Science.gov

Sample records for benzene metabolite levels

  1. Benzene metabolite levels in blood and bone marrow of B6C3F{sub 1} mice after low-level exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Strunk, M.R.; Thornton-Manning, J.R.

    1995-12-01

    Studies at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) have explored the species-specific uptake and metabolism of benzene. Results have shown that metabolism is dependent on both dose and route of administration. Of particular interest were shifts in the major metabolic pathways as a function of exposure concentration. In these studies, B6C3F{sub 1} mice were exposed to increasing levels of benzene by either gavage or inhalation. As benzene internal dose increased, the relative amounts of muconic acid and hydroquinone decreased. In contrast, the relative amount of catechol increased with increasing exposure. These results show that the relative levels of toxic metabolites are a function of exposure level. Based on these results and assuming a linear relationship between exposure concentration and levels of bone marrow metabolites, it would be difficult to detect an elevation of any phenolic metabolites above background after occupational exposures to the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit of 1 ppm benzene.

  2. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites.

  3. Benzene toxicokinetics in humans: exposure of bone marrow to metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, K H; Bois, F Y; Daisey, J M; Auslander, D M; Spear, R C

    1994-01-01

    A three compartment physiologically based toxicokinetic model was fitted to human data on benzene disposition. Two separate groups of model parameter derivations were obtained, depending on which data sets were being fitted. The model was then used to simulate five environmental or occupational exposures. Predicted values of the total bone marrow exposure to benzene and cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow were generated for each scenario. The relation between cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow and continuous benzene exposure was also investigated in detail for simulated inhalation exposure concentrations ranging from 0.0039 ppm to 150 ppm. At the level of environmental exposures, no dose rate effect was found for either model. The occupational exposures led to only slight dose rate effects. A 32 ppm exposure for 15 minutes predicted consistently higher values than a 1 ppm exposure for eight hours for the total exposure of bone marrow to benzene and the cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow. The general relation between the cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow and the inhalation concentration of benzene is not linear. An inflection point exists in some cases leading to a slightly S shaped curve. At environmental levels (0.0039-10 ppm) the curve bends upward, and it saturates at high experimental exposures (greater than 100 ppm). PMID:8044234

  4. Quinones as toxic metabolites of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Irons, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Occupational exposure to benzene has long been associated with toxicity to the blood and bone marrow, including lymphocytopenia, pancytopenia, aplastic anemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, and possible lymphoma. A variety of studies have established that benzene itself is not the toxic species but requires metabolism to reactive intermediates. The bioactivation of benzene is complex. Both primary and secondary oxidation of benzene and its metabolites are mediated via cytochrome P-450 in the liver, although the role of secondary metabolism in the bone marrow is not clear. Toxicity is associated with the dihydroxy metabolites, hydroquinone and catechol, which concentrate in bone marrow. Hydroquinone and its terminal oxidation product, p-benzoquinone, have been demonstrated to be potent suppressors of cell growth in culture. Suppression of lymphocyte blastogenesis by these compounds is a sulfhydryl-dependent process and occurs at concentrations that do not result in cell death, or in detectable alterations in energy metabolism, intracellular glutathione concentration, or protein synthesis. Recent studies suggest that these compounds and other membrane-penetrating sulfyhdryl alkylating agents, such as N-ethylmaleimide and cytochalasin A, and endogenous regulatory molecules, such as soluble immune response suppressor (SIRS), interfere with microtubule assembly in vitro and selectively interfere with microtubule-dependent cell functions at identical concentrations. These agents appear to react with nucleophilic sulfhydryl groups essential for guanosine triphosphate binding to tubulin that are particularly sensitive to sulfhydryl-alkylating agents.

  5. Reactive ring-opened aldehyde metabolites in benzene hematotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Witz, G; Zhang, Z; Goldstein, B D

    1996-01-01

    The hematotoxicity of benzene is mediated by reactive benzene metabolites and possibly by other intermediates including reactive oxygen species. We previously hypothesized that ring-opened metabolites may significantly contribute to benzene hematotoxicity. Consistent with this hypothesis, our studies initially demonstrated that benzene is metabolized in vitro to trans-trans-muconaldehyde (MUC), a reactive six-carbon diene dialdehyde, and that MUC is toxic to the bone marrow in a manner similar to benzene. Benzene toxicity most likely involves interactions among several metabolites that operate by different mechanisms to produce more than one biological effect. Our studies indicate that MUC coadministered with hydroquinone is a particularly potent metabolite combination that causes bone marrow damage, suggesting that the involvement of ring-opened metabolites in benzene toxicity may be related to their biological effects in combination with other benzene metabolites. Studies in our laboratory and by others indicate that MUC is metabolized to a variety of compounds by oxidation or reduction of the aldehyde groups. The aldehydic MUC metabolite 6-hydroxy-trans-trans-2,4-hexadienal (CHO-M-OH), similar to MUC but to a lesser extent, is reactive toward glutathione, mutagenic in V79 cells, and hematotoxic in mice. It is formed by monoreduction of MUC, a process that is reversible and could be of biological significance in benzene bone marrow toxicity. The MUC metabolite 6-hydroxy-trans-trans-2,4-hexadienoic (COOH-M-OH) is an end product of MUC metabolism in vitro. Our studies indicate that COOH-M-OH is a urinary metabolite of benzene in mice, a finding that provides further indirect evidence for the in vivo formation of MUC from benzene. Mechanistic studies showed the formation of cis-trans-muconaldehyde in addition to MUC from benzene incubated in a hydroxyl radical-generating Fenton system. These results suggest that the benzene ring is initially opened to cis

  6. In vivo genotoxic interactions among three phenolic benzene metabolites.

    PubMed

    Marrazzini, A; Chelotti, L; Barrai, I; Loprieno, N; Barale, R

    1994-11-01

    Three benzene metabolites, hydroquinone (HQ), cathecol (CAT) and phenol (PHE) were studied to define their possible interaction in inducing micronuclei (Mn) in mouse bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). HQ and CAT, administered separately, induced Mn while PHE showed no genotoxic effects. Binary and ternary mixtures of two or three metabolites gave different results, causing considerable increase or decrease in Mn induction. HQ and PHE, in binary mixtures, as well as PHE and CAT, increased Mn synergistically, while HQ and CAT interacted negatively. The genotoxicity of ternary mixtures was mainly the consequence of two metabolites: HQ and CAT. The maximal effect obtained is far below the induction of Mn consequent to benzene treatment. These data suggest that toxic and genotoxic effects of benzene alone could be the result of more complex interactions among these and other metabolites.

  7. Modeling the formation and reactions of benzene metabolites.

    PubMed

    Golding, Bernard T; Barnes, Martine L; Bleasdale, Christine; Henderson, Alistair P; Jiang, Dong; Li, Xin; Mutlu, Esra; Petty, Hannah J; Sadeghi, Majid M

    2010-03-19

    One or more of the muconaldehyde isomers is a putative product of benzene metabolism. As muconaldehydes are highly reactive dienals and potentially mutagenic they might be relevant to the carcinogenicity of benzene. Muconaldehydes may be derived through the action of a cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase on benzene oxide-oxepin, which are established metabolites of benzene. Oxidation of benzene oxide-oxepin either by the one-electron oxidant cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) or by iron(III) tris(1,10-phenanthroline) hexafluorophosphate in acetone at -78 degrees C or acetonitrile at -40 degrees C gave (E,Z)-muconaldehyde, which was a single diastereoisomer according to analysis by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Reaction of toluene-1,2-oxide/2-methyloxepin with CAN gave (2E,4Z)-6-oxo-hepta-2,4-dienal. Similarly, the action of CAN on 1,6-dimethylbenzene oxide-2,7-dimethyloxepin gave (3Z,5E)-octa-3,5-diene-2,7-dione. In vivo, benzene oxide-oxepin could suffer one-electron oxidation by cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase giving (E,Z)-muconaldehyde. The observations presented may be relevant to the toxicology of benzene oxide-oxepin and other arene oxide-oxepins as we have previously shown that (E,Z)-muconaldehyde, analogously to (Z,Z)-muconaldehyde, affords pyrrole adducts with the exocyclic amino groups of the DNA bases adenine and guanine. Independent of their possible toxicological significance, the experiments described provide preparatively useful routes to (E,Z)-muconaldehyde and its congeners. Methods are also described for the trapping and analysis of reactive benzene metabolites, e.g. using the Diels-Alder reaction with the dienophile 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione to trap arene oxides and with the diene 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran to trap enals.

  8. Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

    2007-07-15

    Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

  9. Inhibition of human topoisomerase II in vitro by bioactive benzene metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Frantz, C E; Chen, H; Eastmond, D A

    1996-01-01

    Benzene is a clastogenic and carcinogenic agent that induces acute myelogenous leukemia in humans and multiple of tumors in animals. Previous research has indicated that benzene must first be metabolized to one or more bioactive species to exert its myelotoxic and genotoxic effects. To better understand the possible role of individual benzene metabolites in the leukemogenic process, as well as to further investigate inhibition of topoisomerase II by benzene metabolites, a series of known and putative benzene metabolites, phenol, 4,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol, hydroquinone, catechol, 1,2,4-benzenetriol, 1,4-benzoquinone, and trans-trans-muconaldehyde were tested for inhibitory effects in vitro on the human topoisomerase II enzyme. With minor modifications of the standard assay conditions, 1,4-benzoquinone and trans-trans-muconaldehyde were shown to be directly inhibitory, whereas all of the phenolic metabolites were shown to inhibit enzymatic activity following bioactivation using a peroxidase activation system. The majority of compounds tested inhibited topoisomerase II at concentrations at or below 10 microM. These results confirm and expand upon previous findings from our laboratory and indicate that many of the metabolites of benzene could potentially interfere with topoisomerase II. Since other inhibitors of topoisomerase II have been shown to induce leukemia in humans, inhibition of this enzyme by benzene metabolites may also play a role in the carcinogenic effects of benzene. PMID:9118913

  10. Biological monitoring of low-level exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Campagna, M; Satta, Giannina; Campo, Laura; Flore, Valeria; Ibba, A; Meloni, M; Tocco, Maria Giuseppina; Avataneo, G; Flore, C; Fustinoni, Silvia; Cocco, P

    2012-01-01

    Conflicting opinions exist about the reliability of biomarkers of low-level exposure to benzene. We compared the ability of the urinary excretion of trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), s-phenilmercapturic acid (s-PAMA) and urinary benzene (U-Benz) to detect low level occupational and environmental exposure to benzene. We monitored airborne benzene by personal air sampling, and U-Benz, s-PMAI, t,t-MA and cotinine (U-Cotinine) in spot urine samples, collected at 8 am and 8 pm, in 32 oil refinery workers and 65 subjects, randomly selected among the general population of urban and suburban Cagliari, Italy. Information on personal characteristics, diet and events during the sampling day was acquired through in person interviews. The median concentration of airborne benzene was 25.2 microg/m3 in oil refinery workers, and 8.5 microg/m3 in the general population subgroup. U-Benz in morning and evening samples was significantly more elevated among oil refinery workers than the general population subgroup (p = 0.012, and p = 7.4 x 10(-7), respectively) and among current smokers compared to non-smokers (p = 5.2 x 10(-8), and p = 5.2 x 10(-5) respectively). Benzene biomarkers and their readings in the two sampling phases were well correlated to each other. The Spearman's correlation coefficient with airborne benzene was significant for U-Benz in the evening sample, while no correlation was seen with t,t-MA and s-PMA readings in either samplings. The two benzene metabolites were frequently below limit of detection (LOD), particularly among the general population study subjects (17-9% and 39%, for t,t-MA and s-PMA respectively). Morning U-Cotinine excretion showed a good correlation with U-Benz in the morning and in the evening sampling (p < 0.001), and with s-PMA in the evening sample (p < 0.001), but not with t,t-MA in either samplings. t,t-MA in the evening sample was the only biomarker showing a moderate inverse correlation with BMI (p < 0.05). The multiple regression

  11. Genome-Wide Functional Profiling Reveals Genes Required for Tolerance to Benzene Metabolites in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    North, Matthew; Tandon, Vickram J.; Thomas, Reuben; Loguinov, Alex; Gerlovina, Inna; Hubbard, Alan E.; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.; Vulpe, Chris D.

    2011-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and is widely used in industry. Exposure to benzene causes a number of serious health problems, including blood disorders and leukemia. Benzene undergoes complex metabolism in humans, making mechanistic determination of benzene toxicity difficult. We used a functional genomics approach to identify the genes that modulate the cellular toxicity of three of the phenolic metabolites of benzene, hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CAT) and 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT), in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Benzene metabolites generate oxidative and cytoskeletal stress, and tolerance requires correct regulation of iron homeostasis and the vacuolar ATPase. We have identified a conserved bZIP transcription factor, Yap3p, as important for a HQ-specific response pathway, as well as two genes that encode putative NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductases, PST2 and YCP4. Many of the yeast genes identified have human orthologs that may modulate human benzene toxicity in a similar manner and could play a role in benzene exposure-related disease. PMID:21912624

  12. DNA damage in lymphocytes of benzene exposed workers correlates with trans,trans-muconic acids and breath benzene levels.

    PubMed

    Sul, Donggeun; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Mi-Young; Oh, Eunha; Im, Hosub; Lee, Joohyun; Jung, Woon-Won; Won, Namhee; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Eun-Mi; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2005-04-04

    Benzene causes many kinds of blood disorders in workers employed in many different environments. These diseases include myelodisplastic syndrome and acute and chronic myelocytic leukemia. In the present study, five occupational work places, including six industrial process types, namely, printing, shoe-making, methylene di-aniline (MDA), nitrobenzene, carbomer, and benzene production were selected, and the levels of breath benzene, and trans,trans-muconic acids (t,t-MA) and phenol in urine were evaluated, as well as hematological changes and lymphocyte DNA damage. The concentration of benzene in breath was less than 3 ppm in the workplaces, and benzene exposure was found to be higher in work places where benzene is used, than in those where benzene is produced. At low levels of benzene exposure, urinary t,t-MA correlated strongly with benzene in air. Highest Olive tail moments were found in workers producing carbomer. Levels of breathzone benzene were found to be strongly correlated with Olive tail moment values in the lymphocytes of workers, but not with hematological data in the six workplaces types. In conclusion, the highest benzene exposures found occurred in workers at a company, which utilized benzene in the production of carbomer. In terms of low levels of exposure to benzene, urinary t,t-MA and DNA damage exhibited a strong correlation with breath benzene, but not with hematological data. We conclude that breath benzene, t,t-MA and lymphocytic DNA damage are satisfactory biomonitoring markers with respect to benzene exposure in the workplace.

  13. In vitro conjugation of benzene metabolites by human liver: potential influence of interindividual variability on benzene toxicity.

    PubMed

    Seaton, M J; Schlosser, P; Medinsky, M A

    1995-07-01

    In addition to industrial sources, benzene is present in the environment as a component of cigarette smoke and automobile emissions. Toxicity of benzene most likely results from oxidative metabolism of benzene to reactive products. However, susceptibility to these toxic effects may be related to a balance between activation (phase I) and detoxication (phase II) reactions. In the present study, we have estimated kinetic parameters of the two major detoxication reactions for benzene metabolites--phenol sulfation and hydroquinone glucuronidation--in liver subcellular fractions from 10 humans, and single samples from mice and rats. The extent of oxidative metabolism of benzene by these liver samples has been reported previously. Here, initial rates of phenol sulfation varied 3-fold (range 0.309-0.919 nmol/mg protein/min) among human samples. Measured rates were faster in rats (1.195 nmol/mg protein/min) than in mice (0.458 nmol/mg protein/min). Initial rates of hydroquinone glucuronidation by human samples also varied 3-fold (range 0.101-0.281 nmol/mg protein/min). Hydroquinone glucuronidation was more rapid by mouse microsomes (0.218 nmol/mg protein/min) than by rat microsomes (0.077 nmol/mg protein/min). To integrate interindividual differences in various enzyme activities, a physiological compartmental model was developed that incorporates rates of both conjugation reactions and oxidation reactions. Model equations were solved for steady-state concentrations of phenol and hydroquinone attained in human, mouse and rat blood during continuous exposure to benzene (0.01 microM in blood). Among the 10 human subjects, steady-state concentrations of phenol varied 6-fold (range 0.38-2.17 nM) and steady-state concentrations of hydroquinone varied 5-fold (range 6.66-31.44 nM). Predicted steady-state concentrations of phenol were higher in mice compared with rats (2.28 and 0.83 nM respectively). Likewise, higher steady-state concentrations of hydroquinone were predicted in

  14. Cytochromes P450 in benzene metabolism and involvement of their metabolites and reactive oxygen species in toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gut, I.; Nedelcheva, V.; Soucek, P.

    1996-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 was the most efficient CYP enzyme that oxidized benzene to soluble and covalently bound metabolites in rat and human liver microsomes. The covalent binding was due mostly to the formation of benzoquinone (BQ), the oxidation product of hydroquinone (HQ), and was inversely related to the formation of soluble metabolites. In rats, inhalation of benzene K mgAiter of air caused a rapid destruction of CYP281 previously induced by phenobarbital. The ability of benzene metabolites to destroy liver microsomal CYP in vitro decreased in the order BQ > HQ > catechol > phenol. The destruction was reversed by ascorbate and diminished by {alpha}-tocopherol, suggesting that HQ was not toxic, whereas BO and serniquinone radical (SO) caused the effect. In the presence of nicotinamide adenine clinucleoticle phosphate, reduced (NADPH) the microsomes did not oxidize HQ to BQ, while the formation of superoxide anion radical from both HQ and BQ was markedly quenched. Destruction of CYP in vitro caused by HQ or BQ was not mediated by hydroxyl radical formation or by lipid peroxiclation. On the contrary, HQ and BQ inhibited NADPH-mediated lipid peroxidation. Ascorbate induced high levels of hydroxyl radical formation and lipid peroxidation, which were differentially affected by quinones, indicating different mechanisms. Despite reducing the toxicity of HQ and BQ, ascorbate appeared to induce its own toxicity, reflected in high levels of lipid peroxiclation. Iron redox cycling played a significant role in the NADPH-induced hydroxyl radical formation but not in that caused by ascorbate; however, lipid peroxiclation induced by NADPH or ascorbate was suppressed by ethylenediaminetraacetate, indicating a crucial role of iron. Thus, the data indicate that the quinones destroyed CYP directly and not via oxygen activation or lipid peroxiclation. 35 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Benzene exposure assessed by metabolite excretion in Estonian oil shale mineworkers: influence of glutathione s-transferase polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Mette; Poole, Jason; Autrup, Herman; Muzyka, Vladimir; Jensen, Annie; Loft, Steffen; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2004-11-01

    Measurement of urinary excretion of the benzene metabolites S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) and trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) has been proposed for assessing benzene exposure, in workplaces with relatively high benzene concentrations. Excretion of S-PMA and t,t-MA in underground workers at an oil shale mine were compared with the excretion in workers engaged in various production assignments above ground. In addition, possible modifying effects of genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferases T1 (GSTT1), M1 (GSTM1), and P1 (GSTP1) on the excretion of S-PMA and t,t-MA were investigated. Fifty underground workers and 50 surface workers participated. Blood samples and three urine samples were collected from each worker: (a) a preshift sample collected the morning after a weekend, (b) a postshift sample 1 collected after the first shift, and (c) a postshift sample 2 collected after the last shift of the week. Personal benzene exposure was 114 +/- 35 mug/m(3) in surface workers (n = 15) and 190 +/- 50 mug/m(3) in underground workers (n = 15) in measurements made prior to the study. We found t,t-MA excretion to be significantly higher in underground workers after the end of shifts 1 and 2 compared with the corresponding surface workers. The same picture, although not significant, was seen for S-PMA excretion. Excretion of S-PMA and t,t-MA was found to increase significantly during the working week in underground workers but not in those employed on the surface. Both t,t-MA and S-PMA excretion were significantly higher in smokers compared with nonsmokers. Subjects carrying the GSTT1 wild-type excreted higher concentrations of S-PMA than subjects carrying the null genotype, suggesting that it is a key enzyme in the glutathione conjugation that leads to S-PMA. The results support the use of benzene metabolites as biomarkers for assessment of exposure at modest levels and warrant for further investigations of health risks of occupational benzene exposure in shale

  16. Structure-activity relationship in the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of putative metabolites and related analogs of benzene derived from the valence tautomers benzene oxide and oxepin

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, A.A.; Rastetter, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    A series of putative metabolites and related analogs of benzene, derived from the valence tautomers benzene oxide and oxepin, was tested for mutagenicity (reversions to histidine prototrophy and forward mutations to resistance to 8-azaguanine) and for cytotoxicity by the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity test. Benzene was not mutagenic in either assay. The benzene oxide-oxepin system and benzene dihydrodial induced point mutations but not frameshifts. 4,5-sym-Oxepin oxide, which is a putative metabolite of the oxepin valence tautomer; 3,6-diazo-cyclohexane-1,6-3,4-dioxide, a synthetic precursor of sym-oxepin oxide; and transoid-4,11-dioxatricyclo(5.1 0)undeca-1,6-diene, a stable bridgehead diene analog of sym-oxepin oxide, were toxic but not mutagenic in both assays. 4H-Pyran-4-=carboxaldehyde, a stable acid catalyzed rearrangement product of sym-oxepin oxide, was not mutagenic and much less cytotoxic than sym-oxepin oxide. Stable analogs of the valence tautomer benzene oxide, namely syn-indan-3a,7a-oxide and syn-2-hydroxyindan-3a,7a-oxide, were mutagenic and induced point mutations. All compounds were cytotoxic to Salmonella. Firstly, the apparent decay times of these chemicals, especially that of sym-oxepin oxide, were surprisingly longer than expected, as judged by quantitative plate diffusion assays. Secondly, it is concluded that if benzene oxide is further metabolized in its oxepin tautomeric form, toxic but not mutagenic products are formed. Thirdly, the relatively weak mutagenicity of benzene oxide may be mainly due to its instability and corresponding low probability to reach intracellular polynucleotide targets, whereas stable analogs of benzene oxide are relatively more potent mutagens. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. The molecular mechanisms of liver and islets of Langerhans toxicity by benzene and its metabolite hydroquinone in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Baeeri, Maryam; Gholami, Mahdi; Ghafour-Boroujerdi, Elmira; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Benzene (C6H6) is one of the most commonly used industrial chemicals causing environmental pollution. This study aimed to examine the effect of benzene and its metabolite hydroquinone on glucose regulating organs, liver and pancreas, and to reveal the involved toxic mechanisms, in rats. In the in vivo part, benzene was dissolved in corn oil and administered through intragastric route at doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. And, in the in vitro part, toxic mechanisms responsible for weakening the antioxidant system in islets of Langerhans by hydroquinone at different concentrations (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mM), were revealed. Benzene exposure raised the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase) enzymes and increased fasting blood sugar (FBS) in comparison to control animals. Also, the activity of hepatic glucokinase (GK) was decreased significantly. Along with, a significant increase was observed in hepatic tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and plasma insulin in benzene treated rats. Moreover, benzene caused a significant rise in hepatic lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and oxidation of proteins. In islets of Langerhans, hydroquinone was found to decrease the capability of antioxidant system to fight free radicals. Also, the level of death proteases (caspase 3 and caspase 9) was found higher in hydroquinone exposed islets. The current study demonstrated that benzene and hydroquinone causes toxic effects on liver and pancreatic islets by causing oxidative impairment.

  18. Benzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 02 / 001F TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF BENZENE ( NONCANCER EFFECTS ) ( CAS No . 71 - 43 - 2 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) October 2002 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been

  19. Increase of sister chromatid exchanges and perturbations of cell division kinetics in human lymphocytes by benzene metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, K.; Wolff, S.

    1980-04-01

    Benzene, which has been associated with human cancers, is metabolized to produce several major metabolites that could be responsible for the biological effects. Tests have now been carried out on human lymphocytes in culture to determine if benzene or its metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone, induce cytogenetic changes and affect the cell cycle. The results indicate that benzene itself does not induce sister chromatid exchanges or affect cell cycle kinetics over a wide range of doses. Catechol is a potent compound that induces sister chromatid exchanges and delays cell division very readily. Hydroquinone is also potent, but less so than catechol. Thus, the formation of catechol and hydroquinone is the most likely cause of benzene toxicity.

  20. In utero and in vitro effects of benzene and its metabolites on erythroid differentiation and the role of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Badham, Helen J.; Winn, Louise M.

    2010-05-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous occupational and environmental toxicant. Exposures to benzene both prenatally and during adulthood are associated with the development of disorders such as aplastic anemia and leukemia. Mechanisms of benzene toxicity are unknown; however, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by benzene metabolites may play a role. Little is known regarding the effects of benzene metabolites on erythropoiesis. Therefore, to determine the effects of in utero exposure to benzene on the growth and differentiation of fetal erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E), pregnant CD-1 mice were exposed to benzene and CFU-E numbers were assessed in fetal liver (hematopoietic) tissue. In addition, to determine the effect of benzene metabolite-induced ROS generation on erythropoiesis, HD3 chicken erythroblast cells were exposed to benzene, phenol, or hydroquinone followed by stimulation of erythrocyte differentiation. Our results show that in utero exposure to benzene caused significant alterations in female offspring CFU-E numbers. In addition, exposure to hydroquinone, but not benzene or phenol, significantly reduced the percentage of differentiated HD3 cells, which was associated with an increase in ROS. Pretreatment of HD3 cells with polyethylene glycol-conjugated superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD) prevented hydroquinone-induced inhibition of erythropoiesis, supporting the hypothesis that ROS generation is involved in the development of benzene erythrotoxicity. In conclusion, this study provided evidence that ROS generated as a result of benzene metabolism may significantly alter erythroid differentiation, potentially leading to the development of Blood Disorders.

  1. In silico studies with human DNA topoisomerase-II alpha to unravel the mechanism of in vitro genotoxicity of benzene and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Alok Kumar; Gurbani, Deepak; Bajpayee, Mahima; Parmar, Devendra; Ajmani, Subhash; Dhawan, Alok

    2009-02-10

    Exposure of humans to benzene present in environment may lead to adverse chronic effects-even at the genetic level. However, the mechanism of its genotoxicity is not well understood. In the present study, in vitro genotoxicity of benzene (BZ) and its major metabolites [p-benzoquinone (BQ), hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CT), 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT) and trans-trans muconic acid (MA)] at concentrations 0.5-50 microM, was assessed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells employing the alkaline Comet assay, cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay, flow cytometric analysis of micronucleus (flow MN) and chromosome aberration (CA) test. The data revealed significant (P<0.05) concentration-dependent response in all end points. HQ was found to be the most potent DNA damaging metabolite in the Comet assay followed by BQ>BT>CT>BZ>MA. Both CBMN and flow MN assays revealed a good correlation in their results, where BQ and MA exhibited maximum and minimum micronucleus induction respectively. Significant chromosomal aberrations were induced mainly by BQ, BT and HQ, with moderate response shown by CT and BZ and least by MA. The results demonstrated the utility of sensitive techniques like Comet assay and flow cytometry for determination of MN, to quantify in vitro genotoxicity at low levels and also suggested that partly non-repaired DNA damage could cause adverse health effects in human population exposed to benzene. In silico studies using different endpoints of genotoxicity and molecular docking studies with human topoisomerase-II alpha, a major DNA repair enzyme were also conducted. These corroborated the results obtained from the in vitro data, pointing to a direct relationship of the observed genotoxicity with the structural properties and various interactions of metabolites with the enzyme. This comprehensive study demonstrated that genotoxicity of benzene in mammalian cells is mainly due to the inhibition of topoisomerase by the metabolites.

  2. Evaluation of assays for the identification and quantitation of muconic acid, a benzene metabolite in human urine

    SciTech Connect

    Bartczak, A.; Kline, S.A.; Yu, R.; Weisel, C.P.; Goldstein, B.D.; Witz, G.; Bechtold, W.E.

    1994-12-31

    Muconic acid (MA) is a urinary metabolite of benzene and has been used as a biomarker of exposure to benzene in humans exposed to levels as low as 1 ppm. We have modified a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) based assay for urinary MA by the use of a diode array detector. This modification increases the specificity of the HPLC-based assay by identifying false positives. In addition, we have developed a gas chromatography (GC) based assay that uses a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Both assays identified and quantified MA in human urine at concentrations greater than 40-50 ng/ml. Assay precision was within 10% relative standard deviation for MA concentrations above 90 ng/ml using the HPLC assay and above 40 ng/ml using the GC-FID assay. Quantitative accuracy of the assays was evaluated by determining MA in human urine samples using both methods and also a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure. Numerical correlation among the three assays was good at MA concentrations above 100 ng/ml. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Effects of benzene and its metabolites on global DNA methylation in human normal hepatic L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junjie; Ma, Huimin; Zhang, Wenbing; Yu, Zhiqing; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2014-01-01

    Benzene is an important industrial chemical that is also widely present in cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and gasoline. It is reported that benzene can cause hematopoietic disorders and has been recognized as a human carcinogen. However, the mechanisms by which it increases the risk of carcinogenesis are only partially understood. Aberrant DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism associated with the toxicity of carcinogens. To understand the carcinogenic capacity of benzene, experiments were designed to investigate whether exposure to benzene and its metabolites would change the global DNA methylation status in human normal hepatic L02 cells and then to evaluate whether the changes would be induced by variation of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity in HaeIII DNMT-mediated methylation assay in vitro. Our results showed that hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone could induce global DNA hypomethylation with statistically significant difference from control (p < 0.05), but no significant global DNA methylation changes were observed in L02 cells with benzene, phenol, and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene exposure. Benzene metabolites could not influence HaeIII DNMT activity except that 1,4-benzoquinone shows significantly inhibiting effect on enzymatic methylation reaction at concentrations of 5 μM (p < 0.05). These results suggest that benzene metabolites, hydroquinone, and 1,4-benzoquinone can disrupt global DNA methylation, and the potential epigenetic mechanism by which that global DNA hypomethylation induced by 1,4-benzoquinone may work through the inhibiting effects of DNMT activity at 10 μM (p < 0.05).

  4. Cell-specific activation and detoxification of benzene metabolites in mouse and human bone marrow: Identification of target cells and a potential role for modulation of apoptosis in benzene toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.; Siegel, D.; Schattenberg, D.G.

    1996-12-01

    The role of cell-specific metabolism in benzene toxicity was examined in both murine and human bone marrow. Hemopoietic progenitor cells and stromal cells are important control points for regulation of hemopoiesis. We show that the selective toxicity of hydroquinone at the level of the macrophage in murine bone marrow stroma may be explained by a high peroxidase/nicotanimicle adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced [NAD(P)H]:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) ratio. Peroxidases metabolize hydroquinone to the reactive 1,4-benzoquinone, whereas NQO1 reduces the quinones formed, resulting in detoxification. Peroxidase and NQO1 activity in human stromal cultures vary as a function of time in culture, with peroxidase activity decreasing and NQO1 activity increasing with time. Peroxidase activity and, more specifically, myeloperoxidase, which had previously been considered to be expressed at the promyelocyte level, was detected in murine lineage-negative and human CD34{sup +} progenitor cells. This provides a metabolic mechanism whereby phenolic metabolites of benzene can be bioactivated in progenitor cells, which are considered initial target cells for the development of leukemias. Consequences of a high peroxidase/NQO1 ratio in HL-60 cells were shown to include hydroquinone-induced apoptosis. Hydroquinone can also inhibit proteases known to play a role in induction of apoptosis, suggesting that it may be able to inhibit apoptosis induced by other stimuli. Modulation of apoptosis may lead to aberrant hemopoiesis and neoplastic progression. This enzyme-directed approach has identified target cells of the phenolic metabolites of benzene in bone marrow and provided a metabolic basis for benzene-induced toxicity at the level of the progenitor cell in both murine and human bone marrow. 60 refs., 8 figs.

  5. An investigation of the DNA-damaging ability of benzene and its metabolites in human lymphocytes, using the Comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.; Yu, T.W.; Schmezer, P. |

    1995-12-31

    Benzene and five of its known metabolites-muconic acid, hydroquinone, catechol, p-benzoquinone, and benzentriol-were examined for DNA damage in human lymphocytes using the alkaline Comet assay, and conditions were optimised to determine responses. When comets were measured by eye after treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H{sup 2}O{sup 2}), the positive control, and each compound for 0.5 hr, only H{sup 2}O{sup 2} and benzenetrial induced pronounced DNA damage without metabolic activation. The effect of catechol was moderate compared, with that of benzenetriol. There was a very weak effect of benzene in the absence of rat liver S-9 mix. In the presence of S-9 mix, benzene was not activated. The effect of benzenetriol was greatly reduced by the external metabolishing system, but p-benzoquinone became activated o some extent. Catalase abolished the effect of benzenetriol, suggesting that H{sup 2}O{sup 2} formed during autoxidation may be responsible for the DNA-damaging ability of this metabolite. Mitogen-stimulated cycling cells were less sensitive to H{sup 2}O{sup 2} and benzenetrial than unstimulated G{sub O} lymphocytes. Effects tended to become more pronounced at high doses and after longer exposures, although this was not always consistent from experiment to experiment. In conclusion, benzene and all metabolites investigated gave positive responses. Where altered responses were observed, they were significantly different from the corresponding controls. 46 refs., 7 tabs.

  6. The relationship between low-level benzene exposure and blood cell counts in Korean workers.

    PubMed

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Jeon, Hee-Kyung; Lee, Sang-Gil; Ryu, Hyang-Woo

    2015-06-01

    Benzene is a well-known haematological toxin causing aplastic anaemia and leukaemia. Some recent studies have shown that low-level benzene exposure (<1 ppm) disturbs the haematopoietic system. However, other studies showed inconsistent results. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between low-level benzene exposure and blood cell counts in Korean workers. Blood cell counts of benzene-exposed workers were extracted from a nationwide Special Health Examination Database from 2000 to 2008. If a worker did not take a blood test for benzene between 2000 and 2004, the worker was selected for analysis. In total, 8679 personal air benzene measurements were extracted from the nationwide Workplace Environment Measurement Database from 2004 to 2008. Mean benzene levels were calculated and assigned to benzene-exposed workers using various combinations of factory/industry/process codes. Mixed-effects models were used to examine dose-related associations between benzene levels and white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC), platelet, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts. In total, 21 140 blood samples were tested from 10 702 workers between 2005 and 2008; 40% of the workers had repeated blood tests (average, 3.4 times). RBC counts in male workers showed a significant negative association with low-level benzene exposure. WBC, platelet, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts did not show a consistent association with low-level benzene exposure. Our findings support the potential haematotoxicity of low-level benzene exposure (<1 ppm). A longitudinal study with direct benzene measurements for exposed workers is needed to confirm the toxicity of low-level benzene exposure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Improved method for the determination of benzene in soft drinks at sub-ppb levels.

    PubMed

    Cao, X-L; Casey, V

    2008-04-01

    An automated, simple, and reproducible method based on isotope dilution headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry developed previously for the determination of benzene in soft drinks was further improved by adding sodium sulfate to samples, lowering the gas chromatography oven starting temperature to narrow benzene peak width, and increasing sample injection volume. This improved method had a lower detection limit (0.016 microg l(-1)) and good repeatability, and was used in a follow-up survey to assess benzene levels in 139 samples of soft drink products. Benzene was detected in 67% of the 139 products tested. Compared with the previous survey, the average benzene concentrations in most products from this survey were lower, and only a few products had benzene at elevated levels.

  8. Benzene levels in ambient air and breath of smokers and nonsmokers in urban and pristine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I.; Gruenke, L.D.; Craig, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Benzene levels in human breath and in ambient air were compared in the urban area of San Francisco (SF) and in a more remote coastal pristine setting of Stinson Beach, Calif. (SB). Benzene analysis was done by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Ambient benzene levels were sevenfold higher in SF (2.6 +/- 1.3 ppb, n = 25) than SB (0.38 +/- 0.39 ppb, n = 21). In SF, benzene in smokers' breath (6.8 +/- 3.0 ppb) was greater than in nonsmokers' breath (2.5 +/- 0.8 ppb) and smokers' ambient air (3.3 +/- 0.8 ppb). In SB the same pattern was observed: benzene in smokers' breath was higher than in nonsmokers' breath and ambient air. Benzene in SF nonsmokers' breath was greater than in SB nonsmokers' breath. Marijuana-only smokers had benzene breath levels between those of smokers and nonsmokers. There was little correlation between benzene in breath and number of cigarettes smoked, or with other benzene exposures such as diet. Of special interest was the finding that benzene in breath of SF nonsmokers (2.5 +/- 0.8 ppb) was greater than that in nonsmokers ambient air (1.4 +/- 0.1 ppb). The same was true in SB, where benzene in nonsmokers breath was greater than ambient air (1.8 +/- 0.2 ppb versus 1.0 +/- 0.1 ppb on d 1 and 1.3 +/- 0.3 ppb versus 0.23 +/- 0.18 ppb on d 2). This suggests an additional source of benzene other than outdoor ambient air.

  9. Elevated Atmospheric Levels of Benzene and Benzene-Related Compounds from Unconventional Shale Extraction and Processing: Human Health Concern for Residential Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Alisa L.; Orimoloye, Helen T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The advancement of natural gas (NG) extraction across the United States (U.S.) raises concern for potential exposure to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Benzene, a HAP and a primary chemical of concern due to its classification as a known human carcinogen, is present in petroleum-rich geologic formations and is formed during the combustion of bypass NG. It is a component in solvents, paraffin breakers, and fuels used in NG extraction and processing (E&P). OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study are to confirm the presence of benzene and benzene-related compounds (benzene[s]) in residential areas, where unconventional shale E&P is occurring, and to determine if benzene[s] exists in elevated atmospheric concentrations when compared to national background levels. METHODS Ambient air sampling was conducted in six counties in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex with passive samples collected in evacuated 6-L Summa canisters. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, with sampling performed at variable distances from the facility fence line. RESULTS Elevated concentrations of benzene[s] in the atmosphere were identified when compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program. The 24-hour benzene concentrations ranged from 0.6 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 592 ppbv, with 1-hour concentrations from 2.94 ppbv to 2,900.20 ppbv. CONCLUSION Benzene is a known human carcinogen capable of multisystem health effects. Exposure to benzene is correlated with bone marrow and blood-forming organ damage and immune system depression. Sensitive populations (children, pregnant women, elderly, immunocompromised) and occupational workers are at increased risk for adverse health effects from elevated atmospheric levels of benzene[s] in residential areas with unconventional shale E&P. PMID:27199565

  10. Global Gene Expression Profiling of a Population Exposed to a Range of Benzene Levels

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Vermeulen, Roel; Li, Guilan; Hubbard, Alan E.; Porter, Kristin E.; Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J.; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    Background Benzene, an established cause of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), may also cause one or more lymphoid malignancies in humans. Previously, we identified genes and pathways associated with exposure to high (> 10 ppm) levels of benzene through transcriptomic analyses of blood cells from a small number of occupationally exposed workers. Objectives The goals of this study were to identify potential biomarkers of benzene exposure and/or early effects and to elucidate mechanisms relevant to risk of hematotoxicity, leukemia, and lymphoid malignancy in occupationally exposed individuals, many of whom were exposed to benzene levels < 1 ppm, the current U.S. occupational standard. Methods We analyzed global gene expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 125 workers exposed to benzene levels ranging from < 1 ppm to > 10 ppm. Study design and analysis with a mixed-effects model minimized potential confounding and experimental variability. Results We observed highly significant widespread perturbation of gene expression at all exposure levels. The AML pathway was among the pathways most significantly associated with benzene exposure. Immune response pathways were associated with most exposure levels, potentially providing biological plausibility for an association between lymphoma and benzene exposure. We identified a 16-gene expression signature associated with all levels of benzene exposure. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic benzene exposure, even at levels below the current U.S. occupational standard, perturbs many genes, biological processes, and pathways. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms by which benzene may induce hematotoxicity, leukemia, and lymphoma and reveal relevant potential biomarkers associated with a range of exposures. PMID:21147609

  11. Investigation into Variation of Endogenous Metabolites in Bone Marrow Cells and Plasma in C3H/He Mice Exposed to Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rongli; Zhang, Juan; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2014-01-01

    Benzene is identified as a carcinogen. Continued exposure of benzene may eventually lead to damage to the bone marrow, accompanied by pancytopenia, aplastic anemia or leukemia. This paper explores the variations of endogenous metabolites to provide possible clues for the molecular mechanism of benzene-induced hematotoxicity. Liquid chromatography coupled with time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) and principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to investigate the variation of endogenous metabolites in bone marrow cells and plasma of male C3H/He mice. The mice were injected subcutaneously with benzene (0, 300, 600 mg/day) once daily for seven days. The body weights, relative organ weights, blood parameters and bone marrow smears were also analyzed. The results indicated that benzene caused disturbances in the metabolism of oxidation of fatty acids and essential amino acids (lysine, phenylalanine and tyrosine) in bone marrow cells. Moreover, fatty acid oxidation was also disturbed in plasma and thus might be a common disturbed metabolic pathway induced by benzene in multiple organs. This study aims to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in benzene hematotoxicity, especially in bone marrow cells. PMID:24658442

  12. The relationship between low-level benzene exposure and leukemia in Canadian petroleum distribution workers

    SciTech Connect

    Schnatter, A.R.; Armstrong, T.W.; Nicolich, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between leukemia occurrence and long-term, low-level benzene exposures in petroleum distribution workers. Fourteen cases were identified among a previously studied cohort. Four controls per case were selected from the same cohort, controlling for birth year and time at risk. Industrial hygienists estimated workplace exposures for benzene, without knowledge of case-control status. Average benzene concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.2 ppm. Company medical records were used to abstract information on other potential confounders such as cigarette smoking. Odds ratios were calculated for several exposure metrics. Conditional logistic regression modeling was used to control for potential confounders. The risk of leukemia was not associated with increasing cumulative exposure to benzene for these exposure levels. Duration of benzene exposure was more closely associated with leukemia risk than other exposure metrics, although results were not statistically significant. A family history of cancer and cigarette smoking were the two strongest risk factors for leukemia, with cumulative benzene exposure showing no additional risk when considered in the same models. This study is consistent with other data in that it was unable to demonstrate a relationship between leukemia and long-term, low-level benzene exposures. The power of the study was limited. Thus, further study on benzene exposures in this concentration range are warranted. 20 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  13. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Duncan M.; Lyon, Robert; Watson, David G.; Barski, Oleg A.; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M. . E-mail: Elizabeth.ellis@strath.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V {sub max} of 2141 {+-} 500 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 11 {+-} 4 {mu}M. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K {sub I} of 3.1 {+-} 0.57 {mu}M. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V {sub max} of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 15 {+-} 2 {mu}M and was not inhibited by pyrazole.

  14. The induction of monocytopoiesis in HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells is inhibited by hydroquinone, a toxic metabolite of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, N.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chronic exposure of humans to benzene has been shown to have a cytotoxic effect on hematopoietic progenitor cells in intermediate stages of differentiation which can lead to aplastic anemia and acute myelogenous leukemia. This thesis examined the effect of hydroquinone, a toxic metabolite of benzene found in the bone marrow, on the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60) which can be induced to differentiate to both monocyte and myeloid cells, and thus has been used as a surrogate for a granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cell. Exposure of HL-60 cells to noncytotoxic concentrations of hydroquinone for three hours prior to induction with 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate caused a dose-dependent inhibition of the acquisition of characteristics of monocytic differentiation. These included adherence, nonspecific esterase activity and phagocytosis. Hydroquinone had no effect on cell proliferation. Hydroquinone appeared to be affecting maturation beyond the monoblast/promonocyte stages. Hydroquinone also prevented differentiation induced by 1, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D[sub 3], however, the block occurred after the acquisition of adherence. Hydroquinone at concentrations that inhibited monocytic differentiation had no effect on differentiation to granulocytes, suggesting that the block in the differentiation of these bipotential cells is at a step unique to the monocytic pathway. Hydroquinone was unable to prevent differentiation induced by the macrophage-derived cytokine interleukin-1, a differentiation factor for cells of the monocytic lineage. These data demonstrate that treatment of Hl-60 cells with hydroquinone prior to induction of differentiation prevents the acquisition of the monocytic phenotype induced by TPA or 1, 25(OH)[sub 2]D[sub 3] by a mechanism which at present is unknown, but which appears to be specific for the monocytic pathway. These results are of considerable significance for benzene hematotoxicity.

  15. Self-collected breath sampling for monitoring low-level benzene exposures among automobile mechanics.

    PubMed

    Egeghy, Peter P; Nylander-French, Leena; Gwin, Kristin K; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Rappaport, Stephen M

    2002-07-01

    Automobile mechanics are exposed to benzene through their contact with gasoline vapor and engine exhaust. This study investigated the benzene uptake associated with these exposures. We first evaluated the reliability of self-collected breath samples among a subset of subjects and found good agreement between these samples and those collected under expert supervision (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.79, n = 69). We then used self-monitoring together with a longitudinal sampling design (with up to three measurements per worker) to measure benzene in air and benzene in end-exhaled breath among 81 workers from 12 automobile repair garages in North Carolina. A statistically significant difference (P < 0.0001, Mann-Whitney rank sum test) was observed between non-smokers and smokers for post-exposure benzene concentration in breath (median values of 18.9 and 39.1 micro g/m(3), respectively). Comparing pre- and post-exposure breath concentrations within these two groups, the difference was significant among non-smokers (P < 0.0001) but not significant among smokers (P > 0.05). Mixed effects regression analysis using backwards elimination yielded five significant predictors of benzene concentration in breath, namely benzene exposure (P < 0.0001), pre-exposure benzene concentration in breath (P = 0.021), smoking status (P < 0.0001), fuel system work (P = 0.0043) and carburetor cleaner use (P < 0.0001). The between-person variance component comprised only 28% of the total variance in benzene levels in breath, indicating that differences among individuals related to physiological and metabolic characteristics had little influence on benzene uptake among these workers.

  16. Levels of selected urinary metabolites of volatile organic compounds among children aged 6-11 years.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ram B

    2015-10-01

    Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years 2011-2012 were used to evaluate variability in the observed levels of 20 urinary metabolites of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by age, gender, and race/ethnicity among children aged 6-11 years. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was positively associated with the levels of selected metabolites of acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, cyanide, and propylene oxide in a dose-response manner. Levels of the selected metabolites of acrolein, acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, styrene, toluene, and xylene decreased with increase in age. Levels of 1-bromopropane decreased with number of rooms in the house but the reverse was true for 1,3-butadiene, carbon-disulfide, and N,N-dimethylformamide. Levels of most of the 20 metabolites did not vary with gender. Non-Hispanic white children had higher adjusted levels of N-Acetyl-S-(3,4-dihydroxybutyl)-L-cysteine (DHBMA), N-Acetyl-S-(N-methylcarbamoyl)-L-cysteine (AMCC), and phenylglyoxylic acid (PGA) than non-Hispanic black children. Non-Hispanic white children had statistically significantly higher adjusted levels of N-Acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA), trans, trans-Muconic acid (MU), and N-Acetyl-S-(N-methylcarbamoyl)-L-cysteine (AMCC) than non-Hispanic Asian children but statistically significantly lower levels of N-Acetyl-S-(n-propyl)-L-cysteine (BPMA) than non-Hispanic Asian children. Non-Hispanic Asian children had the lowest levels of 13 of the 20 metabolites among four major racial/ethnic groups but highest levels for three metabolites. For selected metabolites of acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile-vinyl chloride-ethylene oxide, benzene, 1,3-butadien, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, ethylbenzene-styrene, and toluene, children had statistically significantly higher levels than nonsmoking adults. These results demonstrate how vulnerable children are to being exposed to harmful chemicals like VOCs in their own homes.

  17. Acute myeloid and chronic lymphoid leukaemias and exposure to low-level benzene among petroleum workers

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, L; Schnatter, A R; Tang, G; Glass, D C

    2014-01-01

    Background: High benzene exposure causes acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Three petroleum case–control studies identified 60 cases (241 matched controls) for AML and 80 cases (345 matched controls) for chronic lymphoid leukaemia (CLL). Methods: Cases were classified and scored regarding uncertainty by two haematologists using available diagnostic information. Blinded quantitative benzene exposure assessment used work histories and exposure measurements adjusted for era-specific circumstances. Statistical analyses included conditional logistic regression and penalised smoothing splines. Results: Benzene exposures were much lower than previous studies. Categorical analyses showed increased ORs for AML with several exposure metrics, although patterns were unclear; neither continuous exposure metrics nor spline analyses gave increased risks. ORs were highest in terminal workers, particularly for Tanker Drivers. No relationship was found between benzene exposure and risk of CLL, although the Australian study showed increased risks in refinery workers. Conclusion: Overall, this study does not persuasively demonstrate a risk between benzene and AML. A previously reported strong relationship between myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (potentially previously reported as AML) at our study's low benzene levels suggests that MDS may be the more relevant health risk for lower exposure. Higher CLL risks in refinery workers may be due to more diverse exposures than benzene alone. PMID:24357793

  18. Hydroquinone, a benzene metabolite, induces Hog1-dependent stress response signaling and causes aneuploidy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Takeki; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Ayumi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that phenyl hydroquinone, a hepatic metabolite of the Ames test-negative carcinogen o-phenylphenol, efficiently induced aneuploidy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by arresting the cell cycle at the G2/M transition as a result of the activation of the Hog1 (p38 MAPK homolog)-Swe1 (Wee1 homolog) pathway. In this experiment, we examined the aneuploidy forming effects of hydroquinone, a benzene metabolite, since both phenyl hydroquinone and hydroquinone are Ames-test negative carcinogens and share similar molecular structures. As was seen in phenyl hydroquinone, hydroquinone induced aneuploidy in yeast by delaying the cell cycle at the G2/M transition. Deficiencies in SWE1 and HOG1 abolished the hydroquinone-induced delay at the G2/M transition and aneuploidy formation. Furthermore, Hog1 was phosphorylated by hydroquinone, which may stabilize Swe1. These data indicate that the hydroquinone-induced G2/M transition checkpoint, which is activated by the Hog1-Swe1 pathway, plays a role in the formation of aneuploidy.

  19. Reducing Benzene and Cresol Levels in National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Pilot-Scale Biorefinergy Scrubber Water

    SciTech Connect

    Buzek, M.L.; Phillips, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermochemical Process Development Unit at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory converts biomass into energy by gasification or pyrolysis. The aqueous effluent generated in these processes must be disposed of as hazardous waste according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act because certain components exceed the regulatory concentration limit. Gas stripping of the scrubber water was investigated as a method of reducing benzene and cresol levels. A custom-designed packed-bed column was built and a half-factorial experimental design was implemented to determine the effects of gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, and column packing height on the final benzene concentration in the liquid. The experimental results show that packing height had a significant effect on final benzene concentration; gas flow rate and liquid flow rate had little effect. The effects of each design variable on final cresol concentration were not determined. Although the current column design did significantly reduce the benzene and cresol levels in the scrubber water, it did not reduce the concentrations below the regulatory limits. A full-factorial experimental design will be implemented with an increased packing height. Other variables, including column diameter and packing type, will be investigated to determine their effects on final benzene and cresol concentrations. Once the packed-bed column is determined to be effective in reducing contaminant concentrations below the regulatory limit, photocatalytic oxidation will be explored for remediating the benzene and cresol from the gas stream.

  20. Assimilation of benzene carbon through multiple trophic levels traced by different stable isotope probing methodologies.

    PubMed

    Bastida, Felipe; Jechalke, Sven; Bombach, Petra; Franchini, Alessandro G; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H

    2011-08-01

    The flow of benzene carbon along a food chain consisting of bacteria and eukaryotes, including larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae), was evaluated by total lipid fatty acids (TLFAs)-, amino acid- and protein-stable isotope probing (SIP). A coconut-fibre textile, colonized by a benzene-degrading biofilm, was sampled in a system established for the remediation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX)-polluted groundwater and incubated with (12)C- and [(13)C(6)]-benzene (>99 at.%) in a batch-scale experiment for 2-8 days. After 8 days, Chironomus sp. larvae were added to study carbon flow to higher trophic levels. Gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio monitoring mass spectrometry of TLFA showed increased isotope ratios in the (13)C-benzene-incubated biofilm. A higher (13)C-enrichment was observed in TLFAs, indicative of Gram-negative bacteria than for Gram-positive. Fatty acid indicators of eukaryotes showed significant (13)C-incorporation, but to a lower extent than bacterial indicators. Fatty acids extracted from larvae feeding on (13)C-biofilm reached an isotopic ratio of 1.55 at.%, illustrating that the larvae feed, to some extent, on labelled biomass. No (13)C-incorporation was detectable in larval proteins after their separation by sodium-dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analysis by nano-liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry. The flow of benzene-derived carbon could be traced in a food web consisting of bacteria and eukaryotes.

  1. Inhibition of human DNA topoisomerase II by hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone, reactive metabolites of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Hutt, A.M.; Kalf, G.F.

    1996-12-01

    Chronic exposure of humans to benzene (BZ) causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Both BZ and therapy-related secondary AML are characterized by chromosomal translocations that may occur by inappropriate recombinational events. DNA topoisomerase 11 (topo 11) is an essential sulfhydryl (SH)-dependent endonuclease required for replication, recombination, chromosome segregation, and chromosome structure. Topo 11 cleaves DNA at purine(R)/pyrimidine(Y) repeat sequences that have been shown to be highly recombinogenic in vivo. Certain antineoplastic drugs stabilize topo 11-DNA cleavage complexes at RY repeat sequences, which leads to translocations of the type observed in leukemia. Hydroquinone (HQ) is metabolized to p-benzoquinone (BQ) in a peroxidase-mediated reaction in myeloid progenitor cells. BO interacts with SH groups of SH-dependent enzymes. Consequently, the aims of this research were to determine whether HQ and BO are topo 11 inhibitors. The ability of the compounds to inhibit the activity of topo, 11 was tested using an assay system that depends on the conversion, by homogeneous human topo 11, of catenated kinetoplast DNA into open and/or nicked open circular DNA that can be separated from the catenated DNA by electrophoresis in a 1% agarose-ethidium bromide gel. We provide preliminary data that indicate that both HQ and BO cause a time and concentration (pM)-dependent inhibition of topo 11 activity. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Characterization of changes in gene expression and biochemical pathways at low levels of benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E; McHale, Cliona M; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R; Smith, Martyn T

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings.

  3. Characterization of Changes in Gene Expression and Biochemical Pathways at Low Levels of Benzene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R.; Smith, Martyn T.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24786086

  4. A study of the hematologic effects of chronic low-level exposure to benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.J.; Conner, P.; Friedlander, B.R.; Easterday, P.A.; Nair, R.S.; Braun, J. )

    1991-05-01

    A study of 200 persons working with benzene showed no differences in commonly measured hematologic outcomes when compared with 268 nonbenzene workers in the same plant. Exposures ranged from 0.01 ppm to a high of 1.40 ppm 8-hour time weighted average over a 10-year period. Several other factors (age, sex, race, and smoking), however, were associated with these outcomes, indicating the importance of considering confounding factors when comparing hematology results. Exposure to low levels of benzene does not appear to produce an increased level of abnormal hematology measures detectable in routine medical surveillance.

  5. Incense, sparklers and cigarettes are significant contributors to indoor benzene and particle levels.

    PubMed

    Tirler, Werner; Settimo, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of incense, magic candles and other flameless products often produces indoor pollutants that may represent a health risk for humans. Today, in fact, incense and air fresheners are used inside homes as well as in public places including stores, shopping malls and places of worship. As a source of indoor contamination, the impact of smoke, incense and sparklers on human health cannot be ignored. In the present work, we report the results of an emission study regarding particles (PM10 and particle number concentration, PNC) and benzene, produced by various incense sticks and sparklers. The results obtained for benzene, PM10 and PNC, showed a strong negative influence on air quality when these products were used indoors. Various incense sticks gave completely different benzene results: from a small increase of the benzene concentration in the air, just slightly above the background levels of ambient air, to very high concentrations, of more than 200 µg/m of benzene in the test room after the incense sticks had been tested.

  6. An overview of benzene metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Hedli, C C

    1996-01-01

    Benzene toxicity involves both bone marrow depression and leukemogenesis caused by damage to multiple classes of hematopoietic cells and a variety of hematopoietic cell functions. Study of the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of benzene indicates that several metabolites of benzene play significant roles in generating benzene toxicity. Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a variety of hydroxylated and ring-opened products that are transported to the bone marrow where subsequent secondary metabolism occurs. Two potential mechanisms by which benzene metabolites may damage cellular macromolecules to induce toxicity include the covalent binding of reactive metabolites of benzene and the capacity of benzene metabolites to induce oxidative damage. Although the relative contributions of each of these mechanisms to toxicity remains unestablished, it is clear that different mechanisms contribute to the toxicities associated with different metabolites. As a corollary, it is unlikely that benzene toxicity can be described as the result of the interaction of a single metabolite with a single biological target. Continued investigation of the metabolism of benzene and its metabolites will allow us to determine the specific combination of metabolites as well as the biological target(s) involved in toxicity and will ultimately lead to our understanding of the relationship between the production of benzene metabolites and bone marrow toxicity. PMID:9118888

  7. Human CYP2E1-dependent and human sulfotransferase 1A1-modulated induction of micronuclei by benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites in Chinese hamster V79-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Lai, Yanmei; Hu, Keqi; Wei, Qinzhi; Liu, Yungang

    2014-12-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and a confirmed human carcinogen, which requires metabolic activation, primarily by CYP2E1, for most of its biological actions. Chromosome damages in benzene-exposed workers and rodents have been observed, and in their urine sulfo- and glucuronide-conjugates of phenol and hydroquinone were present. Yet, direct evidence for human CYP2E1-activated mutagenicity of benzene and the exact significance of phase II metabolism for inactivating benzene metabolites are still missing. In the present study, benzene and its oxidized metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, catechol, 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene and 1,4-benzoquinone) were investigated for induction of micronuclei in a V79-derived cell line genetically engineered for expression of both human CYP2E1 and human sulfotransferase (SULT) 1A1 (indicated by active micronuclei induction by 1-hydroxymethylpyrene). The results demonstrated concentration-dependent induction of micronuclei by benzene and phenol, though with lower potency or efficacy than the other metabolites. Inhibition of CYP2E1 by 1-aminobenzotriazole did not change the effect of benzoquinone, but completely abolished that of benzene and phenol, and attenuated that of the other compounds. Moreover, inhibition of SULT1A1 by pentachlorophenol potentiated the effects of benzene, hydroquinone, catechol and trihydroxybenzene. Ascorbic acid, a reducing and free radical-scavenging agent, significantly lowered the effects of hydroquinone, catechol, trihydroxybenzene as well as N-nitrosodimethylamine (a known CYP2E1-dependent promutagen), with that of benzoquinone unaffected. These results suggest that in addition to activating benzene and phenol, human CYP2E1 may further convert hydroquinone, catechol and trihydroxybenzene to more genotoxic metabolites, and sulfo-conjugation of the multi-hydroxylated metabolites of benzene by human SULT1A1 may represent an important detoxifying pathway.

  8. In utero exposure to benzene increases embryonic c-Myb and Pim-1 protein levels in CD-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M.

    2008-05-01

    Benzene is a known human leukemogen, but its role as an in utero leukemogen remains controversial. Epidemiological studies have correlated parental exposure to benzene with an increased incidence of childhood leukemias. We hypothesize that in utero exposure to benzene may cause leukemogenesis by affecting the embryonic c-Myb/Pim-1 signaling pathway and that this is mediated by oxidative stress. To investigate this hypothesis, pregnant CD-1 mice were treated with either 800 mg/kg of benzene or corn oil (i.p.) on days 10 and 11 of gestation and in some cases pretreated with 25 kU/kg of PEG-catalase. Phosphorylated and total embryonic c-Myb and Pim-1 protein levels were assessed using Western blotting and maternal and embryonic oxidative stress were assessed by measuring reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios. Our results show increased oxidative stress at 4 and 24 h after exposure, increased phosphorylated Pim-1 protein levels 4 h after benzene exposure, and increased Pim-1 levels at 24 and 48 h after benzene exposure. Embryonic c-Myb levels were elevated at 24 h after exposure. PEG-catalase pretreatment prevented benzene-mediated increases in embryonic c-Myb and Pim-1 protein levels, and benzene-induced oxidative stress. These results support a role for ROS in c-Myb and Pim-1 alterations after in utero benzene exposure.

  9. Ambient air benzene at background sites in China's most developed coastal regions: exposure levels, source implications and health risks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Yanli; Lü, Sujun; Huang, Zhonghui; Huang, Xinyu; Wang, Yuesi

    2015-04-01

    Benzene is a known human carcinogen causing leukemia, yet ambient air quality objectives for benzene are not available in China. The ambient benzene levels at four background sites in China's most developed coastal regions were measured from March 2012 to February 2013. The sites are: SYNECP, in the Northeast China Plain (NECP); YCNCP, in the North China Plain (NCP); THYRD, in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) and DHPRD, in the Pearl River Delta (PRD). It was found that the mean annual benzene levels (578-1297 ppt) at the background sites were alarmingly higher, especially when compared to those of 60-480 pptv monitored in 28 cities in the United States. Wintertime benzene levels were significantly elevated at both sites (SYNECP and YCNCP) in northern China due to heating with coal/biofuels. Even at these background sites, the lifetime cancer risks of benzene (1.7-3.7E-05) all exceeded 1E-06 set by USEPA as acceptable for adults. At both sites in northern China, good correlations between benzene and CO or chloromethane, together with much lower toluene/benzene (T/B) ratios, suggested that benzene was largely related to coal combustion and biomass/biofuel burning. At the DHPRD site in the PRD, benzene revealed a highly significant correlation with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), indicating that its source was predominantly from vehicle emissions. At the THYRD site in the YRD, higher T/B ratios and correlations between benzene and tetrachloroethylene, or MTBE, implied that benzene levels were probably affected by both traffic-related and industrial emissions.

  10. The putative benzene metabolite 2,3, 5-tris(glutathion-S-yl)hydroquinone depletes glutathione, stimulates sphingomyelin turnover, and induces apoptosis in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Bratton, S B; Lau, S S; Monks, T J

    2000-07-01

    In this study, we show that 2,3,5-tris(glutathion-S-yl)hydroquinone (TGHQ), a putative metabolite of benzene, induces apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Prior to the onset of apoptosis, TGHQ depletes intracellular glutathione (GSH) in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-independent manner. Neutral, Mg(2+)-dependent sphingomyelinases, which are normally inhibited by GSH, are subsequently activated, as evidenced by increases in intracellular ceramide and depletion of sphingomyelin. As ceramide levels rise, effector caspase (DEVDase) activity steadily increases. Interestingly, while catalase has no effect on TGHQ-mediated depletion of GSH, this hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) scavenger does inhibit DEVDase activity and apoptosis, provided the enzyme is added to HL-60 cells before an increase in ceramide can be observed. Since ceramide analogues inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain, these data imply that ceramide-mediated generation of H(2)O(2) is necessary for the activation of effector caspases-3 and/or -7, and apoptosis. In summary, these studies indicate that TGHQ, and perhaps many quinol-based toxicants and chemotherapeutics, may induce apoptosis in hematopoietic cells by depleting GSH and inducing the proapoptotic ceramide-signaling pathway.

  11. Benzene and its methyl-derivatives: derivation of maximum exposure levels in automobiles.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Thomas; Bolt, Hermann M; Jaeckh, Rudolf; Hengstler, Jan G

    2006-01-05

    Automobile drivers are exposed to several organic hydrocarbons. Concentrations measured in passenger compartments have been reported to range between 13 and 560 microg/m(3) for benzene, 33-258 microg/m(3) for toluene, 20-250 microg/m(3) for xylene (mixed isomers) and 3-23 microg/m(3) for trimethylbenzene (mixed isomers). These aromatic hydrocarbons are emitted from gasoline and from materials inside a car. In the present study we evaluated, whether these exposures pose a potential risk to the health of drivers. Therefore, we derived maximum exposure levels inside cars for chronic (ELIA(chronic)) and short-term (STELIA) exposure. The lowest ELIA's(chronic) for benzene, toluene, xylene and trimethylbenzene were 0.083, 1.2, 8.8 and 0.31 mg/m(3), respectively. The respective STELIA's were 16, 30, 29 and 25 mg/m(3). Obviously concentrations of toluene, xylene and trimethylbenzene inside cars do not exceed their individual STELIA's. In contrast, benzene seems to be problematic, since concentrations inside cars amount up to 0.56 mg/m(3), which exceeds the ELIA(chronic) derived for benzene. This should not be underestimated, since benzene is a genotoxic carcinogen that probably acts by non-threshold mechanisms. In conclusion, concentrations of toluene, xylene and trimethylbenzene usually observed inside cars are unlikely to pose a risk to the health of drivers. A systematic toxicological evaluation of the risk associated with benzene exposure in cars seems to be necessary.

  12. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  13. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  14. Deoxyguanosine Forms a Bis-adduct with E,E-Muconaldehyde, an Oxidative Metabolite of Benzene. Implications for the Carcinogenicity of Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Constance M.; Stec, Donald F.; Christov, Plamen P.; Kozekov, Ivan D.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Harris, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Benzene is employed in large quantities in the chemical industry and is a ubiquitous contaminant in the environment. There is strong epidemiological evidence that benzene exposure induces hematopoietic malignancies, especially acute myeloid leukemia, in humans but the chemical mechanisms remain obscure. E,E-Muconaldehyde is one of the products of metabolic oxidation of benzene. This paper explores the proposition that E,E-muconaldehyde is capable of forming Gua-Gua cross-links. If formed in DNA, the replication and repair of such cross-links might introduce structural defects that could be the origin of the carcinogenicity. We have investigated the reaction of E,E-muconaldehyde with dGuo and found the reaction yields two pairs of interconverting diastereomers of a novel heptacyclic bis-adduct having a spiro ring system linking the two Gua residues. The structures of the four diastereomers have been established by NMR spectroscopy and their absolute configurations by comparison of CD spectra with those of model compounds having known configurations. The final two steps in formation of the bis-nucleoside (5-ring → 6-ring → 7-ring) have significant reversibility, which is the basis for the observed epimerization. The 6-ring precursor was trapped from the equilibrating mixture by reduction with NaBH4. The anti relationship of the two Gua residues in the heptacyclic bis-adduct precludes it from being formed in B DNA but the 6-ring precursor could readily be accommodated as an interchain or intrachain cross-link. It should be possible to form similar cross-links of dCyt, dAdo, the ε-amino group of lysine, and N-termini of peptides with the dGuo-muconaldehyde monoadduct. PMID:21972945

  15. Advances in Understanding Benzene Health Effects and Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Martyn T.

    2015-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous chemical in our environment that causes acute leukemia and probably other hematological cancers. Evidence for an association with childhood leukemia is growing. Exposure to benzene can lead to multiple alterations that contribute to the leukemogenic process, indicating a multimodal mechanism of action. Research is needed to elucidate the different roles of multiple metabolites in benzene toxicity and the pathways that lead to their formation. Studies to date have identified a number of polymorphisms in candidate genes that confer susceptibility to benzene hematotoxicity. However, a genome-wide study is needed to truly assess the role of genetic variation in susceptibility. Benzene affects the blood-forming system at low levels of occupational exposure, and there is no evidence of a threshold. There is probably no safe level of exposure to benzene, and all exposures constitute some risk in a linear, if not supralinear, and additive fashion. PMID:20070208

  16. The toxicology of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Witz, G; Goldstein, B D

    1993-01-01

    Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a series of phenolic and ring-opened products and their conjugates. The mechanism of benzene-induced aplastic anemia appears to involve the concerted action of several metabolites acting together on early stem and progenitor cells, as well as on early blast cells, such as pronormoblasts and normoblasts to inhibit maturation and amplification. Benzene metabolites also inhibit the function of microenvironmental stromal cells necessary to support the growth of differentiating and maturing marrow cells. The mechanism of benzene-induced leukemogenesis is less well understood. Benzene and its metabolites do not function well as mutagens but are highly clastogenic, producing chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, and micronuclei. Benzene has been shown to be a multi-organ carcinogen in animals. Epidemiological studies demonstrate that benzene is a human leukemogen. There is need to better define the lower end of the dose-response curve for benzene as a human leukemogen. The application of emerging methods in biologically based risk assessment employing pharmacokinetic and mechanistic data may help to clarify the uncertainties in low-dose risk assessment. PMID:8354177

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  18. Metabolite

    MedlinePlus

    A metabolite is any substance produced during metabolism (digestion or other bodily chemical processes). The term metabolite may also refer to the product that remains after a drug is broken down (metabolized) by the body.

  19. Spatial variability in levels of benzene, formaldehyde, and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in New York City: a land-use regression study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hazardous air pollutant exposures are common in urban areas contributing to increased risk of cancer and other adverse health outcomes. While recent analyses indicate that New York City residents experience significantly higher cancer risks attributable to hazardous air pollutant exposures than the United States as a whole, limited data exist to assess intra-urban variability in air toxics exposures. Methods To assess intra-urban spatial variability in exposures to common hazardous air pollutants, street-level air sampling for volatile organic compounds and aldehydes was conducted at 70 sites throughout New York City during the spring of 2011. Land-use regression models were developed using a subset of 59 sites and validated against the remaining 11 sites to describe the relationship between concentrations of benzene, total BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes) and formaldehyde to indicators of local sources, adjusting for temporal variation. Results Total BTEX levels exhibited the most spatial variability, followed by benzene and formaldehyde (coefficient of variation of temporally adjusted measurements of 0.57, 0.35, 0.22, respectively). Total roadway length within 100 m, traffic signal density within 400 m of monitoring sites, and an indicator of temporal variation explained 65% of the total variability in benzene while 70% of the total variability in BTEX was accounted for by traffic signal density within 450 m, density of permitted solvent-use industries within 500 m, and an indicator of temporal variation. Measures of temporal variation, traffic signal density within 400 m, road length within 100 m, and interior building area within 100 m (indicator of heating fuel combustion) predicted 83% of the total variability of formaldehyde. The models built with the modeling subset were found to predict concentrations well, predicting 62% to 68% of monitored values at validation sites. Conclusions Traffic and point source emissions

  20. Biological monitoring of exposure to benzene in the production of benzene and in a cokery.

    PubMed

    Kivistö, H; Pekari, K; Peltonen, K; Svinhufvud, J; Veidebaum, T; Sorsa, M; Aitio, A

    1997-06-20

    The purpose of this study was to compare different biological methods in current use to assess benzene exposure. The methods involved in the study were: benzene in blood, urine and exhaled air, and the urinary metabolites t,t-muconic acid (MA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA). Blood, urine and exhaled air samples were collected from workers in a benzene plant (pure benzene exposure) and cokery (mixed exposure, e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons--PAHs) in an Estonian shale oil petrochemical plant. The benzene in these samples was analysed with a head-space gas chromatograph, and the metabolites MA and S-PMA with a liquid chromatograph using methods developed from published procedures. Some of the values measured in the Estonian shale oil area were high in comparison with those published during the last few years, whereas the values measured in the control group did not show any exposure to benzene except in the smokers group. The highest median exposure was in the benzene factory, 0.9 cm3/m3 TWA (2.9 mg/m3) and the highest individual value was 15 cm3/m3 TWA (49 mg/m3). All biological measurements in this study gave the same assessment about exposure to benzene and correlated highly significantly with each other and with the air measurements (r = 0.8 or more). In the benzene factory the correlation was good even when calculated from samples with air concentration < 1 cm3/m3 (3.2 mg/m3) in the case of blood benzene and urinary MA. However, for S-PMA it was weak (r = 0.4) and for benzene in urine and exhaled air it did not exist any more. In the cokery, with mixed exposure, the correlation at low levels was weaker even for blood benzene and urinary MA (r = 0.6). According to the results in the benzene factory the exposure to pure benzene at the level 1 cm3/m3 (3.25 mg/m3) TWA gave: the blood benzene value about 110 nmol/l (8.6 micrograms/l), MA 23 mumol/l (3.3 micrograms/l) or 2.0 mg/g creatinine, S-PMA 58 micrograms/g creatinine or 0.4 mumol/l (95.7 micrograms

  1. Lack of sensitivity of urinary trans,trans-muconic acid in determining low-level (ppb) benzene exposure in children.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Anna; Accorsi, Antonio; Raffi, Giovanni Battista; Nicoli, Luciana; Violante, Francesco Saverio

    2002-01-01

    Benzene is a widespread pollutant of which the main source in the outside environment is automotive traffic. Benzene is also present in cigarette smoke, and small quantities exist in drinking water and food; all of these sources contribute to pollution of indoor environments. Benzene exposure may be studied with biologic indicators. In the present study, the authors evaluated whether differences in urinary concentrations of trans,transmuconic acid (t,t-MA) were detectable in a sample of 150 children and if the chemical was correlated with environmental exposures to low levels of benzene. The children attended primary schools that had significantly different-but low-environmental benzene levels. Analysis of urinary t,t-MA was achieved with high-performance liquid chromatography (photodiode array detector), and analysis of passive air samplers for benzene was performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Statistical analysis (Kruskal-Wallis test) indicated that differences in urinary levels of t,t-MA in children from urban and rural areas were not statistically significant (p = .07), nor were there significant differences between children with and without relatives who smoked (p = .69). As has been shown in other studies of children and adults, results of our study evidenced (1) the difficulty of correlating concentrations of urinary biomarkers with environmental exposure to benzene at a parts-per-billion level (i.e., traffic and environmental tobacco smoke) and, consequently, (2) the lack of specificity of t,t-MA as a biological indicator for the study of a population's exposure.

  2. Micronucleus, Nucleoplasmic Bridge, and Nuclear Budding in Peripheral Blood Cells of Workers Exposed to Low Level Benzene.

    PubMed

    Jamebozorgi, I; Mahjoubi, F; Pouryaghoub, G; Mehrdad, R; Majidzadeh, T; Saltanatpour, Z; Nasiri, F

    2016-10-01

    Benzene is one of the important occupational pollutants. There are some reports about the leukemogenic effects related to low-level exposure to benzene. To study the frequency of micronucleus (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NB), and nuclear budding (NBUD) in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of petrochemical workers with low level exposure to benzene. We enrolled 50 workers exposed to low-level benzene and 31 unexposed workers of a petrochemical industry. After exclusion of 3 samples, peripheral blood lymphocytes of the remaining 47 exposed and 31 unexposed workers were analyzed for the frequency of MN, NB, and NBUD by cytochalasin-blocked MN technique. MN was present in 28 (60%) exposed and 18 (58%) unexposed workers. NB was observed in 6 (13%), and 2 (7%) exposed and unexposed workers, respectively; the frequency for NBUD was 20 (43%), and 13 (42%), respectively. No significant difference was found in the observed frequencies of MN, NB, and NBUD in the peripheral blood lymphocytes between the exposed and unexposed group workers. Occupational exposure to low-level benzene does not increase the frequency of MN, NB, and NBUD in the peripheral blood lymphocytes, biomarkers for DNA damage.

  3. Workers exposed to low levels of benzene present in urban air: Assessment of peripheral blood count variations.

    PubMed

    Casale, Teodorico; Sacco, Carmina; Ricci, Serafino; Loreti, Beatrice; Pacchiarotti, Alessandro; Cupelli, Vincenzo; Arcangeli, Giulio; Mucci, Nicola; Antuono, Vittorio; De Marco, Federica; Tomei, Gianfranco; Tomei, Francesco; Rosati, Maria Valeria

    2016-06-01

    Few studies in the literature have examined the effects of benzene on blood cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible correlation between the blood benzene levels and the blood cell counts. From a population of 2658 workers, we studied a group of 215 subjects. Each worker underwent blood sampling for the assessment of the blood benzene levels and the blood cell counts. The Mann-Whitney U test for two-mode variables and the Kruskal-Wallis test for more-than-two-mode variables were performed on all subjects. We estimated the Pearson correlation index between the variables in the total sample and the subgroups divided according to sex, the smoking habit, and job. After the main confounding factors were evaluated, multiple linear regression was performed on both the total sample and the subgroups. A significant inverse correlation was found among the blood benzene levels and the white blood cells, lymphocytes, and neutrophils in traffic policemen, motorcyclists, and other outdoor workers. We did not find any significant correlation with any other parameters of blood cell count. Our results, which must be considered preliminary, indicate that increased blood benzene levels in outdoor workers lead to decreased counts of white blood cells, neutrophils, and lymphocytes, because of possible immune effects. These are worth investigating in the future by specific immune tests. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Phthalate metabolite levels and menopausal hot flashes in midlife women.

    PubMed

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Gallicchio, Lisa; Chiang, Catheryne; Ther, Sara N; Miller, Susan R; Zacur, Howard A; Dills, Russell L; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-04-01

    During the menopausal transition, a woman's reproductive capacity declines, her hormone milieu changes, and her risk of hot flashes increases. Exposure to phthalates, which can be found in personal care products, can also result in altered reproductive function. Here, we investigated the associations between phthalate metabolite levels and midlife hot flashes. Eligible women (45-54 years of age) provided detailed information on hot flashes history and donated urine samples (n=195). Urinary phthalate metabolite levels were measured by HPLC-MS/MS. A higher total sum of phthalate metabolites commonly found in personal care products was associated with an increased risk of ever experiencing hot flashes (odds ratio (OR)=1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.07-1.96), hot flashes in the past 30days (OR=1.43; 95%CI=1.04-1.96), and more frequent hot flashes (OR=1.47; 95%CI=1.06-2.05). These data suggest that some phthalate exposures from personal care products are associated with menopausal hot flashes in women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phthalate metabolite levels and menopausal hot flashes in midlife women

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Gallicchio, Lisa; Chiang, Catheryne; Ther, Sara N.; Miller, Susan R.; Zacur, Howard A.; Dills, Russell L.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    During the menopausal transition, a woman’s reproductive capacity declines, her hormone milieu changes, and her risk of hot flashes increases. Exposure to phthalates, which can be found in personal-care products, can also result in altered reproductive function. Here, we investigated the associations between phthalate metabolite levels and midlife hot flashes. Eligible women (45–54 years of age) provided detailed information on hot flashes history and donated urine samples (n=195). Urinary phthalate metabolite levels were measured by HPLC-MS/MS. A higher total sum of phthalate metabolites commonly found in personal-care products was associated with an increased risk of ever experiencing hot flashes (odds ratio (OR)=1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI)= 1.07–1.96), hot flashes in the past 30 days (OR=1.43; 95%CI=1.04–1.96), and more frequent hot flashes (OR=1.47; 95%CI=1.06–2.05). These data suggest that some phthalate exposures from personal care products are associated with menopausal hot flashes in women. PMID:26867866

  6. Synthesis of the DDT metabolite 2,4-dichloro-1-[2-chloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethenyl]benzene (o-Cl-DDMU) and its detection in abiotic and biotic samples.

    PubMed

    Gallistl, Christoph; Proctor, Katie; Bader, Korinna; Vetter, Walter

    2017-07-01

    Technical dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been used worldwide as a pesticide since the beginning of the 1940s. Due to its persistence, DDT residues are still ubiquitously distributed in the environment. Photochemical UV degradation has been shown to be a potent degradation path for DDT and most of the resulting photoproducts have been identified up to now. Nevertheless, in 2012, a new DDT metabolite, most likely formed photochemically from DDE, was detected in ray liver samples from Brazil, an area which is highly contaminated with DDT. This study includes photochemical generation, chemical synthesis and isolation of this compound which was verified to consist of both cis- and trans-2,4-dichloro-1-[2-chloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethenyl]benzene. Both stereoisomers were resolved by gas chromatography on a polar capillary column and detected in more than 60 biotic (e.g. marine mammals, birds, human milk) and abiotic samples (fat deposits in kitchen hoods) from different areas all over the world. The stereoisomer distribution and concentrations (0.3-3.9% relative to corresponding 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p'-DDE) levels) were determined by means of the synthesized analytical standard, indicating the widespread occurrence of this compound as an additional minor metabolite of DDT.

  7. Preconcentrator-based sensor µ-system for low-level benzene detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P.; Gràcia, I.; Blanco, F.; Raskin, J.-P.; Cumeras, R.; Sabaté, N.; Vilanova, X.; Correig, X.; Fonseca, L.; Figueras, E.; Santander, J.; Cané, C.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, a preconcentrator-based sensor μ-system for low level benzene detection is presented. It consists of a spiral-shaped μ-reconcentrator with dimensions of 10cm × 300μm × 300μm, followed by a μ-hotplate sensor matrix. The μ-preconcentrator was fabricated on a silicon wafer by means of DRIE and anodic bonding techniques. To obtain the concentration factor of the fabricated devices, a GC/MS: Shimadzu-QP5000 equipment was used. The results obtained showed excellent repeatability and preconcentration factors up to 286. A considerable improvement (1500%) in the sensor responses was achieved with Pd doped SnO2 sensors. The small size of the manufactured devices enables their incorporation in an integrated GC/MS gas sensor system.

  8. Species differences in the metabolism of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, R F

    1996-01-01

    The pathways of metabolism of benzene appear to be qualitatively similar in all species studied thus far. However, there are quantitative differences in the fraction of benzene metabolized by the different pathways. These species differences become important for risk assessments based on animal data. Mice have a greater overall capacity to metabolize benzene than rats or primates, based on mass balance studies conducted in vivo using radiolabled benzene. Mice and monkeys metabolize more of the benzene to hydroquinone metabolites than do rats or chimpanzees, especially at low doses. Nonhuman primates metabolize less of the benzene to muconic acid than do rodents or humans. In all species studied, a greater proportion of benzene is converted to hydroquinone and ring-breakage metabolites at low doses than at high doses. This finding should be considered in attempting to extrapolate the toxicity of benzene observed at high doses to predicted toxicity at low doses. Because ring-breakage metabolites and hydroquinone have both been implicated in the toxicity of benzene, the higher formation of those metabolites in the mouse may partially explain why mice are more sensitive to benzene than are rats. Metabolism of benzene in humans, the species of interest, does not exactly mimic that of any animal species studied. More information on the urinary and blood metabolites of occupationally exposed people is required to determine the fractional conversion of benzene to putative toxic metabolites and the degree of variability present in human subjects. PMID:9118889

  9. Estimating Benzene Exposure Level over Time and by Industry Type through a Review of Literature on Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donguk; Choi, Sangjun; Ha, Kwonchul; Jung, Hyejung; Yoon, Chungsik; Koh, Dong-Hee; Ryu, Seunghun; Kim, Soogeun; Kang, Dongmug; Yoo, Kyemook

    2015-01-01

    The major purpose of this study is to construct a retrospective exposure assessment for benzene through a review of literature on Korea. Airborne benzene measurements reported in 34 articles were reviewed. A total of 15,729 individual measurements were compiled. Weighted arithmetic means [AM(w)] and their variance calculated across studies were summarized according to 5-year period intervals (prior to the 1970s through the 2010s) and industry type. Industries were classified according to Korea Standard Industrial Classification (KSIC) using information provided in the literature. We estimated quantitative retrospective exposure to benzene for each cell in the matrix through a combination of time and KSIC. Analysis of the AM(w) indicated reductions in exposure levels over time, regardless of industry, with mean levels prior to the 1980–1984 period of 50.4 ppm (n = 2,289), which dropped to 2.8 ppm (n = 305) in the 1990–1994 period, and to 0.1 ppm (n = 294) in the 1995–1999 period. There has been no improvement since the 2000s, when the AM(w) of 4.3 ppm (n = 6,211) for the 2005–2009 period and 4.5 ppm (n = 3,358) for the 2010–2013 period were estimated. A comparison by industry found no consistent patterns in the measurement results. Our estimated benzene measurements can be used to determine not only the possibility of retrospective exposure to benzene, but also to estimate the level of quantitative or semiquantitative retrospective exposure to benzene. PMID:26929825

  10. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  11. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  12. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  13. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  14. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  15. BENZENE OXIDE PROTEIN ADDUCTS AS BIOMARKERS OF BENZENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene is known to be hematotoxic and carcinogenic in animals and humans. While metabolism is required for toxicity, the identity of the ultimate carcinogen(s) remains unknown. Benzene oxide (BO) is the first and most abundant of the metabolites, but very little is known about...

  16. BENZENE OXIDE PROTEIN ADDUCTS AS BIOMARKERS OF BENZENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene is known to be hematotoxic and carcinogenic in animals and humans. While metabolism is required for toxicity, the identity of the ultimate carcinogen(s) remains unknown. Benzene oxide (BO) is the first and most abundant of the metabolites, but very little is known about...

  17. Combining regression analysis and air quality modelling to predict benzene concentration levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachokostas, Ch.; Achillas, Ch.; Chourdakis, E.; Moussiopoulos, N.

    2011-05-01

    State of the art epidemiological research has found consistent associations between traffic-related air pollution and various outcomes, such as respiratory symptoms and premature mortality. However, many urban areas are characterised by the absence of the necessary monitoring infrastructure, especially for benzene (C 6H 6), which is a known human carcinogen. The use of environmental statistics combined with air quality modelling can be of vital importance in order to assess air quality levels of traffic-related pollutants in an urban area in the case where there are no available measurements. This paper aims at developing and presenting a reliable approach, in order to forecast C 6H 6 levels in urban environments, demonstrated for Thessaloniki, Greece. Multiple stepwise regression analysis is used and a strong statistical relationship is detected between C 6H 6 and CO. The adopted regression model is validated in order to depict its applicability and representativeness. The presented results demonstrate that the adopted approach is capable of capturing C 6H 6 concentration trends and should be considered as complementary to air quality monitoring.

  18. Serum Reactive Oxygen Metabolite Levels Predict Severe Exacerbations of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Keitaro; Watanabe, Masato; Sada, Mitsuru; Inui, Toshiya; Nakamura, Masuo; Honda, Kojiro; Wada, Hiroo; Mikami, Yu; Matsuzaki, Hirotaka; Horie, Masafumi; Noguchi, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Koyama, Hikari; Kogane, Toshiyuki; Kohyama, Tadashi; Takizawa, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bronchial asthma (BA) is a chronic airway disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling, which are intimately linked to chronic airway inflammation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide are generated by inflammatory cells that are involved in the pathogenesis of BA. However, the role of ROS in the management of BA patients is not yet clear. We attempted to determine the role of ROS as a biomarker in the clinical setting of BA. Subjects and Methods We enrolled patients with BA from 2013 through 2015 and studied the degrees of asthma control, anti-asthma treatment, pulmonary function test results, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), serum reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) levels, and serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Results We recruited 110 patients with BA. Serum ROM levels correlated with white blood cell (WBC) count (rs = 0.273, p = 0.004), neutrophil count (rs = 0.235, p = 0.014), CRP (rs = 0.403, p < 0.001), and IL-6 (rs = 0.339, p < 0.001). Serum ROM levels and IL-8 and CRP levels negatively correlated with %FEV1 (rs = -0.240, p = 0.012, rs = -0.362, p < 0.001, rs = -0.197, p = 0.039, respectively). Serum ROM levels were significantly higher in patients who experienced severe exacerbation within 3 months than in patients who did not (339 [302–381] vs. 376 [352–414] CARR U, p < 0.025). Receiver-operating characteristics analysis showed that ROM levels correlated significantly with the occurrence of severe exacerbation (area under the curve: 0.699, 95% CI: 0.597–0.801, p = 0.025). Conclusions Serum levels of ROM were significantly associated with the degrees of airway obstruction, WBC counts, neutrophil counts, IL-6, and severe exacerbations. This biomarker may be useful in predicting severe exacerbations of BA. PMID:27776186

  19. The use of S-phenylmercapturic acid as a biomarker in molecular epidemiology studies of benzene.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Peter B; Kaur, Balvinder; Roach, Jonathan; Levy, Len; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pietro A; Pesatori, Angela; Fustinoni, Silvia; Buratti, Marina; Bonzini, Matteo; Colombi, Antonio; Popov, Todor; Cavallo, Domenico; Desideri, Arianna; Valerio, Federico; Pala, Mauro; Bolognesi, Claudia; Merlo, Franco

    2005-05-30

    S-Phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA), is a urinary metabolite of benzene, thought to be derived from the condensation product of benzene oxide with glutathione. S-PMA may be determined by GC, HPLC (UV or fluorescence detection), GC-MS, LC-MS/MS or immunoassays. The limit of sensitivities of most of these techniques is 1 microg/l urine or below. It has been suggested that S-PMA may have value as a biomarker for low level human exposure to benzene, in view of the facts that urinary excretion of S-PMA has been found to be related to airborne benzene in occupationally exposed workers, and that only low background levels of S-PMA have been found in control subjects. We have evaluated the use of S-PMA as a biomarker, using a commercially available analytical service, in a multicentre European study of populations exposed to varying levels of benzene, in Italy (Milan, Genoa) and in Bulgaria (Sofia). These were filling station attendants, urban policemen, bus drivers, petrochemical workers and referents (a total of 623 subjects). S-PMA was measured at the end of the work shift by an immunoassay procedure. Urinary benzene (in Milan only) and the benzene metabolite trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) were measured before and after the work shift. Air-borne benzene was measured as a monitor of exposure. Urinary benzene was the most discriminatory biomarker and showed a relationship with airborne benzene at all levels of exposure studied (including groups exposed to <0.1 ppm benzene), whereas t,t-MA and S-PMA, as determined by immunoassay, were suitable only in the highest exposed workers (petrochemical industry, geometric mean 1765 microg/m3 (0.55 ppm) benzene). All three biomarkers were positively correlated with smoking as measured by urinary cotinine).

  20. Nicotine metabolite ratio predicts smoking topography and carcinogen biomarker level

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Andrew A.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Pinto, Angela G.; Tang, Kathy Z.; Hecht, Stephen S.; Carmella, Steve G.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Lerman, Caryn E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Variability in smoking behavior is partly attributable to heritable individual differences in nicotine clearance rates. This can be assessed as the ratio of the metabolites cotinine (COT) and 3'-hydroxycotinine (3HC) (referred to as the nicotine metabolism ratio, NMR). We hypothesized that faster NMR would be associated with greater cigarette puff volume and higher levels of total NNAL, a carcinogen biomarker. Methods Current smokers (n=109) smoked one of their preferred brand cigarettes through a smoking topography device and provided specimens for NMR and total NNAL assays. Results Faster nicotine metabolizers (third and fourth quartiles versus first quartile) based on the NMR exhibited significantly greater total puff volume and total NNAL; the total puff volume by daily cigarette consumption interaction was a significant predictor of total NNAL level. Conclusion A heritable biomarker of nicotine clearance predicts total cigarette puff volume and total NNAL. Impact If validated, the NMR could contribute to smoking risk assessment in epidemiological studies and potentially in clinical practice. PMID:21212060

  1. Benzene exposure, assessed by urinary trans,trans-muconic acid, in urban children with elevated blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, V.M.; Fitzwilliam, A.; Peters, H.L.; Groopman, J.D.

    1996-03-01

    A pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of using trans, trans-muconic acid (MA) as a biomarker of environmental benzene exposure. A secondary aim was to provide data on the extent of exposure to selected toxicants in a unique population consisting of inner-city children who were already overexposed to one urban hazard, lead. Potential sources of benzene were assessed by a questionnaire. Exposure biomarkers included urinary MA and cotinine and blood lead. Mean MA was 176.6 {plus_minus} 341.7 ng/mg creatinine in the 79 children who participated. A wide range of values was found with as many as 10.1%, depending on the comparison study, above the highest levels reported in adults not exposed by occupation. Mean MA was increased in children evaluated in the afternoon compared to morning, those at or above the median for time spent playing near the street, and those studied in the first half of the investigation. MA levels were not associated with blood lead or, consistently, with either questionnaire environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) data or cotinine. As expected, the mean blood lead level was elevated (23.6 {mu}g/dl). Mean cotinine was also increased at 79.2 ng/mg creatinine. We conclude that the use of MA as a biomarker for environmental benzene exposure is feasible since it was detectable in 72% of subjects with a wide range of values present. In future studies, correlation of MA with personal air sampling in environmental exposure will be essential to fully interpret the significance of these findings. In addition, these inner-city children comprise a high risk group for exposure to environmental toxicants including ETS, lead, and probably benzene, based on questionnaire sources and its presence in ETS. 22 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Benzene exposure, assessed by urinary trans,trans-muconic acid, in urban children with elevated blood lead levels.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, V M; Davoli, C T; Heller, P J; Fitzwilliam, A; Peters, H L; Sunyer, J; Murphy, S E; Goldstein, G W; Groopman, J D

    1996-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of using trans,trans-muconic acid (MA) as a biomarker of environmental benzene exposure. A secondary aim was to provide data on the extent of exposure to selected toxicants in a unique population consisting of inner-city children who were already overexposed to one urban hazard, lead. Potential sources of benzene were assessed by a questionnaire. Exposure biomarkers included urinary MA and cotinine and blood lead. Mean MA was 176.6 +/- 341.7 ng/mg creatinine in the 79 children who participated. A wide range of values was found with as many as 10.1%, depending on the comparison study, above the highest levels reported in adults not exposed by occupation. Mean MA was increased in children evaluated in the afternoon compared to morning, those at or above the median for time spent playing near the street, and those studied in the first half of the investigation. MA levels were not associated with blood lead or, consistently, with either questionnaire environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) data or cotinine. As expected, the mean blood lead level was elevated (23.6 micrograms/dl). Mean cotinine was also increased at 79.2 ng/mg creatinine. We conclude that the use of MA as a biomarker for environmental benzene exposure is feasible since it was detectable in 72% of subjects with a wide range of values present. In future studies, correlation of MA with personal air sampling in environmental exposure will be essential to fully interpret the significance of these findings. In addition, these inner-city children comprise a high risk group for exposure to environmental toxicants including ETS, lead, and probably benzene, based on questionnaire sources and its presence in ETS. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8919771

  3. Mechanistic considerations in benzene physiological model development

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Kenyon, E.M.; Seaton, M.J.; Schlosser, P.M.

    1996-12-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, the risks of leukemia at low exposure concentrations have not been established. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) may be necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Because benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol, and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. Zonal localization of phase I and phase 11 enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus also impacts this competition. Biologically based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Mechanistic considerations in benzene physiological model development.

    PubMed Central

    Medinsky, M A; Kenyon, E M; Seaton, M J; Schlosser, P M

    1996-01-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, the risks of leukemia at low exposure concentrations have not been established. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) may be necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Because benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol, and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. Zonal localization of phase I and phase II enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus also impacts this competition. Biologically based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans. PMID:9118926

  5. A calibrated human PBPK model for benzene inhalation with urinary bladder and bone marrow compartments.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Jeffrey S; Kerger, Brent D; Finley, Brent; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2013-07-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of benzene inhalation based on a recent mouse model was adapted to include bone marrow (target organ) and urinary bladder compartments. Empirical data on human liver microsomal protein levels and linked CYP2E1 activities were incorporated into the model, and metabolite-specific conversion rate parameters were estimated by fitting to human biomonitoring data and adjusting for background levels of urinary metabolites. Human studies of benzene levels in blood and breath, and phenol levels in urine were used to validate the rate of human conversion of benzene to benzene oxide, and urinary benzene metabolites from Chinese benzene worker populations provided model validation for rates of human conversion of benzene to muconic acid (MA) and phenylmercapturic acid (PMA), phenol (PH), catechol (CA), hydroquinone (HQ), and benzenetriol (BT). The calibrated human model reveals that while liver microsomal protein and CYP2E1 activities are lower on average in humans compared to mice, the mouse also shows far lower rates of benzene conversion to MA and PMA, and far higher conversion of benzene to BO/PH, and of BO/PH to CA, HQ, and BT. The model also differed substantially from existing human PBPK models with respect to several metabolic rate parameters of importance to interpreting benzene metabolism and health risks in human populations associated with bone marrow doses. The model provides a new methodological paradigm focused on integrating linked human liver metabolism data and calibration using biomonitoring data, thus allowing for model uncertainty analysis and more rigorous validation. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  6. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a) Initial drug testing. (1) HHS-certified laboratories shall apply the following cutoff levels for initial...

  7. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a) Initial drug testing. (1) HHS-certified laboratories shall apply the following cutoff levels for initial...

  8. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a) Initial drug testing. (1) HHS-certified laboratories shall apply the following cutoff levels for initial...

  9. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a) Initial drug testing. (1) HHS-certified laboratories shall apply the following cutoff levels for initial...

  10. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a) Initial drug testing. (1) HHS-certified laboratories shall apply the following cutoff levels for initial...

  11. Leukemia and Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

  12. Assessing Stress in Arctic Lemmings: Fecal Metabolite Levels Reflect Plasma Free Corticosterone Levels.

    PubMed

    Fauteux, Dominique; Gauthier, Gilles; Berteaux, Dominique; Bosson, Curtis; Palme, Rupert; Boonstra, Rudy

    Interest in the ecology of stress in wild populations has triggered the development of noninvasive methods for quantifying stress hormones. Measurement of fecal corticosteroid metabolites (FCMs) is one such method, but it is still unclear whether FCMs can be a reliable proxy of free plasma glucocorticoids. To assess the validity of this assumption, we carried out a robust assessment on brown lemmings (Lemmus trimucronatus) from Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada, that were hand captured and anesthetized and related plasma glucocorticoid levels to fecal metabolite glucocorticoid levels. We examined endogenous factors that could explain interindividual variability. Blood corticosterone was measured from samples obtained on capture and 30 min later, and FCM levels were measured from animals kept in captivity for 72 h. Plasma free corticosterone increased 135-fold over baseline values 30 min after capture, which confirmed that initial handling was perceived as a stressor. We found that FCM levels were highly related with free (marginal [Formula: see text] = 0.53) but not with total ([Formula: see text] = 0.02) corticosterone levels, regardless of age, sex, and reproductive condition. FCM levels started increasing 2 h after capture and reached maximum levels 4 h after capture. No circadian rhythm in FCMs was found. Plasma total corticosterone levels were much higher in adult females compared with adult males, but this difference was much smaller when measuring free corticosterone levels and FCM levels. Our results suggest that FCM levels are good measures of stress by being closely related to plasma free corticosterone levels in brown lemmings.

  13. Empty level structure and dissociative electron attachment cross section in (bromoalkyl)benzenes.

    PubMed

    Modelli, Alberto

    2005-07-21

    The gas-phase electron transmission (ET) and dissociative electron attachment (DEA) spectra are reported for the series of (bromoalkyl)benzenes C6H5(CH2)nBr (n = 0-3), where the bromine atom is directly bonded to a benzene ring or separated from it by 1-3 CH2 groups, and the dihalo derivative 1-Br-4-Cl-benzene. The relative DEA cross sections (essentially due to the Br- fragment) are reported, and the absolute cross sections are also evaluated. HF/6-31G and B3LYP/6-31G* calculations are employed to evaluate the virtual orbital energies (VOEs) for the optimized geometries of the neutral state molecules. The pi* VOEs, scaled with empirical equations, satisfactorily reproduce the corresponding experimental vertical electron attachment energies (VAEs). According to the calculated localization properties, the LUMO (as well as the singly occupied MO of the lowest lying anion state) of C6H5(CH2)3Br is largely localized on both the benzene ring and the C-Br bond, despite only a small pi*/sigma*C-Br interaction and in contrast to the chlorine analogue where the LUMO is predicted to possess essentially ring pi character. This would imply a less important role of intramolecular electron transfer in the bromo derivative for production of the halogen negative fragment through dissociation of the first resonant state. The VAEs calculated as the anion/neutral energy difference with the 6-31+G* basis set which includes diffuse functions are relatively close to the experimental values but do not parallel their sequence. In addition the SOMO of some compounds is not described as a valence MO with large pi* character but as a diffuse sigma* MO.

  14. Low level detection of Benzene in Food Grade Hexane by Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Emmandi, R; Sastry, M I S; Patel, M B

    2014-10-15

    A simple, sensitive, and accurate Ultraviolet Spectrophotometric method has been developed and validated for the determination of Benzene in Food Grade Hexane. Benzene in spectroscopic grade Hexane shows vibrational fine structure having four well resolved peaks. In the wavelength range 240-270nm, peak at 255nm is considered for the method development. Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range of 0.6-10.0μLL(-1), with correlation coefficient, 0.9999, detection limit 0.2μLL(-1) and quantitation limit 0.6μLL(-1) are established. Percentage recovery studies showed that the method was not affected by the presence of other solvents having the similar boiling range with Hexane. The method was validated by determining its accuracy and precision which proves suitability of the developed method for the routine determination of Benzene in Food Grade Hexane. The proposed method has been applied successfully for the analysis of the Food Grade Hexane.

  15. Microminiature Monitor for Vital Electrolyte and Metabolite Levels of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohda, Koji; Gratzl, Miklos

    2004-01-01

    Ions, such as proton (pH) and potassium, play a crucial role in body fluids to maintain proper basic functioning of cells and tissues. Metabolites, such as glucose, control the energy available to the entire human body in normal as well as stress situations, and before, during, and after meals. These molecules diffuse easily between blood in the capillaries and the interstitial fluid residing between cells and tissues. We have developed and approach to monitoring of critical ions (called electrolytes) and glucose in the interstitial fluid under the human skin. Proton and potassium levels sensed using optode technology that translates the respective ionic concentrations into variable colors of corresponding ionophore/dye/polymeric liquid membranes. Glucose is monitored indirectly, by coupling through immobilized glucose oxidase with local pH that is then detected using a similar color scheme. The monitor consists of a tiny plastic bar, 100-200 microns wide and 1-2 mm long, placed just under the skin, with color changing spots for each analyte as well as blanks. The colors are read and translated into concentration values by a CCD camera. Direct optical coupling between the in vivo sensing bar and the ex vivo detector device requires no power, and thus eliminates the need for wires or optical fibers crossing the skin. The microminiature bar penetrates the skin easily and painlessly, so that astronauts could insert it themselves. The approach is fully compatible with telemetry in space, and thus, in vivo clinical data will be available real time in the Earth based command center once the device is fully developed. The information provided can be used for collecting hitherto unavailable vital data on clinical effects of space travel. Managing clinical emergencies in space with the sensor already in place should also become much more efficient than without a continuous monitor, as is currently the case. Civilian applications may include better glucose control of

  16. Microminiature Monitor for Vital Electrolyte and Metabolite Levels of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohda, Koji; Gratzl, Miklos

    2004-01-01

    Ions, such as proton (pH) and potassium, play a crucial role in body fluids to maintain proper basic functioning of cells and tissues. Metabolites, such as glucose, control the energy available to the entire human body in normal as well as stress situations, and before, during, and after meals. These molecules diffuse easily between blood in the capillaries and the interstitial fluid residing between cells and tissues. We have developed and approach to monitoring of critical ions (called electrolytes) and glucose in the interstitial fluid under the human skin. Proton and potassium levels sensed using optode technology that translates the respective ionic concentrations into variable colors of corresponding ionophore/dye/polymeric liquid membranes. Glucose is monitored indirectly, by coupling through immobilized glucose oxidase with local pH that is then detected using a similar color scheme. The monitor consists of a tiny plastic bar, 100-200 microns wide and 1-2 mm long, placed just under the skin, with color changing spots for each analyte as well as blanks. The colors are read and translated into concentration values by a CCD camera. Direct optical coupling between the in vivo sensing bar and the ex vivo detector device requires no power, and thus eliminates the need for wires or optical fibers crossing the skin. The microminiature bar penetrates the skin easily and painlessly, so that astronauts could insert it themselves. The approach is fully compatible with telemetry in space, and thus, in vivo clinical data will be available real time in the Earth based command center once the device is fully developed. The information provided can be used for collecting hitherto unavailable vital data on clinical effects of space travel. Managing clinical emergencies in space with the sensor already in place should also become much more efficient than without a continuous monitor, as is currently the case. Civilian applications may include better glucose control of

  17. Genotoxic effects in peripheral blood and urine of workers exposed to low level benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Yardley-Jones, A; Anderson, D; Jenkinson, P C; Lovell, D P; Blowers, S D; Davies, M J

    1988-01-01

    Blood samples were obtained from a population of refinery workers representing different age groups. Sixty six men with low average exposure to benzene and 33 male controls were investigated. An examination of cell cycle kinetics and sister chromatid exchange was carried out on control and exposed individuals. No significant differences were found between groups of individuals varying in their drinking and smoking habits or their exposure to diagnostic x rays. Individuals with the lowest and highest phenol values were examined for urine mutagenicity, with urinary phenol used here as an indicator of benzene exposure. There was no difference in the number of revertant colonies in strains TA98 and 100 between the high and low urinary phenol groups. There were also no differences in any of the biochemical measures or haematological parameters investigated in all the individuals except that higher values for mean corpuscular volume were found in exposed than in control individuals. These values, however, were within the normal clinical range. PMID:3196663

  18. Determinants of organophosphorus pesticide urinary metabolite levels in young children living in an agricultural community.

    PubMed

    Bradman, Asa; Castorina, Rosemary; Barr, Dana Boyd; Chevrier, Jonathan; Harnly, Martha E; Eisen, Ellen A; McKone, Thomas E; Harley, Kim; Holland, Nina; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2011-04-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are used in agriculture and several are registered for home use. As young children age they may experience different pesticide exposures due to varying diet, behavior, and other factors. We measured six OP dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites (three dimethyl alkylphosphates (DMAP) and three diethyl alkylphosphates (DEAP)) in urine samples collected from ~400 children living in an agricultural community when they were 6, 12, and 24 months old. We examined bivariate associations between DAP metabolite levels and determinants such as age, diet, season, and parent occupation. To evaluate independent impacts, we then used generalized linear mixed multivariable models including interaction terms with age. The final models indicated that DMAP metabolite levels increased with age. DMAP levels were also positively associated with daily servings of produce at 6- and 24-months. Among the 6-month olds, DMAP metabolite levels were higher when samples were collected during the summer/spring versus the winter/fall months. Among the 12-month olds, DMAP and DEAP metabolites were higher when children lived ≤ 60 meters from an agricultural field. Among the 24-month-olds, DEAP metabolite levels were higher during the summer/spring months. Our findings suggest that there are multiple determinants of OP pesticide exposures, notably dietary intake and temporal and spatial proximity to agricultural use. The impact of these determinants varied by age and class of DAP metabolite.

  19. Determinants of Organophosphorus Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels in Young Children Living in an Agricultural Community

    PubMed Central

    Bradman, Asa; Castorina, Rosemary; Barr, Dana Boyd; Chevrier, Jonathan; Harnly, Martha E.; Eisen, Ellen A.; McKone, Thomas E.; Harley, Kim; Holland, Nina; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are used in agriculture and several are registered for home use. As young children age they may experience different pesticide exposures due to varying diet, behavior, and other factors. We measured six OP dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites (three dimethyl alkylphosphates (DMAP) and three diethyl alkylphosphates (DEAP)) in urine samples collected from ∼400 children living in an agricultural community when they were 6, 12, and 24 months old. We examined bivariate associations between DAP metabolite levels and determinants such as age, diet, season, and parent occupation. To evaluate independent impacts, we then used generalized linear mixed multivariable models including interaction terms with age. The final models indicated that DMAP metabolite levels increased with age. DMAP levels were also positively associated with daily servings of produce at 6- and 24-months. Among the 6-month olds, DMAP metabolite levels were higher when samples were collected during the summer/spring versus the winter/fall months. Among the 12-month olds, DMAP and DEAP metabolites were higher when children lived ≤60 meters from an agricultural field. Among the 24-month-olds, DEAP metabolite levels were higher during the summer/spring months. Our findings suggest that there are multiple determinants of OP pesticide exposures, notably dietary intake and temporal and spatial proximity to agricultural use. The impact of these determinants varied by age and class of DAP metabolite. PMID:21695029

  20. Low-dose metabolism of benzene in humans: science and obfuscation.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Stephen M; Kim, Sungkyoon; Thomas, Reuben; Johnson, Brent A; Bois, Frederic Y; Kupper, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous air pollutant that causes human leukemia and hematotoxic effects. Although the mechanism by which benzene causes toxicity is unclear, metabolism is required. A series of articles by Kim et al. used air and biomonitoring data from workers in Tianjin, China, to investigate the dose-specific metabolism (DSM) of benzene over a wide range of air concentrations (0.03-88.9 p.p.m.). Kim et al. concluded that DSM of benzene is greatest at air concentrations <1 p.p.m. This provocative finding motivated the American Petroleum Institute to fund a study by Price et al. to reanalyze the original data. Although their formal 'reanalysis' reproduced Kim's finding of enhanced DSM at sub-p.p.m. benzene concentrations, Price et al. argued that Kim's methods were inappropriate for assigning benzene exposures to low exposed subjects (based on measurements of urinary benzene) and for adjusting background levels of metabolites (based on median values from the 60 lowest exposed subjects). Price et al. then performed uncertainty analyses under alternative approaches, which led them to conclude that '… the Tianjin data appear to be too uncertain to support any conclusions …' regarding the DSM of benzene. They also argued that the apparent low-dose metabolism of benzene could be explained by 'lung clearance.' In addressing these criticisms, we show that the methods and arguments presented by Price et al. are scientifically unsound and that their results are unreliable.

  1. Benzene metabolism by human liver microsomes in relation to cytochrome P450 2E1 activity.

    PubMed

    Seaton, M J; Schlosser, P M; Bond, J A; Medinsky, M A

    1994-09-01

    Low levels of benzene from sources including cigarette smoke and automobile emissions are ubiquitous in the environment. Since the toxicity of benzene probably results from oxidative metabolites, an understanding of the profile of biotransformation of low levels of benzene is critical in making a valid risk assessment. To that end, we have investigated metabolism of a low concentration of [14C]benzene (3.4 microM) by microsomes from human, mouse and rat liver. The extent of phase I benzene metabolism by microsomal preparations from 10 human liver samples and single microsomal preparations from both mice and rats was then related to measured activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1. Measured CYP 2E1 activities, as determined by hydroxylation of p-nitrophenol, varied 13-fold (0.253-3.266 nmol/min/mg) for human samples. The fraction of benzene metabolized in 16 min ranged from 10% to 59%. Also at 16 min, significant amounts of oxidative metabolites were formed. Phenol was the main metabolite formed by all but two human microsomal preparations. In those samples, both of which had high CYP 2E1 activity, hydroquinone was the major metabolite formed. Both hydroquinone and catechol formation showed a direct correlation with CYP 2E1 activity over the range of activities present. A simulation model was developed based on a mechanism of competitive inhibition between benzene and its oxidized metabolites, and was fit to time-course data for three human liver preparations. Model calculations for initial rates of benzene metabolism ranging from 0.344 to 4.442 nmol/mg/min are directly proportional to measured CYP 2E1 activities. The model predicted the dependence of benzene metabolism on the measured CYP 2E1 activity in human liver samples, as well as in mouse and rat liver samples. These results suggest that differences in measured hepatic CYP 2E1 activity may be a major factor contributing to both interindividual and interspecies variations in hepatic metabolism of benzene

  2. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Trichostatin A and MCP30 Relieve Benzene-Induced Hematotoxicity via Restoring Topoisomerase IIα.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Zheng, Zhouyi; Chen, Yi; Li, Jiaqi; Qian, Shanhu; Shi, Yifen; Sun, Lan; Han, Yixiang; Zhang, Shenghui; Yu, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of histone acetylation inhibits topoisomerase IIα (Topo IIα), which is implicated in benzene-induced hematotoxicity in patients with chronic benzene exposure. Whether histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can relieve benzene-induced hematotoxicity remains unclear. Here we showed that hydroquinone, a main metabolite of benzene, increased the HDAC activity, decreased the Topo IIα expression and induced apoptosis in human bone marrow mononuclear cells in vitro, and treatment with two HDAC inhibitors, namely trichostatin A (TSA) or a mixture of ribosome-inactivating proteins MCP30, almost completely reversed these effects. We further established a benzene poisoning murine model by inhaling benzene vapor in a container and found that benzene poisoning decreased the expression and activity of Topo IIα, and impaired acetylation of histone H4 and H3. The analysis of regulatory factors of Topo IIα promoter found that benzene poisoning decreased the mRNA levels of SP1 and C-MYB, and increased the mRNA level of SP3. Both TSA and MCP30 significantly enhanced the acetylation of histone H3 and H4 in Topo IIα promoter and increased the expression and activity of Topo IIα in benzene poisoning mice, which contributed to relieve the symptoms of hematotoxicity. Thus, treatment with HDAC inhibitors represents an attractive approach to reduce benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

  3. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Trichostatin A and MCP30 Relieve Benzene-Induced Hematotoxicity via Restoring Topoisomerase IIα

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Li, Jiaqi; Qian, Shanhu; Shi, Yifen; Sun, Lan; Han, Yixiang; Zhang, Shenghui; Yu, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of histone acetylation inhibits topoisomerase IIα (Topo IIα), which is implicated in benzene-induced hematotoxicity in patients with chronic benzene exposure. Whether histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can relieve benzene-induced hematotoxicity remains unclear. Here we showed that hydroquinone, a main metabolite of benzene, increased the HDAC activity, decreased the Topo IIα expression and induced apoptosis in human bone marrow mononuclear cells in vitro, and treatment with two HDAC inhibitors, namely trichostatin A (TSA) or a mixture of ribosome-inactivating proteins MCP30, almost completely reversed these effects. We further established a benzene poisoning murine model by inhaling benzene vapor in a container and found that benzene poisoning decreased the expression and activity of Topo IIα, and impaired acetylation of histone H4 and H3. The analysis of regulatory factors of Topo IIα promoter found that benzene poisoning decreased the mRNA levels of SP1 and C-MYB, and increased the mRNA level of SP3. Both TSA and MCP30 significantly enhanced the acetylation of histone H3 and H4 in Topo IIα promoter and increased the expression and activity of Topo IIα in benzene poisoning mice, which contributed to relieve the symptoms of hematotoxicity. Thus, treatment with HDAC inhibitors represents an attractive approach to reduce benzene-induced hematotoxicity. PMID:27058040

  4. Evidence That Humans Metabolize Benzene via Two Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Stephen M.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Lan, Qing; Vermeulen, Roel; Waidyanatha, Suramya; Zhang, Luoping; Li, Guilan; Yin, Songnian; Hayes, Richard B.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Smith, Martyn T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent evidence has shown that humans metabolize benzene more efficiently at environmental air concentrations than at concentrations > 1 ppm. This led us to speculate that an unidentified metabolic pathway was mainly responsible for benzene metabolism at ambient levels. Objective We statistically tested whether human metabolism of benzene is better fitted by a kinetic model having two pathways rather than one. Methods We fit Michaelis-Menten-like models to levels of urinary benzene metabolites and the corresponding air concentrations for 263 nonsmoking Chinese females. Estimated benzene concentrations ranged from less than 0.001 ppm to 299 ppm, with 10th and 90th percentile values of 0.002 ppm and 8.97 ppm, respectively. Results Using values of Akaike’s information criterion obtained under the two models, we found strong statistical evidence favoring two metabolic pathways, with respective affinities (benzene air concentrations analogous to Km values) of 301 ppm for the low-affinity pathway (probably dominated by cytochrome P450 enzyme 2E1) and 0.594 ppm for the high-affinity pathway (unknown). The exposure-specific metabolite level predicted by our two-pathway model at nonsaturating concentrations was 184 μM/ppm of benzene, a value close to an independent estimate of 194 μM/ppm for a typical nonsmoking Chinese female. Our results indicate that a nonsmoking woman would metabolize about three times more benzene from the ambient environment under the two-pathway model (184 μM/ppm) than under the one-pathway model (68.6 μM/ppm). In fact, 73% of the ambient benzene dose would be metabolized via the unidentified high-affinity pathway. Conclusion Because regulatory risk assessments have assumed nonsaturating metabolism of benzene in persons exposed to air concentrations well above 10 ppm, our findings suggest that the true leukemia risks could be substantially greater than currently thought at ambient levels of exposure—about 3-fold higher among

  5. Personal reflections on 50 years of study of benzene toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Parke, D V

    1996-01-01

    The metabolism of benzene is reviewed, and the objectives of a quantitative balance study begun in 1945 are outlined; problems of toxicology and metabolism research of some 50 years ago are considered. The quantitative metabolism of 14C-benzene in the rabbit is annotated and compared with that of unlabeled benzene quantified by nonisotopic methods. The anomalies of phenylmercapturic acid and trans-trans-muconic acid as metabolites of benzene are examined in detail by isotopic and nonisotopic methods; these compounds are true but minor metabolites of benzene. Oxygen radicals are involved in both the metabolism of benzene and its toxicity; the roles of CYP2E1, the redox cycling of quinone metabolites, glutathione oxidation, and oxidative stress in the unique radiomimetic, hematopoietic toxicity of benzene are discussed. Differences between the toxicity of benzene and the halobenzenes are related to fundamental differences in their electronic structures and to the consequent pathways of metabolic activation and detoxication. PMID:9118881

  6. Imprinted nanospheres based on precipitation polymerization for the simultaneous extraction of six urinary benzene metabolites from urine followed by injector port silylation and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Abhishek; Bhatia, Tejasvi; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Pandey, Pathya; Pandey, Vivek; Saxena, Prem Narain; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy

    2015-09-15

    In the present communication, uniformly sized molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) as nanospheres were synthesized based on precipitation polymerization using dual-template imprinting approach and used it as sorbent for solid phase extraction of six urinary benzene metabolites (UBMs). This approach in combination with injector port silylation (IPS) has been used for the quantitative determination of these UBMs by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The MIP was synthesized by using t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA) and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (THB) as templates, methacrylic acid (MAA) as a monomer, ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crosslinker, acetonitrile and dimethylsulphoxide as a porogen and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator. The factors affecting the performance of polymer and IPS were investigated and optimized for the simultaneous determination of UBMs in urine. Binding study of imprinted and non-imprinted polymer (NIP) shows that, MIP possesses higher affinity in comparison to NIP for these analytes. Under the optimum conditions, the method developed was found to be linear with regression coefficients falls in the range of 0.9721-0.9988 for all the analyzed metabolites. The percent recovery of the metabolites analyzed in urine was found to be in the range of 76-89%, while the limit of detection and limit of quantification were found to be in the range of 0.9-9.1ngmL(-1) and 2.8-27ngmL(-1) respectively. The validated method was successfully applied to the real urine samples collected from different groups (kitchen workers, smokers and petroleum workers) and found that the developed method has been promising applications in the routine analysis of urine samples of benzene exposed population.

  7. Brain metabolite levels and language abilities in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Catherine; MacMaster, Frank P; Dewey, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    Language acquisition occurs rapidly during early childhood and lays the foundation for future reading success. However, little is known about the brain-language relationships in young children. The goal of this study was to investigate relationships between brain metabolites and prereading language abilities in healthy preschool-aged children. Participants were 67 healthy children aged 3.0-5.4 years scanned on a 3T GE MR750w MRI scanner using short echo proton spectroscopy with a voxel placed in the anterior cingulate gyrus (n = 56) and/or near the left angular gyrus (n = 45). Children completed the NEPSY-II Phonological Processing and Speeded Naming subtests at the same time as their MRI scan. We calculated glutamate, glutamine, creatine/phosphocreatine, choline, inositol, and NAA concentrations, and correlated these with language skills. In the anterior cingulate, Phonological Processing Scaled Scores were significantly correlated with glutamate, creatine, and inositol concentrations. In the left angular gyrus, Speeded Naming Combined Scaled Scores showed trend correlations with choline and glutamine concentrations. For the first time, we demonstrate relationships between brain metabolites and prereading language abilities in young children. Our results show relationships between language and inositol and glutamate that may reflect glial differences underlying language function, and a relationship of language with creatine. The trend between Speeded Naming and choline is consistent with previous research in older children and adults; however, larger sample sizes are needed to confirm whether this relationship is indeed significant in young children. These findings help understand the brain basis of language, and may ultimately lead to earlier and more effective interventions for reading disabilities.

  8. Ambient air levels and the exposure of children to benzene, toluene, and xylenes in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Raaschou-Nielsen, O; Lohse, C; Thomsen, B L; Skov, H; Olsen, J H

    1997-11-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate if the front-door concentrations of benzene, toluene, and xylenes can be used to classify the personal exposures of Danish children and to identify factors that affect their personal exposure. Average concentrations were measured over 1 week with diffusive samplers, and the personal exposures of 98 children and the concentrations outside the front doors of their homes were measured simultaneously. Time and activity patterns were noted in diaries. The front-door concentrations were significantly higher in Copenhagen than in rural areas (all P < 0.0001), but the personal exposures were only slightly higher. Even though the personal exposures were highly significantly associated with front-door concentrations in urban areas (all P < 0.004), use of the residential front-door concentration as an exposure surrogate would imply misclassification, as it cannot be used for rural children. Multiple regression analyses brought to light several factors that affect the exposure of children independently, including front-door concentration, riding in cars, and activities involving potential exposure to gasoline vapors like motocross, moped driving, and refueling of cars.

  9. Benzene poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atlanta, GA. Mirkin DB. Benzene and related aromatic hydrocarbons. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 94. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  10. Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels of Children in Eastern North Carolina Farmworker Households

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Barr, Dana B.; Tapia, Janeth; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.

    2007-01-01

    Background In this investigation we documented the pesticide urinary metabolite levels of farmworker children in North Carolina, determined the number of different metabolites detected for each child, and delineated risk factors associated with the number of metabolites. Methods Urine samples were collected from 60 Latino farmworker children 1–6 years of age (34 female, 26 male). Interviews were completed by their mothers in Spanish. We analyzed urine samples for 14 pesticide metabolites, including the organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, diazinon, isazaphos, malathion, pirimiphos, and parathion and its methyl counterpart; a common metabolite of at least 18 pyrethroid insecticides; the repellent DEET; and the herbicides 2,4,5-trichlorphenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Predictors included measures of paraoccupational, residential, and environmental exposure, child characteristics, and mother characteristics. Results Thirteen metabolites were present in the urine samples. Organophosphate pesticide metabolites were detected in a substantial proportion of children, particularly metabolites of parathion/methyl parathion (90.0%; geometric mean 1.00 μg/L), chlorpyrifos/chlorpyrifos methyl (83.3%; geometric mean 1.92 μg/L), and diazinon (55.0%; geometric mean 10.56 μg/L). The number of metabolites detected ranged from 0 to 7, with a mode of 4 detected (28.3%). Boys, children living in rented housing, and children with mothers working part-time had more metabolites detected. Conclusions Children in farmworker homes experience multiple sources of pesticide exposure. Pesticides may remain in their environments for long periods. Environmental and occupational health changes are needed to address these exposures. Research is needed with more precise measures of exposure and on the health effects of concurrent exposure to multiple pesticides. PMID:17687456

  11. Human Benzene Metabolism Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Stephen M.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Lan, Qing; Li, Guilan; Vermeulen, Roel; Waidyanatha, Suramya; Zhang, Luoping; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported evidence that humans metabolize benzene via two enzymes, including a hitherto unrecognized high-affinity enzyme that was responsible for an estimated 73 percent of total urinary metabolites [sum of phenol (PH), hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CA), E,E-muconic acid (MA), and S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA)] in nonsmoking females exposed to benzene at sub-saturating (ppb) air concentrations. Here, we used the same Michaelis-Menten-like kinetic models to individually analyze urinary levels of PH, HQ, CA and MA from 263 nonsmoking Chinese women (179 benzene-exposed workers and 84 control workers) with estimated benzene air concentrations ranging from less than 0.001 ppm to 299 ppm. One model depicted benzene metabolism as a single enzymatic process (1-enzyme model) and the other as two enzymatic processes which competed for access to benzene (2-enzyme model). We evaluated model fits based upon the difference in values of Akaike’s Information Criterion (ΔAIC), and we gauged the weights of evidence favoring the two models based upon the associated Akaike weights and Evidence Ratios. For each metabolite, the 2-enzyme model provided a better fit than the 1-enzyme model with ΔAIC values decreasing in the order 9.511 for MA, 7.379 for PH, 1.417 for CA, and 0.193 for HQ. The corresponding weights of evidence favoring the 2-enzyme model (Evidence Ratios) were: 116.2:1 for MA, 40.0:1 for PH, 2.0:1 for CA and 1.1:1 for HQ. These results indicate that our earlier findings from models of total metabolites were driven largely by MA, representing the ring-opening pathway, and by PH, representing the ring-hydroxylation pathway. The predicted percentage of benzene metabolized by the putative high-affinity enzyme at an air concentration of 0.001 ppm was 88% based upon urinary MA and was 80% based upon urinary PH. As benzene concentrations increased, the respective percentages of benzene metabolized to MA and PH by the high-affinity enzyme decreased successively

  12. Multinomial logistic regression model to assess the levels in trans, trans-muconic acid and inferential-risk age group among benzene-exposed group

    PubMed Central

    Mala, A.; Ravichandran, B.; Raghavan, S.; Rajmohan, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    There are only a few studies performed on multinomial logistic regression on the benzene-exposed occupational group. A study was carried out to assess the relationship between the benzene concentration and trans-trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), biomarkers in urine samples from petrol filling workers. A total of 117 workers involved in this occupation were selected for this current study. Generally, logistic regression analysis (LR) is a common statistical technique that could be used to predict the likelihood of categorical or binary or dichotomous outcome variables. The multinomial logistic regression equations were used to predict the relationship between benzene concentration and t,t-MA. The results showed a significant correlation between benzene and t,t-MA among the petrol fillers. Prediction equations were estimated by adopting the physical characteristic viz., age, experience in years and job categories of petrol filling station workers. Interestingly, there was no significant difference observed among experience in years. Petrol fillers and cashiers having a higher occupational risk were in the age group of ≤24 and between 25 and 34 years. Among the petrol fillers, the t,t-MA levels with exceeding ACGIH TWA-TLV level was showing to be more significant. This study demonstrated that multinomial logistic regression is an effective model for profiling the greatest risk of the benzene-exposed group caused by different explanatory variables. PMID:21120078

  13. Variability of Metabolite Levels Is Linked to Differential Metabolic Pathways in Arabidopsis's Responses to Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Töpfer, Nadine; Scossa, Federico; Fernie, Alisdair; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Constraint-based approaches have been used for integrating data in large-scale metabolic networks to obtain insights into metabolism of various organisms. Due to the underlying steady-state assumption, these approaches are usually not suited for making predictions about metabolite levels. Here, we ask whether we can make inferences about the variability of metabolite levels from a constraint-based analysis based on the integration of transcriptomics data. To this end, we analyze time-resolved transcriptomics and metabolomics data from Arabidopsis thaliana under a set of eight different light and temperature conditions. In a previous study, the gene expression data have already been integrated in a genome-scale metabolic network to predict pathways, termed modulators and sustainers, which are differentially regulated with respect to a biochemically meaningful data-driven null model. Here, we present a follow-up analysis which bridges the gap between flux- and metabolite-centric methods. One of our main findings demonstrates that under certain environmental conditions, the levels of metabolites acting as substrates in modulators or sustainers show significantly lower temporal variations with respect to the remaining measured metabolites. This observation is discussed within the context of a systems-view of plasticity and robustness of metabolite contents and pathway fluxes. Our study paves the way for investigating the existence of similar principles in other species for which both genome-scale networks and high-throughput metabolomics data of high quality are becoming increasingly available. PMID:24946036

  14. Synthesis and characterization of composite polymer, polyethylene glycol grafted flower-like cupric nano oxide for solid phase microextraction of ultra-trace levels of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and o-xylene in human hair and water samples.

    PubMed

    Sarafraz-Yazdi, Ali; Zendegi-Shiraz, Amene; Es'haghi, Zarrin; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad

    2015-10-30

    In this research, poly (ethylene glycol)-poly (ethylene glycol) grafted flower-like cupric oxidenano particles (PEG-PEG-g-CuO NPs) as a novel fiber coating of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) were synthesized by using sol-gel technology. This fiber was successfully applied to extract and determine the ultra-trace levels of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and o-xylene in human hair using head space-solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Characterization and chemical composition of the nano particle was performed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) and back scatter analysis (BSA). These methods confirmed the successful fabrication of PEG-g-CuO NPs. The surface morphology of the fibers were inspected by scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed many "crack-like" features and highly porous structure on the surface of fiber. The synthesized nanocomposites were used for preconcentration and extraction of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and o-xylene (BTEX). The effects of operating parameters such as: desorption temperature and time, extraction temperature, extraction time, stirring speed and salt effect were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the method detection limits and the limits of quantification were between 0.00025-50.00000pgmL(-1) and 0.00200-200.00000pgmL(-1), respectively. Linearity was observed over a range 0.00200-200000.00000pgmL(-1). The relative standard deviations for one fiber (repeatability; n=5) were obtained from 3.30 up to 5.01% and between fibers or batch to batch (n=3; reproducibility) in the range of 3.63-6.21%. The developed method was successfully applied to simultaneous determination of BTEX in human hairs, tap water and distillate water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of the urinary S-phenylmercapturic acid test as a biomarker for low levels of exposure to benzene in industry.

    PubMed Central

    van Sittert, N J; Boogaard, P J; Beulink, G D

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the determination of S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) in urine has been proposed as a suitable biomarker for the monitoring of low level exposures to benzene. In the study reported here, the test has been validated in 12 separate studies in chemical manufacturing plants, oil refineries, and natural gas production plants. Parameters studied were the urinary excretion characteristics of S-PMA, the specificity and the sensitivity of the assay, and the relations between exposures to airborne benzene and urinary S-PMA concentrations and between urinary phenol and S-PMA concentrations. The range of exposures to benzene was highest in workers in chemical manufacturing plants and in workers cleaning tanks or installations containing benzene as a component of natural gas condensate. Urinary S-PMA concentrations were measured up to 543 micrograms/g creatinine. Workers' exposures to benzene were lowest in oil refineries and S-PMA concentrations were comparable with those in smoking or nonsmoking control persons (most below the detection limit of 1 to 5 micrograms/g creatinine). In most workers S-PMA was excreted in a single phase and the highest S-PMA concentrations were at the end of an eight hour shift. The average half life of elimination was 9.0 (SD 4.5) hours (31 workers). Tentatively, in five workers a second phase of elimination was found with an average half life of 45 (SD 4) hours. A strong correlation was found between eight hour exposure to airborne benzene of 1 mg/m3 (0.3 ppm) and higher and urinary S-PMA concentrations in end of shift samples. It was calculated that an eight hour benzene exposure of 3.25 mg/m3 (1 ppm) corresponds to an average S-PMA concentration of 46 micrograms/g creatinine (95% confidence interval 41-50 micrograms/g creatinine). A strong correlation was also found between urinary phenol and S-PMA concentrations. At a urinary phenol concentration of 50 mg/g creatinine, corresponding to an eight hour benzene exposure of 32.5 mg/m3 (10

  16. Measurement of plasma levels of tricylic psychoactive drugs and their metabolites by UV reflectance photometry of thin layer chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Breyer, U; Villumsen, K

    1976-03-22

    A method has been developed for the determination of perazine, clozapine, imipramine and amitriptyline and their demethylated metabolites in plasma. Other metabolites measured were perazine sulfoxide and the N-oxides of clozapine and perazine, the latter two following their reduction to the parent drugs with ascorbic acid. 10-Hydroxynortriptyline was identified as an amitriptyline metabolite in plasma. The general procedure included extraction of alkalinized plasma samples (3 - 6 g) with benzene or toluene and thin layer chromatography of the extracts, followed by reflectance photometry of the plates at appropriate wave lengths in ultraviolet light. Spots of questionable identity were further characterized by two-dimensional chromatography and by colour reactions. Therecoveries of compounds added in therapeutic concentrations were between 70 and 98 %. The limits of detectability were 5 - 10 ng/g plasma.

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies novel genetic variants contributing to variation in blood metabolite levels.

    PubMed

    Draisma, Harmen H M; Pool, René; Kobl, Michael; Jansen, Rick; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Vaarhorst, Anika A M; Yet, Idil; Haller, Toomas; Demirkan, Ayşe; Esko, Tõnu; Zhu, Gu; Böhringer, Stefan; Beekman, Marian; van Klinken, Jan Bert; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; de Craen, Anton J M; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Dharuri, Harish; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; de Geus, Eco J C; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Henders, Anjali K; Montgomery, Grant W; Nyholt, Dale R; Whitfield, John B; Penninx, Brenda W; Spector, Tim D; Metspalu, Andres; Eline Slagboom, P; van Dijk, Ko Willems; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Strauch, Konstantin; Martin, Nicholas G; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Illig, Thomas; Bell, Jordana T; Mangino, Massimo; Suhre, Karsten; McCarthy, Mark I; Gieger, Christian; Isaacs, Aaron; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-06-12

    Metabolites are small molecules involved in cellular metabolism, which can be detected in biological samples using metabolomic techniques. Here we present the results of genome-wide association and meta-analyses for variation in the blood serum levels of 129 metabolites as measured by the Biocrates metabolomic platform. In a discovery sample of 7,478 individuals of European descent, we find 4,068 genome- and metabolome-wide significant (Z-test, P < 1.09 × 10(-9)) associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and metabolites, involving 59 independent SNPs and 85 metabolites. Five of the fifty-nine independent SNPs are new for serum metabolite levels, and were followed-up for replication in an independent sample (N = 1,182). The novel SNPs are located in or near genes encoding metabolite transporter proteins or enzymes (SLC22A16, ARG1, AGPS and ACSL1) that have demonstrated biomedical or pharmaceutical importance. The further characterization of genetic influences on metabolic phenotypes is important for progress in biological and medical research.

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies novel genetic variants contributing to variation in blood metabolite levels

    PubMed Central

    Kobl, Michael; Jansen, Rick; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Vaarhorst, Anika A.M.; Yet, Idil; Haller, Toomas; Demirkan, Ayşe; Esko, Tõnu; Zhu, Gu; Böhringer, Stefan; Beekman, Marian; van Klinken, Jan Bert; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; de Craen, Anton J.M.; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Amin, Najaf; Dharuri, Harish; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Henders, Anjali K.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Whitfield, John B.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Spector, Tim D.; Metspalu, Andres; Slagboom, P. Eline; van Dijk, Ko Willems; ‘t Hoen, Peter A.C.; Strauch, Konstantin; Martin, Nicholas G.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Illig, Thomas; Bell, Jordana T.; Mangino, Massimo; Suhre, Karsten; McCarthy, Mark I.; Gieger, Christian; Isaacs, Aaron; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites are small molecules involved in cellular metabolism, which can be detected in biological samples using metabolomic techniques. Here we present the results of genome-wide association and meta-analyses for variation in the blood serum levels of 129 metabolites as measured by the Biocrates metabolomic platform. In a discovery sample of 7,478 individuals of European descent, we find 4,068 genome- and metabolome-wide significant (Z-test, P < 1.09 × 10−9) associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and metabolites, involving 59 independent SNPs and 85 metabolites. Five of the fifty-nine independent SNPs are new for serum metabolite levels, and were followed-up for replication in an independent sample (N=1,182). The novel SNPs are located in or near genes encoding metabolite transporter proteins or enzymes (SLC22A16, ARG1, AGPS and ACSL1) that have demonstrated biomedical or pharmaceutical importance. The further characterization of genetic influences on metabolic phenotypes is important for progress in biological and medical research. PMID:26068415

  19. Predictors of neonatal abstinence syndrome in buprenorphine exposed newborn: can cord blood buprenorphine metabolite levels help?

    PubMed

    Shah, Darshan; Brown, Stacy; Hagemeier, Nick; Zheng, Shimin; Kyle, Amy; Pryor, Jason; Dankhara, Nilesh; Singh, Piyuesh

    2016-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid used for the treatment of opioid dependence. Opioid use, including buprenorphine, has been increasing in recent years, in the general population and in pregnant women. Consequently, there has been a rise in frequency of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), associated with buprenorphine use during pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to investigate correlations between buprenorphine and buprenorphine-metabolite concentrations in cord blood and onset of NAS in buprenorphine exposed newborns. Nineteen (19) newborns who met inclusion criteria were followed after birth until discharge in a double-blind non-intervention study, after maternal consent. Cord blood and tissue samples were collected and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for buprenorphine and metabolites. Simple and multiple logistic regressions were used to examine relationships between buprenorphine and buprenorphine metabolite concentrations in cord blood and onset of NAS, need for morphine therapy, and length of stay. Each increase in 5 ng/ml level of norbuprenorphine in cord blood increases odds of requiring treatment by morphine 2.5 times. Each increase in 5 ng/ml of buprenorphine-glucuronide decreases odds of receiving morphine by 57.7 %. Along with concentration of buprenorphine metabolites, birth weight and gestational age also play important roles, but not maternal buprenorphine dose. LC-MS analysis of cord blood concentrations of buprenorphine and metabolites is an effective way to examine drug and metabolite levels in the infant at birth. Cord blood concentrations of the active norbuprenorphine metabolite and the inactive buprenorphine-glucuronide metabolite show promise in predicting necessity of treatment of NAS. These finding have implications in improving patient care and reducing healthcare costs if confirmed in a larger sample.

  20. Benzene: standards, occurrence, and exposure.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, B; Lundberg, P

    1985-01-01

    The national occupational standard values for benzene are 10 ppm for Australia, 10 ppm for Denmark, 10 ppm for Finland, 10 ppm for Japan, 10 ppm for The Netherlands, 10 ppm for the United States, and 5 ppm for Sweden; in the Federal Republic of Germany the technical guideline value is 8 ppm. Crude mineral oil contains benzene as a natural constituent of approximately 0.1%. Gasoline in Sweden may contain 4-5% benzene by volume. The 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) exposure levels of Swedish petroleum refinery workers vary between 0.1 to 1 mg benzene/m3 in air. The exposures of benzene in various other occupations were measured and described. Other environmental exposures to benzene may have their origin in pyrolysis, such as tobacco smoking and burning of substances such as polyvinylchloride.

  1. Fecal estradiol and progesterone metabolite levels in the three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, M; Duarte, D P F; Gilmore, D P; Costa, C P da

    2006-02-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the possibility of measuring fecal steroid hormone metabolites as a noninvasive technique for monitoring reproductive function in the three-toed sloth, Bradypus variegatus. Levels of the estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) metabolites were measured by radioimmunoassay in fecal samples collected over 12 weeks from 4 captive female B. variegatus sloths. The validation of the radioimmunoassay for evaluation of fecal steroid metabolites was carried out by collecting 10 blood samples on the same day as defecation. There was a significant direct correlation between the plasma and fecal E2 and P4 levels (P < 0.05, Pearson's test), thereby validating this noninvasive technique for the study of the estrous cycle in these animals. Ovulation was detected in two sloths (SL03 and SL04) whose E2 levels reached 2237.43 and 6713.26 pg/g wet feces weight, respectively, for over four weeks, followed by an increase in P4 metabolites reaching 33.54 and 3242.68 ng/g wet feces weight, respectively. Interestingly, SL04, which presented higher levels of E2 and P4 metabolites, later gave birth to a healthy baby sloth. The results obtained indicate that this is a reliable technique for recording gonadal steroid secretion and thereby reproduction in sloths.

  2. Weight and Body Composition Compartments do Not Predict Therapeutic Thiopurine Metabolite Levels in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Darcy Q; Strauss, Boyd JG; Moore, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Thiopurine drugs are the most commonly used steroid-sparing therapies in moderate-to-severe inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Their complex metabolism and their narrow therapeutic windows means that optimal dosing is difficult. However, weight-based dosing is the norm. Similar antimetabolites are dosed by body composition parameters. In IBD, treatment response and toxicity has been shown to correlate with thiopurine metabolite levels. We sought to determine whether weight or body composition parameters predicted therapeutic 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6TGN) or toxic 6-methylmercaptopurine (6MMP) levels. METHODS: This single-center retrospective cohort study identified 66 IBD patients who had body composition analysis and thiopurine metabolite levels tested. Statistical analysis was performed using Spearman correlation, Kruskal–Wallis, Mann–Whitney, and unpaired t tests and receiver-operator operating characteristic curves. A P value of <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: No correlation was identified between 6TGN and any body composition parameters, absolute drug dose or drug dose/kg of fat mass, fat-free mass (FFM), subcutaneous adipose tissue area, or visceral adipose tissue area. However, 6MMP correlated with azathioprine dose, thiopurine dose/kg of body weight, and with several body composition parameters. CONCLUSIONS: No relationship was found between therapeutic metabolite levels and weight or body composition compartments. Higher thiopurine doses, especially in relation to FFM, are associated with higher levels of potentially hepatotoxic 6MMP and shunting toward this metabolite. Conventional weight-based dosing to attain therapeutic metabolite levels appears unreliable and may be replaced by metabolite level testing. PMID:27787512

  3. Blood styrene and urinary metabolites in styrene polymerisation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, M S; Lorimer, W V; Lilis, R; Selikoff, I J

    1978-01-01

    The results of the analysis of blood and urine samples for styrene and its metabolites in 491 workers in a styrene polymerisation plant in the United States are reported. The levels of exposure to styrene were estimated to be less than 10 ppm, but nevertheless styrene and metabolites were detectable in more than 50% of workers in polymerisation jobs, within 4 h of exposure. Workers involved in the manufacture and purification of styrene from ethyl benzene also had detectable blood styrene and urinary metabolites in 83% of recently exposed subjects. The relationship between styrene in blood and in subcutaneous fat and urinary metabolites as pharmacokinetic variables is discussed. PMID:737139

  4. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  5. Pyometra in Bitches Induces Elevated Plasma Endotoxin and Prostaglandin F2α Metabolite Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hagman, R; Kindahl, H; Lagerstedt, A-S

    2006-01-01

    Endotoxemia in bitches with pyometra can cause severe systemic effects directly or via the release of inflammatory mediators. Plasma endotoxin concentrations were measured in ten bitches suffering from pyometra with moderately to severely deteriorated general condition, and in nine bitches admitted to surgery for non-infectious reasons. Endotoxin samples were taken on five occasions before, during and after surgery. In addition, urine and uterine bacteriology was performed and hematological, blood biochemical parameters, prostaglandin F2α metabolite 15-ketodihydro-PGF2α (PG-metabolite), progesterone and oestradiol (E2-17β) levels were analysed. The results confirm significantly increased plasma levels of endotoxin in bitches with pyometra and support previous reports of endotoxin involvement in the pathogenesis of the disease. Plasma concentrations of PG-metabolite were elevated in pyometra bitches and provide a good indicator of endotoxin release since the concentrations were significantly correlated to the endotoxin levels and many other hematological and chemistry parameters. The γ-globulin serum protein electrophoresis fraction and analysis of PG-metabolite can be valuable in the diagnosis of endotoxin involvement if a reliable, rapid and cost-effective test for PG-metabolite analysis becomes readily available in the future. Treatment inhibiting prostaglandin biosynthesis and related compounds could be beneficial for bitches suffering from pyometra. PMID:16722306

  6. Pyometra in bitches induces elevated plasma endotoxin and prostaglandin F2alpha metabolite levels.

    PubMed

    Hagman, R; Kindahl, H; Lagerstedt, A S

    2006-01-01

    Endotoxemia in bitches with pyometra can cause severe systemic effects directly or via the release of inflammatory mediators. Plasma endotoxin concentrations were measured in ten bitches suffering from pyometra with moderately to severely deteriorated general condition, and in nine bitches admitted to surgery for non-infectious reasons. Endotoxin samples were taken on five occasions before, during and after surgery. In addition, urine and uterine bacteriology was performed and hematological, blood biochemical parameters, prostaglandin F2alpha metabolite 15-ketodihydro-PGF2alpha (PG-metabolite), progesterone and oestradiol (E2-17beta) levels were analysed. The results confirm significantly increased plasma levels of endotoxin in bitches with pyometra and support previous reports of endotoxin involvement in the pathogenesis of the disease. Plasma concentrations of PG-metabolite were elevated in pyometra bitches and provide a good indicator of endotoxin release since the concentrations were significantly correlated to the endotoxin levels and many other hematological and chemistry parameters. The gamma-globulin serum protein electrophoresis fraction and analysis of PG-metabolite can be valuable in the diagnosis of endotoxin involvement if a reliable, rapid and cost-effective test for PG-metabolite analysis becomes readily available in the future. Treatment inhibiting prostaglandin biosynthesis and related compounds could be beneficial for bitches suffering from pyometra.

  7. Environmental benzene exposure assessment for parent-child pairs in Rouen, France.

    PubMed

    Kouniali, Amin; Cicolella, André; Gonzalez-Flesca, Norbert; Dujardin, Roland; Gehanno, Jean François; Bois, Frédéric Y

    2003-06-01

    There is a lack of data on environmental benzene exposure in children. In this study, we compared personal benzene exposure and inhalation uptake in a group of children to those of their parents. We also compared levels of urinary benzene metabolites, trans,trans-muconic acid (MA) and hydroquinone (HQ), for those two groups, and assessed the correlation between personal benzene exposure and urinary MA and HQ concentrations. The study was performed on 21, 2-3-year-old children and their parents recruited on a voluntary basis among non-smokers from the three largest day-care centers of the town of Rouen in France. Average benzene concentrations were measured over 5 consecutive days with diffusive samplers. The following simultaneous measurements were carried out: personal exposure of the parents, concentrations inside and outside the day care centers, and inside the volunteer's bedrooms. Morning and evening urine samples were collected during the same period. Benzene personal exposure levels were 14.4+/-7.7 microg/m(3) and 11.09+/-6.15 microg/m(3) in parents and children, respectively. Benzene inhalation uptake estimates were 2.51+/-1.23 microg/kg/day in the group of parents and 5.68+/-3.17 microg/kg/day in the group of children. Detectable levels of MA and HQ were found in 85% and 100% of the samples, respectively. Intra-individual variation of urinary MA and HQ concentrations expressed as a coefficient of variation (CV) ranged from 63 to 232% and from 13 to 144%, respectively. Mean values of MA and HQ (in mg/g creatinine) were 1.6- and 1.8-fold higher in the group of children than in the group of parents (P=0.008 and P<0.0001, respectively). Significant correlations between metabolites levels and benzene were not found.

  8. Optical sensors for monitoring dynamic changes of intracellular metabolite levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bi-Huei; Takanaga, Hitomi; Grossmann, Guido; Chen, Li-Qing; Qu, Xiao-Qing; Jones, Alexander M; Lalonde, Sylvie; Schweissgut, Oliver; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Frommer, Wolf B

    2011-10-27

    Knowledge of the in vivo levels, distribution and flux of ions and metabolites is crucial to our understanding of physiology in both healthy and diseased states. The quantitative analysis of the dynamics of ions and metabolites with subcellular resolution in vivo poses a major challenge for the analysis of metabolic processes. Genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors can be used for real-time in vivo detection of metabolites. FRET sensor proteins, for example, for glucose, can be targeted genetically to any cellular compartment, or even to subdomains (e.g., a membrane surface), by adding signal sequences or fusing the sensors to specific proteins. The sensors can be used for analyses in individual mammalian cells in culture, in tissue slices and in intact organisms. Applications include gene discovery, high-throughput drug screens or systematic analysis of regulatory networks affecting uptake, efflux and metabolism. Quantitative analyses obtained with the help of FRET sensors for glucose or other ions and metabolites provide valuable data for modeling of flux. Here we provide a detailed protocol for monitoring glucose levels in the cytosol of mammalian cell cultures through the use of FRET glucose sensors; moreover, the protocol can be used for other ions and metabolites and for analyses in other organisms, as has been successfully demonstrated in bacteria, yeast and even intact plants. The whole procedure typically takes ∼4 d including seeding and transfection of mammalian cells; the FRET-based analysis of transfected cells takes ∼5 h.

  9. A unique automation platform for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite identification studies.

    PubMed

    Krauser, Joel; Walles, Markus; Wolf, Thierry; Graf, Daniel; Swart, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using (14)C or (3)H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector.

  10. A Unique Automation Platform for Measuring Low Level Radioactivity in Metabolite Identification Studies

    PubMed Central

    Krauser, Joel; Walles, Markus; Wolf, Thierry; Graf, Daniel; Swart, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using 14C or 3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector. PMID:22723932

  11. Levels of caffeine and its metabolites among U.S. smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ram B

    2015-03-01

    Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years 2009-2010 were used to estimate the levels of caffeine and 14 of its metabolite among U.S. smokers and nonsmokers after adjustments were made for other factors that affect observed caffeine levels. In this study, when adjusted for daily caffeine intake, adjusted levels (AGM) of caffeine and its metabolites were not found to be statistically significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers. AGMs for caffeine and all of its metabolites were found to be statistically significantly higher (p < 0.01) among females aged ≥ 12 years than males. For caffeine, 1,3-dimethylxanthine, and 1,7-dimethylxanthine, those aged ≥ 20 years had statistically significantly higher (p < 0.01) AGM than those aged 12-19 years but the reverse was true for 7-methylxanthine and 3,7-dimethylxanthine (p ≤ 0.02). The order of the AGMs by race/ethnicity was non-Hispanic whites > Hispanics > non-Hispanic blacks and most of the differences were statistically significant, at least between non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanic blacks (p < 0.01). In general, there was a statistically significant positive association between the levels of caffeine and its metabolites and body mass index as well as daily caffeine intake. However, the levels of 7-methylxanthine were negatively associated with body mass index. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of Plasma IL-6 and Hsp70 with HRV at Different Levels of PAHs Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaosheng; Feng, Yingying; Yang, Liangle; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Deng, Qifei; Wu, Tangchun; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is associated with reduced heart rate variability (HRV), a strong predictor of cardiovascular diseases, but the mechanism is not well understood. Objectives We hypothesized that PAHs might induce systemic inflammation and stress response, contributing to altered cardiac autonomic function. Methods HRV indices were measured using a 3-channel digital Holter monitor in 800 coke oven workers. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) were determined using ELISA. Twelve urinary PAHs metabolites (OH-PAHs) were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results We found that significant dose-dependent relationships between four urinary OH-PAHs and IL-6 (all Ptrend<0.05); and an increase in quartiles of IL-6 was significantly associated with a decrease in total power (TP) and low frequency (LF) (Ptrend = 0.014 and 0.006, respectively). In particular, elevated IL-6 was associated in a dose-dependent manner with decreased TP and LF in the high-PAHs metabolites groups (all Ptrend<0.05), but not in the low-PAHs metabolites groups. No significant association between Hsp70 and HRV in total population was found after multivariate adjustment. However, increased Hsp70 was significantly associated with elevated standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN), TP and LF in the low-PAHs metabolites groups (all Ptrend<0.05). We also observed that both IL-6 and Hsp70 significantly interacted with multiple PAHs metabolites in relation to HRV. Conclusions In coke oven workers, increased IL-6 was associated with a dose-response decreased HRV in the high-PAHs metabolites groups, whereas increase of Hsp70 can result in significant dose-related increase in HRV in the low-PAHs metabolites groups. PMID:24722336

  13. Peripheral blood gene expression profiles linked to monoamine metabolite levels in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Luykx, J J; Olde Loohuis, L M; Neeleman, M; Strengman, E; Bakker, S C; Lentjes, E; Borgdorff, P; van Dongen, E P A; Bruins, P; Kahn, R S; Horvath, S; de Jong, S; Ophoff, R A

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier separates circulating blood from the central nervous system (CNS). The scope of this barrier is not fully understood which limits our ability to relate biological measurements from peripheral to central phenotypes. For example, it is unknown to what extent gene expression levels in peripheral blood are reflective of CNS metabolism. In this study, we examine links between central monoamine metabolite levels and whole-blood gene expression to better understand the connection between peripheral systems and the CNS. To that end, we correlated the prime monoamine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with whole-genome gene expression microarray data from blood (N=240 human subjects). We additionally applied gene-enrichment analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) to identify modules of co-expressed genes in blood that may be involved with monoamine metabolite levels in CSF. Transcript levels of two genes were significantly associated with CSF serotonin metabolite levels after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing: THAP7 (P=2.8 × 10−8, β=0.08) and DDX6 (P=2.9 × 10−7, β=0.07). Differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched for genes expressed in the brain tissue (P=6.0 × 10−52). WGCNA revealed significant correlations between serotonin metabolism and hub genes with known functions in serotonin metabolism, for example, HTR2A and COMT. We conclude that gene expression levels in whole blood are associated with monoamine metabolite levels in the human CSF. Our results, including the strong enrichment of brain-expressed genes, illustrate that gene expression profiles in peripheral blood can be relevant for quantitative metabolic phenotypes in the CNS. PMID:27959337

  14. Quantitative analysis of trace-level benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene in cellulose acetate tow using headspace heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaorong; Zhang, Jing; Guo, Yinlong

    2016-06-01

    This study describes a method for the quantification of trace-level benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene in cellulose acetate tow by heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode. As the major volatile component in cellulose acetate tow samples, acetone would be overloaded when attempting to perform a high-resolution separation to analyze trace benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene. With heart-cutting technology, a larger volume injection was achieved and acetone was easily cut off by employing a capillary column with inner diameter of 0.32 mm in the primary gas chromatography. Only benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were directed to the secondary column to result in an effective separation. The matrix interference was minimized and the peak shapes were greatly improved. Finally, quantitative analysis of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene was performed using an isotopically labeled internal standard. The headspace multidimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry system was proved to be a powerful tool for analyzing trace volatile organic compounds in complex samples.

  15. NON-RESIDENTIAL ORGANOPHOSPHOROUS PESTICIDE USE AS A PREDICTOR OF CHILDREN'S URINARY METABOLITE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NON-RESIDENTIAL ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE USE AS A PREDICTOR OF CHILDREN'S URINARY METABOLITE LEVELS.
    Julie A. Baker, Pauline Mendola, Dana Barr, Debra Walsh, John Creason, and Larry Needham. (University at Buffalo, US Environmental Protection Agency, and Centers for Disease ...

  16. NON-RESIDENTIAL ORGANOPHOSPHOROUS PESTICIDE USE AS A PREDICTOR OF CHILDREN'S URINARY METABOLITE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NON-RESIDENTIAL ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE USE AS A PREDICTOR OF CHILDREN'S URINARY METABOLITE LEVELS.
    Julie A. Baker, Pauline Mendola, Dana Barr, Debra Walsh, John Creason, and Larry Needham. (University at Buffalo, US Environmental Protection Agency, and Centers for Disease ...

  17. Critical issues in benzene toxicity and metabolism: The effect of interactions with other organic chemicals on risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Schlosser, P.M.; Bond, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia. Some individuals exposed repeatedly to cytotoxic concentrations of benzene develop acute myeloblastic anemia. It has been hypothesized that metabolism of benzene is required for its toxicity, although administration of no single benzene metabolite duplicates the toxicity of benzene. Several investigators have demonstrated that a combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) is necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene. Enzymes implicated in the metabolic activation of benzene and its metabolites include the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and myeloperoxidase. Since benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. Other organic molecules that are substrates for cytochrome P450 can inhibit the metabolism of benzene. For example, toluene has been shown to inhibit the oxidation of benzene in a noncompetitive manner. Enzyme inducers, such as ethanol, can alter the target tissue dosimetry of benzene metabolites by inducing enzymes responsible for oxidation reactions involved in benzene metabolism. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Correlation of thiamine metabolite levels with cognitive function in the non-demented elderly.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingwen; Pan, Xiaoli; Fei, Guoqiang; Wang, Changpeng; Zhao, Lei; Sang, Shaoming; Liu, Huimin; Liu, Meng; Wang, Hui; Wang, Zhiliang; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2015-12-01

    Thiamine metabolism is critical for glucose metabolism and also vital for brain function, which is susceptible to decline in the elderly. This study aimed to investigate whether thiamine metabolites correlate with cognitive function in the non-demented elderly and their impact factors. Volunteers >60 years old were recruited and their blood thiamine metabolites and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores were measured. The apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, routine blood parameters, liver and kidney function, and levels of fasting blood glucose and triglycerides were also measured. The results showed that the thiamine diphosphate (TDP) level weakly correlated with MMSE score in the non-demented elderly. Participants with high TDP levels performed better in Recall and Attention and Calculation than those with low TDP. TDP levels were associated with the APOE ε2 allele, body mass index, hemoglobin level, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides. Our results suggest that TDP, which is easily affected by many factors, impacts cognitive function in the elderly.

  19. Benzene Exposure Alters Expression of Enzymes Involved in Fatty Acid β-Oxidation in Male C3H/He Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongli; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Juan; Yang, Wenwen; Wei, Haiyan; Meng, Xing; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2016-10-31

    Benzene is a well-known hematotoxic carcinogen that can cause leukemia and a variety of blood disorders. Our previous study indicated that benzene disturbs levels of metabolites in the fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) pathway, which is crucial for the maintenance and function of hematopoietic and leukemic cells. The present research aims to investigate the effects of benzene on changes in the expression of key enzymes in the FAO pathway in male C3H/He mice. Results showed that benzene exposure caused reduced peripheral white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC), platelet (Pit) counts, and hemoglobin (Hgb) concentration. Investigation of the effects of benzene on the expression of FA transport- and β-oxidation-related enzymes showed that expression of proteins Cpt1a, Crat, Acaa2, Aldh1l2, Acadvl, Crot, Echs1, and Hadha was significantly increased. The ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential decreased in mice exposed to benzene. Meanwhile, reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly increased in the benzene group. Our results indicate that benzene induces increased expression of FA transport and β-oxidation enzymes, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress, which may play a role in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

  20. Personal care product use and urinary levels of phthalate metabolites in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Romero-Franco, Michelle; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Calafat, Antonia M; Cebrián, Mariano E; Needham, Larry L; Teitelbaum, Susan; Wolff, Mary S; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2011-07-01

    Sources of phthalates other than Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) related products are scarcely documented in Mexico. The objective of our study was to explore the association between urinary levels of nine phthalate metabolites and the use of personal care products. Subjects included 108 women who participated as controls in an ongoing population-based case-control study of environmental factors and genetic susceptibility to breast cancer in northern Mexico. Direct interviews were performed to inquire about sociodemographic characteristics, reproductive history, use of personal care products, and diet. Phthalate metabolites measured in urine by high performance liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry were monoethyl phthalate (MEP), monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP), mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP), mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP) as well as mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl phthalate (MEOHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate (MEHHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate (MECPP) that are metabolites of di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Detectable urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites varied from 75% (MEHP) to 100% (MEP, MBP, MEOHP, MEHHP and MECPP). Medians of urinary concentrations of some phthalate metabolites were significantly higher among users of the following personal care products compared to nonusers: body lotion (MEHHP, MECPP and sum of DEHP metabolites (ΣDEHP)), deodorant (MEHP and ΣDEHP), perfume (MiBP), anti-aging facial cream (MEP, MBP and MCPP) and bottled water (MCPP, MEHHP and MEOHP). Urinary concentrations of MEP showed a positive relationship with the number of personal care products used. Our results suggest that the use of some personal care products contributes to phthalate body burden that deserves attention due to its potential health impact.

  1. Metabolic polymorphisms and biomarkers of effect in the biomonitoring of occupational exposure to low-levels of benzene: state of the art.

    PubMed

    De Palma, G; Manno, M

    2014-12-01

    Current levels of occupational exposure to benzene, a genotoxic human carcinogen, in Western countries are reduced by two-three orders of magnitude (from ppm to ppb) as compared to the past. However, as benzene toxicity is strongly dependent on biotransformation and recent evidence underlines a higher efficiency of bio-activation pathways at lower levels of exposure, toxic effects at low doses could be higher than expected, particularly in susceptible individuals. Currently, biological monitoring can allow accurate exposure assessment, relying on sensitive and specific enough biomarkers of internal dose. The availability of similarly reliable biomarkers of early effect or susceptibility could greatly improve the risk assessment process to such an extent that risk could even be assessed at the individual level. As to susceptibility biomarkers, functional genetic polymorphisms of relevant biotransformation enzymes may modulate the risk of adverse effects (NQO1) and the levels of biomarkers of internal dose, in particular S-phenylmercapturic acid (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTA1). Among biomarkers of early effect, genotoxicity indicators, although sensitive in some cases, are too aspecific for routine use in occupational health surveillance programmes. Currently only the periodical blood cell count seems suitable enough to be applied in the longitudinal monitoring of effects from benzene exposure. Novel biomarkers of early effect are expected from higher collaboration among toxicologists and clinicians, also using advanced "omics" techniques.

  2. The relationship of the urinary ascorbate metabolites to specific levels of ascorbate supplementation in the monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Tillotson, J.A.; McGown, E.L.

    1981-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate urinary ascorbic acid (AA) and its metabolites derived from (1-14C) AA administered to trained monkeys fed different levels of ascorbate for extended periods of time. A chromatographic procedure was developed which rapidly separates the urinary compounds into four major fractions with minimal degradation. The distribution of 14C in the four peaks was dependent upon the ascorbate nutritional status of the monkey and remained constant for at least 30 days postlabel. The two major fractions were identified as oxalate and unmetabolized ascorbate. The ascorbate metabolites in the two minor fractions have not been identified. In monkeys maintained on low ascorbate intakes, unmetabolized ascorbate accounted for 10 to 20% and oxalate 25 to 48% of the urinary 14C. The average percentages of 14C in the urine of monkeys fed high levels of ascorbate were 75% for ascorbate and 7% for oxalate. The urine also contained an ascorbate metabolite which degraded during storage and/or chromatography, yielding 14CO2. Ascorbate sulfate was not detected as a urinary metabolite.

  3. Population toxicokinetics of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Bois, F Y; Jackson, E T; Pekari, K; Smith, M T

    1996-01-01

    In assessing the distribution and metabolism of toxic compounds in the body, measurements are not always feasible for ethical or technical reasons. Computer modeling offers a reasonable alternative, but the variability and complexity of biological systems pose unique challenges in model building and adjustment. Recent tools from population pharmacokinetics, Bayesian statistical inference, and physiological modeling can be brought together to solve these problems. As an example, we modeled the distribution and metabolism of benzene in humans. We derive statistical distributions for the parameters of a physiological model of benzene, on the basis of existing data. The model adequately fits both prior physiological information and experimental data. An estimate of the relationship between benzene exposure (up to 10 ppm) and fraction metabolized in the bone marrow is obtained and is shown to be linear for the subjects studied. Our median population estimate for the fraction of benzene metabolized, independent of exposure levels, is 52% (90% confidence interval, 47-67%). At levels approaching occupational inhalation exposure (continuous 1 ppm exposure), the estimated quantity metabolized in the bone marrow ranges from 2 to 40 mg/day. PMID:9118927

  4. Sub-lethal levels of electric current elicit the biosynthesis of plant secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kaimoyo, Evans; Farag, Mohamed A; Sumner, Lloyd W; Wasmann, Catherine; Cuello, Joel L; VanEtten, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Many secondary metabolites that are normally undetectable or in low amounts in healthy plant tissue are synthesized in high amounts in response to microbial infection. Various abiotic and biotic agents have been shown to mimic microorganisms and act as elicitors of the synthesis of these plant compounds. In the present study, sub-lethal levels of electric current are shown to elicit the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in transgenic and non-transgenic plant tissue. The production of the phytoalexin (+)-pisatin by pea was used as the main model system. Non-transgenic pea hairy roots treated with 30-100 mA of electric current produced 13 times higher amounts of (+)-pisatin than did the non-elicited controls. Electrically elicited transgenic pea hairy root cultures blocked at various enzymatic steps in the (+)-pisatin biosynthetic pathway also accumulated intermediates preceding the blocked enzymatic step. Secondary metabolites not usually produced by pea accumulated in some of the transgenic root cultures after electric elicitation due to the diversion of the intermediates into new pathways. The amount of pisatin in the medium bathing the roots of electro-elicited roots of hydroponically cultivated pea plants was 10 times higher 24 h after elicitation than in the medium surrounding the roots of non-elicited control plants, showing not only that the electric current elicited (+)-pisatin biosynthesis but also that the (+)-pisatin was released from the roots. Seedlings, intact roots or cell suspension cultures of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum), barrel medic, (Medicago truncatula), Arabidopsis thaliana, red clover (Trifolium pratense) and chickpea (Cicer arietinum) also produced increased levels of secondary metabolites in response to electro-elicitation. On the basis of our results, electric current would appear to be a general elicitor of plant secondary metabolites and to have potential for application in both basic and commercial research.

  5. Impacts of rising tropospheric ozone on photosynthesis and metabolite levels on field grown soybean.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jindong; Feng, Zhaozhong; Ort, Donald R

    2014-09-01

    The response of leaf photosynthesis and metabolite profiles to ozone (O3) exposure ranging from 37 to 116 ppb was investigated in two soybean cultivars Dwight and IA3010 in the field under fully open-air conditions. Leaf photosynthesis, total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC) and total free amino acids (TAA) decreased linearly with increasing O3 levels in both cultivars with average decrease of 7% for an increase in O3 levels by 10 ppb. Ozone interacted with developmental stages and leaf ages, and caused higher damage at later reproductive stages and in older leaves. Ozone affected yield mainly via reduction of maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax) and maximum rates of electron transport (Jmax) as well as a shorter growing season due to earlier onset of canopy senescence. For all parameters investigated the critical O3 levels (∼50 ppb) for detectable damage fell within O3 levels that occur routinely in soybean fields across the US and elsewhere in the world. Strong correlations were observed in O3-induced changes among yield, photosynthesis, TNC, TAA and many metabolites. The broad range of metabolites that showed O3 dose dependent effect is consistent with multiple interaction loci and thus multiple targets for improving the tolerance of soybean to O3.

  6. Plasma metabolite levels predict bird growth rates: A field test of model predictive ability.

    PubMed

    Albano, Noelia; Masero, José A; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Abad-Gómez, José María; Sánchez-Guzmán, Juan M

    2011-09-01

    Bird growth rates are usually derived from nonlinear relationships between age and some morphological structure, but this procedure may be limited by several factors. To date, nothing is known about the capacity of plasma metabolite profiling to predict chick growth rates. Based on laboratory-trials, we here develop predictive logistic models of body mass, and tarsus and wing length growth rates in Gull-billed Tern Gelochelidon nilotica chicks from measurements of plasma metabolite levels at different developmental stages. The predictive model obtained during the fastest growth period (at the age of 12 days) explained 65-68% of the chicks' growth rates, with fasting triglyceride level explaining most of the variation in growth rate. At the end of pre-fledging period, β-hydroxybutyrate level was also a good predictor of growth rates. Finally, we carried out a field test to check the predictive capacity of the models in two colonies of wild Gull-billed Tern, comparing field-measured and model-predicted growth rates between groups. Both, measured and predicted growth rates, matched statistically. Plasma metabolite levels can thus be applied in comparative studies of chick growth rates when semi-precocial birds can be captured only once.

  7. Determination of benzene at trace levels in air by a novel method based on solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saba, A; Cuzzola, A; Raffaelli, A; Pucci, S; Salvadori, P

    2001-01-01

    A new method for the determination of benzene at trace levels in air is presented. The method consists of the collection of air samples on adsorbent cartridges with simultaneous adsorption of pre-established amounts of D6-labeled internal standard. Desorption from the cartridge is performed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using an ion trap mass spectrometer. The influence of several parameters (type of SPME fiber, temperature, time, for example) was investigated, and good linearity in the range 10-400 ng of C6D6, with a coefficient of variance (CV) around 3-5%, was obtained. The method was tested by sampling air in a town center in Italy, and a benzene concentration of approximately 50 microg/m(3) was determined. The maximum limit recommended by the European Community is 10 microg/m(3).

  8. Methodological issues in the biological monitoring of urinary benzene and S-phenylmercapturic acid at low exposure levels.

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, Silvia; Campo, Laura; Mercadante, Rosa; Manini, Paola

    2010-10-01

    Biological monitoring of low level exposure to pollutants is a very challenging analytical activity, and the quality of results is difficult to assess, especially when a certified reference material is unavailable. The aim of this work was to evaluate the reliability of the assays used to measure urinary benzene (Benz-U) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), by applying an internal quality control protocol. Urine spot samples from 705 subjects who were either members of the general urban population, gasoline station attendants, or refinery plant workers were assayed for Benz-U and SPMA, using GC/MS and LC/MS/MS, with quantification limits of 15 ng/L and 0.10 μg/L. The median Benz-U concentration was 263 ng/L (60-2789 ng/L, 5th-95th percentile), and the median SPMA concentration was 0.19 μg/L (<0.1-2.5 μg/L, 5th-95th percentile). Linearity of both assays was good, but a less-than-proportional response was found for SPMA concentrations below 1 μg/L. Between-run precision and accuracy for Benz-U concentration determination were assessed using quality controls at 120 ng/L and 1000 ng/L and were 10.3% and 4.8%, and 104.8% and 98.9%, respectively; while the precision and accuracy for SPMA concentration determination at 0.3 μg/L, 2.5 μg/L, and 20 μg/L were 40.3%, 6.2%, and 6.2%, and 48.3%, 96.3%, and 98.8%, respectively. Precision, estimated using duplicates of unknown samples, was 13.4% for Benz-U and 26.5% for SPMA analyses. Control charts for the means of the slope of the linear calibration curve of Benz-U showed good stability of the means over a five-year period. For SPMA, a two-laboratory comparison revealed acceptable agreement between ln-transformed data pairs, with a slope of the linear regression of 0.863 (confidence interval 0.774-0.952), null intercept, and a Pearson's r value of 0.844. Reliable results were obtained for Benz-U analyses over the entire concentration range, and for high and medium SPMA levels. However, the determination of SPMA

  9. Occurrence and levels of nitrofuran metabolites in sea cucumber from Dalian, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongxia; Guo, Wuxia; Quan, Wenna; Jiang, Jingqiu; Qu, Baocheng

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence and levels of nitrofuran metabolites (NFMs) in sea cucumber (SC) from Dalian, China, are reported. Four metabolites including 3-amino-5-morpholinomethyl-2-oxazolidinone (AMOZ), 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ), semicarbazide (SEM) and 1-aminohydantoin (AHD) in different SC products (fresh, instant and dry salted SCs) were measured. The frequency of occurrence for NFMs in all SC samples was 42.7%. The total NFM concentrations ranged from non-detectable to 64.6 ng g(-)(1), with a mean of 3.59 ng g(-1). AOZ and SEM were the dominant congeners, accounting for 40.1% and 59.1% of the total NFMs, respectively. The concentrations and patterns varied among different regions. Higher levels of NFMs were found in the fresh SC products, and the order for the average concentration of ∑4NFM was fresh > dry salted > instant.

  10. Benzene risk estimation using radiation equivalent coefficients.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Aki; Isono, Tomomi; Kikuchi, Takuro; Ohnishi, Iichiro; Igarashi, Junichiro; Yoneda, Minoru; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2009-03-01

    We estimated benzene risk using a novel framework of risk assessment that employed the measurement of radiation dose equivalents to benzene metabolites and a PBPK model. The highest risks for 1 microg/m(3) and 3.2 mg/m(3) life time exposure of benzene estimated with a linear regression were 5.4 x 10(-7) and 1.3 x 10(-3), respectively. Even though these estimates were based on in vitro chromosome aberration test data, they were about one-sixth to one-fourteenth that from other studies and represent a fairly good estimate by using radiation equivalent coefficient as an "internal standard."

  11. Diurnal Changes in Metabolite Levels and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in Kalanchoë daigremontiana Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, William H.; Holaday, A. Scott; Black, Clanton C.

    1981-01-01

    Diurnal changes in levels of selected metabolites associated with glycolysis, the C3 cycle, C4-organic acids, and storage carbohydrates were analyzed in active Kalanchoë daigremontiana Crassulacean acid metabolism leaves. Three metabolic transition periods occurred each day. During the first two hours of light, nearly all of the metabolite pools underwent transient changes. Beginning at daylight, stomata opened transiently and closed again within 30 minutes; malate synthesis continued for about 1 hour into the light; C3 photosynthesis began within 30 minutes; and net quantities of starch and glucan began to accumulate after 2 hours, continuing linearly throughout the rest of the day. The second transition occurred in midafternoon: stomata reopened; malate decarboxylation nearly terminated; and the assimilation of ambient CO2 occurred primarily via the C3 cycle. The third transition occurred at dark: stomata transiently closed before opening again; the C3 cycle stopped; malate synthesis started in about 1 hour; starch and glucan degradation began within 1 hour; and the bulk of carbon flow was through glycolysis leading to the synthesis and accumulation of malate throughout the night. At night, the levels of metabolites involved in acidification and glycolysis (except for phosphoenolpyruvate) generally accumulated. Phosphoenolpyruvate levels peaked near midday and were minimal at night. The ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate pool was depleted at night, while sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, glucose 6-phosphate, and fructose 6-phosphate accumulated. Images PMID:16662040

  12. Levels of dichloro-dyphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) metabolites in maternal milk and their determinant factors.

    PubMed

    Torres-Arreola, L; López-Carrillo, L; Torres-Sánchez, L; Cebrián, M; Rueda, C; Reyes, R; López-Cervantes, M

    1999-01-01

    To document the levels and the determinants of dichloro-dyphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) metabolites in maternal milk, we conducted a cohort study of 50 adult females who lived in Mexico City. We measured social and dietary characteristics via interview. Levels of DDT metabolites were determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The mean values (lipid milk basis) were 0.162 ppm p,p'-DDT; 0.138 ppm o,p'-DDT; and 0.594 ppm 2,2(bis)p-chlorophyenyl-1-1-dichloroethylene (DDE). The main determinants of DDT metabolites were maternal age, lifetime lactation, history of living in an agricultural area, and consumption of salted meat and fish. We estimated that 6.0% of the breast-fed babies had daily intakes of DDT above the level of 0.005 mg/kg d recommended by the World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (WHO/FAO). Health-outcomes research among children is needed, and investigators should design or adjust current surveillance programs.

  13. Low-dose metabolism of benzene in humans: science and obfuscation

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous air pollutant that causes human leukemia and hematotoxic effects. Although the mechanism by which benzene causes toxicity is unclear, metabolism is required. A series of articles by Kim et al. used air and biomonitoring data from workers in Tianjin, China, to investigate the dose-specific metabolism (DSM) of benzene over a wide range of air concentrations (0.03–88.9 p.p.m.). Kim et al. concluded that DSM of benzene is greatest at air concentrations <1 p.p.m. This provocative finding motivated the American Petroleum Institute to fund a study by Price et al. to reanalyze the original data. Although their formal ‘reanalysis’ reproduced Kim’s finding of enhanced DSM at sub-p.p.m. benzene concentrations, Price et al. argued that Kim’s methods were inappropriate for assigning benzene exposures to low exposed subjects (based on measurements of urinary benzene) and for adjusting background levels of metabolites (based on median values from the 60 lowest exposed subjects). Price et al. then performed uncertainty analyses under alternative approaches, which led them to conclude that ‘… the Tianjin data appear to be too uncertain to support any conclusions …’ regarding the DSM of benzene. They also argued that the apparent low-dose metabolism of benzene could be explained by ‘lung clearance.’ In addressing these criticisms, we show that the methods and arguments presented by Price et al. are scientifically unsound and that their results are unreliable. PMID:23222815

  14. Plasma Levels of Biotin Metabolites Are Elevated in Hemodialysis Patients with Cramps.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masako; Ando, Itiro; Yagi, Shigeaki; Nishizawa, Manabu; Oguma, Shiro; Satoh, Keisuke; Sato, Hiroshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Patients with renal failure undergoing hemodialysis (HD) are susceptible to muscle cramps during and after HD. Muscle cramps are defined as the sudden onset of a prolonged involuntary muscle contraction accompanied by severe pain. Through HD, water-soluble vitamins are drawn out with water. Since biotin, a water-soluble vitamin, plays an essential role as one of the coenzymes in producing energy, we have hypothesized that deficiency of biotin may be responsible for HD-associated cramps. We previously reported that biotin administration ameliorated the muscle cramps, despite the elevated plasma biotin levels before HD and biotin administration, as judged by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, the ELISA measures not only biotin but also total avidin-binding substances (TABS) including biotin metabolites. In the present study, we determined biotin in HD patients as well as healthy controls, using a newly developed method with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The plasma samples were collected from 28 HD patients (16 patients with cramps and 12 patients without cramps) before HD and biotin administration and from 11 controls. The results showed that the accumulation of biotin and TABS in plasma of HD patients compared to controls. Importantly, the levels of biotin metabolites, i.e. TABS subtracted by biotin, increased significantly in patients with cramps over those without cramps. Moreover, the levels of biotin metabolites were significantly higher in patients with a poor response to administered biotin, compared to those with a good response. We propose that accumulated biotin metabolites impair biotin's functions as a coenzyme.

  15. Species-level assessment of secondary metabolite diversity among Hamigera species and a taxonomic note on the genus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Secondary metabolite phenotypes in nine species of the Hamigera clade were analysed to assess their correlations to a multi-gene species-level phylogeny. High-pressure-liquid-chromatography-based chemical analysis revealed three distinctive patterns of secondary metabolite production: (1) the nine s...

  16. A detailed view on sulphur metabolism at the cellular and whole-plant level illustrates challenges in metabolite flux analyses.

    PubMed

    Rennenberg, Heinz; Herschbach, Cornelia

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of physiological process in the systems biology era requires approaches at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome levels. In this context, metabolite flux experiments have been used in mapping metabolite pathways and analysing metabolic control. In the present review, sulphur metabolism was taken to illustrate current challenges of metabolic flux analyses. At the cellular level, restrictions in metabolite flux analyses originate from incomplete knowledge of the compartmentation network of metabolic pathways. Transport of metabolites through membranes is usually not considered in flux experiments but may be involved in controlling the whole pathway. Hence, steady-state and snapshot readings need to be expanded to time-course studies in combination with compartment-specific metabolite analyses. Because of species-specific differences, differences between tissues, and stress-related responses, the quantitative significance of different sulphur sinks has to be elucidated; this requires the development of methods for whole-sulphur metabolome approaches. Different cell types can contribute to metabolite fluxes to different extents at the tissue and organ level. Cell type-specific analyses are needed to characterize these contributions. Based on such approaches, metabolite flux analyses can be expanded to the whole-plant level by considering long-distance transport and, thus, the interaction of roots and the shoot in metabolite fluxes. However, whole-plant studies need detailed empirical and mathematical modelling that have to be validated by experimental analyses.

  17. Comment on a spurious prediction of a non-planar geometry for benzene at the MP2 level of theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Nagaprasad Reddy; Jordan, Kenneth D.

    2017-02-01

    MP2 calculations with the full aug-cc-pVTZ basis set give a non-planar structure for benzene. Although this non-physical result can be avoided by using the smaller aug-cc-pVDZ basis set or by scaling or deleting selected functions from the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, such changes to the basis set can result in calculated values of the frequencies of the b2g out-of-plane vibrations that are considerably underestimated. The origin of this behavior is traced to linear dependency problems with the aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets when used for benzene.

  18. Oregon Indigenous Farmworkers: Results of Promotor Intervention on Pesticide Knowledge and Organophosphate Metabolite Levels

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Linda; Runkle, Jennifer D.; Samples, Julie; Williams, Bryan; Muniz, Juan F; Semple, Marie; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Examine changes in health beliefs, pesticide safety knowledge, and biomarkers of pesticide exposure in indigenous farmworker who received enhanced pesticide safety training compared to those receiving the standard training. Methods Farmworkers in Oregon were randomly assigned to either a promotores pesticide safety training program or a standard video-based training. Spot urine samples were analyzed for dialkylphosphate (DAP) urinary metabolites. Pre/post intervention questionnaires were used to measure pesticide safety knowledge, health beliefs and work practices. Results Baseline to follow-up improvements in total pesticide knowledge scores were higher in the promotor group compared to the video. Pairwise differences in mean concentrations of DAP metabolite levels showed declines from baseline to follow-up for both intervention groups. Conclusions Results showed reductions in pesticide exposure in indigenous-language speaking farmworkers who receive enhanced pesticide safety training. PMID:24064776

  19. Effects of profession on urinary PAH metabolite levels in the US population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bian; Jia, Chunrong

    2016-01-01

    Although exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is common in both environmental and occupational settings, few studies have compared PAH exposure among people with different professions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the variations in recent PAH exposure among different occupational groups over time using national representative samples. The study population consisted of 4162 participants from the 2001 to 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, who had both urinary PAH metabolites and occupational information. Four corresponding monohydroxy-PAH urine metabolites: naphthalene (NAP), fluorene (FLUO), phenanthrene (PHEN), and pyrene (PYR) among seven broad occupational groups were analyzed using weighted linear regression models, adjusting for creatinine levels, sociodemographic factors, smoking status, and sampling season. The overall geometric mean concentrations of NAP, FLUO, PHEN, and PYR were 6927, 477, 335, and 87 ng/L, respectively. All four PAH metabolites were elevated in the "extractive, construction, and repair (ECR)" group, with 21-42 % higher concentrations than those in the reference group of "management." Similar trends were seen in the "operators, fabricators, and laborers (OFL)" group for FLUO, PHEN, and PYR. In addition, both "service" and "support" groups had elevated FLUO. Significant (p < 0.001) upward temporal trends were seen in NAP and PYR, with an approximately 6-17 % annual increase, and FLUO and PHEN remained relatively stable. Race and socioeconomic status show independent effects on PAH exposure. Heterogeneous distributions of urinary PAH metabolites among people with different job categories exist at the population level. The upward temporal trends in NAP and PYR warrant reduction in PAH exposure, especially among those with OFL and ECR occupations.

  20. Blood levels of the metabolites of glyceryl trinitrate and pentaerythritol tetranitrate after administration of a two-step preparation.

    PubMed

    Neurath, G B; Dünger, M

    1977-02-01

    Blood levels and urinary excretion rates of glyceryl trinitrate- pentaerythritol tetranitrate, and their less nitrate containing metabolites have been determined in ten human volunteers after a single dose of a two- step preparation containing glyceryl trinitrate and pentaerythritol tetranitrate. Blood levels accounted for peak levels of about 40% of the glyceryl trinitrate and 0.4% of the pentaerythritol tetranitrate metabolites, respectively. Within the first 24 h post administration 22% of the glyceryl trinitrate and 19% of the pentaerythritol tetranitrate were excreted as nitrate metabolites, chiefly in form of conjugates. The determinations were obtained by gas chromatography on extremely inactive columns and electron capture detection by means of derivatives.

  1. Exposure of flight attendants to pyrethroid insecticides on commercial flights: urinary metabolite levels and implications.

    PubMed

    Wei, Binnian; Mohan, Krishnan R; Weisel, Clifford P

    2012-07-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been used for disinsection of commercial aircrafts. However, little is known about the pyrethroids exposure of flight attendants. The objective of the study was to assess pyrethroids exposure of flight attendants working on commercial aircrafts through monitoring the urinary pyrethroids metabolite levels. Eighty four urine samples were collected from 28 flight attendants, 18-65 years of age, with seventeen working on planes that were non-disinsected, and eleven working on planes that had been disinsected. Five urinary metabolites of pyrethroids were measured using gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), cis-/trans-3-(2,2-Dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclo-propane carboxylic acid (cis-/trans-Cl2CA), cis-3-(2,2-dibromovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclo-propane-1-carboxylic acid (cis-Br2CA) and 4-fluoro-3-phenoxybenzoic acid (4F-3-PBA). Flight attendants working on disinsected planes had significantly higher urinary levels of 3-PBA, cis- and trans-Cl2CA in pre, post- and 24-h-post flight samples than those on planes which did not report having been disinsected. Urinary levels of cis-Br2CA and 4F-3-PBA did not show significant differences between the two groups. Flight attendants working on international flights connected to Australia had higher urinary levels of 3-PBA, cis- and trans-Cl2CA than those on either domestic and other international flights flying among Asia, Europe and North America. Post-disinsection duration (number of days from disinsection date to flight date) was the most significant factor affecting the urinary pyrethroid metabolites levels of 3-PBA, cis- and trans-Cl2CA of the group flying on disinsected aircraft. It was concluded that working on commercial aircraft disinsected by pyrethroids resulted in elevated body burdens of 3-PBA, cis- and trans-Cl2CA.

  2. Light-responsive metabolite and transcript levels are maintained following a dark-adaptation period in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Araújo, Wagner L; Wallström, Sabá V; Rasmusson, Allan G; Fernie, Alisdair R; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel

    2012-07-01

    • The effect of previous light conditions on metabolite and transcript levels was investigated in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana during illumination and after light-enhanced dark respiration (LEDR), when dark respiration was measured. • Primary carbon metabolites and the expression of light-responsive respiratory genes were determined in A. thaliana leaves before and after 30 min of darkness following different light conditions. In addition, metabolite levels were determined in the middle of the night and the in vivo activities of cytochrome and alternative respiratory pathways were determined by oxygen isotope fractionation. • A large number of metabolites were increased in leaves of plants growing in or transiently exposed to higher light intensities. Transcript levels of respiratory genes were also increased after high light treatment. For the majority of the light-induced metabolites and transcripts, the levels were maintained after 30 min of darkness, where higher and persistent respiratory activities were also observed. The levels of many metabolites were lower at night than after 30 min of darkness imposed in the day, but respiratory activities remained similar. • The results obtained suggest that 'dark' respiration measurements, as usually performed, are probably made under conditions in which the overall status of metabolites is strongly influenced by the previous light conditions. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Serum Tryptophan Metabolite Levels During Sleep in Patients With and Without Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

    PubMed

    Heitkemper, Margaret M; Han, Claire Jungyoun; Jarrett, Monica E; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Shulman, Robert J; Raftery, Daniel; Henderson, Wendy A; Cain, Kevin C

    2016-03-01

    Poor sleep and stress are more frequently reported by women with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) than by healthy control (HC) women. The pathophysiology linking poor sleep and stress to gastrointestinal symptoms remains poorly understood. We used a metabolomic approach to determine whether tryptophan (TRP) metabolites differ between women with and without IBS and whether the levels are associated with sleep indices and serum cortisol levels. This study sample included 38 women with IBS and 21 HCs. The women were studied in a sleep laboratory for three consecutive nights. On the third night of the study, a social stressor was introduced, then blood samples were drawn every 20 min and sleep indices were measured. Metabolites were determined by targeted liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in a sample collected 1 hr after the onset of sleep. The ratios of each metabolite to TRP were used for analyses. Correlations were controlled for age and oral contraceptive use. Melatonin/TRP levels were lower (p = .005) in the IBS-diarrhea group versus the IBS-constipation and HC groups, and kynurenine/TRP ratios tended to be lower (p = .067) in the total IBS and IBS-diarrhea groups compared to HCs. Associations within the HC group included melatonin/TRP with polysomnography-sleep efficiency (r = .61, p = .006) and weaker positive correlations with the other ratios for either sleep efficiency or percentage time in rapid eye movement sleep (r > .40, p = .025-.091). This study suggests that reductions in early nighttime melatonin/TRP levels may be related to altered sleep quality in IBS, particularly those with diarrhea.

  4. Longitudinal increases of brain metabolite levels in 5-10 year old children

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Frances C.; Little, Francesca; Randall, Steven R.; Cotton, Mark F.; van der Kouwe, Andre J. W.; Laughton, Barbara; Meintjes, Ernesta M.

    2017-01-01

    Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies reveal significant changes in brain structure and structural networks that occur together with cognitive and behavioral maturation in childhood. However, the underlying cellular changes accompanying brain maturation are less understood. Examining regional age-related changes in metabolite levels provides insight into the physiology of neurodevelopment. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measures localize brain metabolism. The majority of neuroimaging studies of healthy development are from the developed world. In a longitudinal MRS study of 64 South African children aged 5 to 10 years old (29 female; 29 HIV exposed, uninfected), we examined the age-related trajectories of creatine (Cr+PCr), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), the combined NAA+N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), choline (GPC+PCh), glutamate (Glu) and the combined Glu+glutamine (Glu+Gln) in voxels within gray and white matter, as well as subcortically in the basal ganglia (BG). In frontal gray matter, we found age-related increases in Cr+PCr, NAA, NAA+NAAG and Glu+Gln levels pointing to synaptic activity likely related to learning. In the BG we observed increased levels of Glu, Glu+Gln and NAA+NAAG with age that point to subcortical synaptic reorganization. In white matter, we found increased levels of Cr+PCr, NAA, NAA+NAAG, Glu and Glu+Gln with age, implicating these metabolites in ongoing myelination. We observed no sex-age or HIV exposure-age interactions, indicating that physiological changes are independent of sex during this time period. The metabolite trajectories presented, therefore, provide a critical benchmark of normal cellular growth for a low socioeconomic pediatric population in the developing world against which pathology and abnormal development may be compared. PMID:28700727

  5. Metabolite profiling during cold acclimation of Lolium perenne genotypes distinct in the level of frost tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Aleksandra; Zwierzykowski, Zbigniew; Rapacz, Marcin; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Ciesiołka, Danuta; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2015-11-01

    Abiotic stresses, including low temperature, can significantly reduce plant yielding. The knowledge on the molecular basis of stress tolerance could help to improve its level in species of relatively high importance to agriculture. Unfortunately, the complex research performed so far mainly on model species and also, to some extent, on cereals does not fully cover the demands of other agricultural plants of temperate climate, including forage grasses. Two Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) genotypes with contrasting levels of frost tolerance, the high frost tolerant (HFT) and the low frost tolerant (LFT) genotypes, were selected for comparative metabolomic research. The work focused on the analysis of leaf metabolite accumulation before and after seven separate time points of cold acclimation. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to identify amino acids (alanine, proline, glycine, glutamic and aspartic acid, serine, lysine and asparagine), carbohydrates (fructose, glucose, sucrose, raffinose and trehalose) and their derivatives (mannitol, sorbitol and inositol) accumulated in leaves in low temperature. The observed differences in the level of frost tolerance between the analysed genotypes could be partially due to the time point of cold acclimation at which the accumulation level of crucial metabolite started to increase. In the HFT genotype, earlier accumulation was observed for proline and asparagine. The increased amounts of alanine, glutamic and aspartic acids, and asparagine during cold acclimation could be involved in the regulation of photosynthesis intensity in L. perenne. Among the analysed carbohydrates, only raffinose revealed a significant association with the acclimation process in this species.

  6. Biomarkers of susceptibility following benzene exposure: influence of genetic polymorphisms on benzene metabolism and health effects.

    PubMed

    Carbonari, Damiano; Chiarella, Pieranna; Mansi, Antonella; Pigini, Daniela; Iavicoli, Sergio; Tranfo, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous occupational and environmental pollutant. Improved industrial hygiene allowed airborne concentrations close to the environmental context (1-1000 µg/m(3)). Conversely, new limits for benzene levels in urban air were set (5 µg/m(3)). The biomonitoring of exposure to such low benzene concentrations are performed measuring specific and sensitive biomarkers such as S-phenylmercapturic acid, trans, trans-muconic acid and urinary benzene: many studies referred high variability in the levels of these biomarkers, suggesting the involvement of polymorphic metabolic genes in the individual susceptibility to benzene toxicity. We reviewed the influence of metabolic polymorphisms on the biomarkers levels of benzene exposure and effect, in order to understand the real impact of benzene exposure on subjects with increased susceptibility.

  7. A modified acidic approach for DNA extraction from plant species containing high levels of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, M M; Siqueira, M V B M; Val, T M; Pavanelli, J C; Monteiro, M; Grando, C; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Gimenes, M A

    2014-08-25

    Purified genomic DNA can be difficult to obtain from some plant species because of the presence of impurities such as polysaccharides, which are often co-extracted with DNA. In this study, we developed a fast, simple, and low-cost protocol for extracting DNA from plants containing high levels of secondary metabolites. This protocol does not require the use of volatile toxic reagents such as mercaptoethanol, chloroform, or phenol and allows the extraction of high-quality DNA from wild and cultivated tropical species.

  8. Increased biogenic catecholamine and metabolite levels in two patients with malignant catatonia.

    PubMed

    Nisijima, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of malignant catatonia, a rare life-threatening psychiatric syndrome, has not yet been elucidated. This paper reports on two patients with malignant catatonia who showed elevated urinary or plasma catecholamine levels. Patient 1 had high catecholamine and metabolite levels in a 24-hour urine sample, and patient 2 had elevated plasma catecholamine levels. These findings indicate the presence of peripheral sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity in malignant catatonia. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunction, including tachycardia, labile blood pressure, and diaphoresis, are typical features of malignant catatonia and may be related to the increased levels of biogenic amines in these cases. Although the findings in the present study cannot entirely explain the pathophysiology of malignant catatonia, they do indicate that hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system may be involved in the pathology of this condition.

  9. Altered serum levels of kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Curto, Martina; Lionetto, Luana; Negro, Andrea; Capi, Matilde; Perugino, Francesca; Fazio, Francesco; Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Simmaco, Maurizio; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Martelletti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The reported efficacy of memantine in the treatment of patients with cluster headache (CH) suggests that NMDA receptors are involved in mechanisms of nociceptive sensitization within the trigeminal system associated with CH. NMDA receptors are activated or inhibited by neuroactive compounds generated by tryptophan metabolism through the kynurenine pathway. In the accompanying manuscript, we have found that serum levels of all kynurenine metabolites are altered in patients with chronic migraine. Here, we have extended the study to patients affected by episodic or chronic CH as compared to healthy controls. We assessed serum levels of kynurenine (KYN), kynurenic Acid (KYNA), anthranilic acid (ANA), 3-hydroxy-anthranilic acid (3-HANA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), xanthurenic acid (XA), quinolinic acid (QUINA), tryptophan (Trp) and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) by means of a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) method in 21 patients affected by CH (15 with episodic and 6 with chronic CH), and 35 age-matched healthy subjects. Patients with psychiatric co-morbidities, systemic inflammatory, endocrine or neurological disorders, and mental retardation were excluded. LC/MS-MS analysis of kynurenine metabolites showed significant reductions in the levels of KYN (-36 %), KYNA (-34 %), 3-HK (-51 %), 3-HANA (-54 %), XA (-25 %), 5-HIAA (-39 %) and QUINA (-43 %) in the serum of the overall population of patients affected by CH, as compared to healthy controls. Serum levels of Trp and ANA were instead significantly increased in CH patients (+18 % and +54 %, respectively). There was no difference in levels of any metabolite between patients affected by episodic and chronic CH, with the exception of KYN levels, which were higher in patients with chronic CH. The reduced levels of KYNA (an NMDA receptor antagonist) support the hypothesis that NMDA receptors are overactive in CH. A similar reduction in KYNA levels was shown in the accompanying

  10. Benzene in blood and phenol in urine in monitoring benzene exposure in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Braier, L.; Levy, A.; Dror, K.; Pardo, A.

    1981-01-01

    Determinations of benzene concentration in blood and of phenol in urine were made by head-space gas chromatography techniques on samples taken near the end of the work day from two groups of workers potentially exposed to low levels of benzene in the work-place atmosphere. Preliminary results suggest that benzene in blood is more reliable than phenol tests for assessing both exposure and uptake of benzene. Normal values of phenol in urine (10 mg/liter or less) were found in nearly all those cases in which benzene was detected in the blood.

  11. Intracellular metabolite levels shape sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate respiration

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Boswell A.; Halevy, Itay

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantitative model for sulfur isotope fractionation accompanying bacterial and archaeal dissimilatory sulfate respiration. By incorporating independently available biochemical data, the model can reproduce a large number of recent experimental fractionation measurements with only three free parameters: (i) the sulfur isotope selectivity of sulfate uptake into the cytoplasm, (ii) the ratio of reduced to oxidized electron carriers supporting the respiration pathway, and (iii) the ratio of in vitro to in vivo levels of respiratory enzyme activity. Fractionation is influenced by all steps in the dissimilatory pathway, which means that environmental sulfate and sulfide levels control sulfur isotope fractionation through the proximate influence of intracellular metabolites. Although sulfur isotope fractionation is a phenotypic trait that appears to be strain specific, we show that it converges on near-thermodynamic behavior, even at micromolar sulfate levels, as long as intracellular sulfate reduction rates are low enough (<<1 fmol H2S⋅cell−1⋅d−1). PMID:25362045

  12. Intracellular metabolite levels shape sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate respiration.

    PubMed

    Wing, Boswell A; Halevy, Itay

    2014-12-23

    We present a quantitative model for sulfur isotope fractionation accompanying bacterial and archaeal dissimilatory sulfate respiration. By incorporating independently available biochemical data, the model can reproduce a large number of recent experimental fractionation measurements with only three free parameters: (i) the sulfur isotope selectivity of sulfate uptake into the cytoplasm, (ii) the ratio of reduced to oxidized electron carriers supporting the respiration pathway, and (iii) the ratio of in vitro to in vivo levels of respiratory enzyme activity. Fractionation is influenced by all steps in the dissimilatory pathway, which means that environmental sulfate and sulfide levels control sulfur isotope fractionation through the proximate influence of intracellular metabolites. Although sulfur isotope fractionation is a phenotypic trait that appears to be strain specific, we show that it converges on near-thermodynamic behavior, even at micromolar sulfate levels, as long as intracellular sulfate reduction rates are low enough (<1 fmol H2S⋅cell(-1)⋅d(-1)).

  13. Intracellular metabolite levels shape sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Boswell A.; Halevy, Itay

    2014-12-01

    We present a quantitative model for sulfur isotope fractionation accompanying bacterial and archaeal dissimilatory sulfate respiration. By incorporating independently available biochemical data, the model can reproduce a large number of recent experimental fractionation measurements with only three free parameters: (i) the sulfur isotope selectivity of sulfate uptake into the cytoplasm, (ii) the ratio of reduced to oxidized electron carriers supporting the respiration pathway, and (iii) the ratio of in vitro to in vivo levels of respiratory enzyme activity. Fractionation is influenced by all steps in the dissimilatory pathway, which means that environmental sulfate and sulfide levels control sulfur isotope fractionation through the proximate influence of intracellular metabolites. Although sulfur isotope fractionation is a phenotypic trait that appears to be strain specific, we show that it converges on near-thermodynamic behavior, even at micromolar sulfate levels, as long as intracellular sulfate reduction rates are low enough (<<1 fmol H2Sṡcell-1ṡd-1).

  14. Febuxostat as a novel option to optimize thiopurines' metabolism in patients with inadequate metabolite levels.

    PubMed

    Doré, Maxime; Frenette, Anne Julie; Mansour, Anne-Marie; Troyanov, Yves; Bégin, Josiane

    2014-05-01

    To report the use of febuxostat in order to potentiate thiopurines' metabolism in a patient on azathioprine (AZA) therapy with low metabolite 6-thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) levels and elevated metabolite 6-methylmercaptopurine (6-MMP) levels. A 44-year-old woman with a history of anti-signal recognition particle necrotizing myopathy was treated with AZA-allopurinol combination therapy. When she developed an atypical drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, allopurinol was replaced by the new xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor febuxostat, at a daily dose of 40 mg. Febuxostat-AZA combination was successful with 6-TGN reaching therapeutic levels while 6-MMP levels remained low. After 5 months, she developed similar manifestations that she had presented on AZA-allopurinol combination. Febuxostat and AZA were then stopped. AZA and 6-MP are both inactive pro-drugs that undergo a complex metabolic transformation leading to active 6-TGN and potentially hepatotoxic 6-MMP. Some patients with unfavorable thiopurine metabolism might benefit from addition of XO inhibitor allopurinol in order to potentiate 6-TGN and reduce 6-MMP levels. It is likely that febuxostat, via its XO inhibition, would exhibit the same effect on thiopurines' metabolism. It has been shown that low dose of febuxostat was able to prevent hypermethylation and to potentiate 6-TGN levels in an AZA-treated patient. Thus, febuxostat could be useful in optimizing thiopurines' metabolism, but more data are needed before this practice can be recommended. The mechanisms by which febuxostat optimizes thiopurines' metabolism remain to be confirmed. Also, the optimal dose of febuxostat for this use remains to be determined.

  15. Levels of seven urinary phthalate metabolites in a human reference population.

    PubMed Central

    Blount, B C; Silva, M J; Caudill, S P; Needham, L L; Pirkle, J L; Sampson, E J; Lucier, G W; Jackson, R J; Brock, J W

    2000-01-01

    Using a novel and highly selective technique, we measured monoester metabolites of seven commonly used phthalates in urine samples from a reference population of 289 adult humans. This analytical approach allowed us to directly measure the individual phthalate metabolites responsible for the animal reproductive and developmental toxicity while avoiding contamination from the ubiquitous parent compounds. The monoesters with the highest urinary levels found were monoethyl phthalate (95th percentile, 3,750 ppb, 2,610 microg/g creatinine), monobutyl phthalate (95th percentile, 294 ppb, 162 microg/g creatinine), and monobenzyl phthalate (95th percentile, 137 ppb, 92 microg/g creatinine), reflecting exposure to diethyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, and benzyl butyl phthalate. Women of reproductive age (20-40 years) were found to have significantly higher levels of monobutyl phthalate, a reproductive and developmental toxicant in rodents, than other age/gender groups (p < 0.005). Current scientific and regulatory attention on phthalates has focused almost exclusively on health risks from exposure to only two phthalates, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and di-isononyl phthalate. Our findings strongly suggest that health-risk assessments for phthalate exposure in humans should include diethyl, dibutyl, and benzyl butyl phthalates. PMID:11049818

  16. Exposure to carbon monoxide, methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), and benzene levels inside vehicles traveling on an urban area in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jo, W K; Park, K H

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to allow systematic comparison of exposure on public (40-seater buses) and private (four passengers cars) transport modes for carbon monoxide (CO), methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), and benzene by carrying out simultaneous measurements along the same routes. There were statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in the concentrations of all target compounds among the three microenvironments; inside autos; inside buses; and in ambient air. The target compounds were significantly correlated for all the three environments, with at least p < 0.05. The in-vehicle concentrations of MTBE and benzene were significantly higher (p < 0.0001), on the average 3.5 times higher, in the car with a carbureted engine than in the other three electronic fuel-injected cars. On the other hand, the CO concentrations were not significantly different among the four cars. The in-auto MTBE levels (48.5 micrograms/m3 as a median) measured during commutes in this study was 2-3 times higher than the New Jersey and Connecticut's results. The in-auto concentration of CO (4.8 ppm as a median) in this study was comparable with those in later studies in some American cities, but much lower than those in earlier studies in other American cities. The in-bus CO concentration was 3.6 ppm as a median. As a median, the in-auto concentration of benzene was 44.9 micrograms/m3, while the in-bus concentration 17.0 micrograms/m3. The in-auto/in-bus exposure ratios for all the target compounds was 31-40% higher than the corresponding concentration ratios, due to the higher travel speed on buses in the specified commute route as compared to the autos.

  17. Validation of Armadillo officinalis Dumèril, 1816 (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) as a bioindicator: in vivo study of air benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Agodi, A; Oliveri Conti, G; Barchitta, M; Quattrocchi, A; Lombardo, B M; Montesanto, G; Messina, G; Fiore, M; Ferrante, M

    2015-04-01

    This study tests the potential for using Armadillo officinalis as a bioindicator of exposure to and activation of benzene metabolic pathways using an in vivo model. A. officinalis specimens collected in a natural reserve were divided into a control and three test groups exposed to 2.00, 5.32 or 9.09 µg/m(3) benzene for 24h. Three independent tests were performed to assess model reproducibility. Animals were dissected to obtain three pooled tissue samples per group: hepatopancreas (HEP), other organs and tissues (OOT), and exoskeleton (EXO). Muconic acid (MA), S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA), two human metabolites of benzene, and changes in mtDNA copy number, a human biomarker of benzene exposure, were determined in each sample; benzene was determined only in EXO. MA was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection, S-PMA by triple quadrupole mass spectrometer liquid chromatography with electro spray ionization (LC-MS-ESI-TQD), mtDNA by real-time quantitative PCR and end-point PCR, and benzene by quadrupole mass spectrometer head-space gas chromatography (HSGC-MS). MA and S-PMA levels rose both in HEP and OOT; EXO exhibited increasing benzene concentrations; and mtDNA copy number rose in HEP but not in OOT samples. Overall, our findings demonstrate that A. officinalis is a sensitive bioindicator of air benzene exposure and show for the first time its ability to reproduce human metabolic dynamics.

  18. Reference range levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the US population by measurement of urinary monohydroxy metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Grainger, James . E-mail: jag2@cdc.gov; Huang, Wenlin; Patterson, Donald G.; Turner, Wayman E.; Pirkle, James; Caudill, Samuel P.; Wang, Richard Y.; Needham, Larry L.; Sampson, Eric J.

    2006-03-15

    We developed a gas chromatography isotope-dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC/Id-HRMS) method for measuring 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites representing seven parent PAHs in 3 mL of urine at low parts-per-trillion levels. PAH levels were determined in urine samples collected in 1999 and 2000 from approximately 2400 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and, for the first time, reference range values were calculated for these metabolites in the US population. Using this GC/ID-HRMS method, we found detectable concentrations for monohydroxy metabolite isomers of fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene, benzo[c]phenanthrene, and benz[a]anthracene. Some monohydroxy metabolite isomers of benzo[c]phenanthrene, chrysene, and benz[a]anthracene exhibited low detection frequencies that did not allow for geometric mean calculations. Our study results enabled us to establish a reference range for the targeted PAHs in the general US population.

  19. Prenatal urinary phthalate metabolites levels and neurodevelopment in children at two and three years of age

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Rojo, Martha M.; Cantoral, Alejandra; Cantonwine, David E.; Schnaas, Lourdes; Peterson, Karen; Hu, Howard; Meeker, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that prenatal phthalate exposure affects neurodevelopment and behavior during the first years of life. Objectives To evaluate the effect of maternal urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites during pregnancy on mental and psychomotor development in children 24-36 months of age. Methods This analysis was conducted on the first three years of life among a subsample of 136 mother-child pairs from the ELEMENT cohort studies conducted in Mexico City. Maternal urine samples collected during the third trimester of pregnancy were analyzed for 9 phthalate metabolites: Mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP), Mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP), mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP), Mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP), and four di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) metabolites [mono-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate (MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP), and mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP)]. Among the 136 children, 135 (99.3%) completed the study period. Child neurodevelopment was assessed using mental and psychomotor development indexes (MDI and PDI) from a Bayley (BSID II) test at 24, 30, and 36 months of age. The effect of prenatal phthalate exposure on neurodevelopment was estimated using linear regression models for longitudinal data clustered at the individual level. Results No significant associations were observed among all children combined, but differential effects by gender were found. Among girls, there was a negative association between MDI and DEHP metabolites MEHP (β = −2.11 [95% CI: −3.73, −0.49]), MEHHP (β = −1.89 [95% CI: −3.64, −0.15]), MEOHP (β = −1.80 [95% CI: −3.58, −0.03]) MECPP (β = −2.52 [95% CI: −4.44, −0.61]), and DEHP (β = −3.41 [95% CI: −5.26, −1.55]); there was no significant effect among boys. Male PDI was positively related to MBzP (β = 1.79 [95% CI: 0.14, 3.45]) and MCPP (β = 1.64 [95% CI: 0

  20. Protozoan growth rates on secondary-metabolite-producing Pseudomonas spp. correlate with high-level protozoan taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Annette L; Winding, Anne; Altenburger, Andreas; Ekelund, Flemming

    2011-03-01

    Different features can protect bacteria against protozoan grazing, for example large size, rapid movement, and production of secondary metabolites. Most papers dealing with these matters focus on bacteria. Here, we describe protozoan features that affect their ability to grow on secondary-metabolite-producing bacteria, and examine whether different bacterial secondary metabolites affect protozoa similarly. We investigated the growth of nine different soil protozoa on six different Pseudomonas strains, including the four secondary-metabolite-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens DR54 and CHA0, Pseudomonas chlororaphis MA342 and Pseudomonas sp. DSS73, as well as the two nonproducers P. fluorescens DSM50090(T) and P. chlororaphis ATCC43928. Secondary metabolite producers affected protozoan growth differently. In particular, bacteria with extracellular secondary metabolites seemed more inhibiting than bacteria with membrane-bound metabolites. Interestingly, protozoan response seemed to correlate with high-level protozoan taxonomy, and amoeboid taxa tolerated a broader range of Pseudomonas strains than did the non-amoeboid taxa. This stresses the importance of studying both protozoan and bacterial characteristics in order to understand bacterial defence mechanisms and potentially improve survival of bacteria introduced into the environment, for example for biocontrol purposes. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Urinary 2/16 estrogen metabolite ratio levels in healthy women: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Dallal, Cher; Taioli, Emanuela

    2010-01-01

    This is a summary of the published literature on the urinary 2/16 estrogen metabolite ratio in human populations, and a report the observed range of normal values in healthy women. Original research studies that included the measurement of urinary estrogen metabolites in human subjects were identified through an extensive Medline search; 43 distinct studies were indentified, including a total of 6802 healthy women. The range of mean values of the 2/16 ratio measured with the ELISA method varied from 0.98 to 1.74; in studies of pre-menopausal women the range of mean values was 1.5 to 2.74, in studies of post-menopausal women mean values ranged from 1.15 to 2.25. The heterogeneity across studies was highly significant (p-value Q test: <0.0001). In multivariable analyses, only race confirmed its role as an independent predictor of 2/16 ratio (F value: 7.95; p value: 0.009), after adjustment for age and menopausal status. There appears to be a large body of data on the 2/16 urinary ratio in healthy women. However, summary estimates are difficult to perform due to the high variability of the published study-specific values. The data suggests that race may be a contributor to 2/16 urinary ratio levels. PMID:20601100

  2. No increased levels of the nicotine metabolite cotinine in smokers with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bozikas, Vasilis P; Niopas, Ioannis; Kafantari, Anna; Kanaze, Feraz Imad; Gabrieli, Chrysi; Melissidis, Petros; Gamvrula, Katerina; Fokas, Kostas; Karavatos, Athanasios

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking cigarettes has repeatedly been found to be greater in schizophrenia as compared with other psychiatric patients and the general population. Patients with schizophrenia have been found to engage in heavy smoking and consumption of higher doses of nicotine, probably by deeper inhalation of cigarettes. The aim of the current study was to assess nicotine exposure through smoking by measuring urinary cotinine, the major nicotine metabolite, in a group of smokers from Greece of smokers with schizophrenia and smokers from the general population. Participants were current smokers and belonged to one of two groups: 35 patients with schizophrenia and 48 healthy controls matched in age, education, and gender. The quantitative analysis of cotinine, the major metabolite of nicotine, in urine samples was performed by a modified high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Patients with schizophrenia who smoke presented a significantly larger time interval between last cigarette smoked and urine sample collection, as well as a significantly higher average number of cigarettes consumed daily than normal smokers. Urinary cotinine levels of patients with schizophrenia who smoke did not significantly differ from that of normal smokers when adjusted for average number of cigarettes per day and time interval between last cigarette smoked and urine collection. These results suggest that patients with schizophrenia did not present higher nicotine exposure through smoking compared with smokers from the community. The pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic properties of nicotine, as well as patient medications of the patients may explain our findings.

  3. Urinary levels of substance P and its metabolites are not increased in interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D J; Tenis, N; Rosamilia, A; Clements, J A; Dwyer, P L

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether interstitial cystitis is associated with the increased release of substance P from the bladder wall into urine, by measuring urinary excretion rates of substance P and its metabolites in women with interstitial cystitis and in a control group of women with stress incontinence and normal bladder function. Catheter urine was collected from 13 patients and 10 controls during a water diuresis ( approximately 10 mL/min) before and after instilling the bladder with 100 mL of water. The contribution of the bladder wall to urinary substance P peptides was assessed by measuring the change in substance P peptide levels after 2 min of bladder stasis before and after instillation. Absolute substance P excretion rates were similar in patients with interstitial cystitis and controls; 2 min of bladder stasis reduced the substance P excretion rate (P = 0.03) and increased the excretion rate of substance P metabolites (P = 0.01). The release of substance P from the bladder wall was not increased in patients with interstitial cystitis.

  4. Semen quality and insulin-like factor 3: Associations with urinary and seminal levels of phthalate metabolites in adult males.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Hsiang; Wu, Meng-Hsing; Pan, Hsien-An; Guo, Pao-Lin; Lee, Ching-Chang

    2017-04-01

    Certain phthalates have adverse effects on male reproductive functions in animals, and potentially affect human testicular function and spermatogenesis, but little is known about the active mechanisms. We measured the urinary and seminal phthalate metabolites and explored their associations on insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3) and semen quality. Urine, blood, and semen samples were collected from the male partners of subfertile (n = 253) and fertile (n = 37) couples in a reproductive center in southern Taiwan. INSL3, reproductive hormones, semen-quality, and 11 phthalate metabolites in urine and semen were measured. There were significant correlations in the distribution pattern of metabolites, such as the relative contribution of low or high molecular weight phthalate metabolites. The significantly monotonic trends in semen volume, sperm concentration and motility were associated with increasing quartiles of INSL3 (all p-trend < 0.001). In adjusted regression models, increases in urinary phthalate metabolites levels were adversely associated with sperm concentration (monobenzyl phthalate [MBzP], mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate [MEHP] and MEHP%), motility (MBzP and MEHP) and INSL3 (MBzP, MEHP and MEHP%) (all p < 0.01). Higher seminal phthalate metabolite levels were associated with decreases in sperm concentration (MEHP and mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate), motility (mono-ethyl phthalate [MEP] and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate [DEHP] metabolites), normal morphology (MEP), and INSL3 (monomethyl phthalate and MEP) (all p < 0.05). Our data suggest that INSL3 secretion, reproductive hormone balance, and sperm production and quality might be simultaneously adversely affected for individuals excreting increasing levels of phthalates metabolites (especially di-ethyl phthalate, butylbenzyl phthalate, and DEHP) in urine and semen samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased level of urinary nitric oxide metabolites in leprosy patients during type 2 reactions and decreased after antireactional therapy.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Keshar K; Gupta, Manisha; Girdhar, B K; Girdhar, A; Chakma, J K; Sengupta, U

    2007-12-01

    To assess the urinary nitric oxide metabolites in lepromatous patients in ENL (type 2 reactions) and to compare these metabolites after subsidence of reactions following antireactional therapy. Further to compare the levels in a group of lepromatous leprosy patients without reactions. The initial urine samples were collected from lepromatous leprosy patients when they came with ENL before commencing antireactional therapy and repeat samples were taken after resolution of ENL. Morning urine samples were collected from LL patients without reactions. Nitrites and nitrates in urine were measured using commercially available kit. Mean levels of nitric oxide metabolites of LL patients with ENL and without ENL were compared by student's 't' test. The level during ENL and after resolution was compared by paired 't' test. The nitric oxide metabolites were analyzed in 14 LL patients with ENL and after resolution of ENL and in 5 LL patients without reaction. The level of urinary nitric oxide metabolite is higher in LL patients in ENL reaction compared to LL patients without reaction (P < 0.04). These levels were reduced significantly with resolution of reaction following antireactional therapy (P < 0.004). The findings of this study suggested that the NO/NOM excretion is increased in leprosy patients during ENL episodes. With antireactional therapy (steroids) and clinical improvement the levels are reduced.

  6. Pomegranate Juice and Extracts Provide Similar Levels of Plasma and Urinary Ellagitannin Metabolites in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanjun; McKeever, Rodney; Henning, Susanne M.; Lee, Ru-po; Suchard, Marc A.; Li, Zhaoping; Chen, Steve; Thames, Gail; Zerlin, Alona; Nguyen, Martha; Wang, David; Dreher, Mark; Heber, David

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Pomegranate juice (PJ), a rich source of polyphenols including ellagitannins, has attracted much attention due to its reported health benefits. This has resulted in the consumption of liquid and powder pomegranate extracts as alternatives to PJ. Therefore establishing the bioavailability of polyphenols from these extract preparations is necessary. Sixteen healthy volunteers sequentially consumed, with a 1-week washout period between treatments, PJ (8 ounces, Wonderful fruit variety), a pomegranate polyphenol liquid extract (POMxl, 8 ounces), and a pomegranate polyphenol powder extract (POMxp, 1,000 mg). The three interventions provided 857, 776, and 755 mg of polyphenols as gallic acid equivalents, respectively. Plasma bioavailability, judged based on ellagic acid levels over a 6-hour period, did not show statistical differences in area under the curve for the three interventions: 0.14 ± 0.05, 0.11 ± 0.03, and 0.11 ± 0.04 μmol · hour/L for PJ, POMxl, and POMxp, respectively. The time of maximum concentration was delayed for POMxp (2.58 ± 0.42 hours) compared to PJ (0.65 ± 0.23 hours) and POMxl (0.94 ± 0.06 hours). Urolithin-A glucuronide, a urinary metabolite of ellagic acid, was not significantly different with the three interventions, reaching levels of approximately 1,000 ng/mL. This study demonstrates that ellagitannin metabolites, delivered from pomegranate fruits, as PJ, POMxl, and POMxp, reach equivalent levels with a delay in time of maximum concentration of POMxp compared to PJ and POMxl. PMID:18598186

  7. Firefighters' exposure biomonitoring: Impact of firefighting activities on levels of urinary monohydroxyl metabolites.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta; Slezakova, Klara; Alves, Maria José; Fernandes, Adília; Teixeira, João Paulo; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Pereira, Maria do Carmo; Morais, Simone

    2016-11-01

    The concentrations of six urinary monohydroxyl metabolites (OH-PAHs) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, namely 1-hydroxynaphthalene, 1-hydroxyacenaphthene, 2-hydroxyfluorene, 1-hydroxyphenanthrene, 1-hydroxypyrene (1OHPy), and 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene, were assessed in the post-shift urine of wildland firefighters involved in fire combat activities at six Portuguese fire corporations, and compared with those of non-exposed subjects. Overall, median levels of urinary individual and total OH-PAHs (ΣOH-PAHs) suggest an increased exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during firefighting activities with ΣOH-PAH levels in exposed firefighters 1.7-35 times higher than in non-exposed ones. Urinary 1-hydroxynaphthalene and/or 1-hydroxyacenapthene were the predominant compounds, representing 63-98% of ΣOH-PAHs, followed by 2-hydroxyfluorene (1-17%), 1-hydroxyphenanthrene (1-13%), and 1OHPy (0.3-10%). A similar profile was observed when gender discrimination was considered. Participation in fire combat activities promoted an increase of the distribution percentage of 1-hydroxynaphthalene and 1-hydroxyacenaphthene, while contributions of 1-hydroxyphenanthrene and 1OHPy decreased. The detected urinary 1OHPy concentrations (1.73×10(-2) to 0.152μmol/mol creatinine in exposed subjects versus 1.21×10(-2) to 5.44×10(-2)μmol/mol creatinine in non-exposed individuals) were lower than the benchmark level (0.5μmol/mol creatinine) proposed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. This compound, considered the biomarker of exposure to PAHs, was the less abundant one from the six analyzed biomarkers. Thus the inclusion of other metabolites, in addition to 1OHPy, in future studies is suggested to better estimate firefighters' occupational exposure to PAHs. Moreover, strong to moderate Spearman correlations were observed between individual compounds and ΣOH-PAHs corroborating the prevalence of an emission source.

  8. Effects of dietary protein levels for gestating gilts on reproductive performance, blood metabolites and milk composition.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y D; Jang, S K; Kim, D H; Oh, H K; Kim, Y Y

    2014-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary CP levels in gestation under equal lysine content on reproductive performance, blood metabolites and milk composition of gilts. A total of 25 gilts (F1, Yorkshire×Landrace) were allotted to 4 dietary treatments at breeding in a completely randomized design, and fed 1 of 4 experimental diets containing different CP levels (11%, 13%, 15%, or 17%) at 2.0 kg/d throughout the gestation. Body weight of gilts at 24 h postpartum tended to increase linearly (p = 0.09) as dietary CP level increased. In lactation, backfat thickness, ADFI, litter size and weaning to estrus interval (WEI) did not differ among dietary treatments. There were linear increases in litter and piglet weight at 21 d of lactation (p<0.05) and weight gain of litter (p<0.01) and piglet (p<0.05) throughout the lactation as dietary CP level increased. Plasma urea nitrogen levels of gilts in gestation and at 24 h postpartum were linearly elevated as dietary CP level increased (p<0.05). Free fatty acid (FFA) levels in plasma of gestating gilts increased as dietary CP level increased up to 15%, and then decreased with quadratic effects (15 d, p<0.01; 90 d, p<0.05), and a quadratic trend (70 d, p = 0.06). There were no differences in plasma FFA, glucose levels and milk composition in lactation. These results indicate that increasing dietary CP level under equal lysine content in gestation increases BW of gilts and litter performance but does not affect litter size and milk composition. Feeding over 13% CP diet for gestating gilts could be recommended to improve litter growth.

  9. Selenium metabolite levels in human urine after dosing selenium in different chemical forms

    SciTech Connect

    Hasunuma, Ryoichi; Tsuda, Morizo; Ogawa, Tadao; Kawanishi, Yasuhiro

    1993-11-01

    It has been well known that selenium in marine fish such as tuna and swordfish protects the toxicity of methylmercury in vivo. The protective potency might depend on the chemical forms of selenium in the meat of marine fish sebastes and sperm whale. Little has been revealed, however, on the chemical forms of selenium in the meat of these animals or the selenium metabolites in urine, because the amount of the element is very scarce. Urine is the major excretory route for selenium. The chemical forms of urinary selenium may reflect the metabolism of the element. We have developed methodology for analysis of selenium-containing components in human urine. Using this method, we have observed the time courses of excretory levels of urinary selenium components after a single dose of selenium as selenious acid, selenomethionine, trimethylselenonium ion or tuna meat. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Myelofibrosis and benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Tondel, M; Persson, B; Carstensen, J

    1995-02-01

    Petrol station attendants are exposed to benzene, a well-known carcinogen for blood malignancies. A case of myelofibrosis in a petrol station attendant is presented, along with other reports of myelofibrosis after benzene exposure obtained from the Swedish Cancer Environment Register. Findings of an increased risk for myelofibrosis in the transport sector also suggest a causal relationship with benzene.

  11. Association of circulating irisin levels with metabolic and metabolite profiles of Korean adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jang, Han Byul; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kang, Jae Heon; Park, Sang Ick; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Hye-Ja

    2017-08-01

    Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, has been suggested to regulate energy metabolism. We studied the relationship between circulating irisin and metabolic and metabolite profiles of Korean adolescents, and investigated the effects of physical activity, obesity, and metabolic syndrome (MetS) on irisin levels. Data were obtained from the Korean Children-Adolescents Study. Our cross-sectional study included 618 adolescents (370 normal-weight and 248 obese adolescents; 316 boys and 302 girls) aged 12-15years. Body composition was determined using an impedance body composition analyzer and general participant characteristics and lifestyle information were obtained from questionnaires. Serum irisin levels were measured using a commercial kit. Mean body mass index (BMI) was 19.4kg/m(2) in normal-weight adolescents and 31.4kg/m(2) in obese adolescents. Circulating irisin was positively correlated with adiposity indices, including BMI z-score, waist circumference, percent body fat, fat mass, fat-free mass, fat mass to fat-free mass ratio, and lipid and glucose metabolism markers, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (all p≤0.006). Of these, increased body fat mass [standardized (Std) ß, 0.23; p<0.0001], LDL-C (Std ß, 0.14; p=0.0005) and fasting glucose (Std ß, 0.08; p=0.0383) were the main independent factors associated with higher irisin levels. Moreover, elevated serum irisin was associated with the risk of obesity [odds ratio (OR], 2.2; confidence interval (CI), 1.19-3.87] and MetS (OR, 2.0; CI, 1.15-3.47). Furthermore, irisin and branched-chain amino acids were positively associated (p<4×10(-4) for Bonferroni correction). Additionally, in the normal-weight group, girls had higher irisin levels than boys (p=0.006) and adolescents who engaged in regular physical activity had higher levels of irisin than sedentary adolescents (p=0

  12. Assessment of the levels of DDT and its metabolites in soil and dust samples from Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Salinas, Rebeca I; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando; Batres-Esquivel, Lilia E; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the levels of DDT and its metabolites in two environmental matrices (soil and dust) in five communities in Chiapas, Mexico. DDT and its metabolites were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The soil levels of total DDT ranged from non detectable (levels ranged from non detectable (

  13. [Changes in levels of human nutritious metabolites after exposure to abnormal acceleration of sea state].

    PubMed

    Mo, F F; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Zhang, H W; Li, M

    2016-04-20

    To investigate the changes in the levels of human blood nutritious metabolites and its major regulating factors after exposure to abnormal acceleration of sea state, and to provide clues for further investigating the mechanism of fatigue due to maritime operations. Using randomly sampling method, 60 healthy male adults from one troop were selected as the subjects on April 20, 2010. All subjects were exposed to six degrees of freedom motion simulator ship for 15 min. Their blood samples were collected before and after exposure to abnormal acceleration immediately. The metabolomic technology was used to measure the levels of nutritious metabolites in the serum. Enzyme - linked immunosorbent assay or radioimmunoassay was used to measure the levels of glucocorticoids, adrenaline, insulin, glucagon, ghrelin, resistin, leptin, and gastric inhibitory peptide. After exposure to abnormal acceleration, the subjects showed significant decreases in the levels of serum essential amino acids, such as L-lysine[(23.63±8.24)×10(6) vs(32.83±13.58)×10(6), P<0.05], L-methionine[(4.16±1.12)×10(6) vs(5.80±1.69)×10(6), P<0.05], and L-tryptophan[(29.38±8.56)×10(6) vs (35.93±11.82)×10(6), P<0.05], and the levels of some non-essential amino acids, such as L-histidine[(1.69±0.55)×10(6) vs(2.16±0.92)×10(6), P<0.05] and 4-hydroxy- L-proline[(3.21±1.50)× 10(6) vs (7.92±4.79)×10(6), P<0.05]. After exposure to abnormal acceleration, the subjects had significant increases in the levels of serum carbohydrate metabolites, such as glucose[(2412.40±700.36)×10(6) vs(1939.30±554.33)×10(6), P< 0.05] and pyruvic acid[(9.97±5.96)×10(6) vs(2.43±1.34)×10(6), P<0.05], and the levels of fat metabolites, such as β-hydroxybutyric acid[(37.47±60.21)×10(6) vs(10.29±20.64)×10(6), P<0.05], oleic acid[(31.94±30.39)×10(6) vs (15.94±10.37)×10(6), P<0.05], and linoleic acid[(26.19±19.16)× 10(6) vs (13.58±6.29)× 10(6), P<0.05]. After exposure to abnormal acceleration, the subjects

  14. Development of Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2973 Vitamin D Metabolites in Frozen Human Serum (High Level).

    PubMed

    Tai, Susan; Nelson, Michael; Bedner, Mary; Lang, Brian; Phinney, Karen; Sander, Lane; Yen, James; Betz, Joseph; Sempos, Christopher; Wise, Stephen

    2017-07-24

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements and the Vitamin D Standardization Program, has recently issued a new serum-matrix Standard Reference Material (SRM): 2973 Vitamin D Metabolites in Frozen Human Serum (High Level). SRM 2973 was designed to provide a serum material with a total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration near 100 nmol/L to complement the existing serum-based SRMs with values assigned for total 25(OH)D between 20 and 80 nmol/L. Values were assigned for 25-hydroxyvitamin D₂ [25(OH)D₂], 25-hydroxyvitamin D₃ [25(OH)D₃], 3-epi-25(OH)D₃ , and total 25(OH)D [the sum of 25(OH)D₂ + 25(OH)D₃] using the NIST isotope dilution LC with tandem MS (MS/MS) reference measurement procedure (RMP) and related methods. SRM 2973 has a certified value of 98.4 ± 2.1 nmol/L for 25(OH)D₃ and reference values of 1.59 ± 0.05 nmol/L for 25(OH)D₂ and 5.23 ± 0.20 nmol/L for 3-epi-25(OH)D₃ . In addition, a candidate RMP for 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃ [24R,25(OH)₂D₃] based on LC-MS/MS was used to assign values to SRM 2973 and the existing SRM 972a Vitamin D Metabolites in Frozen Human Serum. Reference values for 24R,25(OH)₂D₃ were assigned to SRM 2973 (7.51 ± 0.26 nmol/L) and the four levels of SRM 972a: Level 1 (6.38 ± 0.23 nmol/L), Level 2 (3.39 ± 0.12 nmol/L), Level 3 (3.88 ± 0.013 nmol/L), and Level 4 (6.32 ± 0.22 nmol/L). The development of SRM 2973 [with a higher concentration of 25(OH)D₃] and the addition of values for 24R,25(OH)₂D₃ assigned to both SRM 972a and SRM 2973 provide laboratories involved in vitamin D measurements with improved QA tools.

  15. Development of Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2973 Vitamin D Metabolites in Frozen Human Serum (High Level).

    PubMed

    Tai, Susan S-C; Nelson, Michael A; Bedner, Mary; Lang, Brian E; Phinney, Karen W; Sander, Lane C; Yen, James H; Betz, Joseph M; Sempos, Christopher T; Wise, Stephen A

    2017-09-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements and the Vitamin D Standardization Program, has recently issued a new serum-matrix Standard Reference Material (SRM): 2973 Vitamin D Metabolites in Frozen Human Serum (High Level). SRM 2973 was designed to provide a serum material with a total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration near 100 nmol/L to complement the existing serum-based SRMs with values assigned for total 25(OH)D between 20 and 80 nmol/L. Values were assigned for 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 [25(OH)D2], 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3], 3-epi-25(OH)D3, and total 25(OH)D [the sum of 25(OH)D2 + 25(OH)D3] using the NIST isotope dilution LC with tandem MS (MS/MS) reference measurement procedure (RMP) and related methods. SRM 2973 has a certified value of 98.4 ± 2.1 nmol/L for 25(OH)D3 and reference values of 1.59 ± 0.05 nmol/L for 25(OH)D2 and 5.23 ± 0.20 nmol/L for 3-epi-25(OH)D3. In addition, a candidate RMP for 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3] based on LC-MS/MS was used to assign values to SRM 2973 and the existing SRM 972a Vitamin D Metabolites in Frozen Human Serum. Reference values for 24R,25(OH)2D3 were assigned to SRM 2973 (7.51 ± 0.26 nmol/L) and the four levels of SRM 972a: Level 1 (6.38 ± 0.23 nmol/L), Level 2 (3.39 ± 0.12 nmol/L), Level 3 (3.88 ± 0.013 nmol/L), and Level 4 (6.32 ± 0.22 nmol/L). The development of SRM 2973 [with a higher concentration of 25(OH)D3] and the addition of values for 24R,25(OH)2D3 assigned to both SRM 972a and SRM 2973 provide laboratories involved in vitamin D measurements with improved QA tools.

  16. Measurement of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethybenzene, and xylene) levels at urban and semirural areas of Algiers City using passive air samplers.

    PubMed

    Kerchich, Yacine; Kerbachi, Rabah

    2012-12-01

    The study presents the levels of air pollution by aromatic organic compounds BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m-, and p-xylenes) in the city of Algiers. The sampling was carried out using Radiello passive sampler. Three sampling campaigns were carried out in roadside, tunnel, urban background, and semirural sites in Algiers. In order to determine the diurnal mean levels of air pollution by BTEX to which people are exposed, a modified passive sampler was used for the first time. In addition, monitoring of pollution inside vehicles was also made. In the spring of 2009, more than 27 samplings were carried out. In the background and road traffic sites the Radiello sampler was exposed for 7 days, whereas the time exposure was reduced to 1 day in the case of the vehicle as well as the tunnel. The results indicate that average benzene concentrations in the roadside and inside vehicle exceed largely the limit value of 5 microg m(-3) established by the European Community (EC). On the other hand, it has been noticed that the concentration levels of other BTEX are relatively high. Also, in order to identify the origin of emission sources, ratios and correlations between the BTEX species have been highlighted. This study shows that road traffic remains the main source of many local emission in Algiers. The vehicle fleet in Algeria is growing rapidly since the 1990s following economic growth and is responsible for the increasing air pollution in large cities. Because there are no data collection of BTEX carried out by national air quality network, all environmental and transportation policies are based on European emissions standards, but national emission standards are currently not in place. This work will contribute to the analysis of real emissions of BTEX in Algiers, for the development of management and for assessment of population exposure variation depending on the location in the city of Algiers.

  17. Levels of Urinary Metabolites of Organophosphate Flame Retardants, TDCIPP, and TPHP, in Pregnant Women in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Fengxiu; Liu, Liangpo; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xia; Li, Yi-Ju; Murtha, Amy; Shen, Heqing; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Jun Jim

    2016-01-01

    Flame retardants are widely used in consumer products to reduce their flammability. Previously used flame retardants have been sequentially banned due to their environmental and human toxicity. Currently, tris(1,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) are among the most commonly used flame retardants. TDCIPP and TPHP are reproductive toxins and have carcinogenic, neurotoxic, and endocrine-disrupting properties. Although high levels of TDCIPP and TPHP have been found in drinking water, seawater, and office air in China, data regarding human exposure are lacking. In this study, we assessed the level of urinary TPHP and TDCIPP metabolites (DPHP and BDCIPP, resp.) in a cohort of pregnant women (N = 23) from Shanghai, China, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. DPHP were detected in 100% urine samples, while only four urine samples had detectable level of BDCIPP in this cohort (17% detected). Geometric means of DPHP and BDCIPP concentrations were 1.1 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR]: 0.6, 1.5 ng/mL) and 1.2 ng/mL (IQR: 0.6, 2.2 ng/mL), respectively. In this small cohort, urinary DPHP and BDCIPP levels were not significantly correlated with miscarriages, neonatal birthweight, gestational diabetes, or maternal age. These data suggest that exposure to TPHP is widespread, and they demonstrate the feasibility of using urinary biomarkers to measure exposures to modern flame-retardant chemicals. PMID:28115951

  18. Oxidative sulfonation of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Kashnikova, L.V.; Golodov, V.A.; Vozdvizhenskii, V.F.; Levintova, T.D.

    1988-02-10

    The oxidative sulfonation of benzene with sulfur dioxide was studied in the presence of copper(II) chloride. The relation of the reaction rate to the amount of sulfur dioxide absorbed and the relation of the initial reaction rate to the benzene concentration is shown. With rise in benzene concentration, the initial reaction rate rose linearly and the amount of SO/sub 2/ absorbed remained practically constant. A mechanism was proposed that included the stage of the successive formation of an intermediate containing Cu(II) with benzene and sulfur dioxide and its subsequent redox breakdown to the final products as a result of attack by a Cu(II) benzene complex.

  19. A preliminary study on ambient levels of carbonyls, benzene, toluene and xylene in the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula (Huelva coast), Spain.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Florentina; Notario, Alberto; Adame, José Antonio; Millán, María Cruz; Mabilia, Rosanna; Albaladejo, José

    2013-01-01

    We report the first observations of volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations, including aldehydes, in the coastal, industrial area of Huelva near the Doñana National Park (south-west of the Iberian Peninsula). The periods studied were July-September 2008 and February-November 2009. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, benzene, toluene and m/p-xylenes were identified and quantified. Acetone and formaldehyde were the most abundant carbonyls, followed by acetaldehyde and propanal. Maximum and minimum values for all these compounds in the period of measurement, and their relationship with meteorological parameters or influence of anthropogenic or biogenic emissions, are analysed. Finally, different concentration ratios and correlations were calculated to assess the effect of the anthropogenic or biogenic processes on the observed VOC levels.

  20. Benzene formation in electronic cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Pankow, James F.; Kim, Kilsun; McWhirter, Kevin J.; Luo, Wentai; Escobedo, Jorge O.; Strongin, Robert M.; Duell, Anna K.; Peyton, David H.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objective The heating of the fluids used in electronic cigarettes (“e-cigarettes”) used to create “vaping” aerosols is capable of causing a wide range of degradation reaction products. We investigated formation of benzene (an important human carcinogen) from e-cigarette fluids containing propylene glycol (PG), glycerol (GL), benzoic acid, the flavor chemical benzaldehyde, and nicotine. Methods/Main results Three e-cigarette devices were used: the JUULTM “pod” system (provides no user accessible settings other than flavor cartridge choice), and two refill tank systems that allowed a range of user accessible power settings. Benzene in the e-cigarette aerosols was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Benzene formation was ND (not detected) in the JUUL system. In the two tank systems benzene was found to form from propylene glycol (PG) and glycerol (GL), and from the additives benzoic acid and benzaldehyde, especially at high power settings. With 50:50 PG+GL, for tank device 1 at 6W and 13W, the formed benzene concentrations were 1.9 and 750 μg/m3. For tank device 2, at 6W and 25W, the formed concentrations were ND and 1.8 μg/m3. With benzoic acid and benzaldehyde at ~10 mg/mL, for tank device 1, values at 13W were as high as 5000 μg/m3. For tank device 2 at 25W, all values were ≤~100 μg/m3. These values may be compared with what can be expected in a conventional (tobacco) cigarette, namely 200,000 μg/m3. Thus, the risks from benzene will be lower from e-cigarettes than from conventional cigarettes. However, ambient benzene air concentrations in the U.S. have typically been 1 μg/m3, so that benzene has been named the largest single known cancer-risk air toxic in the U.S. For non-smokers, chronically repeated exposure to benzene from e-cigarettes at levels such as 100 or higher μg/m3 will not be of negligible risk. PMID:28273096

  1. Benzene formation in electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Pankow, James F; Kim, Kilsun; McWhirter, Kevin J; Luo, Wentai; Escobedo, Jorge O; Strongin, Robert M; Duell, Anna K; Peyton, David H

    2017-01-01

    The heating of the fluids used in electronic cigarettes ("e-cigarettes") used to create "vaping" aerosols is capable of causing a wide range of degradation reaction products. We investigated formation of benzene (an important human carcinogen) from e-cigarette fluids containing propylene glycol (PG), glycerol (GL), benzoic acid, the flavor chemical benzaldehyde, and nicotine. Three e-cigarette devices were used: the JUULTM "pod" system (provides no user accessible settings other than flavor cartridge choice), and two refill tank systems that allowed a range of user accessible power settings. Benzene in the e-cigarette aerosols was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Benzene formation was ND (not detected) in the JUUL system. In the two tank systems benzene was found to form from propylene glycol (PG) and glycerol (GL), and from the additives benzoic acid and benzaldehyde, especially at high power settings. With 50:50 PG+GL, for tank device 1 at 6W and 13W, the formed benzene concentrations were 1.9 and 750 μg/m3. For tank device 2, at 6W and 25W, the formed concentrations were ND and 1.8 μg/m3. With benzoic acid and benzaldehyde at ~10 mg/mL, for tank device 1, values at 13W were as high as 5000 μg/m3. For tank device 2 at 25W, all values were ≤~100 μg/m3. These values may be compared with what can be expected in a conventional (tobacco) cigarette, namely 200,000 μg/m3. Thus, the risks from benzene will be lower from e-cigarettes than from conventional cigarettes. However, ambient benzene air concentrations in the U.S. have typically been 1 μg/m3, so that benzene has been named the largest single known cancer-risk air toxic in the U.S. For non-smokers, chronically repeated exposure to benzene from e-cigarettes at levels such as 100 or higher μg/m3 will not be of negligible risk.

  2. Plasma PGF 2 alpha metabolite levels in cats with uterine disease.

    PubMed

    Hagman, R; Karlstam, E; Persson, S; Kindahl, H

    2009-12-01

    Uterine disease induces PGF(2 alpha) increase in many animal species, which can be measured by the metabolite 15-keto-(13,14)-dihydro-PGF(2 alpha) (PGFM). Plasma PGFM levels are associated with severity of the uterine disease and presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in dogs. The objectives in this study were to investigate PGFM levels, presence of SIRS, and clinical and laboratory parameters in female cats as possible indicators for severity of uterine disease. In total, 7 female cats with pyometra, 2 with mucometra, 7 with cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH), and 14 healthy control cats were included. Physical examination, ovariohysterectomy, and histopathology were performed, laboratory parameters were analyzed, and PGFM levels were analyzed by radioimmunoassay. Analysis of variance, Fisher's exact test, Student's t-test and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. In cats with pyometra, mean PGFM levels were increased (21.1 nmol L(-1)) but were decreased in cats with CEH (0.4 nmol L(-1)) compared with control cats (0.6 nmol L(-1)). In cats with mucometra, the mean PGFM level was 8.8 nmol L(-1). Systemic inflammatory response syndrome was present in 6 (85%) cats with pyometra, 1 cat with mucometra, and 1 cat with CEH. Hospitalization length was negatively correlated with albumin and positively correlated with total white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophils, band neutrophils (BN), percentage BN (PBN), and monocytes. Pyometra and mucometra were associated with increased plasma levels of PGFM. The parameters albumin, WBC, neutrophils, BN, PBN, and monocytes may be useful to determine morbidity as measured by hospitalization length.

  3. Plasma levels of catecholamine metabolites predict the response to sulpiride or fluvoxamine in major depression.

    PubMed

    Ueda, N; Yoshimura, R; Shinkai, K; Nakamura, J

    2002-09-01

    We investigated the relationships between the changes in plasma catecholamine metabolites obtained from depressed patients before and after administration of sulpiride, a benzamide compound, or fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and between clinical responses to treatment with each of these drugs. Responders to sulpiride had significantly lower plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) levels before administration of sulpiride than did non-responders or controls (responders: 4.5 +/- 3.1 ng/ml, non-responders: 11.1 +/- 5.9 ng/ml, controls: 10.9 +/- 5.3 ng/ml). Positive relationships were observed between changes in pHVA levels and improvement rates in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Ham-D). In contrast, responders to fluvoxamine had significantly higher plasma free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (pMHPG) levels before administration of fluvoxamine than did non-responders or controls (responders: 8.5 +/- 1.8 ng/ml, non-responders: 5.9 +/- 2.I ng/ml, controls: 5.2 +/- 2.9 ng/ml). Negative relationships were observed between changes in pMHPG levels and improvement rates in Ham-D. These results suggest that lower pretreatment pHVA levels and higher pretreatment levels of pMHPG might be predictors of response to sulpiride and fluvoxamine, respectively, and that sulpiride might produce a functional increase in the dopaminergic system, resulting in improvement in some depressive symptoms; fluvoxamine, on the other hand, might produce a functional decrease in the noradrenergic system via serotonergic neurons, resulting in improvement of those symptoms.

  4. Reduced Levels of Nitric Oxide Metabolites in Cerebrospinal Fluid Are Associated with Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Njoku, Chinedu J.; Saville, William J. A.; Reed, Stephen M.; Oglesbee, Michael J.; Rajala-Schultz, Päivi J.; Stich, Roger W.

    2002-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a disease of horses that is primarily associated with infection with the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona. Infection with this parasite alone is not sufficient to induce the disease, and the mechanism of neuropathogenesis associated with EPM has not been reported. Nitric oxide (NO) functions as a neurotransmitter, a vasodilator, and an immune effector and is produced in response to several parasitic protozoa. The purpose of this work was to determine if the concentration of NO metabolites (NOx−) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is correlated with the development of EPM. CSF NOx− levels were measured before and after transport-stressed, acclimated, or dexamethasone-treated horses (n = 3 per group) were experimentally infected with S. neurona sporocysts. CSF NOx− levels were also compared between horses that were diagnosed with EPM after natural infection with S. neurona and horses that did not have clinical signs of disease or that showed no evidence of infection with the parasite (n = 105). Among the experimentally infected animals, the mean CSF NOx− levels of the transport-stressed group, which had the most severe clinical signs, was reduced after infection, while these values were found to increase after infection in the remaining groups that had less severe signs of EPM. Under natural conditions, horses with EPM (n = 65) had a lower mean CSF NOx− concentration than clinically normal horses with antibodies (Abs) against S. neurona (n = 15) in CSF, and horses that developed ataxia (n = 81) had a significantly lower mean CSF NOx− concentration than horses that did not have neurologic signs (n = 24). In conclusion, lower CSF NOx− levels were associated with clinical EPM, suggesting that measurement of CSF NOx− levels could improve the accuracy of diagnostic tests that are based upon detection of S. neurona-specific Abs in CSF alone and that reduced NO levels could be causatively related to the development

  5. Major Metabolite Levels of Preoperative Proton Magnetic Resonance Sectroscopy and Intraoperative Fluorescence Intensity in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hai-Long; Zu, Yu-Liang; Wang, Chao-Chao; Lin, Tao; Guo, Zhen-Tao; Jiang, Bin; Yin, Xin; Guo, Wen-Qiang; Wang, Zhi-Gang

    2017-08-20

    Objective To compare the intraoperative major metabolite level of preoperative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy((1)H-MRS)and fluorescence intensity marked with fluorescein sodium(FLs)in glioblastoma(GBM)and thus provide an objective basis for fluorescence surgical treatment of GBM. Methods All newly diagnosed patients by plain and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging from the April 1,2014 to December 31,2015 were enrolled in this study.All of them received (1)H-MRS and marked with FLs.The expression of Ki67 in tumor boundary were confirmed by postoperative pathology and determined by immunostaining assay.The relationship between (1)H-MRS metabolite levels and tumor fluorescence intensity was analyzed. Results Totally 33 patients were included in the study.Preoperative (1)H-MRS revealed high-grade gliomas in 25 cases.The N-acetylaspartate(NAA)decreased significantly and choline(Cho)increased significantly in high-grade gliomas.The ratios of Cho/NAA,NAA/creatine(Cr),and Cho/Cr significantly differed in different tumor regions(P=0.02,P=0.01,and P=0.00,respectively).Surgical results were marked with FLs intraoperatively.Tissue fluorescence were clearly seen.There were 29 patients undergoing total resection and 4 cases undergoing subtotal resection.No acute encephalocele occured after operation,while 2 patients suffered from epilepsy.Postoperative pathology results included:28 cases were diagnosed as GBM(22 cases consistent with (1)H-MRS diagnosis).The results of GBM fluorescence imaging included:the level of fluorescence intensity in tumor parenchyma was significantly higher than that in tumor boundary and peritumoral edema(P=0.01).The result of (1)H-MRS metabolite analysis included:The kurtosis of NAA and of Cho and the ratio of Cho/NAA were significantly different according the fluorescence intensity in tumor parenchyma(P=0.01,P=0.02,and P=0.01).While there was no difference in the kurtosis of NAA,the kurtosis of Cho and the ratio of Cho/NAA were significantly

  6. Species-level assessment of secondary metabolite diversity among Hamigera species and a taxonomic note on the genus

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Hanafusa, Tomoaki; Gohda, Fumiya; Peterson, Stephen; Bills, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Secondary metabolite phenotypes in nine species of the Hamigera clade were analysed to assess their correlations to a multi-gene species-level phylogeny. High-pressure-liquid-chromatography-based chemical analysis revealed three distinctive patterns of secondary metabolite production: (1) the nine species could be divided into two groups on the basis of production of the sesquiterpene tricinonoic acid; (2) the tricinonoic acid-producing group produced two cyclic peptides avellanins A and B; (3) the tricinonoic acid-non-producing group could be further divided into two groups according to the production of avellanins A and B. The chemical phenotype was consistent with the phylogeny of the species, although metabolite patterns were not diagnostic at the species level. In addition, the taxonomy of the Hamigera clade was updated with the new combination Hamigera ingelheimensis proposed for Merimbla ingelheimensis, so that all species in the clade are now in the same genus. PMID:25379334

  7. Benzene reduction in RFG, a new low cost route

    SciTech Connect

    Gildert, R.; Gildert, G.

    1994-12-31

    Benzene has been targeted for reduction in reformulated gasoline because it is the largest single contributor to the toxic emissions group. This presentation describes processes of benzene removal for the petroleum refiner. By making maximum use of existing equipment, the refiner can minimize the changes necessary to produce reformulated gasoline with a reduction in benzene levels.

  8. Optical sensors for measuring dynamic changes of cytosolic metabolite levels in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Clara; Haerizadeh, Farzad; Takanaga, Hitomi; Chermak, Diane; Frommer, Wolf B

    2011-10-27

    Optical sensors allow dynamic quantification of metabolite levels with subcellular resolution. Here we describe protocols for analyzing cytosolic glucose levels in yeast using genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors. FRET glucose sensors with different glucose affinities (K(d)) covering the low nano- to mid- millimolar range can be targeted genetically to the cytosol or to subcellular compartments. The sensors detect the glucose-induced conformational change in the bacterial periplasmic glucose/galactose binding protein MglB using FRET between two fluorescent protein variants. Measurements can be performed with a single sensor or multiple sensors in parallel. In one approach, cytosolic glucose accumulation is measured in yeast cultures in a 96-well plate using a fluorimeter. Upon excitation of the cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), emission intensities of CFP and YFP (yellow fluorescent protein) are captured before and after glucose addition. FRET sensors provide temporally resolved quantitative data of glucose for the compartment of interest. In a second approach, reversible changes of cytosolic free glucose are measured in individual yeast cells trapped in a microfluidic platform, allowing perfusion of different solutions while FRET changes are monitored in a microscope setup. By using the microplate fluorimeter protocol, 96 cultures can be measured in less than 1 h; analysis of single cells of a single genotype can be completed in <2 h. FRET-based analysis has been performed with glucose, maltose, ATP and zinc sensors, and it can easily be adapted for high-throughput screening using a wide spectrum of sensors.

  9. Switching antipsychotics to aripiprazole or blonanserin and plasma monoamine metabolites levels in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Itaru; Shiga, Tetsuya; Katsumi, Akihiko; Kanno-Nozaki, Keiko; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Niwa, Shin-Ichi; Yabe, Hirooki

    2014-03-01

    Blonanserin is a novel atypical antipsychotic drug that has efficacy equal to risperidone. We investigated the effects of aripiprazole and blonanserin on clinical symptoms and plasma levels of homovanillic acid (pHVA) and 3-methoxy-4hydroxyphenylglycol in the switching strategy of schizophrenia. Twenty two Japanese patients with schizophrenia were enrolled into this open study. The antipsychotics of all patients were switched to aripiprazole or blonanserin for the improvement of clinical symptoms or side effects. Plasma monoamine metabolites levels were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography. There were no significant effects for time (p = 0.346) or time × group interaction (p = 0.27) on the changes of positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) total score, although blonanserin decreased PANSS scores. We observed negative correlation between pHVA at baseline and the change in PANSS total score (rs = -0.450, p = 0.046). We also found positive correlation between the changes in pHVA and the changes in PANSS total (rs = 0.536, p = 0.015) and positive (rs = 0.572, p = 0.008) scores. There were no differences between blonanserin and aripiprazole in the improvement of clinical symptoms. Our results suggest that pHVA may be useful indicator for the switching strategy to aripiprazole or blonanserin in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Systems biology of human benzene exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Li, Guilan; Ji, Zhiying; Vermeulen, Roel; Hubbard, Alan E.; Ren, Xuefeng; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; North, Matthew; Skibola, Christine F.; Yin, Songnian; Vulpe, Christopher; Chanock, Stephen J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Toxicogenomic studies, including genome-wide analyses of susceptibility genes (genomics), gene expression (transcriptomics), protein expression (proteomics), and epigenetic modifications (epigenomics), of human populations exposed to benzene are crucial to understanding gene-environment interactions, providing the ability to develop biomarkers of exposure, early effect and susceptibility. Comprehensive analysis of these toxicogenomic and epigenomic profiles by bioinformatics in the context of phenotypic endpoints, comprises systems biology, which has the potential to comprehensively define the mechanisms by which benzene causes leukemia. We have applied this approach to a molecular epidemiology study of workers exposed to benzene. Hematotoxicity, a significant decrease in almost all blood cell counts, was identified as a phenotypic effect of benzene that occurred even below 1ppm benzene exposure. We found a significant decrease in the formation of progenitor colonies arising from bone marrow stem cells with increasing benzene exposure, showing that progenitor cells are more sensitive to the effects of benzene than mature blood cells, likely leading to the observed hematotoxicity. Analysis of transcriptomics by microarray in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of exposed workers, identified genes and pathways (apoptosis, immune response, and inflammatory response) altered at high (>10ppm) and low (<1ppm) benzene levels. Serum proteomics by SELDI-TOF-MS revealed proteins consistently down-regulated in exposed workers. Preliminary epigenomics data showed effects of benzene on the DNA methylation of specific genes. Genomic screens for candidate genes involved in susceptibility to benzene toxicity are being undertaken in yeast, with subsequent confirmation by RNAi in human cells, to expand upon the findings from candidate gene analyses. Data on these and future biomarkers will be used to populate a large toxicogenomics database, to which we will apply bioinformatic

  11. p-Benzoquinone, a reactive metabolite of benzene, prevents the processing of pre-interleukins-1{alpha} and -1{beta} to active cytokines by inhibition of the processing enzymes, calpain, and interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Kalf, G.F.; Renz, J.F.; Niculescu, R.

    1996-12-01

    Chronic exposure of humans to benzene affects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and leads to aplastic anemia. The stromal macrophage, a target of benzene toxicity, secretes interieukin-1 (IL-1), which induces the stromal fibroblast to synthesize hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors. In a mouse model, benzene causes an acute marrow hypocellularity that can be prevented by the concomitant administration of IL-1{alpha}. The ability of benzene to interfere with the production and secretion of IL-1{alpha} was tested. Stromal macrophages from benzene-treated mice were capable of the transcription of the IL-1{alpha} gene and the translation of the message but showed an inability to process the 34-kDa pre-IL-1{alpha} precursor to the 17-kDa biologically active cytokine. Treatment of normal murine stromal macrophages in culture with hydroquinone (HQ) also showed an inhibition in processing of pre-IL-1{alpha}. Hydroquinone is oxidized by a peroxidase-mediated reaction in the stromal macrophage to p-benzoquinone, which interacts with the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of proteins and was shown to completely inhibit the activity of calpain, the SH-dependent protease that cleaves pre-IL-1{alpha}. In a similar manner, HQ, via peroxidase oxidation to p-benzoquinone, was capable of preventing the IL-1{beta} autocrine stimulation of growth of human B1 myeloid tumor cells by preventing the processing of pre-IL-1{beta} to mature cytokine. Benzoquinone was also shown to completely inhibit the ability of the SH-dependent IL-1{beta} converting enzyme. Thus benzene-induced bone marrow hypocellularity may result from apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells brought about by lack of essential cylokines and deficient IL-1{alpha} production subsequent to the inhibition of calpain by p-benzoquinone and the prevention of pre-IL-1 processing. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Investigation on the influence of time-of-day on benzene metabolic pharmacokinetics by direct breath analysis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuling; Sun, Wanyang; Shang, Dewei; Gao, Hao; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Xue

    2017-10-01

    Benzene, well known as a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, can lead to increasing risk of cancer, bone marrow failure as well as other serious diseases. Benzene has been classified as carcinogenic to humans with no recommended safe level of exposure. In this study, the influence of time-of-day on benzene metabolism has been tentatively explored in a mouse model based on direct real-time breath analysis by using membrane inlet single photon ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MI-SPI-TOFMS). The exhaled breath of eight mice was monitored at a time resolution of less than 20 s after intraperitoneal (I.P.) injection of benzene in the morning, afternoon and evening on different days, and two rounds of experiments were carried out in total. The pharmacokinetic parameters such as total exposure AUC0-∞ (h ng/mL), peak level Cmax (ng/mL), time of peak level tmax (h), and terminal half-life t1/2z (h) were calculated and discussed. The values of individual parameter varied greatly among the eight mice, e.g., AUC0-∞ in the morning of the first round of experiment ranged from 10.66 to 162.17 h ng/mL and the mean ± SD was 103.72 ± 99.72 h ng/mL (n = 8). Significant difference has also been observed between two rounds of experiments, implying the damage in the liver caused by the benzene exposure. However, there is no significant difference among the results from the morning, afternoon and evening for each round of the experiment. In our follow-up study, the influence of time-of-day will be further investigated, in which the metabolites of benzene as well as endogenous metabolites will be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Urinary testosterone-metabolite levels and dominance rank in male and female bonobos (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Sannen, Adinda; Van Elsacker, Linda; Heistermann, Michael; Eens, Marcel

    2004-04-01

    The correlation between testosterone (T) and dominance rank may vary among species, and is expected to become stronger as the importance of aggressive competition for rank increases. However, it may also vary among social situations within a species, showing a stronger correlation during socially unstable periods. Knowledge on this topic in great apes, especially in females, is scant. This study presents the first data on the relationship between T and dominance rank in both sexes of the bonobo ( Pan paniscus). For each period (four socially unstable and two stable ones), linear rank orders were determined and subsequently correlated with the accompanying mean urinary T-metabolite concentrations (measured as immunoreactive 5alpha-androstan-17alpha-ol-3-one). No correlation between these two variables was found for either sex among individuals during socially unstable or stable periods. Also, within an individual over the six periods, no relationship of T with rank could be demonstrated. These results suggest that either the outcomes of aggressions have no influence on T levels, or such clear outcomes appear insufficiently frequent to affect T levels over longer periods. Even during the unstable periods, the rate of aggressions was not higher than during stable periods, suggesting that frequencies of aggression have little effect on rank. Further analyses indeed demonstrated no correlation between frequencies of overall aggressions or any type of aggressive behavior separately, or rank. Perhaps factors other than the frequency of displayed aggressions alone have a marked influence on a bonobo's rank, for example, coalition partners. Overall, in bonobos, T apparently does not form a physiological reflection of social status.

  14. Benzene toxicity of the occurrence of benzene in the ambient air of the Houston area

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.C.

    1980-01-01

    This study was conducted by either literature review or actual field survey. Results are summarized as follows: (1) long-term occupational exposure of workers to benzene vapor at levels of 3 to 7 ppM, 2 to 3 ppM and 1.6 ppM may result in a decreased level of leucocyte alkaline phosphates, an increased incidence of chromosome aberrations and an increased level of ALA in erythrocytes, respectively; (2) benzene is capable of causing fetotoxic effects in animals at levels as low as 10 ppM by volume; (3) exposure of animals to or less than 1 ppM benzene vapor may result in leucopenia, an inverse ratio of muscle antagonist chronaxy and a decreased level of ascorbic acid in fetus's and mother's liver as well as whole embryo; (4) benzene is causally associated with the increased incidence of pancytopenia, including unicytopenia, bicytopenia and aplastic anemia, and chromosome aberrations in occupational exposure population, and at best benzene must also be considered as a leukemogen; (5) since it can be emitted into the atmosphere from both man-made and natural sources, benzene in some concentrations is presented everywhere in the various compartments of the environment; (6) the findings of the emission of benzene from certain natural sources indicate that reducing benzene to a zero-level of exposure is theoretically impossible; (7) the annual average of benzene concentration detected in the Houston ambient air is 2.50 ppB, which is about 2.4 times higher than the nation-wide annual average exposure level and may have some health implications to the general public; and (8) in the Houston area, stationary sources are more important than mobile sources in contributing to benzene in the ambient air.

  15. Usefulness of the simultaneous determination of serum levels of theophylline and its metabolites in patients medicated with theophylline preparation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuko; Chohnabayashi, Naohiko; Nasu, Hideki; Nishimura, Naoki; Uchiyama, Noboru; Kizu, Junko

    2011-04-01

    Measurement of the serum level of theophylline is essential for its proper use; however, it is difficult to infer the metabolic ability of individual patients by only the serum theophylline level and to decide the appropriate medication. In this study, we simultaneously measured serum theophylline and metabolite levels in patients treated with theophylline, and investigated their usefulness. The subjects were asthma patients who visited the outpatient clinic of Respiratory Medicine, St Luke's International Hospital, between April and October 2003, and were medicated with sustained-release theophylline tablets (Theodur®). The serum level of theophylline and its metabolites was measured by HPLC in patients who gave written consent. A strong correlation was noted between the serum theophylline (TP) and 1,3-dimethyluric acid (DMU) levels of 52 patients (r = 0.670), and DMU/TP was about 0.04. In a patient whose the DMU/TP was 0.216, it was recognized that metabolic ability was promoted due to a history of smoking. In this study, it was shown that simultaneous measurement by HPLC of the serum level of theophylline and its metabolites and DMU/TP was useful to assess the metabolic ability of individual patients. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Benzene and lymphohematopoietic malignancies in humans.

    PubMed

    Hayes, R B; Songnian, Y; Dosemeci, M; Linet, M

    2001-08-01

    Quantitative evaluations of benzene-associated risk for cancer have relied primarily on findings from a cohort study of highly exposed U.S. rubber workers. An epidemiologic investigation in China (NCI/CAPM study) extended quantitative evaluations of cancer risk to a broader range of benzene exposures, particularly at lower levels. We review the evidence implicating benzene in the etiology of hematopoietic disorders, clarify methodologic aspects of the NCI/CAPM study, and examine the study in the context of the broader literature on health effects associated with occupational benzene exposure. Quantitative relationships for cancer risk from China and the U.S. show a relatively smooth increase in risk for acute myeloid leukemia and related conditions over a broad dose range of benzene exposure (below 200 ppm-years mostly from the China study and above 200 ppm-years mostly from the U.S. study). Risks of acute myeloid leukemia and other malignant and nonmalignant hematopoietic disorders associated with benzene exposure in China are consistent with other information about benzene exposure, hematotoxicity, and cancer risk, extending evidence for hematopoietic cancer risks to levels substantially lower than had previously been established. Published 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Different levels of UV-B resistance in Vaccinium corymbosum cultivars reveal distinct backgrounds of phenylpropanoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Luengo Escobar, Ana; Magnum de Oliveira Silva, Franklin; Acevedo, Patricio; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Alberdi, Miren; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie

    2017-09-01

    UV-B radiation induces several physiological and biochemical effects that can influence regulatory plant processes. Vaccinium corymbosum responds differently to UV-B radiation depending on the UV-B resistance of cultivars, according to their physiological and biochemical features. In this work, the effect of two levels of UV-B radiation during long-term exposure on the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and the expression of genes associated with flavonoid biosynthesis as well as the absolute quantification of secondary metabolites were studied in two contrasting UV-B-resistant cultivars (Legacy, resistant and Bluegold, sensitive). Multivariate analyses were performed to understand the role of phenylpropanoids in UV-B defense mechanisms. The amount of phenylpropanoid compounds was generally higher in Legacy than in Bluegold. Different expression levels of flavonoid biosynthetic genes for both cultivars were transiently induced, showing that even in longer period of UV-B exposure; plants are still adjusting their phenylpropanoids at the transcription levels. Multivariate analysis in Legacy indicated no significant correlation between gene expression and the levels of the flavonoids and phenolic acids. By contrast, in the Bluegold cultivar higher number of correlations between secondary metabolite and transcript levels was found. Taken together, the results indicated different adjustments between the cultivars for a successful UV-B acclimation. While the sensitive cultivar depends on metabolite adjustments to respond to UV-B exposure, the resistant cultivar also possesses an intrinsically higher antioxidant and UV-B screening capacity. Thus, we conclude that UV-B resistance involves not only metabolite level adjustments during the acclimation period, but also depends on the intrinsic metabolic status of the plant and metabolic features of the phenylpropanoid compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Health consequences of involuntary exposure to benzene following a flaring incident at British Petroleum refinery in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Singh, Omesh; Reddy, G Kesava

    2013-01-01

    Environmental exposure to benzene can lead to deleterious effects on many biological systems including blood-forming organs, liver, and kidneys. The authors sought to investigate the health consequences of benzene exposure following a flaring incident that occurred at the British Petroleum (BP) refinery in Texas City, TX. A cohort of subjects who were exposed to a daily sustained release of toxic chemicals including more than 7,711 kg (17,000 lb) of benzene for a total duration of 40 days due to BP's flaring incident. Not applicable to an observational study. Subjects who underwent physical and clinical evaluation between June 2010 and October 2012 were included. Demographic and clinical laboratory data were collected and analyzed. Hematologic data such as white blood cell (WBC) counts, platelet counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine levels in the serum were evaluated. In addition, data on alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), and alanine amino transferase (ALT) levels in the serum were examined. Urinary phenol was evaluated as a benzene metabolite. The outcomes were compared between exposed and unexposed patients. A total of 200 subjects (benzene exposed, n = 100 and unexposed, n = 100) were included. Benzene exposed subjects showed significantly higher levels of WBC (×10(3) per μL) count (8.6 ± 5.4 vs 6.5 ± 2.0, p = 0.0003) and platelet (×10(3) per μL) count (291.3 ± 82.7 vs 264.1 ± 74.0, p = 0.0076) compared with the unexposed subjects. ALP (IU/L) was significantly elevated in the benzene exposed subjects compared with the unexposed subjects (121.2 ± 73.7 vs 65.4 ± 23.6, p = 0.000). Similarly, benzene exposed subjects had significantly higher levels of AST (IU/L) compared with unexposed subjects (23.4 ± 11.8 vs 19.5 ± 8.9, p = 0.0089). This retrospective pilot study found that environmental benzene exposure from the BP's flaring incident appears to pose significant

  19. Dose-, route-, and sex-dependent urinary excretion of phenol metabolites in B6C3F, mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, E.M.; Seeley, M.E.; Janszen, D.; Medinsky, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    Phenol is the major oxidized metabolite of benzene, a known human leukemogen and ubiquitous environmental pollutant. Unlike benzene, phenol does not induce tumors in mice following oral exposure; benzene also exhibits sex-related differences in genotoxicity to bone marrow cells that are not observed following phenol administration. We studied the urinary excretion of phenol metabolites in mice as a means to further investigate the metabolic basis for differences in benzene- and phenol-induced toxicity. Male and female B6C3F, mice (n = 3/group) were exposed to 15, 40, 100, or 225 {mu}mol [{sup 14}C]phenol/kg by iv tail vein injection (6 {mu}Ci/mouse). First-pass intestinal metabolism of phenol was evaluated by comparison of urinary excretion of phenol metabolites following iv administration with additional groups of male mice that received the same dose levels by oral gavage. Mice were placed in glass metabolism cages, and urine was collected over dry ice for 48 h. Urinary metabolites were separated by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and quantified by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Urinary excretion of conjugated metabolites of phenol was dose-dependent in both male and female mice administered phenol by iv injection or gavage. The major urinary metabolites of phenol were phenol sulfate (PS), phenol glucuronide (PG), and hydroquinone glucoronide (HQG). Sulfation was the dominant pathway at all dose levels, but decreased as a percent of the excreted dose with a concomitant increase in glucorodination as the dose level increased. Male mice consistently excreted a higher proportion of phenol as the oxidized conjugated metabolite, HQG, compared to female mice, suggesting that male mice oxidize phenol to hydroquinone more rapidly than female mice. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Fecal cortisol metabolite levels in free-ranging North American red squirrels: Assay validation and the effects of reproductive condition.

    PubMed

    Dantzer, Ben; McAdam, Andrew G; Palme, Rupert; Fletcher, Quinn E; Boutin, Stan; Humphries, Murray M; Boonstra, Rudy

    2010-06-01

    Patterns in stress hormone (glucocorticoid: GC) levels and their relationship to reproductive condition in natural populations are rarely investigated. In this study, we (1) validate an enzyme-immunoassay to measure fecal cortisol metabolite (FCM) levels in North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), and (2) examine relationships between FCM levels and reproductive condition in a free-ranging red squirrel population. Injected radiolabeled cortisol was entirely metabolized and excreted in both the urine (mean+/-SE; 70.3+/-0.02%) and feces (29.7+/-0.02%), with a lag time to peak excretion in the feces of 10.9+/-2.3h. Our antibody reacted with several cortisol metabolites, and an adrenocorticotropic injection significantly increased FCM levels above baseline levels at 8h post-injection. Relative to baseline levels, manipulation by handling also tended to increase FCM levels at 8h post-manipulation, but this difference was not significant. FCM levels did not differ significantly between samples frozen immediately and 5h after collection. Reproductive condition significantly affected FCM levels in free-ranging females (pregnant>lactating>post-lactating>non-breeding) but not males (scrotal testes vs. abdominal testes). Among females with known parturition dates, FCM levels increased during gestation, peaked at parturition, and declined during lactation. The difference between pregnant and lactating females was therefore dependent upon when the fecal samples were obtained during these periods, suggesting caution in categorizing reproductive stages. This study demonstrates the utility of fecal hormone metabolite assays to document patterns of glucocorticoid levels in free-ranging animals.

  1. Behavior of polychlorinated benzenes, PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs during incineration of solid waste contaminated with mg/kg levels of hexachlorobenzene.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mafumi; Noma, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB), one of the well-known Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), is present in some pigments and these raw materials with maximum level of several thousand of mg/kg. Considering that these pigments have been used in long-life products, such as car parts, construction materials and electrical and electronic equipments, the articles containing HCB at a concentration of several hundred mg/kg still have to undergo waste management. In this study, we performed a combustion experiment involving solid waste containing 300 mg/kg of HCB as the input material using a pilot-scale incinerator to determine the destruction of HCB and its influence on the behavior of other polychlorinated benzenes (CBzs) and unintentionally produced POPs, such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs). HCB at a concentration of 300 mg/kg in the input material was destroyed mainly in the primary combustion zone. Overall the destruction efficiency of HCB was > 99.9985%. The input concentration of HCB did not significantly affect the formation and destruction or the final emissions of other CBzs, PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs. These results indicate that incineration, when operated and structured to minimize emissions of dioxin-related compounds, is considered to be one of the Best Available Technologies for the appropriate treatment of waste containing HCB with a concentration in the order of mg/kg.

  2. Levels of compounds and metabolites in wheat ears and grains in organic and conventional agriculture.

    PubMed

    Zörb, Christian; Niehaus, Karsten; Barsch, Aiko; Betsche, Thomas; Langenkämper, Georg

    2009-10-28

    In this work, wheat from two farming systems, organic and conventional, was analyzed. Organic agriculture is one of the fastest growing sectors in the food industry of Europe and the United States. It is an open question, whether organic or conventional agricultural management influences variables such as metabolism, nutrient supply, seed loading and metabolite composition of wheat. Our aim was to detect if organic or conventional farming systems would affect concentrations of metabolites and substances in developing ears and in corresponding matured grain. Therefore, broadband metabolite profiles together with lipids, cations, starch and protein concentrations of wheat ears in the last phase of grain development and of matured grain from organic and conventional agriculture of a rigorously controlled field trial with two organic and two conventional systems were examined. It appears that seed metabolism and supply of developing ears differ in organic and conventional agriculture. However, the differences in 62 metabolite concentrations become marginal or disappear in the matured grains, indicating an adjustment of nutrients in the matured grain from organic agriculture. This result suggests a high degree of homeostasis in the final seed set independent of the growing regime.

  3. Impacts of rising tropospheric ozone on photosynthesis and metabolite levels on field grown soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The response of leaf photosynthesis and metabolite profiles to ozone (O3) exposure ranging from 37 to 116 nL L-1 was investigated in two soybean cultivars Dwight and IA3010 in the field under fully open-air conditions. Leaf photosynthesis, total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC) and total free amin...

  4. Phthalate metabolites in obese individuals undergoing weight loss: Urinary levels and estimation of the phthalates daily intake.

    PubMed

    Dirtu, Alin C; Geens, Tinne; Dirinck, Eveline; Malarvannan, Govindan; Neels, Hugo; Van Gaal, Luc; Jorens, Philippe G; Covaci, Adrian

    2013-09-01

    Human exposure to chemicals commonly encountered in our environment, like phthalates, is routinely assessed through urinary measurement of their metabolites. A particular attention is given to the specific population groups, such as obese, for which the dietary intake of environmental chemicals is higher. To evaluate the exposure to phthalates, nine phthalate metabolites (PMs) were analyzed in urine collected from obese individuals and a control population. Obese individuals lost weight through either bariatric surgery or a conservative weight loss program with dietary and lifestyle counseling. Urine samples were also collected from the obese individuals after 3, 6 and 12months of weight loss. Individual daily intakes of the corresponding phthalate diesters were estimated based on the urinary PM concentrations. A high variability was recorded for the levels of each PM in both obese and control urine samples showing the exposure to high levels of PMs in specific subgroups. The most important PM metabolite as percentage contribution to the total PM levels was mono-ethyl phthalate followed by the metabolites of di-butyl phthalate and di 2-ethyl-hexyl phthalate (DEHP). No differences in the PM levels and profiles between obese entering the program and controls were observed. Although paralleled by a significant decrease of their weight, an increase in the urinary PM levels after 3 to 6months loss was seen. Constant figures for the estimated phthalates daily intake were observed over the studied period, suggesting that besides food consumption, other human exposure sources to phthalates (e.g. air, dust) might be also important. The weight loss treatment method followed by obese individuals influenced the correlations between PM levels, suggesting a change of the intake sources with time. Except for few gender differences recorded between the urinary DEHP metabolites correlations, no other differences were observed for the urinary PM levels as a function of age, body

  5. [Exposure to benzene of service station employees and composition of benzene].

    PubMed

    Lagorio, S; Fuselli, S; Iavarone, I; Vanacore, N; Carere, A

    1994-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies gasoline vapours and exhaust fumes from gasoline fueled automobiles as potential human carcinogens. Data on the chemical composition of gasoline marketed in Italy and especially on the concentration of benzene, are rather poor. Within the framework of an investigation aimed at assessing the mean annual level of exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons among gasoline pump attendants, made on a sample of attendants in Rome between December 1991 and November 1992, samples of gasoline were also collected so as to determine the benzene content of the gasoline over the investigation period, assess the variability of benzene concentration in the various gasolines and according to the season of the year, and take account of gasoline composition in analysing the factors determining individual exposure levels of pump attendants. Benzene exposure was measured via gas chromatography of air samples obtained with personal pumps in the breathing zone. The mean benzene exposure level (8 h TWA) of the 27 subjects under study was 1.73 mg/m3 (SD = 5.53). The benzene concentration in the samples of gasoline, which were collected on the same day as personal exposure monitoring was performed, was measured by means of high resolution gas chromatography (hr-GC). Mean benzene levels of 25.03 g/l (SD = 3.47), equivalent to 2.86% by volume, were measured in 24 samples of alkylated gasoline, and mean levels of 23.18 g/l (SD = 3.93), equivalent to 2.65% v/v, were measured in 10 samples of lead-free gasoline. Statistically significant associations were found between individual exposure to benzene and the quantity of gasoline pumped (r = 0.69) and the quantity of benzene present in the gasoline sold on the day monitoring was performed (r = 0.70). Using regression analysis, the estimated increase in the level of personal benzene exposure was 0.01 mg/m3 for every increase of 100 g in the benzene content of the total amount of gasoline sold

  6. Activity levels of tamoxifen metabolites at the estrogen receptor and the impact of genetic polymorphisms of phase I and II enzymes on their concentration levels in plasma.

    PubMed

    Mürdter, T E; Schroth, W; Bacchus-Gerybadze, L; Winter, S; Heinkele, G; Simon, W; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Eichelbaum, M; Schwab, M; Brauch, H

    2011-05-01

    The therapeutic effect of tamoxifen depends on active metabolites, e.g., cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) mediated formation of endoxifen. To test for additional relationships, 236 breast cancer patients were genotyped for CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP3A5, UGT1A4, UGT2B7, and UGT2B15; also, plasma concentrations of tamoxifen and 22 of its metabolites, including the (E)-, (Z)-, 3-, and 4'-hydroxymetabolites as well as their glucuronides, were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS). The activity levels of the metabolites were measured using an estrogen response element reporter assay; the strongest estrogen receptor inhibition was found for (Z)-endoxifen and (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen (inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) 3 and 7 nmol/l, respectively). CYP2D6 genotypes explained 39 and 9% of the variability of steady-state concentrations of (Z)-endoxifen and (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen, respectively. Among the poor metabolizers, 93% had (Z)-endoxifen levels below IC90 values, underscoring the role of CYP2D6 deficiency in compromised tamoxifen bioactivation. For other enzymes tested, carriers of reduced-function CYP2C9 (*2, *3) alleles had lower plasma concentrations of active metabolites (P < 0.004), pointing to the role of additional pathways.

  7. In vitro cytotoxicity of BTEX metabolites in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y

    1998-04-01

    Fuel leakage from underground storage tanks is a major source of groundwater contamination. Although the toxicity of regulated compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are well recognized, the cytotoxicity of their metabolites has not been studied extensively. In this study, Hela cells, propagated at 37 degrees C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2-95% air, served as a target for evaluation of cytotoxicity of BTEX metabolites 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid. The cells were exposed to different concentrations of the metabolites, which subsequently showed inhibition of cell growth and produced dose-related decreases in cell viability and cell protein content. The BTEX metabolites affected the levels of the polyamines spermidine, spermine, and putrescine, which are known to be important in cell proliferation. The cytotoxic effects for these BTEX metabolites to Hela cells were 3-methylcatechol > 4-methylcatechol > 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid > 4-hydroxybenzoic acid.

  8. Benzene exposure is associated with epigenetic changes (Review).

    PubMed

    Fenga, Concettina; Gangemi, Silvia; Costa, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Benzene is a volatile aromatic hydrocarbon solvent and is known as one of the predominant air pollutants in the environment. Chronic exposure to benzene is known to cause aplastic anemia and increased risk of acute myelogenous leukemia in humans. Although the mechanisms by which benzene causes toxicity remain to be fully elucidated, it is widely accepted that its metabolism is crucial to its toxicity, with involvement of one or more reactive metabolites. Novel approaches aimed at evaluating different mechanisms by which benzene can impact on human health by altering gene regulation have been developed. Among these novel approaches, epigenetics appears to be promising. The present review article summarizes the most important findings, reported from the literature, on epigenetic modifications correlated to benzene exposure. A computerized search in PubMed was performed in November 2014, using search terms, including 'benzene', 'epigenetic', 'histone modifications', 'DNA methylation' and 'microRNA'. Epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated the potential epigenetic effects of benzene exposure. Several of the epigenomic changes observed in response to environmental exposures may be mechanistically associated with susceptibility to diseases. However, further elucidation of the mechanisms by which benzene alters gene expression may improve prediction of the toxic potential of novel compounds introduced into the environment, and allow for more targeted and appropriate disease prevention strategies.

  9. PTEN methylation involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zuo, Xin; Bai, Wenlin; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that benzene is a hematotoxic carcinogen. PTEN promoter methylation is a representative example of transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. However, the effect of PTEN methylation on benzene-induced hematotoxicity has not yet been elucidated. In this study, the animal model of benzene hematotoxicity was successfully established. WBC significantly decreased in experimental groups (P < 0.01). Compared with the control group, the weight of rats increased slowly and even declined with increasing doses of benzene in the benzene-treated groups. An increase in the level of PTEN methylation was observed in the low dose group, and PTEN methylation level increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. However, it was interesting that PTEN mRNA expression increased in the low dose group, but declined with increasing doses of benzene. The decrease of tumor suppressor function caused by PTEN methylation may be an important mechanism of benzene hematotoxicity. Furthermore, lymphoblast cell line F32 was incubated by benzene and then treated with 5-aza and TSA, alone or in combination. A dramatic decrease in the PTEN mRNA expression and a significant increase of PTEN methylation level in benzene-treated cells were also shown. PTEN mRNA expression was up regulated and PTEN methylation level was reduced by the epigenetic inhibitors, 5-aza and TSA. In conclusion, PTEN methylation is involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity through suppressing PTEN mRNA expression.

  10. Benzene release. status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.; Rappe, K.G.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1997-11-04

    Scoping benzene release measurements were conducted on 4 wt percent KTPB `DEMO` formulation slurry using a round, flat bottomed 100-mL flask containing 75 mL slurry. The slurry was agitated with a magnetic stirrer bar to keep the surface refreshed without creating a vortex. Benzene release measurements were made by purging the vapor space at a constant rate and analyzing for benzene by gas chromatography with automatic data acquisition. Some of the data have been rounded or simplified in view of the scoping nature of this study.

  11. Molecular Level Understanding of the Factors Affecting the Stability of Dimethoxy Benzene Catholyte Candidates from First-Principles Investigations

    DOE PAGES

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Jinhua; ...

    2016-06-14

    First-principles simulations are performed to gain molecular level insights into the factors affecting the stability of seven 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DMB) derivatives. These molecules are potential catholyte candidates for nonaqueous redox flow battery systems. Computations are performed to predict oxidation potentials in various dielectric mediums, intrinsic-reorganization energies, and structural changes of these representative catholyte molecules during the redox process. In order to understand the stability of the DMB-based radical cations, the thermodynamic feasibility of the following reactions is computed using density functional theory: (a) deprotonation, (b) dimerization, (c) hydrolysis, and (d) demethylation. The computations indicate that radical cations of the 2,3-dimethyl andmore » 2,5-dimethyl derivatives are the most stable among the DMB derivatives considered in this study. In the presence of solvents with high-proton solvating ability (water, DMSO, acetonitrile), degradation of cation radical occurring via deprotonation is the most likely mechanism. In the presence of solvents such as propylene carbonate (PC), demethylation was found to be the most likely reaction that causes degradation of radical cations. From the computed enthalpy of activation (Delta H-double dagger) for a demethylation reaction in PC, the 2,5-dimethyl DMB cation radical would exhibit better kinetic stability in comparison to the other candidates. Finally, this investigation suggests that computational studies of structural properties such as redox potentials, reorganization energies, and the computed reaction energetics (deprotonation and demethylation) of charged species can be used to predict the relative stability of a large set of molecules required for the discovery of novel redox active materials for flow battery applications« less

  12. In vivo biochemistry: quantifying ion and metabolite levels in individual cells or cultures of yeast.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Clara; Ewald, Jennifer C; Lanquar, Viviane; Jones, Alexander M; Frommer, Wolf B

    2011-08-15

    Over the past decade, we have learned that cellular processes, including signalling and metabolism, are highly compartmentalized, and that relevant changes in metabolic state can occur at sub-second timescales. Moreover, we have learned that individual cells in populations, or as part of a tissue, exist in different states. If we want to understand metabolic processes and signalling better, it will be necessary to measure biochemical and biophysical responses of individual cells with high temporal and spatial resolution. Fluorescence imaging has revolutionized all aspects of biology since it has the potential to provide information on the cellular and subcellular distribution of ions and metabolites with sub-second time resolution. In the present review we summarize recent progress in quantifying ions and metabolites in populations of yeast cells as well as in individual yeast cells with the help of quantitative fluorescent indicators, namely FRET metabolite sensors. We discuss the opportunities and potential pitfalls and the controls that help preclude misinterpretation. © The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 Biochemical Society

  13. Differential metabolite levels in response to spawning-induced inappetence in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Rocco C; Smith, McKenzie L; Vermeersch, Kathleen A; Dove, Alistair D M; Styczynski, Mark P

    2015-03-01

    Atlantic salmon Salmo salar undergo months-long inappetence during spawning, but it is not known whether this inappetence is a pathological state or one for which the fish are adapted. Recent work has shown that inappetent whale sharks can exhibit circulating metabolite profiles similar to ketosis known to occur in humans during starvation. In this work, metabolite profiling was used to explore differences in analyte profiles between a cohort of inappetent spawning run Atlantic salmon and captively reared animals that were fed up to and through the time of sampling. The two classes of animals were easily distinguished by their metabolite profiles. The sea-run fish had elevated ɷ-9 fatty acids relative to the domestic feeding animals, while other fatty acid concentrations were reduced. Sugar alcohols were generally elevated in inappetent animals, suggesting potentially novel metabolic responses or pathways in fish that feature these compounds. Compounds expected to indicate a pathological catabolic state were not more abundant in the sea-run fish, suggesting that the animals, while inappetent, were not stressed in an unnatural way. These findings demonstrate the power of discovery-based metabolomics for exploring biochemistry in poorly understood animal models.

  14. Dexamethasone decreases plasma levels of the prochiral fenbendazole and its chiral and achiral metabolites in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, S; Small, J; Jones, D G; McKellar, Q A

    2003-07-01

    1. The effect of co-administration of either short- or long-acting formulations of DXM on hepatic function and the plasma pharmacokinetic behaviour of prochiral fenbendazole (FBZ) and its metabolites was evaluated in sheep. 2. Neither DXM treatment markedly affected any of the biochemical markers of hepatic function tested. In contrast, both formulations significantly modified the plasma pharmacokinetic behaviour of FBZ and its metabolites. 3. Plasma FBZ concentrations and the associated area under the time-concentration curves were significantly lower, although the plasma detection period was longer (72 versus 48 h) in the DXM pretreated animals compared with those given FBZ alone. 4. DXM also appeared to alter the pattern of FBZ absorption, possibly through effects on abomasal pH. The shape of the plasma concentration-time curves for oxfendazole (OFZ) and fenbendazole sulphone (FBZSO(2)) were similar to FBZ, raising the possibility that DXM treatment may have altered the liver biotransformation of the parent drug. 5. The concentrations of the (+) chiral metabolite of OFZ were significantly lower in DXM pretreated animals compared with those given FBZ alone. The trend was similar for the (-) antipode, although the differences between DXM pretreated and non-pretreated animals were not statistically significant.

  15. Benzene exposure: An overview of monitoring methods and their findings

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Clifford P.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene has been measured throughout the environment and is commonly emitted in several industrial and transportation settings leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposures. Inhalation is the most common exposure route but benzene rapidly penetrates the skin and can contaminant water and food resulting in dermal and ingestion exposures. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it still is a component of petroleum products, including gasoline, and is a trace impurity in industrial products resulting in continued sub to low ppm occupational exposures, though higher exposures exist in small, uncontrolled workshops in developing countries. Emissions from gasoline/petrochemical industry are its main sources to the ambient air, but a person’s total inhalation exposure can be elevated from emissions from cigarettes, consumer products and gasoline powered engines/tools stored in garages attached to homes. Air samples are collected in canisters or on adsorbent with subsequent quantification by gas chromatography. Ambient air concentrations vary from sub-ppb range, low ppb, and tens of ppb in rural/suburban, urban, and source impacted areas, respectively. Short-term environmental exposures of ppm occur during vehicle fueling. Indoor air concentrations of tens of ppb occur in microenvironments containing indoor sources. Occupational and environmental exposures have declined where regulations limit benzene in gasoline (<1%) and cigarette smoking has been banned from public and work places. Similar controls should be implemented worldwide to reduce benzene exposure. Biomarkers of benzene used to estimate exposure and risk include: benzene in breath, blood and urine; its urinary metabolites: phenol, t,t-muconic acid (t,tMA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (sPMA); and blood protein adducts. The biomarker studies suggest benzene environmental exposures are in the sub to low ppb range though non-benzene sources for urinary metabolites

  16. High levels of Bifidobacteria are associated with increased levels of anthocyanin microbial metabolites: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Boto-Ordóñez, María; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel; Tulipani, Sara; Tinahones, Francisco J; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2014-08-01

    The health benefits associated with the consumption of polyphenol-rich foods have been studied in depth, however, the full mechanism of action remains unknown. One of the proposed mechanisms is through microbiota interaction. In the present study, we aimed to explore the relationship between changes in fecal microbiota and changes in urinary phenolic metabolites after wine interventions. Nine participants followed a randomized, crossover, controlled interventional trial. After the washout period, they received red wine, dealcoholized red wine or gin for 20 days each. Polyphenol metabolites (n > 60) in urine were identified and quantified by UPLC-MS/MS and the microbial content of fecal samples was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. Interventions with both red wine and dealcoholized red wine increased the fecal concentration of Bifidobacterium, Enterococcus and Eggerthella lenta, compared to gin intervention and baseline. When participants were categorized in tertiles of changes in fecal bacteria, those in the highest tertile of Bifidobacteria had higher urinary concentration changes in syringic acid, p-coumaric acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and homovanillic acid (all anthocyanin metabolites) than those in tertile 1 (P < 0.05, all). In addition, changes of Bifidobacteria correlated positively with changes of these metabolites (r = 0.5-0.7, P < 0.05, all). Finally, the 68.5% changes in Bifidobacteria can be predicted by syringic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid changes. This study confirms the important role of polyphenols as bacterial substrates and their modulatory capacity as an important field in the research of new products with prebiotic and probiotic characteristics for the food industry.

  17. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy levels of sulfated progesterone metabolites inhibit farnesoid X receptor resulting in a cholestatic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Abu-Hayyeh, Shadi; Papacleovoulou, Georgia; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Tahir, Mehreen; Oduwole, Olayiwola; Jamaludin, Nurul Akmal; Ravat, Sabiha; Nikolova, Vanya; Chambers, Jenny; Selden, Clare; Rees, Myrddin; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Parker, Malcolm G; Williamson, Catherine

    2013-02-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is the most prevalent pregnancy-specific liver disease and is associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes, including preterm labor and intrauterine death. The endocrine signals that cause cholestasis are not known but 3α-sulfated progesterone metabolites have been shown to be elevated in ICP, leading us to study the impact of sulfated progesterone metabolites on farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-mediated bile acid homeostasis pathways. Here we report that the 3β-sulfated progesterone metabolite epiallopregnanolone sulfate is supraphysiologically raised in the serum of ICP patients. Mice challenged with cholic acid developed hypercholanemia and a hepatic gene expression profile indicative of FXR activation. However, coadministration of epiallopregnanolone sulfate with cholic acid exacerbated the hypercholanemia and resulted in aberrant gene expression profiles for hepatic bile acid-responsive genes consistent with cholestasis. We demonstrate that levels of epiallopregnanolone sulfate found in ICP can function as a partial agonist for FXR, resulting in the aberrant expression of bile acid homeostasis genes in hepatoma cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. Furthermore, epiallopregnanolone sulfate inhibition of FXR results in reduced FXR-mediated bile acid efflux and secreted FGF19. Using cofactor recruitment assays, we show that epiallopregnanolone sulfate competitively inhibits bile acid-mediated recruitment of cofactor motifs to the FXR-ligand binding domain. Our results reveal a novel molecular interaction between ICP-associated levels of the 3β-sulfated progesterone metabolite epiallopregnanolone sulfate and FXR that couples the endocrine component of pregnancy in ICP to abnormal bile acid homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. Accumulation of secondary metabolites in healthy and diseased barley, grown under future climate levels of CO2, ozone and temperature.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, B L; Olsen, C E; Lyngkjær, M F

    2015-10-01

    Plants produce secondary metabolites promoting adaptation to changes in the environment and challenges by pathogenic microorganisms. A future climate with increased temperature and CO2 and ozone levels will likely alter the chemical composition of plants and thereby plant-pathogen interactions. To investigate this, barley was grown at elevated CO2, temperature and ozone levels as single factors or in combination resembling future climatic conditions. Increased basal resistance to the powdery mildew fungus was observed when barley was grown under elevated CO2, temperature and ozone as single factors. However, this effect was neutralized in the combination treatments. Twenty-five secondary metabolites were putatively identified in healthy and diseased barley leaves, including phenylpropanoids, phenolamides and hydroxynitrile glucosides. Accumulation of the compounds was affected by the climatic growth conditions. Especially elevated temperature, but also ozone, showed a strong impact on accumulation of many compounds, suggesting that these metabolites play a role in adaptation to unfavorable growth conditions. Many compounds were found to increase in powdery mildew diseased leaves, in correlation with a strong and specific influence of the climatic growth conditions. The observed disease phenotypes could not be explained by accumulation of single compounds. However, decreased accumulation of the powdery mildew associated defense compound p-coumaroylhydroxyagmatine could be implicated in the increased disease susceptibility observed when barley was grown under combination of elevated CO2, temperature and ozone. The accumulation pattern of the compounds in both healthy and diseased leaves from barley grown in the combination treatments could not be deduced from the individual single factor treatments. This highlights the complex role and regulation of secondary metabolites in plants' adaptation to unfavorable growth conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy Levels of Sulfated Progesterone Metabolites Inhibit Farnesoid X Receptor Resulting in a Cholestatic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Hayyeh, Shadi; Papacleovoulou, Georgia; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Tahir, Mehreen; Oduwole, Olayiwola; Jamaludin, Nurul Akmal; Ravat, Sabiha; Nikolova, Vanya; Chambers, Jenny; Selden, Clare; Rees, Myrddin; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Parker, Malcolm G; Williamson, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is the most prevalent pregnancy-specific liver disease and is associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes, including preterm labor and intrauterine death. The endocrine signals that cause cholestasis are not known but 3α-sulfated progesterone metabolites have been shown to be elevated in ICP, leading us to study the impact of sulfated progesterone metabolites on farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-mediated bile acid homeostasis pathways. Here we report that the 3β-sulfated progesterone metabolite epiallopregnanolone sulfate is supraphysiologically raised in the serum of ICP patients. Mice challenged with cholic acid developed hypercholanemia and a hepatic gene expression profile indicative of FXR activation. However, coadministration of epiallopregnanolone sulfate with cholic acid exacerbated the hypercholanemia and resulted in aberrant gene expression profiles for hepatic bile acid-responsive genes consistent with cholestasis. We demonstrate that levels of epiallopregnanolone sulfate found in ICP can function as a partial agonist for FXR, resulting in the aberrant expression of bile acid homeostasis genes in hepatoma cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. Furthermore, epiallopregnanolone sulfate inhibition of FXR results in reduced FXR-mediated bile acid efflux and secreted FGF19. Using cofactor recruitment assays, we show that epiallopregnanolone sulfate competitively inhibits bile acid-mediated recruitment of cofactor motifs to the FXR-ligand binding domain. Conclusion: Our results reveal a novel molecular interaction between ICP-associated levels of the 3β-sulfated progesterone metabolite epiallopregnanolone sulfate and FXR that couples the endocrine component of pregnancy in ICP to abnormal bile acid homeostasis. (Hepatology 2013;) PMID:22961653

  20. FORMATION OF HEMOGLOBIN AND ALBUMIN ADDUCTS OF BENZENE OXIDE IN MOUSE, RAT, AND HUMAN BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the formation and disposition of benzene oxide (BO), the initial metabolite arising from oxidation of benzene by cytochrome P450. In this study, reactions of BO with hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) were investigated in blood from B6C3F1 mice, F344 rats, ...

  1. FORMATION OF HEMOGLOBIN AND ALBUMIN ADDUCTS OF BENZENE OXIDE IN MOUSE, RAT, AND HUMAN BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the formation and disposition of benzene oxide (BO), the initial metabolite arising from oxidation of benzene by cytochrome P450. In this study, reactions of BO with hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) were investigated in blood from B6C3F1 mice, F344 rats, ...

  2. [Epigenic modifications associated with low benzene exposure].

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, Silvia; Bollati, Valentina; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation, mitochondrial DNA copy number and telomeres shortening are cellular modifications associated with an increasing number of tumors, cardiovascular and aging diseases. In our studies these modifications were evaluated in subjects occupationally exposed to low levels of benzene and in the general population. In peripheral blood lymphocytes a decrease of DNA methylation with the increase of personal benzene exposure was found, both in Alu and LINE-1 repetitive elements, and in the global DNA. Telomere length shortening in subjects exposed to traffic exhausts and an increase in mitochondrial DNA copy number correlated to benzene exposure was also found. DNA methylation measured in specimen repeats collected at intervals of 8 years decreased more markedly in exposed subjects than in controls. Our studies highlighted the association of epigenetic modifications of DNA with low benzene exposure.

  3. [Association between urinary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites and elevated serum uric acid levels in coke oven workers].

    PubMed

    Deng, Siyun; Deng, Qifei; Hu, Die; Li, Jun; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Guo, Huan; Wu, Tangchun

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the relationship between metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and serum uric acid levels in coke oven workers and to provide new clues to the pathogenic mechanism of PAHs. A total of 1302 coke oven workers were divided into four groups, namely control group and low-, intermediate-, and high-dose exposure groups. The concentrations of ambient PAHs at each workplace were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The detailed information on the occupational history and health of workers was collected by questionnaire survey and physical examination, and so were their blood and urine samples. Serum uric acid and creatinine levels were measured using a Hitachi 7020 automatic biochemical analyzer. Ten urinary PAH metabolites were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Serum uric acid levels were the highest in the high-dose exposure group, followed by the intermediate- and low-dose exposure groups, and were the lowest in the control group. There were significant correlations between serum uric acid levels and the quartiles of 1-hydroxynaphthalene and 1-hydroxyphenanthrene (P < 0.05). After adjustment for PAH metabolite-related relationship, only urinary 1-hydroxyphenanthrene was significantly correlated with serum uric acid levels (P = 0.001). After adjustment for confounding factors and using the 1st quartile of 1-hydroxyphenanthrene as a reference, the odds ratio for hyperuricemia in subjects with the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles of 1-hydroxyphenanthrene were 1.55, 1.57, and 2.35, respectively. Urinary 1-hydroxyphenanthrene is associated with a dose-response increase in serum uric acid levels in coke oven workers, and exposure to phenanthrene in PAHs may be a risk factor for hyperuricemia.

  4. Benzene Monitor System report

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.

    1992-10-12

    Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

  5. Measurement of children's exposure to pesticides: analysis of urinary metabolite levels in a probability-based sample.

    PubMed Central

    Adgate, J L; Barr, D B; Clayton, C A; Eberly, L E; Freeman, N C; Lioy, P J; Needham, L L; Pellizzari, E D; Quackenboss, J J; Roy, A; Sexton, K

    2001-01-01

    The Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study is a probability-based sample of 102 children 3-13 years old who were monitored for commonly used pesticides. During the summer of 1997, first-morning-void urine samples (1-3 per child) were obtained for 88% of study children and analyzed for metabolites of insecticides and herbicides: carbamates and related compounds (1-NAP), atrazine (AM), malathion (MDA), and chlorpyrifos and related compounds (TCPy). TCPy was present in 93% of the samples, whereas 1-NAP, MDA, and AM were detected in 45%, 37%, and 2% of samples, respectively. Measured intrachild means ranged from 1.4 microg/L for MDA to 9.2 microg/L for TCPy, and there was considerable intrachild variability. For children providing three urine samples, geometric mean TCPy levels were greater than the detection limit in 98% of the samples, and nearly half the children had geometric mean 1-NAP and MDA levels greater than the detection limit. Interchild variability was significantly greater than intrachild variability for 1-NAP (p = 0.0037) and TCPy (p < 0.0001). The four metabolites measured were not correlated within urine samples, and children's metabolite levels did not vary systematically by sex, age, race, household income, or putative household pesticide use. On a log scale, mean TCPy levels were significantly higher in urban than in nonurban children (7.2 vs. 4.7 microg/L; p = 0.036). Weighted population mean concentrations were 3.9 [standard error (SE) = 0.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.5, 5.3] microg/L for 1-NAP, 1.7 (SE = 0.3; 95% CI, 1.1, 2.3) microg/L for MDA, and 9.6 (SE = 0.9; 95% CI, 7.8, 11) microg/L for TCPy. The weighted population results estimate the overall mean and variability of metabolite levels for more than 84,000 children in the census tracts sampled. Levels of 1-NAP were lower than reported adult reference range concentrations, whereas TCPy concentrations were substantially higher. Concentrations of MDA were detected more frequently

  6. Determinants of indoor benzene in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. K.; Jantunen, M. J.; Künzli, N.; Kulinskaya, E.; Colvile, R.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M. J.

    This study identified the key determinants associated with the indoor benzene concentrations that were measured between 1996 and 2000 using the EXPOLIS protocol in the residences of six European cities, including Athens (Greece), Basel (Switzerland), Helsinki (Finland), Milan (Italy), Oxford (United Kingdom), and Prague (Czech Republic). Two consecutive days of home indoor and home outdoor measurements of benzene were carried out at the homes of adult participants on different dates and seasons during the sampling period. Regression models, with interactions searched by all-possible subset method, were used to assess the city effects and the determinants of home indoor benzene (adjusted R2=0.57, n=412). Outdoor benzene concentrations, outdoor temperature, wind speed, the use of anti-moth products, and indoor smoking in terms of number of cigarettes consumed per day were shown to be the key determinants of indoor benzene concentrations. The model was further used to predict the indoor benzene levels in cities. Non-linear relationships were commonly found, indicating that a unit change in the indoor concentration cannot be simply estimated by a proportional change of the determinant, and the pattern of relationships could be differed in different places. This finding is important in formulating indoor air quality guidelines as well as calculating an accurate health risk estimate based on the estimates of population's lifetime exposure levels.

  7. Metabolite profiling reveals novel multi-level cold responses in the diploid model Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry).

    PubMed

    Rohloff, Jens; Kopka, Joachim; Erban, Alexander; Winge, Per; Wilson, Robert C; Bones, Atle M; Davik, Jahn; Randall, Stephen K; Alsheikh, Muath K

    2012-05-01

    Winter freezing damage is a crucial factor in overwintering crops such as the octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) when grown in a perennial cultivation system. Our study aimed at assessing metabolic processes and regulatory mechanisms in the close-related diploid model woodland strawberry (Fragaria vescaL.) during a 10-days cold acclimation experiment. Based on gas chromatography/time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS) metabolite profiling of three F. vesca genotypes, clear distinctions could be made between leaves and non-photosynthesizing roots, underscoring the evolvement of organ-dependent cold acclimation strategies. Carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, photosynthetic acclimation, and antioxidant and detoxification systems (ascorbate pathway) were strongly affected. Metabolic changes in F. vesca included the strong modulation of central metabolism, and induction of osmotically-active sugars (fructose, glucose), amino acids (aspartic acid), and amines (putrescine). In contrast, a distinct impact on the amino acid proline, known to be cold-induced in other plant systems, was conspicuously absent. Levels of galactinol and raffinose, key metabolites of the cold-inducible raffinose pathway, were drastically enhanced in both leaves and roots throughout the cold acclimation period of 10 days. Furthermore, initial freezing tests and multifaceted GC/TOF-MS data processing (Venn diagrams, independent component analysis, hierarchical clustering) showed that changes in metabolite pools of cold-acclimated F. vesca were clearly influenced by genotype. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ovariectomy lowers urine levels of unconjugated (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, and their methylated metabolites in rats fed grape seed extract.

    PubMed

    Cutts, John K; Peavy, Thomas R; Moore, Doyle R; Prasain, Jeevan; Barnes, Stephen; Kim, Helen

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Steroid hormones modulate expression of enzymes that metabolize xenobiotics, including dietary supplements. Half of the human population undergoes menopause, yet the effect of this age-related loss of ovarian steroid hormones on the metabolism of dietary supplements has yet to be determined. Grape seed extract (GSE) is a dietary supplement comprised of monomeric and oligomeric catechins and has health benefits in models of age-related diseases. We hypothesized that surgically-induced loss of ovarian hormones would increase methylation, glucuronidation, and/or sulfation of the grape seed polyphenols (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin. Fourteen-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were ovariectomized (OVX) or sham-OVX. At 17 weeks of age, SHRs were gavaged with vehicle (water) or GSE (300 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 6 days. Urinary excretion of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, and their metabolites was analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Although total urinary output of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, and their methylated metabolites was unaffected by OVX, the amounts of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and their methylated metabolites that were not conjugated with glucuronic acid or sulfate were lowered by OVX. Specifically, urine from OVX SHRs administered GSE contained 30% higher proportions (91.8% vs. 62.3%) of glucuronidated (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin and glucuronidated methyl (+)-catechin and methyl (-)-epicatechin than urine from sham-OVX SHRs. However, there were no differences in urinary levels of total methylated or sulfated catechins in OVX SHRs. This is the first quantitative characterization of metabolites of grape seed polyphenols in a model of menopause; it indicates that ovariectomy causes either an increase in expression and/or activity of select uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase(s).

  9. Urinary BPA and Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations and Plasma Vitamin D Levels in Pregnant Women: A Repeated Measures Analysis.

    PubMed

    Johns, Lauren E; Ferguson, Kelly K; Cantonwine, David E; McElrath, Thomas F; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Meeker, John D

    2017-08-31

    In addition to its well-established role in maintaining skeletal health, vitamin D has essential regulatory functions in female reproductive and pregnancy outcomes. Phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) are endocrine disruptors, and previous research has suggested that these chemical agents may disrupt circulating levels of total 25(OH)D in adults. We investigated the relationships between repeated measures of urinary phthalate metabolites and BPA and circulating total 25(OH)D in a prospective cohort of pregnant women. The present study population includes participants (n=477) in a nested case-control study of preterm birth drawn from a prospective birth cohort of pregnant women at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Urine and blood samples were collected for biomarker measurements at median 10 wk and 26 wk of gestation. In repeated measures analysis, we observed that an interquartile range (IQR) increase in urinary mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP) was associated with a 4.48% decrease [95% confidence interval (CI): -7.37, -1.58] in total 25(OH)D. We also detected inverse associations for metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) [percent difference (%Δ)=-2.83 to -2.16]. For BPA, we observed a nonsignificant inverse association with total 25(OH)D in the overall population. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that the associations for some metabolites (e.g., MEHP) varied by race/ethnicity, which may reflect potential differences in susceptibility. In agreement with findings from repeated measures analysis, we reported that DEHP metabolites and BPA were significantly associated with an approximate 20% increase in the odds of vitamin D deficiency (≤20 ng/mL) [odds ratio (95% CI): 1.19 (1.06, 1.35) for molar sum of DEHP metabolites and 1.22 (1.01, 1.47) for BPA] at median 10 wk and 26 wk, respectively. Our results provide suggestive evidence of the potential for environmental exposure to phthalates and/or BPA to disrupt circulating

  10. [Materials for the substantiation of the biological MAC of benzene].

    PubMed

    Ulanova, I P; Avilova, G G; Karpukhina, E A; Karimova, L K; Boĭko, V I; Makar'eva, L M

    1990-09-01

    Relatively great amount of benzene-originated phenol, the presence of a definite relationship between phenol amount in the urine and benzene content in the air indicate that it is reasonable to use a phenol sample as an exposure test. To determine the intensity of benzene exposure, data on phenol content in the urine of people working at some big-tonnage enterprises has been analyzed. On the basis of the national and foreign literature data on the correlation between the phenol urine concentration and the level of benzene exposure a regression equation was deduced, which has made it possible to calculate phenol content in the urine on the level of average working day benzene concentration adopted in the USSR. This value equals 15 mg/l, which was proposed as a biological benzene MAC.

  11. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by marine sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Florin; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Niculina; Kuypers, Marcel; Widdel, Friedrich

    2010-05-01

    analyses of metabolites with benzene-grown cultures, suggesting an activation of benzene via carboxylation.

  12. Nanostructure imaging mass spectrometry: the role of fluorocarbons in metabolite analysis and yoctomole level sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kurczy, Michael E; Northen, Trent R; Trauger, Sunia A; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructure imaging mass spectrometry (NIMS) has become an effective technology for generating ions in the gas phase, providing high sensitivity and imaging capabilities for small molecules, metabolites, drugs, and drug metabolites. Specifically, laser desorption from the nanostructure surfaces results in efficient energy transfer, low background chemical noise, and the nondestructive release of analyte ions into the gas phase. The modification of nanostructured surfaces with fluorous compounds, either covalent or non-covalent, has played an important role in gaining high efficiency/sensitivity by facilitating analyte desorption from the nonadhesive surfaces, and minimizing the amount of laser energy required. In addition, the hydrophobic fluorinated nanostructure surfaces have aided in concentrating deposited samples into fine micrometer-sized spots, a feature that further facilitates efficient desorption/ionization. These fluorous nanostructured surfaces have opened up NIMS to very broad applications including enzyme activity assays and imaging, providing low background, efficient energy transfer, nondestructive analyte ion generation, super-hydrophobic surfaces, and ultra-high detection sensitivity.

  13. Leukemia in benzene workers.

    PubMed

    Rinsky, R A; Young, R J; Smith, A B

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate the possible association between occupational exposure to benzene and subsequent death from leukemia, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a retrospective cohort mortality study of workers who had been exposed to benzene in the manufacture of rubber hydrochloride at two locations in Ohio. Ascertainment of vital status was accomplished for 98% of the cohort. Among 748 workers who had at least one day of exposure to benzene between 1940 and 1950, seven deaths from leukemia occurred; from United States death rates standardized for sex, age, and calendar time period, only 1.25 leukemia deaths would have been expected (standardized mortality ratio = 560; p less than 0.001). Mean duration of exposure to benzene was brief, and 437 (58%) of the cohort were exposed for less than 1 year. Evaluation of leukemia mortality for those workers exposed five or more years showed an SMR of 2100. All leukemia deaths were myelocytic or monocytic in cell type. Four additional cases of leukemia have been reorganized in workers at the study locations, but occurred in persons not encompassed by the strict definition of the cohort. Reconstruction of past exposures to benzene at the two locations indicates that in some areas of the plant airborne benzene concentrations rose occasionally to several hundred parts per million (ppm), but that for the most part, employee eight-hour time-weighted averages (TWA) fell within the limits considered permissible at the time of exposure. These data corroborate an initial analysis of the same cohort by Infante et al, and indicate that benzene is a human carcinogen at a range of exposures not greatly above the current legal standard.

  14. Significant difference in active metabolite levels of ginseng in humans consuming Asian or Western diet: The link with enteric microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jin-Yi; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhang, Qi-Hui; Liu, Zhi; Musch, Mark W; Bissonnette, Marc; Chang, Eugene B; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2017-04-01

    After ingestion of ginseng, the bioavailability of its parent compounds is low and enteric microbiota plays an important role in parent compound biotransformation to their metabolites. Diet type can influence the enteric microbiota profile. When human subjects on different diets ingest ginseng, their different gut microbiota profiles may influence the metabolism of ginseng parent compounds. In this study, the effects of different diet type on gut microbiota metabolism of American ginseng saponins were investigated. We recruited six healthy adults who regularly consumed different diet types. These subjects received 7 days' oral American ginseng, and their biological samples were collected for LC-Q-TOF-MS analysis. We observed significant ginsenoside Rb1 (a major parent compound) and compound K (a major active metabolite) level differences in the samples from the subjects consuming different diets. Subjects on an Asian diet had much higher Rb1 levels but much lower compound K levels compared with those on a Western diet. Since compound K possesses much better cancer chemoprevention potential, our data suggested that consumers on a Western diet should obtain better cancer prevention effects with American ginseng intake compared with those on an Asian diet. Ginseng compound levels could be enhanced or reduced via gut microbiota manipulation for clinical utility. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Delivery levels and behavior of 1,3-butadiene, acrylonitrile, benzene, and other toxic volatile organic compounds in mainstream tobacco smoke from two brands of commercial cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Pankow, James F; Luo, Wentai; Tavakoli, Ameer D; Chen, Cai; Isabelle, Lorne M

    2004-06-01

    Mainstream tobacco smoke (MTS) was collected from Camel and Marlboro cigarettes for the determination of the delivery levels and equilibrium gas/particle partitioning constants K(p) (m(3) microg(-)(1)) of 26 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of toxicological interest. K(p) values are important for understanding the fractional distribution of each compound of interest between the gas and the particle phases of MTS. The experimental method involved (i) drawing a smoke sample into a Teflon sampling bag at 20 degrees C, (ii) allowing the smoke particulate matter (PM) to collect on the walls of the bag, (iii) sampling the bag to determine the initial gas phase concentration of each VOC, (iv) removing the gas phase from the bag, (v) refilling the bag with humidified nitrogen gas, (vi) reestablishing the gas/PM equilibrium, and (vii) redetermining the gas phase concentrations. For each smoke sample, a comparison of the initial and redetermined gas phase concentrations allowed calculation of the total (i.e., gas + particle) delivery level (= m(tot), ng cig(-)(1)) and K(p) value (= c(p)/c(g)) at 20 degrees C for each compound, where c(p) (ng microg(-)(1)) = concentration in the PM phase and c(g) (ng m(-)(3)) = concentration in the gas phase. Significant deliveries were observed for a number of carcinogenic VOCs. For the Camel cigarettes tested, the average m(tot) values for 1,3-butadiene, acrylonitrile, and benzene were 10(4.6), 10(4.4), and 10(4.8) ng cig(-)(1), respectively; for Marlboro, the m(tot) values were 10(5.0), 10(4.6), and 10(4.7) ng cig(-)(1), respectively. For each of the 26 VOCs, the smoke PM from the two brands yielded very similar K(p) values at 20 degrees C. In addition, the vapor pressure-dependent K(p) values of the 26 VOCs were in close agreement with predictions made by the Pankow theory of absorptive gas/particle partitioning [Pankow, J. F. (1994) Atmos. Environ. 28, 185-188]. These results can be used in general predictions of chemical behavior in

  16. Modifications in the metabolism and myeloclastogenic effect of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Gad-El-Karim, M.; Harper, B.L.; Sadagopa Ramanujam, V.M.; Legator, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Toxicity of benzene was studied in the bone marrow with the micronucleus test and metaphase analysis. Male and female CD-1 mice were subjected to pretreatments with phenobarbital, 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MCA), SKF-525A, or Aroclor-1254. The animals were then treated with benzene (440 or 880 mg/kg), or toluene (860 or 1720 mg/kg), or their mixture by gavage or I.P. in 2 doses 24 hours apart and sacrificed 6 hours or 24 hours after the second dose. Toluene showed no clastogenic activity and reduced the clastogenic effect of benzene when mixture was given. None of the pretreatments protected against the clastogenic effect of benzene. 3-MCA pretreatment caused a tremendous enhancement of benzene myeloclastogenicity. Dose-response curves with benzene treatment alone and with 3-MCA induced groups were generated. Urine fractions were collected from animals gavaged with benzene, either non-induced, PB- or 3MCA induced. The metabolites were quantitated by HPLC, and confirmed by GC/MS.

  17. Analysis of low level radioactive metabolites in biological fluids using high-performance liquid chromatography with microplate scintillation counting: method validation and application.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingshe; Zhao, Weiping; Vazquez, Natasha; Mitroka, James G

    2005-09-01

    TopCount, a microplate scintillation counter (MSC), has been recently employed as an off-line liquid radiochromatographic detector for radioactive metabolite profile analysis. The present study was undertaken to validate TopCount for metabolite profiling with respect to sensitivity, accuracy, precision and radioactivity recovery. Matrix effects of various human samples on TopCount performance and capability of MSC for volatile metabolite analysis were also investigated. TopCount had a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 DPM and a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 15 DPM for [(14)C]-labeled compounds at a 10min counting time. It was two-fold more sensitive than a liquid scintillation counter (LSC), and 50-100-fold more sensitive than a radioactivity flow detector (RFD). TopCount had comparable accuracy and precision to RFD, and comparable precision to LSC for determining relative abundance of metabolites. Human liver microsome incubation (up to 1 mL), plasma (up to 1 mL), urine (up to 2 mL) and feces (up to 50mg) had no significant quenching effects on TopCount performance. Benzoic acid, a volatile metabolite, was detected by TopCount, but not by Microbeta counter after microplates were dried under vacuum. Radioactivity recovery in HPLC-MSC analysis was reliably determined using an LSC-based method. Examples of using HPLC-MSC for analysis of low levels of radioactive metabolites are presented, including determination of plasma metabolite profile, in vitro reactive metabolites trapped by [(3)H]glutathione, and metabolite concentrations in an enzyme kinetic experiment. The data from this study strongly suggest that HPLC in combination with TopCount is a viable alternative analytical tool for detection and quantification of low levels of radioactive metabolites in biological fluids.

  18. Blue-shifting hydrogen bond in the benzene-benzene and benzene-naphthalene complexes.

    PubMed

    Hermida-Ramón, Jose M; Graña, Ana M

    2007-01-30

    Ab initio complete optimizations at MP2/6-31++G** level have been performed in the T-shaped geometry of the benzene-benzene and benzene-naphthalene complexes. To check the effect of the basis set superposition error (BSSE), optimizations have been done in the BSSE corrected and BSSE uncorrected potential energy surfaces. The BSSE effect in the calculation of the Hessian has also been evaluated to check its influence in the frequency values. Quantum theory atoms in molecules (QTAIM) calculations have also been performed on both dimers. Intermolecular energies differ around a 25% when the optimization is performed with or without counterpoise corrected gradients. The influence of BSSE is also noticeable in the distances. Frequency shifts show big changes because of the BSSE. Thus, uncorrected values are up 350% larger than corrected ones. The hypotheses given in the literature to explain the origin of the blue-shifting hydrogen bond do not seem to give a suitable explanation for all characteristics of the behavior found in the studied systems.

  19. Attenuation of aqueous benzene in soils under saturated flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-B; Kim, D-J; Yun, S-T

    2006-01-01

    The fate of aqueous benzene in subsurface was investigated in this study, focusing on the role of sorption and biodegradation on the benzene attenuation under dynamic flow conditions. Two sets of column tests were conducted in Plexiglass flow cells packed uniformly with sandy aquifer materials. The first set of the experiment was conducted with a step-type injection of benzene with different powder activated carbon (PAC) contents: (1) PAC = 0 %; (2) PAC = 0.5 %; (3) PAC = 2.0%. The second set was performed as a pulse-type with different test conditions: (4) benzene; (5) benzene and bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa); (6) benzene and bacteria (P. aeruginosa) with hydrogen peroxide. In addition, numerical experiments were performed to examine the role of sorption processes on the benzene attenuation. In the step mode experiments, the KCl breakthrough curves (BTCs) reached the input concentration while the benzene BTCs were considerably lower than those of KCl with slight retardation for all cases, indicating that both reversible/retardation and irreversible sorption occurred. The pulse type tests showed that attenuation of benzene increased in the presence of bacteria due to biodegradation. The benzene attenuation by microbial degradation increased furthermore in the presence of hydrogen peroxide owing to sufficient supply of dissolved oxygen in soil column. Numerical experiments demonstrated that retardation could not contribute to the attenuation of benzene in soils but could only extend its breakthrough time. Experimental results indicated that aqueous benzene could be attenuated by irreversible sorption and biodegradation during transport through the subsurface. Additionally, the attenuation of aqueous benzene is closely related to organic carbon content and oxygen level existing in contaminated aquifers.

  20. Understanding Metabolic Regulation at a Systems Level: Metabolite Sensing, Mathematical Predictions, and Model Organisms.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; Yilmaz, L Safak; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic networks are extensively regulated to facilitate tissue-specific metabolic programs and robustly maintain homeostasis in response to dietary changes. Homeostatic metabolic regulation is achieved through metabolite sensing coupled to feedback regulation of metabolic enzyme activity or expression. With a wealth of transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data available for different cell types across various conditions, we are challenged with understanding global metabolic network regulation and the resulting metabolic outputs. Stoichiometric metabolic network modeling integrated with "omics" data has addressed this challenge by generating nonintuitive, testable hypotheses about metabolic flux rewiring. Model organism studies have also yielded novel insight into metabolic networks. This review covers three topics: the feedback loops inherent in metabolic regulatory networks, metabolic network modeling, and interspecies studies utilizing Caenorhabditis elegans and various bacterial diets that have revealed novel metabolic paradigms.

  1. Prediagnostic levels of serum one-carbon metabolites and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Lesley M.; Arning, Erland; Wang, Renwei; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Govindarajan, Sugantha; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    Background Rats fed diets deficient in choline develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tumor DNA from these animals is characteristically hypomethylated, suggesting that disruption of the one-carbon metabolism pathway is an underlying mechanism for hepatocarcinogenesis. Prospective studies in humans on circulating choline and other one-carbon metabolites and HCC risk have been lacking. Methods We prospectively examined the association between prediagnostic serum concentrations of one-carbon metabolites including betaine, choline, cystathionine, homocysteine, methionine, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP, the bioactive form of vitamin B6) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and risk of developing HCC based on a nested case-control study of 297 incident cases and 631 matched controls from a cohort of 18,244 men in Shanghai, China. Logistic regression methods were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for established risk factors for HCC. Results Serum choline and PLP were associated with statistically significant reduced risk of HCC, while serum cystathionine, methionine and SAM were associated with increased HCC risk (all Ptrend<0.05). The inverse associations for HCC risk with choline and PLP remained statistically significant after adjusting for all potential confounders. The multivariate-adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for the highest versus lowest quintiles of serum choline and PLP were 0.35 (0.16, 0.78) (P=0.010) and 0.44 (0.25, 0.78) (P=0.005), respectively. There were no associations for HCC risk with 5-MTHF, betaine, or homocysteine. Conclusion The inverse associations between choline and vitamin B6 and the risk of HCC development are novel and warrant further investigation. Impact Identifying new modifiable factors for HCC prevention are warranted. PMID:23897582

  2. Muscle glycogen levels and blood metabolites in reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L.) after transport and lairage.

    PubMed

    Wiklund, E; Andersson, A; Malmfors, G; Lundström, K

    1996-01-01

    A total of 66 reindeer cows and calves were included in a study on the effects of supplementary feeding, transport and lairage on muscle glycogen content, ultimate pH and blood metabolite values. Thirty reindeer (10 not transported, 20 transported 800 km) received no supplementary feed (groups A-C), another 30 animals (10 not transported, 20 transported 1000 km) were given a supplementary reindeer feed mixture 2 months prior to slaughter (groups D-F) and six animals, which had been part of a feeding experiment, were fed for 5 months and slaughtered at the research unit. Glycogen determinations and pH measurements were made in m. longissimus, m. biceps femoris and m. triceps brachii. Blood samples were collected at slaughter and muscle samples were taken 30 min after slaughter. Ultimate pH was measured 30 hr post mortem. The glycogen content in the muscles of groups A-C was very low (100-200 mmol/kg). In groups D-G, the glycogen content was equivalent to normal beef muscle values (300-500 mmol/kg). The values of the blood metabolites urea and creatinine, both of which could indicate protein catabolism caused by stress, were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in animals not having received supplemental feed (groups A-C). Alkaline phosphatase values were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in supplemental fed animals (groups D-G), indicating that their nutritional status was good. Total protein values were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in groups A, D, E and F compared to the other groups. Lorry transport did not significantly (p > 0.05) reduce the muscle glycogen content. Lairage (groups C and F) showed no negative effect on the parameters examined. These results suggest that the animals' physical condition and nutritional status have a considerable effect on their ability to tolerate various stress factors, such as lorry transport and lairage.

  3. The effects of dietary omega fatty acids on pregnancy rate, plasma prostaglandin metabolite levels, serum progesterone levels, and milk fatty-acid profile in beef cows.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Gavin F; McNiven, Mary A; Petit, Hélène V; Duynisveld, John L

    2013-10-01

    The objectives were to determine the effects of feeding supplements rich in omega-6 or omega-3 fatty acids (FA) during the late gestation to the early postpartum and breeding periods on reproduction and milk FA profile in beef cows. For each of two years, at the beginning of period 1 (mid-December), 72 beef cows, calving in January or February, were assigned to diets supplemented with roasted flaxseed (Flax) or roasted soybean (Soybean). For each of two years, after 11 wk (end of period 1), 18 cows of 36 in the Flax group were switched to the soybean supplement and 18 cows of 36 in the Soybean group were switched to the flax supplement (start of Period 2). Cows were bred by timed artificial insemination (TAI) in week 5 of period 2. The FA composition of the milk reflected the FA profile of the oilseed supplements. There were no differences in pregnancy rates among the 4 groups. The treatments had no effect on plasma prostaglandin metabolite levels or ratios at 4 to 11 d postpartum. At 5 to 6 d post- TAI, pregnant cows fed Flax in period 1 had lower (P < 0.05) plasma prostaglandin F metabolite (PGFM) levels and PGFM to prostaglandin E metabolite (PGEM) ratio than cows fed Soybean, but there were no significant differences at 19 to 20 d post-TAI. Cows pregnant from TAI and fed Flax in period 2 had higher (P < 0.05) serum progesterone levels at 5 to 6 d post-TAI than cows fed Soybean, but there was no difference at 19 to 20 d post-TAI. The dietary treatments had no effect on pregnancy rates, but there were some effects on plasma PGFM levels, PGFM to PGEM ratios, and serum progesterone levels. The FA supplements influenced the FA composition of milk.

  4. The effects of dietary omega fatty acids on pregnancy rate, plasma prostaglandin metabolite levels, serum progesterone levels, and milk fatty-acid profile in beef cows

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gavin F.; McNiven, Mary A.; Petit, Hélène V.; Duynisveld, John L.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives were to determine the effects of feeding supplements rich in omega-6 or omega-3 fatty acids (FA) during the late gestation to the early postpartum and breeding periods on reproduction and milk FA profile in beef cows. For each of two years, at the beginning of period 1 (mid-December), 72 beef cows, calving in January or February, were assigned to diets supplemented with roasted flaxseed (Flax) or roasted soybean (Soybean). For each of two years, after 11 wk (end of period 1), 18 cows of 36 in the Flax group were switched to the soybean supplement and 18 cows of 36 in the Soybean group were switched to the flax supplement (start of Period 2). Cows were bred by timed artificial insemination (TAI) in week 5 of period 2. The FA composition of the milk reflected the FA profile of the oilseed supplements. There were no differences in pregnancy rates among the 4 groups. The treatments had no effect on plasma prostaglandin metabolite levels or ratios at 4 to 11 d postpartum. At 5 to 6 d post- TAI, pregnant cows fed Flax in period 1 had lower (P < 0.05) plasma prostaglandin F metabolite (PGFM) levels and PGFM to prostaglandin E metabolite (PGEM) ratio than cows fed Soybean, but there were no significant differences at 19 to 20 d post-TAI. Cows pregnant from TAI and fed Flax in period 2 had higher (P < 0.05) serum progesterone levels at 5 to 6 d post-TAI than cows fed Soybean, but there was no difference at 19 to 20 d post-TAI. The dietary treatments had no effect on pregnancy rates, but there were some effects on plasma PGFM levels, PGFM to PGEM ratios, and serum progesterone levels. The FA supplements influenced the FA composition of milk. PMID:24124276

  5. Urinary DAP metabolite levels in Thai farmers and their families and exposure to pesticides from agricultural pesticide spraying.

    PubMed

    Hanchenlaksh, Chalalai; Povey, Andrew; O'Brien, Sarah; de Vocht, Frank

    2011-08-01

    We conducted a biomarker study to characterise exposure to pesticides among farmers and their families in Thailand to assess the relative importance of the dermal exposure route and to identify important factors that determine exposure levels within farmers' families. Sixteen farmers' families (eight vegetable and eight fruit farmers) participated in the study. Three morning spot urine samples were collected during a pesticide spraying week. Spot samples were grouped by individual and analysed for dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites and creatinine. Additional information on exposure and lifestyle was collected by means of questionnaires. Dermal exposure was assessed using a semi-quantitative observational method (DREAM). Urinary DAP levels varied 20-fold between farmers, with average (geometric mean) levels of 51.1 μg/g for vegetable and 122.2 μg/g for fruit farmers. A moderate correlation (r(s)∼0.45) was found between log(e)-transformed DREAM scores and DAP levels. Farmers' urinary metabolite levels were not correlated with those of their spouses (r(s)∼-0.30) or children (r(s)∼-0.00) collected on the same days. Detectable spouses' DAP levels were on average (geometric mean) 13.0 μg/g and those of children 7.6 μg/g. Farmers in Thailand as well as their families are exposed to pesticides in the spraying season and dermal exposure is an important route. The main route of exposure for farmers' families seems to be through transfer from the farmer to family members or contamination of the home environment, rather than family members helping or playing on the farm. Showering or washing immediately after pesticide spraying greatly reduces the potential exposure of family members to pesticide residues.

  6. Comparison of prorenoate potassium and spironolactone after repeated doses and steady state plasma levels of active metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, G T; Shelton, J R; Harrison, I R; Perkins, R M; Palmer, R F

    1982-01-01

    1 After repeated single daily doses, the aldosterone antagonists prorenoate potassium and spironolactone were compared with regard to renal antimineralocorticoid activity, plasma potassium concentration and steady state plasma levels of their active metabolites, prorenone and canrenone respectively, in a balanced crossover study of twelve healthy subjects. 2 Following challenge with the mineralocorticoid, fludrocortisone, best estimates of the potency of prorenoate potassium relative to spironolactone were 3.6 (95% confidence limits 1.6-10.4) for urinary sodium excretion and 3.4 (95% confidence limits 2.0-6.5) for urinary log10 10Na/K. Estimates with respect to urinary potassium excretion and plasma potassium concentration were imprecise, confirming the limitations of the fludrocortisone model in the evaluation of aldosterone antagonists at steady state. 3 Both compounds exhibited directly proportional relationships between daily dose and steady state plasma levels of active metabolites. The approximate mean terminal elimination half-life of prorenone at steady state was 32.6 h (range 18-80 h). PMID:7059416

  7. Growth Inhibition and Metabolite Pool Levels in Plant Tissues Fed d-Glucosamine and d-Galactose

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, R. M.; Heishman, A.; Wicklin, C.

    1971-01-01

    The growth of corn (Zea mays) roots and barley (Hordeum vulgare) coleoptiles is sensitive to the presence of external d-glucosamine and d-galactose. In order to investigate this effect, tissues were fed the radioactive monosaccharides at concentrations that ranged from those that were strongly inhibitory to those that had little influence on growth. At low concentrations, d-glucosamine is converted to uridine diphosphate-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, phosphate esters of N-acetylglucosamine, and free N-acetylglucosamine. As the external concentrations were increased, the pool levels of each of these metabolites rose several fold; and, in corn roots, two unidentified compounds, which had not been detected previously, began to accumulate in the tissues. The major products of d-galactose metabolism were uridine diphosphate-d-galactose and d-galactose 1-phosphate at all the concentrations tested. Both these compounds showed a marked increase as the external galactose concentrations were raised to inhibitory levels. The experiments indicate that efficient pathways exist in plants for the metabolism of d-glucosamine and d-galactose. These pathways, however, do not appear to be under strict control, so that metabolites accumulate in unusually high amounts and presumably interfere competitively with normal carbohydrate metabolism. Images PMID:16657729

  8. Effect of Methanolic Leaf Extract of Ocimum basilicum L. on Benzene-Induced Hematotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Saha, S; Mukhopadhyay, M K; Ghosh, P D; Nath, D

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective role of methanolic leaf extract of Ocimum basilicum L. against benzene-induced hematotoxicity in Swiss albino mice. GC analysis and subacute toxicity level of the extract were tested. Mice were randomly divided into three groups among which II and III were exposed to benzene vapour at a dose 300 ppm × 6 hr/day × 5 days/week for 2 weeks and group I was control. Group III of this experiment was treated with the leaf methanolic extract at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight, a dose in nontoxic range. Hematological parameters (Hb%, RBC and WBC counts), cell cycle regulatory proteins expression and DNA fragmentation analysis of bone marrow cells was performed. There was an upregulation of p53 and p21 and downregulation of levels of CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and cyclins D1 and E in leaf extract-treated group. DNA was less fragmented in group III compared to group II (P < 0.05). The present study indicates that the secondary metabolites of O. basilicum L. methanolic leaf extract, comprising essential oil monoterpene geraniol and its oxidized form citral as major constituents, have modulatory effect in cell cycle deregulation and hematological abnormalities induced by benzene in mice.

  9. Effect of Methanolic Leaf Extract of Ocimum basilicum L. on Benzene-Induced Hematotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saha, S.; Mukhopadhyay, M. K.; Ghosh, P. D.; Nath, D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective role of methanolic leaf extract of Ocimum basilicum L. against benzene-induced hematotoxicity in Swiss albino mice. GC analysis and subacute toxicity level of the extract were tested. Mice were randomly divided into three groups among which II and III were exposed to benzene vapour at a dose 300 ppm × 6 hr/day × 5 days/week for 2 weeks and group I was control. Group III of this experiment was treated with the leaf methanolic extract at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight, a dose in nontoxic range. Hematological parameters (Hb%, RBC and WBC counts), cell cycle regulatory proteins expression and DNA fragmentation analysis of bone marrow cells was performed. There was an upregulation of p53 and p21 and downregulation of levels of CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and cyclins D1 and E in leaf extract-treated group. DNA was less fragmented in group III compared to group II (P < 0.05). The present study indicates that the secondary metabolites of O. basilicum L. methanolic leaf extract, comprising essential oil monoterpene geraniol and its oxidized form citral as major constituents, have modulatory effect in cell cycle deregulation and hematological abnormalities induced by benzene in mice. PMID:22988471

  10. IN VITRO CYTOTOXICITY OF BTEX METABOLITES IN HELA CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fuel leakage from underground storage tanks is a major source of groundwater contamination. Although the toxicity of regulated compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are well recognized, the cytotoxicity of their metabolites has not been studied exte...

  11. IN VITRO CYTOTOXICITY OF BTEX METABOLITES IN HELA CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fuel leakage from underground storage tanks is a major source of groundwater contamination. Although the toxicity of regulated compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are well recognized, the cytotoxicity of their metabolites has not been studied exte...

  12. Influence of parenting style on the offspring's behaviour and CSF monoamine metabolite levels in crossfostered and noncrossfostered female rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Maestripieri, Dario; McCormack, Kai; Lindell, Stephen G; Higley, J Dee; Sanchez, Mar M

    2006-11-25

    We investigated the association between variation in parenting style and the offspring's behaviour and CSF monoamine metabolite (5-HIAA, HVA, and MHPG) levels in rhesus monkeys. Study subjects were 25 two-year-old females reared by their biological mothers and 15 same-aged females that were crossfostered at birth and reared by unrelated mothers. Subjects that were rejected more by their mothers in the first 6 months of life engaged in more solitary play and had lower CSF concentrations of 5-HIAA than subjects that were rejected less. The relation between these variables was generally similar in crossfostered and noncrossfostered females. CSF levels of 5-HIAA were negatively correlated with rates of scratching, a behavioural indicator of anxiety. These results suggest that that early exposure to high rates of maternal rejection can result in higher anxiety later in life, and that this effect may be mediated by serotonergic mechanisms. Variation in maternal protectiveness did not affect offspring behaviour and neither protectiveness nor rejection affected CSF levels of HVA and MHPG. CSF levels of MHPG, however, were negatively correlated with solitary play behaviour and avoidance of other individuals, suggesting that individuals with lower CSF MHPG were more fearful and socially phobic than those with higher CSF MHPG. Taken together, these findings suggest that individual differences in anxiety and fearfulness in young rhesus monkeys are accounted for, at least in part, by variation in CSF levels of monoamine metabolites, and that the development of brain monoamine systems, particularly serotonin, can be affected by early exposure to variable maternal behaviour.

  13. Modifications in the metabolism and myeloclastogenic effect of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Gad-El Karim, M.M.; Harper, B.L.; Ramanujam, S.V.M.; Legator, M.S.

    1982-02-01

    Benzene was studied in its target organ of effect, the bone marrow, with the micronucleus test and metaphase analysis. In a series of experiments, male and female CD-1 mice were subjected to various pretreatments: phenobarbital (PB) (0.1% in drinking water x 7 days or 80 mg/kg/day (I.P.) x 3 days before treatment), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MCA) (30 mg/kg/day (I.P.) x 2 days), SKF-525A (80 mg/kg (I.P.) 2 hours before each treatment dose), or Aroclor-1254 (100 mg/kg) (I.P.) once, 5 days before treatment. The animals were then treated with benzene (440 or 880 mg/kg) or toluene (860 or 1720 mg/kg) or their mixture in 2 doses 24 hours apart and sacrificed 6 hours or 24 hours after the second dose. Toluene showed no clastogenic activity and reduced the clastogenic effect of benzene when the mixture was given. None of the pretreatments protected against the clastogenic effect of benzene. 3-MCA pretreatment caused a tremendous enhancement of benzene myeloclastogenicity. The sex difference, with females constantly more resistant than males to benzene, was retained among the 3-MCA pretreated group. Toluene, in mixture with benzene, lowered the clastogenic effect in 3-MCA pretreated mice. Dose-response curves with benzene treatment alone and with 3-MCA induced groups were generated in which the former curve was lower for each dose than the latter. Urine fractions were collected at 12-hour intervals from 3-groups of 10 males gavaged with benzene, either non-induced, PB- or 3MCA induced. Catechol was the major metabolite, phenol the minor one, and hydroquinone and semiquinones were present in trace amounts.

  14. Lower Vitamin D Metabolites Levels Were Associated With Increased Coronary Artery Diseases in Type 2 Diabetes Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Adela, Ramu; Borkar, Roshan M; Bhandi, Murali Mohan; Vishwakarma, Gayatri; Reddy, P. Naveen Chander; Srinivas, R.; Banerjee, Sanjay K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure six vitamin D metabolites and to find the association between vitamin D deficiency and coronary artery diseases in diabetes (T2DM_CAD). Four groups [control (n = 50), type 2 diabetes (T2DM, n = 71), coronary artery diseases (CAD, n = 28), T2DM_CAD (n = 38)] of total 187 subjects were included in the study. Six vitamin D metabolites (D2, D3, 25(OH)D2, 25(OH)D3, 1,25(OH)2D2, 1,25(OH)2D3), total 25(OH)D and total 1,25(OH)2D were measured by UPLC/APCI/HRMS method in these subjects. Although all the vitamin D metabolites were significantly decreased in T2DM_CAD as compared to both control and T2DM subjects (p < 0.05), only two metabolites i.e., 25(OH)D3 and total 25(OH)D were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased in the T2DM subjects as compared with the control subjects (p < 0.05). Vitamin D3, 1,25(OH)2D2, 25(OH)D, and 1,25(OH)2D levels were significantly decreased in T2DM_CAD subjects as compared with CAD subjects (p < 0.05). Further, multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that total 25(OH)D and total 1,25(OH)2D can be used to predict T2DM (OR 0.82.95% CI 0.68–0.99; p = 0.0208) and T2DM with CAD (OR 0.460, 95% CI 0.242–0.874; p = 0.0177), respectively. Our data concludes that lower concentration of 1,25(OH)2D is associated with type 2 diabetes coexisting with coronary artery diseases in South Indian subjects. PMID:27883024

  15. Differences in intestinal microbial metabolites in laying hens with high and low levels of repetitive feather-pecking behavior.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Beatrice; Zentek, Jürgen; Harlander-Matauschek, Alexandra

    2013-02-17

    Feather pecking in laying hens is a serious behavioral problem and is often associated with feather eating. There is some evidence that ingested feathers affect gut function. The aim of the present study was to explore whether differences in intestinal microbial metabolites in laying hens with high and low levels of repetitive feather-pecking behavior exist. Sixty high feather-pecking birds (H) and sixty low feather-pecking birds (L) of the White Leghorn breed were used for behavioral recordings of feather pecking. Feather pecking activity was observed for 5 weeks, after which 22 H birds with the highest and 22 L birds with the lowest feather pecking activity were chosen. The number of whole feathers and feather parts in the gizzard and intestinal microbial metabolites in the ileum and ceca of these laying hens was examined. Biogenic amines, short-chain fatty acids, ammonia and lactate were measured as microbial metabolites. A higher number of feather parts and particles were found in H than in L birds. Putrescine and cadaverine concentrations were higher in the ileum of the hens with low pecking activity (P<0.001 and P=0.012). In the cecum the amounts of l-lactate, d-lactate and total lactate and SCFA were higher in H birds (P=0.007, P=0.005, P=0.006, and P<0.001). Acetate, i-butyrate, i-valeriate and n-valeriate all displayed significantly higher molar ratios in the cecal contents of L birds (P=0.001, P=0.003, P=0.001, and P<0.001). Propionate and n-butyrate showed higher molar ratios in H birds (P<0.001 and P=0.034). Ammonia was higher in the ileum and cecum of the L birds (P<0.001 and P=0.004). For the first time, this study shows that birds with high and low numbers of repetitive pecking movements to the plumage of other birds differ in their intestinal microbial metabolism. Further experiments should be conducted to investigate whether these differences alter behavior in H and L feather pecking birds. The present results, however, open new avenues of research

  16. Benzene and childhood acute leukemia in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Janitz, Amanda E; Campbell, Janis E; Magzamen, Sheryl; Pate, Anne; Stoner, Julie A; Peck, Jennifer D

    2017-10-01

    Although childhood cancer is a leading cause of childhood mortality in the US, evidence regarding the etiology is lacking. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between benzene, a known carcinogen, and childhood acute leukemia. We conducted a case-control study including cases diagnosed with acute leukemia between 1997 and 2012 (n = 307) from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry and controls matched on week of birth from birth certificates (n = 1013). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between benzene, measured with the 2005 National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) at census tract of the birth residence, and childhood acute leukemia. We observed no differences in benzene exposure overall between cases and controls. However, when stratified by year of birth, cases born from 2005 to 2010 had a three-fold increased unadjusted odds of elevated exposure compared to controls born in this same time period (4th Quartile OR: 3.53, 95% CI: 1.35, 9.27). Furthermore, the estimates for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were stronger than those with acute lymphoid leukemia, though not statistically significant. While we did not observe an association between benzene and childhood leukemia overall, our results suggest that acute leukemia is associated with increased benzene exposure among more recent births, and children with AML may have increased benzene exposure at birth. Using the NATA estimates allowed us to assess a specific pollutant at the census tract level, providing an advantage over monitor or point source data. Our study, however, cannot rule out the possibility that benzene may be a marker of other traffic-related exposures and temporal misclassification may explain the lack of an association among earlier births. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Global metabolic analyses identify key differences in metabolite levels between polymyxin-susceptible and polymyxin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Mahamad Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Johnson, Matthew D.; Han, Mei-Ling; Boyce, John D.; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Forrest, Alan; Kaye, Keith S.; Hertzog, Paul; Purcell, Anthony W.; Song, Jiangning; Velkov, Tony; Creek, Darren J.; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii presents a global medical crisis and polymyxins are used as the last-line therapy. This study aimed to identify metabolic differences between polymyxin-susceptible and polymyxin-resistant A. baumannii using untargeted metabolomics. The metabolome of each A. baumannii strain was measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate and univariate statistics and pathway analyses were employed to elucidate metabolic differences between the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains. Significant differences were identified between the metabolic profiles of the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficient, polymyxin-resistant 19606R showed perturbation in specific amino acid and carbohydrate metabolites, particularly pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Levels of nucleotides were lower in the LPS-deficient 19606R. Furthermore, 19606R exhibited a shift in its glycerophospholipid profile towards increased abundance of short-chain lipids compared to the parent polymyxin-susceptible ATCC 19606. In contrast, in a pair of clinical isolates 03–149.1 (polymyxin-susceptible) and 03–149.2 (polymyxin-resistant, due to modification of lipid A), minor metabolic differences were identified. Notably, peptidoglycan biosynthesis metabolites were significantly depleted in both of the aforementioned polymyxin-resistant strains. This is the first comparative untargeted metabolomics study to show substantial differences in the metabolic profiles of the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii. PMID:26924392

  18. Global metabolic analyses identify key differences in metabolite levels between polymyxin-susceptible and polymyxin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz Mahamad; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Johnson, Matthew D; Han, Mei-Ling; Boyce, John D; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Forrest, Alan; Kaye, Keith S; Hertzog, Paul; Purcell, Anthony W; Song, Jiangning; Velkov, Tony; Creek, Darren J; Li, Jian

    2016-02-29

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii presents a global medical crisis and polymyxins are used as the last-line therapy. This study aimed to identify metabolic differences between polymyxin-susceptible and polymyxin-resistant A. baumannii using untargeted metabolomics. The metabolome of each A. baumannii strain was measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate and univariate statistics and pathway analyses were employed to elucidate metabolic differences between the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains. Significant differences were identified between the metabolic profiles of the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficient, polymyxin-resistant 19606R showed perturbation in specific amino acid and carbohydrate metabolites, particularly pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Levels of nucleotides were lower in the LPS-deficient 19606R. Furthermore, 19606R exhibited a shift in its glycerophospholipid profile towards increased abundance of short-chain lipids compared to the parent polymyxin-susceptible ATCC 19606. In contrast, in a pair of clinical isolates 03-149.1 (polymyxin-susceptible) and 03-149.2 (polymyxin-resistant, due to modification of lipid A), minor metabolic differences were identified. Notably, peptidoglycan biosynthesis metabolites were significantly depleted in both of the aforementioned polymyxin-resistant strains. This is the first comparative untargeted metabolomics study to show substantial differences in the metabolic profiles of the polymyxin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii.

  19. Effect of major and minor surgery on plasma levels of arginine, citrulline, nitric oxide metabolites, and ornithine in humans.

    PubMed

    Hol, Jaap W; van Lier, Felix; Valk, Madelous; Klimek, Markus; Stolker, Robert J; Fekkes, Durk

    2013-12-01

    To determine the effect of surgical invasiveness on plasma levels of arginine, citrulline, ornithine, and nitric oxide (NO) in humans. Surgical trauma may have a profound effect on the metabolism of NO. However, human studies reported both increased and decreased NO levels after hemorrhagic shock. Arginine, citrulline, and ornithine are key amino acids involved in NO metabolism, but studies evaluating these amino acids together with NO and during 2 types of surgery are lacking. This study tests the hypothesis that major surgery has a more profound effect on plasma levels of arginine, citrulline, NO, and ornithine than minor surgery. Fifteen patients undergoing minor surgery (vulvectomy) and 13 patients undergoing major surgery (laparotomy) were prospectively followed up for 4 days. Plasma was collected for evaluation of levels of arginine, citrulline, NO, and ornithine. Throughout the experiment, arginine levels did not significantly differ between experimental groups. Perioperative plasma citrulline levels were significantly lower in the laparotomy group than in the vulvectomy group, whereas both groups showed a decrease in citrulline levels at the end of the operation and 24 hours postoperatively. Roughly the same pattern was seen for plasma NO and ornithine levels. However, ornithine levels in the laparotomy group showed a more drastic decrease at the end of the operation and 24 hours postoperatively than citrulline and NO levels. The level of surgical invasiveness has the most profound effect on plasma levels of ornithine. In addition, heavier surgical trauma is paired with lower postoperative levels of citrulline and NO metabolites than lighter surgery. It is suggested that surgical trauma stimulates the laparotomy group to consume significantly more ornithine, possibly for use in wound healing.

  20. Vitamin D metabolites and bioactive parathyroid hormone levels during Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Schnoes, Heinrich K.; Deluca, Hector F.; Phelps, Mary E.; Klein, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of an 8-day space flight (Spacelab mission 2) on plasma levels of the vitamin D and parathyroid hormones is investigated experimentally in four crew members. The results are presented in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Parathyroid hormone levels remained normal throughout the flight, whereas vitamin D hormone levels increased significantly on day 1 but returned to normal by day 7.

  1. Vitamin D metabolites and bioactive parathyroid hormone levels during Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Schnoes, Heinrich K.; Deluca, Hector F.; Phelps, Mary E.; Klein, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of an 8-day space flight (Spacelab mission 2) on plasma levels of the vitamin D and parathyroid hormones is investigated experimentally in four crew members. The results are presented in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Parathyroid hormone levels remained normal throughout the flight, whereas vitamin D hormone levels increased significantly on day 1 but returned to normal by day 7.

  2. Structure and electronic properties of a benzene-water solution.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Margarida P S; Galamba, Nuno; Cabral, Benedito J Costa

    2012-01-07

    Electronic properties of benzene in water were investigated by a sequential quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics approach. Emphasis was placed on the analysis of the structure, polarization effects, and ionization spectrum. By adopting a polarizable model for both benzene and water the structure of the benzene-water solution is in good agreement with data from first principles molecular dynamics. Further, strong evidence that water molecules acquire enhanced orientational order near the benzene molecule is found. Upon hydration, the quadrupole moment of benzene is not significantly changed in comparison with the gas-phase value. We are also reporting results for the dynamic polarizability of benzene in water. Our results indicate that the low energy behaviour of the dynamic polarizability of gas-phase and hydrated benzene is quite similar. Outer valence Green's function calculations for benzene in liquid water show a splitting of the gas-phase energy levels associated with the 1e(1g)(π), 2e(2g), and 2e(1u) orbitals upon hydration. Lifting of the orbitals degeneracy and redshift of the outer valence bands is related to symmetry breaking of the benzene structure in solution and polarization effects from the surrounding water molecules.

  3. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods

    PubMed Central

    Salviano dos Santos, Vânia Paula; Medeiros Salgado, Andréa; Guedes Torres, Alexandre; Signori Pereira, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1–10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food. PMID:26904662

  4. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods.

    PubMed

    Salviano Dos Santos, Vânia Paula; Medeiros Salgado, Andréa; Guedes Torres, Alexandre; Signori Pereira, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1-10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food.

  5. Development of an immunoassay to detect benzene adducts in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Grassman, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an immunoassay to detect the adducts formed in hemoglobin after exposure to benzene, which is known to cause bone marrow degeneration and acute myelogenous leukemia. The use of benzene-adduct detection as a biological monitoring method would permit measurement of low exposures and exposures sustained weeks earlier. The reactivity of hydroquinone, an important benzene metabolite, with blood proteins and amino acids was investigated in order to decide which antigens and analytes were likely to be suitable for immunoassay development. The second section determined the combination of benzene-metabolite and antigen need to produce an immunoassay with the requisite low detection limit and specificity. The immunoassays with the best performance were tested on hemoglobin from benzene-exposed mice. In vitro studies showed that hydroquinone efficiently formed adducts with erythrocyte membranes and hemoglobin but not with albumin. Adduction efficiency was greater in incubations using purified hemoglobin than whole blood. Cysteine accounted for 15 to 27% of the adducts formed by hydroquinone. The site of the other adducts were not identified although there was evidence that the hemoglobin heme was adducted. Adducts were found on only 1 of the 2 globin chains. Tryptic digestion of the globin failed to associate the adducts with a specific peptide. Antigens made from hydroquinone-adducted hemoglobin but not hydroquinone-adducted cysteines coupled to carrier proteins effectively elicited adduct-specific antibodies. Interference due to reactivity to hemoglobin was controlled by using uniform quantities of hemoglobin in all wells. The mid-range of the best assays were approximately 12 pmoles HQ per well. Antibodies directed toward hemoglobin adducted with the benzene metabolites phenol, catechol and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene were also made. The performance of the anti-1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene were suitable for quantitative immunoassays.

  6. Field evaluation of two diffusive samplers and two adsorbent media to determine 1,3-butadiene and benzene levels in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandberg, Bo; Sunesson, Anna-Lena; Sundgren, Margit; Levin, Jan-Olof; Sällsten, Gerd; Barregard, Lars

    Two types of diffusive samplers, both of which are compatible with thermal desorption, but differ in their geometry—SKC-Ultra (badge-type) and Radiello (radial symmetry-type)—were evaluated indoors and outdoors under varying temperature, humidity and wind speed conditions, using the graphitized adsorbents Carbopack X or Carbograph 5 to measure 1,3-butadiene and benzene in ambient air. The results obtained by diffusive sampling were compared with results obtained using a conventional active sampling method over both long (1 week) and shorter periods (6-24 h). Analysis and detection were performed using an automatic thermal desorber (ATD) connected to a gas chromatograph-flame ionization detector (GC/FID). Results from each sampler and adsorbent combination were examined using ordinary or multiple linear regression analysis. The overall uncertainty (OU) was also determined. In general, the results obtained with both samplers showed good agreement with those obtained by active sampling. Carbopack X appeared to be a more efficient adsorbent than Carbograph 5 for 1,3-butadiene, but the two adsorbents were equivalent for benzene. No effects of either humidity or air velocity were observed. Minor temperature effects were observed for both samplers for 1,3-butadiene. In summary, the results confirmed the accuracy of sampling rates previously determined for the two samplers and adsorbents. We consider the two samplers to be suitable for stationary and personal monitoring for the general population of 1,3-butadiene and benzene in various environments, indoors and outdoors. They are almost independent of meteorological conditions and may be suitable for monitoring industrial atmospheres.

  7. Influence of CYP2D6 Polymorphisms on Serum Levels of Tamoxifen Metabolites in Spanish Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zafra-Ceres, Mercedes; de Haro, Tomas; Farez-Vidal, Esther; Blancas, Isabel; Bandres, Fernando; de Dueñas, Eduardo Martinez; Ochoa-Aranda, Enrique; Gomez-Capilla, Jose A.; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer tumors depend on estrogen signaling for their growth and replication and can be treated by anti-estrogen therapy with tamoxifen. Polymorphisms of the CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genes are associated with an impaired response to tamoxifen. The study objective was to investigate the impact of genetic polymorphisms in CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 on the pharmacokinetics of tamoxifen and its metabolites in Spanish women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer who were candidates for tamoxifen therapy. Methods: We studied 90 women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, using the AmpliChip CYP450 test to determine CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 gene variants. Plasma levels of tamoxifen and its metabolites were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results The CYP2D6 phenotype was extensive metabolizer in 80%, intermediate metabolizer in 12.2%, ultra-rapid metabolizer in 2.2%, and poor metabolizer in 5.6% of patients, and the allele frequency was 35.0% for allele *1, 21.0% for *2, and 18.9% for *4. All poor metabolizers in this series were *4/*4, and their endoxifen and 4-hydroxy tamoxifen levels were 25% lower than those of extensive metabolizers. CYP2C19*2 allele, which has been related to breast cancer outcomes, was detected in 15.6% of the studied alleles. Conclusion CYP2D6*4/*4 genotype was inversely associated with 4-hydroxy tamoxifen and endoxifen levels. According to these results, CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genotyping appears advisable before the prescription of tamoxifen therapy. PMID:23781139

  8. Effects of physical exercise on serum levels of serotonin and its metabolite in fibromyalgia: a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Valim, Valéria; Natour, Jamil; Xiao, Yangming; Pereira, Abraão Ferraz Alves; Lopes, Beatriz Baptista da Cunha; Pollak, Daniel Feldman; Zandonade, Eliana; Russell, Irwin Jon

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of aerobic training and stretching on serum levels of serotonin (5HT) and its main metabolite 5-hydroxindolacetic acid (5HIAA). Twenty-two women with FM were randomized into one of two exercise modalities (aerobic walking exercise or stretching exercise) to be accomplished three times a week for 20 weeks. The serum levels of 5HT and 5HIAA were evaluated before and after the exercise program by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with colorimetric detection. Within group analysis (pre-post) showed that serum levels of both 5HT and 5HIAA changed significantly in the aerobic group during the 20-week course of therapy (5HT: P = 0,03; 5HIAA: P = 0,003). In the stretching group, however, no statistically significant change was observed (5HT: P=0,491; 5HIAA: P=0,549). Between group statistical comparisons of laboratory measures disclosed that aerobic training was superior to stretching in that it significantly increased the levels of 5HIAA (F test = 6.61; P = 0.01), but the average difference between groups on the levels of 5HT did not meet significance criteria (F test = 3.42; P = 0.08). Aerobic training increases the 5HIAA and 5HT levels and it could explain why aerobic exercise can improve symptoms in fibromyalgia syndrome patient more than stretching exercise.

  9. Plasma prostaglandin E(2) metabolite levels during labor induction with a sustained-release prostaglandin E(2) vaginal insert.

    PubMed

    Goharkhay, N; Stanczyk, F Z; Gentzschein, E; Wing, D A

    2000-01-01

    To measure prostaglandin E(2) levels during labor induction with a sustained-release vaginal polymer insert (prostaglandin E(2) insert) and to determine whether Bishop score change correlated with tachysystole. Twelve primiparas and 12 multiparas were treated with a 0.3 mg per hour sustained-release polymer vaginal prostaglandin E(2) insert for up to 24 hours. Bishop score was assessed at start and end of therapy, and serum samples were collected at 4-hour intervals. Prostaglandin E(2) metabolite (PGEM) levels were measured by specific enzyme immunoassay. Exposure averaged 13.5 +/- 7.2 hours. Four patients (16.7%, three nulliparas) had tachysystole. Mean PGEM levels increased from 187 +/- 42 pg/mL at baseline to 548 +/- 110 pg/mL at 12 hours (P <.05) and remained relatively stable thereafter. Nulliparas with Bishop score changes of four points or more had the highest increase, with average peak levels of 985 +/- 109 pg/mL, compared with 452 +/- 58 pg/mL for all others (P <.001). Patients with tachysystole had higher 4-hour (P <.01) and overall (P <.04) increases in PGEM level. Removal of the insert led to an average decrease of 335 pg/mL in PGEM levels (P <.01). The decrease correlated with the PGEM level measured before removal (r =.94, P <.0001) and the maximum PGEM increase from baseline (r =.94, P <.0001). The mean mixed venous cord PGEM level was 409 +/- 375 pg/mL. Administration of the prostaglandin E(2) insert led to a sustained increase in circulating PGEM levels in women who had labor induction. Peak PGEM levels correlated with Bishop score improvement. Rapid increases in prostaglandin E(2) levels might cause tachysystole.

  10. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans‐Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Summary Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen‐dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene‐degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ‘key players’ of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:21450012

  11. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 on Primary Metabolite Levels in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 Leaves: An Examination of Metabolome Data.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Ko; Watanabe, Chihiro K; Terashima, Ichiro

    2015-11-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentrations ([CO(2)]) affect primary metabolite levels because CO(2) is a direct substrate for photosynthesis. In several studies, the responses of primary metabolite levels have been examined using Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, but these results have not been comprehensively discussed. Here, we examined metabolome data for A. thaliana accession Col-0 leaves that were grown at elevated [CO(2)] with sufficient nitrogen (N) nutrition. At elevated [CO(2)], starch, monosaccharides and several major amino acids accumulated in leaves. The degree of accumulation depended on whether the rooting medium contained NH(4) (+) or only NO(3) (-). Because low N conditions induce an increase in carbohydrates similar to that of elevated [CO(2)], we compared the responses of primary metabolite levels between elevated [CO(2)] and low N conditions. Levels of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle-associated organic acids and major amino acids decreased with low N, but not with elevated [CO(2)]. Even at elevated [CO(2)], the low N induced the decreases in the levels of organic acids and major amino acids. A small sink size also affects the primary metabolite response patterns in leaves under elevated [CO(2)] conditions. Thus, care is necessary when interpreting primary metabolite changes in leaves of field-grown plants.

  12. Suitability of S-Phenylmercapturic acid and trans-trans-muconic acid as biomarkers for exposure to low concentrations of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Boogaard, P.J.; Sittert, N.J. van

    1996-12-01

    Phenol is not reliable as a biomarker for exposure to benzene at concentrations below 5 ppm (8-hr time-weighted average [TWA]). S-Phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) and trans-trans-muconic acid (tt-MA), two minor urinary metabolites of benzene, have been proposed as biomarkers for low-level exposures. The aim of this study was to compare their suitability as biomarkers. S-PMA and tt-MA were determined in 434 urine samples collected from 188 workers in various settings in the petrochemical industry and from 52 control workers with no occupational exposure to benzene. Benzene concentrations in the breathing zone of the potentially exposed workers were assessed by personal air monitoring. Strong correlations were found between S-PMA and tt-MA concentrations in end-of-shift samples and between either of these parameters and airborne benzene concentrations. Exposure to 1 ppm benzene (8-hr TWA) leads to an average concentration in end-of-shift samples of 21 mol S-PMA and 1.5 mmol tt-MA per mol creatinine. Of an inhaled dose of benzene, on average 0.11 % (range 0.05-0.26%) was excreted as S-PMA with an apparent elimination half-life of 9.1 (standard error [SE] 0.7) hr and 3.9% (range 1.9-7.3%) as tt-MA with a half-life of 5.0 (SE 0.5) hr. Due to its longer elimination half-life, S-PMA proved a more reliable biomarker than tt-MA for benzene exposures during 12-hr shifts. We conclude that S-PMA is superior to tt-MA as a biomarker for low-level benzene exposures because it is more specific, enabling reliable determination of benzene exposures down to 0.3 ppm (8-hr TWA), and because its longer half-life makes it more suited for biological monitoring of operators working in shifts longer than 8 hr. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Melatonin metabolite levels in workers exposed to 60-Hz magnetic fields: work in substations and with 3-phase conductors.

    PubMed

    Burch, J B; Reif, J S; Noonan, C W; Yost, M G

    2000-02-01

    Melatonin suppression by 50/60-Hz magnetic fields represents a plausible biological mechanism for explaining increased health risks in workers. Personal exposure to magnetic fields and ambient light, and excretion of the melatonin metabolite 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (6-OHMS), were measured over 3 consecutive workdays in electric utility workers. There was a magnetic field-dependent reduction in adjusted mean nocturnal and post-work 6-OHMS levels among men working more than 2 hours per day in substation and 3-phase environments and no effect among those working 2 hours or less. No changes were observed among men working in 1-phase environments. The results suggest that circular or elliptical magnetic field polarization, or another factor linked to substations and 3-phase electricity, is associated with magnetic field induced melatonin suppression in humans.

  14. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of ten estrogen metabolites at sub-picogram levels in breast cancer women.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Alaa; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M

    2016-09-15

    The measurement of estrogens at sub-picogram levels is essential for research on breast cancer and postmenopausal plasma. Heretofore, these concentration levels have rarely been achieved. However, it is possible through derivatization but still represent problems for monitoring catechol estrogens and 16α-hydroxyestrone (16α-OH-E1). Estrogens possess poor ionization efficiency in MS/MS, which results in insufficient sensitivity for analyzing samples at trace concentrations. The method presented here was used to extract ten estrogen metabolites (EMs) with a derivatization step involving a new adduct. The electrospray ionization (ESI) MS/MS sensitivity for the EMs was enhanced by derivatization with 3-bromomethyl-propyphenazone (BMP). The lower limits of quantification (LLOQ) of the EMs were 12-100 femtogram on-column, equivalent to 0.3-3.6pg/mL plasma, and the limits of detection (LOD) were 0.1-0.8pg/mL plasma. The percentage coefficient of variation (CV%) at the LLOQ was <20 for all investigated EMs. Ionization suppression was minimized by reacting the excess reagent, BMP, with methanol. The method was successfully applied for the determination of ten EMs in the plasma of fifty healthy postmenopausal and fifty ductal breast cancer women aged 47-65 years old. 16α-OH-E1 and three catechol estrogen metabolites, 4-OH-E1, 2-OH-E2 and 4-OH-E2, were successfully measured in the plasma of healthy and breast cancer women. The methyl-propyphenazone-EM derivatives exhibited better sensitivity in ESI-MS (7.5-fold) compared to the commonly used dansylation procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Plasma hormones, metabolites, milk production, and cholesterol levels in Murrah buffaloes fed with Asparagus racemosus in transition and postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra Pratap; Mehla, Ram Kumar; Singh, Mahendra

    2012-12-01

    Ten dry and pregnant Murrah buffaloes were selected to investigate the effect of Asparagus racemosus feeding on hormones, metabolites, milk yield, and plasma cholesterol levels. The treatment groups of buffaloes were fed with A. racemosus (shatavari) @ 150 g/day/animal during prepartum and @ 300 g/day/animal during the postpartum period. Blood samples collected on -6, -4, -2-week, day of parturition (0), and +2, +4, and +6-week postpartum were analyzed for plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), prolactin, cortisol, and blood metabolites. Milk samples collected at weekly intervals (+1, +3, +5, and 7 weeks) were analyzed for total milk fat cholesterol. Prepartum plasma cholesterol concentrations were significantly higher in treatment group over the control (P < 0.05). Mean plasma triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, glucose, and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels varied nonsignificantly between groups. Plasma prolactin and cortisol concentrations were significantly (P < 0.01) more in treatment group than in control group. On day of parturition, plasma prolactin, cortisol, LDL, and plasma total cholesterol were higher (P < 0.01) in treatment group buffaloes in comparison to control group. A. racemosus feeding significantly (P < 0.01) increased plasma prolactin, cortisol (P < 0.01), and milk fat cholesterol (P < 0.05) without affecting total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, glucose, and NEFA concentrations. The buffaloes of treatment group produced more milk (@ 0.526 kg/animal/day) suggesting thereby that A. racemosus is galactopoietic. It was concluded that feeding of A. racemosus increases plasma prolactin and cortisol and decreased plasma total cholesterol and LDL concentration.

  16. Valproic acid I: time course of lipid peroxidation biomarkers, liver toxicity, and valproic acid metabolite levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Vincent; Teng, Xiao Wei; Chang, Thomas K H; Abbott, Frank S

    2005-08-01

    A single dose of valproic acid (VPA), which is a widely used antiepileptic drug, is associated with oxidative stress in rats, as recently demonstrated by elevated levels of 15-F(2t)-isoprostane (15-F(2t)-IsoP). To determine whether there was a temporal relationship between VPA-associated oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated ip with VPA (500 mg/kg) or 0.9% saline (vehicle) once daily for 2, 4, 7, 10, or 14 days. Oxidative stress was assessed by determining plasma and liver levels of 15-F(2t)-IsoP, lipid hydroperoxides (LPO), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs). Plasma and liver 15-F(2t)-IsoP were elevated and reached a plateau after day 2 of VPA treatment compared to control. Liver LPO levels were not elevated until day 7 of treatment (1.8-fold versus control, p < 0.05). Liver and plasma TBARs were not increased until 14 days (2-fold vs. control, p < 0.05). Liver toxicity was evaluated based on serum levels of alpha-glutathione S-transferase (alpha-GST) and by histology. Serum alpha-GST levels were significantly elevated by day 4, which corresponded to hepatotoxicity as shown by the increasing incidence of inflammation of the liver capsule, necrosis, and steatosis throughout the study. The liver levels of beta-oxidation metabolites of VPA were decreased by day 14, while the levels of 4-ene-VPA and (E)-2,4-diene-VPA were not elevated throughout the study. Overall, these findings indicate that VPA treatment results in oxidative stress, as measured by levels of 15-F(2t)-IsoP, which precedes the onset of necrosis, steatosis, and elevated levels of serum alpha-GST.

  17. Nutritionally related blood metabolites and performance of finishing pigs fed on graded levels of dietary fibre.

    PubMed

    Bakare, Archibold Garikayi; Ndou, Saymore Petros; Madzimure, James; Chimonyo, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine effect of feeding fibrous diets on performance and biochemical profiles of finishing pigs. A total of 84 clinically healthy male pigs were used in the experiment. Body weight of the pigs at the beginning of the experiment was 85 ± 10.1 kg. Maize cob (MC), sunflower hulls (SH), lucerne hay (LH) and dried citrus pulp (PU) were incorporated in a basal diet for finishing pigs at different inclusion levels of 0, 80, 160, 240, 320 and 400 g/kg. Effects of week of feeding, fibre source and inclusion level of fibre were significant (P < 0.05). Pigs consumed more LH compared to MC, SH and PU. Average daily gain was high for pigs consuming diets with inclusion levels of 0, 80, 160 and 240 g/kg and low for pigs consuming 320 and 400 g/kg inclusion level of fibre in a diet. There was an increase in serum total concentration (TP) with an increase in PU, MC and LH in pig diets (P < 0.05). Creatine kinase (CK) concentrations decreased as levels of PU, LH and MC increased (P < 0.05). Increasing inclusion level of LH and SH in pig diets resulted in an increase in glycated haemoglobin concentration (P < 0.05). It can be concluded that level of PU, LH, MC and SH in diets of finishing pigs negatively influences average daily feed intake, average daily gain and biochemical profiles.

  18. Circulating tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolite levels in citrin-deficient children with metabolic adaptation, with and without sodium pyruvate treatment.

    PubMed

    Nagasaka, Hironori; Komatsu, Haruki; Inui, Ayano; Nakacho, Mariko; Morioka, Ichiro; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Kaji, Shunsaku; Hirayama, Satoshi; Miida, Takashi; Kondou, Hiroki; Ihara, Kenji; Yagi, Mariko; Kizaki, Zenro; Bessho, Kazuhiko; Kodama, Takahiro; Iijima, Kazumoto; Saheki, Takeyori; Yorifuji, Tohru; Honda, Akira

    2017-03-01

    Citrin deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN-2), which later manifests as severe liver steatosis and life-threatening encephalopathy. Long-standing energy deficit of the liver and brain may predispose ones to CTLN-2. Here, we compared the energy-driving tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid β-oxidation cycle between 22 citrin-deficient children (age, 3-13years) with normal liver functions and 37 healthy controls (age, 5-13years). TCA cycle analysis showed that basal plasma citrate and α-ketoglutarate levels were significantly higher in the affected than the control group (p<0.01). Conversely, basal plasma fumarate and malate levels were significantly lower than those for the control (p<0.001). The plasma level of 3-OH-butyrate derived from fatty acid β-oxidation was significantly higher in the affected group (p<0.01). Ten patients underwent sodium pyruvate therapy. However, this therapy did not correct or attenuate such deviations in both cycles. Sodium pyruvate therapy significantly increased fasting insulin secretion (p<0.01); the fasting sugar level remained unchanged. Our results suggest that citrin-deficient children show considerable deviations of TCA cycle metabolite profiles that are resistant to sodium pyruvate treatment. Thus, long-standing and considerable TCA cycle dysfunction might be a pivotal metabolic background of CTLN-2 development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High levels of PAH-metabolites in urine of e-waste recycling workers from Agbogbloshie, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Feldt, Torsten; Fobil, Julius N; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Michael; Till, Holger; Zoufaly, Alexander; Burchard, Gerd; Göen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The informal recycling of electronic waste (e-waste) is an emerging source of environmental pollution in Africa. Among other toxins, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major health concern for exposed individuals. In a cross-sectional study, the levels of PAH metabolites in the urine of individuals working on one of the largest e-waste recycling sites of Africa, and in controls from a suburb of Accra without direct exposure to e-waste recycling activities, were investigated. Socioeconomic data, basic health data and urine samples were collected from 72 exposed individuals and 40 controls. In the urine samples, concentrations of the hydroxylate PAH metabolites (OH-PAH) 1-hydroxyphenanthrene (1-OH-phenanthrene), the sum of 2- and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (2-/9-OH-phenanthrene), 3-hydroxyphenanthrene (3-OH-phenanthrene), 4-hydroxyphenanthrene (4-OH-phenanthrene) and 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OH-pyrene), as well as cotinine and creatinine, were determined. In the exposed group, median urinary concentrations were 0.85 μg/g creatinine for 1-OH-phenanthrene, 0.54 μg/g creatinine for 2-/9-OH-phenanthrene, 0.99 μg/g creatinine for 3-OH-phenanthrene, 0.22 μg/g creatinine for 4-OH-phenanthrene, and 1.33 μg/g creatinine for 1-OH-pyrene, all being significantly higher compared to the control group (0.55, 0.37, 0.63, 0.11 and 0.54 μg/g creatinine, respectively). Using a multivariate linear regression analysis including sex, cotinine and tobacco smoking as covariates, exposure to e-waste recycling activities was the most important determinant for PAH exposure. On physical examination, pathological findings were rare, but about two thirds of exposed individuals complained about cough, and one quarter about chest pain. In conclusion, we observed significantly higher urinary PAH metabolite concentrations in individuals who were exposed to e-waste recycling compared to controls who were not exposed to e-waste recycling activities. The impact of e-waste recycling on exposure to

  20. Age and Gender Differences in Urinary Levels of Eleven Phthalate Metabolites in General Taiwanese Population after a DEHP Episode

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Chin; Tsai, Chih-Hsin; Liang, Wei-Yen; Li, Sih-Syuan; Pan, Wen-Harn; Chiang, Hung-Che

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In 2011, the Taiwan FDA disclosed illegal di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate) (DEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) use in beverage and nutrition supplements. We aim to determine phthalate exposure and other relevant factors in a sample of the general Taiwanese population in order to evaluate actual phthalate exposure levels after this disclosure of DEHP use. Method We selected subjects aged 7 years old and older in 2013 from the general Taiwanese population. First morning urine samples from each participant were collected to analyze 11 phthalate metabolites representing 7 parent phthalates using on-line liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry. An interview questionnaire was applied to obtain participant demographic characteristics, lifestyle, and other relevant factors. Results The median levels of metabolites of DEHP, including mono-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP), DBP (DnBP and DiBP), including mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP) and mono-iso-butyl phthalate (MiBP), and mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP) in urine samples of 290 adults/ 97 minors (<18 years) were 7.9/ 6.1, 12.6/ 17.8, 22.0/ 25.8, 25.4/ 30.8, 18.1/ 23.6, 9.4/ 13.6 and 14.5/ 12.4 μg/g creatinine, respectively. Women (≧18 years) were exposed to significantly higher levels of MEHHP (P=0.011), MECPP (P=0.01), MnBP (P=0.001) and MEP (P<0.001) than men (≧18 years), whereas no gender difference was observed in minors. We found significant higher level of MEP (creatinine-unadjusted) in subject aged between 18 to 40 years old (P<0.001), especially for women. Exposure levels of MEOHP (P<0.001), MECPP (P=0.002) and MnBP (P=0.044) in minors were significantly higher than those of adults. High frequency usage of food preservation film and bags, and personal care products are potential sources of phthalates exposure in general Taiwanese. Conclusion Our findings indicated

  1. Age and Gender Differences in Urinary Levels of Eleven Phthalate Metabolites in General Taiwanese Population after a DEHP Episode.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Chin; Tsai, Chih-Hsin; Liang, Wei-Yen; Li, Sih-Syuan; Pan, Wen-Harn; Chiang, Hung-Che

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the Taiwan FDA disclosed illegal di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate) (DEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) use in beverage and nutrition supplements. We aim to determine phthalate exposure and other relevant factors in a sample of the general Taiwanese population in order to evaluate actual phthalate exposure levels after this disclosure of DEHP use. We selected subjects aged 7 years old and older in 2013 from the general Taiwanese population. First morning urine samples from each participant were collected to analyze 11 phthalate metabolites representing 7 parent phthalates using on-line liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry. An interview questionnaire was applied to obtain participant demographic characteristics, lifestyle, and other relevant factors. The median levels of metabolites of DEHP, including mono-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP), DBP (DnBP and DiBP), including mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP) and mono-iso-butyl phthalate (MiBP), and mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP) in urine samples of 290 adults/ 97 minors (<18 years) were 7.9/ 6.1, 12.6/ 17.8, 22.0/ 25.8, 25.4/ 30.8, 18.1/ 23.6, 9.4/ 13.6 and 14.5/ 12.4 μg/g creatinine, respectively. Women (≧18 years) were exposed to significantly higher levels of MEHHP (P=0.011), MECPP (P=0.01), MnBP (P=0.001) and MEP (P<0.001) than men (≧18 years), whereas no gender difference was observed in minors. We found significant higher level of MEP (creatinine-unadjusted) in subject aged between 18 to 40 years old (P<0.001), especially for women. Exposure levels of MEOHP (P<0.001), MECPP (P=0.002) and MnBP (P=0.044) in minors were significantly higher than those of adults. High frequency usage of food preservation film and bags, and personal care products are potential sources of phthalates exposure in general Taiwanese. Our findings indicated that DEHP and DBP exposure in a sample of

  2. Trichlorethylene – relationship of metabolite levels to atmospheric concentrations: preliminary communication1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G F

    1978-01-01

    The search for a practical index of trichlorethylene exposure must take into account its degree of narcotic activity in turn related to air concentration. Trichloracetic acid level in urine provides a useful means of assessing exposure and it can be related to trichlorethylene in air. A small investigation of this relationship has been carried out on two continuously exposed subjects. PMID:20894257

  3. Conditional modulation of NAD levels and metabolite profiles in Nicotiana sylvestris by mitochondrial electron transport and carbon/nitrogen supply.

    PubMed

    Hager, Jutta; Pellny, Till K; Mauve, Caroline; Lelarge-Trouverie, Caroline; De Paepe, Rosine; Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2010-04-01

    Environmental controls on leaf NAD status remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the effects of two key environmental variables, CO(2) and nitrogen, on leaf metabolite profiles, NAD status and the abundance of key transcripts involved in de novo NAD synthesis in wild-type (WT) Nicotiana sylvestris and the CMSII mutant that lacks respiratory complex I. High CO(2) and increased N supply both significantly enhanced NAD(+) and NADH pools in WT leaves. In nitrogen-sufficient conditions, CMSII leaves were enriched in NAD(+) and NADH compared to the WT, but the differences in NADH were smaller at high CO(2) than in air because high CO(2) increased WT NADH/NAD(+). The CMSII-linked increases in NAD(+) and NADH status were abolished by growth with limited nitrogen, which also depleted the nicotine and nicotinic acid pools in the CMSII leaves. Few statistically significant genotype and N-dependent differences were detected in NAD synthesis transcripts, with effects only on aspartate oxidase and NAD synthetase mRNAs. Non-targeted metabolite profiling as well as quantitative amine analysis showed that NAD(+) and NADH contents correlated tightly with leaf amino acid contents across all samples. The results reveal considerable genotype- and condition-dependent plasticity in leaf NAD(+) and NADH contents that is not linked to modified expression of NAD synthesis genes at the transcript level and show that NAD(+) and NADH contents are tightly integrated with nitrogen metabolism. A regulatory two-way feedback circuit between nitrogen and NAD in the regulation of N assimilation is proposed that potentially links the nutritional status to NAD-dependent signaling pathways.

  4. Changes in the levels of major sulfur metabolites and free amino acids in pea cotyledons recovering from sulfur deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Macnicol, P.K.; Randall, P.J.

    1987-02-01

    Changes in levels of sulfur metabolites and free amino acids were followed in cotyledons of sulfur-deficient, developing pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.) for 24 hours after resupply of sulfate, during which time the legumin mRNA levels returned almost to normal. Two recovery situations were studied: cultured seeds, with sulfate added to the medium, and seeds attached to the intact plant, with sulfate added to the roots. In both situations the levels of cysteine, glutathione, and methionine rose rapidly, glutathione exhibiting an initial lag. In attached but not cultured seeds methionine markedly overshot the level normally found in sulfur-sufficient seeds. In the cultured seed S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), but not S-methylmethionine, showed a sustained rise; in the attached seed the changes were slight. The composition of the free amino acid pool did not change substantially in either recovery situation. In the cultured seed the large rise in AdoMet level occurred equally in nonrecovering seeds. It was accompanied by 6-fold and 10-fold increases in ..gamma..-aminobutyrate and alanine, respectively. These effects are attributed to wounding resulting from excision of the seed. /sup 35/S-labeling experiments showed that there was no significant accumulation of label in unidentified sulfur-containing amino compounds in either recovery situation. It was concluded from these results and those of other workers that, at the present level of knowledge, the most probable candidate for a signal compound, eliciting recovery of legumin mRNA level in response to sulfur-feeding, is cysteine.

  5. [Genetic improvement in Vicia faba and favism. I. Distribution and levels of presumably hemolytic metabolites].

    PubMed

    Sisini, A; Spanu, A; Arese, P

    1981-07-30

    Covicine + vicine, L-DOPA-glucoside + L-DOPA and ascorbic acid were determined in different lines of Vicia faba beans throughout the biological cycle of the plant. As the seed matures the levels of convicine + vicine as well as of ascorbic acid decrease with seed maturation in all the lines examined. L-DOPA, which is lacking in cotyledons but present in the tegument, also decrease and is nearly undectable in some lines with white flowers.

  6. Effect of benzoic acid on glycolytic metabolite levels and intracellular pH in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warth, A D

    1991-01-01

    Low concentrations of benzoic acid stimulated fermentation rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. At concentrations near the maximum permitting growth, there was inhibition of fermentation, lowered ATP and intracellular pH, and relatively greater accumulation of benzoate. Changes in the levels of glycolytic intermediates suggested that fermentation was inhibited as a result of high ATP usage rather than of lowered intracellular pH. Specific inhibition of phosphofructokinase or of several other glycolytic enzymes was not observed. PMID:1785917

  7. The impact of age-class and social context on fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels in free-ranging male giraffes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, T E; Bennett, N C; Burroughs, R; Ganswindt, A

    2017-09-26

    One of the primary sources of perceived stress is the social environment of an animal and the interactions with conspecifics. An essential component of the response to a stressor is the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, which results amongst others in a temporal increase in circulating glucocorticoid (GC) levels. Giraffes occur in a highly flexible fission-fusion social system and group compositions can change on a daily basis, with bulls establishing an age-related dominance hierarchy and showing a roaming strategy in the search for fertile females. The aim of this study was to non-invasively monitor the influence of different group compositions (mixed sex groups vs. all-male groups) on GC concentrations in free ranging giraffe bulls of different age classes. We collected fecal samples from free-ranging giraffe bulls for 12 months in a South African Private Game Reserve to examine age- and social context-related patterns of fecal GC metabolite (fGCM) concentrations. We found that fGCM levels in giraffe bulls are age-class dependent, as well as associated with changes in the social environment. Independently of the social setting, bulls of the youngest age class exhibited the highest fGCM levels compared to bulls of the other two older age-classes, with differences most pronounced when the bulls are associated in all-male groups. In contrast, an almost reversed picture appears when looking at the fGCM levels of sexually active individuals in mixed sex groups, where highest levels were found for the bulls in the oldest age-class, and the lowest for the bulls in the youngest age-class. The study stresses the importance to taking factors such as age-related status and social settings into account, when interpreting fGCM levels in free ranging giraffes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Urinary Level of Prostaglandin E2 Metabolite and Risk of Incident Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    p=0.08) [Table 3]. On the other hand, women with rheumatoid arthritis had lower levels of PGE-M compared to those who didn’t report having the...8.07) 0.012 6.33 (5.27-7.6) 0.078 Rheumatoid arthritis Yes 569 5.47 (5.19-5.77) Ref 5.47 (5.2-5.77) Ref No 35 4.44 (3.59-5.51) 0.064 4.44 (3.59...through various venues, incorporating new understanding of breast cancer etiology in the analyses of epidemiologic data. These experiences have

  9. Metabolism of benzene and phenol by a reconstituted purified phenobarbital induced rat liver mixed function oxidase system

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 and the electron-donor, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase were isolated from phenobarbital induced rat liver microsomes. Both benzene and its primary metabolite phenol, were substrates for the reconstituted purified phenobarbital induced rat liver mixed function oxidase system. Benzene was metabolized to phenol and the polyhydroxylated metabolites; catechol, hydroquinone and 1,2,4 benzenetriol. Benzene elicited a Type I spectral change upon its interaction with the cytochrome P-450 while phenol's interaction with the cytochrome P-450 produced a reverse Type I spectra. The formation of phenol showed a pH optimum of 7.0 compared with 6.6-6.8 for the production of the polyhyrdoxylated metabolites. Cytochrome P-450 inhibitors, such as metyrapone and SKF 525A, diminished the production of phenol from benzene but not the production of the polyhydroxylated metabolites from phenol. The radical trapping agents, DMSO, KTBA and mannitol, decreased the recovery of polyhydroxylated metabolites, from /sup 14/C-labeled benzene and/or phenol. As KTBA and DMSO interacted with OH. There was a concomitant release of ethylene and methane, which was measured. Desferrioxamine, an iron-chelator and catalase also depressed the recovery of polyhydroxylated metabolites. In summary, benzene and phenol were both substrates for this reconstituted purified enzyme system, but they differed in binding to cytochrome P-450, pH optima and mode of hydroxylation.

  10. The excited state antiaromatic benzene ring: a molecular Mr Hyde?

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Ottosson, Henrik

    2015-09-21

    The antiaromatic character of benzene in its first ππ* excited triplet state (T1) was deduced more than four decades ago by Baird using perturbation molecular orbital (PMO) theory [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1972, 94, 4941], and since then it has been confirmed through a range of high-level quantum chemical calculations. With focus on benzene we now first review theoretical and computational studies that examine and confirm Baird's rule on reversal in the electron count for aromaticity and antiaromaticity of annulenes in their lowest triplet states as compared to Hückel's rule for the ground state (S0). We also note that the rule according to quantum chemical calculations can be extended to the lowest singlet excited state (S1) of benzene. Importantly, Baird, as well as Aihara [Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 1978, 51, 1788], early put forth that the destabilization and excited state antiaromaticity of the benzene ring should be reflected in its photochemical reactivity, yet, today these conclusions are often overlooked. Thus, in the second part of the article we review photochemical reactions of a series of benzene derivatives that to various extents should stem from the excited state antiaromatic character of the benzene ring. We argue that benzene can be viewed as a molecular "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" with its largely unknown excited state antiaromaticity representing its "Mr Hyde" character. The recognition of the "Jekyll and Hyde" split personality feature of the benzene ring can likely be useful in a range of different areas.

  11. [Benzene in soft drinks: a study in Florence (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, Guglielmo; Perico, Andrea; Colzi, Alessio; Bavazzano, Paolo; Di Giusto, Maurizio; Lamberti, Ilaria; Martino, Gianrocco; Puggelli, Francesco; Lorini, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the amount of benzene present in soft drinks sold in Florence (Italy). We analyzed 28 different types of soft drinks, by measuring concentrations of benzoic acid, sorbic acid, ascorbic acid (using high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection) and benzene (using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry). Data was analysed by using SPSS 18.0.Traces of benzene were detected in all analyzed beverages, with a mean concentration of 0.45 µg/L (range: 0.15-2.36 µg/L). Statistically significant differences in mean benzene concentrations were found between beverages according to the type of additive indicated on the drink label, with higher concentrations found in beverages containing both ascorbic acid and sodium benzoate. Two citrus fruit-based drinks were found to have benzene levels above the European limit for benzene in drinking water of 1 µg /L. Sodium benzoate and ascorbic acid were also detected in the two drinks.In conclusion, not all soft drink producers have taken steps to eliminate benzoic acid from their soft drinks and thereby reduce the risk of formation of benzene, as recommended by the European Commission. Furthermore, the presence of benzene in trace amounts in all beverages suggests that migration of constituents of plastic packaging materials or air-borne contamination may be occurring.

  12. Noninvasive monitoring of hormones in bird droppings: physiological validation, sampling, extraction, sex differences, and the influence of diet on hormone metabolite levels.

    PubMed

    Goymann, Wolfgang

    2005-06-01

    During the past several years, the noninvasive measurement of steroid metabolites from mammalian feces and bird droppings has become more and more popular. With an increasing acceptance of the method, investigators may become less aware of the need to validate their assays. It is shown why such validations are essential for each new species investigated and various ways to physiologically validate such noninvasive methods are described. Using the European stonechat (Saxicola torquata rubicola) as a model, it is explained why a validated method to measure androgen metabolites in males does not necessarily work in females. In addition the difficulties that may be neglected owing to the superficial ease of sampling and processing of excreta are investigated. Various issues that may arise during sampling, storage, and extraction of excreta are addressed. Finally, results suggesting that experimental manipulations of the diet may affect hormone metabolite levels in European stonechats are presented. So far, only a few studies have investigated the impact of diet on hormone metabolite levels, and these are the first data to report such an impact in birds. More studies are urgently needed to learn more about differences between the sexes, individuals, and populations and the impact of diet and energy metabolism on hormone metabolites.

  13. Characterization of thiol-conjugated metabolites of ginger components shogaols in mouse and human rrine and modulation of the glutathione levels in cancer cells by [6]-shogaol

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huadong; Soroka, Dominique N.; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Xiaoxin; Sang, Shengmin

    2013-01-01

    Scope Shogaols, a series of major constituents in dried ginger with the most abundant being [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-shogaols, show much higher anti-cancer potencies than gingerols. Previously, we reported the mercapturic acid pathway as a major metabolic route for [6]-shogaol in mice. However, it is still unclear how the side chain length affects the metabolism of shogaols and how shogaols are metabolized in humans. Methods and results We first investigate the metabolism of [10]-shogaol in mouse urine, and then investigate the biotransformation of shogaols in human urine. Our results show that eight major thiol-conjugated metabolites of [10]-shogaol were detected in mouse urine, while six major thiol-conjugated metabolites of [6]-shogaol, two thiol-conjugated metabolites of [8]-shogaol, and two thiol-conjugated metabolites of [10]-shogaol were detected in urine collected from human after drinking ginger tea, using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Our results clearly indicate the mercapturic acid pathway is a major metabolic route for [10]-shogaol in mice and for shogaols in human. Furthermore, we also investigated the regulation of glutathione (GSH) by [6]-shogaol in human colon cancer cells HCT-116. Our results show [6]-shogaol, after initially depleting glutathione levels, can subsequently restore and increase GSH levels over time. Conclusion Shogaols are metabolized extensively in mouse and human to form thiol-conjugated metabolites and GSH might play an important role in the cancer preventative activity of ginger. PMID:23322393

  14. Effect of 14 days of bed rest on urine metabolite excretion and plasma enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Kodama, A. M.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Newsom, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    After 1 week of ambulatory base-line measurement, a group of 8 men 19-26 years of age remained continuously recumbent for 14 days. Studies were continued for 1 week following the prolonged recumbency. Urine excretion rates for a number of constituents were determined 2 days before bed rest, on day 14 of bed rest, and day 6 after bed rest. Blood plasma samples were also obtained at these times, and analyzed for several enzymes. On day 14 of bed rest significant increases were observed in urine excretion of total osmotically-active substances, magnesium, calcium, phosphate, creatinine, hydroxyproline, and 17-OH corticosteroids. A decrease occurred in urinary glucose excretion. Plasma levels of alkaline phosphatase and LDH-3 were depressed, while plasma GPT was elevated. Many of these changes persisted on day 6 after bed rest, and are interpreted as concomitants of the disuse atrophy of the musculoskeletal system that characterizes prolonged bed rest and weightlessness.

  15. Effect of 14 days of bed rest on urine metabolite excretion and plasma enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Kodama, A. M.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Newsom, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    After 1 week of ambulatory base-line measurement, a group of 8 men 19-26 years of age remained continuously recumbent for 14 days. Studies were continued for 1 week following the prolonged recumbency. Urine excretion rates for a number of constituents were determined 2 days before bed rest, on day 14 of bed rest, and day 6 after bed rest. Blood plasma samples were also obtained at these times, and analyzed for several enzymes. On day 14 of bed rest significant increases were observed in urine excretion of total osmotically-active substances, magnesium, calcium, phosphate, creatinine, hydroxyproline, and 17-OH corticosteroids. A decrease occurred in urinary glucose excretion. Plasma levels of alkaline phosphatase and LDH-3 were depressed, while plasma GPT was elevated. Many of these changes persisted on day 6 after bed rest, and are interpreted as concomitants of the disuse atrophy of the musculoskeletal system that characterizes prolonged bed rest and weightlessness.

  16. Urinary Levels of Cigarette Smoke Constituent Metabolites Are Prospectively Associated with Lung Cancer Development in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jian-Min; Gao, Yu-Tang; Murphy, Sharon E.; Carmella, Steven G.; Wang, Renwei; Zhong, Yan; Moy, Kristin A.; Davis, Andrew B.; Tao, Li; Chen, Menglan; Han, Shaomei; Nelson, Heather H.; Yu, Mimi C.; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are believed to be among the principal causative agents for lung cancer in smokers, but no epidemiologic studies have evaluated the relationship of PAH uptake and metabolism to lung cancer. In this study, we quantified prediagnostic urinary levels of r-1,t-2,3,c-4-tetrahydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-phenanthrene (PheT), a validated biomarker of PAH uptake and metabolism, as well as 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides (total NNAL), and cotinine and its glucuronides (total cotinine), validated biomarkers of uptake of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone, and nicotine, respectively, in relation to lung cancer risk among current smokers in a nested case–control study within a cohort of 18,244 Chinese men in Shanghai, China. Urinary levels of PheT, total NNAL, and total cotinine were significantly higher in cases than controls (N = 476 matched pairs). ORs (95% confidence intervals) for lung cancer in the second, third, fourth, and fifth quintiles of PheT were 1.70 (1.00–2.88), 1.07 (0.62–1.84), 1.48 (0.86–2.53), and 2.34 (1.33–4.11), respectively, relative to the lowest quartile (Ptrend = 0.023) after adjustment for self-reported smoking intensity and duration and urinary total NNAL and total cotinine. This study also confirmed that urinary total NNAL and total cotinine are independently related to lung cancer risk. PMID:22028322

  17. Actions of mammalian insulin on a Neurospora variant: effects on intracellular metabolite levels as monitored by P-31 NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, N.J.; McKenzie, M.A.; Jordan, F.; Takahashi, M.; Lenard, J.

    1986-05-01

    Fourier transform P-31 NMR spectroscopy (81 MHz) was used to investigate the biochemical nature of insulin action upon the cell wall-deficient slime mutant of Neurospora crassa. Spectra of oxygenated, living cells (ca.10/sup 9//ml.) in late logarithmic-early stationary phase of growth were accumulated for approximately 20 min. (350-450 pulses). Pronounced differences were seen in the metabolite levels of cells cultured for 18-21 hours in the presence of insulin (100 nM) as compared to cells cultured in its absence. Differences in the insulin-grown cells included higher levels of sugar phosphates, inorganic (cytoplasmic) phosphate, NAD+/NADH and UDP-glucose (UDPG) compared to control cells, in which UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDPNAG) was the prominent sugar nucleotide. When 100 mM glucose was administered with insulin immediately prior to measurement, short term effects were seen. There were significant increases of sugar phosphates, inorganic phosphate, NAD+/NADH, phosphodiesters and UDPG relative to the case of glucose addition alone. These results are wholly consistent with the known influence of insulin upon mammalian metabolism: stimulation of glucose uptake, phosphorylation and oxidation, phosphatide synthesis and Pi uptake.

  18. Benzene oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Coates, J.D.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Highly reduced sediments from San Diego Bay, Calif., that were incubated under strictly anaerobic conditions metabolized benzene within 55 days when they were exposed initially to I ??M benzene. The rate of benzene metabolism increased as benzene was added back to the benzene-adapted sediments. When a [14C]benzene tracer was included with the benzene added to benzene-adapted sediments, 92% of the added radioactivity was recovered as 14CO2. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, inhibited benzene uptake and production of 14CO2 from [14C]benzene. Benzene metabolism stopped when the sediments became sulfate depleted, and benzene uptake resumed when sulfate was added again. The stoichiometry of benzene uptake and sulfate reduction was consistent with the hypothesis that sulfate was the principal electron acceptor for benzene oxidation. Isotope trapping experiments performed with [14C]benzene revealed that there was no production of such potential extracellular intermediates of benzene oxidation as phenol, benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, cyclohexane, catechol, and acetate. The results demonstrate that benzene can be oxidized in the absence of O2, with sulfate serving as the electron acceptor, and suggest that some sulfate reducers are capable of completely oxidizing benzene to carbon dioxide without the production of extracellular intermediates. Although anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to chelated Fe(III) has been documented previously, the study reported here provides the first example of a natural sediment compound that can serve as an electron acceptor for anaerobic benzene oxidation.

  19. Urinary t,t-muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid and benzene as biomarkers of low benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, Silvia; Buratti, Marina; Campo, Laura; Colombi, Antonio; Consonni, Dario; Pesatori, Angela C; Bonzini, Matteo; Farmer, Peter; Garte, Seymour; Valerio, Federico; Merlo, Domenico F; Bertazzi, Pier A

    2005-05-30

    This research compared the capability of urinary trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) and benzene excreted in urine (U-benzene) to monitor low benzene exposure and evaluated the influence of smoking habit on these indices. Gasoline attendants, urban policemen, bus drivers and two groups of referents working in two large Italian cities (415 people) were studied. Median benzene exposure was 61, 22, 21, 9 and 6 microg/m3, respectively, with higher levels in workers than in referents. U-benzene, but not t,t-MA and S-PMA, showed an exposure-related increase. All the biomarkers were strongly influenced by cigarette smoking, with values up to five-fold higher in smokers compared to non-smokers. In conclusion, in the range of investigated benzene exposure (<478 microg/m3 or <0.15 ppm), the smoking habit may be regarded as a major source of benzene intake; among the study indices, U-benzene is the marker of choice for the biological monitoring of occupational and environmental exposure.

  20. Effect of dried rumen digesta pellet levels on feed use, rumen ecology, and blood metabolite in swamp buffalo.

    PubMed

    Seankamsorn, Anuthida; Cherdthong, Anusorn; Wanapat, Metha; Supapong, Chanadol; Khonkhaeng, Benjamad; Uriyapongson, Sutipong; Gunun, Nirawan; Gunun, Pongsatron; Chanjula, Pin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to determine the effect of dried rumen digesta pellet levels on feed intake, digestibility, rumen ecology, and blood metabolites in swamp buffalo. Four 2-year-old male swamp buffalo with an initial body weight (BW) of 150 ± 10.0 kg were randomly assigned according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design to receive four levels of dried rumen digesta pellets (DRDPs). The dietary treatments were supplementation of DRDP at 0, 50, 100, and 150 g dry matter/day, respectively. Total feed intake was significantly different among treatments (p < 0.05) and was highest in the 150 g/day DRDP supplement (2.68 kg/day). Intakes of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber did not affect DRDP levels, while intakes of organic matter and crude protein (CP) were altered significantly when 150 g of DRDP was used (p < 0.05). Buffalo fed with DRDP at 150 g/day had the highest CP and NDF digestibility (p < 0.05). DRDP supplementation did not affect rumen pH, and temperature and the concentration of ruminal ammonia-nitrogen and blood urea nitrogen were not altered among the treatments. The mean value of fungal zoospores in the buffalo was significantly different among treatments and was highest in supplementation with DRDP at 150 g. The mean value of propionic acid was significantly different at various levels of DRDP; it was highest in the group fed with 150 g DRDP (p < 0.05). Thus, supplementation of DRDP at 150 g improved feed use and increased fungal zoospore population. In addition, DRDP feeding is recommended, since it has positive economic impacts and helps control environmental pollution.

  1. CYP3A7*1C allele is associated with reduced levels of 2-hydroxylation pathway oestrogen metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Deepti; Johnson, Nichola; Jain, Pooja; Siskos, Alexandros P; Bennett, Mark; Gilham, Clare; Busana, Marta Cecilia; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Keun, Hector C; Fletcher, Olivia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Endogenous sex hormones are well-established risk factors for breast cancer; the contribution of specific oestrogen metabolites (EMs) and/or ratios of specific EMs is less clear. We have previously identified a CYP3A7*1C allele that is associated with lower urinary oestrone (E1) levels in premenopausal women. The purpose of this analysis was to determine whether this allele was associated with specific pathway EMs. Methods: We measured successfully 12 EMs in mid-follicular phase urine samples from 30 CYP3A7*1C carriers and 30 non-carriers using HPLC-MS/MS. Results: In addition to having lower urinary E1 levels, CYP3A7*1C carriers had significantly lower levels of four of the 2-hydroxylation pathway EMs that we measured (2-hydroxyestrone, P=1.1 × 10−12; 2-hydroxyestradiol, P=2.7 × 10−7; 2-methoxyestrone, P=1.9 × 10−12; and 2-methoxyestradiol, P=0.0009). By contrast, 16α-hydroxylation pathway EMs were slightly higher in carriers and significantly so for 17-epiestriol (P=0.002). Conclusions: The CYP3A7*1C allele is associated with a lower urinary E1 levels, a more pronounced reduction in 2-hydroxylation pathway EMs and a lower ratio of 2-hydroxylation:16α-hydroxylation EMs in premenopausal women. To further characterise the association between parent oestrogens, EMs and subsequent risk of breast cancer, characterisation of additional genetic variants that influence oestrogen metabolism and large prospective studies of a broad spectrum of EMs will be required. PMID:28072767

  2. Blood levels of polychlorinated biphenyls and their hydroxylated metabolites in Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica): emphasis on interspecies comparison, gender difference and association with blood thyroid hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Daisuke; Nomiyama, Kei; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Iwata, Hisato; Tsydenova, Oyuna; Amano, Masao; Petrov, Evgeny A; Batoev, Valeriy B; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica) are still being exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and the population is at risk. In the present study, we measured the residue levels of PCBs and their hydroxylated metabolites (OH-PCBs) in the blood of Baikal seals and assessed the impact of OH-PCBs on the thyroid function. Blood concentrations of PCBs and OH-PCBs were in the range of 2.8-130 ng g(-1)wet wt. and 0.71-4.6 ng g(-1)wetwt., respectively. Concentrations of higher-chlorinated OH-PCBs (hexa- to octa-PCBs) were more than 70% to total OH-PCB concentrations, indicating Baikal seals are mostly risked by higher-chlorinated OH-PCBs. High levels of 4OH-CB146 and 4OH-CB187 and low levels of 4OH-CB107/4'OH-CB108 found in Baikal seals were different from those in other phocidae species, suggesting the unique drug-metabolizing enzyme activities and/or contamination sources in this species. Concentrations of some OH-PCBs in males were significantly higher than those in females. These results suggest that these isomers may be preferentially transferred from mother to pup via cord blood. However, concentrations of almost all the isomers were not significantly correlated with the levels of blood total T3 and T4, implying less impact of PCB-related compounds on the thyroid hormone circulation.

  3. Temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolite levels in bedtime, morning, and 24-h urine samples for 50 adults in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Marsha K; Sobus, Jon R; Barr, Dana Boyd; Croghan, Carry W; Chen, Fu-Lin; Walker, Richard; Alston, Lillian; Andersen, Erik; Clifton, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insects in both agricultural and residential settings worldwide. Few data are available on the temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolites in the urine of non-occupationally exposed adults. In this work, we describe the study design and sampling methodology for the Pilot Study to Estimate Human Exposures to Pyrethroids using an Exposure Reconstruction Approach (Ex-R study). Two major objectives were to quantify the concentrations of several pyrethroid metabolites in bedtime, first morning void (FMV), and 24-h urine samples as concentration (wet weight), specific-gravity (SG) corrected, creatinine (CR) corrected, and excretion rate values for 50 Ex-R adults over a six-week monitoring period and to determine if these correction approaches for urine dilution reduced the variability of the biomarker levels. The Ex-R study was conducted at the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Human Studies Facility in Chapel Hill, North Carolina USA and at participants' homes within a 40-mile radius of this facility. Recruitment of participants and field activities occurred between October 2009 and May 2011. Participants, ages 19-50 years old, provided daily food, activity, and pesticide-use diaries and collected their own urine samples (bedtime, FMV, and 24-h) during weeks 1, 2, and 6 of a six-week monitoring period. A total of 2503 urine samples were collected from the study participants. These samples were analyzed for the pyrethroid metabolites 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), cis/trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-cyclopropane carboxylic acid (cis/trans-DCCA), and 2-methyl-3-phenylbenzoic acid (MPA) using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Only 3-PBA was frequently detected (>50%) in the adult urine samples. Median urinary 3-PBA levels were 0.88 ng/mL, 0.96 ng/mL-SG, 1.04 ng/mg, and 1.04 ng/min for concentration, SG-corrected, CR-corrected, and excretion rate values, respectively

  4. Levels of Pesticides and Their Metabolites in Wistar Rat Amniotic Fluids and Maternal Urine upon Gestational Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bossi, Rossana; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Taxvig, Camilla; Boberg, Julie; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of pesticides and selected metabolites in rat urine and amniotic fluid were determined as biomarker upon oral administration of Wistar rats to two pesticide mixtures consisting of three to five pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion, and terbuthylazine). The pesticides and their metabolites were found in rat amniotic fluid and urine, generally in dose-response concentrations in relation to dosage. The measurement of the substances in the amniotic fluid indicated that the fetus was exposed to the pesticides as well as their metabolites. Moreover, the pesticides detected in urine demonstrated the exposure as well as the ability of the rat to excrete these compounds. PMID:23736656

  5. Metabolic characterization of loci affecting sensory attributes in tomato allows an assessment of the influence of the levels of primary metabolites and volatile organic contents

    PubMed Central

    Zanor, Maria Inés; Rambla, José-Luis; Chaïb, Jamila; Steppa, Agnes; Medina, Aurora; Granell, Antonio; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Causse, Mathilde

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed the extent of genetic and phenotypic variation between both species and cultivars of tomato. Using a series of tomato lines resulting from crosses between a cherry tomato and three independent large fruit cultivar (Levovil, VilB, and VilD), extensive profiling of both central primary metabolism and volatile organic components of the fruit was performed. In this study, it was possible to define a number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) which determined the levels of primary metabolites and/or volatile organic components and to evaluate their co-location with previously defined organoleptic QTLs. Correlation analyses between either the primary metabolites or the volatile organic compounds and organoleptic properties revealed a number of interesting associations, including pharmaceutical aroma–guaiacol and sourness–alanine, across the data set. Considerable correlation within the levels of primary metabolites or volatile organic compounds, respectively, were also observed. However, there was relatively little association between the levels of primary metabolites and volatile organic compounds, implying that they are not tightly linked to one another. A notable exception to this was the strong association between the levels of sucrose and those of a number of volatile organic compounds. The combined data presented here are thus discussed both with respect to those obtained recently from wide interspecific crosses of tomato and within the framework of current understanding of the chemical basis of fruit taste. PMID:19346240

  6. Hematotoxicity and carcinogenicity of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Aksoy, M. )

    1989-07-01

    The hematotoxicity of benzene exposure has been well known for a century. Benzene causes leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, etc. The clinical and hematologic picture of aplastic anemia resulting from benzene exposure is not different from classical aplastic anemia; in some cases, mild bilirubinemia, changes in osmotic fragility, increase in lactic dehydrogenase and fecal urobilinogen, and occasionally some neurological abnormalities are found. Electromicroscopic findings in some cases of aplastic anemia with benzene exposure were similar to those observed by light microscopy. Benzene hepatitis-aplastic anemia syndrome was observed in a technician with benzene exposure. Ten months after occurrence of hepatitis B, a severe aplastic anemia developed. The first epidemiologic study proving the leukemogenicity of benzene was performed between 1967 and 1973 to 1974 among shoe workers in Istanbul. The incidence of leukemia was 13.59 per 100,000, which is a significant increase over that of leukemia in the general population. Following the prohibition and discontinuation of the use of benzene in Istanbul, there was a striking decrease in the number of leukemic shoe workers in Istanbul. In 23.7% of the series, consisting of 59 leukemic patients with benzene exposure, there was a preceding pancytopenic period. Furthermore, a familial connection was found in 10.2% of them. The 89.8% of the series showed the findings of acute leukemia. The possible factors that may determine the types of leukemia in benzene toxicity are discussed. The possible role of benzene exposure is presented in the development of malignant lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and lung cancer.

  7. Relation between clopidogrel active metabolite levels and different platelet aggregation methods in patients receiving clopidogrel and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Johnston, Marilyn; Hirsh, Jack; Pare, Guillaume; Li, Chunjian; Mehta, Shamir; Teo, Koon K; Sloane, Debi; Yi, Qilong; Zhu, Jun; Eikelboom, John W

    2012-11-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that undergoes bioconversion via cytochrome P450 system to form an active metabolite (AM) that binds to the platelet ADP receptor. The antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel is commonly assessed by measuring the aggregatory response to 5 μM ADP by light transmission aggregation (LTA) or multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) or by the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein platelet reactivity index (VASP-PRI). To determine which of these three tests of platelet ADP receptor pathway inhibition most closely correlates with clopidogrel AM levels. We analyzed blood samples from 82 patients with coronary artery disease who were randomized to receive double-dose or standard dose clopidogrel for 2 weeks. We measured peak clopidogrel AM levels, platelet aggregation in response to ADP and VASP-PRI on days 1, and repeated all the measures on days 7 and 14. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the correlation between clopidogrel AM and LTA, MEA and VASP-PRI. Bland-Altman plots were used to explore the agreement between tests of the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel. Clopidogrel AM on day 1 correlated most closely with VASP-PRI (r = -0.5767) and demonstrated weaker correlations with LTA (r = -0.4656) and MEA (r = -0.3384) (all p < 0.01). Intra-class correlation (ICC) between VASP-PRI and LTA was 0.6446; VASP-PRI and MEA was 0.4720; and LTA and MEA was 0.4693. Similar results were obtained on days 7 and 14. Commonly used pharmacodynamic measures of clopidogrel response are only moderately correlated with clopidogrel AM levels and may not be suitable to measure the adequacy of clopidogrel therapy.

  8. Benzene stripping in a flotation unit

    SciTech Connect

    Hillquist, D.; Litchfield, J.; Willet, S.; Whiteford, R.

    1994-12-31

    An induced gas flotation unit is used as a combination stripping/flotation vessel with fuel gas as the stripping/flotation medium. The gas bubbles simultaneously float the oils and solids, and strip out and recover the benzene and other volatile components from wastewater and from the floated oils and solids. The effluent stripping gas is then either used as fuel gas, or recycled to the process for product recovery. The induced gas flotation stripper, IGFS, is self-cleaning and normally experiences no sludge build up or fouling. The unit requires a minimum of operator attention and maintenance. It is sealed to eliminate emissions, has a high stripping efficiency, and has a significantly wider operating range than conventional strippers. The unit does not experience the biological fouling and disposal problems of air strippers, or the fouling and higher capital and operating costs of steam strippers. The IGFS unit was installed at the BF Goodrich ethylene plant in Calvert City in 1991. The unit was designed to treat a combined stream consisting of quench water, neutralized spent caustic, and a number of intermittent smaller oily water streams. The unit is operating effectively in stripping the benzene to levels below the NESHAP requirements. The average benzene removal efficiency is above 97%. Operating data indicate that the benzene removal efficiency can be further enhanced by increasing temperature, increasing stripping flow, reducing oil emulsions in the influent and eliminating dilution from recycled water. This paper presents performance and operating experience of the IGFS unit.

  9. Benzene exposure and the effect of traffic pollution in Copenhagen, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skov, Henrik; Hansen, Asger B.; Lorenzen, Gitte; Andersen, Helle Vibeke; Løfstrøm, Per; Christensen, Carsten S.

    Benzene is a carcinogenic compound, which is emitted from petrol-fuelled cars and thus is found ubiquitous in all cities. As part of the project Monitoring of Atmospheric Concentrations of Benzene in European Towns and Homes (MACBETH) six campaigns were carried out in the Municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark. The campaigns were distributed over 1 year. In each campaign, the personal exposure to benzene of 50 volunteers (non-smokers living in non-smoking families) living and working in Copenhagen was measured. Simultaneously, benzene was measured in their homes and in an urban network distributed over the municipality. The Radiello diffusive sampler was applied to sample 5 days averages of benzene and other hydrocarbons. Comparison of the results with those from a BTX-monitor showed excellent agreement. The exposure and the concentrations in homes and in the urban area were found to be close to log-normal distribution. The annual averages of the geometrical mean values were 5.22, 4.30 and 2.90 μg m -3 for personal exposure, home concentrations and urban concentrations, respectively. Two main parameters are controlling the general level of benzene in Copenhagen: firstly, the emission from traffic and secondly, dispersion due to wind speed. The general level of exposure to benzene and home concentrations of benzene were strongly correlated with the outdoor level of benzene, which indicated that traffic is an important source for indoor concentrations of benzene and for the exposure to benzene.

  10. Induction of granulocytic differentiation in a mouse model by benzene and hydroquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Hazel, B.A.; O`Connor, A.; Niculescu, R.; Kalf, G.F.

    1996-12-01

    Chronic exposure of humans to benzene causes acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The studies presented here were undertaken to determine whether benzene, or its reactive metabolite, hydroquinone (HQ), affects differentiation of myeloblasts. Benzene or HQ administered to C57BL/6J mice specifically induced granulocytic differentiation of myeloblasts. The ability of these compounds to induce differentiation of the myeloblast was tested directly using the murine interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent 32D.3 (G) myeloblastic cell line, and the human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cell line. 37 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Biomonitoring of gasoline station attendants exposed to benzene: Effect of gender.

    PubMed

    Moro, Angela M; Brucker, Natália; Charão, Mariele F; Baierle, Marília; Sauer, Elisa; Goethel, Gabriela; Barth, Anelise; Nascimento, Sabrina N; Gauer, Bruna; Durgante, Juliano; Amaral, Beatriz S; Neto, Francisco R A; Gioda, Adriana; Garcia, Solange C

    2017-01-01

    Women are employed in increasing numbers as gasoline station attendants, a work category with risk of exposure to benzene. We have assessed the effect of gender on biomarkers of occupational benzene exposure. Gasoline station attendants (20 men and 20 women) and 40 control individuals (20 men and 20 women) with no history of occupational benzene exposure were evaluated. Benzene exposure was monitoring by environmental and biological measurements. Urinary trans,trans-muconic acid levels, well-known genetic and hematological alterations linked to benzene exposure, and non-cancer effects on the immune, hepatic, and renal systems were investigated. Our results suggest a potential effect of gender on some effects of occupational benzene exposure, particularly the hematological parameters and trans,trans-muconic acid levels. Despite limitations of our study, our findings provide important considerations about occupational exposure of women to benzene and may contribute to the development of occupational protection standards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Anaerobic Oxidation of Benzene by the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Ferroglobus placidus▿†

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Dawn E.; Risso, Carla; Smith, Jessica A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to the reduction of Fe(III) was studied in Ferroglobus placidus in order to learn more about how such a stable molecule could be metabolized under strict anaerobic conditions. F. placidus conserved energy to support growth at 85°C in a medium with benzene provided as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. The stoichiometry of benzene loss and Fe(III) reduction, as well as the conversion of [14C]benzene to [14C]carbon dioxide, was consistent with complete oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with electron transfer to Fe(III). Benzoate, but not phenol or toluene, accumulated at low levels during benzene metabolism, and [14C]benzoate was produced from [14C]benzene. Analysis of gene transcript levels revealed increased expression of genes encoding enzymes for anaerobic benzoate degradation during growth on benzene versus growth on acetate, but genes involved in phenol degradation were not upregulated during growth on benzene. A gene for a putative carboxylase that was more highly expressed in benzene- than in benzoate-grown cells was identified. These results suggest that benzene is carboxylated to benzoate and that phenol is not an important intermediate in the benzene metabolism of F. placidus. This is the first demonstration of a microorganism in pure culture that can grow on benzene under strict anaerobic conditions and for which there is strong evidence for degradation of benzene via clearly defined anaerobic metabolic pathways. Thus, F. placidus provides a much-needed pure culture model for further studies on the anaerobic activation of benzene in microorganisms. PMID:21742914

  13. Fuel Dependence of Benzene Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Eddings, E; Sarofim, A; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14

    The relative importance of formation pathways for benzene, an important precursor to soot formation, was determined from the simulation of 22 premixed flames for a wide range of equivalence ratios (1.0 to 3.06), fuels (C{sub 1}-C{sub 12}), and pressures (20 to 760 torr). The maximum benzene concentrations in 15 out of these flames were well reproduced within 30% of the experimental data. Fuel structural properties were found to be critical for benzene production. Cyclohexanes and C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} fuels were found to be among the most productive in benzene formation; and long-chain normal paraffins produce the least amount of benzene. Other properties, such as equivalence ratio and combustion temperatures, were also found to be important in determining the amount of benzene produced in flames. Reaction pathways for benzene formation were examined critically in four premixed flames of structurally different fuels of acetylene, n-decane, butadiene, and cyclohexane. Reactions involving precursors, such as C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} species, were examined. Combination reactions of C{sub 3} species were identified to be the major benzene formation routes with the exception of the cyclohexane flame, in which benzene is formed exclusively from cascading fuel dehydrogenation via cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene intermediates. Acetylene addition makes a minor contribution to benzene formation, except in the butadiene flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced directly from the fuel, and in the n-decane flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced from large alkyl radical decomposition and H atom abstraction from the resulting large olefins.

  14. Comparison of Current-Use Pesticide and Other Toxicant Urinary Metabolite Levels among Pregnant Women in the CHAMACOS Cohort and NHANES

    PubMed Central

    Castorina, Rosemary; Bradman, Asa; Fenster, Laura; Barr, Dana Boyd; Bravo, Roberto; Vedar, Michelle G.; Harnly, Martha E.; McKone, Thomas E.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Background We measured 34 metabolites of current-use pesticides and other precursor compounds in urine samples collected twice during pregnancy from 538 women living in the Salinas Valley of California, a highly agricultural area (1999–2001). Precursors of these metabolites included fungicides, carbamate, organochlorine, organophosphorus (OP), and pyrethroid insecticides, and triazine and chloroacetanilide herbicides. We also measured ethylenethiourea, a metabolite of the ethylene-bisdithiocarbamate fungicides. Repeat measurements of the compounds presented here have not been reported in pregnant women previously. To understand the impact of the women’s regional environment on these findings, we compared metabolite concentrations from the CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas) cohort with U.S. national reference data for 342 pregnant women sampled by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2002). Results The eight metabolites detected in > 50% of samples [2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP); 2,5-dichlorophenol (2,5-DCP); 1- and 2-naphthol; ortho-phenylphenol (ORTH); para-nitrophenol (PNP); 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP); and 3,4,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy)] may be related to home or agricultural pesticide use in the Salinas Valley, household products, and other sources of chlorinated phenols. More than 78% of women in this study had detectable levels of at least one of the OP pesticide-specific metabolites that we measured, and > 30% had two or more. The 95th percentile values of six of the most commonly detected (> 50%) compounds were significantly higher among the CHAMACOS women after controlling for age, race, socioeconomic status, and smoking [(2,4-DCP; 2,5-DCP; ORTH; PNP; 2,4,6-TCP; and TCPy); quantile regression p < 0.05]. Conclusions Findings suggest that the CHAMACOS cohort has an additional burden of precursor pesticide exposure compared with the national sample, possibly from living and

  15. Phenylalanine and tyrosine levels are rate-limiting factors in production of health promoting metabolites in Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay Red cell suspension

    PubMed Central

    Manela, Neta; Oliva, Moran; Ovadia, Rinat; Sikron-Persi, Noga; Ayenew, Biruk; Fait, Aaron; Galili, Gad; Perl, Avichai; Weiss, David; Oren-Shamir, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stresses such as high light intensity and temperature cause induction of the shikimate pathway, aromatic amino acids (AAA) pathways, and of pathways downstream from AAAs. The induction leads to production of specialized metabolites that protect the cells from oxidative damage. The regulation of the diverse AAA derived pathways is still not well understood. To gain insight on that regulation, we increased AAA production in red grape Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay Red cell suspension, without inducing external stress on the cells, and characterized the metabolic effect of this induction. Increased AAA production was achieved by expressing a feedback-insensitive bacterial form of 3-deoxy- D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase enzyme (AroG*) of the shikimate pathway under a constitutive promoter. The presence of AroG* protein led to elevated levels of primary metabolites in the shikimate and AAA pathways including phenylalanine and tyrosine, and to a dramatic increase in phenylpropanoids. The AroG* transformed lines accumulated up to 20 and 150 fold higher levels of resveratrol and dihydroquercetin, respectively. Quercetin, formed from dihydroquercetin, and resveratrol, are health promoting metabolites that are induced due to environmental stresses. Testing the expression level of key genes along the stilbenoids, benzenoids, and phenylpropanoid pathways showed that transcription was not affected by AroG*. This suggests that concentrations of AAAs, and of phenylalanine in particular, are rate-limiting in production of these metabolites. In contrast, increased phenylalanine production did not lead to elevated concentrations of anthocyanins, even though they are also phenylpropanoid metabolites. This suggests a control mechanism of this pathway that is independent of AAA concentration. Interestingly, total anthocyanin concentrations were slightly lower in AroG* cells, and the relative frequencies of the different anthocyanins changed as well. PMID:26236327

  16. Genotoxic monitoring and benzene exposure assessment of gasoline station workers in metropolitan Bangkok: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and urinary trans, trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA).

    PubMed

    Tunsaringkarn, Tanasorn; Suwansaksri, Jamsai; Soogarun, Suphan; Siriwong, Wattasit; Rungsiyothin, Anusorn; Zapuang, Kalaya; Robson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Early warning of the potential of mutagens or carcinogens caused by benzene exposure that might occur in gasoline station workers can be achieved by examining 2 major biomarkers: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and trans, trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), a urinary metabolite of benzene. The main objective of this study was to assess benzene exposure and monitor the genotoxic effect of gasoline station workers in Bangkok, Thailand. Blood and urine samples were collected from 33 gasoline station workers, working in Pathumwan district area, central Bangkok, Thailand, for SCE and t,t-MA analysis, from April to June 2009. Control samples were collected from 30 office workers and students in the same area at the same period. Our results indicated significantly higher frequencies of SCE in gasoline exposed workers were than in controls (p<0.01), independent of gender. Urinary t,t-MA and t,t-MA/creatinine levels of gasoline exposed workers were also significantly higher than the control groups (p<0.05) were significantly higher in women than men workers (p<0.01). Calculated chromosomal damage relative risk (RR) of gasoline station workers was 3.00 (95% CI = 1.81 - 4.98, p<0.001) compared to controls. The gasoline exposed workers had potentially higher risk of chromosomal damage and cancer development because of direct contact to benzene.

  17. Dehydrin, alcohol dehydrogenase, and central metabolite levels are associated with cold tolerance in diploid strawberry (Fragaria spp.).

    PubMed

    Davik, Jahn; Koehler, Gage; From, Britta; Torp, Torfinn; Rohloff, Jens; Eidem, Petter; Wilson, Robert C; Sønsteby, Anita; Randall, Stephen K; Alsheikh, Muath

    2013-01-01

    The use of artificial freezing tests, identification of biomarkers linked to or directly involved in the low-temperature tolerance processes, could prove useful in applied strawberry breeding. This study was conducted to identify genotypes of diploid strawberry that differ in their tolerance to low-temperature stress and to investigate whether a set of candidate proteins and metabolites correlate with the level of tolerance. 17 Fragaria vesca, 2 F. nilgerrensis, 2 F. nubicola, and 1 F. pentaphylla genotypes were evaluated for low-temperature tolerance. Estimates of temperatures where 50 % of the plants survived (LT₅₀) ranged from -4.7 to -12.0 °C between the genotypes. Among the F. vesca genotypes, the LT₅₀ varied from -7.7 °C to -12.0 °C. Among the most tolerant were three F. vesca ssp. bracteata genotypes (FDP821, NCGR424, and NCGR502), while a F. vesca ssp. californica genotype (FDP817) was the least tolerant (LT₅₀) -7.7 °C). Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), total dehydrin expression, and content of central metabolism constituents were assayed in select plants acclimated at 2 °C. The LT₅₀ estimates and the expression of ADH and total dehydrins were highly correlated (r(adh) = -0.87, r (dehyd) = -0.82). Compounds related to the citric acid cycle were quantified in the leaves during acclimation. While several sugars and acids were significantly correlated to the LT₅₀ estimates early in the acclimation period, only galactinol proved to be a good LT₅₀ predictor after 28 days of acclimation (r(galact) = 0.79). It is concluded that ADH, dehydrins, and galactinol show great potential to serve as biomarkers for cold tolerance in diploid strawberry.

  18. Plasma levels of brain derived-neurotrophic factor and catecholamine metabolites are increased during active phase of psychotic symptoms in CNS lupus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ikenouchi, Atsuko; Yoshimura, Reiji; Ikemura, Naomi; Utsunomiya, Kensuke; Mitoma, Masae; Nakamura, Jun

    2006-09-30

    In the present study, the authors reported a case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with central nervous system involvement (CNS lupus). The authors also longitudinally investigated plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and catecholamine metabolites in the patient, and found that plasma levels of BDNF, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), and homovanillic acid (HVA) were raised in accordance with the severity of psychotic symptoms in this case of CNS lupus. These results suggest that it is useful to measure plasma levels of BDNF and the catecholamine metabolites in order to predict the severity of psychotic symptoms in CNS lupus and to provide a differential diagnosis from that of steroid-induced psychosis.

  19. Biological monitoring of workers exposed to benzene in the coke oven industry.

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, L; Luck, R; Afacan, A S; Wilson, H K

    1988-01-01

    Workers in the coke oven industry are potentially exposed to low concentrations of benzene. There is a need to establish a well validated biological monitoring procedure for low level benzene exposure. The use of breath and blood benzene and urinary phenol has been explored in conjunction with personal monitoring data. At exposures of about 1 ppm benzene, urinary phenol is of no value as an indicator of uptake/exposure. Benzene in blood was measured by head space gas chromatography but the concentrations were only just above the detection limit. The determination of breath benzene collected before the next shift is non-specific in the case of smokers. The most useful monitor at low concentrations appears to be breath benzene measured at the end-of-shift. PMID:3378002

  20. Serum protein binding of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D: a reevaluation by direct measurement of free metabolite levels.

    PubMed

    Bikle, D D; Siiteri, P K; Ryzen, E; Haddad, J G

    1985-11-01

    Using the technique of centrifugal ultrafiltration isodialysis to measure the free concentration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)2D], we determined the affinity of serum proteins for 1,25-(OH)2D both by Scatchard analysis (increasing ligand concentration at fixed binding site concentrations) and by a novel analysis in which the binding site concentrations were varied (serial dilution) at fixed ligand concentrations. The high affinity binding constant in serum for 1,25-(OH)2D was 3.7 X 10(7) M-1 by Scatchard analysis and 4.2 X 10(7) M-1 by serial dilution analysis. Human serum albumin had a much lower affinity for 1,25-(OH)2D (5.4 X 10(4) M-1). When vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) was selectively removed from serum by an actin affinity column, the affinity of the remaining serum proteins for 1,25-(OH)2D was that of albumin. Postulating a two-site model (DBP and albumin) for transport of 1,25-(OH)2D in serum and incorporating the estimated affinity constants of DBP and albumin for this metabolite, we calculated that 85% of total circulating 1,25-(OH)2D is transported in blood bound to DBP in normal individuals (0.4% is free and 14.6% is bound to albumin). In patients with liver disease, 73% is bound to DBP (1.1% is free and 25.9% is bound to albumin). Using this same two site model, we found a reasonable correlation (r = 0.612; P less than 0.001) between the measured free 1,25-(OH)2D level and the calculated free 1,25-(OH)2D level in serum based on albumin and DBP concentrations in 16 normal subjects and 16 patients with liver disease. These results confirm the concept that although DBP is the principal protein carrier of 1,25-(OH)2D in serum, albumin is a major secondary carrier, especially in patients with low DBP levels.

  1. Variability of Organophosphorous Pesticide Metabolite Levels in Spot and 24-hr Urine Samples Collected from Young Children during 1 Week

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Katherine; Eisen, Ellen A.; Jewell, Nicholas P.; Quirós-Alcalá, Lesliam; Castorina, Rosemary; Chevrier, Jonathan; Holland, Nina T.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Kavanagh-Baird, Geri; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites in spot urine samples are frequently used to characterize children’s exposures to organophosphorous (OP) pesticides. However, variable exposure and short biological half-lives of OP pesticides could result in highly variable measurements, leading to exposure misclassification. Objective: We examined within- and between-child variability in DAP metabolites in urine samples collected during 1 week. Methods: We collected spot urine samples over 7 consecutive days from 25 children (3–6 years of age). On two of the days, we collected 24-hr voids. We assessed the reproducibility of urinary DAP metabolite concentrations and evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of spot urine samples as predictors of high (top 20%) or elevated (top 40%) weekly average DAP metabolite concentrations. Results: Within-child variance exceeded between-child variance by a factor of two to eight, depending on metabolite grouping. Although total DAP concentrations in single spot urine samples were moderately to strongly associated with concentrations in same-day 24-hr samples (r ≈ 0.6–0.8, p < 0.01), concentrations in spot samples collected > 1 day apart and in 24-hr samples collected 3 days apart were weakly correlated (r ≈ –0.21 to 0.38). Single spot samples predicted high (top 20%) and elevated (top 40%) full-week average total DAP excretion with only moderate sensitivity (≈ 0.52 and ≈ 0.67, respectively) but relatively high specificity (≈ 0.88 and ≈ 0.78, respectively). Conclusions: The high variability we observed in children’s DAP metabolite concentrations suggests that single-day urine samples provide only a brief snapshot of exposure. Sensitivity analyses suggest that classification of cumulative OP exposure based on spot samples is prone to type 2 classification errors. PMID:23052012

  2. Spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric VOCs, NO2, SO2, and O3 concentrations at a heavily industrialized region in Western Turkey, and assessment of the carcinogenic risk levels of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civan, Mihriban Yılmaz; Elbir, Tolga; Seyfioglu, Remzi; Kuntasal, Öznur Oğuz; Bayram, Abdurrahman; Doğan, Güray; Yurdakul, Sema; Andiç, Özgün; Müezzinoğlu, Aysen; Sofuoglu, Sait C.; Pekey, Hakan; Pekey, Beyhan; Bozlaker, Ayse; Odabasi, Mustafa; Tuncel, Gürdal

    2015-02-01

    Ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and ground-level ozone (O3) were measured at 55 locations around a densely populated industrial zone, hosting a petrochemical complex (Petkim), a petroleum refinery (Tupras), ship-dismantling facilities, several iron and steel plants, and a gas-fired power plant. Five passive sampling campaigns were performed covering summer and winter seasons of 2005 and 2007. Elevated concentrations of VOCs, NO2 and SO2 around the refinery, petrochemical complex and roads indicated that industrial activities and vehicular emissions are the main sources of these pollutants in the region. Ozone concentrations were low at the industrial zone and settlement areas, but high in rural stations downwind from these sources due to NO distillation. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization receptor model (EPA PMF) was employed to apportion ambient concentrations of VOCs into six factors, which were associated with emissions sources. Traffic was found to be highest contributor to measured ∑VOCs concentrations, followed by the Petkim and Tupras. Median cancer risk due to benzene inhalation calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation was approximately 4 per-one-million population, which exceeded the U.S. EPA benchmark of 1 per one million. Petkim, Tupras and traffic emissions were the major sources of cancer risk due to benzene inhalation in the Aliaga airshed. Relative contributions of these two source groups changes significantly from one location to another, demonstrating the limitation of determining source contributions and calculating health risk using data from one or two permanent stations in an industrial area.

  3. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene-benzene vs benzene-rare gas atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jie; Li, Zhiying; Krems, Roman V.

    2014-10-01

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom-molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom-benzene calculations with those for benzene-benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  4. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: benzene-benzene vs benzene-rare gas atom collisions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Li, Zhiying; Krems, Roman V

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom-molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom-benzene calculations with those for benzene-benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  5. Lower Serum Vitamin D Metabolite Levels in Relation to Circulating Cytokines/Chemokines and Metabolic Hormones in Pregnant Women with Hypertensive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Adela, Ramu; Borkar, Roshan M.; Mishra, Navneeta; Bhandi, Murali Mohan; Vishwakarma, Gayatri; Varma, B. Aparna; Ragampeta, Srinivas; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether lower serum vitamin D metabolite levels were associated with altered cytokine/chemokine and metabolic hormone levels in three different hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP). Healthy pregnancy (n = 30) and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP) (n = 30), i.e., gestational hypertension (GH), preeclampsia (PE), and eclampsia (EC) subjects were enrolled. Vitamin D metabolites were measured by UPLC/APCI/HRMS method. Circulatory 27 cytokines/chemokines and 10 metabolic hormones were measured. Significantly decreased 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D levels were observed in HDP. The levels of 25(OH)D were significantly lower in PE and EC, whereas the serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D significantly decreased only in EC subjects. Serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D levels were negatively correlated with systolic- and diastolic blood pressure, creatinine, and uric acid levels. Serum interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-13 decreased, and GIP levels were increased in gestational hypertensive subjects. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB and IL-8 levels were increased and macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta levels were decreased in EC subjects. IL-8 and IL-10 increased, and rantes and GIP levels decreased in the EC group as compared with the GH group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that eotaxin, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, 25(OH)D, and 1,25(OH)2D were predictors of HDP. Our analyses suggest that lower vitamin D metabolites are associated with altered cytokines/chemokines and metabolic hormones in HDP. PMID:28348564

  6. Systemic Exposure to PAHs and Benzene in Firefighters Suppressing Controlled Structure Fires

    PubMed Central

    Fent, Kenneth W.; Eisenberg, Judith; Snawder, John; Sammons, Deborah; Pleil, Joachim D.; Stiegel, Matthew A.; Mueller, Charles; Horn, Gavin P.; Dalton, James

    2014-01-01

    Turnout gear provides protection against dermal exposure to contaminants during firefighting; however, the level of protection is unknown. We explored the dermal contribution to the systemic dose of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other aromatic hydrocarbons in firefighters during suppression and overhaul of controlled structure burns. The study was organized into two rounds, three controlled burns per round, and five firefighters per burn. The firefighters wore new or laundered turnout gear tested before each burn to ensure lack of PAH contamination. To ensure that any increase in systemic PAH levels after the burn was the result of dermal rather than inhalation exposure, the firefighters did not remove their self-contained breathing apparatus until overhaul was completed and they were >30 m upwind from the burn structure. Specimens were collected before and at intervals after the burn for biomarker analysis. Urine was analyzed for phenanthrene equivalents using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a benzene metabolite (s-phenylmercapturic acid) using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry; both were adjusted by creatinine. Exhaled breath collected on thermal desorption tubes was analyzed for PAHs and other aromatic hydrocarbons using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We collected personal air samples during the burn and skin wipe samples (corn oil medium) on several body sites before and after the burn. The air and wipe samples were analyzed for PAHs using a liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. We explored possible changes in external exposures or biomarkers over time and the relationships between these variables using non-parametric sign tests and Spearman tests, respectively. We found significantly elevated (P < 0.05) post-exposure breath concentrations of benzene compared with pre-exposure concentrations for both rounds. We also found significantly elevated post-exposure levels of PAHs on the neck compared with pre

  7. Systemic exposure to PAHs and benzene in firefighters suppressing controlled structure fires.

    PubMed

    Fent, Kenneth W; Eisenberg, Judith; Snawder, John; Sammons, Deborah; Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Mueller, Charles; Horn, Gavin P; Dalton, James

    2014-08-01

    Turnout gear provides protection against dermal exposure to contaminants during firefighting; however, the level of protection is unknown. We explored the dermal contribution to the systemic dose of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other aromatic hydrocarbons in firefighters during suppression and overhaul of controlled structure burns. The study was organized into two rounds, three controlled burns per round, and five firefighters per burn. The firefighters wore new or laundered turnout gear tested before each burn to ensure lack of PAH contamination. To ensure that any increase in systemic PAH levels after the burn was the result of dermal rather than inhalation exposure, the firefighters did not remove their self-contained breathing apparatus until overhaul was completed and they were >30 m upwind from the burn structure. Specimens were collected before and at intervals after the burn for biomarker analysis. Urine was analyzed for phenanthrene equivalents using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a benzene metabolite (s-phenylmercapturic acid) using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry; both were adjusted by creatinine. Exhaled breath collected on thermal desorption tubes was analyzed for PAHs and other aromatic hydrocarbons using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We collected personal air samples during the burn and skin wipe samples (corn oil medium) on several body sites before and after the burn. The air and wipe samples were analyzed for PAHs using a liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. We explored possible changes in external exposures or biomarkers over time and the relationships between these variables using non-parametric sign tests and Spearman tests, respectively. We found significantly elevated (P < 0.05) post-exposure breath concentrations of benzene compared with pre-exposure concentrations for both rounds. We also found significantly elevated post-exposure levels of PAHs on the neck compared with pre

  8. Effects of sequential feeding with low- and high-protein diets on growth performances and plasma metabolite levels in geese.

    PubMed

    Ho, S-Y; Chen, Y-H; Yang, S-K

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted by two trials to investigate effects of sequential feeding with low- and high-protein diets on growth traits and plasma metabolites in geese. In Trial I, the effect of sequential feeding under time-restricted feeding system was investigated. Seventy-two White Roman goslings were randomly allotted into either sequential feeding (S1) or control feeding (C1) group. All goslings were fed for 1 h at morning and at evening, respectively, from 2 to 8 weeks of age. S1 group was offered 13% CP diet at morning and 19% CP diet at evening. C1 group was offered the same diet (16% CP; mixed equally with the two diets mentioned above) at both morning and evening. Blood samples were hourly collected for 4 h after feeding at both morning and evening for the determination of the postprandial plasma levels of glucose, triacylglycerol and uric acid at the end of experiment. Results showed that BW, average daily gain (ADG), and daily feed intake (FI) were not different between groups, but the feed efficiency (FE) in S1 group was significantly higher than that in C1 group (P<0.05). The areas under curve (AUC) of plasma postprandial levels of glucose, triacylglycerol and uric acid were not affected by treatment, but the AUC of triacylglycerol and uric acid in morning were lower than those in evening (P<0.05). In Trial II, the effect of sequential feeding under ad libitum feeding system was investigated. Twenty-four goslings were randomly allotted into either sequential feeding (S2) or control feeding (C2) group. Diets were altered at 0600 and 1800 h, respectively, and geese were fed ad libitum from 4 to 8 weeks of age. S2 group was offered 14% CP diet at morning and 20% CP diet at evening. C2 group was supplied the same diet (mixed with the two diets according to the ratio of diets consumed by S2 group on the preceded day) at both morning and evening. Results showed that the ADG in S2 group was higher than those in C2 group (P<0.05). Summarized data from both

  9. Effect of prepartal and postpartal dietary fat level on performance and plasma concentration of metabolites in transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Karimian, M; Khorvash, M; Forouzmand, M A; Alikhani, M; Rahmani, H R; Ghaffari, M H; Petit, H V

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 2 levels of dietary fat (low and high) offered during the prepartal and postpartal periods on dry matter intake (DMI), plasma concentration of metabolites, and milk yield and composition. Twenty-four Holstein dry cows were assigned on d 21 relative to expected parturition date to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2×2 factorial arrangement of 2 levels of fat fed during the prepartal period and 2 levels of fat fed during the postpartal period: prepartal low fat and postpartal low fat (LF-LF), prepartal low fat and postpartal high fat (LF-HF), prepartal high fat and postpartal low fat (HF-LF), or prepartal high fat and postpartal high fat (HF-HF). Prepartal and postpartal LF diets contained no fat supplement. Prepartal HF diets contained 1.60% calcium salts of soybean oil. The proportion of calcium salts of soybean oil was increased to 1.70% of DM for the first 21 d of lactation and to 2.27% of DM from d 21 to 56 of lactation in the HF diet. Diets were fed for ad libitum intake from d 21 before calving until d 56 of gestation. Prepartal DMI was lower for cows fed the HF diet compared with those fed the LF diet (12.6 vs. 16.2kg/d). Postpartum, cows fed the HF-HF and HF-LF diets had, respectively, the lowest and highest DMI, although no significant differences existed between HF-LF and LF-LF. Net energy intake was higher for cows fed the postpartal HF diets compared with those fed the LF diets. Prepartal fat level had no effect on net energy intake. Cows offered the prepartal HF diet had higher milk yield when offered the postpartal LF diet compared with those offered the postpartal HF diet and no effect of the postpartal fat level was detected when cows were fed the prepartal LF diet. Milk composition was similar among treatments. Plasma cholesterol concentration postpartum was higher for cows fed the prepartal LF diet than for those fed the prepartal HF diet (5.16 vs. 3.74mmol/L) and postpartal fat level had no effect

  10. Temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolite levels in bedtime, morning, and 24-hr urine samples for 50 adults in North Carolina

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insects in both agricultural and residential settings worldwide. Few data are available on the temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolites in the urine of non-occupationally exposed adults. In this work, we describe the study ...

  11. Temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolite levels in bedtime, morning, and 24-hr urine samples for 50 adults in North Carolina

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insects in both agricultural and residential settings worldwide. Few data are available on the temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolites in the urine of non-occupationally exposed adults. In this work, we describe the study ...

  12. The effect of the lunar cycle on fecal cortisol metabolite levels and foraging ecology of nocturnally and diurnally active spiny mice.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Roee; Dayan, Tamar; Levy, Ofir; Schubert, Iris; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2011-01-01

    We studied stress hormones and foraging of nocturnal Acomys cahirinus and diurnal A. russatus in field populations as well as in two field enclosures populated by both species and two field enclosures with individuals of A. russatus alone. When alone, A. russatus individuals become also nocturnally active. We asked whether nocturnally active A. russatus will respond to moon phase and whether this response will be obtained also in diurnally active individuals. We studied giving-up densities (GUDs) in artificial foraging patches and fecal cortisol metabolite levels. Both species exhibited elevated fecal cortisol metabolite levels and foraged to higher GUDs in full moon nights; thus A. russatus retains physiological response and behavioral patterns that correlate with full moon conditions, as can be expected in nocturnal rodents, in spite of its diurnal activity. The endocrinological and behavioral response of this diurnal species to moon phase reflects its evolutionary heritage.

  13. The Effect of the Lunar Cycle on Fecal Cortisol Metabolite Levels and Foraging Ecology of Nocturnally and Diurnally Active Spiny Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Tamar; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2011-01-01

    We studied stress hormones and foraging of nocturnal Acomys cahirinus and diurnal A. russatus in field populations as well as in two field enclosures populated by both species and two field enclosures with individuals of A. russatus alone. When alone, A. russatus individuals become also nocturnally active. We asked whether nocturnally active A. russatus will respond to moon phase and whether this response will be obtained also in diurnally active individuals. We studied giving-up densities (GUDs) in artificial foraging patches and fecal cortisol metabolite levels. Both species exhibited elevated fecal cortisol metabolite levels and foraged to higher GUDs in full moon nights; thus A. russatus retains physiological response and behavioral patterns that correlate with full moon conditions, as can be expected in nocturnal rodents, in spite of its diurnal activity. The endocrinological and behavioral response of this diurnal species to moon phase reflects its evolutionary heritage. PMID:21829733

  14. Monitoring low benzene exposure: comparative evaluation of urinary biomarkers, influence of cigarette smoking, and genetic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, Silvia; Consonni, Dario; Campo, Laura; Buratti, Marina; Colombi, Antonio; Pesatori, Angela C; Bonzini, Matteo; Bertazzi, Pier A; Foà, Vito; Garte, Seymour; Farmer, Peter B; Levy, Leonard S; Pala, Mauro; Valerio, Federico; Fontana, Vincenzo; Desideri, Arianna; Merlo, Domenico F

    2005-09-01

    Benzene is a human carcinogen and an ubiquitous environmental pollutant. Identification of specific and sensitive biological markers is critical for the definition of exposure to low benzene level and the evaluation of the health risk posed by this exposure. This investigation compared urinary trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), S-phenylmercapturic acid, and benzene (U-benzene) as biomarkers to assess benzene exposure and evaluated the influence of smoking and the genetic polymorphisms CYP2E1 (RsaI and DraI) and NADPH quinone oxidoreductase-1 on these indices. Gas station attendants, urban policemen, bus drivers, and two groups of controls were studied (415 subjects). Median benzene exposure was 61, 22, 21, 9 and 6 microg/m(3), respectively, with higher levels in workers than in controls. U-benzene, but not t,t-MA and S-phenylmercapturic acid, showed an exposure-related increase. All the biomarkers were strongly influenced by cigarette smoking, with values up to 8-fold higher in smokers compared with nonsmokers. Significant correlations of the biomarkers with each other and with urinary cotinine were found. A possible influence of genetic polymorphism of CYP2E1 (RsaI and/or DraI) on t,t-MA and U-benzene in subjects with a variant allele was found. Multiple linear regression analysis correlated the urinary markers with exposure, smoking status, and CYP2E1 (RsaI; R(2) up to 0.55 for U-benzene). In conclusion, in the range of investigated benzene levels (<478 micro/m(3) or <0.15 ppm), smoking may be regarded as the major source of benzene intake; among the study indices, U-benzene is the marker of choice for biomonitoring low-level occupational and environmental benzene exposure.

  15. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50.degree. C. to 300.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered.

  16. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1995-12-19

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50 C to 300 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered. 2 figs.

  17. Fast method for simultaneous quantification of tamoxifen and metabolites in dried blood spots using an entry level LC-MS/MS system.

    PubMed

    Tré-Hardy, Marie; Capron, Arnaud; Antunes, Marina Venzon; Linden, Rafael; Wallemacq, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a new liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MSMS) assay for the simultaneous quantification of tamoxifen (TAM) and its main therapeutically active metabolites, N-desmethyltamoxifen (NDT), 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4HT) and endoxifen (END) in dried blood spots. Ultrasound assisted methanolic extraction was used for TAM and metabolites extraction from dried blood spot. After evaporation and methanol reconstitution, the extract was injected into a LC-MSMS system. Reversed phase chromatography was performed on a C18 grafted column in gradient mode. TAM, metabolites, and internal standard (diazepam-d5; IS) were identified in positive electrospray ionization mode using m/z transition of 372.5>72.1 (TAM); 374.23>58.10 (END); 358.27>58.10 (NDT); 388.23>44.80 (4HT) and 290.00>198.00 (IS). Total analytical run time was 6.5min. Assay was linear from 1 to 500ng/mL for all substances and presented intra and inter-assay precision and accuracy <15%. TAM, NDT, 4HT and END limits of quantification and detection were of 1 and 0.5ng/mL; 1 and 3ng/mL; 1.7 and 3ng/mL; 0.6 and 2ng/mL, respectively. Recovery ranged from 83.8 to 96.3% with matrix effect ranged from 4.3 to 29.8% for TAM and its metabolites. Hematocrit value ≤40% appeared to negatively influence accuracy of the method. In conclusion, the method described here is somewhat accessible, relatively fast, sensitive and selective with no interference. This assay might be used to investigate the level of TAM and its metabolites in DBS for therapeutic drug monitoring purposes.

  18. Environmental exposure to benzene: an update.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L

    1996-01-01

    During the 1990s, several large-scale studies of benzene concentrations in air, food, and blood have added to our knowledge of its environmental occurrence. In general, the new studies have confirmed the earlier findings of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (TEAM) studies and other large-scale studies in Germany and the Netherlands concerning the levels of exposure and major sources. For example, the new studies found that personal exposures exceeded indoor concentrations of benzene, which in turn exceeded outdoor concentrations. The new studies of food concentrations have confirmed earlier indications that food is not an important pathway for benzene exposure. The results of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey on blood levels in a nationwide sample of 883 persons are in good agreement with the concentrations in exhaled breath measured in about 800 persons a decade earlier in the TEAM studies. Major sources of exposure continue to be active and passive smoking, auto exhaust, and driving or riding in automobiles. New methods in breath and blood sampling and analysis offer opportunities to investigate short-term peak exposures and resulting body burden under almost any conceivable field conditions. PMID:9118882

  19. Environmental exposure to benzene: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.

    1996-12-01

    During the 1990s, several large-scale studies of benzene concentrations in air, food, and blood have added to our knowledge of its environmental occurrence. In general, the new studies have confirmed the earlier findings of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (TEAM) studies and other large-scale studies in Germany and the Netherlands concerning the levels of exposure and major sources. For example, the new studies found that personal exposures exceeded indoor concentrations of benzene, which in turn exceeded outdoor concentrations. The new studies of food concentrations have confirmed earlier indications that food is not an important pathway for benzene exposure. The results of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey on blood levels in a nationwide sample of 883 persons are in good agreement with the concentrations in exhaled breath measured in about 800 persons a decade earlier in the TEAM studies. Major sources of exposure continue to be active and passive smoking, auto exhaust, and driving or riding in automobiles. New methods in breath and blood sampling and analysis offer opportunities to investigate short-term peak exposures and resulting body burden under almost any conceivable field conditions. 45 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Quantitative Profiling of Hydroxy Lipid Metabolites in Mouse Organs Reveals Distinct Lipidomic Profiles and Modifications Due to Elevated n-3 Fatty Acid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Cheng-Ying; Smyl, Christopher; Dogan, Inci; Rothe, Michael; Weylandt, Karsten-H.

    2017-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are precursors of bioactive metabolites and mediators. In this study, the profile of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (HETE), hydroxyeicosapentaenoic (HEPE) and hydroxydocosahexaenoic (HDHA) acids derived from arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in colon, liver, lung, spleen, muscle, heart and kidney tissue of healthy wildtype mice were characterized, and compared to profiles in organs from transgenic fat-1 mice engineered to express the Caenorhabditis elegans fat-1 gene encoding an n-3 desaturase and thereby with endogenously elevated n-3 PUFA levels. PUFAs were measured using gas chromatography. The lipid metabolites were assayed using LC-MS/MS. AA and DHA were the prominent PUFAs in wildtype and fat-1 mice. EPA levels were low in both groups even though there was a significant increase in fat-1 organs with an up to 12-fold increase in fat-1 spleen and kidney. DHA levels increased by approximately 1.5-fold in fat-1 as compared to wildtype mice. While HETEs remained the same or decreased moderately and HDHAs increased 1- to 3-fold, HEPE formation in fat-1 tissues increased from 8- (muscle) to 44-fold (spleen). These findings indicate distinct profiles of monohydroxy lipid metabolites in different organs and strong utilization of EPA for HEPE formation, by which moderate EPA supplementation might trigger formation of biologically active EPA-derived resolvins. PMID:28165385

  1. Evaluation of toluene exposure via drinking water on levels of regional brain biogenic monoamines and their metabolites in CD-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, G.C.; Sharma, R.P.; Parker, R.D.; Coulombe, R.A. Jr. )

    1990-10-01

    Toluene, a potentially neurotoxic substance, is found in trace amounts in groundwater. Adult male CD-1 mice were continuously fed drinking water ad libitum containing 0, 17, 80, and 405 mg/liter toluene. After a 28-day treatment, animals were tested for endogenous levels of the biogenic monoamines norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) and their respective metabolites, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxymandelic acid (VMA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), in six discrete brain regions. The maximum toluene-induced increases of biogenic amines and their metabolites generally occurred at a toluene concentration of 80 mg/liter. In the hypothalamus, a major NE-containing compartment, the concentrations of NE significantly increased by 51, 63, and 34% in groups dosed with 17, 80, and 405 mg/liter, respectively. Significant increases of NE were also observed in the medulla oblongata and midbrain. Concomitantly, concentrations of VMA increased in various brain regions. Concentrations of DA were significantly higher in the corpus striatum and hypothalamus. Alterations in levels of DA metabolites, DOPAC and HVA, were marginal. Toluene significantly increased concentrations of 5-HT in all dissected brain regions, except cerebellum, and increased the 5-HIAA levels in the hypothalamus, corpus striatum, and cerebral cortex.

  2. A survey of personal exposures to benzene in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Meneses, F; Romieu, I; Ramirez, M; Colome, S; Fung, K; Ashley, D; Hernandez-Avila, M

    1999-01-01

    Benzene is a widely distributed environmental contaminant that causes leukemia. It is an important component in gasoline, it is used frequently as a solvent or chemical feedstock in industry, and it is emitted as a product of incomplete combustion. In Mexico City, investigators suspect that benzene exposure might be elevated and may pose a risk to the population; however, no published data are available to confirm or disconfirm this suspicion. We, therefore, conducted a survey in 3 occupational groups in Mexico City. Forty-five volunteers who used portable passive monitors measured their personal exposure to benzene during a workshift. None of the participants smoked during the monitoring period. Benzene exposure was significantly higher among service-station attendants (mean = 359.5 microg/m3 [standard deviation = 170.4 microg/m3]) than among the street vendors (83.7 microg/m3 and 45.0 microg/m3, respectively) and office workers (45.2 microg/m3 and 13.3 microg/m3, respectively). However, the benzene exposure levels observed among office workers were substantially higher than levels reported elsewhere for general populations. Our results highlight the need for more complete studies by investigators who should assess the potential benefits of setting environmental standards for benzene in Mexico.

  3. Levels of heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain extracellular fluid after i.v. heroin administration to freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Gottås, A; Øiestad, E L; Boix, F; Vindenes, V; Ripel, Å; Thaulow, C H; Mørland, J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Heroin, with low affinity for μ-opioid receptors, has been considered to act as a prodrug. In order to study the pharmacokinetics of heroin and its active metabolites after i.v. administration, we gave a bolus injection of heroin to rats and measured the concentration of heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain extracellular fluid (ECF). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH After an i.v. bolus injection of heroin to freely moving Sprague–Dawley rats, the concentrations of heroin and metabolites in blood samples from the vena jugularis and in microdialysis samples from striatal brain ECF were measured by ultraperformance LC-MS/MS. KEY RESULTS Heroin levels decreased very fast, both in blood and brain ECF, and could not be detected after 18 and 10 min respectively. 6-Monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) increased very rapidly, reaching its maximal concentrations after 2.0 and 4.3 min, respectively, and falling thereafter. Morphine increased very slowly, reaching its maximal levels, which were six times lower than the highest 6-MAM concentrations, after 12.6 and 21.3 min, with a very slow decline during the rest of the experiment and only surpassing 6-MAM levels at least 30 min after injection. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS After an i.v. heroin injection, 6-MAM was the predominant opioid present shortly after injection and during the first 30 min, not only in the blood but also in rat brain ECF. 6-MAM might therefore mediate most of the effects observed shortly after heroin intake, and this finding questions the general assumption that morphine is the main and most important metabolite of heroin. PMID:23865556

  4. Effects of exposure to amphetamine derivatives on passive avoidance performance and the central levels of monoamines and their metabolites in mice: correlations between behavior and neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Murnane, Kevin Sean; Perrine, Shane Alan; Finton, Brendan James; Galloway, Matthew Peter; Howell, Leonard Lee; Fantegrossi, William Edward

    2012-04-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that amphetamine derivatives can deplete brain monoaminergic neurotransmitters. However, the behavioral and cognitive consequences of neurochemical depletions induced by amphetamines are not well established. In this study, mice were exposed to dosing regimens of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methamphetamine (METH), or parachloroamphetamine (PCA) known to deplete the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin, and the effects of these dosing regimens on learning and memory were assessed. In the same animals, we determined deficits in learning and memory via passive avoidance (PA) behavior and changes in tissue content of monoamine neurotransmitters and their primary metabolites in the striatum, frontal cortex, cingulate, hippocampus, and amygdala via ex vivo high-pressure liquid chromatography. Exposure to METH and PCA impaired PA performance and resulted in significant depletions of dopamine, serotonin, and their metabolites in several brain regions. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the tissue concentration of dopamine in the anterior striatum was the strongest predictor of PA performance, with an additional significant contribution by the tissue concentration of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the cingulate. In contrast to the effects of METH and PCA, exposure to MDMA did not deplete anterior striatal dopamine levels or cingulate levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and it did not impair PA performance. These studies demonstrate that certain amphetamines impair PA performance in mice and that these impairments may be attributable to specific neurochemical depletions.

  5. Plasma level monitoring of the major metabolites of diacetylmorphine (heroin) by the "chasing the dragon" route in severe heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Dubois, N; Demaret, I; Ansseau, M; Rozet, E; Hubert, Ph; Charlier, C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to verify if severe physical health problems frequently encountered in heroin addicts and the concomitant use of alcohol and legal or illegal drugs other than heroin influenced the pharmacokinetics of the major metabolites of heroin. We conducted a 90 minutes follow-up of the plasma concentrations of the pharmaceutical heroin, named diacetylmorphine (DAM), in patients recruited in a DAM assisted treatment centre. TADAM (Traitement Assisté par DiAcétylMorphine) aimed to compare the efficacy of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) compared with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for heroin users considered as treatment resistant patients and who have severe physical and mental health problems. Eleven patients were recruited. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 15, 45 and 90 minutes after DAM administration. All patients received DAM by the "chasing the dragon" route. Plasma samples were analyzed by a previously described ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS-MS) method. A principal component analysis (PCA) was performed and 8 metabolite concentrations ratios were calculated to evaluate the influence of various factors (DAM dose, patient pathologies, concomitant use of medications, methadone, street heroin, alcohol and cocaine) on heroin metabolite pharmacokinetics. It seemed to be not affected by the DAM dose, patient pathologies and the concomitant use of medications, methadone, street heroin and alcohol. Cocaine use was the only parameter which showed differences in heroin pharmacokinetics.

  6. Determination of benzene in soft drinks and other beverages by isotope dilution headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu-Liang; Casey, Valerie; Seaman, Steve; Tague, Brett; Becalski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    An automated, simple, and reproducible method was developed for the determination of benzene in soft drinks, based on isotope dilution headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the selected-ion monitoring mode. The method was used to assess benzene levels in samples of 124 soft drinks and beverages. Benzene was not detected in 60% of the 124 products. The average benzene levels in 6 products exceeded the Canadian maximum acceptable concentration of 5 microg/L for benzene in drinking water, and 2 of the 6 products had benzene levels above the World Health Organization guideline of 10 microg/L. The highest level of benzene, 23 microg/L, was found in a soft drink product specifically marketed to children.

  7. Drug metabolism in human brain: high levels of cytochrome P4503A43 in brain and metabolism of anti-anxiety drug alprazolam to its active metabolite.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Varsha; Kommaddi, Reddy P; Valli, Khader; Ryder, Daniel; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Strobel, Henry W; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2008-06-11

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) is a super-family of drug metabolizing enzymes. P450 enzymes have dual function; they can metabolize drugs to pharmacologically inactive metabolites facilitating their excretion or biotransform them to pharmacologically active metabolites which may have longer half-life than the parent drug. The variable pharmacological response to psychoactive drugs typically seen in population groups is often not accountable by considering dissimilarities in hepatic metabolism. Metabolism in brain specific nuclei may play a role in pharmacological modulation of drugs acting on the CNS and help explain some of the diverse response to these drugs seen in patient population. P450 enzymes are also present in brain where drug metabolism can take place and modify therapeutic action of drugs at the site of action. We have earlier demonstrated an intrinsic difference in the biotransformation of alprazolam (ALP) in brain and liver, relatively more alpha-hydroxy alprazolam (alpha-OHALP) is formed in brain as compared to liver. In the present study we show that recombinant CYP3A43 metabolizes ALP to both alpha-OHALP and 4-hydroxy alprazolam (4-OHALP) while CYP3A4 metabolizes ALP predominantly to its inactive metabolite, 4-OHALP. The expression of CYP3A43 mRNA in human brain samples correlates with formation of relatively higher levels of alpha-OH ALP indicating that individuals who express higher levels of CYP3A43 in the brain would generate larger amounts of alpha-OHALP. Further, the expression of CYP3A43 was relatively higher in brain as compared to liver across different ethnic populations. Since CYP3A enzymes play a prominent role in the metabolism of drugs, the higher expression of CYP3A43 would generate metabolite profile of drugs differentially in human brain and thus impact the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs at the site of action.

  8. Drug Metabolism in Human Brain: High Levels of Cytochrome P4503A43 in Brain and Metabolism of Anti-Anxiety Drug Alprazolam to Its Active Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Varsha; Kommaddi, Reddy P.; Valli, Khader; Ryder, Daniel; Hyde, Thomas M.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Strobel, Henry W.; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) is a super-family of drug metabolizing enzymes. P450 enzymes have dual function; they can metabolize drugs to pharmacologically inactive metabolites facilitating their excretion or biotransform them to pharmacologically active metabolites which may have longer half-life than the parent drug. The variable pharmacological response to psychoactive drugs typically seen in population groups is often not accountable by considering dissimilarities in hepatic metabolism. Metabolism in brain specific nuclei may play a role in pharmacological modulation of drugs acting on the CNS and help explain some of the diverse response to these drugs seen in patient population. P450 enzymes are also present in brain where drug metabolism can take place and modify therapeutic action of drugs at the site of action. We have earlier demonstrated an intrinsic difference in the biotransformation of alprazolam (ALP) in brain and liver, relatively more α-hydroxy alprazolam (α-OHALP) is formed in brain as compared to liver. In the present study we show that recombinant CYP3A43 metabolizes ALP to both α-OHALP and 4-hydroxy alprazolam (4-OHALP) while CYP3A4 metabolizes ALP predominantly to its inactive metabolite, 4-OHALP. The expression of CYP3A43 mRNA in human brain samples correlates with formation of relatively higher levels of α-OH ALP indicating that individuals who express higher levels of CYP3A43 in the brain would generate larger amounts of α-OHALP. Further, the expression of CYP3A43 was relatively higher in brain as compared to liver across different ethnic populations. Since CYP3A enzymes play a prominent role in the metabolism of drugs, the higher expression of CYP3A43 would generate metabolite profile of drugs differentially in human brain and thus impact the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs at the site of action. PMID:18545703

  9. The correlation of urinary levels of albuterol and its metabolites isomers following inhalation from a dry powder inhaler and in vitro particle size characterisation.

    PubMed

    Srichana, Teerapol; Suedee, Roongnapa; Tanmanee, Niwan; Muanpanarai, Det; Marriott, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to analyse the two enantiomers of abuterol in urine after the inhalation of a single dose of racemic albuterol from three dry powder inhalers by human volunteers. Urine samples were collected over 24h and analysed by HPLC-with fluorescence detection. Albuterol and its metabolites in urine could only have resulted from pulmonary absorption because gastrointestinal absorption was prevented. Unchanged albuterol and its conjugated metabolites were detected in the urine of healthy volunteers at much higher levels than in the urine of the asthmatics. Also, the amount of S-(+)-isomer excreted in urine was higher than that of the R-(--)-isomer. These differences did not arise as a consequence of either the formulation or the inter-conversion of two isomers in the urine. There is a relationship between the improvement of mid-expiratory flow (FEF(25-75)) and the amount of R-(--)-albuterol remaining to be excreted. The elimination rate constants of the parent drug in healthy volunteers of both R-(--)- and S-(+)-isomers were higher than those of the respective conjugated metabolites. The mean S/R ratio of the parent drug was about unity initially and increased to about 1.5 in the urine collected between 12 and 24h. The values of S/R ratio of the conjugated metabolites in the healthy volunteers were in the range 1.2-2.4, with the value increasing over the time of collection before reaching a plateau. This also occurred with the asthmatics, but the ratios were higher, in the range of 2.0-4.5. In summary, the urinary level of albuterol following in vivo inhalation was found to correlate with in vitro deposition data from the dry powder inhaler.

  10. Seasonal variation of toxic benzene emissions in petroleum refinery.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Ansari, M F; Gavane, A G; Pandit, V I; Nema, P; Devotta, S

    2007-05-01

    Petroleum refineries are largest chemical industries that are responsible for the emission of several pollutants into the atmosphere. Benzene is among the most important air pollutants that are emitted by petroleum refineries, since they are involved in almost every refinery process. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major group of air pollutants, which play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry. These contribute to toxic oxidants, which are harmful to ecosystem, human health and atmosphere. The variability of pollutants is an important factor in determining human exposure to these chemicals. The ambient air concentrations of benzene were measured in several sites around the Digboi petroleum refinery, near the city of Gowahati in northeast India, during winter and summer 2004. The seasonal and spatial variations of the ambient air concentrations of this benzene were investigated and analyzed. An estimation of the contribution of the refinery to the measured atmospheric levels of benzene was also performed. The ambient air mixing ratios of benzene in a large area outside the refinery was generally low, in ppbv range, much lower than the ambient air quality standards. This article presents the temporal and spatial variation of air pollution in and around petroleum refinery and showed that no health risk due to benzene is present in the areas adjacent to the refinery.

  11. Influence of a five-day vegetarian diet on urinary levels of antibiotics and phthalate metabolites: a pilot study with "Temple Stay" participants.

    PubMed

    Ji, Kyunghee; Lim Kho, Young; Park, Yoonsuk; Choi, Kyungho

    2010-05-01

    Diet is purported to be means of exposure to many environmental contaminants. The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of dietary change on the levels of exposure to several environmental chemicals - in particular, antibiotics and phthalates. For this purpose, we examined the extent to which short-term changes in diet influenced the inadvertent exposure levels to these chemicals in an adult population. We recruited participants (n=25) of a five-day 'Temple Stay' program in Korea and collected urine samples before and after the program. We also conducted a questionnaire survey on participants' dietary patterns prior to their participation. During the program, participants followed the daily routines of Buddhist monks and maintained a vegetarian diet. Urinary levels of three antibiotics and their major metabolites, metabolites of four major phthalates, and malondialdehyde (MDA) as an oxidative stress biomarker were analyzed. The frequency and levels of detection for antibiotics and phthalates noticeably decreased during the program. Urinary MDA levels were significantly lower than before program participation (0.16 versus 0.27mg/g creatinine). Although the exposure to target compounds might be influenced by other behavioral patterns, these results suggest that even short-term changes in dietary behavior may significantly decrease inadvertent exposure to antibiotics and phthalates and hence may reduce oxidative stress levels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Associations between five-factor model of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and plasma levels of monoamine metabolite in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenya; Miura, Itaru; Kanno-Nozaki, Keiko; Horikoshi, Sho; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Niwa, Shin-Ichi; Yabe, Hirooki

    2015-12-15

    The five-factor model of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) for schizophrenia symptoms is the most common multiple-factor model used in analyses; its use may improve evaluation of symptoms in schizophrenia patients. Plasma monoamine metabolite levels are possible indicators of clinical symptoms or response to antipsychotics in schizophrenia. We investigated the association between five-factor model components and plasma monoamine metabolites levels to explore the model's biological basis. Plasma levels of homovanillic acid (HVA), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography in 65 Japanese patients with schizophrenia. Significant negative correlation between plasma 5-HIAA levels and the depression/anxiety component was found. Furthermore, significant positive correlation was found between plasma MHPG levels and the excitement component. Plasma HVA levels were not correlated with any five-factor model component. These results suggest that the five-factor model of the PANSS may have a biological basis, and may be useful for elucidating the psychopathology of schizophrenia. Assessment using the five-factor model may enable understanding of monoaminergic dysfunction, possibly allowing more appropriate medication selection. Further studies of a larger number of first-episode schizophrenia patients are needed to confirm and extend these results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Associations between vitamin D-binding protein isotypes, circulating 25(OH)D levels, and vitamin D metabolite uptake in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hibler, Elizabeth A; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Stone, Angelika Dampf; Sardo, Christine L; Galligan, Michael A; Jurutka, Peter W

    2014-04-01

    Vitamin D metabolites have been extensively studied as cancer chemopreventive agents. Gc-globulin (GC) isotypes, based on rs7041 and rs4588 diplotypes, have varying affinities for 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), which may affect circulating metabolite concentration as well as delivery at the cellular level. We evaluated associations between GC isotype and circulating vitamin D metabolite concentrations in 403 ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) clinical trial participants. Metabolite uptake was evaluated in human colon cancer (HCT-116) cells treated with ethanol vehicle, 1,25(OH)2D, or 25(OH)D, and with plasma from individuals with known GC isotype. Mammalian-2-hybrid and vitamin D-responsive element-based luciferase assays were used to measure the vitamin D receptor pathway activation as a marker for metabolite uptake. Regression analysis demonstrated significantly lower serum 25(OH)D concentration for clinical trial participants with 1F_2, 1S_2, or 2_2 isotypes (P < 0.01) compared with 1S_1S. Consistent with these in vivo observations, cellular data revealed that 25(OH)D uptake varied less by GC isotype only at the higher concentration tested (P = 0.05), while 1,25(OH)2D uptake differed markedly by GC isotype across concentration and assay (P < 0.01). The 1F_1S and 1F_2 isotypes produced the greatest reporter gene induction with 1,25(OH)2D treatment and, while activation varied less with 25(OH)D, the 2_2 isotype demonstrated increased induction at the lower concentration. These results suggest that vitamin D metabolite concentration and delivery to colon cells may vary not only by GC isotype, but also that certain isotypes may more effectively deliver 1,25(OH)2D versus 25(OH)D. Overall, these results may help identify populations at risk for cancer and potential recipients of targeted chemoprevention.

  14. Acetyl-l-carnitine partially prevents benzene-induced hematotoxicity and oxidative stress in C3H/He mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongli; Zhang, Juan; Wei, Haiyan; Meng, Xing; Ding, Qin; Sun, Fengxia; Cao, Meng; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2017-02-13

    Benzene is an environmental pollutant and occupational toxicant which induces hematotoxicity. Our previous metabonomics study suggested that acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) decreased in the mouse plasma and bone marrow (BM) cells due to benzene exposure. In the present study, the topic on whether ALCAR influences hematotoxicity caused by benzene exposure was explored. Thirty-two male C3H/He mice were divided into four groups: control group (C: vehicle, oil), benzene group (150mg/kg body weight (b.w.) benzene), benzene+A1 group (150mg/kg b.w. benzene+100mg/kg b.w. ALCAR), and benzene+A2 group (150mg/kg b.w. benzene+200mg/kg b.w. ALCAR). Benzene was injected subcutaneously, and ALCAR was orally administrated via gavage once daily for 4 weeks consecutively. After the experimental period, the blood routine, BM cell number and frequency of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HS/PC) were assessed. The mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP level were determined to evaluate the mitochondrial function. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also examined, and the comet assay was performed to measure oxidative stress. Results showed that ALCAR intervention can partially reduce the benzene-induced damage on BM and HS/PCs and can simultaneously alleviate the DNA damage by reducing benzene-induced H2O2, ROS, and MDA.

  15. A lack of consensus in the literature findings on the removal of airborne benzene by houseplants: Effect of bacterial enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriprapat, Wararat; Strand, Stuart E.

    2016-04-01

    Removal rates of benzene and formaldehyde gas by houseplants reported by several laboratories varied by several orders of magnitude. We hypothesized that these variations were caused by differential responses of soil microbial populations to the high levels of pollutant used in the studies, and tested responses to benzene by plants and soils separately. Five houseplant species and tobacco were exposed to benzene under hydroponic conditions and the uptake rates compared. Among the test plants, Syngonium podophyllum and Chlorophytum comosum and Epipremnum aureum had the highest benzene removal rates. The effects of benzene addition on populations of soil bacteria were determined using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays targeting microbial genes involved in benzene degradation. The total bacterial population increased as shown by increases in the levels of eubacteria 16S rRNA, which was significantly higher in the high benzene incubations than in the low benzene incubations. Transcripts (mRNA) of genes encoding phenol monooxygenases, catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and the housekeeping gene rpoB increased in all soils incubated with high benzene concentrations. Therefore the enrichment of soils with benzene gas levels typical of experiments with houseplants in the literature artificially increased the levels of total soil bacterial populations, and especially the levels and activities of benzene-degrading bacteria.

  16. The immunotoxicological pattern of subchronic and chronic benzene exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Karaulov, Alexander V; Mikhaylova, Irina V; Smolyagin, Alexander I; Boev, Viktor M; Kalogeraki, Alexandra; Tsatsakis, Aristides M; Engin, Ayse Basak

    2017-06-05

    Exposure to benzene and its inevitable metabolites can result in deleterious effects on human health, including lymphocytopenia, hematotoxicity and cancer. However, the duration of exposure might alter the effects including immune consequences. The aim of this study was to determine whether benzene could modulate lymphocyte proliferation induced by the T cell mitogen concanavalin A, in rats, at different exposure durations. 386 Wistar rats were assigned into control and treatment groups which were subdivided into groups for 45, 90 and 135days for 0,6mL/kg of drinking water mixed benzene treatment. The percentage of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ spleen lymphocytes was defined using the flow cytometer. Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10 and interferon-gamma, in supernatants of splenocyte cultures stimulated with Concanavalin A, were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. The decrease in the total lymphocyte and T cell counts were associated with increased benzene exposure duration. Th2-type cytokine, IL-4 significantly increased, whereas IL-6, CD4+T cells, CD4+/CD8+ ratio and CD3+ T cells decreased. Despite the positive correlation between benzene toxicity and indicated increased immune responses, 45-day exposure to benzene appeared to be the most sensitive time point for evaluating benzene cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. ITP Filtrate Benzene Removal Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1993-05-21

    Existing ITP filtrate hold tanks may provide sufficient capacity and residence time to strip dissolved benzene from the incoming filtrate using nitrogen sparging in the bottom of the old tanks. This is based on equilibrium supported by late Wash test data using aged washed slurry. Theoretical considerations indicate that benzene stripping will be more difficult from the ITP unwashed high salt filtrates due to reduced mass transfer. Therefore experimental sparging data is needed to quantify the theoretical effects.Foaming limits which dictate allowable sparging rate will also have to be established. Sparging in the hold tanks will require installation of sintered metal spargers, and possibly stirrers and foam monitoring/disengagement equipment. The most critical sparging needs are at the start of the precipitation/concentration cycle, when the filtrate flux rate is the highest,and at the end of wash cycle where Henry`s equilibrium constant falls off,requiring more gas to sparge the dissolved benzene. With adequate recycle (for proper distribution) or sparging in the old tanks, the 30 inch column could be used for the complete ITP process. A courser packing would reduce back pressure while enabling benzene stripping. The Late Wash Tests indicate adequate benzene stripping even at reduced gas flow. This will require experimental verification under ITP conditions. Using the 30 in. column vs 18 in. during the wash cycle will enhance stripping without need for additional sparging provided the minimum flow requirements are met.

  18. Multiresidue method for N-methyl carbamates and metabolite pesticide residues at the parts-per-billion level in selected representative commodities of fruit and vegetable crop groups.

    PubMed

    Podhorniak, Lynda V; Schenck, Frank J; Krynitsky, Alexander; Griffith, Francis

    2004-01-01

    A reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method with both fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection is presented for the determination of 13 parent N-methyl carbamate pesticides and their metabolites, as well as piperonyl butoxide, for a total of 24 compounds in selected fruits and vegetables. The commodities chosen were of special concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) because they had the least amount of monitoring data for dietary exposure estimates used in risk assessment. The method is based on a judicious selection of procedures from U.S. Food and Drug Administration sources such as the Pesticide Analytical Manual (Volume I), and Laboratory Information Bulletins, plus additional material from the chemical literature combined in a manner to recover the N-methyl carbamates and their metabolites at the 1 microg/kg or 1 part-per-billion level. The method uses an acetone extraction, followed by an aminopropyl solid-phase extraction cleanup. Determination of residues is by RP-LC, in which the liquid chromatograph is interfaced with either a fluorescence or a mass spectrometric detector. The method is designed so that a set of 6 samples can be prepared in 1 working day for overnight instrumental analysis. Recovery data are presented from analyses of selected commodities in some of EPA's fruit and vegetable crop groupings. A table listing relative retention times is presented for the N-methyl carbamates and their metabolites.

  19. Network Analysis of Enzyme Activities and Metabolite Levels and Their Relationship to Biomass in a Large Panel of Arabidopsis Accessions[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sulpice, Ronan; Trenkamp, Sandra; Steinfath, Matthias; Usadel, Bjorn; Gibon, Yves; Witucka-Wall, Hanna; Pyl, Eva-Theresa; Tschoep, Hendrik; Steinhauser, Marie Caroline; Guenther, Manuela; Hoehne, Melanie; Rohwer, Johann M.; Altmann, Thomas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Natural genetic diversity provides a powerful resource to investigate how networks respond to multiple simultaneous changes. In this work, we profile maximum catalytic activities of 37 enzymes from central metabolism and generate a matrix to investigate species-wide connectivity between metabolites, enzymes, and biomass. Most enzyme activities change in a highly coordinated manner, especially those in the Calvin-Benson cycle. Metabolites show coordinated changes in defined sectors of metabolism. Little connectivity was observed between maximum enzyme activities and metabolites, even after applying multivariate analysis methods. Measurements of posttranscriptional regulation will be required to relate these two functional levels. Individual enzyme activities correlate only weakly with biomass. However, when they are used to estimate protein abundances, and the latter are summed and expressed as a fraction of total protein, a significant positive correlation to biomass is observed. The correlation is additive to that obtained between starch and biomass. Thus, biomass is predicted by two independent integrative metabolic biomarkers: preferential investment in photosynthetic machinery and optimization of carbon use. PMID:20699391

  20. Identification of genes specifically required for the anaerobic metabolism of benzene in Geobacter metallireducens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh K.; Smith, Jessica A.; Bain, Timothy S.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the biochemical pathways for the anaerobic degradation of many of the hydrocarbon constituents in petroleum reservoirs have been elucidated, the mechanisms for anaerobic activation of benzene, a very stable molecule, are not known. Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter metallireducens can anaerobically oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor and that phenol is an intermediate in benzene oxidation. In an attempt to identify enzymes that might be involved in the conversion of benzene to phenol, whole-genome gene transcript abundance was compared in cells metabolizing benzene and cells metabolizing phenol. Eleven genes had significantly higher transcript abundance in benzene-metabolizing cells. Five of these genes had annotations suggesting that they did not encode proteins that could be involved in benzene metabolism and were not further studied. Strains were constructed in which one of the remaining six genes was deleted. The strain in which the monocistronic gene Gmet 0232 was deleted metabolized phenol, but not benzene. Transcript abundance of the adjacent monocistronic gene, Gmet 0231, predicted to encode a zinc-containing oxidoreductase, was elevated in cells metabolizing benzene, although not at a statistically significant level. However, deleting Gmet 0231 also yielded a strain that could metabolize phenol, but not benzene. Although homologs of Gmet 0231 and Gmet 0232 are found in microorganisms not known to anaerobically metabolize benzene, the adjacent localization of these genes is unique to G. metallireducens. The discovery of genes that are specifically required for the metabolism of benzene, but not phenol in G. metallireducens is an important step in potentially identifying the mechanisms for anaerobic benzene activation. PMID:24904558

  1. Use of allopurinol with low-dose 6-mercaptopurine in inflammatory bowel disease to achieve optimal active metabolite levels: A review of four cases and the literature

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Todd N; Ginsberg, Allen L

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At least one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease do not respond or are intolerant to therapy with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP). A subgroup fails to attain optimal levels of 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN) and instead shunts to 6-methylmercaptopurine nucleotide (6-MMPN). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted, and four patients are described who had been previously unable to achieve optimal 6-TGN metabolite levels until allopurinol was added to their treatment. RESULTS: All four patients achieved optimal 6-TGN levels and undetectable 6-MMPN with a mean 6-MP dose of 0.49 mg/kg. Three achieved steroid-free clinical remission. Two of those three patients had normalization of liver enzymes; one patient had baseline normal liver enzymes despite an initial 6-MMPN level of 27,369 pmol/8×108 red blood cells. Two patients experienced reversible leukopenia. CONCLUSIONS: Combination allopurinol and low-dose 6-MP is an effective means to achieve optimal metabolite levels and steroid-free clinical remission in previously refractory patients. Caution is advised. PMID:18299738

  2. Benzene exposure assessment for use of a mineral spirits-based degreaser.

    PubMed

    Fedoruk, Marion J; Bronstein, Rod; Kerger, Brent D

    2003-10-01

    This study examines benzene emissions from the use of a metal parts washer ("degreaser") supplied with a mineral spirits solvent containing either 9 or 58 ppm benzene. Air samples were obtained during a one-hour session of relatively vigorous parts cleaning activity using a degreaser station equipped with wet brush and sprayer attachments and a compressed air hose. Two methods were utilized to assess airborne benzene levels: U.S. EPA TO-14 (summa stainless steel canister) and NIOSH 1501 (charcoal tube). Overall, both methods provided similar results, excepting detection limit differences. The first simulation was performed with recycled solvent (9 ppm benzene in solvent) showing average one-hour airborne benzene levels < or =33 ppbv in the worker's breathing zone and directly above the parts cleaning tank. Average airborne benzene concentrations 18 inches away from the tank were below 2 ppbv during the 60-minute cleaning protocol. The second simulation with benzene-spiked recycled solvent (58 ppm benzene) showed airborne benzene levels averaging 500 ppbv measured over the 60-minute cleaning period in the worker's breathing zone and directly above the tank, while average concentrations 18 inches from the tank perimeter were 63 ppbv. The data indicate that average and peak exposures to airborne benzene were roughly proportional to the solvent benzene content, although the brief peak exposures exhibited greater variance probably related to aerosol generation associated with the use of the brush and/or spraying attachment. Under this selected upper bound exposure simulation, we found that cleaning parts using a recycled mineral spirits-based solvent in an open warehouse setting did not result in exposures in excess of the current occupational exposure limit of 0.5 ppm averaged over 8 hours for solvent benzene content between 9 and 58 ppm.

  3. Mechanism of action of benzoic acid on Zygosaccharomyces bailii: effects on glycolytic metabolite levels, energy production, and intracellular pH.

    PubMed Central

    Warth, A D

    1991-01-01

    The effects of benzoic acid in the preservative-resistant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii were studied. At concentrations of benzoic acid up to 4 mM, fermentation was stimulated and only low levels of benzoate were accumulated. Near the MIC (10 mM), fermentation was inhibited, ATP levels declined, and benzoate was accumulated to relatively higher levels. Intracellular pH was reduced but not greatly. Changes in the levels of metabolites at different external benzoic acid levels showed that glycolysis was limited at pyruvate kinase and glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase-phosphoglycerate kinase steps. Inhibition of phosphofructokinase and several other glycolytic enzymes was not responsible for the inhibition of fermentation. Instead, the results suggest that the primary action of benzoic acid in Z. bailii is to cause a general energy loss, i.e., ATP depletion. PMID:1785916

  4. Contribution of tobacco smoke to environmental benzene exposure in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.; Ruppert, T.; Daube, H.

    1995-12-31

    The concentrations of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) constituents including benzene were measured in the living rooms of 10 nonsmoking households and 20 households with at least one smoker situated in the city and suburbs of Munich. In the city, the median benzene levels during the evening, when all household members were at home, were 8.1 and 10.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in nonsmoking and smoking homes, respectively. The corresponding levels of 3.5 and 4.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3} were considerably lower in the suburbs. Median time-integrated 1-week benzene concentrations in the city were 10.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in nonsmoking homes and 13.1 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in smoking homes. In the suburbs, the corresponding values were 3.2 and 5.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. No difference was found between smoking and nonsmoking households located either in the city or in the suburbs. There was no statistically significant difference between benzene exposure of non-smokers in smoking and nonsmoking homes. Nonsmokers living in nonsmoking households in the city had significantly higher exposure to benzene compared to their counterparts living in the suburban. Nonsmokers from all households with smokers were significantly more exposed to benzene than nonsmokers living in the nonsmoking households (personal samplers: 13.2 vs. 7.0 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, p < 0.05; benzene in exhalate: 2.6 vs. 1.8 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, p < 0.01; trans-muconic acid excretion in urine: 73 vs. 62 {mu}g/g creatinine), but the contribution of ETS to the total benzene exposure was relatively low compared to that from other sources. Analysis of variance showed that at most 15% of the benzene exposure of nonsmokers living in smoking homes was attributable to ETS. For nonsmokers living in nonsmoking households benzene exposure from ETS was insignificant.

  5. DNA Extraction Protocol for Plants with High Levels of Secondary Metabolites and Polysaccharides without Using Liquid Nitrogen and Phenol.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sunil Kumar; Thangaraj, Muthusamy; Kathiresan, Kandasamy

    2012-01-01

    Mangroves and salt marsh species are known to synthesize a wide spectrum of polysaccharides and polyphenols including flavonoids and other secondary metabolites which interfere with the extraction of pure genomic DNA. Although a plethora of plant DNA isolation protocols exist, extracting DNA from mangroves and salt marsh species is a challenging task. This study describes a rapid and reliable cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) protocol suited specifically for extracting DNA from plants which are rich in polysaccharides and secondary metabolites, and the protocol also excludes the use of expensive liquid nitrogen and toxic phenols. Purity of extracted DNA was excellent as evident by A260/A280 ratio ranging from 1.78 to 1.84 and A260/A230 ratio was >2, which also suggested that the preparations were sufficiently free of proteins and polyphenolics/polysaccharide compounds. DNA concentration ranged from 8.8 to 9.9 μg μL(-1). The extracted DNA was amenable to RAPD, restriction digestion, and PCR amplification of plant barcode genes (matK and rbcl). The optimized method is suitable for both dry and fresh leaves. The success of this method in obtaining high-quality genomic DNA demonstrated the broad applicability of this method.

  6. A simple HPLC method for plasma level monitoring of mitotane and its two main metabolites in adrenocortical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Garg, Madhu B; Sakoff, Jennette A; Ackland, Stephen P

    2011-08-01

    Mitotane (o,p'-DDD or (1,1-dichloro-2-[o-chlorophenyl]-2-[p-chlorophenyl]ethane, DDD) is the drug of choice for non-resectable and metastatic adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC). Measurement of mitotane and metabolites, o,p'-DDE (1,1-dichloro-2-[p-chlorophenyl]-2-[o-chlorophenyl]ethene, DDE) and o,p'-DDA (1,1-[o,p'-dichlorodiphenyl] acetic acid, DDA) provides a better understanding of mitotane pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We have developed a simple, robust and efficient high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method to measure mitotane and its two main metabolites, DDE and DDA. The method involves a single ethanol extraction of mitotane, DDE, DDA, and an internal standard (int std) p,p'-DDD (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane) with an extraction efficiency of 77-88%. All compounds are measured simultaneously using a reversed-phase phenyl HPLC column with an isocratic elution of mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.6 ml/min followed by UV detection at λ 226 nm. Inter and intra-day validation demonstrates good reproducibility and accuracy. Limits of quantitation are 0.2 μg/ml for mitotane and DDE, and 0.5 μg/ml for DDA. The method has been evaluated in plasma from 23 patients on mitotane therapy, revealing DDA concentrations 1-18 times higher than the parent compound.

  7. Benzene Uptake and Glutathione S-transferase T1 Status as Determinants of S-Phenylmercapturic Acid in Cigarette Smokers in the Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Haiman, Christopher A.; Patel, Yesha M.; Stram, Daniel O.; Carmella, Steven G.; Chen, Menglan; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loic; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Research from the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) demonstrated that, for the same quantity of cigarette smoking, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher lung cancer risk than Whites, while Latinos and Japanese Americans are less susceptible. We collected urine samples from 2,239 cigarette smokers from five different ethnic groups in the MEC and analyzed each sample for S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), a specific biomarker of benzene uptake. African Americans had significantly higher (geometric mean [SE] 3.69 [0.2], p<0.005) SPMA/ml urine than Whites (2.67 [0.13]) while Japanese Americans had significantly lower levels than Whites (1.65 [0.07], p<0.005). SPMA levels in Native Hawaiians and Latinos were not significantly different from those of Whites. We also conducted a genome-wide association study in search of genetic risk factors related to benzene exposure. The glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) deletion explained between 14.2–31.6% (p = 5.4x10-157) and the GSTM1 deletion explained between 0.2%-2.4% of the variance (p = 1.1x10-9) of SPMA levels in these populations. Ethnic differences in levels of SPMA remained strong even after controlling for the effects of these two deletions. These results demonstrate the powerful effect of GSTT1 status on SPMA levels in urine and show that uptake of benzene in African American, White, and Japanese American cigarette smokers is consistent with their lung cancer risk in the MEC. While benzene is not generally considered a cause of lung cancer, its metabolite SPMA could be a biomarker for other volatile lung carcinogens in cigarette smoke. PMID:26959369

  8. A comparative study on diurnal changes in metabolite levels in the leaves of three crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species, Ananas comosus, Kalanchoë daigremontiana and K. pinnata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Song; Lin, Qin; Nose, Akihiro

    2002-02-01

    A comparative study on diurnal changes in metabolite levels associated with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in the leaves of three CAM species, Ananas comosus (pineapple), a hexose-utilizing species, and Kalanchoë daigremontiana and K. pinnata, two starch-utilizing species, were made. All three CAM species showed a typical feature of CAM with nocturnal malate increase. In the two Kalanchoë species, isocitrate levels were higher than citrate levels; the reverse was the case in pineapple. In the two Kalanchoë species, a small nocturnal citrate increase was found and K. daigremontiana showed a small nocturnal isocitrate increase. Glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P), fructose 6-phosphate (F-6-P) and glucose 1-phosphate (G-1-P) levels in the three CAM species rose rapidly during the first part of the dark period and decreased during the latter part of the dark period. The levels of the metabolites also decreased during the first 3 h of the light period, then, remained little changed through the rest of the light period. Absolute levels of G-6-P, F-6-P and G-1-P were higher in pineapple than in the two Kalanchoë species. Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P(2)) levels in the three CAM species increased during the dark period, then dramatically decreased during the first 3 h of the light period and remained unchanged through the rest of the light period. The extent of nocturnal F-1,6-P(2) increase was far greater in the two Kalanchoë species than in pineapple. Absolute levels of F-1,6-P(2) were higher in the two Kalanchoë species than in pineapple, especially during dark period. Diurnal changes in oxaloacetate (OAA), pyruvate (Pyr) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) levels in the three CAM species were similar.

  9. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide—glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01–10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  10. Investigation of abiogenic stress-induced alterations in the level of secondary metabolites in poppy plants (Papaver somniferum L.).

    PubMed

    Szabó, Beáta; Lakatos, A; Koszegi, T; Botz, L

    2008-12-01

    We aimed to understand the effects of water stress on the alkaloid production in various developmental stages of poppy plants and the effect of stress on the alkaloids content in the capsules. Three stages of the life cycle of Papaver somniferum L. were selected in our studies: Rosette, Flowering and Lancing developmental stages. Four types of water conditions were examined: Control, Withdrawal of Water, 50% Water Supply and Inundation. The morphological monitoring, results of Relative Water Content and proline content were used as indicators of stress. The result of the measurements in poppy leaves show that the secondary metabolites dramatically respond to these stress conditions. The constant water supply was beneficial for the accumulation of alkaloids in the capsules.

  11. Alterations in leukocyte telomere length in workers occupationally exposed to benzene.

    PubMed

    Bassig, Bryan A; Zhang, Luoping; Cawthon, Richard M; Smith, Martyn T; Yin, Songnian; Li, Guilan; Hu, Wei; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen; Barone-Adesi, Francesco; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Lan, Qing

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to benzene, a known leukemogen and probable lymphomagen, has been demonstrated to result in oxidative stress, which has previously been associated with altered telomere length (TL). TL specifically has been associated with several health outcomes in epidemiologic studies, including cancer risk, and has been demonstrated to be altered following exposure to a variety of chemical agents. To evaluate the association between benzene exposure and TL, we measured TL by monochrome multiplex quantitative PCR in 43 workers exposed to high levels of benzene and 43 age and sex-matched unexposed workers in Shanghai, China. Benzene exposure levels were monitored using organic vapor passive dosimetry badges before phlebotomy. The median benzene exposure level in exposed workers was 31 ppm. The mean TL in controls, workers exposed to levels of benzene below the median (≤31 ppm), and above the median (>31 ppm) was 1.26 ± 0.17, 1.25 ± 0.16, and 1.37 ± 0.23, respectively. Mean TL was significantly elevated in workers exposed to >31 ppm of benzene compared with controls (P = 0.03). Our findings provide evidence that high levels of occupational benzene exposure are associated with TL. Environ.

  12. Benzene exposure in industries using or manufacturing paint in China--a literature review, 1956-2005.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Liang, Youxin; Bowes, Stephen; Xu, Hongzhi; Zhou, Yimei; Armstrong, Thomas W; Wong, Otto; Schnatter, A R; Fang, Jinbin; Wang, Laiming; Nie, Liping; Fu, Hua; Irons, Richard

    2009-11-01

    A systematic review of the Chinese literature was conducted from 1956 to 2005. The survey included both online and manual searching, as well as expert discussions aimed at providing insight into factors affecting benzene exposure levels in paint/coatings industries. Data extracted from 204 papers included: (1) year of occurrence, (2) type of paint/coatings products, (3) type of industries where the products were used or produced, (4) job titles and work activities, (5) type of literature searched, (6) working conditions whenever data were available, and (7) exposure levels. Most benzene measurements were short-term samples for comparison with the Chinese maximum allowable concentration standard. The accuracy and precision of the sampling and analytical methods were not reported. The distribution of benzene concentrations was tested and found to fit neither normal nor lognormal distributions. Analysis of variance (comparison for more than two groups) and t-test (comparison for two groups) were conducted on Blom-transformed benzene concentration data. The overall median benzene exposure levels were 215, 82, 31, and 6 mg/m(3) during the periods 1956-1978, 1979-1989, 1990-2001, and 2002-2005, respectively. Mean benzene exposure was significantly lower for paint manufacturing than paint spraying. No significant difference was found among paint types and benzene exposure for paint application. Benzene exposure was significantly higher in workplaces judged to have poor ventilation. No significant differences were found in benzene exposure as a function of industry type. Even though substantially lower when compared with levels in the past, recent benzene exposure measurements suggested that many facilities in the paint/coatings industries in China still have benzene concentrations that are above the current China occupational exposure limit for benzene (6 mg/m(3) as a time-weighted average). Benzene concentrations from the present exercise, while not directly supporting

  13. Effects of exposure to amphetamine derivatives on passive avoidance performance and the central levels of monoamines and their metabolites in mice: correlations between behavior and neurochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Murnane, Kevin Sean; Perrine, Shane Alan; Finton, Brendan James; Galloway, Matthew Peter; Howell, Leonard Lee; Fantegrossi, William Edward

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Considerable evidence indicates that amphetamine derivatives can deplete brain monoaminergic neurotransmitters. However, the behavioral and cognitive consequences of neurochemical depletions induced by amphetamines are not well established. Objectives In this study, mice were exposed to dosing regimens of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methamphetamine (METH), or para-chloroamphetamine (PCA) known to deplete the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin, and the effects of these dosing regimens on learning and memory were assessed. Methods In the same animals, we determined deficits in learning and memory via passive avoidance (PA) behavior and changes in tissue content of monoamine neurotransmitters and their primary metabolites in the striatum, frontal cortex, cingulate, hippocampus, and amygdala via ex vivo high pressure liquid chromatography. Results Consistent with previous studies, significant reductions in tissue content of dopamine and serotonin were readily apparent. In addition, exposure to METH and PCA impaired PA performance and resulted in significant depletions of dopamine, serotonin, and their metabolites in several brain regions. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the tissue concentration of dopamine in the anterior striatum was the strongest predictor of PA performance, with an additional significant contribution by the tissue concentration of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the cingulate. In contrast to the effects of METH and PCA, exposure to MDMA did not deplete anterior striatal dopamine levels or cingulate levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and it did not impair PA performance. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that certain amphetamines impair PA performance in mice and that these impairments may be attributable to specific neurochemical depletions. PMID:21993877

  14. Brassica napus L. cultivars show a broad variability in their morphology, physiology and metabolite levels in response to sulfur limitations and to pathogen attack

    PubMed Central

    Weese, Annekathrin; Pallmann, Philip; Papenbrock, Jutta; Riemenschneider, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Under adequate sulfur supply, plants accumulate sulfate in the vacuoles and use sulfur-containing metabolites as storage compounds. Under sulfur-limiting conditions, these pools of stored sulfur-compounds are depleted in order to balance the nitrogen to sulfur ratio for protein synthesis. Stress conditions like sulfur limitation and/or pathogen attack induce changes in the sulfate pool and the levels of sulfur-containing metabolites, which often depend on the ecotypes or cultivars. We are interested in investigating the influence of the genetic background of canola (Brassica napus) cultivars in sulfur-limiting conditions on the resistance against Verticillium longisporum. Therefore, four commercially available B. napus cultivars were analyzed. These high-performing cultivars differ in some characteristics described in their cultivar pass, such as several agronomic traits, differences in the size of the root system, and resistance to certain pathogens, such as Phoma and Verticillium. The objectives of the study were to examine and explore the patterns of morphological, physiological and metabolic diversity in these B. napus cultivars at different sulfur concentrations and in the context of plant defense. Results indicate that the root systems are influenced differently by sulfur deficiency in the cultivars. Total root dry mass and length of root hairs differ not only among the cultivars but also vary in their reaction to sulfur limitation and pathogen attack. As a sensitive indicator of stress, several parameters of photosynthetic activity determined by PAM imaging showed a broad variability among the treatments. These results were supported by thermographic analysis. Levels of sulfur-containing metabolites also showed large variations. The data were interrelated to predict the specific behavior during sulfur limitation and/or pathogen attack. Advice for farming are discussed. PMID:25699060

  15. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  16. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  17. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  18. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  19. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  20. Vitamin C-lipid metabolites: uptake and retention and effect on plasma C-reactive protein and oxidized LDL levels in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pancorbo, Dario; Vazquez, Carlos; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2008-11-01

    Previously, a novel formulation of vitamin C-lipid metabolites (PureWay-C) was shown to be more rapidly taken-up by human T-lymphocytes and more rapidly stimulate neurite outgrowth, fibroblast adhesion and inhibition of xenobiotic-induced T-cell hyperactivation. Here, PureWay-C serum levels were measured in healthy volunteers after oral supplementation. Plasma C-reactive protein and oxidized low density lipoprotein levels (LDL) were also measured. Healthy volunteers maintained a low vitamin C diet for 14 days and, following an overnight fast, received a single oral dose of (vitamin C) 1000 mg of either ascorbic acid (AA), calcium ascorbate (CaA), vitamin C-lipid metabolites (PureWay-C), or calcium ascorbate-calcium threonate-dehydroascorbate (Ester-C). Blood samples were collected immediately prior to the oral dose administration and at various times post ingestion. Twenty-four-hour urine collections were saved for oxalate and uric acid assays. PureWay-C supplementation leads to the highest absolute serum vitamin C levels when compared to AA, CaA and Ester-C. PureWay-C provides a statistically significant greater serum level than calcium ascorbate at 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours post oral supplementation whereas Ester-C shows a less but slightly statistically significant increase at only 1 and 4 hours. Oral supplementation with PureWay-C also led to a greater reduction in plasma C-reactive protein and oxidized LDL levels compared to the other vitamin C formulations. PureWay-C is more rapidly absorbed and leads to higher serum vitamin C levels and greater reduction of plasma levels of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers than other forms of vitamin C, including Ester-C.

  1. Genotype-phenotype modeling considering intermediate level of biological variation: a case study involving sensory traits, metabolites and QTLs in ripe tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huange; Paulo, Joao; Kruijer, Willem; Boer, Martin; Jansen, Hans; Tikunov, Yury; Usadel, Björn; van Heusden, Sjaak; Bovy, Arnaud; van Eeuwijk, Fred

    2015-11-01

    Modeling genotype-phenotype relationships is a central objective in plant genetics and breeding. Commonly, variations in phenotypic traits are modeled directly in relation to variations at the DNA level, regardless of intermediate levels of biological variation. Here we present an integrative method for the simultaneous modeling of a set of multilevel phenotypic responses to variations at the DNA level. More specifically, for ripe tomato fruits, we use Gaussian graphical models and causal inference techniques to learn the dependencies of 24 sensory traits on 29 metabolites and the dependencies of those sensory and metabolic traits on 21 QTLs. The inferred dependency network which, though not essentially representing biological pathways, suggests how the effects of allele substitutions propagate through multilevel phenotypes. Such simultaneous study of the underlying genetic architecture and multifactorial interactions is expected to enhance the prediction and manipulation of complex traits.

  2. Extracellular dopamine and its metabolites in the nucleus accumbens of Fisher and Lewis rats: Basal levels and cocaine-induced changes

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, R.E.; Eberle, W.F.; Ashby, C.R. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Rats of the Lewis (LEW) strain show a greater preference for drugs of abuse than do Fisher 344 (F344) rats. The in vivo microdialysis procedure was used to examine basal and cocaine-evoked extracellular (EC) levels of dopamine (DA), DOPAC, and HVA in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of F344 and LEW rats. The basal EC levels of the DA metabolites DOPAC and HVA in the NAc were markedly lower in LEW than in F344 rats. Although the increase in ECDA after 3, 10 or 30 mg/kg, i/p. of cocaine was similar in both strains, LEW rats had a smaller peak DA elevation followed by a slower return to basal DA levels at the 30 mg/kg dose. The neurochemical differences observed may contribute to the strain differences in the behavioral response to cocaine. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Geographical distribution of benzene in air in northwestern Italy and personal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gilli, G.; Scursatone, E.; Bono, R.

    1996-12-01

    Benzene is a solvent strictly related to some industrial activities and to automotive emissions. After the reduction in lead content of fuel gasoline, and the consequent decrease in octane number, an increase in benzene and other aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline occurred. Therefore, an increase in the concentration of these chemicals in the air as primary pollutants and as precursors of photochemical smog could occur in the future. The objectives of this study were to describe the benzene air pollution at three sites in northwestern Italy throughout 1991 and 1994; to examine the relationship between benzene air pollution in indoor, outdoor, and personal air as measured by a group of nonsmoking university students; and to determine the influence of environmental tobacco smoke on the level of benzene exposure in indoor air environments. The results indicate a direct relationship between population density and levels of contamination; an indoor/outdoor ratio of benzene air pollution higher than 1 during day and night; a similar level of personal and indoor air contamination; and a direct relationship between levels of personal exposure to benzene and intensity of exposure to tobacco smoke. Human exposure to airborne benzene has been found to depend principally on indoor air contamination not only in the home but also in many other confined environments. 29 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Iron regulation through the back door: iron-dependent metabolite levels contribute to transcriptional adaptation to iron deprivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ihrig, Jessica; Hausmann, Anja; Hain, Anika; Richter, Nadine; Hamza, Iqbal; Lill, Roland; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2010-03-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) responds to iron deprivation both by Aft1-Aft2-dependent transcriptional activation of genes involved in cellular iron uptake and by Cth1-Cth2-specific degradation of certain mRNAs coding for iron-dependent biosynthetic components. Here, we provide evidence for a novel principle of iron-responsive gene expression. This regulatory mechanism is based on the modulation of transcription through the iron-dependent variation of levels of regulatory metabolites. As an example, the LEU1 gene of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis is downregulated under iron-limiting conditions through depletion of the metabolic intermediate alpha-isopropylmalate, which functions as a key transcriptional coactivator of the Leu3 transcription factor. Synthesis of alpha-isopropylmalate involves the iron-sulfur protein Ilv3, which is inactivated under iron deficiency. As another example, decreased mRNA levels of the cytochrome c-encoding CYC1 gene under iron-limiting conditions involve heme-dependent transcriptional regulation via the Hap1 transcription factor. Synthesis of the iron-containing heme is directly correlated with iron availability. Thus, the iron-responsive expression of genes that are downregulated under iron-limiting conditions is conferred by two independent regulatory mechanisms: transcriptional regulation through iron-responsive metabolites and posttranscriptional mRNA degradation. Only the combination of the two processes provides a quantitative description of the response to iron deprivation in yeast.

  5. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  6. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  7. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  8. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  9. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  10. The effect of two different routes of administration of oxytocin on peripheral plasma prostaglandin F(2α) metabolite levels in early post-partum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bajcsy, A C S; Kindahl, H; Szenci, O; van der Weijden, G C; Bartyik, J; Taverne, M A M

    2012-04-01

    Various parenteral treatment forms of oxytocin, as often used under praxis circumstances, may act differently on contractility of the uterus during the first days of the puerperium. Various patterns of such induced uterotonic responses may lead to alterations in the emptying characteristics of the uterine lumen, thus influencing, as a late consequence, the process of involution. Therefore, this study was designed to test whether two different parenteral administration forms of oxytocin induce changes in peripheral plasma concentrations of 15-ketodihydro-prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α) metabolite) in early post-partum cows. Between 13 and 15 h after uncomplicated calving, healthy dairy cows without retained foetal membranes were treated with 50 IU oxytocin, either intramuscularly (OT-IM group; n = 15) or intravenously (OT-IV group; n = 16). Saline solution was administered intramuscularly as controls (CON group; n = 15). Jugular blood samples were taken at 10-min intervals from 1 h before to 2 h after treatment. Plasma PGF(2α) metabolite levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. No significant differences in peripheral plasma PGF(2α) metabolite concentrations occurred in the OT-IM and CON groups, but mean values significantly increased in the OT-IV group, peaking at 20 min after treatment and reaching pre-treatment baseline values again at 120 min. Although the source of prostaglandins was not investigated in this study, our results suggest that exogenous oxytocin may enhance secretion of prostaglandins by the uterus during the first day after normal calving. These prostaglandins might contribute, by an endocrine or paracrine route, to the stimulation of myometrial contractility when exogenous oxytocin is given during this early post-partum stage. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Reductive dehalogenation of dichlorobenzenes and monochlorobenzene to benzene in microcosms.

    PubMed

    Fung, Jennifer M; Weisenstein, Brian P; Mack, E Erin; Vidumsky, John E; Ei, Tom A; Zinder, Stephen H

    2009-04-01

    Anaerobic microcosms were constructed using sediments from a historically chlorobenzene-contaminated site and were provided with yeast extract as an electron donor. In these methanogenic microcosms, all three isomers of dichlorobenzene (DCB) were reductively dehalogenated to monochlorobenzene (MCB) when added together or individually, with 1,2-DCB dehalogenation being the most rapid and 1,4-DCB the slowest. When nearly all of the DCBs were consumed, benzene was detected and its accumulation was concomitant with MCB disappearance. Small amounts of toluene were also detected along with benzene. Subsequent MCB doses were also converted to benzene, and benzene reached levels in excess of 5000 micromol/L in some microcosms. An initial DCB dose stimulated, and in some cases was necessary for, MCB dehalogenation. Subsequent doses of DCB or MCB were dehalogenated more rapidly than previous ones, consistent with a growth-related process. Addition of a ca. 4% inoculum from microcosms that had consumed DCBs or MCB stimulated DCB and MCB dehalogenation in fresh microcosms, also indicative of growth and suggests thatthe chlorobenzene-dehalogenating microorganisms in these microcosms are candidates for bioaugmentation at anaerobic DCB or MCB contaminated sites. These studies add to evidence that benzene production from chlorobenzenes needs to be considered when modeling processes at contaminated sites.

  12. Ab initio investigation of benzene clusters: Molecular tailoring approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevi, A. Subha; Rahalkar, Anuja P.; Gadre, Shridhar R.; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2010-10-01

    An exhaustive study on the clusters of benzene (Bz)n, n =2-8, at MP2/6-31++G∗∗ level of theory is reported. The relative strengths of CH-π and π-π interactions in these aggregates are examined, which eventually govern the pattern of cluster formation. A linear scaling method, viz., molecular tailoring approach (MTA), is efficiently employed for studying the energetics and growth patterns of benzene clusters consisting up to eight benzene (Bz) units. Accuracy of MTA-based calculations is appraised by performing the corresponding standard calculations wherever possible, i.e., up to tetramers. For benzene tetramers, the error introduced in energy is of the order of 0.1 mH (˜0.06 kcal/mol). Although for higher clusters the error may build up, further corrections based on many-body interaction energy analysis substantially reduce the error in the MTA-estimate. This is demonstrated for a prototypical case of benzene hexamer. A systematic way of building up a cluster of n monomers (n-mer) which employs molecular electrostatic potential of an (n -1)-mer is illustrated. The trends obtained using MTA method are essentially identical to those of the standard methods in terms of structure and energy. In summary, this study clearly brings out the possibility of effecting such large calculations, which are not possible conventionally, by the use of MTA without a significant loss of accuracy.

  13. MiR-34a, a promising novel biomarker for benzene toxicity, is involved in cell apoptosis triggered by 1,4-benzoquinone through targeting Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yujiao; Sun, Pengling; Guo, Xiaoli; Gao, Ai

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to benzene is inevitable, and concerns regarding the adverse health effects of benzene have been raised. Most investigators found that benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity. In this regard, Our study aimed to explore a novel potential biomarker of adverse health effects following benzene exposure and the toxic mechanisms of benzene metabolites in vitro. This study consisted of 314 benzene-exposed workers and 288 control workers, an air benzene concentration of who were 2.64 ± 1.60 mg/m(3) and 0.05 ± 0.01 mg/m(3), respectively. In this population-based study, miR-34a expression was elevated in benzene-exposed workers. The correlation of miR-34a with the airborne benzene concentration, S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) and trans, trans-muconic acid (t, t-MA), all of which reflect benzene exposure, was found. Correlation analysis indicated that miR-34a was associated with peripheral blood count, alanine transaminase (ALT) and oxidative stress. Furthermore, multivariate analysis demonstrated that miR-34a expression was strongly associated with white blood cell count (structure loadings = 0.952). In population-based study, miR-34a had the largest contribution to altered peripheral blood counts, which reflect benzene-induced hematotoxicity. The role of miR-34a in benzene toxicity was assessed using lentiviral vector transfection. Results revealed that 1,4-benzoquinone induced abnormal cell apoptosis and simultaneously upregulated miR-34a accompanied with decreased Bcl-2. Finally, inhibition of miR-34a elevated Bcl-2 and decreased 1,4-benzoquinone-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, miR-34a was observed to be involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity by targeting Bcl-2 and could be regarded as a potential novel biomarker for benzene toxicity.

  14. Biomass fuels and coke plants are important sources of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, benzene and toluene.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruifang; Li, Junnan; Chen, Laiguo; Xu, Zhencheng; He, Dechun; Zhou, Yuanxiu; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Wei, Fusheng; Li, Jihua

    2014-11-01

    Large amounts of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene and toluene (BT) might be emitted from incomplete combustion reactions in both coal tar factories and biomass fuels in rural China. The health effects arising from exposure to PAHs and BT are a concern for residents of rural areas close to coal tar plants. To assess the environmental risk and major exposure sources, 100 coke plant workers and 25 farmers in Qujing, China were recruited. The levels of 10 mono-hydroxylated PAHs (OH-PAHs), four BT metabolites and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the urine collected from the subjects were measured. The 8-OHdG levels in the urine were determined to evaluate the oxidative DNA damage induced by the PAHs and BT. The results showed that the levels of the OH-PAHs, particularly those of 1-hydroxynathalene and 1-hydroxypyrene, in the farmers were 1-7 times higher than those in the workers. The concentrations of the BT metabolites were comparable between the workers and farmers. Although the exact work location within a coke oven plant might affect the levels of the OH-PAHs, one-way ANOVA revealed no significant differences for either the OH-PAHs levels or the BT concentrations among the three groups working at different work sites. The geometric mean concentration (9.17 µg/g creatinine) of 8-OHdG was significantly higher in the farmers than in the plant workers (6.27 µg/g creatinine). The levels of 8-OHdG did not correlate with the total concentrations of OH-PAHs and the total levels of BT metabolites. Incompletely combusted biomass fuels might be the major exposure source, contributing more PAHs and BT to the local residents of Qujing. The estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of naphthalene and fluorene for all of the workers and most of the farmers were below the reference doses (RfDs) recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), except for the pyrene levels in two farmers. However, the EDIs of benzene in the workers and local

  15. Effect of finasteride on serum levels of androstenedione, testosterone and their 5α-reduced metabolites in men at risk for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Frank Z; Azen, Colleen G; Pike, Malcolm C

    2013-11-01

    Studies show that treatment of men with 5α-reductase inhibitors such as finasteride is effective for the primary prevention of prostate cancer. Although it is known that finasteride treatment suppresses serum levels of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and its distal metabolite, 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol glucuronide (3α-diol G), and increases serum testosterone (T) levels, little is known about its effect on other precursors and metabolites of DHT, as well as on the relationship of these androgens to prostate specific antigen (PSA), a marker of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. The present study provides new data on the effect of finasteride on precursors and metabolites of DHT. Fifty-three men, ages 57-79 years, with elevated PSA levels (>4ng/ml), were randomized to treatment with finasteride (5mg/day) or observation (controls) for 12 months. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months for measurement of PSA, androstenedione (A), T, DHT, 3α-diol G, androsterone glucuronide (ADT G) and DHT sulfate (DHT S) in serum by validated, highly specific radioimmunoassays. Statistical analysis was carried out using mixed model ANOVA and t-tests. In the control group, PSA and androgen levels were unchanged throughout the 12 months of treatment. In the finasteride group, PSA, DHT, DHT S, 3α-diol G and ADT G decreased from baseline to 1 month by 23.2%, 78.7%, 71.0%, 75.7% and 43.0%, respectively. The change in PSA decreased further to 46.1% and 55.1% at 3 and 12 months of treatment, respectively, whereas the decrease in androgens observed at 1 month did not change by more than 6.9% for DHT, DHT S and 3α-diol G in the subsequent months of sampling. However, the decline in ADT G was only 22.2% at month 3, and remained essentially at this level after that time. In contrast, T and A increased significantly from baseline, and the increase in A of approximately 34.5% was about 1.9 times the increase in T (approximately 18.3%). The present data suggest that either

  16. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. This paper describes a long-term (26 week) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to 1) the length of exposure, and it describes three 8-week experiments relating concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to 2) their concentration in soil 3) the soil organic matter content and, 4) the degree of chlorination. In the 26-week experiment, the concentration of 1,2,4 - trichlorobenzene in earthworms fluctuated only slightly about a mean of 0.63 ppm (Fig. 1). Although a statistically significant decrease can be demonstrated over the test (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = -0.62 p < 0.05), the decrease was minor. Hexachlorobenzene in earthworms showed a cyclical trend that coincided with replacement of the media, and a slight but statistically significant tendency to increase from about 2 to 3 ppm over the 26 weeks (r = 0.55, p < 0.05). Concentrations of both trichlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene in earthworms increased as the concentrations in the soil increased (Fig. 2), but leveled off at the highest soil concentrations. The most surprising result of this study was the relatively low concentrations in earthworms compared to those in soils. The average concentration of each of the six isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene in earthworms was only about 1 ppm (Table 2); the isomeric structure did not affect accumulation. The concentration of organic matter in soil had a prominent effect on hexachlorobenzene concentrations in earthworms (Fig. 3). Hexachlorobenzene concentrations decreased steadily from 9.3 ppm in earthworms kept in soil without any peat moss added to about 1 ppm in soil containing 16 or 32% organic matter.

  17. The resonance energy of benzene: a revisit.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yirong

    2009-04-30

    Zielinski and van Lenthe recently extended the block-localized wave function (BLW) method by introducing the resonating BLW (RBLW) method and performed test calculations on hexagonal H(6) and benzene [J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 13197]. However, the Pauling's resonance energies from their RBLW and ab initio valence bond (VB) calculations were greatly underestimated largely due to the imperfect use of either one-electron orbitals (method = delocal) or resonance structures (method = local). Whereas it has been well recognized that electronic resonance within a molecular system plays a stabilizing role, there are many indirect experimental evidences available to evaluate the resonance energy and, thus, to justify computational results. Here we used the BLW method, which can be regarded as the simplest variant of modern ab initio VB theory, to re-evaluate the resonance energy of benzene at the B3LYP level, following the original definition by Pauling and Wheland, who obtained the resonance energy "by subtracting the actual energy of the molecule in question from that of the most stable contributing structure". The computed vertical resonance energy (or quantum mechanical resonance energy) in benzene is 88.8, 92.2, or 87.9 kcal/mol with the basis sets of 6-31G(d), 6-311+G(d,p), or cc-pVTZ, respectively, while the adiabatic resonance energy (or theoretical resonance energy) is 61.4, 63.2, or 62.4 kcal/mol, exhibiting insignificant basis set dependency for moderate basis sets. In line with predictions, the geometry optimization of the elusive cyclohexatriene (i.e., the Kekule structure) with the BLW method also resulted in carbon-carbon bond lengths (e.g., 1.322 and 1.523 A with the cc-pVTZ basis set) comparable to those in ethylene or ethane.

  18. Current understanding of the mechanism of benzene-induced leukemia in humans: implications for risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.

    2012-01-01

    Benzene causes acute myeloid leukemia and probably other hematological malignancies. As benzene also causes hematotoxicity even in workers exposed to levels below the US permissible occupational exposure limit of 1 part per million, further assessment of the health risks associated with its exposure, particularly at low levels, is needed. Here, we describe the probable mechanism by which benzene induces leukemia involving the targeting of critical genes and pathways through the induction of genetic, chromosomal or epigenetic abnormalities and genomic instability, in a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC); stromal cell dysregulation; apoptosis of HSCs and stromal cells and altered proliferation and differentiation of HSCs. These effects modulated by benzene-induced oxidative stress, aryl hydrocarbon receptor dysregulation and reduced immunosurveillance, lead to the generation of leukemic stem cells and subsequent clonal evolution to leukemia. A mode of action (MOA) approach to the risk assessment of benzene was recently proposed. This approach is limited, however, by the challenges of defining a simple stochastic MOA of benzene-induced leukemogenesis and of identifying relevant and quantifiable parameters associated with potential key events. An alternative risk assessment approach is the application of toxicogenomics and systems biology in human populations, animals and in vitro models of the HSC stem cell niche, exposed to a range of levels of benzene. These approaches will inform our understanding of the mechanisms of benzene toxicity and identify additional biomarkers of exposure, early effect and susceptibility useful for risk assessment. PMID:22166497

  19. Hydrogen bonding in the benzene-ammonia dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodham, David A.; Suzuki, Sakae; Suenram, Richard D.; Lovas, Frank J.; Dasgupta, Siddharth; Goddard, William A., III; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution optical and microwave spectra of the gas-phase benzene-ammonia dimer were obtained, showing that the ammonia molecule resides above the benzene plane and undergoes free, or nearly free, internal rotation. To estimate the binding energy (De) and other global properties of the intermolecular potential, theoretical calculations were performed for the benzene-ammonia dimer, using the Gaussian 92 (Fritsch, 1992) program at the MP2/6-31G** level. The predicted De was found to be at the lowest end of the range commonly accepted for hydrogen bonding and considerably below that of C6H6-H2O, consistent with the gas-phase acidities of ammonia and water. The observed geometry greatly resembles the amino-aromatic interaction found naturally in proteins.

  20. Hydrogen bonding in the benzene-ammonia dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodham, David A.; Suzuki, Sakae; Suenram, Richard D.; Lovas, Frank J.; Dasgupta, Siddharth; Goddard, William A., III; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution optical and microwave spectra of the gas-phase benzene-ammonia dimer were obtained, showing that the ammonia molecule resides above the benzene plane and undergoes free, or nearly free, internal rotation. To estimate the binding energy (De) and other global properties of the intermolecular potential, theoretical calculations were performed for the benzene-ammonia dimer, using the Gaussian 92 (Fritsch, 1992) program at the MP2/6-31G** level. The predicted De was found to be at the lowest end of the range commonly accepted for hydrogen bonding and considerably below that of C6H6-H2O, consistent with the gas-phase acidities of ammonia and water. The observed geometry greatly resembles the amino-aromatic interaction found naturally in proteins.

  1. Changing dietary calcium-phosphorus level and cereal source selectively alters abundance of bacteria and metabolites in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Mann, Evelyne; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Wagner, Martin; Ritzmann, Mathias; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2013-12-01

    Several dietary ingredients may affect the bacterial community structure and metabolism in the porcine gut and may therefore influence animals' health and performance. This study investigated the effects of cereal source and calcium-phosphorus (CaP) level in the diet on bacterial microbiota and metabolites, nutrient intake, and gut environment in weaned pigs. Pigs (n=8/treatment) were fed wheat-barley- or corn-based diets with an adequate or high CaP level for 14 days. Effects on microbiota in the stomach, ileum, and midcolon were assessed using quantitative PCR. Data showed that Enterobacteriaceae, Campylobacter spp., and Helicobacter spp., which all contain highly immune reactive lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were abundant at all gut sites. Diet effects on bacteria and metabolites were moderate and occurred mainly in the upper gut, whereas no effects on bacteria, fermentation products, and LPS could be observed in the colon. Differences in carbohydrate intake with corn versus wheat-barley diets selectively stimulated Bifidobacterium in the stomach and ileum. There was a growth advantage for a few bacterial groups in the stomach and ileum of pigs fed the high versus adequate CaP level (i.e., gastric Enterobacteriaceae and ileal Enterococcus, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas, and Campylobacter). Interestingly, gastrointestinal pH was not affected by dietary CaP level. The present findings demonstrate the stability of the bacterial community and gut environment toward dietary changes even in young pigs. The results on stimulation of gastric and ileal Bifidobacterium by corn diets may be employed in nutritional strategies to support gut health after weaning.

  2. Changing Dietary Calcium-Phosphorus Level and Cereal Source Selectively Alters Abundance of Bacteria and Metabolites in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tracts of Weaned Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Evelyne; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Wagner, Martin; Ritzmann, Mathias; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2013-01-01

    Several dietary ingredients may affect the bacterial community structure and metabolism in the porcine gut and may therefore influence animals' health and performance. This study investigated the effects of cereal source and calcium-phosphorus (CaP) level in the diet on bacterial microbiota and metabolites, nutrient intake, and gut environment in weaned pigs. Pigs (n = 8/treatment) were fed wheat-barley- or corn-based diets with an adequate or high CaP level for 14 days. Effects on microbiota in the stomach, ileum, and midcolon were assessed using quantitative PCR. Data showed that Enterobacteriaceae, Campylobacter spp., and Helicobacter spp., which all contain highly immune reactive lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were abundant at all gut sites. Diet effects on bacteria and metabolites were moderate and occurred mainly in the upper gut, whereas no effects on bacteria, fermentation products, and LPS could be observed in the colon. Differences in carbohydrate intake with corn versus wheat-barley diets selectively stimulated Bifidobacterium in the stomach and ileum. There was a growth advantage for a few bacterial groups in the stomach and ileum of pigs fed the high versus adequate CaP level (i.e., gastric Enterobacteriaceae and ileal Enterococcus, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas, and Campylobacter). Interestingly, gastrointestinal pH was not affected by dietary CaP level. The present findings demonstrate the stability of the bacterial community and gut environment toward dietary changes even in young pigs. The results on stimulation of gastric and ileal Bifidobacterium by corn diets may be employed in nutritional strategies to support gut health after weaning. PMID:24038702

  3. Association Between Variants in Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltranserase (AS3MT) and Urinary Metabolites of Inorganic Arsenic: Role of Exposure Level.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaofan; Drobná, Zuzana; Voruganti, V Saroja; Barron, Keri; González-Horta, Carmen; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; Ballinas-Casarrubias, Lourdes; Cerón, Roberto Hernández; Morales, Damián Viniegra; Terrazas, Francisco A Baeza; Ishida, María C; Gutiérrez-Torres, Daniela S; Saunders, R Jesse; Crandell, Jamie; Fry, Rebecca C; Loomis, Dana; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G; Del Razo, Luz M; Stýblo, Miroslav; Mendez, Michelle A

    2016-09-01

    Variants in AS3MT, the gene encoding arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltranserase, have been shown to influence patterns of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism. Several studies have suggested that capacity to metabolize iAs may vary depending on levels of iAs exposure. However, it is not known whether the influence of variants in AS3MT on iAs metabolism also vary by level of exposure. We investigated, in a population of Mexican adults exposed to drinking water As, whether associations between 7 candidate variants in AS3MT and urinary iAs metabolites were consistent with prior studies, and whether these associations varied depending on the level of exposure. Overall, associations between urinary iAs metabolites and AS3MT variants were consistent with the literature. Referent genotypes, defined as the genotype previously associated with a higher percentage of urinary dimethylated As (DMAs%), were associated with significant increases in the DMAs% and ratio of DMAs to monomethylated As (MAs), and significant reductions in MAs% and iAs%. For 3 variants, associations between genotypes and iAs metabolism were significantly stronger among subjects exposed to water As >50 versus ≤50 ppb (water As X genotype interaction P < .05). In contrast, for 1 variant (rs17881215), associations were significantly stronger at exposures ≤50 ppb. Results suggest that iAs exposure may influence the extent to which several AS3MT variants affect iAs metabolism. The variants most strongly associated with iAs metabolism-and perhaps with susceptibility to iAs-associated disease-may vary in settings with exposure level. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The reduced form of coenzyme Q10 mediates distinct effects on cholesterol metabolism at the transcriptional and metabolite level in SAMP1 mice.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Constance; Okun, Jürgen G; Haas, Dorothea; Higuchi, Keiichi; Sawashita, Jinko; Mori, Masayuki; Döring, Frank

    2010-11-01

    Studies in humans and mice indicate a role for coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) in gene expression. To analyze this function in relation to metabolism, SAMP1 mice were supplemented with the reduced (ubiquinol) or oxidized (ubiquinone) form of CoQ(10) (500 mg/kg BW/d) for 14 months. Microarray analyses in liver tissues of SAMP1 mice identified 946 genes as differentially expressed between ubiquinol-treated and control animals (≥1.5-fold, P < 0.05). Text mining analyses revealed for a part of the ubiquinol-regulated genes, a functional connection in PPARα and LXR/RXR signalling pathways. Because these pathways are involved in cholesterol homeostasis, relevant metabolites were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). We found a significant increase of desmosterol (2.0-fold, P < 0.001) in the liver of ubiquinol-supplemented SAMP1 mice when related to control animals. In agreement, cholesterol concentrations were also distinctly increased (1.3-fold, P = 0.057). The Q(10)H(2)-induced PPARα and LXR/RXR gene expression signatures and effects on cholesterol metabolism were not apparent for the oxidized form of CoQ(10). In conclusion, the reduced form of CoQ(10) mediates distinct effects on cholesterol metabolism at the transcriptional and metabolite level in SAMP1 mice.

  5. Atmospheric benzene observations from oil and gas production in the Denver-Julesburg Basin in July and August 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, Hannah S.; Thompson, Anne M.; Wisthaler, Armin; Blake, Donald R.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Apel, Eric C.; Hills, Alan J.

    2016-09-01

    High time resolution measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected using a proton-transfer-reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry (PTR-QMS) instrument at the Platteville Atmospheric Observatory (PAO) in Colorado to investigate how oil and natural gas (O&NG) development impacts air quality within the Wattenburg Gas Field (WGF) in the Denver-Julesburg Basin. The measurements were carried out in July and August 2014 as part of NASA's "Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality" (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign. The PTR-QMS data were supported by pressurized whole air canister samples and airborne vertical and horizontal surveys of VOCs. Unexpectedly high benzene mixing ratios were observed at PAO at ground level (mean benzene = 0.53 ppbv, maximum benzene = 29.3 ppbv), primarily at night (mean nighttime benzene = 0.73 ppbv). These high benzene levels were associated with southwesterly winds. The airborne measurements indicate that benzene originated from within the WGF, and typical source signatures detected in the canister samples implicate emissions from O&NG activities rather than urban vehicular emissions as primary benzene source. This conclusion is backed by a regional toluene-to-benzene ratio analysis which associated southerly flow with vehicular emissions from the Denver area. Weak benzene-to-CO correlations confirmed that traffic emissions were not responsible for the observed high benzene levels. Previous measurements at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) and our data obtained at PAO allow us to locate the source of benzene enhancements between the two atmospheric observatories. Fugitive emissions of benzene from O&NG operations in the Platteville area are discussed as the most likely causes of enhanced benzene levels at PAO.

  6. Double photoionization of halogenated benzene

    SciTech Connect

    AlKhaldi, Mashaal Q.; Wehlitz, Ralf

    2016-01-28

    We have experimentally investigated the double-photoionization process in C{sub 6}BrF{sub 5} using monochromatized synchrotron radiation. We compare our results with previously published data for partially deuterated benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}D{sub 3}) over a wide range of photon energies from threshold to 270 eV. A broad resonance in the ratio of doubly to singly charged parent ions at about 65 eV appears shifted in energy compared to benzene data. This shift is due to the difference in the bond lengths in two molecules. A simple model can explain the shape of this resonance. At higher photon energies, we observe another broad resonance that can be explained as a second harmonic of the first resonance.

  7. Functionalization of benzene by superhalogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Ambrish Kumar; Kumar, Abhishek; Misra, Neeraj

    2017-03-01

    We perform ab initio MP2/6-311++G(d,p) calculations to analyze the molecular properties and aromaticity of NO3, BO2 as well as BF4 superhalogen substituted benzene and compare them with well known electron withdrawing group substituted benzene such as C6H5F and C6H5CN in neutral and ionic forms. It has been noticed that the properties (including aromaticity) of C6H5BO2 closely resemble those of C6H5F and C6H5CN. On the contrary, C6H5NO3 possesses some quite different properties such as high electron affinity, small frontier orbital energy gap and enhanced aromaticity. It is also revealed that C6H5BF4 exists only in the form of C6H5F⋯BF3 complex.

  8. Induction of micronuclei and aneuploidy by the quinone-forming agents benzene and o-phenylphenol.

    PubMed

    Eastmond, D A

    1993-04-01

    A number of carcinogens appear to exert their tumorigenic effects through the formation of quinone metabolites. These quinone-forming carcinogens are generally inactive or weakly active in standard gene mutation assays. Accumulating evidence indicates that this class of compounds may exert their genotoxic and carcinogenic effects through the induction of large-scale gene alterations. This article presents an overview of work that has been performed using recently developed molecular cytogenic techniques to investigate the aneuploidy-inducing and clastogenic properties of the major quinone-forming metabolites of benzene, a widely used industrial chemical, and o-phenylphenol, a fungicide and disinfectant. These metabolites of benzene (hydroquinone, catechol, and benzenetriol) and o-phenylphenol (phenylhydroquinone) have each been shown to be capable of interfering with chromosome segregation and inducing chromosomal breakage. These results indicate that both numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations induced by the quinone metabolites of benzene and o-phenylphenol may play a role in the carcinogenic effects of these two agents.

  9. Levels of prostaglandin E metabolite and leukotriene E(4) are increased in the urine of smokers: evidence that celecoxib shunts arachidonic acid into the 5-lipoxygenase pathway.

    PubMed

    Duffield-Lillico, Anna J; Boyle, Jay O; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Ghosh, Aradhana; Butala, Geera S; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Newman, Robert A; Morrow, Jason D; Milne, Ginger L; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2009-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) play a role in inflammation and carcinogenesis. Biomarkers that reflect tobacco smoke-induced tissue injury are needed. In this study, levels of urinary prostaglandin E metabolite (PGE-M) and leukotriene E(4) (LTE(4)), biomarkers of the COX and 5-LO pathways, were compared in never smokers, former smokers, and current smokers. The effects of celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, on levels of PGE-M and LTE(4) were determined. Baseline levels of PGE-M and LTE(4) were positively associated with smoking status; levels of PGE-M and LTE(4) were higher in current versus never smokers. Treatment with 200 mg celecoxib twice daily for 6 +/- 1 days led to a reduction in urinary PGE-M levels in all groups but exhibited the greatest effect among subjects with high baseline PGE-M levels. Thus, high baseline PGE-M levels in smokers reflected increased COX-2 activity. In individuals with high baseline PGE-M levels, treatment with celecoxib led to a significant increase in levels of urinary LTE(4), an effect that was not found in individuals with low baseline PGE-M levels. In conclusion, increased levels of urinary PGE-M and LTE(4) were found in human smokers, a result that may reflect subclinical lung inflammation. In individuals with high baseline levels of PGE-M (elevated COX-2 activity), celecoxib administration shunted arachidonic acid into the proinflammatory 5-LO pathway. Because 5-LO activity and LTE(4) have been suggested to play a role in cardiovascular disease, these results may help to explain the link between use of COX-2 inhibitors and cardiovascular complications.

  10. Association of blood glucose, blood lactate, serum cortisol levels, muscle metabolites, muscle fiber type composition, and pork quality traits.

    PubMed

    Choe, J H; Kim, B C

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of blood glucose levels with blood lactate, serum cortisol levels, postmortem muscle glycogen and lactate content, muscle fiber type composition, and pork quality traits. Compared to pigs with lower blood glucose levels, pigs with higher blood glucose levels showed higher blood lactate and serum cortisol levels at exsanguination, and they had lower residual glycogen and higher lactate content in the muscle at 45min postmortem. In addition, pigs with higher blood glucose levels had higher type IIB and lower type I area composition and finally exhibited lower muscle pH, paler color, and excessive loss of fluid on surface. These results imply that measuring blood glucose levels at exsanguination can be useful to indicate early glycolytic rates during postmortem and thus may be of value in the identification of pork with undesirable quality traits.

  11. Endogenous Levels of Five Fatty Acid Metabolites in Exhaled Breath Condensate to Monitor Asthma by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography: Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nording, Malin L.; Yang, Jun; Hegedus, Christine M.; Bhushan, Abhinav; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Davis, Cristina E.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Airway inflammation characterizing asthma and other airway diseases may be monitored through biomarker analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC). In an attempt to discover novel EBC biomarkers, a high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) method was used to analyze EBC from ten control non-asthmatics and one asthmatic individual for five fatty acid metabolites: 9,12,13-trihydroxyoctadecenoic acid (9,12,13-TriHOME), 9,10,13-TriHOME, 12,13-dihydroxyoctadecenoic acid (12,13-DiHOME), 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), and 12(13)-epoxyoctadecenoic acid (12(13)-EpOME). The method was shown to be sensitive, with an on-column limit of quatitation (LOQ) in the pg range (corresponding to pM concentrations in EBC), and linear over several orders of magnitude for each analyte in the calibrated range. Analysis of EBC spiked with the five fatty acid metabolites was within 81%–119% with only a few exceptions. Endogenous levels in EBC exhibited intra- and inter-assay precision of 10%–22%, and 12%–36%, respectively. EBC from the healthy subjects contained average analyte levels between 15 and 180 pM with 12-HETE present above the LOQ in only one of the subjects at a concentration of 240 pM. Exposure of the asthmatic subject to allergen led to increased EBC concentrations of 9,12,13-TriHOME, 9,10,13-TriHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, and 12(13)-EpOME when compared to levels in EBC collected prior to allergen exposure (range =40–510 pM). 12,13-DiHOME was significantly increased (Student's t-test, p < 0.05). In conclusion, we have developed a new HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for the analysis of five fatty acid metabolites in EBC, which are potential biomarkers for asthma monitoring and diagnosis. PMID:21103452

  12. Benzene exposure in childhood: Role of living environments and assessment of available tools.

    PubMed

    Protano, Carmela; Guidotti, Maurizio; Manini, Paola; Petyx, Marta; La Torre, Giuseppe; Vitali, Matteo

    2010-10-01

    Benzene is a widespread air pollutant and a well-known human carcinogen. Evidence is needed regarding benzene intake in the pediatric age group. We investigated the use of urinary (u) trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), and unmodified