses, we interpret the shallow waters of the Belt Basin to be oxic with sulfidic pore fluids and deeper waters in parts of the basin as likely euxinic, consistent with the results of some bulk geochemical proxies. This redox reconstruction also

  10. Processing and Analysis of Hyperspectral Fingerprints to Characterise Haematite of Singbhum Iron Ore Belt, Orissa, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magendran, T.; Sanjeevi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The demand for iron ore has been increasing in the recent years, thereby requiring the adoption of fast and accurate approaches to iron ore exploration and its grade-assessment. It is in this context that hyperspectral sensing is deemed as a potential tool. This paper examines the potential of hyperspectral fingerprints in the visible, NIR and SWIR regions of the EMR to assess the grades of haematite of the western Singhbhum iron ore belt of Orissa, eastern India, in a rapid manner. Certain spectro-radiometric measurements and geochemical analysis were carried out and the results have been presented. From the spectral measurements, it is seen that the strength of reflectance and absorption at definite wavelength regions is controlled by the chemical composit ion of the iron ores. It is observed that the primary spectral characteristics of these haematites lie in the 650-750 nm, 850 to 900 nm and 2130-2230 nm regions. The laboratory based hyperspectral fingerprints and multiple regression analysis of spectral parameters and geochemical parameters (Fe% and Al2O3%) predicted the concentration of iron and alumina content in the haematite. A very strong correlation (R2 = 0.96) between the spectral parameters and Fe% in the haematite with a minimum error of 0.1%, maximum error of 7.4% and average error of 2.6% is observed. Similarly, a very strong correlation (R2 = 0.94) between the spectral parameters and Al2O3% in the iron ores with a minimum error of 0.04%, maximum error of 7.49% and average error of 2.5% is observed. This error is perhaps due to the presence of other components (SiO2, TiO2, P2O etc.) in the samples which can alter the degree of reflectance and hence the spectral parameters. Neural network based multi-layer perception (MLP) analysis of various spectral parameters and geochemical parameters helped to understand the relative importance of the spectral parameters for predictive models. The strong correlations (Iron: R2 = 0.96; Alumina: R2 = 0

  11. The composition of Earth's oldest iron formations: The Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt (Québec, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mloszewska, Aleksandra M.; Pecoits, Ernesto; Cates, Nicole L.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; O'Neil, Jonathan; Robbins, Leslie J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2012-02-01

    The composition of iron formations in the ≥ 3.75 Ga yr old Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt in northern Québec provides a proxy for seawater composition of the Eoarchean, and perhaps Hadean oceans, as well as constraints on the types of nutrients available to Earth's earliest life forms. Integrated petrologic and geochemical relationships, mapped between mineral phases in thin section and whole-rock chemistry, provide a framework for interpreting bulk and micro-scale variations in these chemical sedimentary precipitates. Results show that there are two distinct chemical sedimentary units in the Nuvvuagittuq belt: i) a banded iron formation (BIF) consisting of alternating micro-bands of magnetite, Ca-Mg-Fe-silicates and quartz, and ii) a more silicate-rich (Fe-poor) unit, the banded silicate-formation (BSF), of alternating micro-bands of quartz and Ca-Mg-Fe silicates. Precursor BIF and BSF deposits were likely layered amorphous silica and ferric-oxyhydroxides, fine-grained carbonate oozes and/or Ca-Mg-Fe rich silicate gels deposited in a marine setting. Low Al2O3, TiO2 and HFSE concentrations show that they are relatively detritus-free, with distinctively seawater-like REE + Y profiles and consistently positive Eu anomalies. These features suggest that the rocks preserved their seawater-like compositions despite metamorphic overprinting. The most significant trace elements in the sediments are Ni and Zn. Experimentally-derived partitioning coefficients show that Ni was enriched in Eoarchean seawater as compared to today (up to 300 nM), while Zn was fairly similar (up to 20 nM). Compositional resemblances between the Nuvvuagittuq sediments and those documented in the ca. 3.8 Ga Isua supracrustals (West Greenland) provide a plausible case that global ocean processes - in terms of trace metal abundances - had reached steady-state by the Eoarchean.

  12. Voronoi analysis of the short–range atomic structure in iron and iron–carbon melts

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron–carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short–range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  13. Iron Atom Exchange between Hematite and Aqueous Fe(II).

    PubMed

    Frierdich, Andrew J; Helgeson, Maria; Liu, Chengshuai; Wang, Chongmin; Rosso, Kevin M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2015-07-21

    Aqueous Fe(II) has been shown to exchange with structural Fe(III) in goethite without any significant phase transformation. It remains unclear, however, whether aqueous Fe(II) undergoes similar exchange reactions with structural Fe(III) in hematite, a ubiquitous iron oxide mineral. Here, we use an enriched (57)Fe tracer to show that aqueous Fe(II) exchanges with structural Fe(III) in hematite at room temperature, and that the amount of exchange is influenced by particle size, pH, and Fe(II) concentration. Reaction of 80 nm-hematite (27 m(2) g(-1)) with aqueous Fe(II) at pH 7.0 for 30 days results in ∼5% of its structural Fe(III) atoms exchanging with Fe(II) in solution, which equates to about one surface iron layer. Smaller, 50 nm-hematite particles (54 m(2) g(-1)) undergo about 25% exchange (∼3× surface iron) with aqueous Fe(II), demonstrating that structural Fe(III) in hematite is accessible to the fluid in the presence of Fe(II). The extent of exchange in hematite increases with pH up to 7.5 and then begins to decrease as the pH progresses to 8.0, likely due to surface site saturation by sorbed Fe(II). Similarly, when we vary the initial amount of added Fe(II), we observe decreasing amounts of exchange when aqueous Fe(II) is increased beyond surface saturation. This work shows that Fe(II) can catalyze iron atom exchange between bulk hematite and aqueous Fe(II), despite hematite being the most thermodynamically stable iron oxide.

  14. The Iron Project:. Radiative Atomic Processes in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2011-06-01

    Astronomical objects, such as, stars, galaxies, blackhole environments, etc are studied through their spectra produced by various atomic processes in their plasmas. The positions, shifts, and strengths of the spectral lines provide information on physical processes with elements in all ionization states, and various diagnostics for temperature, density, distance, etc of these objects. With presence of a radiative source, such as a star, the astrophysical plasma is dominated by radiative atomic processes such as photoionization, electron-ion recombination, bound-bound transitions or photo-excitations and de-excitations. The relevant atomic parameters, such as photoionization cross sections, electron-ion recombination rate coefficients, oscillator strengths, radiative transition rates, rates for dielectronic satellite lines etc are needed to be highly accurate for precise diagnostics of physical conditions as well as accurate modeling, such as, for opacities of astrophysical plasmas. for opacities of astrophysical plasmas. This report illustrates detailed features of radiative atomic processes obtained from accurate ab initio methods of the latest developments in theoretical quantum mechanical calculations, especially under the international collaborations known as the Iron Project (IP) and the Opacity Project (OP). These projects aim in accurate study of radiative and collsional atomic processes of all astrophysically abundant atoms and ions, from hydrogen to nickel, and calculate stellar opacities and have resulted in a large number of atomic parameters for photoionization and radiative transition probabilities. The unified method, which is an extension of the OP and the IP, is a self-consistent treatment for the total electron-ion recombination and photoionization. It incorporates both the radiative and the dielectronic recombination processes and provides total recombination rates and level-specific recombination rates for hundreds of levels for a wide range of

  15. Highly unsaturated binuclear butadiene iron carbonyls: quintet spin states, perpendicular structures, agostic hydrogen atoms, and iron-iron multiple bonds.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi; Wang, Shijian; Feng, Hao; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The highly unsaturated binuclear butadiene iron carbonyls (C(4)H(6))(2)Fe(2)(CO)(n) (n = 2, 1) have been examined using density functional theory. For (C(4)H(6))(2)Fe(2)(CO)(n) (n = 2, 1), both coaxial and perpendicular structures are found. The global minima of (C(4)H(6))(2)Fe(2)(CO)(n) (n = 2, 1) are the perpendicular structures 2Q-1 and 1Q-1, respectively, with 17- and 15-electron configurations for the iron atoms leading to quintet spin states. The Fe=Fe distance of 2.361 Å (M06-L) in the (C(4)H(6))(2)Fe(2)(CO)(2) structure 2Q-1 suggests a formal double bond. The Fe≡Fe bond distance in the (C(4)H(6))(2)Fe(2)(CO) structure 1Q-1 is even shorter at 2.273 Å (M06-L), suggesting a triple bond. Higher energy (C(4)H(6))(2)Fe(2)(CO)(n) (n = 2, 1) structures include structures in which a bridging butadiene ligand is bonded to one of the iron atoms as a tetrahapto ligand and to the other iron atom through two agostic hydrogen atoms from the end CH(2) groups. Singlet (C(4)H(6))(2)Fe(2)(CO) structures with formal Fe-Fe quadruple bonds of lengths ∼2.05 Å were also found but at very high energies (∼47 kcal/mol) relative to the global minimum.

  16. TIPTOPbase: the Iron Project and the Opacity Project Atomic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Claudio; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil; Seaton, Micheal; Zeippen, Claude

    2001-05-01

    The Opacity Project, the IRON Project, and the RmaX Network (The Opacity Project Team, Vol.1,2), IOPP, Bristol (1995,1996); Hummer et al., Astron. Astrophys. 279, 298 (1993) are international computational efforts concerned with the production of high quality atomic data for astrophysical applications. Research groups from Canada, France, Germany, UK, USA and Venezuela are involved. Extensive data sets containing accurate energy levels, f-values, A-values, photoionisation cross sections, collision strengths, recombination rates, and opacitites have been computed for cosmically abundant elements using state-of-the-art atomic physics codes. Their volume, completeness and overall accuracy are presently unmatched in the field of laboratory astrophysics. Some of the data sets have been available since 1993 from a public on-line database service referred to as TOPbase (Cunto et al Astron. Astrophys. 275), L5 (1993), ( http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/OP.html at CDS France, and http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/topbase, at NSAS USA). We are currently involved in a major effort to scale the existing database services to develop a robust platform for the high-profile dissemination of atomic data to the scientific community within the next 12 months. (Partial support from the NSF and NASA is acknowledged.)

  17. Atomic mechanism and prediction of hydrogen embrittlement in iron.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Curtin, W A

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement in metals has posed a serious obstacle to designing strong and reliable structural materials for many decades, and predictive physical mechanisms still do not exist. Here, a new H embrittlement mechanism operating at the atomic scale in α-iron is demonstrated. Direct molecular dynamics simulations reveal a ductile-to-brittle transition caused by the suppression of dislocation emission at the crack tip due to aggregation of H, which then permits brittle-cleavage failure followed by slow crack growth. The atomistic embrittlement mechanism is then connected to material states and loading conditions through a kinetic model for H delivery to the crack-tip region. Parameter-free predictions of embrittlement thresholds in Fe-based steels over a range of H concentrations, mechanical loading rates and H diffusion rates are found to be in excellent agreement with experiments. This work provides a mechanistic, predictive framework for interpreting experiments, designing structural components and guiding the design of embrittlement-resistant materials.

  18. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.; Anderegg, J.W.; Shechtman, D.

    2009-12-01

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strength- ened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  19. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.

    2011-08-09

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  20. Point defect absorption by grain boundaries in α -iron by atomic density function modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapikranian, O.; Zapolsky, H.; Patte, R.; Pareige, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.

    2015-12-01

    Using the atomic density function theory (ADFT), we examine the point defect absorption at [110] symmetrical tilt grain boundaries in body-centered cubic iron. It is found that the sink strength strongly depends on misorientation angle. We also show that the ADFT is able to reproduce reasonably well the elastic properties and the point defect formation volume in α -iron.

  1. Structural features of atomized white cast iron powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, A. P.; Astakhov, S. I.

    1991-01-01

    White cast iron powder rapidly quenched from the liquid condition with presence of the same phases and structural components differs markedly in structure from normally cast white iron. With an increase in cooling rate vcool during solidification the amount of eutectic decreases. However, with an increase in carbon content this tendency is weakened and with 3.9% the structure of powder cast iron is almost entirely of eutectic.

  2. The Cretaceous iron belt of northern Chile: role of oceanic plates, a superplume event, and a major shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzun, Roberto; Oyarzún, Jorge; Ménard, Jean Jacques; Lillo, Javier

    2003-08-01

    The Cretaceous constitutes a turning point in the tectonic, magmatic, and metallogenic history of Chile. The geological evidence indicates that a major change occurred in late Neocomian time when superplume emplacement (Mid-Pacific Superplume) and plate reorganization processes took place in the Pacific. The superplume event resulted in a major ridge-push force resulting in increased coupling between the subducting and overriding plates. This completely changed the tectonic setting of Chile ending the Early Cretaceous extensional period (aborted rifting in the back-arc basin), and increasing stress at a crustal scale. As a consequence, overpressurized dioritic magmas were pushed up mainly along the best possible structural path in northern Chile, i.e., the Atacama Fault Zone, eventually forming a +500-km-long belt of Kiruna-type iron deposits with reserves of ~2,000 Mt (60% Fe), a unique case in Chile's geological history.

  3. Bioavailable iron in the Southern Ocean: the significance of the iceberg conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Raiswell, Rob; Benning, Liane G; Tranter, Martyn; Tulaczyk, Slawek

    2008-05-30

    Productivity in the Southern Oceans is iron-limited, and the supply of iron dissolved from aeolian dust is believed to be the main source from outside the marine reservoir. Glacial sediment sources of iron have rarely been considered, as the iron has been assumed to be inert and non-bioavailable. This study demonstrates the presence of potentially bioavailable Fe as ferrihydrite and goethite in nanoparticulate clusters, in sediments collected from icebergs in the Southern Ocean and glaciers on the Antarctic landmass. Nanoparticles in ice can be transported by icebergs away from coastal regions in the Southern Ocean, enabling melting to release bioavailable Fe to the open ocean. The abundance of nanoparticulate iron has been measured by an ascorbate extraction. This data indicates that the fluxes of bioavailable iron supplied to the Southern Ocean from aeolian dust (0.01-0.13 Tg yr(-1)) and icebergs (0.06-0.12 Tg yr(-1)) are comparable. Increases in iceberg production thus have the capacity to increase productivity and this newly identified negative feedback may help to mitigate fossil fuel emissions.

  4. Change of Energy of the Cubic Subnanocluster of Iron Under Influence of Interstitial and Substitutional Atoms.

    PubMed

    Nedolya, Anatoliy V; Bondarenko, Natalya V

    2016-12-01

    Energy change of an iron face-centred cubic subnanocluster was evaluated using molecular mechanics method depending on the position of a carbon interstitial atom and substitutional atoms of nickel. Calculations of all possible positions of impurity atoms show that the energy change of the system are discrete and at certain positions of the atoms are close to continuous.In terms of energy, when all impurity atoms are on the same edge of an atomic cluster, their positions are more advantageous. The presence of nickel atoms on the edge of a cubic cluster resulted in decrease of potential barrier for a carbon atom and decrease in energy in the whole cluster. A similar drift of a carbon atom from central octahedral interstitial site to the surface in the direction <011> occurred under the influence of surface factors.Such configuration corresponds to decreasing symmetry and increasing the number of possible energy states of a subnanocluster, and it corresponds to the condition of spontaneous crystallization process in an isolated system.Taking into account accidental positions of the nickel atom in the iron cluster, such behaviour of the carbon atom can explain the mechanism of growth of a new phase and formation of new clusters in the presence of other kind of atoms because of surface influence.

  5. Removal of iron interferences by solvent extraction for geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Iron is a common interferent in the determination of many elements in geochemical samples. Two approaches for its removal have been taken. The first involves removal of iron by extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from hydrochloric acid medium, leaving the analytes in the aqueous phase. The second consists of reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) by ascorbic acid to minimize its extraction into MIBK, so that the analytes may be isolated by extraction. Elements of interest can then be determined using the aqueous solution or the organic extract, as appropriate. Operating factors such as the concentration of hydrochloric acid, amounts of iron present, number of extractions, the presence or absence of a salting-out agent, and the optimum ratio of ascorbic acid to iron have been determined. These factors have general applications in geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1985.

  6. The Gogebic Iron Range - A Sample of the Northern Margin of the Penokean Fold and Thrust Belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, William F.; LaBerge, Gene L.; Klasner, John S.; Schulz, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    The Gogebic iron range is an elongate belt of Paleoproterozoic strata extending from the west shore of Lake Gogebic in the upper peninsula of Michigan for about 125 km westward into northern Wisconsin. It is one of six major informally named iron ranges in the Lake Superior region and produced about 325 million tons of direct-shipping ore between 1887 and 1967. A significant resource of concentrating-grade ore remains in the western and eastern parts of the range. The iron range forms a broad, gently southward-opening arc where the central part of the range exposes rocks that were deposited somewhat north of the eastern and western parts. A fundamental boundary marking both the tectonic setting of deposition and the later deformation within the Penokean orogen lies fortuitously in an east-west direction along the range so that the central part of the range preserves sediments deposited north of that boundary, whereas the eastern and western parts of the range were deposited south of the boundary. Thus, the central part of the range provides a record of sedimentation and very mild deformation in a part of the Penokean orogen farthest from the interior of the orogen to the south. The eastern and western parts of the range, in contrast, exhibit a depositional and deformational style typical of parts closer to the interior of the orogen. A second fortuitous feature of the iron range is that the entire area was tilted from 40° to 90° northward by Mesoproterozoic deformation so that the map view offers an oblique cross section of the Paleoproterozoic sedimentary sequence and structures. Together, these features make the Gogebic iron range a unique area in which to observe (1) the lateral transition from deposition on a stable platform to deposition in a tectonically and volcanically active region, and (2) the transition from essentially undeformed Paleoproterozoic strata to their folded and faulted equivalents.Paleoproterozoic strata in the Gogebic iron range are part

  7. Iron meteorite fragment studied by atomic and nuclear analytical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnek, Martin; Štefánik, Milan; Kmječ, Tomáš; Miglierini, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    Chemical and structural compositions of a fragment of Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite were investigated by X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS). XRF and NAA revealed the presence of chemical elements which are characteristic for iron meteorites. XRF also showed a significant amount of Si and Al on the surface of the fragment. MS spectra revealed possible presence of α-Fe(Ni, Co) phase with different local Ni concentration. Furthermore, paramagnetic singlet was detected in Mössbauer spectra recorded at room temperature and at 4.2 K.

  8. Study of the analytical methods for iron determination in complex organic liquids by atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Torre, M.; Gonzalez, M.C.; Jimenez, O.; Rodriquez, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    In the determination of iron in complex organic liquids by atomic absorption spectrometry (A.A.S.), methods of sample preparation, such as dilution with an organic solvent and sample pretreatment to destroy organic material, are investigated. Moreover, methods of analysis using calibration curve and standard additions are presented. The possible cause of error associated with iron determination in organic samples by flame (F-A.A.S.) and graphite furnace (GF-A.A.S.) atomic absorption spectrometry are discussed. From all of these studies, the use of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after sample dilution with methyl isobutyl ketone, and the use of the method of standard additions are advised for iron determination.

  9. Iron and chlorine as guides to stratiform Cu-Co-Au deposits, Idaho Cobalt Belt, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nash, J.T.; Connor, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Cu-Co-Au deposits of the Idaho Cobalt Belt are in lithostratigraphic zones of the Middle Proterozoic Yellowjacket Formation characterized by distinctive chemical and mineralogical compositions including high concentrations of Fe (15- > 30 wt. percent Fe2O3), Cl (0.1-1.10 wt. percent), and magnetite or biotite (> 50 vol. percent). The Cu-Co-Au deposits of the Blackbird mine are stratabound in Fe-silicate facies rocks that are rich in biotite, Fe, and Cl, but stratigraphically equivalent rocks farther than 10 km from ore deposits have similar compositions. A lower lithostratigraphic zone containing magnetite and small Cu-Co-Au deposits extends for more than 40 km. The Fe-rich strata are probably exhalative units related to mafic volcanism and submarine hot springs, but the origin of the high Cl concentrations is less clear. Former chlorine-rich pore fluids are suggested by the presence of supersaline fluid inclusions, by Cl-rich biotite and scapolite (as much as 1.87 percent Cl in Fe-rich biotite), and by high Cl concentrations in rock samples. Chlorine is enriched in specific strata and in zones characterized by soft-sediment deformation, thus probably was introduced during sedimentation or diagenesis. Unlike some metasedimentary rocks containing scapolite and high Cl, the Yellowjacket Formation lacks evidence for evaporitic strata that could have been a source of Cl. More likely, the Cl reflects a submarine brine that carried Fe, K, and base metals. Strata containing anomalous Fe-K-Cl are considered to be a guide to sub-basins favorable for the occurrence of stratiform base-metal deposits. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Evaluation of the biogeochemical impact of iron-rich shelf water to the Green Belt in the southeastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Yasuda, I.; Kuma, K.; Nishioka, J.

    2017-07-01

    The Green Belt (GB) in the southeastern Bering Sea lying along the continental slope is a biological hotspot where summertime high primary production is sustained by continuous input of nutrients and iron. To understand the mechanisms to sustain the GB, we need to know how dissolved iron (D-Fe), which regulates the GB production, is drawn from the abundant source in the adjacent shelf should be clarified, but no quantification has ever been done yet. In the present paper, using hydrographic and D-Fe data taken by a cruise and hydrographic database, we estimate horizontal D-Fe flux from the outer-shelf along 25.4 σθ and 26.2 σθ density surfaces, which are proposed as possible pathways by previous studies. The hydrographic data shows that the cold outer-shelf water is distributed in the slope region, and we estimate that 10% (65%) of the water-mass in the slope is originated from the outer-shelf at 25.4 (26.2) σθ. Assuming that this portion of the along-slope geostrophic transport is derived from the outer-shelf through horizontal isopycnal mixing, and using the observed D-Fe concentration, we estimate the D-Fe flux of Ο(103) molFe/day at 25.4 σθ and Ο(104) molFe/day at 26.2 σθ. The large flux at 26.2 σθ is consistent with the vertical maximum of D-Fe concentration previously observed off the shelf break at this density range, and the flux provides sufficient iron into the euphotic zone via the subsequent enhanced vertical mixing off the shelf break, which is estimated to be Ο(103) molFe/day based on our prior studies. Since our estimated D-Fe flux through horizontal mixing at 25.4 σθ and the vertical mixing off the shelf break altogether are comparable to the minimum D-Fe requirement by phytoplankton in the GB, which is estimated as Ο(103-104) molFe/day, we suggest that both processes could play important roles in providing D-Fe to the euphotic zone in the GB.

  11. Cohesive Relations for Surface Atoms in the Iron-Technetium Binary System

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Iron-technetium alloys are of relevance to the development of waste forms for disposition of radioactive technetium-99 obtained from spent nuclear fuel. Corrosion of candidate waste forms is a function of the local cohesive energy () of surface atoms. A theoretical model for calculating is developed. Density functional theory was used to construct a modified embedded atom (MEAM) potential for iron-technetium. Materials properties determined for the iron-technetium system were in good agreement with the literature. To explore the relationship between local structure and corrosion, MEAM simulations were performed on representative iron-technetium alloys and intermetallics. Technetium-rich phases have lower , suggesting thatmore » these phases will be more noble than iron-rich ones. Quantitative estimates of based on numbers of nearest neighbors alone can lead to errors up to 0.5 eV. Consequently, atomistic corrosion simulations for alloy systems should utilize physics-based models that consider not only neighbor counts, but also local compositions and atomic arrangements.« less

  12. Energy of the Isolated Metastable Iron-Nickel FCC Nanocluster with a Carbon Atom in the Tetragonal Interstice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Natalya V.; Nedolya, Anatoliy V.

    2017-02-01

    The energy of the isolated iron-nickel nanocluster was calculated by molecular mechanics method using Lennard-Jones potential. The cluster included a carbon atom that drifted from an inside octahedral interstice to a tetrahedral interstice in direction and after that in <222> direction to the surface. In addition, one of 14 iron atoms was replaced by a nickel atom, the position of which was changing during simulation.

  13. Lead, arsenic, fluoride, and iron contamination of drinking water in the tea garden belt of Darrang district, Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Borah, Kamala Kanta; Bhuyan, Bhabajit; Sarma, Hari Prasad

    2010-10-01

    Drinking water quality with respect to lead, iron, fluoride, and arsenic has been carried out in and around tea gardens of Darrang district of Assam, India. The district lies between 26 degrees 25(') and 26 degrees 55(') northern latitude and 91 degrees 45(') and 91 degrees 20(') east longitude and covers an area of 3,465.30 km(2). Twenty-five different sampling stations were selected for the study. Iron, lead, and arsenic were analyzed by using an atomic absorption spectrometer, Perkin Elmer AA 200, while fluoride was measured by the SPADNS method using a UV-VIS spectrometer, Shimadzu 1240 model. The study revealed that the water sources in the area are heavily polluted with lead. Statistical analysis of the data is presented to determine the distribution pattern, localization of data, and other related information. Statistical observations imply non-uniform distribution of the studied parameters with a long asymmetric tail either on the right or left side of the median.

  14. Iron Mining Eta Carinae's Archived Spectra and Benchmarking Atomic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urech, Alexander; Bautista, M.; Gull, T. R.; Hartman, H.; Fivet, V.

    2013-01-01

    Fe II has proven to be one of the most conspicuous species in UV, visible, and IR spectra. The complexity of this atomic system still challenges current theoretical methods. Comparisons of available atomic data with different astronomical spectra is the focus of the current research. Spectra from the Orion and the Eta Carinae nebulae are being used in these studies. Orions spectrum contains over 70 emission line for [Fe II] which have been used in the systematical benchmarking of Einstein transition probabilities (A-values) for forbidden transitions of the interest species against calculations from literature and our own. The spectra from many other sources must be compared to end with accurate data, which is why examination of Eta Carinae is also taking place. The Weigelt blobs are close in ejectas thought to originate from the central star of Eta Carinae and are of particular interest in this study. IDL software is being used for measuring the forbidden [Fe II] transitions from these spectra collected with the Hubble Space Telescope/ Space Telescope Image Spectrograph.

  15. Atomic Environment Changes Induced by Iron Addition to Gallium Bismuthate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, V.; BarzǍ, L.; Simon, S.; ChiuzbǍIAN, S. G.; Neumann, M.

    Atomic environment of xFe2O3·(80-x)Bi2O3·20Ga2O3 heavy glasses (0≤x≤20 mol%) was investigated with respect to electronic structure of the samples. Data obtained from Bi 4f, Ga 2p, Fe 2p, and O 1s core-level photoelectron spectra indicate changes in the local order on the account of partial substitution of bismuth by iron. The bismuth cations behave essentially as network formers while the iron and gallium ones acts as network modifiers. The number of nonbridging oxygens depends on Fe2O3 content.

  16. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  17. Interactions of foreign interstitial and substitutional atoms in bcc iron from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Y.; Yan, M. F.

    2013-05-01

    C and N atoms are the most frequent foreign interstitial atoms (FIAs), and often incorporated into the surface layers of steels to enhance their properties by thermochemical treatments. Al, Si, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb and Mo are the most common alloying elements in steels, also can be called foreign substitutional atoms (FSAs). The FIA and FSA interactions play an important role in the diffusion of C and N atoms, and the microstructures and mechanical properties of surface modified layers. Ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory are carried out to investigate FIA interactions with FSA in ferromagnetic bcc iron. The FIA-FSA interactions are analyzed systematically from five aspects, including interaction energies, density of states (DOS), bond populations, electron density difference maps and local magnetic moments.

  18. Timing of multiple hydrothermal events in the iron oxide-copper-gold deposits of the Southern Copper Belt, Carajás Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreto, Carolina P. N.; Monteiro, Lena V. S.; Xavier, Roberto P.; Creaser, Robert A.; DuFrane, S. Andrew; Melo, Gustavo H. C.; Delinardo da Silva, Marco A.; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.; Sato, Kei

    2015-06-01

    The Southern Copper Belt, Carajás Province, Brazil, hosts several iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits, including Sossego, Cristalino, Alvo 118, Bacuri, Bacaba, Castanha, and Visconde. Mapping and U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) IIe zircon geochronology allowed the characterization of the host rocks, situated within regional WNW-ESE shear zones. They encompass Mesoarchean (3.08-2.85 Ga) TTG orthogneiss, granites, and remains of greenstone belts, Neoarchean (ca. 2.74 Ga) granite, shallow-emplaced porphyries, and granophyric granite coeval with gabbro, and Paleoproterozoic (1.88 Ga) porphyry dykes. Extensive hydrothermal zones include albite-scapolite, biotite-scapolite-tourmaline-magnetite alteration, and proximal potassium feldspar, chlorite-epidote and chalcopyrite formation. U-Pb laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) analysis of ore-related monazite and Re-Os NTIMS analysis of molybdenite suggest multiple Neoarchean (2.76 and 2.72-2.68 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.06 Ga) hydrothermal events at the Bacaba and Bacuri deposits. These results, combined with available geochronological data from the literature, indicate recurrence of hydrothermal systems in the Southern Copper Belt, including 1.90-1.88-Ga ore formation in the Sossego-Curral ore bodies and the Alvo 118 deposit. Although early hydrothermal evolution at 2.76 Ga points to fluid migration coeval with the Carajás Basin formation, the main episode of IOCG genesis (2.72-2.68 Ga) is related to basin inversion coupled with Neoarchean (ca. 2.7 Ga) felsic magmatism. The data suggest that the IOCG deposits in the Southern Copper Belt and those in the Northern Copper Belt (2.57-Ga Salobo and Igarapé Bahia-Alemão deposits) do not share a common metallogenic evolution. Therefore, the association of all IOCG deposits of the Carajás Province with a single extensive hydrothermal system is precluded.

  19. Atomic-scale mechanisms of helium bubble hardening in iron

    DOE PAGES

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    Generation of helium due to (n,α) transmutation reactions changes the response of structural materials to neutron irradiation. The whole process of radiation damage evolution is affected by He accumulation and leads to significant changes in the material s properties. A population of nanometric He-filled bubbles affects mechanical properties and the impact can be quite significant because of their high density. Understanding how these basic mechanisms affect mechanical properties is necessary for predicting radiation effects. In this paper we present an extensive study of the interactions between a moving edge dislocation and bubbles using atomic-scale modeling. We focus on the effectmore » of He bubble size and He concentration inside bubbles. Thus, we found that ability of bubbles to act as an obstacle to dislocation motion is close to that of voids when the He-to-vacancy ratio is in the range from 0 to 1. A few simulations made at higher He contents demonstrated that the interaction mechanism is changed for over-pressurized bubbles and they become weaker obstacles. The results are discussed in light of post-irradiation materials testing.« less

  20. Atomic-scale mechanisms of helium bubble hardening in iron

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    Generation of helium due to (n,α) transmutation reactions changes the response of structural materials to neutron irradiation. The whole process of radiation damage evolution is affected by He accumulation and leads to significant changes in the material s properties. A population of nanometric He-filled bubbles affects mechanical properties and the impact can be quite significant because of their high density. Understanding how these basic mechanisms affect mechanical properties is necessary for predicting radiation effects. In this paper we present an extensive study of the interactions between a moving edge dislocation and bubbles using atomic-scale modeling. We focus on the effect of He bubble size and He concentration inside bubbles. Thus, we found that ability of bubbles to act as an obstacle to dislocation motion is close to that of voids when the He-to-vacancy ratio is in the range from 0 to 1. A few simulations made at higher He contents demonstrated that the interaction mechanism is changed for over-pressurized bubbles and they become weaker obstacles. The results are discussed in light of post-irradiation materials testing.

  1. Reaction of an Iron(IV) Nitrido Complex with Cyclohexadienes: Cycloaddition and Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The iron(IV) nitrido complex PhB(MesIm)3Fe≡N reacts with 1,3-cyclohexadiene to yield the iron(II) pyrrolide complex PhB(MesIm)3Fe(η5-C4H4N) in high yield. The mechanism of product formation is proposed to involve sequential [4 + 1] cycloaddition and retro Diels–Alder reactions. Surprisingly, reaction with 1,4-cyclohexadiene yields the same iron-containing product, albeit in substantially lower yield. The proposed reaction mechanism, supported by electronic structure calculations, involves hydrogen-atom abstraction from 1,4-cyclohexadiene to provide the cyclohexadienyl radical. This radical is an intermediate in substrate isomerization to 1,3-cyclohexadiene, leading to formation of the pyrrolide product. PMID:25068927

  2. Modeling of yttrium, oxygen atoms and vacancies in γ-iron lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopejenko, Aleksejs; Zhukovskii, Yuri F.; Vladimirov, Pavel V.; Kotomin, Eugene A.; Möslang, Anton

    2011-09-01

    Development of the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels for fission and fusion reactors requires a deep understanding of the mechanism and kinetics of Y 2O 3 nanoparticle precipitation in the steel matrix. Therefore, it is necessary to perform a large-scale theoretical modeling of the Y 2O 3 formation. In the current study, a series of first-principles calculations have been performed on different elementary clusters consisting of pair and triple solute atoms and containing: (i) the Y-Fe-vacancy pairs, (ii) the two Y atoms substituted for Fe lattice atoms and (iii) the O impurity atoms dissolved in the steel matrix. The latter is represented by a face-centered cubic γ-Fe single crystal. This structure is relevant because a transition to γ-phase occurs in low Cr ferritic-martensitic steels at typically hot isostatic pressing temperatures. The results clearly demonstrate a certain attraction between the Y substitute and Fe vacancy whereas no binding has been found between the two Y substitute atoms. Results of calculations on different Y-O-Y cluster configurations in lattice show that not only a presence of oxygen atom favors a certain binding between the impurity atoms inside the γ-Fe lattice but also the increased concentration of Fe vacancies is required for the growth of the Y 2O 3 precipitates within the iron crystalline matrix.

  3. Biological Fe oxidation controlled deposition of banded iron formation in the ca. 3770 Ma Isua Supracrustal Belt (West Greenland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaja, Andrew D.; Johnson, Clark M.; Beard, Brian L.; Roden, Eric E.; Li, Weiqiang; Moorbath, Stephen

    2013-02-01

    The redox balance of the Archean atmosphere-ocean system is among the most significant uncertainties in our understanding of the earliest history of Earth's surface zone. Most workers agree that oxygen did not constitute a significant proportion of the atmosphere until after ca. 2.45 Ga, after the Great Oxidation Event, but there is less agreement on when O2 production began, and how this may have been consumed by reduced species such as Fe(II) in the oceans. The Fe redox cycle through time has been traced using banded iron formations (BIFs), and Fe isotopes are increasingly used to constrain the conditions of Earth's paleoenvironments, including the pathways of formation of BIFs. Iron isotope analyses of BIFs from the 3.7 to 3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt (ISB), obtained by micro-sampling of magnetite-rich layers and conventional analysis, as well as by in situ femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA-ICP-MS), indicate a consistently narrow range of non-zero δ56Fe values. Analysis of magnetite by fs-LA-ICP-MS allows for precise and accurate micron-scale analyses without the problems of orientation effects that are associated with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses. Magnetite δ56Fe values range from +0.4‰ to +1.1‰ among different bands, but within individual layers magnetite grains are mostly homogeneous. Although these BIFs have been metamorphosed to amphibolite-facies, the metamorphism can neither explain the range in Fe isotope compositions across bands, nor that between hand samples. The isotopic compositions therefore reflect “primary”, low-temperature sedimentary values. The positive δ56Fe values measured from the ISB magnetites are best explained by deposition of Fe(III)-oxides produced by partial oxidation of Fe(II)-rich ocean water. A dispersion/reaction model, which accounts for rates of hydrothermal Fe(II)aq input, rates of oxidation, and rates of Fe(OH)3 settling suggests exceptionally low O2 contents, <0.001% of modern O2 contents in

  4. New Atomic Data for Doubly Ionized Iron Group Atoms by High Resolution UV Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter L.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    Currently available laboratory spectroscopic data of doubly ionized iron-group element were obtained about 50 years ago using spectrographs of modest dispersion, photographic plates, and eye estimates of intensities. The accuracy of the older wavelength data is about 10 mAngstroms at best, whereas wavelengths are now needed to an accuracy of 1 part in 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7) (0.2 to 2 mAngstroms at 2000 Angstroms). The Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy group at Imperial College, London, and collaborators at the Harvard College Observatory have used a unique VUV FT spectrometer in a program focussed on improving knowledge of spectra of many neutral and singly and doubly ionized, astrophysically important, iron group elements. Spectra of Fe II and Fe III have been recorded at UV and VUV wavelengths with signal-to-noise ratios of several hundred for the stronger lines. Wavelengths and energy levels for Fe III are an order of magnitude more accurate than previous work; analysis is close to completion. f-values for Fe II have been published.

  5. 47. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM SYSTEM WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM SYSTEM WITH BACK BELT DROPPING HARDENED NAILS ON THE FRONT BELT TO BE TEMPERED; MOTION STOPPED - LaBelle Iron Works, Thirtieth & Wood Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  6. Petrography and geochemistry of Mesoarchaean komatiites from the eastern Iron Ore belt, Singhbhum craton, India, and its similarity with 'Barberton type komatiite'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Trisrota; Mazumder, Rajat; Arima, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The Mesoarchaean supracrustals of the Gorumahishani-Badampahar belt, eastern India record sedimentation-volcanism like most other contemporary greenstone belts over the world. The current study reports unambiguous komatiitic rocks from Tua-Dungri hill, Gorumahishani-Badampahar belt, Jharkhand and presents a petrological and geochemical inventory of these very interesting rocks. The Tua-Dungri komatiites are characterised by a well distinguishable cumulate, platy and random spinifex zone. These Tua-Dungri komatiites are rich in SiO2 (47-50 wt%) like Barberton type komatiite or modern day boninite. Their Al depleted nature (Al2O3 = 1.36-2.95 wt%) with very low Al2O3/TiO2 (3.4-6.5) and high CaO/Al2O3 (2-3), high LREE/HREE ratios show further resemblance with the Barberton komatiite. The Tua Dungri komatiite data along with published geochemical, sedimentological and stratigraphic data from the Iron Ore Group of rocks suggest mantle plume activity during the Mesoarchaean on the Singhbhum craton.

  7. Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Peng, Bin; Zhou, Ziyao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Shu-Ming; Jiang, Zhuang-De; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-27

    Highly-ordered and conformal iron oxide nanotube arrays on an atomic scale are successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with controlled oxidization states and tunable magnetic properties between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism. Non-magnetic α-Fe2O3 and superparamagnetic Fe2O3with a blocking temperature of 120 K are in-situ obtained by finely controlling the oxidation reaction. Both of them exhibit a very small grain size of only several nanometers due to the nature of atom-by-atom growth of the ALD technique. Post-annealing α-Fe2O3 in a reducing atmosphere leads to the formation of the spinel Fe3O4 phase which displays a distinct ferrimagnetic anisotropy and the Verwey metal-insulator transition that usually takes place only in single crystal magnetite or thick epitaxial films at low temperatures. Finally, the ALD deposition of iron oxide with well-controlled phase and tunable magnetism demonstrated in this work provides a promising opportunity for the fabrication of 3D nano-devices to be used in catalysis, spintronics, microelectronics, data storages and bio-applications.

  8. Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Peng, Bin; Zhou, Ziyao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Shu-Ming; Jiang, Zhuang-De; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-27

    Highly-ordered and conformal iron oxide nanotube arrays on an atomic scale are successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with controlled oxidization states and tunable magnetic properties between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism. Non-magnetic α-Fe2O3 and superparamagnetic Fe3O4 with a blocking temperature of 120 K are in-situ obtained by finely controlling the oxidation reaction. Both of them exhibit a very small grain size of only several nanometers due to the nature of atom-by-atom growth of the ALD technique. Post-annealing α-Fe2O3 in a reducing atmosphere leads to the formation of the spinel Fe3O4 phase which displays a distinct ferrimagnetic anisotropy and the Verwey metal-insulator transition that usually takes place only in single crystal magnetite or thick epitaxial films at low temperatures. The ALD deposition of iron oxide with well-controlled phase and tunable magnetism demonstrated in this work provides a promising opportunity for the fabrication of 3D nano-devices to be used in catalysis, spintronics, microelectronics, data storages and bio-applications.

  9. Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Peng, Bin; Zhou, Ziyao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Shu-Ming; Jiang, Zhuang-De; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Highly-ordered and conformal iron oxide nanotube arrays on an atomic scale are successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with controlled oxidization states and tunable magnetic properties between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism. Non-magnetic α-Fe2O3 and superparamagnetic Fe3O4 with a blocking temperature of 120 K are in-situ obtained by finely controlling the oxidation reaction. Both of them exhibit a very small grain size of only several nanometers due to the nature of atom-by-atom growth of the ALD technique. Post-annealing α-Fe2O3 in a reducing atmosphere leads to the formation of the spinel Fe3O4 phase which displays a distinct ferrimagnetic anisotropy and the Verwey metal-insulator transition that usually takes place only in single crystal magnetite or thick epitaxial films at low temperatures. The ALD deposition of iron oxide with well-controlled phase and tunable magnetism demonstrated in this work provides a promising opportunity for the fabrication of 3D nano-devices to be used in catalysis, spintronics, microelectronics, data storages and bio-applications.

  10. Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Peng, Bin; ...

    2016-01-27

    Highly-ordered and conformal iron oxide nanotube arrays on an atomic scale are successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with controlled oxidization states and tunable magnetic properties between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism. Non-magnetic α-Fe2O3 and superparamagnetic Fe2O3with a blocking temperature of 120 K are in-situ obtained by finely controlling the oxidation reaction. Both of them exhibit a very small grain size of only several nanometers due to the nature of atom-by-atom growth of the ALD technique. Post-annealing α-Fe2O3 in a reducing atmosphere leads to the formation of the spinel Fe3O4 phase which displays a distinct ferrimagnetic anisotropy and the Verwey metal-insulatormore » transition that usually takes place only in single crystal magnetite or thick epitaxial films at low temperatures. Finally, the ALD deposition of iron oxide with well-controlled phase and tunable magnetism demonstrated in this work provides a promising opportunity for the fabrication of 3D nano-devices to be used in catalysis, spintronics, microelectronics, data storages and bio-applications.« less

  11. Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Peng, Bin; Zhou, Ziyao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Shu-Ming; Jiang, Zhuang-De; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Wei; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Highly-ordered and conformal iron oxide nanotube arrays on an atomic scale are successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with controlled oxidization states and tunable magnetic properties between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism. Non-magnetic α-Fe2O3 and superparamagnetic Fe3O4 with a blocking temperature of 120 K are in-situ obtained by finely controlling the oxidation reaction. Both of them exhibit a very small grain size of only several nanometers due to the nature of atom-by-atom growth of the ALD technique. Post-annealing α-Fe2O3 in a reducing atmosphere leads to the formation of the spinel Fe3O4 phase which displays a distinct ferrimagnetic anisotropy and the Verwey metal-insulator transition that usually takes place only in single crystal magnetite or thick epitaxial films at low temperatures. The ALD deposition of iron oxide with well-controlled phase and tunable magnetism demonstrated in this work provides a promising opportunity for the fabrication of 3D nano-devices to be used in catalysis, spintronics, microelectronics, data storages and bio-applications. PMID:26813143

  12. Structural, magnetic and electronic properties of single Iron atom at graphene edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Hao, Yanjun; Xu, Xiaohong

    2017-02-01

    A systemic theoretical study of one iron atom on graphene ribbon edges (Fe/GR) has been carried out by using density functional theory. Thermodynamic stabilities, electronic and magnetic properties of Fe/GR with different edge types and adsorption locations were investigated. According to the Clar's aromatic sextet rule, the formation energies and density of states of Fe atom are found to rely tightly on the ribbon's periodic length. Moreover, Fe atoms on reconstructed zz edges are also stable with low formation energies and semiconducting properties. Finally, the magnetic properties are found sensitive with the structural details, especially the local bond environment. The present theoretical results constitute a useful picture for the deep comprehending on the interface details of the lateral Fe/graphene heterostructures.

  13. Properties and reactivities of nonheme iron(IV)-oxo versus iron(V)-oxo: long-range electron transfer versus hydrogen atom abstraction.

    PubMed

    Karamzadeh, Baharan; Singh, Devendra; Nam, Wonwoo; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P

    2014-11-07

    Recent work of Nam and co-workers [J. Yoon, S. A. Wilson, Y. K. Jang, M. S. Seo, K. Nehru, B. Hedman, K. O. Hodgson, E. Bill, E. I. Solomon and W. Nam, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed., 2009, 48, 1257] on a biomimetic iron complex implicated a mixture of iron(IV)-oxo and iron(V)-oxo intermediates but the latter could not be spectroscopically characterized, hence its involvement was postulated. To gain insight into the relative activity of these iron(IV)-oxo versus iron(V)-oxo intermediates, we have performed an extensive density functional theory (DFT) study on the chemical properties of the chemical system of Nam et al., namely [Fe(O)(BQEN)(NCCH3)](2+/3+) with BQEN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)ethane-1,2-diamine and their reactivity in hydrogen atom abstraction from ethylbenzene. We show that the perceived iron(V)-oxo species actually is an iron(IV)-oxo ligand cation radical, similar to cytochrome P450 compound I. Moreover, this intermediate has an extremely large electron affinity and therefore can abstract electrons from substrates readily. In our particular system, this means that prior to the hydrogen atom abstraction, an electron is abstracted to form an iron(IV)-oxo species, which subsequently abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate. Thus, our calculations show for the first time how some nonheme iron complexes react by long-range electron transfer and others directly via hydrogen atom abstraction. We have rationalized our results with detailed thermochemical cycles that explain the observed reactivity patterns.

  14. Nanoscale structure and atomic disorder in the iron-based chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Saini, Naurang Lal

    2013-02-01

    The multiband iron-based superconductors have layered structure with a phase diagram characterized by a complex interplay of charge, spin and lattice excitations, with nanoscale atomic structure playing a key role in their fundamental electronic properties. In this paper, we briefly review nanoscale structure and atomic disorder in iron-based chalcogenide superconductors. We focus on the Fe(Se,S)1-x Te x (11-type) and K0.8Fe1.6Se2 (122-type) systems, discussing their local structure obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure. Local structure studies on the Fe(Se,S)1-x Te x system reveal clear nanoscale phase separation characterized by coexisting components of different atomic configurations, similar to the case of random alloys. In fact, the Fe-Se/S and Fe-Te distances in the ternary Fe(Se,S)1-x Te x are found to be closer to the respective distances in the binary FeSe/FeS and FeTe systems, showing significant divergence of the local structure from the average one. The observed features are characteristic of ternary random alloys, indicating breaking of the local symmetry in these materials. On the other hand, K0.8Fe1.6Se2 is known for phase separation in an iron-vacancy ordered phase and an in-plane compressed lattice phase. The local structure of these 122-type chalcogenides shows that this system is characterized by a large local disorder. Indeed, the experiments suggest a nanoscale glassy phase in K0.8Fe1.6Se2, with the superconductivity being similar to the granular materials. While the 11-type structure has no spacer layer, the 122-type structure contains intercalated atoms unlike the 1111-type REFeAsO (RE = rare earth) oxypnictides, having well-defined REO spacer layers. It is clear that the interlayer atomic correlations in these iron-based superconducting structures play an important role in structural stability as well as superconductivity and magnetism.

  15. Nanoscale structure and atomic disorder in the iron-based chalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Naurang Lal

    2013-01-01

    The multiband iron-based superconductors have layered structure with a phase diagram characterized by a complex interplay of charge, spin and lattice excitations, with nanoscale atomic structure playing a key role in their fundamental electronic properties. In this paper, we briefly review nanoscale structure and atomic disorder in iron-based chalcogenide superconductors. We focus on the Fe(Se,S)1−xTex (11-type) and K0.8Fe1.6Se2 (122-type) systems, discussing their local structure obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure. Local structure studies on the Fe(Se,S)1−xTex system reveal clear nanoscale phase separation characterized by coexisting components of different atomic configurations, similar to the case of random alloys. In fact, the Fe–Se/S and Fe–Te distances in the ternary Fe(Se,S)1−xTex are found to be closer to the respective distances in the binary FeSe/FeS and FeTe systems, showing significant divergence of the local structure from the average one. The observed features are characteristic of ternary random alloys, indicating breaking of the local symmetry in these materials. On the other hand, K0.8Fe1.6Se2 is known for phase separation in an iron-vacancy ordered phase and an in-plane compressed lattice phase. The local structure of these 122-type chalcogenides shows that this system is characterized by a large local disorder. Indeed, the experiments suggest a nanoscale glassy phase in K0.8Fe1.6Se2, with the superconductivity being similar to the granular materials. While the 11-type structure has no spacer layer, the 122-type structure contains intercalated atoms unlike the 1111-type REFeAsO (RE = rare earth) oxypnictides, having well-defined REO spacer layers. It is clear that the interlayer atomic correlations in these iron-based superconducting structures play an important role in structural stability as well as superconductivity and magnetism. PMID:27877557

  16. Influence of the bath gas on the condensation of supersaturated iron atom vapour at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, A.; Gurentsov, E.; Schulz, C.

    2008-03-01

    The influence of the kind of bath gas and its pressure on the iron nanoparticle formation and growth was investigated experimentally. Iron nanoparticles were synthesized from supersaturated iron vapour generated by ArF excimer laser pulse photolysis of gaseous Fe(CO)5 at room temperature. The particle size was determined by time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TiRe-LII) as a function of time after photolysis at different experimental conditions. Additionally, final particles were sampled and analysed by transmission electron microscopy and by energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. The particle growth rate and the final particle size depended on the bath-gas composition and pressure. Increasing the argon bath-gas pressure accelerated the iron nanoparticle growth rate. In contrast to argon, no influence of helium on the particle growth rate was observed. The experimental results are compared with numerical simulations of particle surface growth, based on the model developed in previous investigations. The simulations indicate that the observed differences in the influence of the bath gas on the particle formation are caused by the species-dependent quenching probability of the active atom-particle complexes by the bath gas.

  17. [Application of solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry to mensuration of brain iron content in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Sheng, Qing-hai; Shi, Zhen-hua; Zhang, Zhi-guo; Duan, Xiang-lin; Chang, Yan-zhong

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, the authors performed the solid sampling and detected the iron levels in cortex, hippocampus and striatum of rat brain by GFAAS. The authors' results showed that there are no remarkable difference between the data obtained by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption and liquid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption. Compared to liquid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption, the sample pre-treatment stage was obviously simplified, the cost was reduced significantly, and the time was shortened significantly in the solid sampling GFAAS. This study will be beneficial to the mensuration of iron content in micro-tissue of animal by solid sampling GFASS.

  18. Cyanide Ligand Assembly by Carbon Atom Transfer to an Iron Nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, Jorge L.; Lin, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Wei-Tsung; ...

    2017-09-21

    The new iron(IV) nitride complex PhB(iPr2Im)3Fe≡N reacts with two equivalents of bis(diisopropylamino)cyclopropenylidene (BAC) to provide PhB(iPr2Im)3Fe(CN)(N2)(BAC). This unusual example of a four-electron reaction involves carbon atom transfer from BAC to create a cyanide ligand along with the alkyne iPr2N-C≡C-NiPr2. The iron complex is in equilibrium with an N2- free species. Further reaction with CO leads to formation of a CO analogue, which can be independently prepared using NaCN as the cyanide source, while reaction with B(C6F5)3 provides the cyanoborane derivative.

  19. Cyanide Ligand Assembly by Carbon Atom Transfer to an Iron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jorge L; Lin, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Wei-Tsung; Pink, Maren; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Gao, Xinfeng; Dickie, Diane A; Smith, Jeremy M

    2017-10-11

    The new iron(IV) nitride complex PhB((i)Pr2Im)3Fe≡N reacts with 2 equiv of bis(diisopropylamino)cyclopropenylidene (BAC) to provide PhB((i)Pr2Im)3Fe(CN)(N2)(BAC). This unusual example of a four-electron reaction involves carbon atom transfer from BAC to create a cyanide ligand along with the alkyne (i)Pr2N-C≡C-N(i)Pr2. The iron complex is in equilibrium with an N2-free species. Further reaction with CO leads to formation of a CO analogue, which can be independently prepared using NaCN as the cyanide source, while reaction with B(C6F5)3 provides the cyanoborane derivative.

  20. New laboratory atomic data for neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements for astrophysics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Juliet C.; Nave, Gillian; Liggins, Florence; Clear, Christian; Ruffoni, Matthew; Sansonetti, Craig

    2015-08-01

    We present new laboratory spectroscopic measurements to produce atomic data for astrophysically important species: neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements.We use high resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometry (FTS) (resolving power up to 2x106 at 200nm) to measure atomic spectra, giving accurate line wavelengths (to a few parts in 108), atomic energy levels, hyperfine structure splitting and log gfs (accurate to a few %) (Ruffoni et al this meeting). These data are vital for astrophysical spectral analyses for: line identification, spectrum synthesis, elemental abundance determinations [eg 1], and disentangling of blends etc. It is not possible to theoretically calculate these atomic data to the accuracy needed for modern astrophysics applications.At Imperial College we have a unique visible-VUV FT spectrometer with short wavelength cut-off of 135nm. We supplement FTS data at shorter wavelengths with spectra recorded on the NIST 10.7m grating spectrograph (with phosphor image or photographic plates) and at longer wavelengths in the IR we use the NIST IR FT spectrometer.An elemental spectrum may contain thousands of spectral lines from the IR to VUV. We use these wavelengths to correct known atomic energy levels, and search for new atomic levels. The result is a classified linelist and accurate atomic energy levels.We present progress on iron group element atomic energy levels and wavelengths for V I and V II [2,3], Co III [4], Cr I, Mn I and Mn II, and Ni II.This work is supported by STFC(UK), The Leverhulme Trust, The Royal Society and NASA.References[1] Bergemann M, Pickering JC & Gehren T,“NLTE analysis of Co I/Co II lines in spectra of cool stars with new laboratory hyperfine splitting constants",MNRAS 401(2) 1334 (2010)[2] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V II”, ApJS 207,13 (2013)[3] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V I",ApJS 192,11 (2011)[4] Smillie DG

  1. Iron analysis in atmospheric water samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in water-methanol.

    PubMed

    Sofikitis, A M; Colin, J L; Desboeufs, K V; Losno, R

    2004-01-01

    To distinguish between Fe(II) and Fe(III) species in atmospheric water samples, we have adapted an analytical procedure based on the formation of a specific complex between Fe(II) and ferrozine (FZ) on a chromatographic column. After elution of Fe(III), the Fe(II) complex is recovered with water-methanol (4:1). The possibility of trace iron measurements in this complex medium by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry has been investigated. A simplex optimization routine was required to complete the development of the analytical method.

  2. Correlated wave functions for the ground and some excited states of the iron atom.

    PubMed

    Buendía, E; Gálvez, F J; Sarsa, A

    2006-04-21

    We study the states arising from the [Ar]4s(2)3d6 and [Ar]4s(1)3d7 configurations of iron atom with explicitly correlated wave functions. The variational wave function is the product of the Jastrow correlation factor times a model function obtained within the parametrized optimized effective potential framework. A systematic analysis of the dependence of both the effective potential and the correlation factor on the configuration and on the term is carried out. The ground state of both, the cation, Fe+, and anion, Fe-, are calculated with correlated wave functions and the ionization potential and the electron affinity are obtained.

  3. Axial ligand tuning of a nonheme iron(IV)–oxo unit for hydrogen atom abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Sastri, Chivukula V.; Lee, Jimin; Oh, Kyungeun; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Junghyun; Jackson, Timothy A.; Ray, Kallol; Hirao, Hajime; Shin, Woonsup; Halfen, Jason A.; Kim, Jinheung; Que, Lawrence; Shaik, Sason; Nam, Wonwoo

    2007-01-01

    The reactivities of mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)–oxo complexes bearing different axial ligands, [FeIV(O)(TMC)(X)]n+ [where TMC is 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and X is NCCH3 (1-NCCH3), CF3COO− (1-OOCCF3), or N3− (1-N3)], and [FeIV(O)(TMCS)]+ (1′-SR) (where TMCS is 1-mercaptoethyl-4,8,11-trimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane), have been investigated with respect to oxo-transfer to PPh3 and hydrogen atom abstraction from phenol OH and alkylaromatic CH bonds. These reactivities were significantly affected by the identity of the axial ligands, but the reactivity trends differed markedly. In the oxidation of PPh3, the reactivity order of 1-NCCH3 > 1-OOCCF3 > 1-N3 > 1′-SR was observed, reflecting a decrease in the electrophilicity of iron(IV)–oxo unit upon replacement of CH3CN with an anionic axial ligand. Surprisingly, the reactivity order was inverted in the oxidation of alkylaromatic CH and phenol OH bonds, i.e., 1′-SR > 1-N3 > 1-OOCCF3 > 1-NCCH3. Furthermore, a good correlation was observed between the reactivities of iron(IV)–oxo species in H atom abstraction reactions and their reduction potentials, Ep,c, with the most reactive 1′-SR complex exhibiting the lowest potential. In other words, the more electron-donating the axial ligand is, the more reactive the iron(IV)–oxo species becomes in H atom abstraction. Quantum mechanical calculations show that a two-state reactivity model applies to this series of complexes, in which a triplet ground state and a nearby quintet excited-state both contribute to the reactivity of the complexes. The inverted reactivity order in H atom abstraction can be rationalized by a decreased triplet-quintet gap with the more electron-donating axial ligand, which increases the contribution of the much more reactive quintet state and enhances the overall reactivity. PMID:18048327

  4. Hardening due to copper precipitates in alpha-iron studied by atomic-scale modelling.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, David J; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2004-01-01

    We present results of a large-scale atomic-level study of dislocation-precipitate interaction. We have considered a 1/2 <111> edge dislocation gliding in {alpha}-iron containing coherent copper precipitates of size from 0.7 to 6 nm over a temperature range from 0 to 450 K. The results demonstrate that some features are qualitatively consistent with earlier theoretical conclusions, e.g. the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) is proportional to L{sup -1} and ln(D), where L and D are precipitate spacing and diameter. Other features, which are intrinsic to the atomic-level nature of the dislocation-precipitate interaction, include strong dependence of the CRSS on temperature, dislocation climb and precipitate phase transformation.

  5. Zeeman relaxation of cold atomic iron and nickel in collisions with {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Cort; Newman, Bonna; Kleppner, Daniel; Greytak, Thomas J.; Brahms, Nathan; Doyle, John M.

    2010-06-15

    We have measured the ratio {gamma} of the diffusion cross section to the angular momentum reorientation cross section in the colliding Fe-{sup 3}He and Ni-{sup 3}He systems. Nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) atoms are introduced via laser ablation into a cryogenically cooled experimental cell containing cold (<1 K) {sup 3}He buffer gas. Elastic collisions rapidly cool the translational temperature of the ablated atoms to the {sup 3}He temperature. {gamma} is extracted by measuring the decays of the atomic Zeeman sublevels. For our experimental conditions, thermal energy is comparable to the Zeeman splitting. As a result, thermal excitations between Zeeman sublevels significantly impact the observed decay. To determine {gamma} accurately, we introduce a model of Zeeman-state dynamics that includes thermal excitations. We find {gamma}{sub Ni-}{sup 3}{sub He}=5x10{sup 3} and {gamma}{sub Fe-}{sup 3}{sub He{<=}}3x10{sup 3} at 0.75 K in a 0.8-T magnetic field. These measurements are interpreted in the context of submerged shell suppression of spin relaxation, as studied previously in transition metals and rare-earth-metal atoms [C. I. Hancox, S. C. Doret, M. T. Hummon, R. V. Krems, and J. M. Doyle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 013201 (2005); C. I. Hancox, S. C. Doret, M. T. Hummon, L. Luo, and J. M. Doyle, Nature (London) 431, 281 (2004); A. Buchachenko, G. Chaasiski, and M. Szczniak, Eur. Phys. J. D 45, 147 (2007)].

  6. ON THE EFFECT OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE SCATTERING OF PARENT BODIES OF IRON METEORITE FROM THE TERRESTRIAL PLANET REGION INTO THE ASTEROID BELT: A CONCEPT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2012-04-20

    In their model for the origin of the parent bodies of iron meteorites, Bottke et al. proposed differentiated planetesimals, formed in 1-2 AU during the first 1.5 Myr, as the parent bodies, and suggested that these objects and their fragments were scattered into the asteroid belt as a result of interactions with planetary embryos. Although viable, this model does not include the effect of a giant planet that might have existed or been growing in the outer regions. We present the results of a concept study where we have examined the effect of a planetary body in the orbit of Jupiter on the early scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial region into the asteroid belt. We integrated the orbits of a large battery of planetesimals in a disk of planetary embryos and studied their evolutions for different values of the mass of the planet. Results indicate that when the mass of the planet is smaller than 10 M{sub Circled-Plus }, its effects on the interactions among planetesimals and planetary embryos are negligible. However, when the planet mass is between 10 and 50 M{sub Circled-Plus }, simulations point to a transitional regime with {approx}50 M{sub Circled-Plus} being the value for which the perturbing effect of the planet can no longer be ignored. Simulations also show that further increase of the mass of the planet strongly reduces the efficiency of the scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial planet region into the asteroid belt. We present the results of our simulations and discuss their possible implications for the time of giant planet formation.

  7. Investigating the role of atomic hydrogen on chloroethene reactions with iron using tafel analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiankang; Farrell, James

    2003-09-01

    Metallic iron filings are commonly employed as reducing agents in permeable barriers used for remediating groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Reactions of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with zerovalent iron were investigated to determine the role of atomic hydrogen in their reductive dechlorination. Experiments simultaneously measuring dechlorination and iron corrosion rates were performed to determine the fractions of the total current going toward dechlorination and hydrogen evolution. Corrosion rates were determined using Tafel analysis, and dechlorination rates were determined from rates of byproduct generation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the number of reactions that controlled the observed rates of chlorocarbon disappearance, as well as the role of atomic hydrogen in TCE and PCE reduction. Comparison of iron corrosion rates with those for TCE reaction showed that TCE reduction occurred almost exclusively via atomic hydrogen at low pH values and via atomic hydrogen and direct electron transfer at neutral pH values. In contrast, reduction of PCE occurred primarily via direct electron transfer at both low and neutral pH values. At low pH values and micromolar concentrations, TCE reaction rates were faster than those for PCE due to more rapid reduction of TCE by atomic hydrogen. At neutral pH values and millimolar concentrations, PCE reaction rates were faster than those for TCE. This shift in relative reaction rates was attributed to a decreasing contribution of the atomic hydrogen reaction mechanism with increasing halocarbon concentrations and pH values. The EIS data showed that all the rate limitations for TCE and PCE dechlorination occurred during the transfer of the first two electrons. Results from this study show that differences in relative reaction rates of TCE and PCE with iron are dependent on the significance of the reduction pathway involving atomic hydrogen.

  8. Spin-polarized metastable-atom deexcitation spectroscopy study of Xenon-adsorbed iron surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Yasushi; Kurahashi, Mitsunori; Suzuki, Taku; Sun, Xia; Wang, Zhongping

    2007-03-01

    The electron spin polarization at the interface between nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic medias is one of the essential factors that may alter the spin transport phenomena. To investigate fundamental aspects of induced spin polarization we have examined the adsorbate-covered magnetic surfaces by means of spin polarized metastable-atom deexcitation spectroscopy (SPMDS). Use of spin-polarized metastable helium atoms in triplet states moving at thermal energies gives rise to the ultimate surface sensitivity. Although Xenon can adsorb on surfaces at low temperatures by the van der Waals force, no electron exchange with surfaces, especially no spin interaction, is expected because of its closed shell structure. SPMDS spectra measured for Xenon-adsorbed iron surfaces show three prominent peaks that are the same as those previously reported for other surfaces by D. M. Oro, et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49 (1994) 4703]. Two peaks (^2P1/2, ^2P3/2) at higher kinetic energies exhibit clear spin asymmetries while the other low energy peak has no appreciable spin asymmetry. The spin asymmetries will be discussed on the basis of spin polarization and deexcitation processes of metastable atoms.

  9. Zeeman relaxation of cold atomic iron and nickel in collisions with He3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Cort; Newman, Bonna; Brahms, Nathan; Doyle, John M.; Kleppner, Daniel; Greytak, Thomas J.

    2010-06-01

    We have measured the ratio γ of the diffusion cross section to the angular momentum reorientation cross section in the colliding Fe-He3 and Ni-He3 systems. Nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) atoms are introduced via laser ablation into a cryogenically cooled experimental cell containing cold (<1 K) He3 buffer gas. Elastic collisions rapidly cool the translational temperature of the ablated atoms to the He3 temperature. γ is extracted by measuring the decays of the atomic Zeeman sublevels. For our experimental conditions, thermal energy is comparable to the Zeeman splitting. As a result, thermal excitations between Zeeman sublevels significantly impact the observed decay. To determine γ accurately, we introduce a model of Zeeman-state dynamics that includes thermal excitations. We find γNi-3He=5×103 and γFe-3He⩽3×103 at 0.75 K in a 0.8-T magnetic field. These measurements are interpreted in the context of submerged shell suppression of spin relaxation, as studied previously in transition metals and rare-earth-metal atoms [C. I. Hancox, S. C. Doret, M. T. Hummon, R. V. Krems, and J. M. Doyle, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.94.013201 94, 013201 (2005); C. I. Hancox, S. C. Doret, M. T. Hummon, L. Luo, and J. M. Doyle, Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature02938 431, 281 (2004); A. Buchachenko, G. Chaasiski, and M. Szczniak, Eur. Phys. J. DEPJDF61434-606010.1140/epjd/e2006-00263-3 45, 147 (2007)].

  10. Exceedingly Fast Oxygen Atom Transfer to Olefins via a Catalytically Competent Nonheme Iron Species.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Plana, Joan; Aguinaco, Almudena; Belda, Raquel; García-España, Enrique; Basallote, Manuel G; Company, Anna; Costas, Miquel

    2016-05-17

    The reaction of [Fe(CF3 SO3 )2 (PyNMe3 )] with excess peracetic acid at -40 °C leads to the accumulation of a metastable compound that exists as a pair of electromeric species, [Fe(III) (OOAc)(PyNMe3 )](2+) and [Fe(V) (O)(OAc)(PyNMe3 )](2+) , in fast equilibrium. Stopped-flow UV/Vis analysis confirmed that oxygen atom transfer (OAT) from these electromeric species to olefinic substrates is exceedingly fast, forming epoxides with stereoretention. The impact of the electronic and steric properties of the substrate on the reaction rate could be elucidated, and the relative reactivities determined for the catalytic oxidations could be reproduced by kinetic studies. The observed fast reaction rates and high selectivities demonstrate that this metastable compound is a truly competent OAT intermediate of relevance for nonheme iron catalyzed epoxidations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Specific incorporation of chalcogenide bridge atoms in molybdenum/tungsten-iron-sulfur single cubane clusters.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Amit; Holm, R H

    2011-11-07

    An extensive series of heterometal-iron-sulfur single cubane-type clusters with core oxidation levels [MFe(3)S(3)Q](3+,2+) (M = Mo, W; Q = S, Se) has been prepared by means of a new method of cluster self-assembly. The procedure utilizes the assembly system [((t)Bu(3)tach)M(VI)S(3)]/FeCl(2)/Na(2)Q/NaSR in acetonitrile/THF and affords product clusters in 30-50% yield. The trisulfido precursor acts as a template, binding Fe(II) under reducing conditions and supplying the MS(3) unit of the product. The system leads to specific incorporation of a μ(3)-chalcogenide from an external source (Na(2)Q) and affords the products [((t)Bu(3)tach)MFe(3)S(3)QL(3)](0/1-) (L = Cl(-), RS(-)), among which are the first MFe(3)S(3)Se clusters prepared. Some 16 clusters have been prepared, 13 of which have been characterized by X-ray structure determinations including the incomplete cubane [((t)Bu(3)tach)MoFe(2)S(3)Cl(2)(μ(2)-SPh)], a possible trapped intermediate in the assembly process. Comparisons of structural and electronic features of clusters differing only in atom Q at one cubane vertex are provided. In comparative pairs of complexes differing only in Q, placement of one selenide atom in the core increases core volumes by about 2% over the Q = S case, sets the order Q = Se > S in Fe-Q bond lengths and Q = S > Se in Fe-Q-Fe bond angles, causes small positive shifts in redox potentials, and has an essentially nil effect on (57)Fe isomer shifts. Iron mean oxidation states and charge distributions are assigned to most clusters from isomer shifts. ((t)Bu(3)tach = 1,3,5-tert-butyl-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Optimized determination of iron in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olalla, M; Cruz González, M; Cabrera, C; López, M C

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the different methods of sample preparation for the determination of iron in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization; results are also reported for the practical application of these methods to the analysis of commercial samples produced in Spain. The methods examined include dealcoholization and dry and wet mineralization treatment using different acids and/or mixtures of them, both with and without heating. The sensitivity, detection limit, accuracy, precision, and selectivity of each method were established. The best results were obtained for wet mineralization with heated acid (HNO3-H2SO4); the results for table wines had an accuracy of 97.5-101.6%, a relative standard deviation of 3.51%, a detection limit of 19.2 micrograms/L, and a determination limit of 32.0 micrograms/L. The method was also sufficiently sensitive and selective. It was applied to the determination of iron in grape juice, different types of wines, and beverages with high alcoholic content, all of which are produced and widely consumed in Spain. The values obtained ranged from 3.394 +/- 2.15 mg/L for the juice, 2.938 +/- 1.47 mg/L for the white wines, 19.470 +/- 5.43 mg/L for the sweet wines, 0.311 +/- 0.07 mg/L for the brandies, and 0.564 +/- 0.12 mg/L for the anisettes. Thus, the method is useful for routine analysis in the quality control of these beverages.

  13. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  14. How Many Atomic Layers of Zinc Are in a Galvanized Iron Coating? An Experiment for General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Shui-Ping

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an experiment using a novel gasometric assembly to determine the thickness and number of atomic layers of zinc coating on galvanized iron substrates. Students solved this problem through three stages. In the first stage, students were encouraged to find a suitable acidic concentration through the guided-inquiry approach. In…

  15. How Many Atomic Layers of Zinc Are in a Galvanized Iron Coating? An Experiment for General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Shui-Ping

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an experiment using a novel gasometric assembly to determine the thickness and number of atomic layers of zinc coating on galvanized iron substrates. Students solved this problem through three stages. In the first stage, students were encouraged to find a suitable acidic concentration through the guided-inquiry approach. In…

  16. Spin-induced band modifications of graphene through intercalation of magnetic iron atoms.

    PubMed

    Sung, S J; Yang, J W; Lee, P R; Kim, J G; Ryu, M T; Park, H M; Lee, G; Hwang, C C; Kim, Kwang S; Kim, J S; Chung, J W

    2014-04-07

    Intercalation of magnetic iron atoms through graphene formed on the SiC(0001) surface is found to induce significant changes in the electronic properties of graphene due mainly to the Fe-induced asymmetries in charge as well as spin distribution. From our synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy data together with ab initio calculations, we observe that the Fe-induced charge asymmetry results in the formation of a quasi-free-standing bilayer graphene while the spin asymmetry drives multiple spin-split bands. We find that Fe adatoms are best intercalated upon annealing at 600 °C, exhibiting split linear π-bands, characteristic of a bilayer graphene, but much diffused. Subsequent changes in the C 1s, Si 2p, and Fe 3p core levels are consistently described in terms of Fe-intercalation. Our calculations together with a spin-dependent tight binding model ascribe the diffuse nature of the π-bands to the multiple spin-split bands originated from the spin-injected carbon atoms residing only in the lower graphene layer.

  17. Iron(II)-Catalyzed Iron Atom Exchange and Mineralogical Changes in Iron-rich Organic Freshwater Flocs: An Iron Isotope Tracer Study.

    PubMed

    ThomasArrigo, Laurel K; Mikutta, Christian; Byrne, James; Kappler, Andreas; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2017-06-20

    In freshwater wetlands, organic flocs are often found enriched in trace metal(loid)s associated with poorly crystalline Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. Under reducing conditions, flocs may become exposed to aqueous Fe(II), triggering Fe(II)-catalyzed mineral transformations and trace metal(loid) release. In this study, pure ferrihydrite, a synthetic ferrihydrite-polygalacturonic acid coprecipitate (16.7 wt % C), and As- (1280 and 1230 mg/kg) and organic matter (OM)-rich (18.1 and 21.8 wt % C) freshwater flocs dominated by ferrihydrite and nanocrystalline lepidocrocite were reacted with an isotopically enriched (57)Fe(II) solution (0.1 or 1.0 mM Fe(II)) at pH 5.5 and 7. Using a combination of wet chemistry, Fe isotope analysis, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we followed the Fe atom exchange kinetics and secondary mineral formation over 1 week. When reacted with Fe(II) at pH 7, pure ferrihydrite exhibited rapid Fe atom exchange at both Fe(II) concentrations, reaching 76 and 89% atom exchange in experiments with 0.1 and 1 mM Fe(II), respectively. XAS data revealed that it transformed into goethite (21%) at the lower Fe(II) concentration and into lepidocrocite (73%) and goethite (27%) at the higher Fe(II) concentration. Despite smaller Fe mineral particles in the coprecipitate and flocs as compared to pure ferrihydrite (inferred from Mössbauer-derived blocking temperatures), these samples showed reduced Fe atom exchange (9-30% at pH 7) and inhibited secondary mineral formation. No release of As was recorded for Fe(II)-reacted flocs. Our findings indicate that carbohydrate-rich OM in flocs stabilizes poorly crystalline Fe minerals against Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation by surface-site blockage and/or organic Fe(II) complexation. This hinders the extent of Fe atom exchange at mineral surfaces and secondary mineral formation, which may consequently impair Fe(II)-activated trace metal(loid) release. Thus, under short

  18. Fe2+ catalyzed iron atom exchange and re-crystallization in a tropical soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, Viktor; Meile, Christof; Scherer, Michelle M.; Pasakarnis, Timothy S.; Thompson, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous ferrous iron (Fe2+(aq)) is known to transfer electrons and exchange structural positions with solid-phase ferric (FeIII) atoms in many Fe minerals. However, this process has not been demonstrated in soils or sediments. In a 28-day sterile experiment, we reacted 57Fe-enriched Fe2+(aq) (57/54Fe = 5.884 ± 0.003) with a tropical soil (natural abundance 57/54Fe = 0.363 ± 0.004) under anoxic conditions and tracked 57/54Fe in the aqueous phase and in sequential 0.5 M and 7 M HCl extractions targeting surface-adsorbed and bulk-soil Fe, respectively; we also analyzed the reacted soil with 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. In 28 days, the aqueous and bulk pools both moved ∼7% toward the isotopic equilibrium (57/54Fe = 1.33). Using a kinetic model, we calculate final adsorption-corrected 57/54Fe ratios of 5.56 ± 0.05 and 0.43 ± 0.03 in the aqueous and bulk pools, respectively. The aqueous and surface/labile Fe initially exchanged atoms rapidly (10-80 mmol kg-1 d-1) decreasing to a near constant rate of 1 mmol kg-1 d-1 that was close to the 0.74 mmol kg-1 d-1 exchange-rate between the surface and bulk pools. Thus, after 28 days we calculate aqueous Fe has exchanged with 20.1 mmol kg-1 of bulk Fe atoms (1.9% of total Fe) in addition to the 17.0 mmol kg-1 of surface/labile Fe atoms (1.6% of total Fe), which have likely turned over several times during our experiment. Extrapolating these rates, we calculate a hypothetical whole-soil turnover time of ∼3.6 yrs. Furthermore, Mössbauer spectroscopy indicates the soil-incorporated 57Fe label re-crystallized as short-range-ordered (SRO) FeIII-oxyhydroxides: our model suggests this pool could turnover in less than seven months via Fe2+-catalyzed recrystallization. Thus, we conclude Fe atom exchange can occur in soils at rates fast enough to impact ecological processes reliant on Fe minerals, but sufficiently slow that complete Fe mineral turnover is unlikely, except perhaps in permanently anoxic environments.

  19. Mesoscale effects in electrochemical conversion: coupling of chemistry to atomic- and nanoscale structure in iron-based electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wiaderek, Kamila M; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Pereira, Nathalie; Ilavsky, Jan; Amatucci, Glenn G; Chupas, Peter J; Chapman, Karena W

    2014-04-30

    The complex coupling of atomic, chemical, and electronic transformations across multiple length scales underlies the performance of electrochemical energy storage devices. Here, the coupling of chemistry with atomic- and nanoscale structure in iron conversion electrodes is resolved by combining pair distribution function (PDF) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis for a series of Fe fluorides, oxyfluorides, and oxides. The data show that the anion chemistry of the initial electrode influences the abundance of atomic defects in the Fe atomic lattice. This, in turn, is linked to different atom mobilities and propensity for particle growth. Competitive nanoparticle growth in mixed anion systems contributes to a distinct nanostructure, without the interconnected metallic nanoparticles formed for single anion systems.

  20. Determining the Effect of Environmental Conditions on Iron Corrosion by Atomic Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malel, Esteban; Shalev, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Iron corrosion is a complex process that occurs when iron is exposed to oxygen and humidity and is exacerbated by the presence of chloride ions. The deterioration of iron structures or other components can be costly to society and is usually evaluated by following the properties of the corroding material. Here, the iron ions released into solution…

  1. Determining the Effect of Environmental Conditions on Iron Corrosion by Atomic Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malel, Esteban; Shalev, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Iron corrosion is a complex process that occurs when iron is exposed to oxygen and humidity and is exacerbated by the presence of chloride ions. The deterioration of iron structures or other components can be costly to society and is usually evaluated by following the properties of the corroding material. Here, the iron ions released into solution…

  2. Belt-driven conveyor belts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    An intermediate belt drive system offers a number of advantages over conventional systems, including lower power requirements and the ability to use lower quality, cheaper, conveyor belts. The advantages of a correctly designed belt conveyor with end pulley drives are included.

  3. Petrological and geochemical features of the Jingtieshan banded iron formation (BIF): A unique type of BIF from the Northern Qilian Orogenic Belt, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Zuo-Heng; Duan, Shi-Gang; Zhao, Xin-Min

    2015-12-01

    The Jingtieshan banded iron formation (BIF) is located in the Northern Qilian Orogenic Belt (NQOB) in NW China. The BIFs are hosted in Mesoproterozoic Jingtieshan Group, a dominantly clastic-carbonate sedimentary formation, and was metamorphosed to lower greenschist facies. The Jingtieshan BIFs include oxide-, carbonate- and mixed carbonate-oxide facies, and consist of alternating iron-rich and silica-rich bands. The BIFs are composed essentially of specularite and jasper, with minor carbonate minerals and barite. The SiO2 + Fe2O3 content is markedly high in the oxide facies BIF, followed by FeO, CO2 and Ba, with the other elements usually lower than 1%, suggesting that the original chemical sediments were composed of Fe, Si, CO32- and Ba. The positive correlation between Al2O3, TiO2 and Zr in the BIFs indicates that these chemical sediments incorporate minor detrital components. Oxide facies BIF shows low HFSE, low ∑REE and low Y/Ho. The Post Archean Australian Shale-normalized REE patterns for Jingtieshan BIFs are characterized slight LREE depletion, strong positive Eu anomalies and lack of significant negative Ce anomalies. Siderite in the carbonate- and mixed carbonate-oxide facies BIF shows negative δ13C values varying from -8.4‰ to -3.0‰, and δ18O values show a range of -16.6‰ to -11.7‰. The geochemical signatures and carbon-oxygen isotopes suggest origin from high-temperature hydrothermal fluids with weak seawater signature for the sediments of Jingtieshan BIFs. The absence of negative Ce anomalies and the high Fe3+/∑Fe ratios of the oxide facies BIF do not support ocean anoxia. In contrast to the three main types (Algoma-, Superior- and Rapitan-type) of global BIFs, the Jingtieshan BIFs represent a unique type with features similar to those of sedimentary-exhalative mineralization.

  4. Energy of the Isolated Metastable Iron-Nickel FCC Nanocluster with a Carbon Atom in the Tetragonal Interstice.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Natalya V; Nedolya, Anatoliy V

    2017-12-01

    The energy of the isolated iron-nickel nanocluster was calculated by molecular mechanics method using Lennard-Jones potential. The cluster included a carbon atom that drifted from an inside octahedral interstice to a tetrahedral interstice in [Formula: see text] direction and after that in <222> direction to the surface. In addition, one of 14 iron atoms was replaced by a nickel atom, the position of which was changing during simulation.The energy of the nanocluster was estimated at the different interatomic distances. As a result of simulation, the optimal interatomic distances of Fe-Ni-C nanocluster was chosen for the simulation, in which height of the potential barrier was maximal and face-centered cubic (FCC) nanocluster was the most stable.It is shown that there were three main positions of a nickel atom that significantly affected nanocluster's energy.The calculation results indicated that position of the carbon atom in the octahedral interstice was more energetically favorable than tetrahedral interstice in the case of FCC nanocluster. On the other side, the potential barrier was smaller in the direction [Formula: see text] than in the direction <022>.This indicates that there are two ways for carbon atom to drift to the surface of the nanocluster.

  5. The Iron PROJECT/RmaX Network: Atomic Calculations for the Iron-Peak Elements and for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoxin; Delahaye, Franck; Nahar, Sultana; Oelgetz, Justin; Pradhan, Anil; Zhang, Honglin; Bautista, Manuel

    2001-05-01

    We report the latest results from the Iron Project (IP) obtained by the Ohio State Atomic Astrophysics group. The IP is devoted to the study of collisional and radiative atomic processes primarily for the iron-group elements for various applications in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The RmaX network is a part of IP focused on inner-shell transitions and X-ray spectroscopy. The processes of interest are: electron impact excitation, photoionization, transition probabilities and electron-ion recombination. The large-scale atomic calculations for the heavy atomic systems are carried out with the close coupling R-matrix method, including relativistic effects in the Breit-Pauli approximation. Selected results, and new physical features, are reported from recent work on collision strengths, radiative transition probabilities, photoionization cross sections, and unified electron-ion recombination rates for Fe XVII, Fe XXIV, Fe XXV, and Ni II. For example, extensive and dense resonance structures are found in electron excitation collision strengths for Ne-like Fe XVII that differ considerably from those in the Distorted Wave approximation, and should significantly affect X-ray plasma diagnostics. (Partial support from the NSF and NASA is acknowledged.)

  6. Inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric method is described for the determination of six elements in a variety of geological materials. Sixteen reference materials are analysed by this technique to demonstrate its use in geochemical exploration. Samples are decomposed with nitric, hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids, and the residue dissolved in hydrochloric acid and diluted to volume. The elements are determined in two groups based on compatibility of instrument operating conditions and consideration of crustal abundance levels. Cadmium, Cu, Pb and Zn are determined as a group in the 50-ml sample solution under one set of instrument conditions with the use of scatter correction. Limitations of the scatter correction technique used with the fluorescence instrument are discussed. Iron and Mn are determined together using another set of instrumental conditions on a 1-50 dilution of the sample solution without the use of scatter correction. The ranges of concentration (??g g-1) of these elements in the sample that can be determined are: Cd, 0.3-500; Cu, 0.4-500; Fe, 85-250 000; Mn, 45-100 000; Pb, 5-10 000; and Zn, 0.4-300. The precision of the method is usually less than 5% relative standard deviation (RSD) over a wide concentration range and acceptable accuracy is shown by the agreement between values obtained and those recommended for the reference materials.

  7. Simple-Cubic Carbon Frameworks with Atomically Dispersed Iron Dopants toward High-Efficiency Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biwei; Wang, Xinxia; Zou, Jinxiang; Yan, Yancui; Xie, Songhai; Hu, Guangzhi; Li, Yanguang; Dong, Angang

    2017-03-08

    Iron and nitrogen codoped carbons (Fe-N-C) have attracted increasingly greater attention as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Although challenging, the synthesis of Fe-N-C catalysts with highly dispersed and fully exposed active sites is of critical importance for improving the ORR activity. Here, we report a new type of graphitic Fe-N-C catalysts featuring numerous Fe single atoms anchored on a three-dimensional simple-cubic carbon framework. The Fe-N-C catalyst, derived from self-assembled Fe3O4 nanocube superlattices, was prepared by in situ ligand carbonization followed by acid etching and ammonia activation. Benefiting from its homogeneously dispersed and fully accessible active sites, highly graphitic nature, and enhanced mass transport, our Fe-N-C catalyst outperformed Pt/C and many previously reported Fe-N-C catalysts for ORR. Furthermore, when used for constructing the cathode for zinc-air batteries, our Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited current and power densities comparable to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst.

  8. Observation of Nanometric Silicon Oxide Bifilms in a Water-Atomized Hypereutectic Cast Iron Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Mathieu; Christopherson, Denis; L'Espérance, Gilles

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the reasons for the irregular structure of primary graphite nodules that were formed in a hypereutectic cast iron powder during water atomization. The graphite nodules contain a significant amount of micron-sized pores and multiple nanometric voids that formed from silicon oxide bifilms. The bifilms theory is often used to explain the mechanisms responsible for the presence of pores in castings. However, even if many results presented in the literature tend to corroborate the existence of bifilms, to this date, only indirect evidences of their existence were presented. The observations presented in this paper are the first to show the double-sided nature of these defects. These observations support the bifilms theory and give an explanation for the presence of porosities in castings. The bifilms were used as substrate for graphite growth during solidification. The irregular structure of the graphite nodules is a consequence of the rather random structure of the bifilms that were introduced in the melt as a result of turbulences on the surface of the melt during pouring. The confirmation of the existence of bifilms can contribute to the understanding of the mechanical properties of various metallic parts.

  9. Exchange interactions and the state of iron atoms in Bi3Nb1-xFexO7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chezhina, N. V.; Korolev, D. A.; Zhuk, N. A.; Lutoev, V. P.; Makeev, B. A.

    2017-03-01

    On the basis of the results of magnetic susceptibility and ESR studies of the Bi3Nb1-xFexO7-δ solid solutions iron atoms in the solid solutions of cubic modification of bismuth niobate were found to exist as Fe(III) monomers and exchange bound Fe(III)-O-Fe(III) dimers with antiferro- and ferromagnetic type of superexchange. The exchange parameters and the distribution of monomers and dimers in the solid solutions were calculated as a function of paramagnetic atom content.

  10. Sulfur and iron diagenesis in temperate unsteady sediments of the East China Sea inner shelf and a comparison with tropical mobile mud belts (MMBs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mao-Xu; Chen, Ke-Ke; Yang, Gui-Peng; Fan, De-Jiang; Li, Tie

    2016-11-01

    Redox cycling of iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) exerts profound influences on fates of numerous elements in coastal marine sediments. In this study, S and Fe cycling and its geochemical expressions in the East China Sea (ECS) inner shelf, a representative of temperate mobile mud belts (MMBs), were characterized and compared with tropical counterparts (the Amazon shelf and the Gulf of Papua). Fe and S speciation consistently points to the dominance of authigenic nonsulfidized Fe(II) phases (i.e., poorly crystalline clays (PCCs) and carbonates) and the prevalence of Fe redox cycling in the suboxic or weakly sulfidic regimes of the ECS-MMBs. High contents of authigenic magnetite may be a common diagenetic expression in all MMBs. Compared to the tropical MMBs, three main differences of diagenetic expressions in the ECS-MMBs are (i) light 34Spyrite in the ECS-MMB versus characteristically heavy 34Spyrite in the Amazon shelf MMBs; (ii) lower total reactive Fe (FeTR), total diagenetic Fe(II), and ratio of FeTR to total Fe in the ECS-MMBs; and (iii) Fe(II) carbonates and PCCs are equally important sinks for nonsulfidized Fe(II) in the ECS-MMBs, whereas PCCs are the predominant sink in the tropical counterparts. These differences are ascribable to factors including low degradability of organic matter, small diffusion scales, less intense chemical weathering in the drainage basin, and/or weaker reverse weathering in the ECS-MMBs. Despite the differences above, Fe and S diagenetic expressions that characterize the prevalence of Fe redox cycling in the unsteady suboxic regimes are shared by the ECS-MMBs and tropical MMBs.

  11. 3D polymer hydrogel for high-performance atomic iron-rich catalysts for oxygen reduction in acidic media

    DOE PAGES

    Qiao, Zhi; Zhang, Hanguang; Karakalos, Stavros; ...

    2017-08-03

    Current platinum group metal (PGM)-free carbon nanocomposite catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic electrolyte often suffer from rapid degradation associated with carbon corrosion due to the use of large amount of amorphoous carbon black supports. Here, we developed a new concept of using freestanding 3D hydrogel to design support-free Fe-N-C catalysts. A 3D polyaniline (PANI)-based hydrogel was used for preparing a new type of single atomic iron site-rich catalyst, which has exhibited exceptionally enhanced activity and stability compared to conventional Fe-N-C catalysts supported on amorphous carbon blacks. The achieved performance metric on the hydrogel PANI-Fe catalysts ismore » one of the best ever reported PGM-free catalysts, reaching a half-wave potential up to 0.83 V vs. RHE and only leaving 30 mV gap with Pt/C catalysts (60 μgPt/cm2) in challenging acidic media. Remarkable ORR stability was accomplished as well on the same catalyst evidenced by using harsh potential cycling tests. The well dispersion of atomic iron into partially graphitized carbon, featured with dominance of micropores and porous network structures, is capable of accommodating increased number of active sites, strengthening local bonding among iron, nitrogen and carbon, and facilitating mass transfer. The 3D polymer hydrogel approach would be a new pathway to advance PGM-free catalysts.« less

  12. A slurry sampling method for the determination of iron and zinc in baby food by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2012-01-01

    A slurry sampling method is proposed for the determination of iron and zinc in baby food by flame atomic absorption spectrometry without sample digestion prior to analysis. The effect of slurry concentration (the ratio of solid sample to total slurry volume), different acids at various concentrations as diluent and the addition of dispersant on accuracy and precision were investigated. The samples were dried at 105 °C overnight and ground using an agate mortar. To obtain quantitative recoveries, 500 mg of sample was slurried in 20 ml of 0.05% Triton X-114 containing 0.1 M HNO(3), homogenised using a high-performance overhead disperser at 15,000 rpm for 5 min and directly aspirated into the flame. The accuracy of the method was tested by determination of analytes in various certified reference materials. The limits of detection of the method (N = 10; 3σ) for iron and zinc were 5.5 and 3.4 µg g(-1), respectively, using a very dilute slurry of baby food, which gave a very low background signal. Finally, the proposed method was applied to the determination of iron and zinc in different baby food samples obtained from markets in Turkey. The range of iron and zinc content for the samples were 33-76 and 15-73 µg g(-1), respectively.

  13. Iron atoms redistribution in oxide films of Zr-Fe, Zr-Fe-Cu alloys during corrosion in autoclave at 350°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, V.; Bateev, A.

    2016-04-01

    The data on changes of iron atoms state in the oxide films of binary Zr-1.24 mas.%Fe and ternary Zr-1.39 mas.%Fe-0.60 mas.%Cu zirconium alloys are obtained. Alloys are subjected to corrosion tests under autoclave conditions at 350°C temperature in a steam-water environment under pressure p = 16.8 MPa. In initial specimens of the alloys the iron atoms are in the form of intermetallic compounds. In oxide films the decomposition of intermetallic compounds and formation of new compounds occurs with structural phase distortion. In the oxide films metallic the metallic iron particles α-Fe, iron oxide in the form of hematite α-Fe2O3, solid solutions of iron ions in ZrO2 are formed. The phase composition of the oxide films depends on the alloy composition and changes during the growth process of the oxide film.

  14. Atomic Layer Deposition of Iron Sulfide and Its Application as a Catalyst in the Hydrogenation of Azobenzenes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Youdong; Guo, Zheng; Li, Hao; Su, Yantao; Wang, Xinwei

    2017-03-13

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of iron sulfide (FeSx ) is reported for the first time. The deposition process employs bis(N,N'-di-tert-butylacetamidinato)iron(II) and H2 S as the reactants and produces fairly pure, smooth, and well-crystallized FeSx thin films following an ideal self-limiting ALD growth behavior. The FeSx films can be uniformly and conformally deposited into deep narrow trenches with aspect ratios as high as 10:1, which highlights the broad applicability of this ALD process for engineering the surface of complex 3D nanostructures in general. Highly uniform nanoscale FeSx coatings on porous γ-Al2 O3 powder were also prepared. This compound shows excellent catalytic activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of azo compounds under mild reaction conditions, demonstrating the promise of ALD FeSx as a catalyst for organic reactions.

  15. In situ measurement of osmium concentrations in iron meteorites by resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.; Pellin, M. J.; Calaway, W. F.; Young, C. E.; Gruen, D. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1990-03-01

    Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for in situ quantitative measurement of Os with a spatial resolution of about 70 microns. A linear correlation between Os(+) signal intensity and the known Os concentration was observed over a range of nearly 10,000 in Os concentration with an accuracy of about + or - 10 percent, a minimum detection limit of 7 parts per billion atomic, and a useful yield of 1 percent. Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms samples the dominant neutral-fraction of sputtered atoms and utilizes multiphoton resonance ionization to achieve high sensitivity and to eliminate atomic and molecular interferences.

  16. A flow-batch internal standard procedure for iron determination in hydrated ethanol fuel by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    da Silva, José Edson; da Silva, Fábio André; Pimentel, M Fernanda; Honorato, Ricardo Saldanha; da Silva, Valdinete Lins; Montenegro, Maria da Conceição B S M; Araújo, Alberto N

    2006-10-15

    A flow-batch manifold coupled to a flame atomic absorption spectrometer was evaluated to assess the iron content by the internal standard method in hydrated ethanol used as fuel in automotive industry. For this assessment official methods require calibration procedures with matrix matching, making it difficult to obtain accurate results for samples adulterated by the addition of water. Nickel was selected as the internal standard since it is usually absent in samples and because it requires similar conditions of atomization. After procedure optimization, which requires about 4.25mL of sample and standard per measurement, it was possible to get linear analytical response for iron concentrations between 0.12 and 1.40mgL(-1) and a detection limit of 0.04mgL(-1). Eighteen samples were collected randomly from fuel stations in Pernambuco (Brazil) and iron concentration was determined using the proposed procedure. Comparison of results obtained (0.20-1.50mgL(-1)) showed a mean standard error of 3.9%, with 3.8% and 2.3% calculated for the mean variation coefficients of the proposed method and the reference procedure, respectively. For adulterated samples (0.12-0.64mgL(-1)), the mean standard error was 4.8% when compared with the standard addition method. These results allowed concluding that the proposed procedure is adequate to accomplish the determination of iron in ethanol fuel in a large scale basis with a sampling rate of about 10h(-1).

  17. Comparison of colorimetry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron in human sera.

    PubMed

    Jittangprasert, Piyada; Wilairat, Prapin; Pootrakul, Pensri

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a comparison of two analytical techniques, one employing bathophenanthrolinedisulfonate (BPT), a most commonly-used reagent for Fe (II) determination, as chromogen and an electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS) for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) in sera from thalassemic patients. Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was employed as the ligand for binding iron from low molecular weight iron complexes present in the serum but without removing iron from the transferrin protein. After ultrafiltration the Fe (III)-NTA complex was then quantified by both methods. Kinetic study of the rate of the Fe (II)-BPT complex formation for various excess amounts of NTA ligand was also carried out. The kinetic data show that a minimum time duration (> 60 minutes) is necessary for complete complex formation when large excess of NTA is used. Calibration curves given by colorimetric and ETAAS methods were linear over the range of 0.15-20 microM iron (III). The colorimetric and ETAAS methods exhibited detection limit (3sigma) of 0.13 and 0.14 microM, respectively. The NTBI concentrations from 55 thalassemic serum samples measured employing BPT as chromogen were statistically compared with the results determined by ETAAS. No significant disagreement at 95% confidence level was observed. It is, therefore, possible to select any one of these two techniques for determination of NTBI in serum samples of thalassemic patients. However, the colorimetric procedure requires a longer analysis time because of a slow rate of exchange of NTA ligand with BPT, leading to the slow rate of formation of the colored complex.

  18. Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mucolytic drug ambroxol through ion-pair formation with iron and thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Levent, Abdulkadir; Sentürk, Zühre

    2010-09-01

    Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods have been developed for the determination of mucolytic drug Ambroxol. These procedures depend upon the reaction of iron(III) metal ion with the drug in the presence of thiocyanate ion to form stable ion-pair complex which extractable chloroform. The red-coloured complex was determined either colorimetrically at 510 nm or by indirect atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) via the determination of the iron content in the formed complex. The optimum experimental conditions for pH, concentrations of Fe(3+) and SCN(-), shaking time, phase ratio, and the number of extractions were determined. Under the proposed conditions, linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 4.1x10(-6) - 5.7x10(-5) M (1.7-23.6 µg mL(-1)) using both methods, with detection limits of 4.6x10(-7) M (0.19 µg mL(-1)) for colorimetry and 1.1x10(-6) M (0.46 µg mL(-1)) for AAS. The proposed methods were applied for the determination of Ambroxol in tablet dosage forms. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode-array detection.

  19. The Iron Project and the Rmax Project: Atomic Processes and Spectral Diagnostics of Laboratory and Astrophysicsl Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Chen, G.; Delahaye, F.; Nahar, S.; Oelgeotz, J.; Pradhan, A.; Eissner, Werner

    2003-05-01

    New results on radiative and collisional processes will be presented from the Iron Project on the iron-peak elements, and from the Rmax Project relevant to X-ray plasmas. Calculations are carried out in ab initio close coupling approximation using relativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix method developed under the Iron Project. Examples of the results are: (I) Kα resonances in all oxygen ions O I -- O VI are computed to interpret X-ray spectra observed with Chandra and XMM. (II) Use of large-scale atomic data in plasma modeling is exemplified through calculations of monochromatic X-ray opacities and absorption spectrum, and line intensities from ionization/recombination - collisional/radiative models. (III) Extensive sets of theoretical fine structure energy levels and transition probabilities for Ne-like Fe XVII and N-like Fe XX for levels with total angular momenta J = 0 - 7 for Fe XVII and J = 1/2 - 19/2 for Fe XX of both even and odd parities. Fe XVII transitions include electric dipole, quadrupole, octupole (E1, E2, E3) and magnetic dipole and quadrupole (M1, M2). Results will be presented for 490 and 1792 energy levels, and corresponding transitions, about 2.6 × 10^4 for Fe XVII, and 3.8 × 10^5 for Fe XX, respectively.

  20. Detecting single atoms of calcium and iron in biological structures by electron energy-loss spectrum-imaging.

    PubMed

    Leapman, R D

    2003-04-01

    As techniques for electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) reach a higher degree of optimization, experimental detection limits for analysing biological structures are approaching values predicted by the physics of the electron scattering. Theory indicates that it should be possible to detect a single atom of certain elements like calcium and iron contained in a macromolecular assembly using a finely focused probe in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). To test this prediction, EELS elemental maps have been recorded with the spectrum-imaging technique in a VG Microscopes HB501 STEM coupled to a Gatan Enfina spectrometer, which is equipped with an efficient charge-coupled device (CCD) array detector. By recording spectrum-images of haemoglobin adsorbed onto a thin carbon film, it is shown that the four heme groups in a single molecule can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10 : 1. Other measurements demonstrate that calcium adsorbed onto a thin carbon film can be imaged at single atom sensitivity with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 5 : 1. Despite radiation damage due to the necessarily high electron dose, it is anticipated that mapping single atoms of metals and other bound elements will find useful applications in characterizing large protein assemblies.

  1. Atomic-scale investigation of point defects and hydrogen-solute atmospheres on the edge dislocation mobility in alpha iron

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, M. A.; Solanki, K. N.; Groh, S.

    2014-08-14

    In this study, we present atomistic mechanisms of 1/2 [111](11{sup ¯}0) edge dislocation interactions with point defects (hydrogen and vacancies) and hydrogen solute atmospheres in body centered cubic (bcc) iron. In metals such as iron, increases in hydrogen concentration can increase dislocation mobility and/or cleavage-type decohesion. Here, we first investigate the dislocation mobility in the presence of various point defects, i.e., change in the frictional stress as the edge dislocation interacts with (a) vacancy, (b) substitutional hydrogen, (c) one substitutional and one interstitial hydrogen, (d) interstitial hydrogen, (e) vacancy and interstitial hydrogen, and (f) two interstitial hydrogen. Second, we examine the role of a hydrogen-solute atmosphere on the rate of local dislocation velocity. The edge dislocation simulation with a vacancy in the compression side of the dislocation and an interstitial hydrogen atom at the tension side exhibit the strongest mechanical response, suggesting a higher potential barrier and hence, the higher frictional stress (i.e., ∼83% higher than the pure iron Peierls stress). In the case of a dislocation interacting with a vacancy on the compressive side, the vacancy binds with the edge dislocation, resulting in an increase in the friction stress of about 28% when compared with the Peierls stress of an edge dislocation in pure iron. Furthermore, as the applied strain increases, the vacancy migrates through a dislocation transportation mechanism by attaining a velocity of the same order as the dislocation velocity. For the case of the edge dislocation interacting with interstitial hydrogen on the tension side, the hydrogen atom jumps through one layer perpendicular to the glide plane during the pinning-unpinning process. Finally, our simulation of dislocation interactions with hydrogen show first an increase in the local dislocation velocity followed by a pinning of the dislocation core in the atmosphere, resulting in

  2. Atomic-scale investigation of point defects and hydrogen-solute atmospheres on the edge dislocation mobility in alpha iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, M. A.; Groh, S.; Solanki, K. N.

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we present atomistic mechanisms of 1/2 [111](1 1 ¯0) edge dislocation interactions with point defects (hydrogen and vacancies) and hydrogen solute atmospheres in body centered cubic (bcc) iron. In metals such as iron, increases in hydrogen concentration can increase dislocation mobility and/or cleavage-type decohesion. Here, we first investigate the dislocation mobility in the presence of various point defects, i.e., change in the frictional stress as the edge dislocation interacts with (a) vacancy, (b) substitutional hydrogen, (c) one substitutional and one interstitial hydrogen, (d) interstitial hydrogen, (e) vacancy and interstitial hydrogen, and (f) two interstitial hydrogen. Second, we examine the role of a hydrogen-solute atmosphere on the rate of local dislocation velocity. The edge dislocation simulation with a vacancy in the compression side of the dislocation and an interstitial hydrogen atom at the tension side exhibit the strongest mechanical response, suggesting a higher potential barrier and hence, the higher frictional stress (i.e., ˜83% higher than the pure iron Peierls stress). In the case of a dislocation interacting with a vacancy on the compressive side, the vacancy binds with the edge dislocation, resulting in an increase in the friction stress of about 28% when compared with the Peierls stress of an edge dislocation in pure iron. Furthermore, as the applied strain increases, the vacancy migrates through a dislocation transportation mechanism by attaining a velocity of the same order as the dislocation velocity. For the case of the edge dislocation interacting with interstitial hydrogen on the tension side, the hydrogen atom jumps through one layer perpendicular to the glide plane during the pinning-unpinning process. Finally, our simulation of dislocation interactions with hydrogen show first an increase in the local dislocation velocity followed by a pinning of the dislocation core in the atmosphere, resulting in resistance

  3. Auger electron spectroscopy study of surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 atomic percent indium, copper-2 atomic percent tin, and iron-6.55 atomic percent silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 at. % indium, copper-2 at. % tin and iron-6.55 at. % silicon. The copper-tin and copper-indium alloys were single crystals oriented with the /111/ direction normal to the surface. An iron-6.5 at. % silicon alloy was studied (a single crystal oriented in the /100/ direction for study of a (100) surface). It was found that surface segregation occurred following sputtering in all cases. Only the iron-silicon single crystal alloy exhibited equilibrium segregation (i.e., reversibility of surface concentration with temperature) for which at present we have no explanation. McLean's analysis for equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries did not apply to the present results, despite the successful application to dilute copper-aluminum alloys. The relation of solute atomic size and solubility to surface segregation is discussed. Estimates of the depth of segregation in the copper-tin alloy indicate that it is of the order of a monolayer surface film.

  4. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    This work focuses on (1) searching/summarizing published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron catalysts with/without potassium/platinum promoters; (3) measurement of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption/dissociation kinetics on iron catalysts using transient methods; (3) analysis of the transient rate data to calculate kinetic parameters of early elementary steps in FTS; (4) construction of a microkinetic model of FTS on iron, and (5) validation of the model from collection of steady-state rate data for FTS on iron catalysts. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by non-aqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2} and thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. Kinetic parameters for CO adsorption, CO dissociation, and surface carbon hydrogenation on these catalysts were determined from temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO and temperature programmed surface hydrogenation (TPSR), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), and isothermal, transient hydrogenation (ITH). A microkinetic model was constructed for the early steps in FTS on polycrystalline iron from the kinetic parameters of elementary steps determined experimentally in this work and from literature values. Steady-state rate data were collected in a Berty reactor and used for validation of the microkinetic model. These rate data were fitted to 'smart' Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expressions derived from a sequence of elementary steps and using a combination of fitted steady-state parameters and parameters specified from the transient

  5. (Nitro)Iron(III) Porphyrins. EPR Detection of a Transient Low-Spin Iron(III) Complex and Structural Characterization of an O Atom Transfer Product.

    PubMed

    Munro, Orde Q.; Scheidt, W. Robert

    1998-05-04

    The reaction of BF(3).OEt(2) with the bis(nitro) complex of iron(III) picket-fence porphyrin, [K(18C6)(OH(2))][Fe(TpivPP)(NO(2))(2)], leads to the formation of a transient porphyrin intermediate, assigned on the basis of its rhombic low-spin EPR spectrum as the five-coordinate N-bound mono(nitro) iron(III) derivative, [Fe(TpivPP)(NO(2))]. This species is reactive and readily undergoes oxygen atom transfer to form [Fe(III)(TpivPP)(NO(3))] and [Fe(II)(TpivPP)(NO)]. The reactions have been followed by EPR and IR spectroscopy. [Fe(TpivPP)(NO(2))] has a rhombic EPR spectrum (g = 2.60, 2.35, and 1.75) in chlorobenzene and CH(2)Cl(2) and is spectroscopically distinct from the bis(nitro) starting material (g = 2.70, 2.50, and 1.57). Oxidation of the nitrosyl species to [Fe(TpivPP)(NO(3))] proceeds via an intermediate assigned as [Fe(TpivPP)(NO(2))] on the basis of its EPR spectrum. The crystal structure of one of the reaction products, [Fe(TpivPP)(NO(3))], has been determined. The nitrate ion of [Fe(TpivPP)(NO(3))] is bound to the iron(III) ion in a "symmetric" bidentate fashion within the ligand-binding pocket of the porphyrin pickets. Individual Fe-O distances are 2.123(3) and 2.226(3) Å. The dihedral angle between the plane of the nitrate ion and the closest N(p)-Fe-N(p) plane is 10.0 degrees. The Fe-N(p) bonds (and trans N(p)-Fe-N(p) angles) perpendicular and parallel to the plane of the axial ligand average to 2.060(5) Å (154.84(9) degrees ) and 2.083(3) Å (146.14(9) degrees ), respectively. Crystal data for [Fe(TpivPP)(NO(3))]: a = 23.530(2) Å, b = 10.0822(5) Å, c = 48.748(3) Å, beta = 92.145(5) degrees, monoclinic, space group I2/a, V = 11556.4(14) Å(3), Z = 8, FeN(9)O(7)C(64)H(64), 8798 observed data, R(1) = 0.0606, wR(2) = 0.1313, all observations at 127(2) K.

  6. Magnetic properties of a single iron atomic chain encapsulated in armchair carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masrour, R.; Jabar, A.; Hamedoun, M.; Benyoussef, A.; Hlil, E. K.

    2017-06-01

    The magnetic properties have been investigated of FeCuxC1-x for a Fe atom chain wrapped in armchair (N,N) carbon nanotubes (N = 4,6,8,10,12) diluted by Cu2+ ions using Monte Carlo simulations. The thermal total magnetization and magnetic susceptibility are found. The reduced transition temperatures of iron and carbon have been calculated for different N and the exchange interactions. The total magnetization is obtained for different exchange interactions and crystal field. The Magnetic hysteresis cycles are obtained for different N, the reduced temperatures and exchange interactions. The multiple magnetic hysteresis is found. This system shows it can be used as magnetic nanostructure possessing potential current and future applications in permanent magnetism, magnetic recording and spintronics.

  7. An iron(II) diketonate-diamine complex as precursor for thin film fabrication by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratvold, Jon E.; Carraro, Giorgio; Barreca, Davide; Nilsen, Ola

    2015-08-01

    A new divalent Fe precursor has been explored for deposition of iron-containing thin films by atomic layer deposition and molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD). The Fe(II) β-diketonate-diamine complex, Fe(hfa)2TMEDA, (hfa = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionate, TMEDA = N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylethylenediamine) can be handled in air, and sublimation at 60 °C ensures a satisfactory vaporization rate. The reactivity of the precursor does not allow for direct reaction with water as co-reactant. Nevertheless, it reacts with carboxylic acids, resulting in organic-inorganic hybrid materials, and with ozone, yielding α-Fe2O3. The divalent oxidation state of iron was maintained during deposition when oxalic acid was used as co-reactant, demonstrating the first preservation of Fe(II) from precursor to film during an MLD process. A self-saturating growth mode was proven by in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, and the films were further characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  8. Atomic data for controlled fusion research. Volume IV. Spectroscopic data for iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, W.L.

    1985-02-01

    Comprehensive spectroscopic data tables are presented for all ions of Fe. Tables of ionization potentials, wave lengths of spectral lines, atomic energy levels, and transition probabilities are given which were excerpted from general critical compilations. All utilized compilations are less than five years old and include data on electric dipole as well as magnetic dipole transitions.

  9. Atomic level simulations of interaction between edge dislocations and irradiation induced ellipsoidal voids in alpha-iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bida; Huang, Minsheng; Li, Zhenhuan

    2017-04-01

    High concentrations of vacancies tend to be formed inside the metal materials under irradiation, and then accumulate and cluster together gradually to promote the formation of nanovoids. Generally, these voids act as obstacles for dislocation glide and thereby change/degrade the mechanical behavior of irradiated materials. In this work, the interaction between ellipsoidal nanovoids with edge dislocations in alpha-iron has been studied by atomic simulations. The results illuminate that the ellipsoidal void's semi-major axis on the slip plane and parallel to the dislocation line is the dominant factor controlling the obstacle strength of ellipsoidal nanovoids. Two other semi-major axes, which are perpendicular to the glide plane and parallel to the Burgers vector, respectively, can also influence the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) for dislocation shearing the ellipsoidal void. The intrinsic atomic mechanisms controlling above phenomena, such as nanovoid-geometry spatial constraint and nanovoid-surface curvature on dislocation evolution, have been discussed carefully. The classical continuum model has been amended to describe the dislocation-ellipsoidal nanovoid interaction base on current results. In addition, the influence of temperature on the CRSS of ellipsoidal nanovoids has also been investigated.

  10. High-valent iron and manganese complexes of corrole and porphyrin in atom transfer and dioxygen evolving catalysis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2011-04-14

    Manganese(V) imido complexes of 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole (H(3)tpfc) can be prepared by the reaction of Mn(III)(tpfc) and organic nitrene generated from either photolytic or thermal activation of organic azides. The terminal imido complexes of manganese(V) were among the first structurally characterized examples of Mn(V) terminal imido complexes in the literature. They feature a short Mn≡N triple bond and a nearly linear M[triple bond, length as m-dash]N-C angle. The ground state of (tpfc)Mn(V)(NAr) is singlet. Contrary to expectations, arylimido complexes of manganese(V) were stable to moisture and did not undergo [NR] group transfer to olefins. Manganese(V) imido corrole with an activated tosyl imido ligand was prepared from iodoimine (ArINTs) and manganese(III) corrole. The resulting complex (tpfc)Mn(NTs) is paramagnetic (S = 1), hydrolyzes to (tpfc)Mn(O) in the presence of water, abstracts hydrogen atoms from benzylic C-H bonds, and catalyzes aziridination of alkenes. Mechanistic studies on the aziridination and hydrogen atom transfer reactions are reviewed. This perspective also describes the reaction chemistry of the heme enzyme chlorite dismutase, the mechanism by which dioxygen is formed on a single-metal site, and recent advances in functional modelling of this enzyme. We also compare the reactivity of water-soluble iron versus manganese porphyrins towards the chlorite anion.

  11. Determination of copper, zinc and iron in broncho-alveolar lavages by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harlyk, C; Mccourt, J; Bordin, G; Rodriguez, A R; van der Eeckhout, A

    1997-11-01

    Concentrations of Zn, Cu and Fe were measured in 157 broncho-alveolar lavages (BAL), before and after centrifugation, collected at the Leuven University Hospital (Belgium). Zn was measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy, using direct calibration, while Cu and Fe were determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy, using the method of standard additions. For Fe only 56 samples were measured. Most of the studied elements are present in the liquid phase (supernatant). About 90% of Cu concentrations lie between 0 and 15 micrograms/kg, while 90% of Zn concentrations are lower than 230 micrograms/kg, with 30% between 30 and 70 micrograms/kg, and 50% between 100 and 200 micrograms/kg. There seems to be a reverse relationship between Cu and Zn levels with high Cu going along with low Zn and vice versa.

  12. Atomic Decay Data for Modeling K Lines of Iron Peak and Light Odd-Z Elements*

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Mendoza, C.; Bautista, M. A.; Garcia, J.; Witthoeft, M. C.; Kallman, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    Complete data sets of level energies, transition wavelengths, A-values, radiative and Auger widths and fluorescence yields for K-vacancy levels of the F, Na, P, Cl, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu and Zn isonuclear sequences have been computed by a Hartree-Fock method that includes relativistic corrections as implemented in Cowan's atomic structure computer suite. The atomic parameters for more than 3 million fine-structure K lines have been determined. Ions with electron number N greater than 9 are treated for the first time, and detailed comparisons with available measurements and theoretical data for ions with N less than or equal to 9 are carried out in order to estimate reliable accuracy ratings.

  13. Site occupancy of interstitial deuterium atoms in face-centred cubic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Akihiko; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Hidehiko; Hattori, Takanori; Sano-Furukawa, Asami; Endo, Naruki; Katayama, Yoshinori; Iizuka, Riko; Sato, Toyoto; Matsuo, Motoaki; Orimo, Shin-Ichi; Aoki, Katsutoshi

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogen composition and occupation state provide basic information for understanding various properties of the metal-hydrogen system, ranging from microscopic properties such as hydrogen diffusion to macroscopic properties such as phase stability. Here the deuterization process of face-centred cubic Fe to form solid-solution face-centred cubic FeDx is investigated using in situ neutron diffraction at high temperature and pressure. In a completely deuterized specimen at 988 K and 6.3 GPa, deuterium atoms occupy octahedral and tetrahedral interstitial sites with an occupancy of 0.532(9) and 0.056(5), respectively, giving a deuterium composition x of 0.64(1). During deuterization, the metal lattice expands approximately linearly with deuterium composition at a rate of 2.21 Å3 per deuterium atom. The minor occupation of the tetrahedral site is thermally driven by the intersite movement of deuterium atoms along the ‹111› direction in the face-centred cubic metal lattice.

  14. Temperature dependent local atomic displacements in ammonia intercalated iron selenide superconductor.

    PubMed

    Paris, E; Simonelli, L; Wakita, T; Marini, C; Lee, J-H; Olszewski, W; Terashima, K; Kakuto, T; Nishimoto, N; Kimura, T; Kudo, K; Kambe, T; Nohara, M; Yokoya, T; Saini, N L

    2016-06-09

    Recently, ammonia-thermal reaction has been used for molecular intercalation in layered FeSe, resulting a new Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 superconductor with Tc ~ 45 K. Here, we have used temperature dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to investigate local atomic displacements in single crystals of this new superconductor. Using polarized EXAFS at Fe K-edge we have obtained direct information on the local Fe-Se and Fe-Fe bondlengths and corresponding mean square relative displacements (MSRD). We find that the Se-height in the intercalated system is lower than the one in the binary FeSe, suggesting compressed FeSe4 tetrahedron in the title system. Incidentally, there is hardly any effect of the intercalation on the bondlengths characteristics, revealed by the Einstein temperatures, that are similar to those found in the binary FeSe. Therefore, the molecular intercalation induces an effective compression and decouples the FeSe slabs. Furthermore, the results reveal an anomalous change in the atomic correlations across Tc, appearing as a clear decrease in the MSRD, indicating hardening of the local lattice mode. Similar response of the local lattice has been found in other families of superconductors, e.g., A15-type and cuprates superconductors. This observation suggests that local atomic correlations should have some direct correlation with the superconductivity.

  15. Temperature dependent local atomic displacements in ammonia intercalated iron selenide superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Paris, E.; Simonelli, L.; Wakita, T.; Marini, C.; Lee, J.-H.; Olszewski, W.; Terashima, K.; Kakuto, T.; Nishimoto, N.; Kimura, T.; Kudo, K.; Kambe, T.; Nohara, M.; Yokoya, T.; Saini, N. L.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ammonia-thermal reaction has been used for molecular intercalation in layered FeSe, resulting a new Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 superconductor with Tc ~ 45 K. Here, we have used temperature dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to investigate local atomic displacements in single crystals of this new superconductor. Using polarized EXAFS at Fe K-edge we have obtained direct information on the local Fe-Se and Fe-Fe bondlengths and corresponding mean square relative displacements (MSRD). We find that the Se-height in the intercalated system is lower than the one in the binary FeSe, suggesting compressed FeSe4 tetrahedron in the title system. Incidentally, there is hardly any effect of the intercalation on the bondlengths characteristics, revealed by the Einstein temperatures, that are similar to those found in the binary FeSe. Therefore, the molecular intercalation induces an effective compression and decouples the FeSe slabs. Furthermore, the results reveal an anomalous change in the atomic correlations across Tc, appearing as a clear decrease in the MSRD, indicating hardening of the local lattice mode. Similar response of the local lattice has been found in other families of superconductors, e.g., A15-type and cuprates superconductors. This observation suggests that local atomic correlations should have some direct correlation with the superconductivity. PMID:27276997

  16. Systematic conveyor belt cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Rappen, A.

    1984-01-01

    The currently available conveyor belt cleaning devices are enumerated. Recent investigations have confirmed the belt scraping devices based on intermittent linear contact by means of individually adjustable and spring-loaded scraper blades, usually of metallic construction as the most advanced type of belt cleaner. The system also allows application on reversing belts. Criteria are presented for assessing the performance of a belt cleaner.

  17. Single Atomic Iron Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media: Particle Size Control and Thermal Activation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Hanguang; Hwang, Sooyeon; Wang, Maoyu; ...

    2017-09-13

    It remains a grand challenge to replace platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts with earth-abundant materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media, which is crucial for large-scale deployment of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). We report a high-performance atomic Fe catalyst derived from chemically Fe-doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) by directly bonding Fe ions to imidazolate ligands within 3D frameworks. Although the ZIF was identified as a promising precursor, the new synthetic chemistry enables the creation of well-dispersed atomic Fe sites embedded into porous carbon without the formation of aggregates. The size of catalyst particles is tunablemore » through synthesizing Fe-doped ZIF nanocrystal precursors in a wide range from 20 to 1000 nm followed by one-step thermal activation. Similar to Pt nanoparticles, the unique size control without altering chemical properties afforded by this approach is able to increase the number of PGM-free active sites. The best ORR activity is measured with the catalyst at a size of 50 nm. Further size reduction to 20 nm leads to significant particle agglomeration, thus decreasing the activity. In using the homogeneous atomic Fe model catalysts, we elucidated the active site formation process through correlating measured ORR activity with the change of chemical bonds in precursors during thermal activation up to 1100 °C. The critical temperature to form active sites is 800 °C, which is associated with a new Fe species with a reduced oxidation number (from Fe3+ to Fe2+) likely bonded with pyridinic N (FeN4) embedded into the carbon planes. Further increasing the temperature leads to continuously enhanced activity, linked to the rise of graphitic N and Fe–N species. The new atomic Fe catalyst has achieved respectable ORR activity in challenging acidic media (0.5 M H2SO4), showing a half-wave potential of 0.85 V vs RHE and leaving only a 30 mV gap with Pt/C (60 μgPt/cm2). Finally

  18. Single Atomic Iron Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Acidic Media: Particle Size Control and Thermal Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanguang; Hwang, Sooyeon; Wang, Maoyu; Feng, Zhenxing; Karakalos, Stavros; Luo, Langli; Qiao, Zhi; Xie, Xiaohong; Wang, Chongmin; Su, Dong; Shao, Yuyan; Wu, Gang

    2017-09-13

    It remains a grand challenge to replace platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts with earth abundant materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media, which is crucial for large-scale deployment of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Here, we report a high-performance atomic Fe catalyst derived from chemically Fe-doped zeolitic imidazo-late frameworks (ZIFs) by directly bonding Fe ions to imidazolate ligands within 3D frameworks. Although the ZIF was iden-tified as a promising precursor, the new synthetic chemistry enables well-dispersed atomic Fe sites embedded into porous carbon without the formation of aggregates. Catalyst particle sizes are tunable through synthesizing Fe-doped ZIF nanocrys-tal precursors in a wide range from 20 to 1000 nm followed by one-step thermal activation. Similar to Pt nanoparticles, the unique size control without altering chemical properties is able to increase the number of PGM-free active sites. The best ORR activity is measured with the catalyst with a size of 50 nm. Further size reduction to 20 nm leads to significant particle agglomeration thus decreasing the activity. Using the homogeneous atomic Fe model catalysts, we elucidated the active site formation process through correlating measured ORR activity with the chemical bond changes of precursors during thermal activation up to 1100oC. The critical temperature to form active sites is 800oC associated with a new Fe species with reduced oxidation number (from Fe3+ to Fe2+) likely bonded with pyridinic N (FeN4) embedded into carbon planes. Further increasing temperature leads to continuously enhanced activity, linking to the rise of graphitic N and Fe-N species. The new atomic Fe catalyst has achieved respectful ORR activity in challenging acidic media (0.5 M H2SO4) showing a half-wave potential of 0.85 V vs. RHE, only leaving 30 mV gap with Pt/C (60 µgPt/cm2). Enhanced stability is attained with the same catalyst only losing 20 mV after 10,000 potential

  19. N2 Binding to an Iron-Sulfur-Carbon Site

    PubMed Central

    Čorić, Ilija; Mercado, Brandon Q.; Bill, Eckhard; Vinyard, David J.; Holland, Patrick L.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenases are found in some microorganisms, and these enzymes convert atmospheric N2 to ammonia, thereby providing essential nitrogen atoms for higher organisms. Some nitrogenases reduce atmospheric N2 at the FeMoco, a sulfur-rich iron-molybdenum cluster1–5. The iron centers that are coordinated to sulfur and carbon atoms in FeMoco have been proposed as the substrate binding sites, based on kinetic and spectroscopic studies5,6. Studies on the enzyme indicate that iron atom Fe6 and possibly also adjacent belt iron sites are involved.5–8 In the resting state, the central Fe sites (including Fe6) have identical environments consisting of three sulfides and a carbide. Addition of electrons to the resting state causes the FeMoco to react with N2, but the geometry and bonding environment of N2-bound species remain unknown5. In this manuscript, we describe a synthetic complex with a sulfur-rich coordination sphere that, upon reduction, breaks an Fe-S bond and binds N2. The product is the first synthetic Fe–N2 complex in which iron has bonds to sulfur and carbon atoms, providing a model for N2 coordination in the FeMoco. Our results demonstrate that breaking an Fe-S bond is a chemically reasonable route to N2 binding in the FeMoco, and show structural and spectroscopic details for weakened N2 on a sulfur-rich iron site. PMID:26416755

  20. Photoelectrochemical investigation of ultrathin film iron oxide solar cells prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Klahr, Benjamin M; Martinson, Alex B F; Hamann, Thomas W

    2011-01-04

    Atomic layer deposition was used to grow conformal thin films of hematite with controlled thickness on transparent conductive oxide substrates. The hematite films were incorporated as photoelectrodes in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells employing an aqueous [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) electrolyte. Steady state current density versus applied potential measurements under monochromatic and simulated solar illumination were used to probe the photoelectrochemical properties of the hematite electrodes as a function of film thickness. Combining the photoelectrochemical results with careful optical measurements allowed us to determine an optimal thickness for a hematite electrode of ∼20 nm. Mott-Schottky analysis of differential capacitance measurements indicated a depletion region of ∼17 nm. Thus, only charge carriers generated in the depletion region were found to contribute to the photocurrent.

  1. Photoelectrochemical investigation of ultrathin film iron oxide solar cells prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Klahr, B. M.; Martinson, A. B. F.; Hamann, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition was used to grow conformal thin films of hematite with controlled thickness on transparent conductive oxide substrates. The hematite films were incorporated as photoelectrodes in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells employing an aqueous [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-/4-} electrolyte. Steady state current density versus applied potential measurements under monochromatic and simulated solar illumination were used to probe the photoelectrochemical properties of the hematite electrodes as a function of film thickness. Combining the photoelectrochemical results with careful optical measurements allowed us to determine an optimal thickness for a hematite electrode of {approx}20 nm. Mott-Schottky analysis of differential capacitance measurements indicated a depletion region of {approx}17 nm. Thus, only charge carriers generated in the depletion region were found to contribute to the photocurrent.

  2. Photoelectrochemical Investigation of Ultrathin Film Iron Oxide Solar Cells Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Klahr, Benjamin M.; Martinson, Alex B.F.; Hamann, Thomas W.

    2010-12-02

    Atomic layer deposition was used to grow conformal thin films of hematite with controlled thickness on transparent conductive oxide substrates. The hematite films were incorporated as photoelectrodes in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells employing an aqueous [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- electrolyte. Steady state current density versus applied potential measurements under monochromatic and simulated solar illumination were used to probe the photoelectrochemical properties of the hematite electrodes as a function of film thickness. Combining the photoelectrochemical results with careful optical measurements allowed us to determine an optimal thickness for a hematite electrode of ~20 nm. Mott-Schottky analysis of differential capacitance measurements indicated a depletion region of ~17 nm. Thus, only charge carriers generated in the depletion region were found to contribute to the photocurrent.

  3. Distance- and spin-resolved spectroscopy of iridium atoms on an iron bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöneberg, Johannes; Caffrey, Nuala Mai; Ferriani, Paolo; Heinze, Stefan; Berndt, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The induced spin polarization of Ir atoms on a ferromagnetic Fe double layer on W(110) has been investigated with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy. An unoccupied state is observed with a spin polarization exceeding 60 % that is inverted with respect to the Fe layer. This inversion is due to the tunneling gap acting as an orbital and spin filter. Distance dependent measurements show that the spin polarization remains approximately constant over the entire experimentally accessible range, from far in the tunneling regime to 1 Å from the point of contact formation. This is corroborated by density functional theory calculations which show that the inversion of spin polarization occurs within 0.5 Å of the adatom.

  4. Atomic scale modeling of iron-doped biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Sandrine; Kaur, Amandeep; Grenèche, Jean-Marc; Nedelec, Jean-Marie; Renaudin, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) are bioceramics composed of hydroxyapatite (HAp, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) and beta-Tricalcium Phosphate (β-TCP, Ca3(PO4)2). Because their chemical and mineral composition closely resembles that of the mineral component of bone, they are potentially interesting candidates for bone repair surgery, and doping can advantageously be used to improve their biological behavior. However, it is important to describe the doping mechanism of BCP thoroughly in order to be able to master its synthesis and then to fully appraise the benefit of the doping process. In the present paper we describe the ferric doping mechanism: the crystallographic description of our samples, sintered at between 500°C and 1100°C, was provided by Rietveld analyses on X-ray powder diffraction, and the results were confirmed using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The mechanism is temperature-dependent, like the previously reported zinc doping mechanism. Doping was performed on the HAp phase, at high temperature only, by an insertion mechanism. The Fe(3+) interstitial site is located in the HAp hexagonal channel, shifted from its centre to form a triangular three-fold coordination. At lower temperatures, the Fe(3+) are located at the centre of the channel, forming linear two-fold coordinated O-Fe-O entities. The knowledge of the doping mechanism is a prerequisite for a correct synthesis of the targeted bioceramic with the adapted (Ca+Fe)/P ratio, and so to be able to correctly predict its potential iron release or magnetic properties.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Surface Grafted Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and Poly(Carboxylic Acid)– Iron Particles via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sutrisno, Joko; Fuchs, Alan; Evrensel, Cahit

    2014-01-01

    This research relates to the preparation and characterization of surface grafted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(carboxylic acid)–micron-size iron particles via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The surface grafted polymers–iron particles result in multifunctional materials which can be used in biomedical applications. The functionalities consist of cell targeting, imaging, drug delivery, and immunological response. The multifunctional materials are synthesized in two steps. First, surface grafting is used to place polymer molecules on the iron particles surface. The second step, is conjugation of the bio-molecules onto the polymer backbone. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to confirm the presence of polymers on the iron particles. The thickness of the grafted polymers and glass transition temperature of the surface grafted polymers were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The covalent bond between grafted polymers and iron particles caused higher glass transition temperature as compared with non-grafted polymers. The ability to target the bio-molecule and provide fluorescent imaging was simulated by conjugation of rat immunoglobulin and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled anti-rat. The fluorescence intensity was determined using flow cytometry and conjugated IgG-FITC anti-rat on iron particles which was imaged using a fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25382869

  6. Laterally bendable belt conveyor

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, William J.

    1985-01-01

    An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making lateral turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rollers which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

  7. Laterally bendable belt conveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.J.

    1985-07-02

    An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making laterial turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rolles which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

  8. Laterally bendable belt conveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.J.

    1982-09-24

    An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making lateral turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rollers which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

  9. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun; Hao, Haixia; Hui, Longfei; Zhao, Fengqi; Feng, Hao

    2017-06-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe2O3) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe2O3 was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe2O3 energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe2O3 composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe2O3 nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe2O3 is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe2O3 composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  10. Matrix infrared spectroscopic and computational studies on the reactions of osmium and iron atoms with carbon monoxide and dinitrogen mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhang-Hui; Xu, Qiang

    2011-10-06

    Reactions of laser-ablated osmium and iron atoms with CO and N(2) mixtures in excess neon have been investigated using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. The (NN)(x)MCO (M = Os, Fe; x = 1, 2) complexes are formed as reaction products during sample deposition and on annealing. These reaction products are characterized on the basis of the results of isotopic substitution, mixed isotopic splitting patterns, stepwise annealing, broad-band irradiation, and change of reagent concentration and laser energy. Density functional theory calculations have been performed on these products. Overall agreement between the experimental and calculated results supports the identification of these species from the matrix infrared spectra. The bonding characteristics and reaction mechanisms have been discussed. The M-C bonds are stronger than the M-N bonds in the same molecules. The formation of metal carbonyl dinitrogen complexes from the addition of CO to metal dinitrogen complexes is found to be more energetically favorable than that from the reactions of N(2) with metal carbonyls.

  11. Detecting the magnetic response of iron oxide capped organosilane nanostructures using magnetic sample modulation and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Lewandowski, Brian R; Xu, Song; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-06-15

    A new imaging strategy using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated for mapping magnetic domains at size regimes below 100 nm. The AFM-based imaging mode is referred to as magnetic sample modulation (MSM), since the flux of an AC-generated electromagnetic field is used to induce physical movement of magnetic nanomaterials on surfaces during imaging. The AFM is operated in contact mode using a soft, nonmagnetic tip to detect the physical motion of the sample. By slowly scanning an AFM probe across a vibrating area of the sample, the frequency and amplitude of vibration induced by the magnetic field is tracked by changes in tip deflection. Thus, the AFM tip serves as a force and motion sensor for mapping the vibrational response of magnetic nanomaterials. Essentially, MSM is a hybrid of contact mode AFM combined with selective modulation of magnetic domains. The positional feedback loop for MSM imaging is the same as that used for force modulation and contact mode AFM; however, the vibration of the sample is analyzed using channels of a lock-in amplifier. The investigations are facilitated by nanofabrication methods combining particle lithography with organic vapor deposition and electroless deposition of iron oxide, to prepare designed test platforms of magnetic materials at nanometer length scales. Custom test platforms furnished suitable surfaces for MSM characterizations at the level of individual metal nanostructures.

  12. Effect of mass of the primary knock-on atom on displacement cascade debris in alpha-iron

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Calder F; Bacon, David J; Barashev, Aleksandr; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of displacement cascades created in -iron (Fe) by primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with energy from 5 to 20 keV and mass chosen to represent C, Fe and Bi. Molecular Bi2 has also been simulated using two Bi PKAs, and PKA-Fe interaction potential has also been varied. Four effects are reported. First, the PKA mass has a major effect on cascade damage while the interaction potential has little if any. Second, the total number of point defects produced in a cascade decreases with increasing PKA mass. This fact is not accounted for in models used conventionally for estimating damage. Third, interstitial loops of <111> type and both vacancy and interstitial loops of <100> type are formed, the latter being observed in MD simulation for the first time. The probability of <100> loop appearance increases with increasing PKA mass as well as energy. Finally, there is a correlation between production of large vacancy and interstitial clusters in the same cascade.

  13. Atomic data from the Iron Project. LIII. Relativistic allowed and forbidden transition probabilities for Fe XVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Eissner, Werner; Chen, Guo-Xin; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2003-09-01

    An extensive set of fine structure levels and corresponding transition probabilities for allowed and forbidden transitions in Fe XVII is presented. A total of 490 bound energy levels of Fe XVII of total angular momenta 0 <= J <= 7 of even and odd parities with 2 <= n<= 10, 0 <= l<= 8, 0 <= L<= 8, and singlet and triplet multiplicities, are obtained. They translate to over 2.6x 104 allowed (E1) transitions that are of dipole and intercombination type, and 2312 forbidden transitions that include electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), electric octopole (E3), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) type representing the most detailed calculations to date for the ion. Oscillator strengths f, line strengths S, and coefficients A of spontaneous emission for the E1 type transitions are obtained in the relativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix approximation. A-values for the forbidden transitions are obtained from atomic structure calculations using codes SUPERSTRUCTURE and GRASP. The energy levels are identified in spectroscopic notation with the help of a newly developed level identification algorithm. Nearly all 52 spectroscopically observed levels have been identified, their binding energies agreeing within 1% with our calculation. Computed transition probabilities are compared with other calculations and measurement. The effect of 2-body magnetic terms and other interactions is discussed. The present data set enhances by more than an order of magnitude the heretofore available data for transition probabilities of Fe XVII. Complete electronic data tables of energies and transition probabilities are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/408/789

  14. Strata-bound Fe-Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-REE deposits of the Idaho Cobalt Belt: Multistage hydrothermal mineralization in a magmatic-related iron oxide copper-gold system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies of strata-bound Fe-Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-rare-earth element (REE) deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt in east-central Idaho provide evidence of multistage epigenetic mineralization by magmatic-hydrothermal processes in an iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG) system. Deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt comprise three types: (1) strata-bound sulfide lenses in the Blackbird district, which are cobaltite and, less commonly, chalcopyrite rich with locally abundant gold, native bismuth, bismuthinite, xenotime, allanite, monazite, and the Be-rich silicate gadolinite-(Y), with sparse uraninite, stannite, and Bi tellurides, in a gangue of quartz, chlorite, biotite, muscovite, garnet, tourmaline, chloritoid, and/or siderite, with locally abundant fluorapatite or magnetite; (2) discordant tourmalinized breccias in the Blackbird district that in places have concentrations of cobaltite, chalcopyrite, gold, and xenotime; and (3) strata-bound magnetite-rich lenses in the Iron Creek area, which contain cobaltiferous pyrite and locally sparse chalcopyrite or xenotime. Most sulfide-rich deposits in the Blackbird district are enclosed by strata-bound lenses composed mainly of Cl-rich Fe biotite; some deposits have quartz-rich envelopes.Whole-rock analyses of 48 Co- and/or Cu-rich samples show high concentrations of Au (up to 26.8 ppm), Bi (up to 9.16 wt %), Y (up to 0.83 wt %), ∑REEs (up to 2.56 wt %), Ni (up to 6,780 ppm), and Be (up to 1,180 ppm), with locally elevated U (up to 124 ppm) and Sn (up to 133 ppm); Zn and Pb contents are uniformly low (≤821 and ≤61 ppm, respectively). Varimax factor analysis of bulk compositions of these samples reveals geochemically distinct element groupings that reflect statistical associations of monazite, allanite, and xenotime; biotite and gold; detrital minerals; chalcopyrite and sparse stannite; quartz; and cobaltite with sparse selenides and tellurides. Significantly, Cu is statistically separate from Co and As

  15. Simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruno M; Santos, Rafael F; Bolzan, Rodrigo C; Muller, Edson I; Primel, Ednei G; Duarte, Fabio A

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the development of a method of simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) with direct solid sampling. In order to carry out simultaneous measurements, both the main resonance line of nickel (232.003nm) and the adjacent secondary line of iron (232.036nm) were monitored in the same spectral window. The proposed method was optimized with a perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) sample and was applied to the determination of iron and nickel in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-TFM) samples. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, as well as the use of Pd and H2 (during pyrolysis) as chemical modifiers, were carefully investigated. Compromise temperatures for pyrolysis and atomization of both analytes were achieved at 800 and 2300°C, respectively, using only 0.5Lmin(-1) H2 as chemical modifier during pyrolysis. Calibration curves were performed with aqueous standards by using a single solution which contained both analytes. Limits of detection were 221 and 9.6ngg(-1) for iron and nickel, respectively. Analyte concentrations in all samples ranged from 3.53 to 12.4µgg(-1) for iron and from 37 to 78ngg(-1) for nickel, with relative standard deviation less than 19%. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing these results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample digestion by microwave-induced combustion and no significant statistical difference was observed.

  16. 45. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM WHICH CONVEY THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM WHICH CONVEY THE HARDENED NAILS TO THE DRAWBACK TUBE FOR TEMPERING; MOTIONED STOPPED - LaBelle Iron Works, Thirtieth & Wood Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  17. Belt attachment and system

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, Abraham D.; Davidson, Erick M.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein is a belt assembly including a flexible belt with an improved belt attachment. The belt attachment includes two crossbars spaced along the length of the belt. The crossbars retain bearings that allow predetermined movement in six degrees of freedom. The crossbars are connected by a rigid body that attaches to the bearings. Implements that are attached to the rigid body are simply supported but restrained in pitching rotation.

  18. Ionic liquid-based extraction followed by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kato, Tatsuya; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-02-01

    The analysis of high-purity materials for trace impurities is an important and challenging task. The present paper describes a facile and sensitive method for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal. Trace heavy metals in an iron sample solution were rapidly and selectively preconcentrated by the extraction into a tiny volume of an ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide] for the determination by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A nitrogen-donating neutral ligand, 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ), was found to be effective in the ionic liquid-based selective extraction, allowing the nearly complete (~99.8%) elimination of the iron matrix. The combination with the optimized GFAAS was successful. The detectability reached sub-μg g(-1) levels in iron metal. The novel use of TPTZ in ionic liquid-based extraction followed by GFAAS was successfully applied to the determination of traces of Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb in certified reference materials for high-purity iron metal.

  19. Green Belt Europe - borders separate, nature unites

    Treesearch

    Uwe Friedel

    2015-01-01

    During the period of the Cold War between 1945 and 1989, a "Green Belt" of valuable pristine landscapes developed along the border line between Eastern and Western Europe, the intensively fortified and guarded so called Iron Curtain. Due to the remoteness of the border areas, a high number of national parks and other large conservation areas can be found...

  20. Conveyor belt plow for ideal belt cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelsen, W.J.

    1982-05-01

    The accumulation of excess material around the return drum of a conveyor arises from an inefficient belt plow. The frequency with which this problem occurs would indicate a design problem rather than faulty installation or negligent maintenance. The reasons for the poor operation of the plow become obvious after applying basic physical principles. Simple and cheap improvements can be implemented to improve plow performance. To be effective, a plow should be installed either near the tail end, to protect the return drum, or ahead of the automatic belt tensioning device, to prevent spillage from falling onto the take-up pulley. In order to perform well, the scraping blade of the plow must be in continuous contact with the belt across its full width, having contact pressure as uniform as possible. It has been proven, though, that uniform contact pressure cannot be achieved under operating conditions with the standard arrangement shown in Figure 1. There are two solutions to this problem which can be carried out in most mine workshops and help reduce belt downtime. All too often an ineffective plow allows material to be needlessly trapped against the belt, causing excessive wear and, ultimately, tearing the belt. Even with highly experienced belt crews, a short stoppage in the main belt can have serious effects throughout the mine. An efficient plow means a cleaner running belt.

  1. Source characteristics of the ∼2.5 Ga Wangjiazhuang Banded Iron Formation from the Wutai greenstone belt in the North China Craton: Evidence from neodymium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changle; Zhang, Lianchang; Dai, Yanpei; Li, Wenjun

    2014-10-01

    Here we first present samarium (Sm)-neodymium (Nd) isotopic data for the ∼2.5 Ga Wangjiazhuang BIF and associated lithologies from the Wutai greenstone belt (WGB) in the North China Craton. Previous geochemical data of the BIF indicate that there are three decoupled end members controlling REE compositions: high-T hydrothermal fluids, ambient seawater and terrigenous contaminants. Clastic meta-sediment samples were collected for major and trace elements studies in an attempt to well constrain the nature of detrital components of the BIF. Fractionated light rare earth elements patterns and mild negative Eu anomalies in the majority of these meta-sedimentary samples point toward felsic source rocks. Moreover, the relatively low Th/Sc ratios and positive εNd(t) values are similar to those of the ∼2.5 Ga granitoids, TTG gneisses and felsic volcanics in the WGB, further indicating that they are derived from less differentiated terranes. Low Chemical Index of Weathering (CIW) values and features in the A-CN-K diagrams for these meta-sediments imply a low degree of source weathering. Sm-Nd isotopes of the chemically pure BIF samples are characterized by negative εNd(t) values, whereas Al-rich BIF samples possess consistently positive εNd(t) features. Significantly, the associated supracrustal rocks in the study area have positive εNd(t) values. Taken together, these isotopic data also point to three REE sources controlling the back-arc basin depositional environment of the BIF, the first being seafloor-vented hydrothermal fluids (εNd(t) < -2.5) derived from interaction with the underlying old continental crust, the second being ambient seawater which reached its composition by erosion of parts of the depleted landmass (likely the arc) (εNd(t) > 0), the third being syndepositional detritus that received their features by weathering of a nearby depleted source (likely the arc) (εNd(t) > 0).

  2. Combining Textural Techniques to Explore Effects of Diagenesis and Low-grade Metamorphism on Iron Mineralogy and Iron Speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Webb, S.; Eiler, J. M.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Fischer, W. W.

    2016-12-01

    Iron chemistry and mineralogy in the sedimentary rocks provide a valuable tool for studying paleoenvironmental conditions due to the fact that iron atoms can take on either the +II or +III valence state under geological redox conditions. One method utilizing this redox chemistry is `iron speciation', a bulk chemical sequential extraction technique that maps proportions of iron species to redox conditions empirically calibrated from modern sediments. However, all Precambrian and many Phanerozoic rocks have experienced post-depositional processes; it is vital to explore their effects on iron mineralogy and speciation. We combined light and electron microscopy, magnetic microscopy, (synchrotron-based) microprobe x-ray spectroscopy, and rock magnetic measurements in order to deconvolve secondary overprints from primary phases and provide quantitative measurement of iron minerals. These techniques were applied to excellently-preserved shale and siltstone samples of the 1.4 Ga lower Belt Supergroup, Montana and Idaho, USA, spanning a metamorphic gradient from sub-biotite to garnet zone. Previously measured Silurian-Devonian shales, sandstones, and carbonates in Maine and Vermont, USA spanning from the chlorite to kyanite zone provided additional well-constrained, quantitative data for comparison and to extend our analysis. In all of the studied samples, pyrrhotite formation occurred at the sub-biotite or sub-chlorite zone. Pyrrhotite was interpreted to form from pyrite and/or other iron phases based on lithology; these reactions can affect the paleoredox proxy. Iron carbonates can also severely influence iron speciation results since they often form in anoxic pore fluids during diagenesis; textural analyses of the Belt Supergroup samples highlighted that iron-bearing carbonates were early diagenetic cements or later diagenetic overprints. The inclusion of iron from diagenetic minerals during iron speciation analyses will skew results by providing a view of pore

  3. Simultaneous and direct determination of iron and nickel in biological solid samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Nieto, Beatriz; Gismera, Ma Jesús; Sevilla, Ma Teresa; Procopio, Jesús R

    2013-11-15

    The simultaneous and direct determination of nickel and iron in plants and lichens has been investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The primary resonance line for nickel at 232.003 nm and the adjacent secondary line for iron at 232.036 nm have been used for this purpose. The optimization of the experimental conditions was performed using a pine needles certified reference material (SRM 1575a). The influence of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, the amount of solid sample introduced into the graphite furnace and the use of aqueous or solid standard for calibration were studied. The spectral interferences caused by absorption of the concomitants of the solid sample were detected and corrected using a least square algorithm. Aliquots of 0.1-1mg of the solid samples were weighed onto the solid sampling platforms and analyzed directly, without addition of any reagents. The limits of detection were 25 µg kg(-1) for nickel and 0.40 mg kg(-1) for iron and the precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, ranged from 7% to 12%. The proposed method was used to determine both metals in different bioindicator samples with successful results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Simultaneous determination of cadmium, iron and tin in canned foods using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leao, Danilo J; Junior, Mario M S; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2016-06-01

    A method was established to simultaneously determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned-food samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). The quantification step has been performed using the primary line (228.802nm) for cadmium and the adjacent secondary lines (228.725nm and 228.668nm) for iron and tin, respectively. The selected chemical modifier was an acid solution that contained a mixture of 0.1% (w/v) Pd and 0.05% (w/v) Mg. The absorbance signals were measured based on the peak area using 3 pixels for cadmium and 5 pixels for iron and tin. Under these conditions, cadmium, iron and tin have been determined in canned-food samples using the external calibration technique based on aqueous standards, where the limits of quantification were 2.10ngg(-1) for cadmium, 1.95mgkg(-1) for iron and 3.00mgkg(-1) for tin, and the characteristic masses were 1.0pg for cadmium, 0.9ng for iron and 1.1ng for tin. The precision was evaluated using two solutions of each metal ion, and the results, which were expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%), were 3.4-6.8%. The method accuracy for cadmium and iron was confirmed by analyzing a certified reference material of apple leaves (NIST 1515), which was supplied by NIST. However, for tin, the accuracy was confirmed by comparing the results of the proposed method and another analytical technique (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry). The proposed procedure was applied to determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned samples of peeled tomato and sardine. Eleven samples were analyzed, and the analyte concentrations were 3.57-62.9ngg(-1), 2.68-31.48mgkg(-1) and 4.06-122.0mgkg(-1) for cadmium, iron and tin, respectively. In all analyzed samples, the cadmium and tin contents were lower than the permissible maximum levels for these metals in canned foods in the Brazilian legislation.

  5. Synaptic ribbon. Conveyor belt or safety belt?

    PubMed

    Parsons, T D; Sterling, P

    2003-02-06

    The synaptic ribbon in neurons that release transmitter via graded potentials has been considered as a conveyor belt that actively moves vesicles toward their release sites. But evidence has accumulated to the contrary, and it now seems plausible that the ribbon serves instead as a safety belt to tether vesicles stably in mutual contact and thus facilitate multivesicular release by compound exocytosis.

  6. Iron and sulfur isotope constraints on redox conditions associated with the 3.2 Ga barite deposits of the Mapepe Formation (Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busigny, Vincent; Marin-Carbonne, Johanna; Muller, Elodie; Cartigny, Pierre; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Assayag, Nelly; Philippot, Pascal

    2017-08-01

    The occurrence of Early Archean barite deposits is intriguing since this type of sediment requires high availability of dissolved sulfate (SO42-), the oxidized form of sulfur, although most authors argued that the Archean eon was dominated by reducing conditions, with low oceanic sulfate concentration (<10 μM) relative to present day levels of 28,000 μM. In order to better assess the redox state of the paleo-atmosphere and -oceans, we examined Fe and S isotope compositions in a sedimentary sequence from the 3.2 Ga-old Mendon and Mapepe formations (Kaapvaal craton, South Africa), recovered from the drill-core BBDP2 of the Barberton Barite Drilling Project. Major elements were also analyzed to constrain the respective imprints of detrital vs metasomatic processes, in particular using Al, Ti and K interrelations. Bulk rock Fe isotope compositions are linked to mineralogy, with δ56Fe values varying between -2.04‰ in Fe sulfide-dominated barite beds, to +2.14‰ in Fe oxide-bearing cherts. δ34S values of sulfides vary between -10.84 and +3.56‰, with Δ33S in a range comprised between -0.35 and +2.55‰, thus supporting an O2-depleted atmosphere (<10-5 PAL). Iron isotope variations together with major element correlations show that, although the sediments experienced a pervasive stage of hydrothermal alteration, the rocks preserved a primary/authigenic signature predating subsequent hydrothermal stage. Highly positive δ56Fe values recorded in primary Fe-oxides from ferruginous cherts support partial Fe oxidation in a reducing oceanic environment (O2 < 10-4 μM), but are incompatible with a model of complete oxidation at the redox boundary of a stratified water column. Iron oxide precipitation under low O2 levels was likely mediated by anoxygenic photosynthesis, and/or abiotic photo-oxidation processes. Our results are consistent with global anoxic conditions in the 3.2 Ga-old sediments, implying that the barite deposits were most likely sourced by atmospheric

  7. Introducing a new histologic scoring system for iron deposition in liver of thalassemic patients, compared with atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Habib; Mahjoub, Fatemeh; Jahanzad, Eesa; Farahmand, Fatemeh; Izadyar, Mina; Sani, Mehri Najafi; Rashti, Mohammad Lamei; Aramli, Mohammad Sadegh

    2015-01-01

    Iron deposition in liver is a major finding in thalassemic patients and because of direct iron toxicity to liver it is associated with several consequences for example liver fibrosis. Liver biopsies from 63 patients were evaluated, 40 (63.5%) were male and 20 (36.5%) were female. The mean age of the patients was 8.01 ± 3.7 and the age range was from 1.8 to 15 years. Histologic grading and staging was performed for each case according to modified HAI (Hepatitis Activity Index) system. Iron scoring was performed according to Sindram & Marx and MTK1-3 scoring systems. The mean (SD) dry weight (dw) of liver specimens was 1.34 (0.11) mg (range 0.20 to 3.80 mg). The mean (SD) of hepatic iron concentration was 230.9 (121.2)μmol/g dry weight. The relationship between the variables HIC, HII (hepatic iron index) and all histological gradings of iron (S&M and MTK1-3) was very strong. The relationship between the HIC and staging by HAI method was good. Significant differences were identified between the mean HIC in scores 1&2 of all histological iron scorings (S&M and MTK1-3), but no significant differences identified between mean HIC in other adjacent scores in all histological iron scorings (S&M and MTK1, 2 and 3). New scoring system introduced by us in this study which considered size and density of iron granules as well as zone of iron deposition was very much the same as simple Sindram and Marx classification.

  8. Electronic structure and local atomic arrangement of transition metal ions in nanoporous iron-substituted nickel phosphates, VSB-1 and VSB-5.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Woo; Oh, Eun-Jin; Jhung, Sung Hwa; Chang, Jong-San; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure and local atomic arrangement of transition metal ions in nanoporous iron-substituted nickel phosphates VSB-1 and VSB-5 have been investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at Fe K- and Ni K-edges. The Fe K-edge XANES study clearly demonstrated that substituted iron ions were stabilized in octahedral nickel sites of nanoporous nickel phosphate lattice. A comparison with several Fe-references revealed that the substituted irons have mixed Fe2+/Fe3+ oxidation state with the average valence of +2.8-3.0. According to the Ni K-edge XANES analysis, the aliovalent substitution of Ni2+ with Fe2+/Fe3+ induced a slight reduction of divalent nickel ions in VSB-5 to meet a charge balance. On the contrary, Fe substitution for the VSB-1 phase did not cause notable decrease in the oxidation state of nickel ions, which would be related either to the accompanying decrease of pentavalent phosphorus cations or to the increase of oxygen anions. In conclusion, the present findings clearly demonstrated that the nanoporous lattice of nickel phosphate can accommodate effectively iron ions in its octahedral nickel sites.

  9. A Green Analytical Method Using Ultrasound in Sample Preparation for the Flow Injection Determination of Iron, Manganese, and Zinc in Soluble Solid Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yebra, M. Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method was developed for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples. The method is based on continuous ultrasonic water dissolution of the sample (5–30 mg) at room temperature followed by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. A good precision of the whole procedure (1.2–4.6%) and a sample throughput of ca. 25 samples h–1 were obtained. The proposed green analytical method has been successfully applied for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid food samples (soluble cocoa and soluble coffee) and pharmaceutical preparations (multivitamin tablets). The ranges of concentrations found were 21.4–25.61 μg g−1 for iron, 5.74–18.30 μg g−1 for manganese, and 33.27–57.90 μg g−1 for zinc in soluble solid food samples and 3.75–9.90 μg g−1 for iron, 0.47–5.05 μg g−1 for manganese, and 1.55–15.12 μg g−1 for zinc in multivitamin tablets. The accuracy of the proposed method was established by a comparison with the conventional wet acid digestion method using a paired t-test, indicating the absence of systematic errors. PMID:22567553

  10. Towards the atomic-scale characterization of isolated iron sites confined in a nitrogen-doped graphene matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingfei; Liu, Yun; Li, Haobo; Li, Lulu; Deng, Dehui; Yang, Fan; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-07-01

    Atomic scale characterization of the surface structure of powder catalysts is essential to the identification of active sites, but remains a major challenge in catalysis research. We described here a procedure that combines atomic force microscopy (AFM), operated in air, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), operated in UHV, to obtain the atomic structure and local electronic properties of powder catalysts. The atomically dispersed Fe-N-C catalyst was used as an example, which was synthesized by low temperature ball milling methods. We discussed the effect of solvents in the dispersion of powder catalysts on a planar support, which is key to the subsequent atomic characterization. From the morphology, atomic structure and local electronic properties of the Fe-N-C catalyst, our combined measurements also provide an insight for the effect of ball milling in the preparation of atomically dispersed metal catalysts.

  11. Column chromatographic pre-concentration of iron(III) in alloys and biological samples with 1-nitroso-2-naphthol-3,6-disulphonate and benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium-perchlorate adsorbent supported on naphthalene using atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miura, J; Arima, S; Satake, M

    1990-09-01

    The solid ion-pair material produced from the reaction between benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride (BDTA) and sodium perchlorate on naphthalene provides the basis for a simple, rapid and selective technique for pre-concentrating iron from up to 500 ml of aqueous solution. Iron reacts with disodium 1-nitroso-2-naphthol-3,6-disulphonate (Nitroso-R salt) to form a water-soluble coloured chelate anion. The iron chelate anion forms a water-insoluble, stable iron-Nitroso-R-BDTA complex on naphthalene packed in a column. Trace amounts of iron are quantitatively retained on naphthalene in the pH range 3.5-7.5 and at a flow-rate of 1-2 ml min-1. The solid mass is dissolved out from the column with 5 ml of N,N-dimethylformamide and iron is determined by means of an atomic absorption spectrometer at 248 nm. The calibration graph is linear for concentrations of iron over the range of 0.5-20 micrograms in 5 ml of final solution. The standard deviation and relative standard deviation were calculated. The detection limit of the method was 0.0196 micrograms ml-1 of iron. The sensitivity for 1% absorption was 0.072 microgram ml-1 (0.165 microgram ml-1 by direct atomic absorption spectrometry of aqueous solution). The proposed method was applied to the determination of iron in standard alloys and biological samples.

  12. Ring current and radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed during 1983-1986 on the ring current, the injection boundary model, and the radiation belts are discussed. The results of these studies yielded the first observations on the composition and charge state of the ring current throughout the ring-current energy range, and strong observational support for an injection-boundary model accounting for the origins of radiation-belt particles, the ring current, and substorm particles observed at R less than about 7 earth radii. In addition, the results have demonstrated that the detection of energetic neutral atoms generated by charge-exchange interactions between the ring current and the hydrogen geocorona can provide global images of the earth's ring current and its spatial and temporal evolution.

  13. Variational calculation of ground-state energy of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields. [at neutron star surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, E. G.; Ruderman, M. A.; Lee, J.-F.; Sutherland, P. G.; Hillebrandt, W.; Mueller, E.

    1977-01-01

    Variational calculations of the binding energies of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields (greater than 10 to the 12th gauss). These calculations include the electron exchange energy. The cohesive energy of the condensed matter, which is the difference between these two binding energies, is of interest in pulsar theories and in the description of the surfaces of neutron stars. It is found that the cohesive energy ranges from 2.6 keV to 8.0 keV.

  14. Variational calculation of ground-state energy of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields. [at neutron star surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, E. G.; Ruderman, M. A.; Lee, J.-F.; Sutherland, P. G.; Hillebrandt, W.; Mueller, E.

    1977-01-01

    Variational calculations of the binding energies of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields (greater than 10 to the 12th gauss). These calculations include the electron exchange energy. The cohesive energy of the condensed matter, which is the difference between these two binding energies, is of interest in pulsar theories and in the description of the surfaces of neutron stars. It is found that the cohesive energy ranges from 2.6 keV to 8.0 keV.

  15. Evidence of a reduction reaction of oxidized iron/cobalt by boron atoms diffused toward naturally oxidized surface of CoFeB layer during annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Soshi Honjo, Hiroaki; Niwa, Masaaki; Ikeda, Shoji; Ohno, Hideo; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-06

    We have investigated the redox reaction on the surface of Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction stack samples after annealing at 300, 350, and 400 °C for 1 h using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for precise analysis of the chemical bonding states. At a capping tantalum layer thickness of 1 nm, both the capping tantalum layer and the surface of the underneath CoFeB layer in the as-deposited stack sample were naturally oxidized. By comparison of the Co 2p and Fe 2p spectra among the as-deposited and annealed samples, reduction of the naturally oxidized cobalt and iron atoms occurred on the surface of the CoFeB layer. The reduction reaction was more significant at higher annealing temperature. Oxidized cobalt and iron were reduced by boron atoms that diffused toward the surface of the top CoFeB layer. A single CoFeB layer was prepared on SiO{sub 2}, and a confirmatory evidence of the redox reaction with boron diffusion was obtained by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the naturally oxidized surface of the CoFeB single layer after annealing. The redox reaction is theoretically reasonable based on the Ellingham diagram.

  16. Evidence of a reduction reaction of oxidized iron/cobalt by boron atoms diffused toward naturally oxidized surface of CoFeB layer during annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Soshi; Honjo, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Shoji; Ohno, Hideo; Endoh, Tetsuo; Niwa, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the redox reaction on the surface of Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction stack samples after annealing at 300, 350, and 400 °C for 1 h using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for precise analysis of the chemical bonding states. At a capping tantalum layer thickness of 1 nm, both the capping tantalum layer and the surface of the underneath CoFeB layer in the as-deposited stack sample were naturally oxidized. By comparison of the Co 2p and Fe 2p spectra among the as-deposited and annealed samples, reduction of the naturally oxidized cobalt and iron atoms occurred on the surface of the CoFeB layer. The reduction reaction was more significant at higher annealing temperature. Oxidized cobalt and iron were reduced by boron atoms that diffused toward the surface of the top CoFeB layer. A single CoFeB layer was prepared on SiO2, and a confirmatory evidence of the redox reaction with boron diffusion was obtained by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the naturally oxidized surface of the CoFeB single layer after annealing. The redox reaction is theoretically reasonable based on the Ellingham diagram.

  17. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, K; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Oka, T; Hasai, H

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate 152Eu and 60Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen.

  18. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. [Ferric iron absorption in deltar p f F xoo, a gene deletion mutant of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, assayed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Wu, Mao-Sen; He, Chen-Yang

    2010-04-01

    The ferric iron absorption is one of the most important limiting factors of bacterial growth of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. It has been previously speculated that r p f F xoo might be involved in the ferric iron metabolism of the pathogen. In the present study, deltar p f F xoo, a gene deletion mutant, was generated from the wild-type strain PXO99A of Xoo through the homologous recombination, and Fe content was assayed using flame atomic absorption in PXO99A and deltar p f F xoo. The results indicated that the recovery was 99.7% and the relative standard deviation was 1.89 under optimized AAS operating conditions. The increase in Fe absorption in PXO99A and deltar p f F xoo was observed with the increasing time. However, the ferric content of deltar p f F xoo was significantly lower than that of PXO99A (P < 0.05). It is suggested that r p f F xoo is involved in iron metabolism in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

  20. Hydrogen atom transfer from iron(II)-tris[2,2'-bi(tetrahydropyrimidine)] to TEMPO: a negative enthalpy of activation predicted by the Marcus equation.

    PubMed

    Mader, Elizabeth A; Larsen, Anna S; Mayer, James M

    2004-07-07

    The transfer of a hydrogen atom from iron(II)-tris[2,2'-bi(tetrahydropyrimidine)], [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, to the stable nitroxide, TEMPO, was studied by stopped-flow UV-vis spectrophotometry. The products are the deprotonated iron(III) complex [FeIII(H2bip)2(Hbip)]2+ and the hydroxylamine, TEMPO-H. This reaction can also be referred to as proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). The equilibrium constant for the reaction is close to 1; thus, the reaction can be driven in either direction. The rate constants for the forward and reverse reactions at 298 K are k1 = 260 +/- 30 M-1 s-1 and k-1 = 150 +/- 20 M-1 s-1. Interestingly, the rate constant for the forward reaction decreases as reaction temperature is increased, implying a negative activation enthalpy: DeltaH1 = -2.7 +/- 0.4 kcal mol-1, DeltaS1 = -57 +/- 8 cal mol-1 K-1. Marcus theory predicts this unusual temperature dependence on the basis of independently measured self-exchange rate constants and equilibrium constants: DeltaHcalcd = -3.5 +/- 0.5 kcal mol-1, DeltaScalcd = -42 +/- 10 cal mol-1 K-1. This result illustrates the value of the Marcus approach for these types of reactions. The dominant contributor to the negative activation enthalpy is the favorable enthalpy of reaction, DeltaH1 degrees = -9.4 +/- 0.6 kcal mol-1, rather than the small negative activation enthalpy for the H-atom self-exchange between the iron complexes.

  1. ATOMIC-SCALE DESIGN OF IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS: A COMBINED COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, EXPERIMENTAL, AND MICROKINETIC MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2005-03-22

    Efforts during this first year focused on four areas: (1) searching/summarizing published FTS mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) construction of mass spectrometer-TPD and Berty CSTR reactor systems; (3) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron and alumina-supported iron catalysts at various iron loadings (4) Determination of thermochemical parameters such as binding energies of reactive intermediates, heat of FTS elementary reaction steps, and kinetic parameters such as activation energies, and frequency factors of FTS elementary reaction steps on a number of model surfaces. Literature describing mechanistic and kinetic studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts was compiled in a draft review. Construction of the mass spectrometer-TPD system is 90% complete and of a Berty CSTR reactor system 98% complete. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by nonaqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2}, thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. The alumina-supported iron catalysts will be used for kinetic and mechanistic studies. In the coming year, adsorption/desorption properties, rates of elementary steps, and global reaction rates will be measured for these catalysts, with and without promoters, providing a database for understanding effects of dispersion, metal loading, and support on elementary kinetic parameters and for validation of computational models that incorporate effects of surface structure and promoters. Furthermore, using state-of-the-art self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods, we have extensively studied the thermochemistry and kinetics of various elementary steps on

  2. Belt conveyor apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, D.J.; Bogart, R.L.

    1987-05-05

    A belt conveyor apparatus is described comprising: means defining a conveyance path including a first pulley and at least a second pulley, an endless belt member adapted for continuous travel about the pulleys defining thereby an upper and lower reach, the endless belt member having a lower portion which engages the pulleys and an integral upper portion adapted to receive objects at a first location on the conveyance path and transport the objects to and then discharge the objects at a second location on the conveyance path; and motive means in communication with the means defining a conveyance path, for effecting the travel of the endless belt member about the conveyance path.

  3. Determination of tin, vanadium, iron, and molybdenum in various matrices by atomic absorption spectrometry using a simultaneous liquid-liquid extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Viñas, M; Bagur, G M; Gázquez, D; Camino, M; Romero, R

    1999-01-01

    An atomic-absorption spectrometric method is described for the determination of tin, vanadium, iron, and molybdenum in two certified reference materials, food samples, and petroleum crude. After treatment with acids, these elements are separated from matrix elements by simultaneous solvent extraction of 5,5'-methylenedisalicylohydroxamic acid complexes from HCl/NaClO4 solution into an isobutyl methyl ketone/tributyl phosphate solution. The detection limits range from 0.018 to 0.19 microg/mL (n = 3), and the relative standard deviations do not exceed 2.0% at levels of 0.5, 0.6, 2.0, and 7.0 microg/mL of Fe, Mo, V, and Sn, respectively. The method is selective and suffers only from interference by Zr(IV), Ti(IV), Th(IV), W(VI), PO4(3-), and F-.

  4. Determination of molybdenum in ores, iron and steel by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after separation by alpha-benzoinoxime extraction or further xanthate extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1980-02-01

    A simple and moderately rapid method for determining 0.001% or more of molybdenum in ores, iron and steel is described. After sample decomposition, molybdenum is separated from the matrix elements, except tungsten, by chloroform extraction of its alpha-benzoinoxime complex from a 1.75 M hydrochloric-0.13 M tartaric acid medium. Depending on the amount of tungsten present, molybdenum, if necessary, is back-extracted into concentrated ammonia solution and subsequently separated from coextracted tungsten by chloroform extraction of its xanthate complex from a 1.5M hydrochloric-0.13M tartaric acid medium. It is ultimately determined by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry, at 313.3 nm, in a 15% v/v hydrochloric acid medium containing 1,000 microg/ml of aluminium as the chloride, after evaporation of either extract to dryness with nitric, perchloric and sulphuric acids and dissolution of the salts in dilute ammonia solution.

  5. Redox speciation analysis of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters with on-line solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaojin; Feng, Sichao; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing

    2015-05-01

    An automatic on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) system employing the flow injection (FI) technique directly coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) was established for speciation and determination of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters. Fe(II) was mixed with ferrozine solution in a sample stream to form the Fe(II)-ferrozine complex which was extracted onto a C18 SPE cartridge, eluted with eluent and detected with GFAAS. In a parallel flow channel, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with ascorbic acid and then detected in the same way as Fe(II). The home-made interface between FI-SPE and GFAAS efficiently realized the sample introduction to the furnace in a semi-automated way. Parameters of the FI-SPE system and graphite furnace program were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and an orthogonal array design. The salinity effect on the method sensitivity was investigated. The proposed method provided a detection limit of 1.38 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II) and 1.87 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II+III). With variation of the sample loading volume, a broadened determination range of 2.5-200 nmol L(-1) iron could be obtained. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze iron species in samples collected from the Jiulongjiang Estuary, Fujian, China. With the 2-cartridge FI-SPE system developed, on-line simultaneous determination of Fe species with GFAAS was achieved for the first time.

  6. Atomic data from the Iron Project. XLIV. Transition probabilities and line ratios for Fe VI with fluorescent excitation in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guo Xin; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2000-11-01

    Relativistic atomic structure calculations for electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic dipole (M1) transition probabilities among the first 80 fine-structure levels of Fe VI, dominated by configurations 3d3, 3d24s, and 3d24p, are carried out using the Breit-Pauli version of the code SUPERSTRUCTURE. Experimental energies are used to improve the accuracy of these transition probabilities. Employing the 80-level collision-radiative (CR) model with these dipole and forbidden transition probabilities, and Iron Project R-matrix collisional data, we present a number of [Fe VI] line ratios applicable to spectral diagnostics of photoionized H II regions. It is shown that continuum fluorescent excitation needs to be considered in CR models in order to interpret the observed line ratios of optical [Fe VI] lines in planetary nebulae NGC 6741, IC 351, and NGC 7662. The analysis leads to parametrization of line ratios as function of, and as constraints on, the electron density and temperature, as well as the effective radiation temperature of the central source and a geometrical dilution factor. The spectral diagnostics may also help ascertain observational uncertainties. The method may be generally applicable to other objects with intensive background radiation fields, such as novae and active galactic nuclei. The extensive new Iron Project radiative and collisional calculations enable a consistent analysis of many line ratios for the complex iron ions. The complete tables of transition probabilities are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html.

  7. Estimation of perimortal percent carboxy-heme in nonstandard postmortem specimens using analysis of carbon monoxide by GC/MS and iron by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Middleberg, R A; Easterling, D E; Zelonis, S F; Rieders, F; Rieders, M F

    1993-01-01

    In decomposed, formalin-fixed, embalmed, exhumed, and some fire-dried cases in which normal blood is unavailable, the usual methods for determination of carboxyhemoglobin saturation frequently fail. To address these specimens, a method utilizing both gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) determination of carbon monoxide (CO) and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) determination of iron (Fe), in the same specimen, was developed. The method is reported here, along with its application to seven pertinent forsensic death investigations. The CO analytical methodology involves acid liberation of the gas from the specimen aliquot in a headspace vial. After heating and equilibrating, a sample of the headspace vapor is injected into the GC/MS system with a gastight syringe. Quantitation is achieved by standard addition comparison utilizing the ideal gas law equation. Iron is quantified by FAAS analysis of the same aliquot used for the CO determination, following nitric acid digestion. The concentration is determined by comparison to a standard curve. A formula for determining the minimum percent carboxy-heme saturation was derived by using the ratio of the amount of CO to the amount of Fe in the aliquot analyzed. Tissue types analyzed include spleen, liver, muscle, dried blood, and unspecified decomposed tissue.

  8. To Belt or Not To Belt?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1999-01-01

    The National Highway Traffic Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) is in the midst of the first school-bus crash tests in more than 10 years. Its report is expected in June 2000, and those on both sides of the seat-belt debate are waiting to see what NHTSA will recommend on passenger restraints in large school buses. A sidebar lists sources…

  9. Atomic data from the Iron Project. XVII. Radiative transition probabilities for dipole allowed and forbidden transitions in Fe III.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, S. N.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1996-11-01

    Transition probabilities are obtained for both the dipole allowed (E1) fine structure transitions and the forbidden electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole (E2, M1) transitions in Fe III. For the E1 transitions, ab initio calculations in the close coupling (CC) approximation using the R-matrix method are carried out in LS coupling with a 49-term eigenfunction expansion for Fe IV. The fine structure components are obtained through algebraic transformation of the LS line strengths, and the oscillator strengths and A-coefficients are computed using spectroscopic energies of the observed levels. Radiative transition probabilities for 9797 fine structure E1 transitions corresponding to 1408 LS multiplets among 200 bound states of Fe III are reported. Forbidden E2 and M1 transition probabilities are computed for 362 transitions among the 34 fine structure levels of all 16 LS terms dominated by the 3d^6^ configuration using optimised configuration-interaction wavefunctions from the SUPERSTRUCTURE program in the Breit-Pauli approximation. Comparison of the present results is made with previous calculations and significant differences are found. Theoretical line ratios computed using the present E2 and M1 A-coefficients show better agreement with observations for some prominent Fe III lines in the infra-red than those using the earlier data by Garstang (1957MNRAS.117..393G). This work is carried out as part of the Iron Project to obtain accurate radiative and collisional data for the Iron group elements.

  10. Reactions between a <111> screw dislocation and <100> interstitial dislocation loops in alpha-iron modelled at atomic-scale

    SciTech Connect

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Bacon, David J; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2010-03-01

    Interstitial dislocation loops with Burgers vector of <100> type are observed in {alpha}-iron irradiated by neutrons or heavy ions, and their population increases with increasing temperature. Their effect on motion of a 1/2<111> edge dislocation was reported earlier 1. Results are presented of a molecular dynamics study of interactions between a 1/2<111> screw dislocation and <100> loops in iron at temperature in the range 100 to 600 K. A variety of reaction mechanisms and outcomes are observed and classified in terms of the resulting dislocation configuration and the maximum stress required for the dislocation to break away. The highest obstacle resistance arises when the loop is absorbed to form a helical turn on the screw dislocation line, for the dislocation cannot glide away until the turn closes and a loop is released with the same Burgers vector as the line. Other than one situation found, in which no dislocation-loop reaction occurs, the weakest obstacle strength is found when the original <100> loop is restored at the end of the reaction. The important role of the cross-slip and the influence of model boundary conditions are emphasised and demonstrated by examples.

  11. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Rahul P. Nabar

    2006-09-29

    Work continued on the development of a microkinetic model of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on supported and unsupported Fe catalysts. The following aspects of the FT mechanism on unsupported iron catalysts were investigated on during this third year: (1) the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor based on sequential design of experiments; (2) CO adsorption and CO-TPD for obtaining the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron; and (3) isothermal hydrogenation (IH) after Fischer Tropsch reaction to identify and quantify surface carbonaceous species. Rates of C{sub 2+} formation on unsupported iron catalysts at 220 C and 20 atm correlated well to a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be rate-determining steps. From desorption of molecularly adsorbed CO at different temperatures the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron was determined to be 100 kJ/mol. Amounts and types of carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for 5-10 minutes at 150, 175, 200 and 285 C vary significantly with temperature. Mr. Brian Critchfield completed his M.S. thesis work on a statistically designed study of the kinetics of FTS on 20% Fe/alumina. Preparation of a paper describing this work is in progress. Results of these studies were reported at the Annual Meeting of the Western States Catalysis and at the San Francisco AIChE meeting. In the coming period, studies will focus on quantitative determination of the rates of kinetically-relevant elementary steps on unsupported Fe catalysts with/without K and Pt promoters by SSITKA method. This study will help us to (1) understand effects of promoter and support on elementary kinetic parameters and (2) build a microkinetics model for FTS on iron. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on models of defected Fe surfaces, most significantly the stepped Fe(211) surface. Binding

  12. A comparison of simultaneous plasma, atomic absorption, and iron colorimetric determinations of major and trace constituents in acid mine waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three water samples collected during June to October 1982 from the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin were originally analyzed by simultaneous multielement direct-current plasma (DCP) atomic-emission spectrometry, flame atomic-absorption spectrometry, graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) (thallium only), ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry.Determinations were made for the following metallic and semi-metallic constituents: AI, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe(11), Fe(total), Li, Pb, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, K, Sb, Se, Si, Na, Sr, TI, V, and Zn. These samples were re-analyzed later by simultaneous multielement inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-emission spectrometry and Zeeman-corrected GFAAS to determine the concentrations of many of the same constituents with improved accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. The result of this analysis has been the generation of comparative concentration values for a significant subset of the solute constituents. Many of the more recently determined values replace less-than-detection values for the trace metals; others constitute duplicate analyses for the major constituents. The multiple determinations have yielded a more complete, accurate, and precise set of analytical data. They also have resulted in an opportunity to compare the performance of the plasma-emission instruments operated in their respective simultaneous multielement modes. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for Na and K and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for As because of their lower detection limit and relative freedom from interelement spectral effects. Colorimetric determination using ferrozine as the color agent was judged most accurate, precise, and sensitive for Fe. Cadmium, lead, and vanadium concentrations were too low in this set of samples to enable a determination of whether ICP or DCP is a more suitable technique. Of

  13. Belt conveyor apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, David J.; Bogart, Rex L.

    1987-01-01

    A belt conveyor apparatus according to this invention defines a conveyance path including a first pulley and at least a second pulley. An endless belt member is adapted for continuous travel about the pulleys and comprises a lower portion which engages the pulleys and an integral upper portion adapted to receive objects therein at a first location on said conveyance path and transport the objects to a second location for discharge. The upper belt portion includes an opposed pair of longitudinally disposed crest-like members, biased towards each other in a substantially abutting relationship. The crest-like members define therebetween a continuous, normally biased closed, channel along the upper belt portion. Means are disposed at the first and second locations and operatively associated with the belt member for urging the normally biased together crest-like members apart in order to provide access to the continuous channel whereby objects can be received into, or discharged from the channel. Motors are in communication with the conveyance path for effecting the travel of the endless belt member about the conveyance path. The conveyance path can be configured to include travel through two or more elevations and one or more directional changes in order to convey objects above, below and/or around existing structures.

  14. Belt scales user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, N.I. )

    1993-02-01

    A conveyor-belt scale provides a means of obtaining accurate weights of dry bulk materials without delaying other plant operations. In addition, for many applications a belt scale is the most cost-effective alternative among many choices for a weighing system. But a number of users are not comfortable with the accuracy of their belt scales. In cases of unsatisfactory scale performance, it is often possible to correct problems and achieve the accuracy that was expected. To have a belt scale system that is accurate, precise, and cost effective, practical experience has shown that certain basic requisites must be satisfied. These requisites include matching the scale capability to the needs of the application, selecting durable scale equipment and conveyor idlers, adopting improved conveyor support methods, employing superior scale installation and alignment techniques, and establishing and practicing an effective scale testing and performance monitoring program. The goal of the Belt Scale Users' Guide is to enable utilities to reap the benefits of consistently accurate output from their new or upgraded belt scale installations. Such benefits include eliminating incorrect payments for coal receipts, improving coal pile inventory data, providing better heat rate results to enhance plant efficiency and yield more economical power dispatch, and satisfying regulatory agencies. All these benefits can reduce the cost of power generation.

  15. A continental rift model for the La Grande greenstone belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skulski, T.; Hynes, A.; Liu, M.; Francis, D.; Rivard, B.; Stamatelopoulou-Seymour, K.

    1986-01-01

    Stratigraphic relationships and the geochemistry of volcanic rocks contrain the nature and timing of the tectonic and magmatic processes in the pre-deformational history of the La Grande greenstone belt in the Superior Province of north-central Quebec. The lowermost supracrustals in this belt are obscured by syntectonic granitoid intrusives. The supracrustal succession in the western part of the belt consists of a lower sequence of immature clastic sediments and mafic volcanoclastics, overlain by pillowed and massive basalts. Further east, along tectonic strike, a lower sequence of mafic volcanoclastics and immature clastic sediments is overlain by a thick sequence of pillowed and massive basalts, and resedimented coarse clastic sediments and banded iron formation. These are overlain by assive basaltic andesites, andesites and intermediate volcanoclastics intercalated with immature clastic sediments. In contrast, in the eastern part of the belt lenses of felsic volcanics and volcanoclastics occur at the base of the succession and pillowed and massive basalts are overlain by komatiites at the top. The La Grande greenstone belt can be explained as the product of continental rifting. The restricted occurence of komatiites, and eastwardly directed paleocurrents in clastic sediments in the central part of the belt are consistent with rifting commencing in the east and propagating westward with time. The increase in depth of emplacement and deposition with time of the lower three units in the central part of the belt reflects deposition in a subsiding basin. These supracrustal rocks are believed to represent the initial rift succession.

  16. In situ atomic force microscopy analysis of morphology and particle size changes in lithium iron phosphate cathode during discharge.

    PubMed

    Demirocak, Dervis Emre; Bhushan, Bharat

    2014-06-01

    Li-ion batteries offer great promise for future plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and pure electric vehicles (EVs). One of the challenges is to improve the cycle life of Li-ion batteries which requires detailed understanding of the aging phenomenon. In situ techniques are especially valuable to understand aging since it allows monitoring the physical and chemical changes in real time. In this study, in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) is utilized to study the changes in morphology and particle size of LiFePO4 cathode during discharge. The guidelines for in situ AFM cell design for accurate and reliable measurements based on different designs are presented. The effect of working electrode to counter electrode surface area ratio on cycling data of an in situ cell is also discussed. Analysis of the surface area change in LiFePO4 particles when the cell was cycled between 100% and 70% state of charge is presented. Among four particles analyzed, surface area increase of particles during Li intercalation of LiFePO4 spanned from 1.8% to 14.3% indicating the inhomogeneous nature of the cathode surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of tin in ores, iron, steel and non-ferrous alloys by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after separation by extraction as the iodide.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1980-06-01

    A simple and moderately rapid method for determining 0.001% or more of tin in ores, concentrates and tailings, iron, steel and copper-, zinc-, aluminium-, titanium- and zirconium-base alloys is described. After sample decomposition, tin is separated from the matrix elements, except arsenic, by toluene extraction of its iodide from a 3M sulphuric acid-1.5M potassium iodide medium containing tartaric and ascorbic acids. It is finally back-extracted into a nitric-sulphuric acid solution containing hydrochloric acid to prevent the formation of an insoluble tin-arsenic compound and the resultant solution is evaporated to dryness. Tin is subsequently determined by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry in a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame, at 235.4 nm in a 10% hydrochloric-0.5% tartaric acid medium containing 250 mug of potassium per ml. Co-extracted arsenic does not interfere. Results obtained by this method are compared with those obtained spectrophotometrically with gallein after the separation of tin by iodide extraction.

  18. Determination of chromium in ores, rocks and related materials, iron, steel and non-ferrous alloys by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after separation by tribenzylamine-chloroform extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1980-10-01

    A method for determining trace and moderate amounts of chromium in ores, concentrates, rocks, soils and clays is described. After fusion of the sample with sodium peroxide, the melt is dissolved in dilute sulphuric acid. The chromium(III) produced by the hydrogen peroxide formed is co-precipitated with hydrous ferric oxide. The precipitate is dissolved in 0.7M sulphuric acid and chromium oxidized to chromium(VI) with ceric ammonium sulphate. The chromium(VI) is extracted as an ion-association complex into chloroform containing tribenzylamine and stripped with ammoniacal hydrogen peroxide. This solution is acidified with perchloric acid and chromium determined by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry in an air-acetylene flame, at 357.9 nm. Barium and strontium do not interfere. The procedure is also applicable to iron and steel, and nickel-copper, aluminium and zirconium alloys. Up to 5 mg of manganese and 10 mg each of molybdenum and vanadium will not interfere. In the absence of vanadium, up to 10 mg of tungsten will not interfere. In the presence of 1 mg of vanadium, up to 1 mg of tungsten will not interfere.

  19. Rapid determination of zinc and iron in foods by flow-injection analysis with flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry and slurry nebulization.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, J C; Strong, F C; Martin, N J

    1990-07-01

    A rapid method of determining zinc and iron in food by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with slurry nebulization into an air-acetylene flame has been developed. A V-groove, clog-free Babington-type nebulizer, coupled to a single-line flow-injection analysis (FIA) system, was employed to introduce the slurry into the spray chamber. Under the FIA conditions described, an injection frequency of 120/hr is possible, with negligible carry-over and memory effects. The calibration graphs were obtained by using various concentrations (up to 0.1 g/ml) of white bean homogenate as standards, rather than solutions. The method has been applied to various kinds of foods, including grains, vegetables, fruits and sausage. Homogenization of semi-prepared samples to form slurries took only 4 min. Relative deviations between results by the slurry and solution methods for both elements averaged 2-3%. Detection limits by the slurry method were 0.3 mug/ml Zn and 0.6 mug/ml Fe.

  20. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes.

  1. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, and selenium in fruit slurry: analytical application to nutritional and toxicological quality control.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, C; Lorenzo, M L; Lopez, M C

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for direct determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, and selenium in slurried fruit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The fresh samples were suspended in Triton X-100 and shaken with 10 g zirconia spheres until a slurry was formed. The graphite furnace conditions were optimized for each element. The detection limits were 0.3, 3.5, 15.0, 0.5, and 10.0 ng/g for Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Se, respectively. Accuracy and precision were checked against sample mineralization in a microwave acid-digestion bomb. Results for analyses of National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials agreed closely with certified values. Analytical application of this method was tested with 40 samples of 8 widely consumed fruit species. The mean values (referred to fresh weight of edible fraction) for each fruit species had ranges of 0.0003-0.050 microgram/g for Cd, 0.316-1.094 micrograms/g for Cu, 2.00-5.50 micrograms/g for Fe, 0.050-0.396 microgram/g for Pb, and 0.010-0.020 microgram/g for Se. The proposed method is useful for routine multielemental analysis in nutritional and toxicological quality control of fruits and similar foodstuffs.

  2. Ligandless dispersive liquid--liquid microextraction of iron in biological and foodstuff samples and its determination by Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madadizadeh, Mohadeseh; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Ashkenani, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    A new, simple, and efficient method comprising ligandless dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is reported for the preconcentration and determination of ultratrace amounts of Fe(III). Carbon tetrachloride and acetone were used as the extraction and disperser solvents, respectively. Some effective parameters of the microextraction such as choice of extraction and disperser solvents, their volume, extraction time and temperature, salt and surfactant effect, and pH were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.02 to 0.46 microg/L of Fe(III), with LOD and LOQ of 5.2 and 17.4 ng/L, respectively. The RSD for seven replicated determinations of Fe(IIl) ion at 0.1 microg/L concentration level was 5.2%. Operational simplicity, rapidity, low cost, good repeatability, and low consumption of extraction solvent are the main advantages of the proposed method. The method was successfully applied to the determination of iron in biological, food, and certified reference samples.

  3. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing shall not be applied while belts are...

  4. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless the machines are provided with mechanical shifters. (b) Belt dressing shall not be applied while belts are...

  5. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission (RBSP) will explore the Van Allen Radiation Belts in the Earth's magnetosphere. The charge particles in these regions can be hazardous to both spacecraft and ...

  6. Moving belt radiator development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Alan

    1988-01-01

    Development of the Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) as an advanced space radiator concept is discussed. The ralative merits of Solid Belt (SBR), Liquid Belt (LBR), and Hybrid Belt (HBR) Radiators are described. Analytical and experimental efforts related to the dynamics of a rotating belt in microgravity are reviewed. The development of methods for transferring heat to the moving belt is discussed, and the results from several experimental investigations are summarized. Limited efforts related to the belt deployment and stowage, and to fabrication of a hybrid belt, are also discussed. Life limiting factors such as seal wear and micrometeroid resistance are identified. The results from various MBR point design studies for several power levels are compared with advanced Heat Pipe Radiator technology. MBR designs are shown to compare favorable at both 300 and 1000 K temperature levels. However, additional effort will be required to resolve critical technology issues and to demonstrate the advantage of MBR systems.

  7. Moving belt radiator development status

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.A.

    1988-07-01

    Development of the Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) as an advanced space radiator concept is discussed. The ralative merits of Solid Belt (SBR), Liquid Belt (LBR), and Hybrid Belt (HBR) Radiators are described. Analytical and experimental efforts related to the dynamics of a rotating belt in microgravity are reviewed. The development of methods for transferring heat to the moving belt is discussed, and the results from several experimental investigations are summarized. Limited efforts related to the belt deployment and stowage, and to fabrication of a hybrid belt, are also discussed. Life limiting factors such as seal wear and micrometeroid resistance are identified. The results from various MBR point design studies for several power levels are compared with advanced Heat Pipe Radiator technology. MBR designs are shown to compare favorable at both 300 and 1000 K temperature levels. However, additional effort will be required to resolve critical technology issues and to demonstrate the advantage of MBR systems.

  8. Moving Belt Radiator technology issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Alan, III

    1988-01-01

    Development of the Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) as an advanced space radiator concept is discussed. The relative merits of Solid Belt (SBR) Liquid Belt (LBR), and Hybrid Belt (HBR) Radiators are described. Analytical and experimental efforts related to the dynamics of a rotating belt in microgravity are reviewed. The development of methods for transferring heat to the moving belt is discussed, and the results from several experimental investigations are summarized. Limited efforts related to the belt deployment and stowage, and to fabrication of a hybrid belt, are also discussed. Life limiting factors such as seal wear and micrometeroid resistance are identified. The results from various MBR point design studies for several power levels are compared with advanced Heat Pipe Radiator technology. MBR designs are shown to compare favorable at both 300 and 1000 K temperature levels. However, additional effort will be required to resolve critical technology issues and to demonstrate the advantage of MBR systems.

  9. Conveyor belt care.

    PubMed

    1989-07-08

    Nurses, doctors, politicians and public have reacted to the prospect of high-volume hospital bed usage - conveyor belt care - by warning of a future-shock scenario of 'pro[Illegible Word] pea' patients whipped through dehumanising hospital treatment and promptly dumped crutchless into the community.

  10. The Stroke Belt Consortium.

    PubMed

    Alberts, M J

    1996-01-01

    The "Stroke Belt" describes a region of the southeastern United States with a high incidence of stroke and mortality due to stroke. In an effort to address the problem of stroke in this region, we have formed the Stroke Belt Consortium (SBC). This report describes the formation and functions of the SBC. The SBC is a unique organization with representatives from many areas, including health care, government, nonprofit organizations, the pharmaceutical industry, minority groups, educational groups, and managed care. The goals of the consortium are to advance public and professional education about stroke in the Stroke Belt, with a special emphasis on the populations in that region. The first meeting of the consortium was held in November 1994. Many helpful and innovative ideas and initiatives were generated at the first SBC meeting. These included improved techniques for professional education, the development of a mass media campaign for public education, screening of college students for stroke risk factors, and using fast-food restaurants and sporting events as venues to promote stroke education. This type of organized effort may produce cost-effective programs and initiatives, particularly for largescale educational efforts, that will enhance the prevention and treatment of stroke patients. If successful in the Stroke Belt, similar organizations can be formed in other regions of the nation to address specific issues related to stroke prevention, education, and treatment.

  11. Radiation belts of jupiter.

    PubMed

    Fillius, R W; McIlwain, C E

    1974-01-25

    Pioneer 10 counted relativistic electrons throughout the magnetosphere of Jupiter, with the greatest fluxes being inside 20 Jupiter radii. The peak flux of electrons with energy greater than 50 million electron volts was 1.3 x 10(7) per square centimeter per second at the innermost penetration of the radiation belts.

  12. Radiation belts of jupiter.

    PubMed

    Stansberry, K G; White, R S

    1973-12-07

    Predictions of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts are based mainly on decimeter observations of 1966 and 1968. Extensive calculations modeling radial diffusion of particles inward from the solar wind and electron synchrotron radiation are used to relate the predictions and observations.

  13. Continuing scearch for a new type charging belt

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, N.L.

    1995-12-31

    The EN Tandem accelerator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates to support a varied program of atomic physics research. As such, the demands on the accelerator often require a range of operation from {approximately}0.38 to 7.0 MV on the terminal, with low ripple and long term steady state operation. The standard charging belts obtained from the manufacture have generally given acceptable performance, but it is reasonable that modem manufacturing techniques and materials could increase belt lifetimes and improve accelerator performance, particularly voltage ripple. A new belt of significantly different construction from that of the conventional belts was specified, purchased, and installed in 1993. After 2800 hours of use at voltages from 0.38 to 5.8 MV, it was removed from the accelerator in early August 1995.

  14. Epsilon Eridani Inner Asteroid Belt

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-14

    SCI2017_0004: Artist's illustration of the Epsilon Eridani system showing Epsilon Eridani b, right foreground, a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting its parent star at the outside edge of an asteroid belt. In the background can be seen another narrow asteroid or comet belt plus an outermost belt similar in size to our solar system's Kuiper Belt. The similarity of the structure of the Epsilon Eridani system to our solar system is remarkable, although Epsilon Eridani is much younger than our sun. SOFIA observations confirmed the existence of the asteroid belt adjacent to the orbit of the Jovian planet. Credit: NASA/SOFIA/Lynette Cook

  15. Microstructual investigation of mixed rar earth iron boron processed vis melt-spinning and high-pressure gas-atomization for isotrophic bonded permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Buelow, Nicholas Lee

    2005-01-01

    A solid solution of three rare earths (RE) in the RE2Fe14B structure have been combined to create the novel mixed rare earth iron boron (MRE2Fe14B) alloy family. MRE2Fe14B exhibits reduced temperature dependent magnetic properties; remanence and coercivity. The desired form of MRE2Fe14B is a powder that can be blended with a polymer binder and compression or injection molded to form an isotropic polymer bonded permanent magnet (PBM). Commercially, Nd2Fe14B is the alloy of choice for PBMs. Powders of Nd2Fe14B are made via melt-spinning as can be MRE2Fe14B which allows for direct comparisons. MRE2Fe14B made using melt-spinning at high wheel speeds is overquenched and must be annealed to an optimal hard magnetic state. Due to the rare earth content in the MRE2Fe14B powders, they must be protected from the environment in which they operate. This protection is accomplished by using a modified fluidized bed process to grow a protective fluoride coating nominally 15nm thick, to reduce air oxidation. MRE2Fe14B has demonstrated reduced temperature dependent magnetic properties in ribbon and PBM form. The real challenge has been modifying alloy designs that were successfully melt-spun to be compatible with high-pressure gas-atomization (HPGA). The cooling rates in HPGA are lower than melt-spinning, as the powders are quenched via convective cooling, compared to melt-spinning, which quenches initially by conductive cooling. Early alloy designs, in gas atomized and melt-spun form, did not have similar phase compositions or microstructures. Alloy additions, such as the addition of zirconium as a nucleation catalyst, were successful in creating similar phases and microstructures in the HPGA powders and melt-spun ribbon of the same MRE2Fe14

  16. Measuring brain manganese and iron accumulation in rats following 14 weeks of low-dose manganese treatment using atomic absorption spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A; Zhang, Na; Anderson, Joel G; Erikson, Keith M; Avison, Malcolm J; Gore, John C; Aschner, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) may lead to a movement disorder due to preferential Mn accumulation in the globus pallidus and other basal ganglia nuclei. Iron (Fe) deficiency also results in increased brain Mn levels, as well as dysregulation of other trace metals. The relationship between Mn and Fe transport has been attributed to the fact that both metals can be transported via the same molecular mechanisms. It is not known, however, whether brain Mn distribution patterns due to increased Mn exposure vs. Fe deficiency are the same, or whether Fe supplementation would reverse or inhibit Mn deposition. To address these questions, we utilized four distinct experimental populations. Three separate groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats on different diets (control diet [MnT], Fe deficient [FeD], or Fe supplemented [FeS]) were given weekly intravenous Mn injections (3 mg Mn/kg body mass) for 14 weeks, whereas control (CN) rats were fed the control diet and received sterile saline injections. At the conclusion of the study, both blood and brain Mn and Fe levels were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. The data indicate that changes in dietary Fe levels (either increased or decreased) result in regionally specific increases in brain Mn levels compared with CN or MnT animals. Furthermore, there was no difference in either Fe or Mn accumulation between FeS or FeD animals. These data suggest that dietary Fe manipulation, whether increased or decreased, may contribute to brain Mn deposition in populations vulnerable to increased Mn exposure.

  17. Iron species determination by task-specific ionic liquid-based in situ solvent formation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Susan; Ashoori, Vahid

    2017-10-01

    The task-specific ionic liquid (TSIL) of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide functionalized with 8-hydroxyquinoline was used as a chelating agent and extracting solvent for dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and subsequent determination of Fe(III) by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The in situ solvent formation of TSIL using KPF6 provided the desired water-immiscible ionic liquid. The total Fe concentration could be determined after pre-oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Various factors affecting the proposed extraction procedure were optimized. The proposed analytical conditions were: sample pH 5, TSIL amount 0.3% (w/v), KPF6 amount 0.15% (w/v), anti-sticking 0.1% (w/v) and salt concentration 5% (w/v). Under optimal conditions, the linear dynamic ranges for Fe(III) and total Fe were 20-80 and 20-110 ng mL(-1) , respectively, with a detection limit of 6.9 ng mL(-1) for Fe(III) and relative standard deviation of 2.2%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace Fe(III) in water (underground, tap, refined water and artificial sea water) and beverage (apple, tomato, and tea) samples. The developed method offers advantages such as simplicity, ease of operation, and extraction of Fe(III) from aqueous solutions without the use of organic solvent. It was successfully applied for iron speciation in different real samples. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. The empty primordial asteroid belt.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Sean N; Izidoro, Andre

    2017-09-01

    The asteroid belt contains less than a thousandth of Earth's mass and is radially segregated, with S-types dominating the inner belt and C-types the outer belt. It is generally assumed that the belt formed with far more mass and was later strongly depleted. We show that the present-day asteroid belt is consistent with having formed empty, without any planetesimals between Mars and Jupiter's present-day orbits. This is consistent with models in which drifting dust is concentrated into an isolated annulus of terrestrial planetesimals. Gravitational scattering during terrestrial planet formation causes radial spreading, transporting planetesimals from inside 1 to 1.5 astronomical units out to the belt. Several times the total current mass in S-types is implanted, with a preference for the inner main belt. C-types are implanted from the outside, as the giant planets' gas accretion destabilizes nearby planetesimals and injects a fraction into the asteroid belt, preferentially in the outer main belt. These implantation mechanisms are simple by-products of terrestrial and giant planet formation. The asteroid belt may thus represent a repository for planetary leftovers that accreted across the solar system but not in the belt itself.

  19. The empty primordial asteroid belt

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Sean N.; Izidoro, Andre

    2017-01-01

    The asteroid belt contains less than a thousandth of Earth’s mass and is radially segregated, with S-types dominating the inner belt and C-types the outer belt. It is generally assumed that the belt formed with far more mass and was later strongly depleted. We show that the present-day asteroid belt is consistent with having formed empty, without any planetesimals between Mars and Jupiter’s present-day orbits. This is consistent with models in which drifting dust is concentrated into an isolated annulus of terrestrial planetesimals. Gravitational scattering during terrestrial planet formation causes radial spreading, transporting planetesimals from inside 1 to 1.5 astronomical units out to the belt. Several times the total current mass in S-types is implanted, with a preference for the inner main belt. C-types are implanted from the outside, as the giant planets’ gas accretion destabilizes nearby planetesimals and injects a fraction into the asteroid belt, preferentially in the outer main belt. These implantation mechanisms are simple by-products of terrestrial and giant planet formation. The asteroid belt may thus represent a repository for planetary leftovers that accreted across the solar system but not in the belt itself. PMID:28924609

  20. The levantine amber belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissenbaum, A.; Horowitz, A.

    1992-02-01

    Amber, a fossil resin, is found in Early Cretaceous sanstones and fine clastics in Lebanon, Jordan, and Israel. The term "Levantine amber belt" is coined for this amber-containing sediment belt. The amber occurs as small nodules of various colors and frequently contains inclusions of macro- and microorganisms. The Lebanese amber contains Lepidoptera and the amber from southern Israel is rich in fungal remains. The source of the amber, based on geochemical and palynological evidence, is assumed to be from a conifer belonging to the Araucariaceae. The resins were produced by trees growing in a tropical near shore environment. The amber was transported into small swamps and was preserved there together with lignite. Later reworking of those deposits resulted in redeposition of the amber in oxidized sandstones.

  1. Kuiper Belt Mapping Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Nilsen, E.

    2001-01-01

    Since their initial discovery in 1992, to date only a relatively small number of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBO's) have been discovered. Current detection techniques rely on frame-to-frame comparisons of images collected by optical telescopes such as Hubble, to detect KBO's as they move against the background stellar field. Another technique involving studies of KBO's through occultation of known stars has been proposed. Such techniques are serendipitous, not systematic, and may lead to an inadequate understanding of the size, range, and distribution of KBO's. In this paper, a future Kuiper Belt Mapping Radar is proposed as a solution to the problem of mapping the size distribution, extent, and range of KBO's. This approach can also be used to recover radar albedo and object rotation rates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Jupiter's radiation belts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, N.; Mcdonough, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    A model for the production and loss of energetic electrons in Jupiter's radiation belt is presented. It is postulated that the electrons originate in the solar wind and are diffused in toward the planet by perturbations which violate the particles' third adiabatic invariant. At large distances, magnetic perturbations, electric fields associated with magnetospheric convection, or interchange instabilities driven by thermal plasma gradients may drive the diffusion. Inside about 10 Jupiter radii, the diffusion is probably driven by electric fields associated with the upper atmosphere dynamo which is driven by neutral winds in the ionosphere. The diurnal component of the dynamo wind fields produces a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the decimetric radiation from the electrons in the belts, and the lack of obvious measured asymmetries in the decimetric radiation measurements provides estimates of upper limits for these Jovian ionospheric neutral winds.

  3. Deconstructing the conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Lozier, M Susan

    2010-06-18

    For the past several decades, oceanographers have embraced the dominant paradigm that the ocean's meridional overturning circulation operates like a conveyor belt, transporting cold waters equatorward at depth and warm waters poleward at the surface. Within this paradigm, the conveyor, driven by changes in deepwater production at high latitudes, moves deep waters and their attendant properties continuously along western boundary currents and returns surface waters unimpeded to deepwater formation sites. A number of studies conducted over the past few years have challenged this paradigm by revealing the vital role of the ocean's eddy and wind fields in establishing the structure and variability of the ocean's overturning. Here, we review those studies and discuss how they have collectively changed our view of the simple conveyor-belt model.

  4. Infrared Kuiper Belt Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Teplitz, V.L.; Stern, S.A.; Anderson, J.D.; Rosenbaum, D.; Scalise, R.J.; Wentzler, P.

    1999-05-01

    We compute the temperature and IR signal of particles of radius {ital a} and albedo {alpha} at heliocentric distance {ital R}, taking into account the emissivity effect, and give an interpolating formula for the result. We compare with analyses of {ital COBE} DIRBE data by others (including recent detection of the cosmic IR background) for various values of heliocentric distance {ital R}, particle radius {ital a}, and particle albedo {alpha}. We then apply these results to a recently developed picture of the Kuiper belt as a two-sector disk with a nearby, low-density sector (40{lt}R{lt}50{endash}90 AU) and a more distant sector with a higher density. We consider the case in which passage through a molecular cloud essentially cleans the solar system of dust. We apply a simple model of dust production by comet collisions and removal by the Poynting-Robertson effect to find limits on total and dust masses in the near and far sectors as a function of time since such a passage. Finally, we compare Kuiper belt IR spectra for various parameter values. Results of this work include: (1) numerical limits on Kuiper belt dust as a function of ({ital R}, {ital a}, {alpha}) on the basis of four alternative sets of constraints, including those following from recent discovery of the cosmic IR background by Hauser et al.; (2) application to the two-sector Kuiper belt model, finding mass limits and spectrum shape for different values of relevant parameters including dependence on time elapsed since last passage through a molecular cloud cleared the outer solar system of dust; and (3) potential use of spectral information to determine time since last passage of the Sun through a giant molecular cloud. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  5. Exploring Main Belt Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, M. V.; Larson, S. M.; Whiteley, R.; Fink, U.; Jedicke, R.; Emery, J.; Fevig, R.; Kelley, M.; Harris, A. W.; Ostro, S.; Reed, K.; Binzel, R. P.; Rivkin, A.; Magri, C.; Bottke, W.; Durda, D.; Walker, R.; Davis, D.; Hartmann, W. K.; Sears, D.; Yano, H.; Granahan, J.; Storrs, A.; Bus, S. J.; Bell, J. F.; Tholen, D.; Cellino, A.

    2001-11-01

    Terrestrial planet formation in the main asteroid belt was interrupted when growing protoplanets became sufficiently massive to gravitationally perturb the local population, causing bodies to collide with increased energy, thus ending accretion and commencing fragmentation and disruption. Few of these protoplanets are thought to have survived unshattered (e.g., Ceres, Vesta, Pallas), leaving a main belt population dominated by fragments of fragments, and significantly depleted of mass as a consequence of dynamical scattering. Yet, these fragments retain a record of the early steps of planet formation and evolution, as well as a record of early solar system conditions and the primordial composition gradient in that region. By exploring main belt asteroids through groundbased observations and spacecraft, modeling and theoretical work, we seek ultimately to recover this information. A single mission to a single target is not sufficient to address, in isolation, these questions. They require a foundation of robust, broad, and continuing groundbased, theoretical, and modeling programs. Such work is funded at a small fraction of a typical mission cost through the NASA Research and Analysis Program. Therefore, within the context of planetary decadal study recommendations to NASA, highest priority needs to be given to maintaining and growing a healthy R&A program over the next ten years and beyond. Missions also have an important role to play. An Earth orbiting remote sensing mission needs to be considered as a means of collecting important data for a large fraction of all main belt asteroids above a sub-kilometer diameter (while also realizing synergistic benefits to astrophysics). Missions to specific main belt targets can provide important new insights and leverage new understanding of existing data, models, and theories, but target definition (and corresponding instrument complement) is critical and must be based on our existing knowledge of these very diverse objects

  6. A photo-oxidation procedure using UV radiation/H 2O 2 for decomposition of wine samples — Determination of iron and manganese content by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Walter N. L.; Brandão, Geovani C.; Portugal, Lindomar A.; David, Jorge M.; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.

    2009-06-01

    This paper proposes the use of photo-oxidation with UV radiation/H 2O 2 as sample pretreatment for the determination of iron and manganese in wines by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The optimization involved the study of the following variables: pH and concentration of buffer solution, concentrated hydrogen peroxide volume and irradiation time. The evaluation of sample degradation was monitored by measuring the absorbance at the maximum wavelength of red wine (530 nm). Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (irradiation time of 30 min, oxidant volume of 2.5 mL, pH 10, and a buffer concentration of 0.15 mol L - 1 ), this procedure allows the determination of iron and manganese with limits of detection of 30 and 22 μg L - 1 , respectively, for a 5 mL volume of digested sample. The precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), were 2.8% and 0.65% for iron and 2.7% and 0.54% for manganese for concentrations of 0.5 and 2.0 mg L - 1 , respectively. Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the ranges of 90%-111% and 95%-107% for iron and manganese, respectively. This digestion procedure has been applied for the determination of iron and manganese in six wine samples. The concentrations varied from 1.58 to 2.77 mg L - 1 for iron and from 1.30 to 1.91 mg L - 1 for manganese. The results were compared with those obtained by an acid digestion procedure and determination of the elements by FAAS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a paired t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  7. Effects of iron concentration level in extracting solutions from contaminated soils on the determination of zinc by flame atomic absorption spectrometry with two background correctors.

    PubMed

    Waterlot, Christophe; Pelfrêne, Aurélie; Douay, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Zinc and iron concentrations were determined after digestion, water, and three-step sequential extractions of contaminated soils. Analyses were carried out using flame absorption spectrometry with two background correctors: a deuterium lamp used as the continuum light source (D(2) method) and the high-speed self-reversal method (HSSR method). Regarding the preliminary results obtained with synthetic solutions, the D(2) method often emerged as an unsuitable configuration for compensating iron spectral interferences. In contrast, the HSSR method appeared as a convenient and powerful configuration and was tested for the determination of zinc in contaminated soils containing high amounts of iron. Simple, fast, and interference-free method, the HSSR method allows zinc determination at the ppb level in the presence of large amounts of iron with high stability, sensitivity, and reproducibility of results. Therefore, the HSSR method is described here as a promising approach for monitoring zinc concentrations in various iron-containing samples without any pretreatment.

  8. The variable extension of Saturn's electron radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Carbary, J. F.; Kollmann, P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Contrary to the permanent MeV ion belts which are relatively stable in intensity over both short and long time scales and are modulated by a single Galactic Cosmic Ray driven source, the electron belts of Saturn appear to be much more complex in both structure and temporal evolution. In order to understand the responses of this system to the different factors that may control it (internal or external/solar sources) we study its long-term, temporal evolution. We achieve that by tracking the equatorial distance of the belts' outer boundary, using MIMI/LEMMS energetic charged particle observations over a period of more than 7 years. This boundary is defined at the distance that a selected count rate level is measured in a LEMMS channel that has the properties of an omnidirectional, integral energy detector. Simulated solar wind moments, energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations and solar irradiance data are used to support the analysis. In many cases, correlations of the different datasets are weak, suggesting that the electron belts are modulated in time scales that are much shorter than the sampling of the electron belt boundary (typically every 10-30 days). Still, we find several cases of persistent, long term and strong perturbations in the system that appear to have corresponding disturbances in the extension of the electron belts, even on such long time scales. From the analysis of those intervals we believe that we have established a solid link with the planetary ring current as the primary source of the electron belts of Saturn. This is concluded mostly on the basis of an extended ring current decay in 2011 (inferred through ENA observations), coinciding with a similar, unusual drop in the electron belt extension (and intensity). This means that the electron belts should reflect also the modulation of the ring current. We suggest that possible sources of long term modulation are both the solar UV irradiance of the Saturnian thermosphere and the solar wind. The

  9. Jupiter's magnetosphere and radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1979-01-01

    Radioastronomy and Pioneer data reveal the Jovian magnetosphere as a rotating magnetized source of relativistic particles and radio emission, comparable to astrophysical cosmic ray and radio sources, such as pulsars. According to Pioneer data, the magnetic field in the outer magnetosphere is radially extended into a highly time variable disk-shaped configuration which differs fundamentally from the earth's magnetosphere. The outer disk region, and the energetic particles confined in it, are modulated by Jupiter's 10 hr rotation period. The entire outer magnetosphere appears to change drastically on time scales of a few days to a week. In addition to its known modulation of the Jovian decametric radio bursts, Io was found to absorb some radiation belt particles and to accelerate others, and most importantly, to be a source of neutral atoms, and by inference, a heavy ion plasma which may significantly affect the hydrodynamic flow in the magnetosphere. Another important Pioneer finding is that the Jovian outer magnetosphere generates, or permits to escape, fluxes of relativistic electrons of such intensities that Jupiter may be regarded as the dominant source of 1 to 30 MeV cosmic ray electrons in the heliosphere.

  10. Lap belt injuries in children.

    PubMed

    McGrath, N; Fitzpatrick, P; Okafor, I; Ryan, S; Hensey, O; Nicholson, A J

    2010-01-01

    The use of adult seat belts without booster seats in young children may lead to severe abdominal, lumbar or cervical spine and head and neck injuries. We describe four characteristic cases of lap belt injuries presenting to a tertiary children's hospital over the past year in addition to a review of the current literature. These four cases of spinal cord injury, resulting in significant long-term morbidity in the two survivors and death in one child, arose as a result of lap belt injury. These complex injuries are caused by rapid deceleration characteristic of high impact crashes, resulting in sudden flexion of the upper body around the fixed lap belt, and consequent compression of the abdominal viscera between the lap belt and spine. This report highlights the dangers of using lap belts only without shoulder straps. Age-appropriate child restraint in cars will prevent these injuries.

  11. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon- fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning

  12. Radiation Belt Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-27

    is unlimited. 15 DISTRIBUTION LIST DTIC/OCP 8725 John J. Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117... AFRL -RV-PS- AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2016-0007 TR-2016-0007 RADIATION BELT DYNAMICS Jay M. Albert, et al. 27 December 2015 Final Report APPROVED FOR... KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, NM 87117-5776 DTIC COPY NOTICE AND SIGNATURE PAGE Using Government drawings, specifications, or other data included in this

  13. Intrusive rocks and plutonic belts of southeastern Alaska, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brew, David A.; Morrell, Robert P.; Roddick, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    reconstruction of 200 km of right-lateral movement on the Chatham Strait fault does not significantly change the pattern of the major belts but does bring parts of the minor mid-Tertiary and Ordovician(?) belts closer together. The major belts are related to the stratigraphic-tectonic terranes of Berg, Jones, and Coney (1978) as follows: the Fairweather-Baranof belt is largely in the Chugach, Wrangell (Wrangellia), and Alexander terranes; the Muir-Chichagof belt is in the Alexander and Wrangell terranes; the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt is in the Gravina and Taku terranes; the Klukwan-Duke belt is in the Gravina, Taku, and Alexander terranes; the Coast Plutonic Complex sill belt is probably between the Taku and Tracy Arm terranes; and the Coast Plutonic Complex belts I and II are in the Tracy Arm and Stikine terranes. Significant metallic-mineral deposits are spatially related to certain of these belts, and some deposits may be genetically related. Gold, copper, and molybdenum occurrences may be related to granodiorites of the Fairweather-Baranof belt. Magmatic copper-nickel deposits occur in the layered gabbro within that belt. The Juneau gold belt, which contains gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc occurrences, parallels and lies close to the Coast Plutonic Complex sill belt; iron deposits occur in the Klukwan-Duke belt; and porphyry molybdenum deposits occur in the Behm Canal belt. The Muir-Chichagof belt of mid-Cretaceous age and the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt of probable Cretaceous age are currently interpreted as possible magmatic arcs associated with subduction events. In general, the other belts of intrusive rocks are spatially related to structural discontinuities, but genetic relations, if any, are not yet known. The Coast Plutonic Complex sill belt is probably related to a post-Triassic, pre-early Tertiary suture zone that nearly corresponds to the boundary between the Tracy Arm and Taku terranes. The boundary between the Admiralty-Revillagigedo and Muir

  14. Potential Greenstone Belt Continuity Undercover, Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Álvarez, I.; Aurore, J.; McCuaig, C. T.; Alok, P.

    2009-05-01

    , sedimentary units and banded iron formation (BIF). Based on the available geological information, magnetic positive anomalies are interpreted as BIF units and ultramafic-mafic suites, whereas the negative ones are interpreted as phyllitic and quartzitic units. On the residual Bouguer map, positive anomalies in the Harare-Shamva are associated with the Reliance F. within the previously mapped greenstone belt, which comprises up to 6-km thick succession of mafic- ultramafic rocks. On the contrary, the Zeederbergs F. (2-3 km thick sequence of sediments and tholeiitic basalts) and the Chinamora Complex (tonalites-granodiorites) are characterized by negative anomalies. Positive gravity anomalies in the Harare-Shamva area continue ˜20 km further to the N and probably ˜30 km to the E beyond the mapped greenstone belt, which suggests continuity of the mafic-ultramafic rocks under the cover sediments. Possible undercover continuity and thickening of the Harare-Shamva greenstone belts to the E is tested by applying petrophysical measurements, and direct 2D joint gravity and magnetic modeling using Geosoft-GM- SYS software by integrating the potential field data and available geological information. Several transverse cross-sections are developed through some key areas to verify the above interpretations. The 2.7 Ga greenstone belts with komatiite sequences in Zimbabwe are highly prospective for commodities such as Ni. This study contributes data for a potential re-evaluation of geological relationships in Zimbabwe, as well as delineation of new potential areas for targeting greenstone-hosted mineral deposits.

  15. How iron controls iron.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Lukas C

    2009-12-01

    Cells regulate iron homeostasis by posttranscriptional regulation of proteins responsible for iron uptake and storage. This requires RNA-binding activity of iron-regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2. Two studies recently published in Science by Vashisht et al. (2009) and Salahudeen et al. (2009) reveal how cells adjust IRP2 activity.

  16. Gould Belt Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Leticia; Loinard, Laurent; Dzib, Sergio

    2013-07-01

    Using archive VLA data and recent observations on the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array it is worked on a semi-automatic python/CASA code to select, reduce and plot several young stars belonging to the Ophiuchus core. This code mean to help to select observations made along the 30 years of the VLA done in the selected area with the wide configurations A and B, and in the X and C band, to determine their position and compare it with the most recent ones. In this way it is possible to determinate their proper motion with very high precision. It is presented the phases of the process and our first results worked on three well know stars: S1, DoAr 21 and VLA1623. This is the tip of a bigger work that includes Taurus molecular cloud and other important recent star formation regions belonging to the Gould Belt. Our goal is to support the most suitable among several theories about Gould Belt origin or provide a new one taking in count the dynamics of those regions.

  17. Physics and Automobile Safety Belts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortman, Peter; Witt, C. Edwin

    This collection of problems and experiments related to automobile safety belt usage is intended to serve as a supplement to a standard physics course. Its purpose is to convince the students that the use of safety belts to prevent injury or death is firmly supported by the considerations of physical quantities and laws which apply in a collision…

  18. Teaching Science: Seat Belt Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Describes activities that will help students understand how car seat belts work, the limited reaction time available to passengers in an automobile accident, and the force of impact in a car collision. These activities will provide students with hands-on experiences that demonstrate the importance of always wearing seat belts while in an…

  19. Geography of the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, B. H.

    1978-01-01

    The CSM classification serves as the starting point on the geography of the asteroid belt. Raw data on asteroid types are corrected for observational biases (against dark objects, for instance) to derive the distribution of types throughout the belt. Recent work on family members indicates that dynamical families have a true physical relationship, presumably indicating common origin in the breakup of a parent asteroid.

  20. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  1. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  2. Inner Radiation Belt Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, Timothy; Selesnick, Richard; Mazur, Joseph

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented ver-sion of the Selesnick et al., [2007] model. The physics-based model computes inner belt proton intensities as a function of time and of the three adiabatic invariants M, K, and L according to a comprehensive list of inner belt source and loss processes. We modify the model solution based on in-situ proton observations and according to a data-assimilation method which exploits the non-Gaussian nature of inner belt proton intensities and Poisson or Gaussian counting statistics of the observations, as appropriate. We demonstrate the method by presenting data-assimilated inner belt proton intensities during a solar particle injection.

  3. Inner Radiation Belt Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented version of the Selesnick Inner Zone Model (SIZM). The physics-based model computes inner belt proton intensities as a function of time and of the three adiabatic invariants M, K, and L according to a comprehensive list of inner belt source and loss processes. We modify the model solution based on in-situ proton observations from SAMPEX/PET and HEO orbit and according to a data-assimilation method which exploits the non-Gaussian nature of inner belt proton intensities and Poisson or Gaussian counting statistics of the observations, as appropriate. We demonstrate the method by presenting data-assimilated inner belt proton intensities during a solar particle injection.

  4. Inner Radiation Belt Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P.; Mazur, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented version of the Selesnick et al., [2007] model. The physics-based model computes inner belt proton intensities as a function of time and of the three adiabatic invariants M, K, and L according to a comprehensive list of inner belt source and loss processes. We modify the model solution based on in-situ proton observations and according to a data-assimilation method which exploits the non-Gaussian nature of inner belt proton intensities and Poisson or Gaussian counting statistics of the observations, as appropriate. We demonstrate the method by presenting data-assimilated inner belt proton intensities during a solar particle injection.

  5. Cloud point extraction of iron(III) and vanadium(V) using 8-quinolinol derivatives and Triton X-100 and determination of 10(-7)moldm(-3) level iron(III) in riverine water reference by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akira; Ito, Hiromi; Kanai, Chikako; Imura, Hisanori; Ohashi, Kousaburo

    2005-01-30

    The cloud point extraction behavior of iron(III) and vanadium(V) using 8-quinolinol derivatives (HA) such as 8-quinolinol (HQ), 2-methyl-8-quinolinol (HMQ), 5-butyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(4)Q), 5-hexyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(6)Q), and 2-methyl-5-octyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HMO(8)Q) and Triton X-100 solution was investigated. Iron(III) was extracted with HA and 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 in the pH range of 1.70-5.44. Above pH 4.0, more than 95% of iron(III) was extracted with HQ, HMQ, and HMO(8)Q. Vanadium(V) was also extracted with HA and 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 in the pH range of 2.07-5.00, and the extractability increased in the following order of HMQ < HQ < HO(4)Q < HO(6)Q. The cloud point extraction was applied to the determination of iron(III) in the riverine water reference by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. When 1.25 x 10(-3)M HMQ and 1% (v/v) Triton X-100 were used, the found values showed a good agreement with the certified ones within the 2% of the R.S.D. Moreover, the effect of an alkyl group on the solubility of 5-alkyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol and 2-methyl-5-alkyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol in 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 at 25 degrees C was also investigated.

  6. Determination of aluminium in iron, steel and ferrous and non-ferrous alloys by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after a mercury-cathode separation and extraction of the aluminium-acetylacetone complex.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1981-07-01

    A method for determining 0.0005% or more of total aluminium in high- and low-alloy steels, iron and ferrovanadium is described. Iron, chromium and other matrix elements are separated from aluminium by electrolysis with a mercury cathode and aluminium is separated from tungsten, titanium, vanadium and phosphate by chloroform extraction of its acetylacetone complex at pH 6.5 from an ammonium acetate-hydrogen peroxide medium. The extract is evaporated to dryness and organic material is destroyed with nitric and perchloric acids. Aluminium is determined by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry in a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame, at 309.3 nm, in a 5% v/v perchloric acid medium containing 1000 mug of sodium per ml. Acid-soluble and acid-insoluble aluminium can also be determined. The method is also applicable to copper- and nickel-base alloys. Results obtained by this method are compared with those obtained spectrophotometrically with Pyrocatechol Violet, after the separations described above followed by the separation of the residual co-extracted iron and copper by a combined ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate-cupferron-chloroform extraction from 10% v/v hydrochloric acid medium.

  7. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  8. Well-defined iron complexes as efficient catalysts for "green" atom-transfer radical polymerization of styrene, methyl methacrylate, and butyl acrylate with low catalyst loadings and catalyst recycling.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, So-Ichiro; Kawamura, Mitsunobu; Kai, Hidetomo; Jin, Ren-Hua; Sunada, Yusuke; Nagashima, Hideo

    2014-05-05

    Environmentally friendly iron(II) catalysts for atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were synthesized by careful selection of the nitrogen substituents of N,N,N-trialkylated-1,4,9-triazacyclononane (R3 TACN) ligands. Two types of structures were confirmed by crystallography: "[(R3 TACN)FeX2 ]" complexes with relatively small R groups have ionic and dinuclear structures including a [(R3 TACN)Fe(μ-X)3 Fe(R3 TACN)](+) moiety, whereas those with more bulky R groups are neutral and mononuclear. The twelve [(R3 TACN)FeX2 ]n complexes that were synthesized were subjected to bulk ATRP of styrene, methyl methacrylate (MMA), and butyl acrylate (BA). Among the iron complexes examined, [{(cyclopentyl)3 TACN}FeBr2 ] (4 b) was the best catalyst for the well-controlled ATRP of all three monomers. This species allowed easy catalyst separation and recycling, a lowering of the catalyst concentration needed for the reaction, and the absence of additional reducing reagents. The lowest catalyst loading was accomplished in the ATRP of MMA with 4 b (59 ppm of Fe based on the charged monomer). Catalyst recycling in ATRP with low catalyst loadings was also successful. The ATRP of styrene with 4 b (117 ppm Fe atom) was followed by precipitation from methanol to give polystyrene that contained residual iron below the calculated detection limit (0.28 ppm). Mechanisms that involve equilibria between the multinuclear and mononuclear species were also examined. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Evaluation of the static belt fit provided by belt-positioning booster seats.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew P; Ebert, Sheila M; Sherwood, Christopher P; Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A

    2009-05-01

    Belt-positioning booster seats are recommended for children who use vehicle seat belts as primary restraints but who are too small to obtain good belt fit. Previous research has shown that belt-positioning boosters reduce injury risk, but the belt fit produced by the wide range of boosters in the US market has not previously been assessed. The present study describes the development of a method for quantifying static belt fit with a Hybrid-III 6-year-old test dummy. The measurement method was applied in a laboratory seat mockup to 31 boosters (10 in both backless and highback modes) across a range of belt geometries obtained from in-vehicle measurements. Belt fit varied widely across boosters. Backless boosters generally produced better lap belt fit than highback boosters, largely because adding the back component moved the dummy forward with respect to the lap belt routing guides. However, highback boosters produced more consistent shoulder belt fit because of the presence of belt routing guides near the shoulder. Some boosters performed well on both lap belt and shoulder belt fit. Lap belt fit in dedicated boosters was generally better than in combination restraints that also can be used with an integrated harness. Results demonstrate that certain booster design features produce better belt fit across a wide range of belt geometries. Lap belt guides that hold the belt down, rather than up, and shoulder belt guides integrated into the booster backrest provided better belt fit.

  10. Energetic and kinetic dataset on interaction of the vacancy and self-interstitial atom with the grain boundary in α-iron

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyan; Liu, Wei; Xu, Yichun; Liu, C.S.; Pan, B.C.; Liang, Yunfeng; Fang, Q.F.; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.; Lu, Guang-Hong; Wang, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    We provide the dataset of the vacancy (interstitial) formation energy, segregation energy, diffusion barrier, vacancy-interstitial annihilation barrier near the grain boundary (GB) in bcc-iron and also the corresponding interactive range. The vacancy-interstitial annihilation mechanisms in the bulk, near the GB and at the GB at across scales were given. PMID:27077081

  11. Energetic and kinetic dataset on interaction of the vacancy and self-interstitial atom with the grain boundary in α-iron.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyan; Liu, Wei; Xu, Yichun; Liu, C S; Pan, B C; Liang, Yunfeng; Fang, Q F; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G-N; Lu, Guang-Hong; Wang, Zhiguang

    2016-06-01

    We provide the dataset of the vacancy (interstitial) formation energy, segregation energy, diffusion barrier, vacancy-interstitial annihilation barrier near the grain boundary (GB) in bcc-iron and also the corresponding interactive range. The vacancy-interstitial annihilation mechanisms in the bulk, near the GB and at the GB at across scales were given.

  12. Seat Belt Use and Stress in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schichor, Aric; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Explored adolescent seat belt use and psychosocial risk factors in urban minority population (n=541). Found seat belt use reported by 49 percent of respondents. Those reporting no or intermittent seat belt use were significantly more likely than seat belt users to feel down, have decreased home support, have problems with school and the law, and…

  13. Investigation of a new type charging belt

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, N.L.

    1994-12-31

    There are many desirable characteristics for an electrostatic accelerator charging belt. An attempt has been made to find a belt that improves on these properties over the stock belt. Results of the search, procurement, and 1,500 hours of operational experience with a substantially different belt are reported.

  14. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt... § 393.93 Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. (a) Buses—(1) Buses... the driver's seat and seat belt assembly anchorages that conform to the location and...

  15. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt... § 393.93 Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages. (a) Buses—(1) Buses... the driver's seat and seat belt assembly anchorages that conform to the location and...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1731 - Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor....1731 Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries. (a) Damaged rollers, or other damaged belt conveyor components, which pose a fire hazard must be immediately repaired or replaced. All...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1731 - Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor....1731 Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries. (a) Damaged rollers, or other damaged belt conveyor components, which pose a fire hazard must be immediately repaired or replaced. All...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1731 - Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor....1731 Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries. (a) Damaged rollers, or other damaged belt conveyor components, which pose a fire hazard must be immediately repaired or replaced. All...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1731 - Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor....1731 Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries. (a) Damaged rollers, or other damaged belt conveyor components, which pose a fire hazard must be immediately repaired or replaced. All...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1731 - Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor....1731 Maintenance of belt conveyors and belt conveyor entries. (a) Damaged rollers, or other damaged belt conveyor components, which pose a fire hazard must be immediately repaired or replaced. All...

  1. Previously Undetected Radiation Belt Revealed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth'€™s Van Allen radiation belts have been considered to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. Observations f...

  2. The earth's trapped radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, R. B.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    The near-earth charged particle environment is discussed in terms of spacecraft design criteria. Models are presented of the trapped radiation belts and based on in-situ data obtained from spacecraft.

  3. Chaos on the conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Bulcsú; Járai-Szabó, Ferenc; Tél, Tamás; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of a spring-block train placed on a moving conveyor belt is investigated both by simple experiments and computer simulations. The first block is connected by a spring to an external static point and, due to the dragging effect of the belt, the blocks undergo complex stick-slip dynamics. A qualitative agreement with the experimental results can be achieved only by taking into account the spatial inhomogeneity of the friction force on the belt's surface, modeled as noise. As a function of the velocity of the conveyor belt and the noise strength, the system exhibits complex, self-organized critical, sometimes chaotic, dynamics and phase transition-like behavior. Noise-induced chaos and intermittency is also observed. Simulations suggest that the maximum complexity of the dynamical states is achieved for a relatively small number of blocks (around five).

  4. Propeller Belts of Saturn

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-10

    This view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft is the sharpest ever taken of belts of the features called propellers in the middle part of Saturn's A ring. The propellers are the small, bright features that look like double dashes, visible on both sides of the wave pattern that crosses the image diagonally from top to bottom. The original discovery of propellers in this region in Saturn's rings was made using several images taken from very close to the rings during Cassini's 2004 arrival at Saturn. Those discovery images were of low resolution and were difficult to interpret, and there were few clues as to how the small propellers seen in those images were related to the larger propellers Cassini observed later in the mission. This image, for the first time, shows swarms of propellers of a wide range of sizes, putting the ones Cassini observed in its Saturn arrival images in context. Scientists will use this information to derive a "particle size distribution" for propeller moons, which is an important clue to their origins. The image was taken using the Cassini spacecraft's narrow-angle camera on April 19. The view was has an image scale of 0.24 mile (385 meters) per pixel, and was taken at a sun-ring-spacecraft angle, or phase angle, of 108 degrees. The view looks toward a point approximately 80,000 miles (129,000 kilometers) from Saturn's center. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21448

  5. The distant Kuiper Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladman, B.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Petit, J. M.; Morbidelli, A.; Holman, M.; Loredo, T.

    2000-10-01

    We present results from a series of deep imaging surveys designed to look for very faint objects in the outer solar system. We find roughly 10-20 percent of our detections outside a heliocentric distance of 48 AU, a much larger fraction than all previously published surveys. The implications of this result for the radial structure of the Kuiper Belt will be discussed, as well as how it interacts with various theories regarding the sculpting of the orbital distribution of the trans-Neptunian region. We find a luminosity function with a continuing steep slope down to the limit of our detections at about 26th magnitude, implying that observations are just on the threshold of reaching the level where the TNO size distribution is exptected to `roll over' to a shallower collisional slope. The size distribution in the observed region is expected to hold information about the time scale and physics of planetesimal building in the early outer Solar System. This work has been supported by a Henri Chretien international research grant (AAS), by NASA Origins grants NAG5-8198 and NAG5-9678, by an ACI Jeune award from the French Research Ministry, and an Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur BQR grant.

  6. Chromium and iron determinations in food and herbal plant samples by atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) disk.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Unsal, Yunus Emre

    2010-06-01

    A preconcentration-separation procedure has been established based on solid phase extraction of Fe(III) and Cr(III) on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) disk. The analyte ions were quantitatively recovered at pH 8.0 on single-walled carbon nanotubes disk that contains 30 mg of nanotube. The influences of matrix components were tolerable. The detection limits for iron and chromium were calculated as 2.12 and 4.08 microg/l, respectively. The presented method was validated by the analysis of lichen (IAEA-336), CRM025-050 Metals on soil and BCR-032 Moroccan Phosphate rock certified reference materials. The method was successfully applied to the preconcentration and separation of iron and chromium in some food and herbal plant samples from Turkey.

  7. The equilibrium concentration of hydrogen atoms ahead of a mixed mode I-mode III crack tip in single crystal iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.Y.; Hack, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Calculations of the equilibrium hydrogen concentration profiles about a mixed ode I-mode III crack in single crystal iron were performed. Both material anisotropy and the tetragonal nature of the distortion induced in the iron crystal structure by interstitial hydrogen were incorporated. Results show that, unlike the case of a spherical distortion, a strong coupling exists between the strain field of the interstitial hydrogen and the stress field of the crack for orientations of the crack plane that are not coincident with the cube axes of the lattice. As a result, the predicated enhancement of hydrogen in the crack tip region increases with increasing levels of mode III loading for those orientations. The results may help reconcile conflicting observations concerning the potential role of shear stresses in hydrogen embrittlement and preferential cracking of grains ahead of loaded crack tips in sustained load cracking experiments.

  8. Belt conveyors for bulk materials. 6th ed.

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    The 16 chapters are entitled: Belt conveyor general applications economics; Design considerations; Characteristics and conveyability of bulk materials; Capacities, belt widths and speeds; Belt conveyor idlers; Belt tension and power engineering; Belt selection; Pulleys and shafts; Curves; Steep angle conveying; Belt cleaners and accessories; Transfer points; Conveyor motor drives and controls; Operation, maintenance and safety; Belt takeups; and Emerging technologies. 6 apps.

  9. Northern Belt of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    A four-panel frame shows a section of Jupiter's north equatorial belt viewed by NASA's Cassini spacecraft at four different wavelengths, and a separate reference frame shows the location of the belt on the planet.

    A fascinating aspect of the images in the four-panel frame is the small bright spot in the center of each. The images come from different layers of the atmosphere, so the spot appears to be a storm penetrating upward through several layers. This may in fact be a 'monster' thunderstorm, penetrating all the way into the stratosphere, as do some summer thunderstorms in the midwestern United States. These images were taken on Nov. 27, 2000, at a resolution of 192 kilometers (119 miles) per pixel. They have been contrast-enhanced to highlight features in the atmosphere.

    The top panel of the four-panel frame is an image taken in a near-infrared wavelength at which the gases in Jupiter's atmosphere are relatively non-absorbing. Sunlight can penetrate deeply into the atmosphere at this wavelength and be reflected back out, providing a view of an underlying region of the atmosphere, the lower troposphere.

    The second panel was taken in the blue portion of wavelengths detected by the human eye. At these wavelengths, gases in the atmosphere scatter a modest amount of sunlight, so the clouds we see tend to be at somewhat higher altitudes than in the top panel.

    The third panel shows near-infrared reflected sunlight at a wavelength where the gas methane, an important constituent of Jupiter's atmosphere, absorbs strongly. Dark places are regions without high-level clouds and consequently large amounts of methane accessible to sunlight. Bright regions are locations with high clouds in the upper troposphere shielding the methane below.

    The bottom panel was taken in the ultraviolet. At these very short wavelengths, the clear atmosphere scatters sunlight, and hazes in the stratosphere, above the troposphere

  10. Northern Belt of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    A four-panel frame shows a section of Jupiter's north equatorial belt viewed by NASA's Cassini spacecraft at four different wavelengths, and a separate reference frame shows the location of the belt on the planet.

    A fascinating aspect of the images in the four-panel frame is the small bright spot in the center of each. The images come from different layers of the atmosphere, so the spot appears to be a storm penetrating upward through several layers. This may in fact be a 'monster' thunderstorm, penetrating all the way into the stratosphere, as do some summer thunderstorms in the midwestern United States. These images were taken on Nov. 27, 2000, at a resolution of 192 kilometers (119 miles) per pixel. They have been contrast-enhanced to highlight features in the atmosphere.

    The top panel of the four-panel frame is an image taken in a near-infrared wavelength at which the gases in Jupiter's atmosphere are relatively non-absorbing. Sunlight can penetrate deeply into the atmosphere at this wavelength and be reflected back out, providing a view of an underlying region of the atmosphere, the lower troposphere.

    The second panel was taken in the blue portion of wavelengths detected by the human eye. At these wavelengths, gases in the atmosphere scatter a modest amount of sunlight, so the clouds we see tend to be at somewhat higher altitudes than in the top panel.

    The third panel shows near-infrared reflected sunlight at a wavelength where the gas methane, an important constituent of Jupiter's atmosphere, absorbs strongly. Dark places are regions without high-level clouds and consequently large amounts of methane accessible to sunlight. Bright regions are locations with high clouds in the upper troposphere shielding the methane below.

    The bottom panel was taken in the ultraviolet. At these very short wavelengths, the clear atmosphere scatters sunlight, and hazes in the stratosphere, above the troposphere

  11. Geophysical ore guides along the Colorado mineral belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Case, James E.

    1967-01-01

    A 40-50-mgal gravity low trends northeast along the Colorado mineral belt between Monarch Pass and Breckenridge, Colorado. The low is probably caused by a silicic Tertiary batholith of lower density than adjacent Precambrian crystalline rocks. Many major mining districts associated with silicic Tertiary intrusives are near the axis of the low. Positive and negative aeromagnetic anomalies are present over the larger silicic Tertiary intrusive bodies. A good correlation exists between the magnetic lows and zones of altered, mineralized porphyry. Apparently, original magnetite in the silicic porphyries has been altered to relatively nonmagnetic pyrite or iron oxides. The regional gravity low aids in defining the limits of the mineral belt, and the magnetic lows over the porphyries indicate specific alteration zones and the possibility of associated mineral deposits.

  12. Cloud point extraction of copper, lead, cadmium, and iron using 2,6-diamino-4-phenyl-1,3,5-triazine and nonionic surfactant, and their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination in water and canned food samples.

    PubMed

    Citak, Demirhan; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    A cloud point extraction procedure was optimized for the separation and preconcentration of lead(II), cadmium(II), copper(II), and iron(III) ions in various water and canned food samples. The metal ions formed complexes with 2,6-diamino-4-phenyl-1,3,5-triazine that were extracted by surfactant-rich phases in the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114. The surfactant-rich phase was diluted with 1 M HNO3 in methanol prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the proposed method, such as sample pH, complexing agent concentration, surfactant concentration, temperature, and incubation time, were optimized. LOD values based on three times the SD of the blank (3Sb) were 0.38, 0.48, 1.33, and 1.85 microg/L for cadmium(II), copper(II), lead(II), and iron(III) ions, respectively. The precision (RSD) of the method was in the 1.86-3.06% range (n=7). Validation of the procedure was carried out by analysis of National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material (NIST-SRM) 1568a Rice Flour and GBW 07605 Tea. The method was applied to water and canned food samples for determination of metal ions.

  13. Atomic force microscopic comparison of remineralization with casein-phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate paste, acidulated phosphate fluoride gel and iron supplement in primary and permanent teeth: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Nikita; Shashikiran, N. D.; Singla, Shilpy; Ravi, K. S.; Kulkarni, Vinaya Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Context: Demineralization of tooth by erosion is caused by frequent contact between the tooth surface and acids present in soft drinks. Aim: The present study objective was to evaluate the remineralization potential of casein-phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel and iron supplement on dental erosion by soft drinks in human primary and permanent enamel using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Materials and Methods: Specimens were made from extracted 15 primary and 15 permanent teeth which were randomly divided into three treatment groups: CPP-ACP paste, APF gel and iron supplement. AFM was used for baseline readings followed by demineralization and remineralization cycle. Results and Statistics: Almost all group of samples showed remineralization that is a reduction in surface roughness which was higher with CPP-ACP paste. Statistical analysis was performed using by one-way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U-test with P < 0.05. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the application of CPP-ACP paste is effective on preventing dental erosion from soft drinks. PMID:24808700

  14. Atomic force microscopic comparison of remineralization with casein-phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate paste, acidulated phosphate fluoride gel and iron supplement in primary and permanent teeth: An in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nikita; Shashikiran, N D; Singla, Shilpy; Ravi, K S; Kulkarni, Vinaya Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Demineralization of tooth by erosion is caused by frequent contact between the tooth surface and acids present in soft drinks. The present study objective was to evaluate the remineralization potential of casein-phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel and iron supplement on dental erosion by soft drinks in human primary and permanent enamel using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Specimens were made from extracted 15 primary and 15 permanent teeth which were randomly divided into three treatment groups: CPP-ACP paste, APF gel and iron supplement. AFM was used for baseline readings followed by demineralization and remineralization cycle. Almost all group of samples showed remineralization that is a reduction in surface roughness which was higher with CPP-ACP paste. Statistical analysis was performed using by one-way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U-test with P < 0.05. It can be concluded that the application of CPP-ACP paste is effective on preventing dental erosion from soft drinks.

  15. A mantle conveyor belt beneath the Tethyan collisional belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Faccenna, C.

    2011-12-01

    Collisional belts are generated by the arrival of continental lithosphere into a subduction zone, leading to stacking of crustal slices during indentation. The Tethyan suture from the Bitlis to the Himalayas is a prime example where the Arabian and Indian plates collided with Eurasia during the Cenozoic, generating the highest mountain belts on Earth (Argand, 1924). While the kinematics of this process are well established, its dynamics are more uncertain. India and Arabia intriguingly keep advancing in spite of large collisional resisting forces. We perform global mantle circulation computations to test the role of deep mantle flow as a driving force for the kinematics of the Tethyan collisional belt, evaluating different boundary conditions and mantle density distributions as inferred from seismic tomography or slab models. Our results show that mantle drag exerted on the base of the lithosphere by a large-scale upwelling is likely the main cause for the ongoing indentation of the Indian and Arabian plates into Eurasia.

  16. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... are used together to detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these ... help determine whether the condition is due to iron deficiency or another cause, such as chronic blood loss ...

  17. Iron-embedded C2N monolayer: a promising low-cost and high-activity single-atom catalyst for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    He, B L; Shen, J S; Tian, Z X

    2016-09-21

    An Fe-embedded C2N monolayer as a promising single-atom catalyst for CO oxidation by O2 has been investigated based on first-principles calculations. It is found that the single Fe atom can be strongly trapped in the cavity of the C2N monolayer with a large adsorption energy of 4.55 eV and a high diffusion barrier of at least 3.00 eV to leave the cavity, indicating that Fe should exist in the isolated single-atom form. Due to the localized metal 3d orbitals near the Fermi level, the embedded Fe single-atom catalyst has a high chemical activity for the adsorption of CO and O2 molecules. CO oxidation by O2 on the catalyst would proceed via a two-step mechanism. The first step of the CO oxidation reaction has been studied via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms with energy barriers of 0.46 and 0.65 eV, respectively. The second step of the CO oxidation reaction follows the Eley-Rideal mechanism with a much smaller energy barrier of 0.24 eV. For both the steps, the CO2 molecules produced are weakly adsorbed on the substrates, suggesting that the proposed catalyst will not be poisoned by the generated CO2. Our results indicate that the Fe-embedded C2N monolayer is a promising single-atom catalyst for CO oxidation by O2 at low temperatures.

  18. Proton Spectrometer Belt Research (PSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, David

    The National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), the Aerospace Corporation, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have jointly formed the Proton Spectrometer Belt Research (PSBR) program to meet two primary objectives: to measure the high-energy proton spectrum by placing the Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) instrument on board the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) spacecraft to measure the inner Van Allen belt protons with energies from 50 MeV to 2 GeV, and to produce the next generation radiation belt models. Presently, the intensity of trapped protons with energies beyond about 150 MeV is not well known and thought to be underestimated in existing specification models. Such protons are known to pose a number of hazards to astronauts and spacecraft; including total ionizing dose, displacement damage, single event effects, and nuclear activation. The RPS addresses a priority highly ranked by the scientific and technical community and will extend the measurement capability of the RBSP mission to a range beyond that originally planned. The PSBR program will use the RPS data, coupled with other data sets, to upgrade existing radiation belt models, significantly improving the radiation hazards specified by increasing the spectral and spatial coverage, and the time-correlated probability of occurrence statistics, quantifying the model accuracy and uncertainty.

  19. Applications of radiation belt research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2011-10-01

    When Arthur Clark and John Pierce proposed geosynchronous and low-Earth-orbiting (GEO and LEO) communications satellites, respectively, they did not envision that the environment in which their concepts would fly would be anything but benign. Discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts in 1958 fundamentally altered understanding of Earth's near-space environment and its impacts on technologies. Indeed, the first commercial telecommunications satellite, Telstar 1, in LEO, failed some 6 months after launch (10 July 1962) due to trapped radiation that had been enhanced from the Starfish Prime high-altitude nuclear test on the day prior to launch. Today radiation trapped in the geomagnetic field, as well as solar energetic particles that can access the magnetosphere, forms critical constraints on the design and operations of satellite systems. These considerations were important factors in the planning of the AGU Chapman Conference on radiation belts that was hosted in July 2011 by the Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John's, Canada (see "Chapman Conference on Radiation Belts and the Inner Magnetosphere," page 4). The conference presentations, discussions, and hallway conversations illuminated current understanding of Earth's radiation belts and critical issues remaining. Certainly, fundamental understanding of radiation belt origins remains elusive. The relative roles of adiabatic processes, geomagnetic storm injections, and wave heating, among other considerations, are central topics of intense debate and of competing modeling regimes by numerous active groups.

  20. Trends in PVC conveyor belting

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, J.E.

    1984-03-01

    The development of mechanical systems of extraction at the coal face necessitated the introduction of efficient methods of mineral transportation in deep-mining operations. The most popular system is the belt conveyor. Originally PVC was being evaluated as a rubber substitute, as in its liquid form it appeared to offer an easier route to fabric coating and impregnation for conveyor belt applications. However, it was not until 1950, when over 200 miners lost their lives due to an underground fire being spread by combustible rubber conveyor belts, that the full significance of the properties of PVC were appreciated. Following this tragedy, an intensive development program to produce a substitute for rubber was initiated. It had to have similar operational characteristics as rubber while incorporating the safety features of resistance to flame propagation and build-up of static electrical charges. It became evident that PVC could be compounded to realize these requirements and belting manufacturers immediately started to produce a new generation of belts based on the previouly proven mechanical characteristics of multiply fabrics, but substituting PVC for the rubber content. The advantages of PVC are discussed.

  1. Effects of vehicle seat and belt geometry on belt fit for children with and without belt positioning booster seats.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew P; Ebert-Hamilton, Sheila M; Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Rupp, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to quantify the effects of belt-positioning boosters on lap and shoulder belt fit. Postures and belt fit were measured for forty-four boys and girls ages 5-12 in four highback boosters, one backless booster, and on a vehicle seat without a booster. Belt anchorage locations were varied over a wide range. Seat cushion angle, seat back angle, and seat cushion length were varied in the no-booster conditions. All boosters produced better mean lap belt fit than was observed in the no-booster condition, but the differences among boosters were relatively large. With one midrange belt configuration, the lap belt was not fully below the anterior-superior iliac spine (ASIS) landmark on the front of the pelvis for 89% of children in one booster, and 75% of children failed to achieve that level of belt fit in another. In contrast, the lap belt was fully below the ASIS for all but two children in the best-performing booster. Child body size had a statistically significant but relatively small effect on lap belt fit. The largest children sitting without a booster had approximately the same lap belt fit as the smallest children experienced in the worst-performing booster. Increasing lap belt angle relative to horizontal produced significantly better lap belt fit in the no-booster condition, but the boosters isolated the children from the effects of lap belt angles. Reducing seat cushion length in the no-booster condition improved lap belt fit but changing cushion angle did not. Belt upper anchorage (D-ring) location had a strong effect on shoulder belt fit in conditions without shoulder belt routing from the booster. Unexpectedly, the worst average shoulder belt fit was observed in one highback booster with a poorly positioned shoulder belt routing clip. The shoulder belt was routed more outboard, on average, with a backless booster than without a booster, but raising the child also amplified the effect of D-ring location, such that children were

  2. Dynamics of Radiation Belt Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-11-01

    This paper reviews basic concepts of particle dynamics underlying theoretical aspect of radiation belt modeling and data analysis. We outline the theory of adiabatic invariants of quasiperiodic Hamiltonian systems and derive the invariants of particle motion trapped in the radiation belts. We discuss how the nonlinearity of resonant interaction of particles with small-amplitude plasma waves, ubiquitous across the inner magnetosphere, can make particle motion stochastic. Long-term evolution of a stochastic system can be described by the Fokker-Plank (diffusion) equation. We derive the kinetic equation of particle diffusion in the invariant space and discuss its limitations and associated challenges which need to be addressed in forthcoming radiation belt models and data analysis.

  3. Apparatus for forming drive belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topits, A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus for manufacturing belts, such as seamless belts, is provided, the apparatus has relatively movable rollers that are mounted in an oven. A belt blank, for example, of a thin polyester film, is rotated on the rollers as heat is applied. Four rollers, each mounted on a separate roller assembly, are movable along appropriate tracks while a fifth centrally located roller is stationary. A pair of dc motors are operatively connected to a speed reduction gear assembly to provide a pair of rotating drive shafts that extend into the oven. One rotating shaft drives all of the rollers through a rotational gear assembly while the other drive shaft is capable of positioning the movable rollers through respective rotating threaded shafts. Control devices are provided for controlling the motors while measuring devices are operatively connected to the positional drive shaft to indicate the position of the rollers.

  4. Atomic data from the Iron project. XIII. Electron excitation rates and emissivity ratios for forbidden transitions in NI II and Fe II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1996-02-01

    Electron impact excitation rates and emissivity line ratios are reported for Optical and IR transitions in Ni II and Fe II arising from low-lying even parity levels. A total of 7 LS terms were included for Ni II, which result in 17 fine structure levels and 136 transitions. Coupling effects and resonance structures considered in the present calculations result in significant differences with the earlier distorted wave calculations by Nussbaumer & Storey (1982), although a reasonable agreement is found for the line diagnostics of some strong transitions in Ni II. Whereas an extensive set of collisional data has been presented earlier by Zhang & Pradhan for Fe II in the Iron Project series, in this paper we report collision strengths for some transitions missing from their dataset using an improved eigenfunction expansion for Fe II which includes the lowest 18 LS terms giving 52 fine structure levels and 1326 transitions. The present dataset provides a useful check on several forbidden transitions in Fe II and essentially confirms the diagnostics derived from the earlier work. The present calculations were carried out on the massively parallel processor Cray T3D with a parallelized version of the Iron Project R-matrix codes; to our knowledge these are the first such calculations.

  5. 14 CFR 31.63 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.63 Safety belts. (a) There must be a safety belt... requirements of Subpart C of this part. (b) This section does not apply to balloons that incorporate a...

  6. 14 CFR 31.63 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.63 Safety belts. (a) There must be a safety belt... requirements of subpart C of this part. (b) This section does not apply to balloons that incorporate a...

  7. 14 CFR 31.63 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.63 Safety belts. (a) There must be a safety belt... requirements of subpart C of this part. (b) This section does not apply to balloons that incorporate a...

  8. 14 CFR 31.63 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.63 Safety belts. (a) There must be a safety belt... requirements of subpart C of this part. (b) This section does not apply to balloons that incorporate a...

  9. Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission Trailer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    With launch scheduled for 2012, the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) are two identical spacecraft that will investigate the doughnut shaped Van Allen radiation belts, the first discovery of the sp...

  10. Scenarios for the Evolution of Asteroid Belts

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-01

    This illustration shows three possible scenarios for the evolution of asteroid belts. At the top, a Jupiter-size planet migrates through the asteroid belt, scattering material and inhibiting the formation of life on planets.

  11. An Experimental Concept for Probing Nonlinear Radiation Belt Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatucci, Bill; Ganguli, Guru; Crabtree, Chris; Mithaiwala, Manish; Siefring, Carl; Tejero, Erik

    2014-10-01

    The SMART sounding rocket is designed to probe the nonlinear response of a known ionospheric stimulus. High-speed neutral barium atoms generated by a shaped charge explosion perpendicular to the magnetic field in the ionosphere form a ring velocity distribution of photo-ionized Ba+ that will generate lower hybrid waves. Induced nonlinear scattering of lower hybrid waves into whistler/magnetosonic waves has been theoretically predicted, confirmed by simulations, and observed in the lab. The effects of nonlinear scattering on wave evolution and whistler escape to the radiation belts have been studied and observable signatures quantified. The fraction of the neutral atom kinetic energy converted into waves is estimated at 10-12%. SMART will carry a Ba release module and an instrumented daughter section with vector wave magnetic and electric field sensors, Langmuir probes and energetic particle detectors to determine wave spectra in the source region and detect precipitated particles. The Van Allen Probes can detect the propagation of the scattered whistlers and their effects in the radiation belts. By measuring the radiation belt whistler energy density, SMART will confirm the nonlinear scattering process and the connection to weak turbulence. Supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Funds.

  12. Keeping conveyor belts clean reduces operating costs

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, T.C.

    1982-07-01

    Surveys devices for cleaning conveyor belts. Inefficient belt cleaning will result in material sticking to the return belt. This material then accumulates and forms piles underneath the conveyor, as shown in an illustration. Unevenly worn idlers bring about off-centering of the belt, causing spillage, and often, considerable damage. Continued accumulation of the material brings about stoppages and unscheduled shut downs of the plant. Devices examined include brushes, metallic cable and depression rollers.

  13. 46 CFR 169.723 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Safety belts. 169.723 Section 169.723 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.723 Safety belts. Each vessel must carry a harness type safety belt conforming to Offshore Racing Council (ORC) standards for each person on watch...

  14. 36 CFR 4.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety belts. 4.15 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.15 Safety belts. (a) Each operator and passenger occupying any seating position of a motor vehicle in a park area will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened...

  15. 46 CFR 169.723 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety belts. 169.723 Section 169.723 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.723 Safety belts. Each vessel must carry a harness type safety belt conforming to Offshore Racing Council (ORC) standards for each person on watch...

  16. 36 CFR 4.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety belts. 4.15 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.15 Safety belts. (a) Each operator and passenger occupying any seating position of a motor vehicle in a park area will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened...

  17. 36 CFR 4.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety belts. 4.15 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.15 Safety belts. (a) Each operator and passenger occupying any seating position of a motor vehicle in a park area will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened...

  18. 46 CFR 169.723 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety belts. 169.723 Section 169.723 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.723 Safety belts. Each vessel must carry a harness type safety belt conforming to Offshore Racing Council (ORC) standards for each person on watch...

  19. 46 CFR 169.723 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Safety belts. 169.723 Section 169.723 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.723 Safety belts. Each vessel must carry a harness type safety belt conforming to Offshore Racing Council (ORC) standards for each person on watch...

  20. 46 CFR 169.723 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety belts. 169.723 Section 169.723 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.723 Safety belts. Each vessel must carry a harness type safety belt conforming to Offshore Racing Council (ORC) standards for each person on watch...

  1. 36 CFR 4.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety belts. 4.15 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.15 Safety belts. (a) Each operator and passenger occupying any seating position of a motor vehicle in a park area will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened...

  2. 36 CFR 4.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety belts. 4.15 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.15 Safety belts. (a) Each operator and passenger occupying any seating position of a motor vehicle in a park area will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened...

  3. Grinding Glass Disks On A Belt Sander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, James J., III

    1995-01-01

    Small machine attached to table-top belt sander makes possible to use belt sander to grind glass disk quickly to specified diameter within tolerance of about plus or minus 0.002 in. Intended to be used in place of production-shop glass grinder. Held on driveshaft by vacuum, glass disk rotated while periphery ground by continuous sanding belt.

  4. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not...

  7. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless...

  8. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless...

  9. 30 CFR 77.406 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drive belts. 77.406 Section 77.406 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... Mechanical Equipment § 77.406 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not be shifted while in motion unless...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1727 - Drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drive belts. 75.1727 Section 75.1727 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1727 Drive belts. (a) Drive belts shall not...

  12. 30 CFR 77.1107 - Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Belt conveyors. 77.1107 Section 77.1107 Mineral... § 77.1107 Belt conveyors. Belt conveyors in locations where fire would create a hazard to personnel shall be provided with switches to stop the drive pulley automatically in the event of...

  13. 30 CFR 77.1107 - Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Belt conveyors. 77.1107 Section 77.1107 Mineral... § 77.1107 Belt conveyors. Belt conveyors in locations where fire would create a hazard to personnel shall be provided with switches to stop the drive pulley automatically in the event of...

  14. 30 CFR 77.1107 - Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Belt conveyors. 77.1107 Section 77.1107 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... § 77.1107 Belt conveyors. Belt conveyors in locations where fire would create a hazard to...

  15. 30 CFR 77.1107 - Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Belt conveyors. 77.1107 Section 77.1107 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... § 77.1107 Belt conveyors. Belt conveyors in locations where fire would create a hazard to...

  16. 30 CFR 77.1107 - Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Belt conveyors. 77.1107 Section 77.1107 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY... § 77.1107 Belt conveyors. Belt conveyors in locations where fire would create a hazard to...

  17. Hazards of conveyor belt fires

    SciTech Connect

    Perzak, F.J.; Litton, C.D.; Mura, K.E.; Lazzara, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    This report describes a US Bureau of Mines study on the hazards of large-scale conveyor belt fires in underground coal mines, as a function of both air velocity and distance from belt surface to gallery roof. The fire hazards considered were smoke obscuration, toxic effects of carbon monoxide (CO), and elevated air temperatures downstream of the fire. All of these hazards scale with the ratio of fire intensity to ventilation airflow. These hazards were all found to be greater at the lower belt-to-roof distance, owing to the greater fire intensities that resulted. The hazards of smoke obscuration and elevated CO levels were greater at lower air velocities. Smoke obscuration was found to be the earliest hazard, reaching critical levels before the stages of flame spread. Fire growth rates during rapid flame spread were much greater than rates measured during the early stages of flame spread. Fire growth rates during rapid flame spread were much greater than rates measured during the early stages of belt burning. Data were analyzed to determine the early-warning capability of fire sensors. Smoke sensors provided the earliest warning, followed closely by CO sensors. Thermal sensors did not exhibit any early warning capability.

  18. The Iron Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Anil K.

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in theoretical atomic physics have enabled large-scale calculation of atomic parameters for a variety of atomic processes with high degree of precision. The development and application of these methods is the aim of the Iron Project. At present the primary focus is on collisional processes for all ions of iron, Fe I - FeXXVI, and other iron-peak elements; new work on radiative processes has also been initiated. Varied applications of the Iron Project work to X-ray astronomy are discussed, and more general applications to other spectral ranges are pointed out. The IP work forms the basis for more specialized projects such as the RmaX Project, and the work on photoionization/recombination, and aims to provide a comprehensive and self-consistent set of accurate collisional and radiative cross sections, and transition probabilities, within the framework of relativistic close coupling formulation using the Breit-Pauli R-Matrix method. An illustrative example is presented of how the IP data may be utilized in the formation of X-ray spectra of the K alpha complex at 6.7 keV from He-like Fe XXV.

  19. Studying the Saturn Inner Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, A.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Dandouras, I.

    2013-09-01

    In 2004 the MIMI/INCA detector onboard the Cassini spacecraft measured the significant flux of the energetic neutral atoms (ENA) coming from the area between the D-ring and the Saturn's atmosphere, what brought up the idea of the possible existence of the innermost radiation belt in this narrow gap. In the present study we estimate the possible sources for this radiation belt, assuming the two main processes: the double charge exchange of the ENAs, coming from the middle magnetosphere, what can bring the keV ions to the region of our interest, and the interaction of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) with the Saturn's atmosphere and rings, which due to CRAND process can produce the keV-MeV ions or electrons in the region. Both of these possible sources are possible to evaluate using the charged particle tracer. In our group we developed such charged particle tracer, which works in all different modes (Newton-Lorentz full equation of motion, guiding center or bounce averaged approximations), and allows using the different magnetic field models (from simple dipole magnetic field till complex realistic magnetic field model like Khurana model of Saturn's magnetosphere) for both forward and backward tracing simulations. This charged particle tracer was validated using the comparison of the simulation results and observations during several flybys of Cassini by icy moons of Saturn. Using the particle tracer we can calculate the access of GCRs to the atmosphere and rings of the planet and evaluate the filtering of the GCR spectrum that hits the atmosphere from the direction of the Saturn's main rings. Also we can investigate different non-dipolar effects which possible can change the Stroemer cutoff rigidities of GCRs, especially for the high-latitude atmosphere, which maps magnetically in the outer magnetosphere. We can also estimate the production of secondaries as well (and also from the multiple impacts of these secondaries on the rings or atmosphere) and evaluate the

  20. Determination of antimony in concentrates, ores and non-ferrous materials by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after iron-lanthanum collection, or by the iodide method after further xanthate extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1979-11-01

    Methods for determining trace and moderate amounts of antimony in copper, nickel, molybdenum, lead and zinc concentrates and in ores are described. Following sample decomposition, antimony is oxidized to antimony(V) with aqua regia, then reduced to antimony(III) with sodium metabisulphite in 6M hydrochloric acid medium and separated from most of the matrix elements by co-precipitation with hydrous ferric and lanthanum oxides. Antimony (>/= 100 mug/g) can subsequently be determined by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry, at 217.6 nm after dissolution of the precipitate in 3M hydrochloric acid. Alternatively, for the determination of antimony at levels of 1 mug/g or more, the precipitate is dissolved in 5M hydrochloric acid containing stannous chloride as a reluctant for iron(III) and thiourea as a complexing agent for copper. Then tin is complexed with hydrofluoric acid, and antimony is separated from iron, tin, lead and other co-precipitated elements, including lanthanum, by chloroform extraction of its xanthate. It is then determined spectrophotometrically, at 331 or 425 nm as the iodide. Interference from co-extracted bismuth is eliminated by washing the extract with hydrochloric acid of the same acid concentration as the medium used for extraction. Interference from co-extracted molybdenum, which causes high results at 331 nm, is avoided by measuring the absorbance at 425 nm. The proposed methods are also applicable to high-purity copper metal and copper- and lead-base alloys. In the spectrophotometric iodide method, the importance of the preliminary oxidation of all of the antimony to antimony(V), to avoid the formation of an unreactive species, is shown.

  1. Molecular modeling of the binding modes of the iron-sulfur protein to the Jac1 co-chaperone from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by all-atom and coarse-grained approaches.

    PubMed

    Mozolewska, Magdalena A; Krupa, Paweł; Scheraga, Harold A; Liwo, Adam

    2015-08-01

    The iron-sulfur protein 1 (Isu1) and the J-type co-chaperone Jac1 from yeast are part of a huge ATP-dependent system, and both interact with Hsp70 chaperones. Interaction of Isu1 and Jac1 is a part of the iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis system in mitochondria. In this study, the structure and dynamics of the yeast Isu1-Jac1 complex has been modeled. First, the complete structure of Isu1 was obtained by homology modeling using the I-TASSER server and YASARA software and thereafter tested for stability in the all-atom force field AMBER. Then, the known experimental structure of Jac1 was adopted to obtain initial models of the Isu1-Jac1 complex by using the ZDOCK server for global and local docking and the AutoDock software for local docking. Three most probable models were subsequently subjected to the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the UNRES force field to obtain the final structures of the complex. In the most probable model, Isu1 binds to the left face of the Γ-shaped Jac1 molecule by the β-sheet section of Isu1. Residues L105 , L109 , and Y163 of Jac1 have been assessed by mutation studies to be essential for binding (Ciesielski et al., J Mol Biol 2012; 417:1-12). These residues were also found, by UNRES/molecular dynamics simulations, to be involved in strong interactions between Isu1 and Jac1 in the complex. Moreover, N(95), T(98), P(102), H(112), V(159), L(167), and A(170) of Jac1, not yet tested experimentally, were also found to be important in binding.

  2. Molecular modeling of the binding modes of the Iron-sulfur protein to the Jac1 co-chaperone from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by all-atom and coarse-grained approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mozolewska, Magdalena A.; Krupa, Paweł; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The Iron sulfur protein 1 (Isu1) from yeast, and the J-type co-chaperone Jac1, are part of a huge ATP-dependent system, and both interact with Hsp70 chaperones. Interaction of Isu1 and Jac1 is a part of the iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis system in mitochondria. In this study, the structure and dynamics of the yeast Isu1-Jac1 complex has been modeled. First, the complete structure of Isu1 was obtained by homology modeling using the I-TASSER server and YASARA software and thereafter tested for stability in the all-atom force field AMBER. Then, the known experimental structure of Jac1 was adopted to obtain initial models of the Isu1-Jac1 complex by using the ZDOCK server for global and local docking and the AutoDock software for local docking. Three most probable models were subsequently subjected to the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the UNRES force field to obtain the final structures of the complex. In the most probable model, Isu1 binds to the left face of the “Γ” shaped Jac1 molecule by the β-sheet section of Isu1. Residues L105, L109, and Y163 of Jac1 have been assessed by mutation studies to be essential for binding (Ciesielski et al., J. Mol. Biol. 2012, 417, 1–12). These residues were also found, by UNRES/MD simulations, to be involved in strong interactions between Isu1 and Jac1 in the complex. Moreover, N95, T98, P102, H112, V159, L167 and A170 of Jac1, not yet tested experimentally, were also found important in binding. PMID:25973573

  3. Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Wawa greenstone belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, K. J.; Sylvester, P. J.; Attoh, K.

    1983-01-01

    The Wawa greenstone belt is located in the District of Algoma and extends east-northeast from Lake Superior to the western part of the Sudbury District in Ontario, Canada. Recent mapping by Attoh has shown that an unconformity at the base of the Dore' Formation and equivalent sedimentary rocks marks a significant stratigraphic break which can be traced throughout the volcanic belt. This break has been used to subdivide the volcanic-sedimentary into pre- and post-Dore' sequences. The pre-Dore' sequence includes at least two cycles of mafic-to-felsic volcanism, each capped by an iron-formation unit. The post-Dore' sequence includes an older mafic-to-felsic unit, which directly overlies sedimentary rocks correlated with the Dore' Formation, and a younger felsic breccia unit interpreted to have formed as debris flows from a felsic volcanic center. In the present study, samples of both the pre-and post-Dore' volcanic sequences were analyzed for major and trace elements, incuding rare earths (REE). This preliminary study is part of an ongoing program to assess the petrogenesis of the volcanic rocks of the Wawa greenstone belt.

  4. Tectonics of some Amazonian greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Greenstone belts exposed amid gneisses, granitoid rocks, and less abundant granulites along the northern and eastern margins of the Amazonian Craton yield Trans-Amazonican metamorphic ages of 2.0-2.1 Ga. Early proterozoic belts in the northern region probably originated as ensimatic island arc complexes. The Archean Carajas belt in the southeastern craton probably formed in an extensional basin on older continental basement. That basement contains older Archean belts with pillow basalts and komatiites. Belts of ultramafic rocks warrant investigatijon as possible ophiolites. A discussion follows.

  5. Seat Belt Sign and Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Amit; Inamadar, Praveenkumar Ishwarappa; Subrahmanyam, Bhattara Vishweswar

    2013-01-01

    Safety belts are the most important safety system in motor vehicles and when worn intend to prevent serious injuries. However, in unusual circumstances (high velocity motor vehicle collisions) these safety measures (seat belts) can be the source and cause of serious injuries. The seat belt syndrome was first described as early by Garrett and Braunste in but the term “seat belt sign” was discussed by Doersch and Dozier. Medical personnel's involved in emergency care of trauma patients should be aware of seat belt sign and there should a higher index of suspicion to rule out underlying organ injuries. PMID:24479100

  6. Seat belt use on interstate highways.

    PubMed Central

    Wells, J K; Williams, A F; Lund, A K

    1990-01-01

    More than 5,000 miles of limited-access highways in the eastern United States and Canada were traveled to observe seat belt use. Overall belt use was 58 percent in the United States and 79 percent in Canada. The data indicate that belt use in the United States follows a different pattern on interstate highways than on other streets and roads, with relatively high belt use rates (over 50 percent) appearing to be somewhat independent of belt use law provisions. PMID:2343969

  7. Economic geology of the Copper Mountain Supracrustal Belt, Owl Creek Mountains, Fremont County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hausel, W.D.; Graff, P.J.; Albert, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    The Archean stratigraphy and associated mineral deposits at Copper Mountain were investigated to determine if this supracrustal belt has potential commercial mineral deposits. It was concluded Copper Mountain lacks the stratigraphic and structural character of a classical greenstone belt, exhibits higher metamorphic grade, and may be better classified as a high-grade terrain. However, potential is noted for stratiform Au associated with iron formation, stratiform W associated with gneiss, and Cu-Au mineralization in strike veins. 63 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs. (ACR)

  8. Improved extraction method for the determination of iron, copper, and nickel in new varieties of sunflower oil by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Rehana; Kazi, Tasneem G; Jamali, Mohammad K; Arain, Mohammad B; Sherazi, Syed T; Jalbani, Nusrat; Afridi, Hassan I

    2008-01-01

    A simple and fast procedure is proposed for the extraction of iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and nickel (Ni) in 16 varieties of sunflower seed oil samples using an ultrasonic bath. The experimental parameters of the ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) method were optimized to improve the sensitivity and detect the metals at trace levels in minimum time. Conventional wet acid digestion method was used for comparative purposes. The optimum recovery of all 3 metals was obtained by UAE for 7 min, while the separation of aqueous and organic phases after extraction using centrifugation (UAE-2) required 3 min, as compared to the conventional equilibration method (UAE-1) that required 90 min. The respective recoveries of Cu, Fe, and Ni obtained with UAE-2 were in the range of 95.8-97.5, 93.5-98.3, and 95.6-98.2%, respectively, for different varieties of sunflower oil samples. Accuracy was determined by the standard addition method. Under the optimum operating conditions, the limits of detection obtained from the standard addition curves were 21.7, 20.4, and 35.6 ng/mL for Fe, Cu, and Ni, respectively. The fact that all varieties of sunflower oil contain significant amounts of Fe, Cu, and Ni indicates the deterioration of sunflower oil quality immediately after extraction from seeds, which poses a threat to oil quality and human health.

  9. Size-based speciation of iron in clay mineral particles by gravitational field-flow fractionation with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantiwas, Rattikan; Beckett, Ronald; Grudpan, Kate

    2005-01-01

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (FFF) coupled to UV and ETAAS detectors has been tested for micron-size particles in the range of 5-20 μm using three Fe-rich clay samples. The iron content estimated after aqua regia extraction was about 20-40 mg kg -1. The ETAAS analysis was performed both off-line from collected fractions and in an online continuous sampling mode using a specially designed flow through vial placed in the autosampler of the ETAAS. Comparison of the direct injection method with total analysis after aqua regia digestion shows that slurry injection of the dilute samples in the gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) effluent is quite efficient in these samples. In the majority of cases, more than 90% recovery was obtained for the slurry injection method. Fe mass-based particle size distributions and Fe concentration versus particle diameter plots can be generated using certain assumptions. This provides detailed information on size-based speciation of particulate samples. Generally, the Fe concentrations in the particles decreased slightly with an increase in particle size as is often found for soil and sediment samples.

  10. Determination of scandium, yttrium and lanthanides in silicate rocks and four new canadian iron-formation reference materials by flame atomic-absorption spectrometry with microsample injection.

    PubMed

    Sen Gupta, J G

    1984-12-01

    Enhancement of sensitivity by factors of up to 1.5 by use of the microsampling technique, coupled with the advantage of using small samples in small solution volumes, permits rapid flame AAS determination of traces of Sc, Y, Nd, Eu, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm and Yb in ultramafic and most other rocks of low rare-earth content, which would be either impossible or very difficult to analyse by direct aspiration because of the need for much larger sample weights and solution volumes. The rare-earths are separated by a modified ion-exchange or a double calcium oxalate and single hydrous ferric oxide co-precipitation procedure, and ultimately determined in an ethanolic perchlorate solution, buffered with 1% lanthanum, by the flame microsample injection technique, with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The results obtained by this technique for six international reference rocks SY-2 (syenite), BCR-1 (basalt), BHVO-1 (Hawaiian basalt), SCo-1 (cody shale), MAG-1 (marine mud) and STM-1 (syenite) are compared with those obtained previously by the direct aspiration method and with other reported data. Results are given for four new Canadian iron formation reference materials FeR-1 to FeR-4.

  11. Molecular Spintronics: Theory of Spin-Dependent Electron Transport Between Iron Nano-Contacts Bridged by Organic Molecules and Fe Atomic Chains*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgleish, Hugh

    2005-03-01

    Recent experiments [1] have lent support to theoretical predictions [2] that organic molecules connecting nickel nano-contacts may exhibit magneto-resistance and spin-valve effects. Here we present predictions of spintronic phenomena in another class of ferromagnetic nano-systems: Fe nano-contacts bridged by single conducting or insulating molecules or chains of Fe atoms. Models are constructed based on semi-empirical considerations, the known electronic structure of bulk Fe and ab initio density functional calculations. Using Lippmann-Schwinger and Green's function techniques, and Landauer theory, significant magneto-resistance is predicted in these systems. Under appropriate conditions, novel device characteristics such as negative magneto-resistance are also predicted to emerge. * Supported by NSERC and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. 1 J. R. Petta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 136601 (2004). 2 E. G. Emberly and G. Kirczenow, Chem. Phys. 281, 311 (2002); R. Pati, et al., Phys. Rev. B 68, 100407 (2003).

  12. Determination of iron, cobalt, nickel, manganese, zinc, copper, cadmium and lead in human hair by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasa Rao, K.; Balaji, T.; Prasada Rao, T.; Babu, Y.; Naidu, G. R. K.

    2002-08-01

    A method was standardized for the dissolution of hair samples and analysis was carried out by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Hair samples were brought into solution by using a mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. Various parameters that influence the sample preparation, namely temperature, digestion time and ratio of acid mixture were studied and standardized. The optimized method has been employed to digest standard reference materials and hair samples of residents of India, collected from different age groups and sex, and analyzed for Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb. The values agree for most of the metals with the data reported for human hair samples of residents of India. The NIES CRM Human Hair No. 5 and IAEA Reference Hair HH-1 certified reference materials were used in order to verify the accuracy of the method and the results were in excellent agreement with the certified values.

  13. Development of new atom transfer radical polymerization system by iron (III)-metal salts without using any external initiator and reducing agent.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Yusuf; Chen, Xiangxiong; Lee, Seung Woo; Noh, Seok Kyun

    2013-08-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) catalyzed by high oxidation state metal salts of FeX3 is developed for the first time in the absence of both external initiator and reducing agent. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) and styrene are polymerized successfully using FeX3 /Phosphorous ligands with well-controlled molecular weight distributions (=1.5). The molecular weight of the polymers increases with monomer consumption with the progress of time and the polymerization behaviors show a decent ATRP trend. Activators and initiators are suggested to generate in situ by the addition reaction of MMA and one equivalent of FeX3 . The PMMA synthesized from without-initiator system is characterized by (1) H, (13) C and DEPT (distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer nuclear magnetic resonance) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Chain extension and copolymerization experiments prove the livingness of the obtained polymer. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Coherence properties and quantum state transportation in an optical conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Kuhr, S; Alt, W; Schrader, D; Dotsenko, I; Miroshnychenko, Y; Rosenfeld, W; Khudaverdyan, M; Gomer, V; Rauschenbeutel, A; Meschede, D

    2003-11-21

    We have prepared and detected quantum coherences of trapped cesium atoms with long dephasing times. Controlled transport by an "optical conveyor belt" over macroscopic distances preserves the atomic coherence with slight reduction of coherence time. The limiting dephasing effects are experimentally identified, and we present an analytical model of the reversible and irreversible dephasing mechanisms. Our experimental methods are applicable at the single-atom level. Coherent quantum bit operations along with quantum state transport open the route towards a "quantum shift register" of individual neutral atoms.

  15. Seat belt misuse among children transported in belt-positioning booster seats.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Joseph; Daniels, Dawn M; Talty, Judith L; Bull, Marilyn J

    2009-05-01

    Observe and report seat belt use among children transported in belt-positioning booster seats. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational survey of children transported in motor vehicles between 2006 and 2007. While drivers completed a survey reporting the child's age, weight and gender, and the driver's age, gender, race, income, education, and relationship to the child; a child passenger safety technician recorded vehicle seating location, restraint type, and use of the car safety seat harness or seat belt as appropriate for the child. Twenty-five fast food restaurants and discount department stores throughout Indiana. A convenience sample of drivers transporting children younger than 16 years. Seat belt use among children transported in belt-positioning booster seats. Seat belt misuse. Overall, 1446 drivers participated, 2287 children were observed with 564 children in belt-positioning booster seats. At least one seat belt misuse was observed for 64.8% of the children transported. Common misuses were the shoulder belt being placed over the booster seat armrest (35.8%); shoulder belt not at mid-shoulder position (28.5%), seat belt was too loose (24.5%), and the shoulder belt was either behind the child's back (9.1%) or under their arm (10.0%). There is a high frequency of seat belt misuses among children transported in booster seats. Advice to parents on appropriate car seat selection, and encouragement to parents to supervise seat belt use may decrease misuse.

  16. Determination of bismuth in ores, concentrates and non-ferrous alloys by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after separation by diethyldithiocarbamate extraction or iron collection.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1979-12-01

    Two simple, reliable and moderately rapid atomic-absorption methods for determining trace and minor amounts of bismuth in copper, nickel, molybdenum, lead and zinc concentrates and ores, and in non-ferrous alloys, are described. These methods involve the separation of bismuth from matrix elements either by chloroform extraction of its diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) complex, at pH 11.5-12.0, from a sodium hydroxide medium containing citric acid, tartaric acid, EDTA and potassium cyanide as complexing agents, or by co-precipitation with hydrous ferric oxide from an ammoniacal medium. Bismuth is ultimately determined, at 223.1 nm after evaporation of the extract to dryness in the presence of nitric and petchloric acids and dissolution of the salts in 20% v/v hydrochloric acid, or by dissolution of the hydrous oxide precipitate with the same acid solution, respectively. Results obtained by both methods are compared with those obtained spectrophotometrically by the iodide method after the separation of bismuth by DDTC and xanthate extractions.

  17. Solid phase extraction method for the determination of iron, lead and chromium by atomic absorption spectrometry using Amberite XAD-2000 column in various water samples.

    PubMed

    Elci, Latif; Kartal, Aslihan A; Soylak, Mustafa

    2008-05-01

    This work describes a procedure for the separation-preconcentration of Fe(III), Pb(II) and Cr(III) from some water samples using a column-filled Amberlite XAD-2000 resin. The analyte ions retained on the column were eluted with 0.5 mol L(-1) HNO(3). The analytes in the effluent were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Several parameters governing the efficiency of the method were evaluated including pH, resin amount, sample volume, flow rates, eluent type and divers ion effects. The recoveries under the optimum working conditions were found to be as 100+/-1% Fe, 96+/-1% Pb and 93+/-2% Cr. The relative standard deviations and errors were less than 2% and 5%, respectively. The detection limit based on three standard deviations of the blank was found to be 0.32, 0.51 and 0.81 microg L(-1), for Fe, Pb and Cr, respectively. The procedure was applied to the determination of Fe, Cr and Pb in hot spring water and drinking water samples.

  18. Electronic Structure of the Ferryl Intermediate in the α-Ketoglutarate Dependent Non-Heme Iron Halogenase SyrB2: Contributions to H Atom Abstraction Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, Shaun D; Matthews, Megan L; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J Martin; Solomon, Edward I

    2016-04-20

    Low temperature magnetic circular dichroism (LT MCD) spectroscopy in combination with quantum-chemical calculations are used to define the electronic structure associated with the geometric structure of the Fe(IV)═O intermediate in SyrB2 that was previously determined by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy. These studies elucidate key frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and their contribution to H atom abstraction reactivity. The VT MCD spectra of the enzymatic S = 2 Fe(IV)═O intermediate with Br(-) ligation contain information-rich features that largely parallel the corresponding spectra of the S = 2 model complex (TMG3tren)Fe(IV)═O (Srnec, M.; Wong, S. D.; England, J; Que, L; Solomon, E. I. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2012, 109, 14326-14331). However, quantitative differences are observed that correlate with π-anisotropy and oxo donor strength that perturb FMOs and affect reactivity. Due to π-anisotropy, the Fe(IV)═O active site exhibits enhanced reactivity in the direction of the substrate cavity that proceeds through a π-channel that is controlled by perpendicular orientation of the substrate C-H bond relative to the halide-Fe(IV)═O plane. Also, the increased intrinsic reactivity of the SyrB2 intermediate relative to the ferryl model complex is correlated to a higher oxyl character of the Fe(IV)═O at the transition states resulting from the weaker ligand field of the halogenase.

  19. Liquid belt radiator design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. P.; Fitzgerald, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Liquid Belt Radiator (LBR) is an advanced concept developed to meet the needs of anticipated future space missions. A previous study documented the advantages of this concept as a lightweight, easily deployable alternative to present day space heat rejection systems. The technical efforts associated with this study concentrate on refining the concept of the LBR as well as examining the issues of belt dynamics and potential application of the LBR to intermediate and high temperature heat rejection applications. A low temperature point design developed in previous work is updated assuming the use of diffusion pump oil, Santovac-6, as the heat transfer media. Additional analytical and design effort is directed toward determining the impact of interface heat exchanger, fluid bath sealing, and belt drive mechanism designs on system performance and mass. The updated design supports the earlier result by indicating a significant reduction in system specific system mass as compared to heat pipe or pumped fluid radiator concepts currently under consideration (1.3 kg/sq m versus 5 kg/sq m).

  20. Beyond the Kuiper Belt Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Of the thousands of known objects beyond Neptune, only one has a perihelion significantly beyond 50 AU, Sedna at 75 AU. Kuiper Belt surveys to date have not been optimized to survey beyond the Kuiper Belt edge at 50 AU. Most of these surveys either did not go faint enough, did not have the required long cadence to detect very slow moving objects or covered too small of an area of sky. The dynamical and physical properties of objects in this region offer key constraints on the formation and evolution of our solar system. In order to probe the Sedna like population of objects with moderate radii (100 km) we propose a deep wide-field outer solar system survey. This survey will allow us to determine if the objects beyond 50 AU are fainter than expected, if there is truly a dearth of objects, or if the Kuiper Belt continues again after some sizable gap possibly caused by a planet sized object. We will be able to examine the origin of Sedna and determine if this eccentric, distant body is unique (as once believed for Pluto) or just the first of a new class of object in the outer Solar System. We will also explore the Neptune Trojans and scattered disk populations through the survey.

  1. Beyond the Kuiper Belt Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott; Trujillo, Chad

    2012-02-01

    Of the thousands of known objects beyond Neptune, only one has a perihelion significantly beyond 50 AU, Sedna at 75 AU. Kuiper Belt surveys to date have not been optimized to survey beyond the Kuiper Belt edge at 50 AU. Most of these surveys either did not go faint enough, did not have the required long cadence to detect very slow moving objects or covered too small of an area of sky. The dynamical and physical properties of objects in this region offer key constraints on the formation and evolution of our solar system. In order to probe the Sedna like population of objects with moderate radii (100 km) we propose a medium wide-field outer solar system survey. This survey will allow us to determine if the objects beyond 50 AU are fainter than expected, if there is truly a dearth of objects, or if the Kuiper Belt continues again after some sizable gap possibly caused by a planet sized object. We will be able to examine the origin of Sedna and determine if this eccentric, distant body is unique (as once believed for Pluto) or just the first of a new class of object in the outer Solar System.

  2. Beyond the Kuiper Belt Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott

    2012-06-01

    Of the thousands of known objects beyond Neptune, only one has a perihelion significantly beyond 50 AU, Sedna at 75 AU. Kuiper Belt surveys to date have not been optimized to survey beyond the Kuiper Belt edge at 50 AU. Most of these surveys either did not go faint enough, did not have the required long cadence to detect very slow moving objects or covered too small of an area of sky. The dynamical and physical properties of objects in this region offer key constraints on the formation and evolution of our solar system. In order to probe the Sedna like population of objects with moderate radii (100 km) we propose a deep wide-field outer solar system survey. This survey will allow us to determine if the objects beyond 50 AU are fainter than expected, if there is truly a dearth of objects, or if the Kuiper Belt continues again after some sizable gap possibly caused by a planet sized object. We will be able to examine the origin of Sedna and determine if this eccentric, distant body is unique (as once believed for Pluto) or just the first of a new class of object in the outer Solar System. We will also explore the Neptune Trojans and scattered disk populations through the survey.

  3. V-belt assembly for transmitting power

    SciTech Connect

    Okawa, S.; Ogino, I.; Okuwaki, S.

    1987-02-24

    This patent describes a V-belt assembly trained over V-belt wheels for transmitting power comprising: a flexible endless belt; rigid suspension members secured fixedly to the endless belt perpendicularly to the longitudinal direction of the endless belt and having pivotal projections extending from opposite sides thereof; substantially U-shaped rigid transmission pieces having holes formed therein wherein the pivotal projections extending from the respective suspension members extend in sidewise directions and into the holes so as to allow for relative movement between each of the pivotal projections and the hole for engaging V-shaped grooves of the V-belt wheels. A center axis of the pivotal projection passes through an approximately central portion of thickness of the endless belt. Each of the suspension members is substantially U-shaped so as to surround one bottom surface and opposite side surfaces of the endless belt and is secured fixedly to the endless belt; and an opposed plate connected to each of the suspension members and positioned against a bottom surface of the endless belt opposite the one bottom surface.

  4. Morphology of the ferritin iron core by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Nan; Dowle, Miriam; Horniblow, Richard D.; Tselepis, Chris; Palmer, Richard E.

    2016-11-01

    As the major iron storage protein, ferritin stores and releases iron for maintaining the balance of iron in fauna, flora, and bacteria. We present an investigation of the morphology and iron loading of ferritin (from equine spleen) using aberration-corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Atom counting method, with size selected Au clusters as mass standards, was employed to determine the number of iron atoms in the nanoparticle core of each ferritin protein. Quantitative analysis shows that the nuclearity of iron atoms in the mineral core varies from a few hundred iron atoms to around 5000 atoms. Moreover, a relationship between the iron loading and iron core morphology is established, in which mineral core nucleates from a single nanoparticle, then grows along the protein shell before finally forming either a solid or hollow core structure.

  5. Morphology of the ferritin iron core by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jian, Nan; Dowle, Miriam; Horniblow, Richard D; Tselepis, Chris; Palmer, Richard E

    2016-11-18

    As the major iron storage protein, ferritin stores and releases iron for maintaining the balance of iron in fauna, flora, and bacteria. We present an investigation of the morphology and iron loading of ferritin (from equine spleen) using aberration-corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Atom counting method, with size selected Au clusters as mass standards, was employed to determine the number of iron atoms in the nanoparticle core of each ferritin protein. Quantitative analysis shows that the nuclearity of iron atoms in the mineral core varies from a few hundred iron atoms to around 5000 atoms. Moreover, a relationship between the iron loading and iron core morphology is established, in which mineral core nucleates from a single nanoparticle, then grows along the protein shell before finally forming either a solid or hollow core structure.

  6. Intelligent seat belt reminders-do they change driver seat belt use in Europe?

    PubMed

    Lie, Anders; Krafft, Maria; Kullgren, Anders; Tingvall, Claes

    2008-10-01

    Many modern cars have seat belt reminders (SBRs) using loud and clear sound and light signals. These systems have developed over the last few years. This study investigates how these modern systems influence the seat belt use in real-life traffic in built-up areas in some European cities. The data were collected by field observations in major cities in six European countries and in five cities around Sweden. A selection of car models having seat belt reminders (SBR) were compared to a fleet of similar car models without such reminders. A significant difference in seat belt wearing rate was found in the cars with seat belt reminders. For all observations, the total seat belt wearing rate was 97.5% +/- 0.5% in cars with SBR, while it was 85.8% +/- 0.8% in cars without. There were differences in seat belt use in the different observation locations. The lowest seat belt use was found in Brussels/Belgium with a use rate of 92.6 +/- 2.2% in cars with seat belt reminders and 69.6 +/- 3.1% in cars not fitted with reminders. The highest seat belt use was found in Paris/France where 99.8 +/- 0.4% of the drivers used the seat belt in cars with reminders and 96.9 +/-1.1% were belted in cars without reminders. Seat belt reminders fulfilling Euro NCAP's seat belt reminder protocol are increasing the seat belt use in daily traffic significantly. Around 80% (82.2% +/- 8.6%) of the drivers not putting the belt on without a seat belt reminder do so in cars equipped with an SBR that has a light signal and an associated loud and clear sound signal.

  7. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  8. Inner radiation belt source of helium and heavy hydrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, A. A.; Galper, A. M.; Koldashov, S. V.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Casolino, M.; Picozza, P.; Sparvoli, R.

    Nuclear interactions between inner zone protons and atoms in the upper atmosphere provide the main source of energetic H and He isotopes nuclei in the radiation belt. This paper reports on the specified calculations of these isotope intensities using various inner zone proton intensity models (AP-8 and SAMPEX/PET PSB97), the atmosphere drift-averaged composition and density model MSIS-90, and cross-sections of the interaction processes from the GNASH nuclear model code. To calculate drift-averaged densities and energy losses of secondaries, the particles were tracked in the geomagnetic field (modelled through IGRF-95) by integrating numerically the equation of the motion. The calculations take into account the kinematics of nuclear interactions along the whole trajectory of trapped proton. The comparison with new data obtained from the experiments on board RESURS-04 and MITA satellites and with data from SAMPEX and CRRES satellites taken during different phases of solar activity shows that the upper atmosphere is a sufficient source for inner zone helium and heavy hydrogen isotopes. The calculation results are energy spectra and angular distributions of light nuclear isotopes in the inner radiation belt that may be used to develop helium inner radiation belt model and to evaluate their contribution to SEU (single event upset) rates.

  9. Synchronous and Cogged Fan Belt Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, D.; Dean, J.; Acosta, J.

    2014-02-01

    The GSA Regional GPG Team commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to perform monitoring of cogged V-belts and synchronous belts on both a constant volume and a variable air volume fan at the Byron G. Rodgers Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Denver, Colorado. These motor/fan combinations were tested with their original, standard V-belts (appropriately tensioned by an operation and maintenance professional) to obtain a baseline for standard operation. They were then switched to the cogged V-belts, and finally to synchronous belts. The power consumption by the motor was normalized for both fan speed and air density changes. This was necessary to ensure that the power readings were not influenced by a change in rotational fan speed or by the power required to push denser air. Finally, energy savings and operation and maintenance savings were compiled into an economic life-cycle cost analysis of the different belt options.

  10. Controllable ferromagnetism of iron doped topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shan; Liu, Zhen; Ji, Fuhao; Li, Bin; Xi, Fuchun; Kuroda, K.; Ye, Mao; Miyamoto, K.; Kimura, A.

    2012-02-01

    The higher than room temperature ferromagnetism was found in iron doped Bi2Se3. Samples generated by different processes have different magnetic characters. The Curie temperature is independent on iron concentration which against all discovered dilute magnetic systems. EXAFS observations show that the local structure of iron in samples with paramagnetic character is complex. On the contrary, that with ferromagnetic character is very simple that the iron atoms make up small single atom, dimer or trimer structures and these structures randomly distributed in Bi2Se3 crystal. The ferromagnetism can be enhanced or suppressed by the shift of Fermi edge by co-doping of Mg and Fe to Bi2Se3 crystal. The less than 3 atoms small structure cannot have room temperature ferromagnetism, so we believe that the higher than room temperature controllable ferromagnetism is intrinsic character of iron doped topological insulator.

  11. A Heavy Ion and Proton Radiation Belt Inside of Jupiter's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, Peter; Mauk, Barry; Paranicas, Chris; Clark, George; Haggerty, Dennis; Rymer, Abigail; Santos-Costa, Daniel; Connerney, John; Allegrini, Frederic; Valek, Phil; Kurth, William; Gladstone, Randy; Levin, Steven; Bolton, Scott

    2017-04-01

    The JEDI instrument onboard the Juno spacecraft obtained the first in-situ observations of energetic charged particles in Jupiter's inner radiation belt, located between Jupiter's rings (1.3-3.2 planetary radii from Jupiter) and its atmosphere. The inner belt contains protons and heavier ions (up to the atomic mass of sulfur) with energies of hundreds of keV. The measured energy spectra are unusual, exhibiting an increase in intensity above about 300keV. We suggest that this is due to inefficient removal of ions at these high energies due to charge exchange in Jupiter's tenuous upper atmosphere and/or by ring material absorption. Since this innermost belt includes heavy ions it cannot be exclusively supplied by cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), an important source in the inner magnetospheres of Earth and Saturn; CRAND only supplies protons and electrons. We propose as an alternative that the inner radiation belt may be supplied by stripping of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) in Jupiter's tenuous upper atmosphere. This mechanism is consistent with the unusually low ratio of energetic electrons to ions found in this belt, since electrons stripped from energetic neutrals are of low energy.

  12. 30 CFR 57.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... drive pulley if slippage could cause ignition of the belt. (c) A person shall attend the belt at the... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 57.4503 Section 57.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. (a) Surface belt...

  13. 30 CFR 57.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... drive pulley if slippage could cause ignition of the belt. (c) A person shall attend the belt at the... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 57.4503 Section 57.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. (a) Surface belt...

  14. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and organometallic mediated radical polymerization (OMRP) of styrene mediated by diaminobis(phenolato)iron(II) complexes: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Poli, Rinaldo; Shaver, Michael P

    2014-07-21

    This study has addressed the radical polymerization of styrene mediated by the diaminobis(phenolate) complexes [Fe(O-2,4-Y2C6H2-5-CH2)2NCH2CH2NMe2], abbreviated as [Fe(II)]. The system is known to be well controlled when Y = Cl but not when Y = alkyl. The control was proposed to occur by a dual ATRP+OMRP mechanism. We have used DFT calculations to address the Y = Cl and Y = CH3 systems. The growing radical chain, ATRP dormant chain, and OMRP dormant chain were simplified to PhCH(CH3)(•), PhCH(CH3)-Cl, and [PhCH(CH3)-Fe(III)]. The idealized ATRP activation/deactivation equilibrium involves [Fe(III)-Cl] (I(Y)) and PhCH(CH3)(•) on the active side and [Fe(II)] (II(Y)) and PhCH(CH3)-Cl on the dormant side, whereas the OMRP activation/deactivation relates [Fe(II)] and PhCH(CH3)(•) with [PhCH(CH3)-Fe(III)] (III(Y)). A benchmarking of various functionals against the known spin properties of alkylporphyriniron(III) shows B3PW91* to be a suitable functional. For the purpose of bond dissociation energy calculations, a dispersion correction was made (B3PW91*-D3). For both Y systems, the ground state is a spin sextet for I, a spin quintet for II, and a spin quartet for III. The calculations show a greater energy cost for the ATRP activation process involving Cl atom addition to II(Cl) to yield I(Cl) (7.2 kcal/mol) relative to the process transforming II(Me) to I(Me) (2.1 kcal/mol). On the other hand, the alkyl addition transforming II to III provides slightly greater stabilization for II(Cl) (27.1 kcal/mol) than for II(Me) (26.1 kcal/mol). As a result, both ATRP and OMRP trapping processes provide greater stabilization for the Y = Cl system, in agreement with the observed better control. The charge analysis attributes these minor but determining energy differences to the inductive electron withdrawing effect of the phenolato Cl substituents. The ATRP and OMRP activation/deactivation pathways have been analyzed in relation to the spin state change; they show in each case

  15. Workshop on Techtonic Evolution of Greenstone Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewit, M. J. (Editor); Ashwal, Lewis D. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: greenstone belt externalities; boundaries; rock terranes; synthesis and destiny; tectonic evolution; rock components and structure; sedimentology; stratigraphy; volcanism; metamorphism; and geophysics.

  16. Investigation of Moving Belt Radiator Technology Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. Peter; Aguilar, Jerry L.

    1994-01-01

    The development of an advanced spacecraft radiator technology is reported. The moving belt radiator is a thermal radiator concept with the promise of lower specific mass (per kW rejected) than that afforded by existing technologies. The results of a parametric study to estimate radiator mass for future space power systems is presented. It is shown that this technology can be scaled up to 200 MW for higher rejection temperatures. Several aspects of the design concept are discussed, including the dynamics of a large rotating belt in microgravity. The results of a computer code developed to model the belt dynamics are presented. A series of one-g experiments to investigate the dynamics of small belts is described. A comprehensive test program to investigate belt dynamics in microgravity aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft is discussed. It was found that the desired circular shape can readily be achieved in microgravity. It is also shown that a rotating belt is stable when subjected to simulated attitude control maneuvers. Heat exchanger design is also investigated. Several sealing concepts were examined experimentally, and are discussed. Overall heat transfer coefficients to the rotating belt are presented. Material properties for various belt materials, including screen meshes, are also presented. The results presented in this report indicate that the moving belt radiator concept is technically feasible.

  17. The galactic 'belt of life'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marochnik, L. S.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1983-11-01

    A galactic anthropocentric principle is proposed according to which the terrestrial forms of life and civilization can arise only in galactic 'belts of life', i.e., in corotation tori. It is noted that this principle holds not only for the Milky Way but also for other spiral galaxies, and that the special position of the solar system in the corotation band of the Galaxy makes the proposed hypothesis especially appealing. Upper bounds to the possible number of technological civilizations in the framework of the proposed principle are calculated.

  18. Synthetic mononuclear nonheme iron-oxygen intermediates.

    PubMed

    Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-08-18

    Mononuclear nonheme iron-oxygen species, such as iron-superoxo, -peroxo, -hydroperoxo, and -oxo, are key intermediates involved in dioxygen activation and oxidation reactions catalyzed by nonheme iron enzymes. Because these iron-oxygen intermediates are short-lived due to their thermal instability and high reactivity, it is challenging to investigate their structural and spectroscopic properties and reactivity in the catalytic cycles of the enzymatic reactions themselves. One way to approach such problems is to synthesize biomimetic iron-oxygen complexes and to tune their geometric and electronic structures for structural characterization and reactivity studies. Indeed, a number of biologically important iron-oxygen species, such as mononuclear nonheme iron(III)-superoxo, iron(III)-peroxo, iron(III)-hydroperoxo, iron(IV)-oxo, and iron(V)-oxo complexes, were synthesized recently, and the first X-ray crystal structures of iron(III)-superoxo, iron(III)-peroxo, and iron(IV)-oxo complexes in nonheme iron models were successfully obtained. Thus, our understanding of iron-oxygen intermediates in biological reactions has been aided greatly from the studies of the structural and spectroscopic properties and the reactivities of the synthetic biomimetic analogues. In this Account, we describe our recent results on the synthesis and characterization of mononuclear nonheme iron-oxygen complexes bearing simple macrocyclic ligands, such as N-tetramethylated cyclam ligand (TMC) and tetraamido macrocyclic ligand (TAML). In the case of iron-superoxo complexes, an iron(III)-superoxo complex, [(TAML)Fe(III)(O2)](2-), is described, including its crystal structure and reactivities in electrophilic and nucleophilic oxidative reactions, and its properties are compared with those of a chromium(III)-superoxo complex, [(TMC)Cr(III)(O2)(Cl)](+), with respect to its reactivities in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions. In the case of iron-peroxo intermediates

  19. [Method of quantitative iron determination in the serum, urine and tissue].

    PubMed

    Preu, E; Schmidt, U; Lüftner, J; Anschütz, U

    1984-04-15

    In this paper the methodology of the quantitative determination of the iron in serum, urine and tissue is described. For the quantitative recognition of the iron in the serum the photometric determination with bathophenanthroline as well as the atomic absorption spectrophotometry may be used. The atomic absorption spectrophotometry may be used. The atomic absorption spectrophotometry is particularly suited for the measurement of the iron content in the urine. Tissue is disintegrated by wet ash formation and also determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  20. Dichotomous Hydrogen Atom Transfer vs. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer During Activation of X-H Bonds (X = C, N, O) by Nonheme Iron-Oxo Complexes of Variable Basicity

    PubMed Central

    Usharani, Dandamudi; Lacy, David C.; Borovik, A. S.; Shaik, Sason

    2013-01-01

    We describe herein the hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT)/ proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactivity for FeIV-oxo and FeIII-oxo complexes (1–4) that activate C-H, N-H, and O-H bonds in 9,10 dihydroanthracene (S1), dimethylformamide (S2), 1,2 diphenylhydrazine (S3), p-methoxyphenol (S4), and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (S5). In 1–3, the iron is pentacoordinated by tris[N'-tert-butylureaylato)-N-ethylene]aminato ([H3buea]3−) or its derivatives. These complexes are basic, in the order 3 >> 1 > 2. Oxidant 4, [FeIVN4Py(O)]2+ (N4Py: N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-bis(2-pyridyl) methylamine), is the least basic oxidant. The DFT results match experimental trends and exhibit a mechanistic spectrum ranging from concerted HAT and PCET reactions to concerted-asynchronous proton transfer (PT) / electron transfer (ET) mechanisms, all the way to PT. The singly occupied orbital along the O---H---X (X= C, N, O) moiety in the TS shows clearly that in the PCET cases, the electron is transferred separately from the proton. The Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not account for the observed reactivity pattern, as evidenced by the scatter in the plot of calculated barrier vs. reactions driving forces. However, a plot of the deformation energy in the TS vs. the respective barrier provides a clear signature of the HAT/PCET dichotomy. Thus, in all C-H bond activations, the barrier derives from the deformation energy required to create the TS, whereas in N-H/O-H bond activations, the deformation energy is much larger than the corresponding barrier, indicating the presence of stabilizing interaction between the TS fragments. A valence bond model is used to link the observed results with the basicity/acidity of the reactants. PMID:24124906

  1. Jupiter's radiation belts and atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, I.; Dames, H. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Maps and stripscans of the radio emission from Jupiter were made during the Pioneer 10 flyby in December 1973 at wavelengths of 6 cm, 21 cm, and 50 cm using the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. With this instrument the disk of the planet was resolved at 6 and 21 cm. The pictures are averaged over 15 deg of Jovian longitude. At 21 cm the stripscans clearly show the existence of a 'hot region' in the radiation belts at a System III longitude (1965.0) of 255 + or - 10 deg. Its flux is about 9% of the total nonthermal flux, and it has a volume emissivity enhanced by a factor of about 1.6 with respect to the general radiation belts. The temperature of the thermal disk at 21 cm appears to be 290 + or - 20 K. This is likely due to a high ammonia mixing ratio in the atmosphere, a factor of 4-5 larger than the expected solar value of 0.00015.

  2. Beyond the Kuiper Belt Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Of the thousands of known objects beyond Neptune, only one has a perihelion significantly beyond 50 AU, Sedna at 75 AU. Most Kuiper Belt surveys to date either did not go faint enough, did not have the required long cadence to detect very slow moving objects or covered too small of an area of sky to efficiently detect objects beyond 50 AU. The dynamical and physical properties of objects in this region offer key constraints on the formation and evolution of our solar system. In order to probe the Sedna like population of objects with moderate radii (100 km) we are conducting a deep wide-field outer solar system survey. This survey will allow us to determine if the objects beyond 50 AU are fainter than expected, if there is truly a dearth of objects, or if the Kuiper Belt continues again after some sizable gap possibly caused by a planet sized object. We will be able to examine the origin of Sedna and determine if it is unique (as once believed for Pluto) or one of a new class of object. We request one night in 2012B to recover interesting objects that will be discovered at Subaru in July 2012 and complete the sky coverage needed to constrain the Sedna-like population.

  3. Beyond the Kuiper Belt Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Of the thousands of known objects beyond Neptune, only one has a perihelion significantly beyond 50 AU, Sedna at 75 AU. Most Kuiper Belt surveys to date either did not go faint enough, did not have the required long cadence to detect very slow moving objects or covered too small of an area of sky to efficiently detect objects beyond 50 AU. The dynamical and physical properties of objects in this region offer key constraints on the formation and evolution of our solar system. In order to probe the Sedna like population of objects with moderate radii (100 km) we are conducting a deep wide-field outer solar system survey. This survey will allow us to determine if the objects beyond 50 AU are fainter than expected, if there is truly a dearth of objects, or if the Kuiper Belt continues again after some sizable gap possibly caused by a planet sized object. We will be able to examine the origin of Sedna and determine if it is unique (as once believed for Pluto) or one of a new class of object. We request one night in 2013B to recover a very interesting object that we discovered at Subaru in July 2012 and complete the sky coverage needed to constrain the Sedna-like population. This one night was awarded to us in 2012B but lost because of instrument problems.

  4. Microstructural Observations on High Strength Polycrystalline Iron Whiskers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-01

    found that the whiskers consisted of a unique and complex microdispersion of iron oxides, iron carbide, and atomic carbon which bond the very small alpha ... iron crystallites into a non-porous microstructure of high integrity. The mixing of strong covalent bonding with metallic bonding is proposed to explain the exceptionally high tensile strength of the whiskers. (Author)

  5. 14 CFR 31.63 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety belts. 31.63 Section 31.63 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.63 Safety belts. (a) There must be a safety...

  6. 14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section 27.1413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety...

  7. 36 CFR 1004.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety belts. 1004.15 Section 1004.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.15 Safety... administered by the Presidio Trust will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened at...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section 27.1413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety...

  9. 36 CFR 1004.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Safety belts. 1004.15 Section 1004.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.15 Safety... administered by the Presidio Trust will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened at...

  10. 14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section 27.1413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety...

  11. 36 CFR 1004.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety belts. 1004.15 Section 1004.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.15 Safety... administered by the Presidio Trust will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened at...

  12. 36 CFR 1004.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety belts. 1004.15 Section 1004.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.15 Safety... administered by the Presidio Trust will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened at...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section 27.1413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety...

  14. 36 CFR 1004.15 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety belts. 1004.15 Section 1004.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.15 Safety... administered by the Presidio Trust will have the safety belt or child restraint system properly fastened at...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section 27.1413 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety...

  16. Seat Belts on School Buses: Some Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soule, David

    1982-01-01

    A representative of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration weighs advantages and discusses issues associated with installing seat belts in school buses. Federal regulations and research findings are considered. A list of guideline questions for school districts planning to install seat belts is included. (PP)

  17. Understanding Quaternions and the Dirac Belt Trick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Dirac belt trick is often employed in physics classrooms to show that a 2n rotation is not topologically equivalent to the absence of rotation whereas a 4n rotation is, mirroring a key property of quaternions and their isomorphic cousins, spinors. The belt trick can leave the student wondering if a real understanding of quaternions and spinors…

  18. Understanding Quaternions and the Dirac Belt Trick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Dirac belt trick is often employed in physics classrooms to show that a 2n rotation is not topologically equivalent to the absence of rotation whereas a 4n rotation is, mirroring a key property of quaternions and their isomorphic cousins, spinors. The belt trick can leave the student wondering if a real understanding of quaternions and spinors…

  19. Combined Radiation Belt - Plasma Sheet System Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseev, Nikita; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander; Zhu, Hui

    2017-04-01

    Recent years have given rise to numerous mathematical models of the Earth's radiation belt dynamics. Driven by observations at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) where satellites (e.g. GOES and LANL) provide extensive in-situ measurements, radiation belt models usually take into account only diffusion processes in the energetic electron belts (100 keV and greater), leaving aside the dynamics of colder source population (tens of keV). Such models are able to reconstruct the radiation belt state, but they are not capable of predicting the electron dynamics at GEO, where many communication and navigation satellites currently operate. In this work we present combined four-dimensional electron radiation belt - plasma sheet model accounting for adiabatic advective transport, radial diffusion due to interaction with ULF waves, local acceleration of electrons, scattering into the atmosphere, magnetopause shadowing, and adiabatic effects due to contraction and expansion of the magnetic field. The developed model is applicable to energetic, relativistic and ultrarelativistic electrons as well as to source electron population. The model provides spatial particle distribution allowing us to compare and validate the model with multiple satellite measurements at different MLT sectors (e.g. Van Allen Probes, GOES, LANL, THEMIS). The model can be helpful for the prediction of crucial for satellite operators geosynchronous electron fluxes and electron radiation belt dynamics including the heart of the outer belt, slot region and inner belt.

  20. Biomechanics of seat belt restraint system.

    PubMed

    Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam; Herbst, Brian; Meyer, Steve; Hock, Davis

    2004-01-01

    Seat belt system restrains and protects occupants in motor vehicle crashes and any slack in seat belt system induces additional loading on occupant. Signs of belt loading are more obvious in high-speed frontal collisions with heavy occupants. However subtle changes may occur at low speeds or with low forces from occupants during rollovers. In certain cases, the seat belt webbing is twisted and loaded by the occupant. The loading of webbing induces an observable fold/crimp on the seat belt. The purpose of the study is to biomechanically evaluate the force required to produce such marks using an anthropometric physical test dummy. Two tests were conducted to determine the amount of force required to put an observable fold/crimp in a shoulder belt. A head form designed by Voight Hodgson was used to represent the neck which interacted with the belt. The force was applied with a pneumatic pull ram (central hydraulic 89182 N) and the force was measured with a 44,000 N transducer load cell (DSM-10K). Results indicate that the force of over 1,000 N produced a fold or crimp in the belt.

  1. The Administrator's "Handy Dandy" Tool Belt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Every good leader needs a tool belt. Throughout the author's years of building early childhood programs, she has acquired a number of tools for her personal belt. These tools have helped her sharpen her skills in supporting teachers and staff, connecting with families, and educating children. This article focuses on those leadership skills that…

  2. Pregnancy: Should I Use a Seat Belt?

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury or death in the event of a car crash. You should wear a seat belt no matter where you sit in the car.How should I wear my seat belt?The ... together keep you from being thrown from the car during an accident. The shoulder strap also keeps ...

  3. Apparatus for heat treating plastic belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topits, A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Apparatus performs programed rotating, stretching/shrinking and heat treatment necessary to fabrication of high-performance plastic belts. Belts can be treated in lengths varying from 7 to 48 in., in widths up to 1 in., and in thicknesses up to approximately 0.003 in.

  4. Seat belt use in cars with air bags.

    PubMed

    Williams, A F; Wells, J K; Lund, A K

    1990-12-01

    Seat belt use was observed in 1,628 cars with air bags and manual belts and 34,223 cars with manual seat belts only. Sixty-six percent of drivers in cars with air bags wore seat belts compared to 63 percent of drivers in cars with manual belts only. The study found no evidence for the speculation that drivers with air bags will reduce their seat belt use because they believe an air bag alone provides sufficient protection.

  5. Seat belt use in cars with air bags.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A F; Wells, J K; Lund, A K

    1990-01-01

    Seat belt use was observed in 1,628 cars with air bags and manual belts and 34,223 cars with manual seat belts only. Sixty-six percent of drivers in cars with air bags wore seat belts compared to 63 percent of drivers in cars with manual belts only. The study found no evidence for the speculation that drivers with air bags will reduce their seat belt use because they believe an air bag alone provides sufficient protection. PMID:2240346

  6. Tensioning of a belt around a drum using membrane element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H. S.

    1980-01-01

    An application of the membrane element to the problem of the tensioning of a conveyer belt which wraps around a drum is presented. Two cases were investigated: (1) belt tension increase due to drum edge wear; and (2) material trapped between the drum and the belt. In both cases it was found that the increase in belt tension was due to the additional stretching of the belt resulting from the drum radius change rather than from the transverse deflection of the belt.

  7. Pitch difference and belt tooth configuration effect on load distribution of timing belt using FEM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Takanao; Furukawa, Yoshihisa; Tomono, Kiyohisa; Takahashi, Hideaki

    1996-09-01

    A timing belt used for an automotive engine`s camshaft consists of a facing fabric, elastoeric body and glass fiber cords. These materials show significant non-linear characteristics. Therefore, a model of the timing belt was analyzed using ABAQUS (a general non-linear finite element program). As a result, the mechanism that generates the belt load distribution was successfully confirmed by calculation. It was found that the pitch difference existing between the timing belt and pulley, and belt tooth configuration both have a large affect on load distribution of toothed belts. This paper reports the development of an analytical model which shows the effects of pitch difference and pulley tooth configuration on belt contact pressure.

  8. Belt separation system under slat in fattening pig housing: effect of belt type and extraction frequency.

    PubMed

    Alonso, F; Vázquez, J; Ovejero, I; Garcimartín, M A; Mateos, A; Sánchez, E

    2010-08-01

    The efficiency of manure separation by a conveyor belt under a partially slatted floor for fattening pigs was determined for two types of belts, a flat belt with an incline of up to 6 degrees transversely and a concave belt with an incline of up to 1 degrees longitudinally. A 31.20% and 23.75% dry matter content of the solid fraction was obtained for the flat and concave belt, respectively. The flat belt was more efficient at 6 degrees than other slope angles. The residence time of the manure on the two belt types influenced the separation efficiency from a live weight of 63.00 kg upwards. The quantity of residue produced with this system was reduced to 25-40% with respect to a pit system under slat. This could mean a remarkable reduction in costs of storage, transport and application of manure. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effectiveness of Ford's belt reminder system in increasing seat belt use

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A; Wells, J; Farmer, C

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: The study investigated the effectiveness in increasing seat belt use of Ford's belt reminder system, a supplementary system that provides intermittent flashing lights and chimes for five minutes if drivers are not belted. Methods: Seat belt use of drivers in relatively new cars with and without the reminder system was unobtrusively observed as vehicles were brought to dealerships for service. Results: Overall use rates were estimated at 71% for drivers in vehicles without the reminder system and 76% for drivers in vehicles with belt reminders (p<0.01). Conclusions: Seat belt use is relatively low in the United States. The present study showed that vehicle based reminder systems can be at least modestly effective in increasing belt use, which may encourage further development of such systems. PMID:12460965

  10. Radiation belt dynamics during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Mullen, E.G. ); Holeman, E. )

    1989-12-01

    Two types of temporal variation in the radiation belts are studied using low altitude data taken onboard the DMSP F7 satellite: those associated with the solar cycle and those associated with large magnetic storm effects. Over a three-year period from 1984 to 1987 and encompassing solar minimum, the protons in the heart of the inner belt increased at a rate of approximately 6% per year. Over the same period, outer zone electron enhancements declined both in number and peak intensity. During the large magnetic storm of February 1986, following the period of peak ring current intensity, a second proton belt with energies up to 50 MeV was found at magnetic latitudes between 45{degrees} and 55{degrees}. The belt lasted for more than 100 days. The slot region between the inner and outer electron belts collapsed by the merging of the two populations and did not reform for 40 days.

  11. Cable Belt Conveyors in mine haulage

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.E.

    1983-06-01

    The Cable Belt is not a conveyor in the conventional sense, but rather a continuous bulk handling system. It is custom built for the application. It may come as a surprise to some people to learn that the Cable Belt system is not new, having been invented in the requirements at that time for long-haul, high-lift, single-flight, heavy duty applications, primarily in the coal mining industry. In those days, belt conveyors of 200 HP were regarded as heavy duty units; it was therefore inevitable that, as mining progressed into the next decade and the demand for minerals increased, technology also had to keep pace to fulfill the industries' needs. With the simplicity of the Cable Belt design, this was achieved, a position which today is maintained by Cable Belt as leaders in long-distance, single-flight, single-drive conveyor applications.

  12. Inner Radiation Belt Dynamics and Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, P. P.; Looper, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    We present preliminary results of inner belt proton data assimilation using an augmented version of the Selesnick et al. Inner Zone Model (SIZM). By varying modeled physics parameters and solar particle injection parameters to generate many ensembles of the inner belt, then optimizing the ensemble weights according to inner belt observations from SAMPEX/PET at LEO and HEO/DOS at high altitude, we obtain the best-fit state of the inner belt. We need to fully sample the range of solar proton injection sources among the ensemble members to ensure reasonable agreement between the model ensembles and observations. Once this is accomplished, we find the method is fairly robust. We will demonstrate the data assimilation by presenting an extended interval of solar proton injections and losses, illustrating how these short-term dynamics dominate long-term inner belt climatology.

  13. Water oxidation: High five iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Costas, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation of water is essential to the sustainable production of fuels using sunlight or electricity, but designing active, stable and earth-abundant catalysts for the reaction is challenging. Now, a complex containing five iron atoms is shown to efficiently oxidize water by mimicking key features of the oxygen-evolving complex in green plants.

  14. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  15. Missing Fe: hydrogenated iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilalbegović, G.; Maksimović, A.; Mohaček-Grošev, V.

    2017-03-01

    Although it was found that the FeH lines exist in the spectra of some stars, none of the spectral features in the interstellar medium (ISM) have been assigned to this molecule. We suggest that iron atoms interact with hydrogen and produce Fe-H nanoparticles which sometimes contain many H atoms. We calculate infrared spectra of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles using density functional theory methods and find broad, overlapping bands. Desorption of H2 could induce spinning of these small Fe-H dust grains. Some of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles possess magnetic and electric moments and should interact with electromagnetic fields in the ISM. FenHm nanoparticles could contribute to the polarization of the ISM and the anomalous microwave emission. We discuss the conditions required to form FeH and FenHm in the ISM.

  16. Recent Arecibo Radar Observations of Main-Belt Asteroids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Michael K.; Howell, Ellen; Nolan, Michael; Taylor, Patrick; Springmann, Alessondra; Giorgini, Jon; Benner, Lance; Magri, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    We recently observed main-belt asteroids 12 Victoria (Tholen S-class, Bus L-class), 246 Asporina (A-class), and 2035 Stearns with the S-band (12 cm) Arecibo radar. Signal-to-noise ratios for Asporina and Stearns were only strong enough for continuous-wave (CW) analysis. Signal-to-noise ratios for Victoria were high enough for delay-Doppler imaging. Stearns exhibited a high radar polarization ratio of unity, higher than any other main-belt E-class, but similar to near-Earth E-class asteroids [Benner et al. Icarus 198, 294-304, 2008; Shepard et al. Icarus 215, 547-551, 2011]. The A-class asteroids show spectral absorption features consistent with olivine and have been suggested as the source of pallasite meteorites or the rare brachinites [Cruikshank and Hartmann, Science 223, 281-283, 1984]. The radar cross-section measured for Asporina leads to a radar albedo estimate of 0.11, suggesting a low near-surface bulk density, and by inference, a low metal content. This suggests that the brachinites are a better analog for Asporina than the iron-rich pallasites. Victoria has been observed by radar in the past and the continuous-wave echoes suggest it has a large concavity or is a contact binary [Mitchell et al. Icarus 118, 105-131, 1995]. Our new imaging observations should determine which is more likely.

  17. Iron-oxo clusters biomineralizing on protein surfaces: Structural analysis of Halobacterium salinarum DpsA in its low- and high-iron states

    PubMed Central

    Zeth, Kornelius; Offermann, Stefanie; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2004-01-01

    The crystal structure of the Dps-like (Dps, DNA-protecting protein during starvation) ferritin protein DpsA from the halophile Halobacterium salinarum was determined with low endogenous iron content at 1.6-Å resolution. The mechanism of iron uptake and storage was analyzed in this noncanonical ferritin by three high-resolution structures at successively increasing iron contents. In the high-iron state of the DpsA protein, up to 110 iron atoms were localized in the dodecameric protein complex. For ultimate iron storage, the archaeal ferritin shell comprises iron-binding sites for iron translocation, oxidation, and nucleation. Initial iron–protein interactions occur through acidic residues exposed along the outer surface in proximity to the iron entry pore. This narrow pore permits translocation of ions toward the ferroxidase centers via two discrete steps. Iron oxidation proceeds by transient formation of tri-iron ferroxidase centers. Iron storage by biomineralization inside the ferritin shell occurs at two iron nucleation centers. Here, a single iron atom provides a structural seed for iron-oxide cluster formation. The clusters with up to five iron atoms adopt a geometry that is different from natural biominerals like magnetite but resembles iron clusters so far known only from bioinorganic model compounds. PMID:15365182

  18. Does a higher metal oxidation state necessarily imply higher reactivity toward H-atom transfer? A computational study of C-H bond oxidation by high-valent iron-oxo and -nitrido complexes.

    PubMed

    Geng, Caiyun; Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank

    2014-04-28

    In this work, the reactions of C-H bond activation by two series of iron-oxo ( (Fe(IV)), (Fe(V)), (Fe(VI))) and -nitrido model complexes ( (Fe(IV)), (Fe(V)), (Fe(VI))) with a nearly identical coordination geometry but varying iron oxidation states ranging from iv to vi were comprehensively investigated using density functional theory. We found that in a distorted octahedral coordination environment, the iron-oxo species and their isoelectronic nitrido analogues feature totally different intrinsic reactivities toward C-H bond cleavage. In the case of the iron-oxo complexes, the reaction barrier monotonically decreases as the iron oxidation state increases, consistent with the gradually enhanced electrophilicity across the series. The iron-nitrido complex is less reactive than its isoelectronic iron-oxo species, and more interestingly, a counterintuitive reactivity pattern was observed, i.e. the activation barriers essentially remain constant independent of the iron oxidation states. The detailed analysis using the Polanyi principle demonstrates that the different reactivities between these two series originate from the distinct thermodynamic driving forces, more specifically, the bond dissociation energies (BDEE-Hs, E = O, N) of the nascent E-H bonds in the FeE-H products. Further decomposition of the BDEE-Hs into the electron and proton affinity components shed light on how the oxidation states modulate the BDEE-Hs of the two series.

  19. Observed use of automatic seat belts in 1987 cars.

    PubMed

    Williams, A F; Wells, J K; Lund, A K; Teed, N

    1989-10-01

    Usage of the automatic belt systems supplied by six large-volume automobile manufacturers to meet the federal requirements for automatic restraints were observed in suburban Washington, D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia. The different belt systems studied were: Ford and Toyota (motorized, nondetachable automatic shoulder belt), Nissan (motorized, detachable shoulder belt), VW and Chrysler (nonmotorized, detachable shoulder belt), and GM (nonmotorized detachable lap and shoulder belt). Use of automatic belts was significantly greater than manual belt use in otherwise comparable late-model cars for all manufacturers except Chrysler; in Chrysler cars, automatic belt use was significantly lower than manual belt use. The automatic shoulder belts provided by Ford, Nissan, Toyota, and VW increased use rates to about 90%. Because use rates were lower in Ford cars with manual belts, their increase was greater. GM cars had the smallest increase in use rates; however, lap belt use was highest in GM cars. The other manufacturers supply knee bolsters to supplement shoulder belt protection; all--except VW--also provide manual lap belts, which were used by about half of those who used the automatic shoulder belt. The results indicate that some manufacturers have been more successful than others in providing automatic belt systems that result in high use that, in turn, will mean fewer deaths and injuries in those cars.

  20. Serum iron test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test if you have: Signs of low iron (iron deficiency) Signs of too much iron Anemia caused by ... Brittenham GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and ... Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  1. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  2. Effect of Thermospheric Neutral Density upon Inner Trapped-belt Proton Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Diaz, Abel B.

    2007-01-01

    We wish to point out that a secular change in the Earth's atmospheric neutral density alters charged-particle lifetime in the inner trapped radiation belts, in addition to the changes recently reported as produced by greenhouse gases. Heretofore, changes in neutral density have been of interest primarily because of their effect on the orbital drag of satellites. We extend this to include the orbital lifetime of charged particles in the lower radiation belts. It is known that the charged-belt population is coupled to the neutral density of the atmosphere through changes induced by solar activity, an effect produced by multiple scattering off neutral and ionized atoms along with ionization loss in the thermosphere where charged and neutral populations interact. It will be shown here that trapped-belt flux J is bivariant in energy E and thermospheric neutral density , as J(E,rho). One can conclude that proton lifetimes in these belts are also directly affected by secular changes in the neutral species populating the Earth s thermosphere. This result is a consequence of an intrinsic property of charged-particle flux, that flux is not merely a function of E but is dependent upon density rho when a background of neutrals is present.

  3. Geology, geochemistry and genesis of BIF of Kushtagi schist belt, Archaean Dharwar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, R. M. K.; Naqvi, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    The Banded Iron-Formation (BIF) of the Kushtagi schist belt, Dharwar Craton is interbedded with metavolcanics. The oxide fades cherty (Al2O3 < 2%) and shaley (Al2O3 > 2%) BIFs show large-scale variations in their major and trace elements abundance. Cherty Banded Iron-Formation (CBIF) is depleted in Al2O3, TiO2, Zr, Hf and other trace elements like Cr, Ni, Co, Rb, Sr, V, Y and REE in comparison to Shaley Banded Iron-Formation (SBIF). Depleted ∑REE, positive Eu anomalies and the flat to HREE-enriched pattern of CBIF indicate that Fe and SiO2 for these BIFs were added to ambient ocean water by hydrothermal solutions at the AMOR vent sites. It is inferred that the higher amount of hydrothermal fluid flux with a higher exit temperature provided enormous quantities of iron and silica. Fine-grained sedimentation in the basin gave rise to the observed variability in the composition of BIF. During transgression a wave base was raised up, consequently deposition of CBIF became possible, whereas, during the regressive stage, these chemical sediments were buried by and/or mixed with the terrigenous sediments resulting in deposition of SBIF and interbedded shales. Volcaniclastic activity within the basin appears to have contributed significantly to the composition of some SBIF and shales. The hydrothermal exhalative hypothesis combined with the Archaean miniplate model explains most of the chemical features of the BIFs of greenstone belts.

  4. Electric filter with movable belt electrode

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1983-09-20

    A method and apparatus for removing airborne contaminants entrained in a gas or airstream includes an electric filter characterized by a movable endless belt electrode, a grounded electrode, and a filter medium sandwiched there between. Inclusion of the movable, endless belt electrode provides the driving force for advancing the filter medium through the filter, and reduces frictional drag on the filter medium, thereby permitting a wide choice of filter medium materials. Additionally, the belt electrode includes a plurality of pleats in order to provide maximum surface area on which to collect airborne contaminants. 4 figs.

  5. Electric filter with movable belt electrode

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing airborne contaminants entrained in a gas or airstream includes an electric filter characterized by a movable endless belt electrode, a grounded electrode, and a filter medium sandwiched therebetween. Inclusion of the movable, endless belt electrode provides the driving force for advancing the filter medium through the filter, and reduces frictional drag on the filter medium, thereby permitting a wide choice of filter medium materials. Additionally, the belt electrode includes a plurality of pleats in order to provide maximum surface area on which to collect airborne contaminants.

  6. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Malhotra, Renu

    1997-01-01

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  7. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    PubMed

    Liou; Malhotra

    1997-01-17

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  8. Bioavailability and stability of intravenous iron sucrose originator versus generic iron sucrose AZAD.

    PubMed

    Praschberger, Monika; Cornelius, Carolin; Schitegg, Markus; Goldenberg, Hans; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara; Sturm, Brigitte

    2015-03-01

    Severe iron deficiency requires intravenous iron supplementation to replenish iron stores. Intravenous iron sucrose has been used for decades for the treatment of anemia. New generic iron sucrose products are now marketed for the use in several countries and there is an ongoing discussion about the safety and efficacy of iron sucrose similars. In this study, we compared the iron sucrose originator Venofer® and the generic iron sucrose AZAD (ISA) regarding bioavailability, toxicity and stability in human THP-1 cells and HepG2 cells. The bioavailability of Venofer® and ISA was investigated in both cell types by a ferrozin-based assay. The release of incorporated iron was assayed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ferritin content was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HepG2 cells were used to investigate the intracellular labile iron pool (LIP), which was measured by the fluorescent calcein assay. The amount of redox-active iron within the iron formulations was assayed using fluorescent dichlorofluorescein. We found no significant differences in all parameters between Venofer® and ISA in regard of bioavailability, toxicity and stability in vitro. ISA shows identical physico-chemical features and identical bioavailability in vitro. This study is a profound basis for future clinical tests with generic iron sucrose compounds.

  9. The chemical structure of the Main-Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carry, Benoit; DeMeo, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    The asteroid main belt between Mars and Jupiter holds evidences from the early Solar System history. The original chemical stratification of the accretion disk has been scrambled by planetary migrations, resulting in a radial mixing of compositions. Since the 1970s, spectral surveys have characterized the surface compositions of the largest members first, then of smaller bodies, slowly tapering into the size-frequency distribution. These surveys led to major discoveries, including the succession of dominating taxonomic classes along heliocentric distances, stained by the presence of interlopers in this over-arching structure. In the 2000s, these results have sustained the emergence of the current paradigm of Solar System formation: the Nice model, in which planets migrated from their formation locations to their current orbits.Since then, all-sky surveys in the visible and mid-infrared, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and NASA WISE mission, have observed tens of thousands of asteroids, allowing characterization of their surface composition and estimation of their diameter. Simultaneously, our knowledge on asteroid density greatly improved: the sample of density determinations presented a tenfold increase. Such a rich dataset opened the possibility to scrutinize asteroid compositions to smaller sizes and to study the distribution of material in the main belt by mass, rather than by numbers. The picture resulting from these data go back over the previous view, and the few interlopers seem to be rule. The large scale structure seen on the largest bodies holds, but mixing increases at smaller sizes. This detailed picture supports the main results from recent dynamical models of planetary migration and radial mixing of smaller bodies, albeit several observed structures remain yet to be explained: numerous primitive D-type in the inner belt, apparently missing mantle counterpart (A-types) to the crustal and iron core-like (V- and M-types) material.Observational evidences

  10. 30 CFR 56.14131 - Seat belts for haulage trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seat belts for haulage trucks. 56.14131 Section... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14131 Seat belts for haulage trucks. (a) Seat belts shall be provided and worn in haulage trucks. (b) Seat belts shall be maintained in...

  11. 30 CFR 56.14131 - Seat belts for haulage trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seat belts for haulage trucks. 56.14131 Section... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14131 Seat belts for haulage trucks. (a) Seat belts shall be provided and worn in haulage trucks. (b) Seat belts shall be maintained in...

  12. 46 CFR 111.105-27 - Belt drives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Belt drives. 111.105-27 Section 111.105-27 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-27 Belt drives. Each belt drive in a hazardous location must have: (a) A conductive belt; and (b) Pulleys, shafts, and driving equipment grounded to meet NFPA...

  13. 46 CFR 111.105-27 - Belt drives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Belt drives. 111.105-27 Section 111.105-27 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-27 Belt drives. Each belt drive in a hazardous location must have: (a) A conductive belt; and (b) Pulleys, shafts, and driving equipment grounded to meet NFPA...

  14. 46 CFR 111.105-27 - Belt drives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Belt drives. 111.105-27 Section 111.105-27 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-27 Belt drives. Each belt drive in a hazardous location must have: (a) A conductive belt; and (b) Pulleys, shafts, and driving equipment grounded to meet NFPA...

  15. 46 CFR 111.105-27 - Belt drives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Belt drives. 111.105-27 Section 111.105-27 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-27 Belt drives. Each belt drive in a hazardous location must have: (a) A conductive belt; and (b) Pulleys, shafts, and driving equipment grounded to meet NFPA...

  16. 46 CFR 111.105-27 - Belt drives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Belt drives. 111.105-27 Section 111.105-27 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-27 Belt drives. Each belt drive in a hazardous location must have: (a) A conductive belt; and (b) Pulleys, shafts, and driving equipment grounded to meet NFPA...

  17. 30 CFR 56.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shall attend the belt at the drive pulley when it is necessary to operate the conveyor while temporarily... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 56.4503 Section 56.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. Belt conveyors...

  18. 30 CFR 56.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall attend the belt at the drive pulley when it is necessary to operate the conveyor while temporarily... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 56.4503 Section 56.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. Belt conveyors...

  19. 30 CFR 57.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 57.4503 Section 57.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. (a) Surface belt conveyors...) Underground belt conveyors shall be equipped with a detection system capable of automatically stopping...

  20. 30 CFR 57.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 57.4503 Section 57.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. (a) Surface belt conveyors...) Underground belt conveyors shall be equipped with a detection system capable of automatically stopping...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1403-5 - Criteria-Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criteria-Belt conveyors. 75.1403-5 Section 75... Criteria—Belt conveyors. (a) Positive-acting stop controls should be installed along all belt conveyors... can be stopped or started at any location. (b) Belt conveyors used for regularly scheduled...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1403-5 - Criteria-Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criteria-Belt conveyors. 75.1403-5 Section 75... Criteria—Belt conveyors. (a) Positive-acting stop controls should be installed along all belt conveyors... can be stopped or started at any location. (b) Belt conveyors used for regularly scheduled...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1403-5 - Criteria-Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria-Belt conveyors. 75.1403-5 Section 75... Criteria—Belt conveyors. (a) Positive-acting stop controls should be installed along all belt conveyors... can be stopped or started at any location. (b) Belt conveyors used for regularly scheduled...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1403-5 - Criteria-Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criteria-Belt conveyors. 75.1403-5 Section 75... Criteria—Belt conveyors. (a) Positive-acting stop controls should be installed along all belt conveyors... can be stopped or started at any location. (b) Belt conveyors used for regularly scheduled...

  5. 30 CFR 56.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 56.4503 Section 56.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. Belt conveyors within... shall attend the belt at the drive pulley when it is necessary to operate the conveyor while...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1403-5 - Criteria-Belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criteria-Belt conveyors. 75.1403-5 Section 75... Criteria—Belt conveyors. (a) Positive-acting stop controls should be installed along all belt conveyors... can be stopped or started at any location. (b) Belt conveyors used for regularly scheduled...

  7. 30 CFR 56.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 56.4503 Section 56.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. Belt conveyors within... shall attend the belt at the drive pulley when it is necessary to operate the conveyor while...

  8. 30 CFR 56.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 56.4503 Section 56.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. Belt conveyors within... shall attend the belt at the drive pulley when it is necessary to operate the conveyor while...

  9. 30 CFR 57.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 57.4503 Section 57.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. (a) Surface belt conveyors...) Underground belt conveyors shall be equipped with a detection system capable of automatically stopping...

  10. Atomic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  11. Testing steel-cord belt splices with a magnetic conveyor belt monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.

    1985-03-01

    Steel-cord belt splices fail for a variety of reasons, including corrosion, poor vulcanising, and incorrect construction. The latter often leads to early failure. A conveyor belt monitor (CBM) has been used to evaluate the splice lay-up. The mass of the overlapping cords and their magnetic signature are used to rapidly locate suspect splices in the belt. The general shape of the magnetic signature for ideal splices will be discussed.

  12. Electron Flux of Radiation Belts Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation shows meridional (from north-south) plane projections of the REPT-A and REPT-B electron flux values. The animation first shows the expected two-belt Van Allen zone structure; from Se...

  13. Seat Belt Usage on School Buses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Ernest

    1985-01-01

    Studies on seat belt usage conducted under contract with governmental organizations or prepared by professional societies, state and local organizations, and transportation specialists have made significant contributions, but none has successfully resolved the issue. (MLF)

  14. Visualization of Radiation Belts from REPT Data

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This visualization, created using actual data from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescopes (REPT) on NASA’s Van Allen Probes, clearly shows the emergence of new third belt and second slot reg...

  15. Congressional panel makes recommendations on belt safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-12-15

    The Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006 (MINER Act) called for a Technical Study Panel to present a review and make recommendations on the use of belt air and the composition and fire retardant properties of belt materials in underground coal mining. In October 2007 the Panel released 20 recommendations publicly. These are presented in the article. Many recommendations encouraged the MSHA to enforce existing laws of maintenance and fire protection or example more vigorously. Maybe the biggest change recommended was that the industry should adopt the Belt Evaluation Laboratory Test (BELT) standard proposed in 1992. Another important recommendation was one that would help eliminate hazards associated with point feeding. 1 photo.

  16. The Possible Belts for Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, I.-G.; Duncan, M.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2004-08-01

    More than 100 extrasolar planets have been discovered since the 1990s. Unlike those of the solar system, these planets' orbital eccentricities cover a huge range from 0 to 0.7. Incidentally, the first Kuiper belt object was discovered in 1992. Thus an interesting and important question will be whether extrasolar planetary systems could have structures like the Kuiper belt or asteroid belt. We investigate the stability of these planetary systems with different orbital eccentricities by similar procedures to Rabl & Dvorak (1988) and Holman & Wiegert (1999). We claim that most extrasolar planetary systems can have their own belts at the outer regions. However, we find that orbits with high eccentricity are very powerful in depletion of these populations.

  17. Emission products from combustion of conveyor belts

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    A series of experiments were undertaken by the Bureau of Mines to determine the emission products of several types of conveyor belting and other combustible materials found in mines. These experiments were conducted under intermediate scale, stimulated mine conditions to determine smoke characteristics and gas concentrations. From these determinations, heat-release rates, particle sizes, obscuration rates, combustion yields, and production constants were calculated. Three types of belts were investigated: chloroprene, also known as neoprene (NP); polyvinyl chloride (PVC); and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The belts were designated as ignitable or self-extinguishing depending on the length of the burning time and the subsequent combustion products. These conveyor belt combustion results are compared with previous analyses of wood, transformer fluid, and coal fires. Together they form a data base by which findings from future experiments with other mine combustibles can be compared.

  18. Equipment guide - stage loaders, conveyor belting, takeups

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Tables provide mine operators with a general guide to stageloaders, conveyor belting, and takeups. This is not a complete list of the models available, nor of the US manufacturers that produce this equipment.

  19. A repair of a charging belt

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, N.L.

    1989-01-01

    Accelerator charging belts are expensive, and sometimes delicate items. A means of repair of the rubber coating has been found that, when applied properly, should give extended lifetime to these items at minimal cost. 3 refs.

  20. Radiation Belt and Plasma Model Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Radiation belt and plasma model environment. Environment hazards for systems and humans. Need for new models. How models are used. Model requirements. How can space weather community help?

  1. Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Fox, N.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Mauk, B. H.

    2009-01-01

    Scheduled to launch in May 2012, NASA's dual spacecraft Living With a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission carries the field and particle instrumentation needed to determine the processes that produce enhancements in radiation belt ion and electron fluxes, the dominant mechanisms that cause the loss of relativistic electrons, and the manner by which the ring current and other geomagnetic phenomena affect radiation belt behavior. The two spacecraft will operate in low-inclination elliptical lapping orbits around the Earth, within and immediately exterior to the Van Allen radiation belts. During course of their two year primary mission, they will cover the full range of local times, measuring both AC and DC electric and magnetic fields to 10kHz, as well as ions from 50 eV to 1 GeV and electrons with energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 MeV.

  2. The Belt Method for Measuring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, Blake W , Jr

    1943-01-01

    The measurement of pressure distribution may be accomplished rapidly for any number of locations deemed necessary in model or full-scale investigations by use of the "belt" method. Reasonable accuracy may be obtained by careful use of this method.

  3. Colorimetry and constant-potential coulometry determinations of transferrin-bound iron, total iron-binding capacity, and total iron in serum containing iron-dextran, with use of sodium dithionite and alumina columns.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J C; Alexander, N M

    1990-10-01

    After the parenteral administration of iron-dextran (imferon), the increased total iron concentrations in serum can be determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and by colorimetric methods involving sodium dithionite, which reductively dissociates iron from the dextran complex. We report that constant-potential coulometry detects only about 55-70% of dextran-bound iron before dithionite reduction and variable amounts after reaction with the reducing agent. In addition, we have developed a procedure for determining transferrin-bound iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), total iron, and dextran-bound iron with the Kodak Ektachem colorimetric system. In determining total serum iron, the sample is first mixed with sodium dithionite, which rapidly dissociates all dextran-bound iron, but does not remove iron from either transferrin or hemoglobin. After the mixture is applied to an Ektachem slide, transferrin-bound iron is released at pH 4 and is detected together with the iron previously bound to dextran. TIBC is determined by mixing serum with ferric citrate in moderate excess and filtering through a small alumina (Al2O3) column, which binds excess free iron and iron-dextran; the iron in the column eluate represents the TIBC. Transferrin-bound iron is determined by applying diluted serum without added ferric citrate to an alumina column and measuring the iron in the column eluate. Dextran-bound iron is equivalent to the difference between total and transferrin-bound iron. Using this method, we found that transferrin iron-binding sites are saturated in vitro by excess iron-dextran less efficiently than by ferric citrate.

  4. A heavy ion and proton radiation belt inside of Jupiter's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Clark, G.; Mauk, B. H.; Haggerty, D. K.; Rymer, A. M.; Santos-Costa, D.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Allegrini, F.; Valek, P.; Kurth, W. S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Levin, S.; Bolton, S.

    2017-06-01

    Energetic charged particle measurements by the Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) on board Juno have revealed a radiation belt of hundreds of keV ions up to the atomic mass of sulfur, located between Jupiter's rings and atmosphere. Proton energy spectra display an unusual intensity increase above 300 keV. We suggest that this is because charge exchange in Jupiter's neutral environment does not efficiently remove ions at such high energies. Since this innermost belt includes heavy ions, it cannot be exclusively supplied by cosmic ray albedo neutron decay, which is an important source at Earth and Saturn but only supplies protons and electrons. We find indications that the stripping of energetic neutral atoms in Jupiter's high atmosphere might be the ion source. Since the stripped off electrons are of low energy, this hypothesis is consistent with observations of the ratio of energetic electrons to ions being much less than 1.

  5. Seat-belt message and the law?

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S K; Patil, N G; Law, G

    1989-09-01

    This paper attempts to draw together available information on the use of seat belts, one of the most important safety devices for a person in a car. Considering the high rate of mortality and morbidity due to road traffic accidents in Papua New Guinea the authors strongly feel that seat-belt usage should be made compulsory. When one looks at the history of the implementation of such a successful countermeasure in other countries it seems that legislation is the only answer.

  6. How to evaluate belt conveyor idlers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomsky, E.H.

    1985-11-01

    This article discusses how to evaluate the relative merits of tapered roller-bearing vs. ball-bearing idlers for use in belt conveyors. Considered are: bearing load capacity; bearing life; bearing life under misalignment conditions; relubricatable vs. factory sealed idlers; relubrication frequency, and rotational resistance. Each of these factors are discussed and some criteria are provided for selecting the best belt conveyor idler for a material handling application.

  7. Eccentricity distribution in the main asteroid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Renu; Wang, Xianyu

    2017-03-01

    The observationally complete sample of the main belt asteroids now spans more than two orders of magnitude in size and numbers more than 64 000 (excluding collisional family members). We undertook an analysis of asteroids' eccentricities and their interpretation with simple physical models. We find that a century old conclusion that the asteroids' eccentricities follow a Rayleigh distribution holds for the osculating eccentricities of large asteroids, but the proper eccentricities deviate from a Rayleigh distribution; there is a deficit of eccentricities smaller than ∼0.1 and an excess of larger eccentricities. We further find that the proper eccentricities do not depend significantly on asteroid size but have strong dependence on heliocentric distance; the outer asteroid belt follows a Rayleigh distribution, but the inner belt is strikingly different. Eccentricities in the inner belt can be modelled as a vector sum of a primordial eccentricity vector of random orientation and magnitude drawn from a Rayleigh distribution of parameter ∼0.06, and an excitation of random phase and magnitude ∼0.13. These results imply that when a late dynamical excitation of the asteroids occurred, it was independent of asteroid size and was stronger in the inner belt than in the outer belt. We discuss implications for the primordial asteroid belt and suggest that the observationally complete sample size of main belt asteroids is large enough that more sophisticated model-fitting of the eccentricities is warranted and could serve to test alternative theoretical models of the dynamical excitation history of asteroids and its links to the migration history of the giant planets.

  8. Jupiter's Radiation Belts: Can Pioneer 10 Survive?

    PubMed

    Hess, W N; Birmingham, T J; Mead, G D

    1973-12-07

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  9. Jupiter's radiation belts: Can Pioneer 10 survive?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, W. N.; Birmingham, T. J.; Mead, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    Model calculations of Jupiter's electron and proton radiation belts indicate that the Galilean satellites can reduce particle fluxes in certain regions of the inner magnetosphere by as much as six orders of magnitude. Average fluxes should be reduced by a factor of 100 or more along the Pioneer 10 trajectory through the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts in early December. This may be enough to prevent serious radiation damage to the spacecraft.

  10. A photometric survey of outer belt asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimartino, M.; Gonano-Beurer, M.; Mottola, Stefano; Neukum, G.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1989, we have been conducting a research program devoted to the study of the Trojans and outer belt asteroids (Hilda and Cybele groups), in order to characterize their rotational properties and shapes. As an outcome of several observational campaigns, we determined rotational periods and lightcurve amplitudes for 23 distant asteroids, using both CCD and photoelectric photometry. In this paper, we compare the rotational properties of main belt asteroids and Trojans, based on the preliminary results of this survey.

  11. Collisional Records in Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, K.; Lavielle, B.; Jeannot, J.-P.

    1995-09-01

    The asteroid belt is considered to be the ultimate source of iron meteorites and it would be of considerable interest to obtain a chronology of break-ups of asteroidal objects. However, as multiple fragmentation of such objects did likely occur, the exposure ages date the break-off of iron masses from shielded locations within the immediate parent object. Meteorites which were fragmented in more than one collisional event may have recorded integral effects of cosmic ray interactions in varying geometrical configuration and individual stages may be difficult to unravel; we term such exposure histories "complex". Exposure age histograms based on potassium ages have been discussed by Voshage [1] and he concluded that irons of groups IIIA and IIIB reveal similar histograms and probably were derived from the same parent body. He also noted a cluster for group IVA members ,but no clear evidence for other clusters. We present the collisional evidence based on published noble gas data, coupled to the new production rates which we calculate for central locations, adjusted for off-center locations whenever concentration profiles can be inferred. Unlike potassium ages which show large uncertainties for ages < 300 Ma, T38 ages can be obtained for all iron meteorites. We note, however,that T38 values of five "old" irons are systematically 15% lower than potassium ages. We confirm the evidence for stochastic events for IIIAB and IVA irons. The statistics are improved because of the larger data base. There are interesting clusters also among ages < 100 Ma, in the range which overlaps the histograms of chondrites. Recent reports [2,3] of H-chondritic inclusions in IIE irons, whose exposure ages are consistent with H-chondrite clusters, point to a genetic link. Group IIAB reveals two clusters with T38 < 100 Ma, and both events appear to involve also IIE irons. Clusterings of two thirds of group IIIE members and of group IID irons appear significant. The youngest IVB ages coincide

  12. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  13. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  14. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  15. Decay rate of the second radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Robbins, D E

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  16. Age constraints of the Wassa and Benso mesothermal gold deposits, Ashanti Belt, Ghana, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Avila, Luis A.; Bourassa, Yan; Miller, John; Perrouty, Stéphane; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Campbell McCuaig, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Ashanti Belt in Ghana hosts numerous multi-million ounce gold deposits and is one of the most richly gold endowed Paleoproterozoic belts of the West African Craton. This work shows that the Wassa mineralized intrusion is part of the Sefwi Group. This unit at Wassa is strongly magnetic and show a distinctly high response in regional magnetic data sets compared to other units of equivalent age within the belt. The unit is inferred to be a lateral extension of an exposed fragment of what defines the substrate to the Tarkwa Basin sediments. The Wassa deposit, located in the eastern limb of the belt, is hosted within mafic to intermediate volcanic flows that are interbedded with minor horizons of volcaniclastics, clastic sediments. The clastic sediments include wackes and magnetite rich sedimentary layers, presumably derived from banded iron formations. The previously described sequence is intruded by syn-volcanic mafic intrusives and felsic porphyries rocks that are all part of the Birimian stratigraphy. Two new key SHRIMP II U-Pb ages were determined as part of this study: a new age of 2191 ± 6 Ma was determined on magmatic zircon grains of the Wassa porphyry host rock, which now represents the oldest known felsic intrusion hosting gold mineralization in the Ashanti Belt region. The Benso gold deposit system, which is located in the eastern limb of the Ashanti Belt approximately 38 km southwest of Wassa is hosted within a series of volcanic units intruded by mafic to intermediate units. A SHRIMP II U-Pb age of 2157 ± 5 Ma was determined from magmatic zircons obtained from a granodiorite of the G-Zone of the Benso deposit. This granodiorite is the main host rock for gold mineralization and thus the age provides an upper constraint for mineral emplacement. The newly determined ages provide an upper constraint for the gold mineralization within this region of the Ashanti Belt. They also support recent structural studies that have interpreted that the Wassa

  17. 49 CFR 393.93 - Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER... belt assembly that conforms to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 209 1 (§ 571.209) installed at... requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 210 1 (§ 571.210) for that seat belt assembly. 1...

  18. Intracellular Iron Chelation Modulates the Macrophage Iron Phenotype with Consequences on Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Christina; Akam, Eman Abureida; Rehwald, Claudia; Brüne, Bernhard; Tomat, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that macrophage polarization dictates the expression of iron-regulated genes. Polarization towards iron sequestration depletes the microenvironment, whereby extracellular pathogen growth is limited and inflammation is fostered. In contrast, iron release contributes to cell proliferation, which is important for tissue regeneration. Moreover, macrophages constitute a major component of the infiltrates in most solid tumors. Considering the pivotal role of macrophages for iron homeostasis and their presence in association with poor clinical prognosis in tumors, we approached the possibility to target macrophages with intracellular iron chelators. Analyzing the expression of iron-regulated genes at mRNA and protein level in primary human macrophages, we found that the iron-release phenotype is a characteristic of polarized macrophages that, in turn, stimulate tumor cell growth and progression. The application of the intracellular iron chelator (TC3-S)2 shifted the macrophage phenotype from iron release towards sequestration, as determined by the iron-gene profile and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Moreover, whereas the addition of macrophage supernatants to tumor cells induced tumor growth and metastatic behavior, the supernatant of chelator-treated macrophages reversed this effect. Iron chelators demonstrated potent anti-neoplastic properties in a number of cancers, both in cell culture and in clinical trials. Our results suggest that iron chelation could affect not only cancer cells but also the tumor microenvironment by altering the iron-release phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). The study of iron chelators in conjunction with the effect of TAMs on tumor growth could lead to an improved understanding of the role of iron in cancer biology and to novel therapeutic avenues for iron chelation approaches. PMID:27806101

  19. Iron and nitrogen self-diffusion in non-magnetic iron nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Mukul; Gupta, Ajay; Gupta, Rachana; Stahn, J.; Horisberger, M.; Wildes, A.; Tayal, Akhil

    2011-12-15

    The self-diffusion of iron and nitrogen is measured in nm range non-magnetic iron nitride thin films. Two non-magnetic iron nitrides, Fe{sub 2.23}N and FeN, were studied using neutron reflectivity. Neutron reflectivity with a depth resolution in the sub-nm range has a different scattering cross section for isotopes, providing a unique opportunity to measure very small diffusivities. The isotope heterostructure in thin film multilayers [Fe-N/{sup 57}Fe-N]{sub 10} and [Fe-N/Fe-{sup 15}N]{sub 10} were prepared using magnetron sputtering. It was observed that nitrogen diffuses slower than iron although the atomic size of iron is larger than that of nitrogen. It was found that a significantly larger group of N atoms participates in the diffusion process than of Fe, making N diffusion slower than that of Fe.

  20. Speciation analysis of calcium, iron, and zinc in casein phosphopeptide fractions from toddler milk-based formula by anion exchange and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame atomic-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miquel, Esther; Alegría, Amparo; Barberá, Reyes; Farré, Rosaura

    2005-03-01

    Casein phosphopeptides (CPP) are phosphorylated casein-derived peptides that can be released by in-vitro or in-vivo enzymatic hydrolysis of alpha(s1)-casein, alpha(s2)-casein, and beta-casein (CN). Many of these peptides contain a highly polar acidic sequence of three phosphoseryl groups followed by two glutamic acid residues. These domains are binding sites for minerals such as calcium, iron, and zinc and play an important role in mineral bioavailability. The aim of this study was speciation analysis of calcium, iron, and zinc in CPP fractions from the soluble fraction of a toddler milk-based formula. Methods for CPP separation by anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (AE-HPLC) were combined with CPP identification by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and determination of the calcium, iron, zinc, and phosphorus content of the fractions obtained by AE-HPLC. Calcium and phosphorus were detected in all the analyzed AE-HPLC fractions. Calcium and zinc could be bound to CPP derived from alpha(s1)-CN and alpha(s2)-CN in fraction 3. Iron could be bound to CPP in fraction 4 in which beta-CN(15-34)4P was present with the cluster sequence S(P)S(P)S(P)EE. The results obtained prove the different distribution of calcium, iron, and zinc in heterogeneous CPP fractions.

  1. Total iron binding capacity

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron supplies are low. This can occur with: Iron deficiency anemia Pregnancy (late) Lower-than-normal TIBC may ... Brittenham GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and ... Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  2. Atomic Calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, Matthias; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Han, Han; Tareen, Ammar; Chang, Jackson; Christopher, Jason; Corman, Benjamin; Bishop, David

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a MEMS based method to fabricate devices with a small number of atoms. In standard semiconductor fabrication, a large amount of material is deposited, after which etching removes what is not wanted. This technique breaks down for structures that approach the single atom limit, as it is inconceivable to etch away all but one atom. What is needed is a bottom up method with single or near single atom precision. We demonstrate a MEMS device that enables nanometer position controlled deposition of gold atoms. A digitally driven plate is swept as a flux of gold atoms passes through an aperture. Appling voltages on four comb capacitors connected to the central plate by tethers enable nanometer lateral precision in the xy plane over 15x15 sq. microns. Typical MEMS structures have manufacturing resolutions on the order of a micron. Using a FIB it is possible to mill apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter. Assuming a low incident atomic flux, as well as an integrated MEMS based shutter with microsecond response time, it becomes possible to deposit single atoms. Due to their small size and low power consumption, such nano-printers can be mounted directly in a cryogenic system at ultrahigh vacuum to deposit clean quench condensed metallic structures.

  3. Atomic supersymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic supersymmetry is a quantum-mechanical supersymmetry connecting the properties of different atoms and ions. A short description of some established results in the subject are provided and a few recent developments are discussed including the extension to parabolic coordinates and the calculation of Stark maps using supersymmetry-based models.

  4. IDENTIFYING COLLISIONAL FAMILIES IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Robert A.; Ragozzine, Darin; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Holman, Matthew J.

    2011-05-20

    The identification and characterization of numerous collisional families-clusters of bodies with a common collisional origin-in the asteroid belt has added greatly to the understanding of asteroid belt formation and evolution. More recent study has also led to an appreciation of physical processes that had previously been neglected (e.g., the Yarkovsky effect). Collisions have certainly played an important role in the evolution of the Kuiper Belt as well, though only one collisional family has been identified in that region to date, around the dwarf planet Haumea. In this paper, we combine insights into collisional families from numerical simulations with the current observational constraints on the dynamical structure of the Kuiper Belt to investigate the ideal sizes and locations for identifying collisional families. We find that larger progenitors (r {approx} 500 km) result in more easily identifiable families, given the difficulty in identifying fragments of smaller progenitors in magnitude-limited surveys, despite their larger spread and less frequent occurrence. However, even these families do not stand out well from the background. Identifying families as statistical overdensities is much easier than characterizing families by distinguishing individual members from interlopers. Such identification seems promising, provided the background population is well known. In either case, families will also be much easier to study where the background population is small, i.e., at high inclinations. Overall, our results indicate that entirely different techniques for identifying families will be needed for the Kuiper Belt, and we provide some suggestions.

  5. Stacked pneumatic cylinders automate conveyor belt operations

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, G.

    1982-11-01

    Shows how clusters of remotely controlled pneumatic cylinders swing a hinged conveyor belt to 4 preselected vertical positions. Using a manual method to move the conveyor meant that the operator had to use a hand winch, sheaves, drums, and winch cable. There was a need to develop a simple, effective, and remotely controlled system which would perform 2 functions: eliminate the need for stopping the conveyor to reset the hinged belt, and not require the operator to leave the master control console. Using the developed system, the operator need only turn on the appropriate switching valves from the master console. Each pneumatic cylinder is actuated in sequence, on the retraction stroke only, through the elevating positions. To lower the conveyor belt, the head end of each cylinder is exhausted; the weight of the belt extends the cylinders, lowering the belt by gravity. Cylinder exhaust ports in the power valves are fitted with adjustable flow control valves to regulate cylinder speed; common exhaust ports in the interconnected manifolds are fitted with air silencers.

  6. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  7. Gamma radiation induced resistivity changes in Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tundwal, Ambika; Kumar, V.; Datta, A.

    2017-03-01

    Monte Carlo Code JA-IPU is used for estimation of Frenkel pairs and their effect on change of resistivity of Iron on irradiation by gamma spectrum of Co60. The Code includes three cascade processes of incident gamma, produced electrons and recoiled atoms and simulation of the lattice structure of the target material. Change in experimentally measured resistivity of Iron is found to vary with number of Frenkel pairs as (x - 1) ln N d .

  8. Propagation of Uncertainties in Radiation Belt Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporeale, E.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Chandorkar, M.; Drozdov, A.; Wing, S.

    2016-12-01

    We present the first study of the uncertainties associated with radiation belt simulations, performed in the standard quasi-linear diffusionframework. In particular, we estimate how uncertainties of some input parameters propagate through the nonlinear simulation, producing a distribution of outputs that can be quite broad. Here, we restrict our focus on two-dimensional simulations (in energy and pitch angle space) and to parallel chorus waves only, and we study as stochastic input parameters the geomagnetic index Kp (that characterize the time dependency of an idealized storm), the latitudinal extent of waves, and the average electron density. We employ a collocation method, thus performing an ensemble of simulations. The results of this work point to the necessity of shifting to a probabilistic interpretation of radiation belt simulation results, and suggest as an important research goal a less uncertain estimation of the electron density in the belts.

  9. Distribution of Dust from Kuiper Belt Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorkavyi, Nick N.; Ozernoy, Leonid; Taidakova, Tanya; Mather, John C.; Fisher, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Using an efficient computational approach, we have reconstructed the structure of the dust cloud in the Solar system between 0.5 and 100 AU produced by the Kuiper belt objects. Our simulations offer a 3-D physical model of the 'kuiperoidal' dust cloud based on the distribution of 280 dust particle trajectories produced by 100 known Kuiper belt objects; the resulting 3-D grid consists of 1.9 x 10' cells containing 1.2 x 10" particle positions. The following processes that influence the dust particle dynamics are taken into account: 1) gravitational scattering on the eight planets (neglecting Pluto); 2) planetary resonances; 3) radiation pressure; and 4) the Poynting-Robertson (P-R) and solar wind drags. We find the dust distribution highly non-uniform: there is a minimum in the kuiperoidal dust between Mars and Jupiter, after which both the column and number densities of kuiperoidal dust sharply increase with heliocentric distance between 5 and 10 AU, and then form a plateau between 10 and 50 AU. Between 25 and 45 AU, there is an appreciable concentration of kuiperoidal dust in the form of a broad belt of mostly resonant particles associated with Neptune. In fact, each giant planet possesses its own circumsolar dust belt consisting of both resonant and gravitationally scattered particles. As with the cometary belts simulated in our related papers, we reveal a rich and sophisticated resonant structure of the dust belts containing families of resonant peaks and gaps. An important result is that both the column and number dust density are more or less flat between 10 and 50 AU, which might explain the surprising data obtained by Pioneers 10 & 11 and Voyager that the dust number density remains approximately distance-independent in this region. The simulated kuiperoidal dust, in addition to asteroidal and cometary dust, might represent a third possible source of the zodiacal light in the Solar system.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , ...

  11. Alteration mineral mapping for iron prospecting using ETM+ data, Tonkolili iron field, northern Sierra Leone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansaray, Lamin R.; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Jun; Ma, Zhimin

    2013-10-01

    The Tonkolili iron field in northern Sierra Leone has the largest known iron ore deposit in Africa. It occurs in a greenstone belt in an Achaean granitic basement. This study focused mainly on mapping areas with iron-oxide and hydroxyl bearing minerals, and identifying potential areas for haematite mineralization and banded iron formations (BIFs) in Tonkolili. The predominant mineral assemblage at the surface (laterite duricrust) of this iron field is haematitegoethite- limonite ±magnetite. The mineralization occurs in quartzitic banded ironstones, layered amphibolites, granites, schists and hornblendites. In this study, Crosta techniques were applied on Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data to enhance areas with alteration minerals and target potential areas of haematite and BIF units in the Tonkolili iron field. Synthetic analysis shows that alteration zones mapped herein are consistent with the already discovered magnetite BIFs in Tonkolili. Based on the overlaps of the simplified geological map and the remote sensing-based alteration mineral maps obtained in this study, three new haematite prospects were inferred within, and one new haematite prospect was inferred outside the tenement boundary of the Tonkolili exploration license. As the primary iron mineral in Tonkolili is magnetite, the study concludes that, these haematite prospects could also be underlain by magnetite BIFs. This study also concludes that, the application of Crosta techniques on ETM+ data is effective not only in mapping iron-oxide and hydroxyl alterations but can also provide a basis for inferring areas of potential iron resources in Algoma-type banded iron formations (BIFs), such as those in the Tonkolili field.

  12. Enhanced radiation belts and systems implications workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, C. M.

    1983-03-01

    Determination of the degree of understanding of the effects on space systems produced by enhancement of the natural radiation belts, identification of the areas where additional understanding is needed, and provision of suggestions for further research were determined. Topics relevant to enhanced radiation belts and their potential effects on the architecture of enduring space systems were discussed. Topics included injection of trapped radiation from fission debris, loss mechanisms and lifetimes, SPECTER codes for predicting total radiation flux, mission considerations of trapped radiation, hardware vulnerability and hardening, single event phenomena, and planning for a chemical release satellite.

  13. Ionospheric heating for radiation belt control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, William J.; Villalon, Elena

    1990-10-01

    Pitch-angle scattering interactions of electromagnetic waves in the ELF/VLF bands with trapped electrons describe the dynamics of the freshly filled radiation belts flux tubes. The natural existence of a 'slot' region with electron fluxes below the Kennel-Petschek limit requires non-local wave sources. A set of planned, active experiments is described in which VLF radiation is injected from ground and space band transmitters in conjunction with the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite in the radiation belts. These experiments can measure the intensity if waves driving pitch-angle diffusion and the electron energies in gyroresonance with the waves.

  14. Inner Radiation Belt Data / Model Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, Timothy; O'Brien, Paul; Selesnick, Richard

    We present detailed comparisons of a time-dependent inner radiation belt model with proton observations made by a variety of in-situ spacecraft during solar cycle 23. The recently-developed model (Selesnick et al., 2007) computes proton intensities as a function of time and of the three adiabatic invariants in the inner belt, which we convert to the observable count rate at the location of the satellite by using a nominal instrument response function. These comparisons and initial data-assimilation efforts suggest that the model performance can be improved especially during intervals containing unmodeled processes such as trapped proton losses during geomagnetic storms.

  15. Inner Radiation Belt Data / Model Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P.; Selesnick, R.; Looper, M.

    2008-12-01

    We present detailed comparisons of a time-dependent inner radiation belt model with in-situ proton observations made by a variety of spacecraft during solar cycle 23. The recently-developed model (Selesnick et al., 2007) computes proton intensities as a function of time and of the three adiabatic invariants in the inner belt, which we convert to the observable count rate in a detector at the location of the satellite by using instrument response functions. These comparisons and initial data-assimilation efforts suggest that the model performance can be improved especially during injections of solar protons, and at L-shells above 2.

  16. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Continuous Fluid Atomization of Materials in a Rapidly Spinning Cup.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-14

    128. The shaft enters a housing 132 containing power delivery components. These components are a ferrofluidic seal 134 whose axial shaft connects to a...162 via ferrofluidic seal 164 to pulley 168 5 which is connected by belts to a motor, not shown, to power the impact atomizer. Again, during

  18. Iberian Pyrite Belt Subsurface Life (IPBSL): searching for life in the Rio Tinto subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amils, R.; Gómez, F.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Fernández-Remolar, D.; Parro, V.; Rodríguez-Manfredi, J. A.; Tornos-Arroyo, F.; Timmis, K.; Oggerin, M.; Sánchez-Román, M.; López, F. J.; Fernández, J. P.; Omoregie, E.; Puente-Sánchez, F.; García, M.; Rodríguez, N.

    2013-09-01

    The geomicrobiologica l characterization of Río Tinto (Iberian Pyrite Belt), has proven the importance of the iron and sulfur cycles in generating the extreme conditions of acidity and high concentration of heavy metals of the habitat. It has been hypothesized that the extreme conditions found in the Tinto basin are the product of the subsurface chemolithotrophic metabolism of microorganisms thriving on the high concentrat ion of metal sulfides of the IPB. To test this hypothesis, a drilling project (IPBSL) is currently under development to provide evidence of subsurface microbial activities and the potential resources to support them.

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectra of iron-sulphur proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, P T; Johnson, C E; Wallbank, B; Cammack, R; Hall, D O; Rao, K K

    1975-01-01

    The X-ray photoelectron spectra of the 2p, 3s and 3p levels of iron in oxidized Clostridium pasteurianum ferredoxin indicate that the eight iron atoms in the molecule are indistinguishable. Their magnetic state is indicated both by core polarization splitting of the 3s electrons, and by "shake-up' satellites on the 2p lines. Similar satellites are observed in the 2p lines of reduced Chromatium high-potential iron-sulphur proteins and oxidized spinach ferredoxin, indicating that there too the iron atoms are magnetic. The low observed magnetic susceptibility of these proteins is therefore due to spin-coupling between the iron atoms in the active centre. PMID:1180907

  20. The Kerala Khondalite Belt (KKB) of Southern India: An ensialic mobile belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Thomas; Meen, James K.; Kumar, G. R. Ravindra; Rogers, John J. W.

    The Proterozoic Kerala Khondalite belt of the Southern Indian Shield is described, a belt dominated by granulite grade (750 C, 5 to 6 kbar) supracrustal rocks whose protoliths included arkoses and shales with cratonic provenances. Rare earth elements and other geochemical signatures suggest a granitic source for these metasediments, possibly the spatially associated charnockite massifs. The presence of intercalated mafic gneisses, interpreted as basalts, implies a cratonic rift basin rather than a foreland basin setting. It was argued that the Kerala, as well as other early Proterozoic mobile belts formed during abortive continental rifting without major additions of new crust.

  1. Iron supplementation in pregnancy and breastfeeding and iron, copper and zinc status of lactating women from a human milk bank.

    PubMed

    Mello-Neto, Julio; Rondó, Patricia Helen Carvalho; Oshiiwa, Marie; Morgano, Marcelo Antonio; Zacari, Cristiane Zago; dos Santos, Mariana Lima

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of iron supplementation in pregnancy and breastfeeding on iron status of lactating women from a Brazilian Human Milk Bank. Blood and mature breast milk samples were collected from 145 women for assessment of iron status, as well as copper and zinc status. Haemoglobin, serum iron and ferritin were determined, respectively, by electronic counting, colorimetry and chemiluminescence. Transferrin and ceruloplasmin were analysed by nephelometry. Serum copper and zinc were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and serum alkaline phosphatase was measured by a colorimetric method. Iron, zinc and copper in breast milk were determined by spectrometry. Mean values of iron, copper and zinc (blood and breast milk) were compared by ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. Iron supplementation was beneficial to prevent anaemia in pregnancy but not effective to treat anaemia. During breastfeeding, iron supplementation had a negative effect on maternal copper status, confirming an interaction between these micronutrients.

  2. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  3. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  4. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  5. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  6. Ultra-fast Electrons Explain Third Radiation Belt

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In September 2012, NASA's Van Allen Probes observed the radiation belts around Earth had settled into a new configuration, separating into three belts instead of two. Scientists think the unusual p...

  7. 29. Elevator no. 3: top floor, conveyor belt rollers for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Elevator no. 3: top floor, conveyor belt rollers for belt to gangway (in background) connecting with elevator no. 2, facing northwest - Washburn Crosby Company Elevators No. 2 & 3, 900 & 1000 Second Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  8. High-temperature superconductivity: Electron mirages in an iron salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaanen, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The detection of unusual 'mirage' energy bands in photoemission spectra of single-atom layers of iron selenide reveals the probable cause of high-temperature superconductivity in these artificial structures. See Letter p.245

  9. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA).

    PubMed

    Heeney, Matthew M; Finberg, Karin E

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a common global problem whose etiology is typically attributed to acquired inadequate dietary intake and/or chronic blood loss. However, in several kindreds multiple family members are affected with iron deficiency anemia that is unresponsive to oral iron supplementation and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy. The discovery that many of these cases harbor mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene led to the recognition that they represent a single clinical entity: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA). This article reviews clinical features of IRIDA, recent genetic studies, and insights this disorder provides into the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis.

  10. Submicron Positioning of Single Atoms in a Microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Nussmann, Stefan; Hijlkema, Markus; Weber, Bernhard; Rohde, Felix; Rempe, Gerhard; Kuhn, Axel

    2005-10-21

    The coupling of individual atoms to a high-finesse optical cavity is precisely controlled and adjusted using a standing-wave dipole-force trap, a challenge for strong atom-cavity coupling. Ultracold Rubidium atoms are first loaded into potential minima of the dipole trap in the center of the cavity. Then we use the trap as a conveyor belt that we set into motion perpendicular to the cavity axis. This allows us to repetitively move atoms out of and back into the cavity mode with a repositioning precision of 135 nm. This makes it possible to either selectively address one atom of a string of atoms by the cavity, or to simultaneously couple two precisely separated atoms to a higher mode of the cavity.

  11. The Medical Case for Seat Belts on School Buses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeager, Arthur

    1985-01-01

    A group is actively supporting legislation to require seat belts on only newly manufactured school buses. However, misinformation is being circulated to oppose the installation of seat belts in school buses. If the industry continues to block the installation of seat belts, punitive legislation may be passed. (MLF)

  12. 14 CFR 125.211 - Seat and safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seat and safety belts. 125.211 Section 125... Requirements § 125.211 Seat and safety belts. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless there are available... share one approved safety belt and two persons occupying a multiple lounge or divan seat may share...

  13. 14 CFR 125.211 - Seat and safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seat and safety belts. 125.211 Section 125... Requirements § 125.211 Seat and safety belts. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless there are available... share one approved safety belt and two persons occupying a multiple lounge or divan seat may share...

  14. Effect of enhanced seat belt reminders on driver fatality risk.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Charles M; Wells, Joann K

    2010-02-01

    Enhanced seat belt reminders in automobiles have been shown to increase belt use rates by approximately 3 percentage points. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of enhanced seat belt reminders on driver fatality risk. Data included all passenger vehicle driver deaths and vehicle registration counts in the United States for calendar years 2000-2007. Driver fatality rates per vehicle registration per year were compared for otherwise identical vehicle models with and without enhanced seat belt reminders. Driver fatality rates were 6% lower for vehicles with enhanced seat belt reminders compared with vehicles without enhanced belt reminders. After adjusting for vehicle age differences, the estimated effect of enhanced belt reminders on driver fatality risk ranged from a 9% reduction for General Motors vehicles to a 2% increase for Honda vehicles. Combining all manufacturers, enhanced belt reminders reduced fatality risk by approximately 2%. Although not statistically significant, the 2% reduction in fatality risk agrees with what should be expected from a 3 percentage point increase in seat belt use rates. Enhanced seat belt reminders have raised driver belt use rates and reduced fatality rates, but more aggressive systems may be needed for some drivers. It can be inferred that nonfatal injury rates also have been reduced. Manufacturers should be encouraged to put enhanced seat belt reminders on all vehicles as soon as possible. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 30 CFR 56.15020 - Life jackets and belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Life jackets and belts. 56.15020 Section 56.15020 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... § 56.15020 Life jackets and belts. Life jackets or belts shall be worn where there is danger...

  16. 30 CFR 56.15020 - Life jackets and belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Life jackets and belts. 56.15020 Section 56.15020 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... § 56.15020 Life jackets and belts. Life jackets or belts shall be worn where there is danger...

  17. 30 CFR 56.15020 - Life jackets and belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Life jackets and belts. 56.15020 Section 56.15020 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... § 56.15020 Life jackets and belts. Life jackets or belts shall be worn where there is danger...

  18. 30 CFR 57.15020 - Life jackets and belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Life jackets and belts. 57.15020 Section 57.15020 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Protection Surface Only § 57.15020 Life jackets and belts. Life jackets or belts shall be worn where there...

  19. 30 CFR 57.15020 - Life jackets and belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Life jackets and belts. 57.15020 Section 57.15020 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Protection Surface Only § 57.15020 Life jackets and belts. Life jackets or belts shall be worn where there...

  20. 30 CFR 57.15020 - Life jackets and belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Life jackets and belts. 57.15020 Section 57.15020 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Protection Surface Only § 57.15020 Life jackets and belts. Life jackets or belts shall be worn where there...

  1. 45. July 1974. BLACKSMITH SHOP, VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING BELT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. July 1974. BLACKSMITH SHOP, VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING BELT CHASE FOR TWO BELTS FROM THE BASEMENT, THE W. E. & J. BARNES CO. DRILL PRESS, AND THE DRILL PRESS USED FOR REAMING. THE BELT PASSING THROUGH THE WALL POWERS THE SANDER IN THE WOOD SHOP. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  2. 30 CFR 57.14212 - Chains, ropes, and drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chains, ropes, and drive belts. 57.14212... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14212 Chains, ropes, and drive belts. Chains, ropes, and drive belts shall be guided mechanically onto moving pulleys, sprockets, or...

  3. 30 CFR 56.14108 - Overhead drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overhead drive belts. 56.14108 Section 56.14108 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14108 Overhead drive belts. Overhead drive belts...

  4. 30 CFR 56.14212 - Chains, ropes, and drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chains, ropes, and drive belts. 56.14212... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14212 Chains, ropes, and drive belts. Chains, ropes, and drive belts shall be guided mechanically onto moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums...

  5. 30 CFR 57.14212 - Chains, ropes, and drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chains, ropes, and drive belts. 57.14212... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14212 Chains, ropes, and drive belts. Chains, ropes, and drive belts shall be guided mechanically onto moving pulleys, sprockets, or...

  6. 30 CFR 56.14108 - Overhead drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Overhead drive belts. 56.14108 Section 56.14108 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14108 Overhead drive belts. Overhead drive belts...

  7. 30 CFR 56.14108 - Overhead drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Overhead drive belts. 56.14108 Section 56.14108 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14108 Overhead drive belts. Overhead drive belts...

  8. 30 CFR 56.14108 - Overhead drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overhead drive belts. 56.14108 Section 56.14108 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14108 Overhead drive belts. Overhead drive belts...

  9. 30 CFR 56.14212 - Chains, ropes, and drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chains, ropes, and drive belts. 56.14212... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14212 Chains, ropes, and drive belts. Chains, ropes, and drive belts shall be guided mechanically onto moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums...

  10. 30 CFR 57.14212 - Chains, ropes, and drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chains, ropes, and drive belts. 57.14212... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14212 Chains, ropes, and drive belts. Chains, ropes, and drive belts shall be guided mechanically onto moving pulleys, sprockets, or...

  11. 30 CFR 56.14212 - Chains, ropes, and drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chains, ropes, and drive belts. 56.14212... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14212 Chains, ropes, and drive belts. Chains, ropes, and drive belts shall be guided mechanically onto moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums...

  12. 30 CFR 56.14212 - Chains, ropes, and drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chains, ropes, and drive belts. 56.14212... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14212 Chains, ropes, and drive belts. Chains, ropes, and drive belts shall be guided mechanically onto moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums...

  13. 30 CFR 56.14212 - Chains, ropes, and drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chains, ropes, and drive belts. 56.14212... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14212 Chains, ropes, and drive belts. Chains, ropes, and drive belts shall be guided mechanically onto moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums...

  14. 30 CFR 56.14108 - Overhead drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Overhead drive belts. 56.14108 Section 56.14108 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14108 Overhead drive belts. Overhead drive belts...

  15. 30 CFR 57.14212 - Chains, ropes, and drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chains, ropes, and drive belts. 57.14212... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14212 Chains, ropes, and drive belts. Chains, ropes, and drive belts shall be guided mechanically onto moving pulleys, sprockets, or...

  16. 30 CFR 57.14212 - Chains, ropes, and drive belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chains, ropes, and drive belts. 57.14212... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14212 Chains, ropes, and drive belts. Chains, ropes, and drive belts shall be guided mechanically onto moving pulleys, sprockets, or...

  17. 30 CFR 75.350 - Belt air course ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Belt air course ventilation. 75.350 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.350 Belt air course ventilation. (a) The belt air course must not be used as a return air course; and except as provided in...

  18. 30 CFR 57.4263 - Underground belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Control Firefighting Equipment § 57.4263 Underground belt conveyors. Fire protection shall be provided at the head, tail, drive, and take-up pulleys of underground belt conveyors. Provisions shall be... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground belt conveyors. 57.4263 Section...

  19. 30 CFR 57.15020 - Life jackets and belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Life jackets and belts. 57.15020 Section 57.15020 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Protection Surface Only § 57.15020 Life jackets and belts. Life jackets or belts shall be worn where there is...

  20. 30 CFR 56.15020 - Life jackets and belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Life jackets and belts. 56.15020 Section 56.15020 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... § 56.15020 Life jackets and belts. Life jackets or belts shall be worn where there is danger from...