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Sample records for benzopyrene exposed cells

  1. Benzopyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.R.; Crosby, N.T.

    1987-01-01

    The first in a series on carcinogenesis, this volume presents a survey of the chemistry and cancer-causing properties of the polycyclic hydrocarbons benzo(a) pyrene and benzo(e) pyrene. The book covers the synthesis, physical and chemical properties of benzopyrene, its metabolism, interaction with DNA, and induction of mutation and cancer, and also its environmental occurrence and analysis. There are copious references to the original literature.

  2. DNA methylation analysis using CpG microarrays is impaired in benzopyrene exposed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Andrews, Joseph; Rodenhiser, David I.

    2007-12-15

    Epigenetic alterations have emerged as a key mechanism involved in tumorigenesis. These disruptions are partly due to environmental factors that change normal DNA methylation patterns necessary for transcriptional regulation and chromatin compaction. Microarray technologies are allowing environmentally susceptible epigenetic patterns to be mapped and the precise targets of environmentally induced alterations to be identified. Previously, we observed BaP-induced epigenetic events and cell cycle disruptions in breast cancer cell lines that included time- and concentration-dependent loss of proliferation as well as sequence-specific hypo- and hypermethylation events. In this present report, we further characterized epigenetic changes in BaP-exposed MCF-7 cells. We analyzed DNA methylation on a CpG island microarray platform with over 5400 unique genomic regions. Depleted and enriched microarray targets, representative of putative DNA methylation changes, were identified across the genome; however, subsequent sodium bisulfite analyses revealed no changes in DNA methylation at a number of these loci. Instead, we found that the identification of DNA methylation changes using this restriction enzyme-based microarray approach corresponded with the regions of DNA bound by the BaP derived DNA adducts. This DNA adduct formation occurs at both methylated and unmethylated CpG dinucleotides and affects PCR amplification during sample preparation. Our data suggest that caution should be exercised when interpreting data from comparative microarray experiments that rely on enzymatic reactions. These results are relevant to genome screening approaches involving environmental exposures in which DNA adduct formation at specific nucleotide sites may bias target acquisition and compromise the correct identification of epigenetically responsive genes.

  3. Benzopyrenes

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.R.; Crosby, N.T.

    1987-01-01

    This volume surveys the chemistry and cancer-causing properties of the polycyclic hydrocarbons benzo(a)pyrene and benzo(e)pyrene. Benzo(a)pyrene is a pollutant formed whenever organic matter is burned. It occurs in soot, tar, cigarette smoke and automobile exhaust, and in small amounts in the atmosphere, in water and in soil. It has been shown to produce cancer in small mammals. It has been widely studied both as a measure of industrial pollution and as a model compound in studies of the mechanism of induction of cancer. Information about the compound is scattered through the scientific literature in various journals, conference proceedings and other publications; this book gathers all this information together for reference. It includes chapters on the synthesis, physical and chemical properties of benzopyrene, its metabolism, interaction with DNA and induction of mutation and cancer, and also its environmental occurrence and analysis.

  4. Interactions of chrysotile and benzopyrene in a human cell culture systems.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R E; Joseph, L B; Daniel, F B; Schenck, K M; Newman, H A; Lipetz, P D; Millette, J R

    1983-01-01

    The risk of lung cancer related to asbestos exposure has been shown to increase disproportionately by cigarette smoking, suggesting a synergistic effect. Differing lengths of NIEHS chrysotile with benzopyrene [B(a)P, B(e)P] (organic by-products of combustion) were applied on normal human fibroblasts (cell line CI) to test for cytotoxicity (survival determined by colony-forming efficiency), binding of benzopyrene to DNA, and the production of benzopyrene metabolites. At concentrations of 100 micrograms/mL, NIEHS short chrysotile was more cytotoxic than NIEHS intermediate chrysotile (3% and 17% survival, respectively); B(a)P and B(e)P concentrations up to and including 10 microM were not cytotoxic. Simultaneous application of NIEHS short chrysotile with B(a)P or B(e)P did not decrease survival synergistically. On the contrary, application of B(a)P simultaneously with NIEHS intermediate chrysotile resulted in increased survival over that of intermediate chrysotile alone (25% and 17% survival, respectively). There were low levels of B(a)P bound to DNA in the presence of NIEHS short chrysotile or NIEHS intermediate chrysotile. Measurable levels of B(a)P-DNA adducts were formed both in the absence and in the presence of each size of NIEHS chrysotile. However, there was no strong indication of a perturbation of the level of DNA-B(a)P binding following simultaneous administration of increasing levels of asbestos in addition to 1 microM hydrocarbon. The asbestos had no demonstrable influence on the level of B(a)P metabolism during the 24-hr period following simultaneous exposure of asbestos and hyrdocarbons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6315368

  5. Benzopyrene exposure disrupts DNA methylation and growth dynamics in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Rodenhiser, David I. . E-mail: drodenhi@uwo.ca

    2006-11-01

    Exposures to environmental carcinogens and unhealthy lifestyle choices increase the incidence of breast cancer. One such compound, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), leads to covalent DNA modifications and the deregulation of gene expression. To date, these mechanisms of BaP-induced carcinogenesis are poorly understood, particularly in the case of breast cancer. We tested the effects of BaP exposure on cellular growth dynamics and DNA methylation in four breast cancer cell lines since disruptions in DNA methylation lead to deregulated gene expression and the loss of genomic integrity. We observed robust time- and concentration-dependent loss of proliferation, S phase and G2M accumulation and apoptosis in p53 positive MCF-7 and T47-D cells. We observed minimal responses in p53 negative HCC-1086 and MDA MB 231 cells. Furthermore, BaP increased p53 levels in both p53 positive cell lines, as well as p21 levels in MCF-7 cells, an effect that was prevented by the p53-specific inhibitor pifithrin-{alpha}. No changes in global levels of DNA methylation levels induced by BaP were detected by the methyl acceptor assay (MAA) in any cell line, however, methylation profiling by AIMS (amplification of intermethylated sites) analysis showed dynamic, sequence-specific hypo- and hypermethylation events in all cell lines. We also identified BaP-induced hypomethylation events at a number of genomic repeats. Our data confirm the p53-specific disruption of the cell cycle as well as the disruption of DNA methylation as a consequence of BaP treatment, thus reinforcing the link between environmental exposures, DNA methylation and breast cancer.

  6. Macrophages promote benzopyrene-induced tumor transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells by activation of NF-κB and STAT3 signaling in a bionic airway chip culture and in animal models.

    PubMed

    Li, Encheng; Xu, Zhiyun; Zhao, Hui; Sun, Zhao; Wang, Lei; Guo, Zhe; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Zhancheng; Wang, Qi

    2015-04-20

    We investigated the role of macrophages in promoting benzopyrene (BaP)-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells using a BaP-induced tumor transformation model with a bionic airway chip in vitro and in animal models. The bionic airway chip culture data showed that macrophages promoted BaP-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells, which was mediated by nuclear factor (NF)-κB and STAT3 pathways to induce cell proliferation, colony formation in chip culture, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Blockage of interleukin (IL)-6 or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α signaling or inhibition of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 expression abrogated the effect of macrophages on malignant transformation in the bionic airway chip culture. In vivo, macrophages promoted lung tumorigenesis in a carcinogen-induced animal model. Similarly, blockage of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 using siRNA transfection decreased the carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis in rats. We demonstrated that macrophages are critical in promoting lung tumorigenesis and that the macrophage-initiated TNF-α/NF-κB/cyclinD1 and IL-6/STAT3/cyclinD1 pathways are primarily responsible for promoting lung tumorigenesis.

  7. Macrophages promote benzopyrene-induced tumor transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells by activation of NF-κB and STAT3 signaling in a bionic airway chip culture and in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhao; Wang, Lei; Guo, Zhe; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Zhancheng; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of macrophages in promoting benzopyrene (BaP)-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells using a BaP-induced tumor transformation model with a bionic airway chip in vitro and in animal models. The bionic airway chip culture data showed that macrophages promoted BaP-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells, which was mediated by nuclear factor (NF)-κB and STAT3 pathways to induce cell proliferation, colony formation in chip culture, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Blockage of interleukin (IL)-6 or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α signaling or inhibition of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 expression abrogated the effect of macrophages on malignant transformation in the bionic airway chip culture. In vivo, macrophages promoted lung tumorigenesis in a carcinogen-induced animal model. Similarly, blockage of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 using siRNA transfection decreased the carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis in rats. We demonstrated that macrophages are critical in promoting lung tumorigenesis and that the macrophage-initiated TNF-α/NF-κB/cyclinD1 and IL-6/STAT3/cyclinD1 pathways are primarily responsible for promoting lung tumorigenesis. PMID:25823926

  8. Selective immunosuppression resulting from exposure to the carcinogenic congener of benzopyrene in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, J H; Luster, M I; Boorman, G A; Lauer, L D; Leubke, R W; Lawson, L

    1983-01-01

    B6C3F1 mice were exposed to two congeners of benzopyrene, either the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) or the non-carcinogen benzo(e)pyrene (B(e)P. Exposure of mice to B(a)P resulted in a reduced number of IgM and IgG antibody plaque forming cells (PFC) to the T-dependent (TD) antigen SRBC and IgM PFC's to the T-independent (TI) antigen LPS. The IgM response to hapten conjugated TI antigens was examined using TNP-LPS for reactivity of less mature B cells (B1) and TNP-Ficoll for more mature B cells (B2). Exposure to B(a)P severely depressed the TNP-Ficoll PFC response by up to 77% without altering the TNP-LPS response. These data indicated that exposure to B(a)P alters differentiation and antibody production in mature B cells to both TD and B2 TI antigens. No change in PFC was observed following exposure to B(e)P. Mishell-Dutton co-cultures confirmed that B cells were affected and that T helper cells or suppressor Mphi were not involved. Parameters of cell-mediated immunocompetence including delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity to KLH, allograft or tumour cell rejection and susceptibility to Listeria monocytogens were unaltered in B(a)P treated mice. PMID:6305542

  9. Ozone exposed epithelial cells modify cocultured natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) causes significant adverse health effects worldwide. Nasal epithelial cells (NECs) are among the first sites within the respiratory system to be exposed to inhaled air pollutants. They recruit, activate, and interact with immune cells via soluble mediators and direct cell-cell contacts. Based on our recent observation demonstrating the presence of natural killer (NK) cells in nasal lavages, the goal of this study was to establish a coculture model of NECs and NK cells and examine how exposure to O3 modifies this interaction. Flow cytometry analysis was used to assess immunophenotypes of NK cells cocultured with either air- or O3-exposed NECs. Our data show that coculturing NK cells with O3-exposed NECs decreased intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ), enhanced, albeit not statistically significant, IL-4, and increased CD16 expression on NK cells compared with air controls. Additionally, the cytotoxicity potential of NK cells was reduced after coculturing with O3-exposed NECs. To determine whether soluble mediators released by O3-exposed NECs caused this shift, apical and basolateral supernatants of air- and O3-exposed NECs were used to stimulate NK cells. While the conditioned media of O3-exposed NECs alone did not reduce intracellular IFN-γ, O3 enhanced the expression of NK cell ligands ULBP3 and MICA/B on NECs. Blocking ULBP3 and MICA/B reversed the effects of O3-exposed NECs on IFN-γ production in NK cells. Taken together, these data showed that interactions between NECs and NK cells in the context of O3 exposure changes NK cell activity via direct cell-cell interactions and is dependent on ULBP3/MICA/B expressed on NECs. PMID:23241529

  10. Determination of carbon-14-labeled 3,4-benzopyrene adsorbed on different solids

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, F.; Kanij, J.

    1983-09-01

    Recovery studies for 3,4-benzopyrene (BaP) are necessary for quantifying polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons on solid matrices. One of the main problems in recovery studies is the simulation of samples, on which a known quantity of BaP is adsorbed and homogeneously divided on solid substrates. In this study the samples were spiked by the addition of a toluene solution containing /sup 14/C-BaP, taking into account that BaP was not homogeneously divided on the adsorbent. The samples were treated by two destruction methods, i.e., a wet destruction with a potassium dichromate-sulfuric acid and orthophosphoric acid and a combustion with oxygen. The liberated CO/sub 2/ was adsorbed and the /sup 14/C radioactivity analyzed by means of liquid scintillation counting. 6 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  11. Characterization of the phosphatidylserine-exposing subpopulation of sickle cells.

    PubMed

    de Jong, K; Larkin, S K; Styles, L A; Bookchin, R M; Kuypers, F A

    2001-08-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), exclusively present in the inner monolayer of the normal red blood cell (RBC) membrane, is exposed in subpopulations of sickle cells. PS-exposing RBCs were found predominantly among the densest and the very light sickle cells. Within the light RBC fraction, PS exposure was found on reticulocytes, transferrin receptor-expressing reticulocytes, and mature RBCs. The last subset contained low-density valinomycin-resistant RBCs, previously shown to have high Na(+) and low K(+) content. This subpopulation contained the highest percentage of PS-exposing cells. The PS-exposing sickle cells did not show the sustained high cytosolic Ca(++) levels that have been shown to activate scramblase activity. Data from this study indicate that PS exposure can occur at different stages in the life of the sickle RBC and that it correlates with the loss of aminophospholipid translocase activity, the only common denominator of the PS-exposing cells. The additional requirement of scramblase activation may occur during transient increases in cytosolic Ca(++). (Blood. 2001;98:860-867)

  12. Unleashing Cancer Cells on Surfaces Exposing Motogenic IGDQ Peptides.

    PubMed

    Corvaglia, Valentina; Marega, Riccardo; De Leo, Federica; Michiels, Carine; Bonifazi, Davide

    2016-01-20

    Thiolated peptides bearing the Ile-Gly-Asp (IGD) motif, a highly conserved sequence of fibronectin, are used for the preparation of anisotropic self-assembled monolayers (SAM gradients) to study the whole-population migratory behavior of metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells). Ile-Gly-Asp-Gln-(IGDQ)-exposing SAMs sustain the adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells by triggering focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, similarly to the analogous Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-(GRGD)-terminating surfaces. However, the biological responses of different cell lines interfaced with the SAM gradients show that only those exposing the IGDQ sequence induce significant migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. In particular, the observed migratory behavior suggests the presence of cell subpopulations associated with a "stationary" or a "migratory" phenotype, the latter determining a considerable cell migration at the sub-cm length scale. These findings are of great importance as they suggest for the first time an active role of biological surfaces exposing the IGD motif in the multicomponent orchestration of cellular signaling involved in the metastatic progression.

  13. Comparative genomic hybridization study of arsenic-exposed and non-arsenic-exposed urinary transitional cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.-I; Chiu, Allen W.; Pu, Y.-S.; Wang, Y.-H.; Huan, Steven K.; Hsiao, C.-H.; Hsieh, F.-I; Chen, C.-J.

    2008-03-01

    To compare the differences in DNA aberrations between arsenic-exposed and non-arsenic-exposed transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), we analyzed 19 arsenic-exposed and 29 non-arsenic-exposed urinary TCCs from Chi-Mei Hospital using comparative genomic hybridization. DNA aberrations were detected in 42 TCCs including 19 arsenic-exposed and 23 non-arsenic-exposed TCCs. Arsenic-exposed TCCs had more changes than unexposed TCCs (mean {+-} SD, 6.6 {+-} 2.9 vs. 2.9 {+-} 2.2). Arsenic exposure was significantly associated with the number of DNA aberrations after adjustment for tumor stage, tumor grade and cigarette smoking in multiple regression analysis. The most frequent DNA gains, which were strikingly different between arsenic-exposed and non-arsenic-exposed TCCs, included those at 1p, 4p, 4q and 8q. A much higher frequency of DNA losses in arsenic-exposed TCCs compared with non-arsenic-exposed TCCs was observed in 10q, 11p and 17p. Chromosomal loss in 17p13 was associated not only with arsenic exposure, but also with tumor stage and grade. The p53 immunohistochemistry staining showed that chromosome 17p13 loss was associated with either p53 no expression (25%) or p53 overexpression (75%). The findings suggest that long-term arsenic exposure may increase the chromosome abnormality in TCC, and 17p loss plays an important role in arsenic-induced urinary carcinogenesis.

  14. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  15. The efficiency of photovoltaic cells exposed to pulsed laser light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, R. A.; Landis, G. A.; Jenkins, P.

    1993-01-01

    Future space missions may use laser power beaming systems with a free electron laser (FEL) to transmit light to a photovoltaic array receiver. To investigate the efficiency of solar cells with pulsed laser light, several types of GaAs, Si, CuInSe2, and GaSb cells were tested with the simulated pulse format of the induction and radio frequency (RF) FEL. The induction pulse format was simulated with an 800-watt average power copper vapor laser and the RF format with a frequency-doubled mode-locked Nd:YAG laser. Averaged current vs bias voltage measurements for each cell were taken at various optical power levels and the efficiency measured at the maximum power point. Experimental results show that the conversion efficiency for the cells tested is highly dependent on cell minority carrier lifetime, the width and frequency of the pulses, load impedance, and the average incident power. Three main effects were found to decrease the efficiency of solar cells exposed to simulated FEL illumination: cell series resistance, LC 'ringing', and output inductance. Improvements in efficiency were achieved by modifying the frequency response of the cell to match the spectral energy content of the laser pulse with external passive components.

  16. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of-cavity pulse- stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two-photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two- photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond layers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  17. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular, we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond(s) pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of- cavity pulse-stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two- photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two-photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond lasers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  18. Synthesis of protein in intestinal cells exposed to cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.W.; Berg, W.D. Jr.; Coppenhaver, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism by which cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), formed by intestinal epithelial cells in response to cholera toxin, ultimately results in alterations in water and electrolyte transport is poorly understood. Several studies have indicated that inhibitors of transcription or translation block much of the transport of ions and water in the intestine and edema formation in tissue elicited by cholera toxin. Data presented in this study confirmed the inhibitory effects of cycloheximide on cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation in the rabbit intestinal loop model. Neither cycloheximide nor actinomycin D altered the amount of cyclic AMP that accumulated in intestinal cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to cholera toxin. An increase in (/sup 3/H) leucine incorporation was readily demonstrable in intestinal epithelial cells from rabbits challenged with Vibrio cholerae. Similarly, intestinal epithelial cells incubated with cholera toxin for 4 hr synthesized substantially more protein than controls as determined by relative incorporation of (/sup 35/S) methionine. Most of the new protein synthesized in response to cholera toxin was membrane associated and of high molecular weight. The possible significance of the toxin-induced protein relative to cholera pathogenesis was discussed.

  19. Polyamines and polyamine biosynthesis in cells exposed to hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Gerner, E.W.; Stickney, D.G.; Herman, T.S.; Fuller, D.J.

    1983-02-01

    The issue of how polyamines act to sensitize cultured cells to the lethal effects of hyperthermia was investigated using Chinese hamster cells which were induced to express thermotolerance. Intracellular levels of these naturally occurring polycations were manipulated in certain situations by treating whole cells with methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone), an inhibitor of the S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylases. Exogenous spermine as low as 100 ..mu..M in the culture media dramatically sensitized cells expressing thermotolerance to the lethal effects of subsequent 42/sup 0/C exposures. When thermotolerance was differentially induced in cultures exposed to 42.4/sup 0/C by varying the rate of heating from 37 to 42.4/sup 0/C, the most resistant cells and the highest levels of intracellular spermidine and spermine. This finding was explainable in part by the observation that the putrescine-dependent S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase activity was minimally affected in cells expressng the greatest degree of thermotolerance. When this enzyme activity was inhibited by drug, lowered intracellular polyamine levels did not correspond with subsequent survival responses to heat. Interestingly, cultures treated with methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) 24 hr previous to heat exposure showed a reduced capacity to express rate of heating-induced thermotolerance. Together, these results demonstrate that the polyamines, especially spermidine and spermine, enhance hyperthermia-induced cell killing by some mechanism involving the plasma membrane. Further, our data suggest that methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) can act to affect thermal responses by a mechanism(s) other than modification of intracellular polyamine levels.

  20. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M.; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection. PMID:26157174

  1. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma; Larsson, Marie

    2015-08-15

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection. PMID:26157174

  2. Proteome analysis of proliferative response of bystander cells adjacent to cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gerashchenko, Bogdan I.; Yamagata, Akira; Oofusa, Ken; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Howell, Roger W.

    2010-01-01

    Recently (Cytometry 2003, 56A, 71–80), we reported that direct cell-to-cell contact is required for stimulating proliferation of bystander rat liver cells (WB-F344) cocultured with irradiated cells, and neither functional gap junction intercellular communication nor long-range extracellular factors appear to be involved in this proliferative bystander response (PBR). The molecular basis for this response is unknown. Confluent monolayers of WB-F344 cells were exposed to 5-Gray (Gy) of γ-rays. Irradiated cells were mixed with unirradiated cells and co-cultured for 24 h. Cells were harvested and protein expression was examined using 2-DE. Protein expression was also determined in cultures of unirradiated and 5-Gy irradiated cells. Proteins were identified by MS. Nucleophosmin (NPM)-1, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, was more highly expressed in bystander cells than in either unirradiated or 5-Gy irradiated cells. Enolase-α, a glycolytic enzyme, was present in acidic and basic variants in unirradiated cells. In bystander and 5-Gy irradiated cells, the basic variant was weakly expressed, whereas the acidic variant was overwhelmingly present. These data indicate that the presence of irradiated cells can affect NPM-1 and enolase-α in adjacent bystander cells. These proteins appear to participate in molecular events related to the PBR and suggest that this response may involve cellular defense, proliferation, and metabolism. PMID:17514680

  3. Proteome analysis of proliferative response of bystander cells adjacent to cells exposed to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, Bogdan I; Yamagata, Akira; Oofusa, Ken; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; de Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W

    2007-06-01

    Recently (Cytometry 2003, 56A, 71-80), we reported that direct cell-to-cell contact is required for stimulating proliferation of bystander rat liver cells (WB-F344) cocultured with irradiated cells, and neither functional gap junction intercellular communication nor long-range extracellular factors appear to be involved in this proliferative bystander response (PBR). The molecular basis for this response is unknown. Confluent monolayers of WB-F344 cells were exposed to 5-Gray (Gy) of gamma-rays. Irradiated cells were mixed with unirradiated cells and co-cultured for 24 h. Cells were harvested and protein expression was examined using 2-DE. Protein expression was also determined in cultures of unirradiated and 5-Gy irradiated cells. Proteins were identified by MS. Nucleophosmin (NPM)-1, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, was more highly expressed in bystander cells than in either unirradiated or 5-Gy irradiated cells. Enolase-alpha, a glycolytic enzyme, was present in acidic and basic variants in unirradiated cells. In bystander and 5-Gy irradiated cells, the basic variant was weakly expressed, whereas the acidic variant was overwhelmingly present. These data indicate that the presence of irradiated cells can affect NPM-1 and enolase-alpha in adjacent bystander cells. These proteins appear to participate in molecular events related to the PBR and suggest that this response may involve cellular defense, proliferation, and metabolism.

  4. Biliary epithelium and liver B cells exposed to bacteria activate intrahepatic MAIT cells through MR1

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Kurioka, Ayako; Parekh, Krishan; Stirling, Kathryn; Roberts, Sheree; Dutton, Emma E.; Hunter, Stuart; Geh, Daniel; Braitch, Manjit K.; Rajanayagam, Jeremy; Iqbal, Tariq; Pinkney, Thomas; Brown, Rachel; Withers, David R.; Adams, David H.; Klenerman, Paul; Oo, Ye H.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like T cells characterised by the invariant TCR-chain, Vα7.2-Jα33, and are restricted by MR1, which presents bacterial vitamin B metabolites. They are important for antibacterial immunity at mucosal sites; however, detailed characteristics of liver-infiltrating MAIT (LI-MAIT) and their role in biliary immune surveillance remain unexplored. Methods The phenotype and intrahepatic localisation of human LI-MAIT cells was examined in diseased and normal livers. MAIT cell activation in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, biliary epithelial cells (BEC) and liver B cells was assessed with/without anti-MR1. Results Intrahepatic MAIT cells predominantly localised to bile ducts in the portal tracts. Consistent with this distribution, they expressed biliary tropic chemokine receptors CCR6, CXCR6, and integrin αEβ7. LI-MAIT cells were also present in the hepatic sinusoids and possessed tissue-homing chemokine receptor CXCR3 and integrins LFA-1 and VLA-4, suggesting their recruitment via hepatic sinusoids. LI-MAIT cells were enriched in the parenchyma of acute liver failure livers compared to chronic diseased livers. LI-MAIT cells had an activated, effector memory phenotype, expressed α4β7 and receptors for IL-12, IL-18, and IL-23. Importantly, in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, liver B cells and BEC, MAIT cells upregulated IFN-γ and CD40 Ligand and degranulated in an MR1-dependent, cytokine-independent manner. In addition, diseased liver MAIT cells expressed T-bet and RORγt and the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17. Conclusions Our findings provide the first evidence of an immune surveillance effector response for MAIT cells towards BEC in human liver; thus they could be manipulated for treatment of biliary disease in the future. PMID:26743076

  5. Cytoplasmic myosin-exposed apoptotic cells appear with caspase-3 activation and enhance CLL cell viability.

    PubMed

    Cui, X; Zhang, L; Magli, A R; Catera, R; Yan, X-J; Griffin, D O; Rothstein, T L; Barrientos, J; Kolitz, J E; Allen, S L; Rai, K R; Chiorazzi, N; Chu, C C

    2016-01-01

    The degree of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) binding to myosin-exposed apoptotic cells (MEACs) correlates with worse patient outcomes, suggesting a link to disease activity. Therefore, we studied MEAC formation and the effects of MEAC binding on CLL cells. In cell line studies, both intrinsic (spontaneous or camptothecin-induced) and extrinsic (FasL- or anti-Fas-induced) apoptosis created a high percent of MEACs over time in a process associated with caspase-3 activation, leading to cytoplasmic myosin cleavage and trafficking to cell membranes. The involvement of common apoptosis pathways suggests that most cells can produce MEACs and indeed CLL cells themselves form MEACs. Consistent with the idea that MEAC formation may be a signal to remove dying cells, we found that natural IgM antibodies bind to MEACs. Functionally, co-culture of MEACs with CLL cells, regardless of immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region gene mutation status, improved leukemic cell viability. Based on inhibitor studies, this improved viability involved BCR signaling molecules. These results support the hypothesis that stimulation of CLL cells with antigen, such as those on MEACs, promotes CLL cell viability, which in turn could lead to progression to worse disease. PMID:26220042

  6. Ultrastructural changes in tracheal epithelial cells exposed to oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, D. E.; Harrison, G. A.; Turnbill, C.; Black, S.

    1977-01-01

    White albino rats were sacrificed after 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 h of exposure to 100% O2 at 1 atm. Tissue was prepared for the scanning electron microscope (SEM) by Critical Point Drying and for the transmission electron microscope (TEM) by plastic embedding. Scanning microscopy showed a loss of microvilli after 48 h of exposure. Cilia appeared relatively normal with SEM, but TEM revealed changes in the outer membrane. In TEM, nonciliated cells appeared swollen and often encroached on the ciliated cells. A heavy mucous blanket remained even after processing. All the changes observed that are induced by oxygen exposure contribute to mucostasis, reducing and/or halting mucociliary clearance.

  7. Proliferation of human mammary cancer cells exposed to 27-hydroxycholesterol

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ, PAMELA; TORRES, CRISTIAN; RAMÍREZ, MARÍA EUGENIA; EPUÑÁN, MARÍA JOSÉ; VALLADARES, LUIS EMILIO; SIERRALTA, WALTER DANIEL

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the possible mechanisms by which certain estradiol receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumor cells remain resistant to treatment with anti-estrogens or inhibitors of local estradiol (E2) production. To this end, we compared the proliferative effects on mammary cancer cells of the novel selective ER modulator 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHC) to those of E2, and evaluated their inhibition by ICI 182,780 (ICI). Analysis of the effects on the cell cycle of 27OHC and E2 in the absence or presence of ICI was conducted. In ER-positive mammary tumor cells, we detected the blocking of 27OHC proliferation-stimulatory activity by simvastatin, as well as the inhibition of E2-stimulated proliferation by an α-fetoprotein-derived cyclic nonapeptide. The effects reported herein may be extrapolated to infiltrating mammary cancer, where the activity of local macrophages may stimulate tumor growth. We suggest that increased breast cancer growth in obese patients may be related to increased 27OHC circulatory levels. PMID:22993572

  8. Correlation between dielectric property by dielectrophoretic levitation and growth activity of cells exposed to electric field.

    PubMed

    Hakoda, Masaru; Hirota, Yusuke

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system analyzing cell activity by the dielectrophoresis method. Our previous studies revealed a correlation between the growth activity and dielectric property (Re[K(ω)]) of mouse hybridoma 3-2H3 cells using dielectrophoretic levitation. Furthermore, it was clarified that the differentiation activity of many stem cells could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)] without differentiation induction. In this paper, 3-2H3 cells exposed to an alternating current (AC) electric field or a direct current (DC) electric field were cultivated, and the influence of damage by the electric field on the growth activity of the cells was examined. To evaluate the activity of the cells by measuring the Re[K(ω)], the correlation between the growth activity and the Re[K(ω)] of the cells exposed to the electric field was examined. The relations between the cell viability, growth activity, and Re[K(ω)] in the cells exposed to the AC electric field were obtained. The growth activity of the cells exposed to the AC electric field could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)]. Furthermore, it was found that the adverse effects of the electric field on the cell viability and the growth activity were smaller in the AC electric field than the DC electric field.

  9. Autosomal mutants of proton-exposed kidney cells display frequent loss of heterozygosity on nonselected chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grygoryev, Dmytro; Dan, Cristian; Gauny, Stacey; Eckelmann, Bradley; Ohlrich, Anna P; Connolly, Marissa; Lasarev, Michael; Grossi, Gianfranco; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2014-05-01

    High-energy protons found in the space environment can induce mutations and cancer, which are inextricably linked. We hypothesized that some mutants isolated from proton-exposed kidneys arose through a genome-wide incident that causes loss of heterozygosity (LOH)-generating mutations on multiple chromosomes (termed here genomic LOH). To test this hypothesis, we examined 11 pairs of nonselected chromosomes for LOH events in mutant cells isolated from the kidneys of mice exposed to 4 or 5 Gy of 1 GeV protons. The mutant kidney cells were selected for loss of expression of the chromosome 8-encoded Aprt gene. Genomic LOH events were also assessed in Aprt mutants isolated from isogenic cultured kidney epithelial cells exposed to 5 Gy of protons in vitro. Control groups were spontaneous Aprt mutants and clones isolated without selection from the proton-exposed kidneys or cultures. The in vivo results showed significant increases in genomic LOH events in the Aprt mutants from proton-exposed kidneys when compared with spontaneous Aprt mutants and when compared with nonmutant (i.e., nonselected) clones from the proton-exposed kidneys. A bias for LOH events affecting chromosome 14 was observed in the proton-induced Aprt mutants, though LOH for this chromosome did not confer increased radiation resistance. Genomic LOH events were observed in Aprt mutants isolated from proton-exposed cultured kidney cells; however the incidence was fivefold lower than in Aprt mutants isolated from exposed intact kidneys, suggesting a more permissive environment in the intact organ and/or the evolution of kidney clones prior to their isolation from the tissue. We conclude that proton exposure creates a subset of viable cells with LOH events on multiple chromosomes, that these cells form and persist in vivo, and that they can be isolated from an intact tissue by selection for a mutation on a single chromosome.

  10. Comparative Mitochondrial Proteomic Analysis of Raji Cells Exposed to Adriamycin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Jie; Sun, Qing; Fang, Xiao-Sheng; Wang, Xin

    2009-01-01

    The antitumor mechanisms of adriamycin (ADR) have been thought to contribute to induction of apoptosis and inefficiency of DNA repair, processes that are to a large extent mediated by mitochondria. This study aimed to investigate characteristics of ADR, including its antineoplastic activity, drug resistance, and unexpected toxicity in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) Raji cells at the mitochondrial proteomic level. The alterations of the mitochondrial proteome of Raji cells treated with ADR were analyzed by two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with linear ion trap quadrupole–electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LTQ-ESI-MS/MS).The altered patterns of three identified proteins were validated by Western blot and analyzed by pathway studio software. The results showed that 34 proteins were downregulated and 3 proteins upregulated in the study group compared with the control group. The differentially expressed proteins distributed their functions in reduction-oxidation reactions, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, transporters and channels, and oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), ATP-binding cassette transporter isoform B6 (ABCB6), and prohibitin (PHB) identified in this study may be closely related to chemoresistance and could serve as potential chemotherapeutic targets for NHL. Collectively, these results suggest that specific mitochondrial proteins are uniquely susceptible to alterations in abundance following exposure to ADR and carry implications for the investigation of therapeutic and prognostic markers. Further studies focusing on these identified proteins will be used to predict treatment response and reverse apoptosis resistance,and to explore drug-combination strategies associated with ADR for NHL therapy. PMID:19209238

  11. Differential gene expression in pulmonary artery endothelial cells exposed to sickle cell plasma.

    PubMed

    Klings, Elizabeth S; Safaya, Surinder; Adewoye, Adeboye H; Odhiambo, Adam; Frampton, Garrett; Lenburg, Marc; Gerry, Norman; Sebastiani, Paola; Steinberg, Martin H; Farber, Harrison W

    2005-05-11

    Clinical variability in sickle cell disease (SCD) suggests a role for extra-erythrocytic factors in the pathogenesis of vasoocclusion. We hypothesized that endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction, one possible modifier of disease variability, results from induction of phenotypic changes by circulating factors. Accordingly, we analyzed gene expression in cultured human pulmonary artery ECs (HPAEC) exposed to plasma from 1) sickle acute chest syndrome (ACS) patients, 2) SCD patients at steady state, 3) normal volunteers, and 4) serum-free media, using whole genome microarrays (U133A-B GeneChip, Affymetrix). Data were analyzed by Bayesian analysis of differential gene expression (BADGE). Differential expression was defined by the probability of >1.5 fold change in signal intensity greater than 0.999 and a predicted score of 70-100, measured by cross-validation. Compared with normal plasma, plasma from SCD patients (steady state) resulted in differential expression of 50 genes in HPAEC. Of these genes, molecules involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and lipid transport, the cellular stress response, and extracellular matrix proteins were most prominent. Another 58 genes were differentially expressed in HPAEC exposed to plasma from ACS patients. The pattern of altered gene expression suggests that plasma from SCD patients induces an EC phenotype which is anti-apoptotic and favors cholesterol biosynthesis. An altered EC phenotype elicited by SCD plasma may contribute to the pathogenesis of sickle vasoocclusion.

  12. DNA Fragmentation in mammalian cells exposed to various light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, M.; Cherubini, R.; Dalla Vecchia, M.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Moschini, G.; Sapora, O.; Signoretti, C.; Simone, G.; Sorrentino, E.; Tabocchini, M. A.

    Elucidation of how effects of densely ionizing radiation at cellular level are linked to DNA damage is fundamental for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to genomic damage (especially chromosome aberrations) and developing biophysical models to predict space radiation effects. We have investigated the DNA fragmentation patterns induced in Chinese hamster V79 cells by 31 keV/μm protons, 123 keV/μm helium-4 ions and γ-rays in the size range 0.023-5.7 Mbp, using calibrated Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). The frequency distributions of fragments induced by the charged particles were shifted towards smaller sizes with respct to that induced by comparable doses of γ-rays. The DSB yields, evaluated from the fragments induced in the size range studied, were higher for protons and helium ions than for γ-rays by a factor of about 1.9 and 1.2, respectively. However, these ratios do not adequately reflect the RBE observed on the same cells for inactivation and mutation induced by these beams. This is a further indication for the lack of correlation between the effects exerted at cellular level and the initial yield of DSB. The dependence on radiation quality of the fragmentation pattern suggests that it may have a role in damage reparability. We have analyzed these patterns with a "random breakage" model generalized in order to consider the initial non-random distribution of the DNA molecules. Our results suggest that a random breakage mechanism can describe with a reasonable approximation the DNA fragmentation induced by γ-rays, while the approximation is not so good for light ions, likely due to the interplay between ion tracks and chromatin organization at the loop level.

  13. DETAIL OF ZINC CLEANER CELL INTERIOR (EXPOSED AT F/45 FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF ZINC CLEANER CELL INTERIOR (EXPOSED AT F/45 FOR DEPTH OF FIELD PURPOSES). NOTE GALIGHER STYLE BAFFLES AND TENDENCY OF ZINC TO BUILD UP ON CELL COMPONENTS. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  14. Extracellular vesicles released from cells exposed to reactive oxygen species increase annexin A2 expression and survival of target cells exposed to the same conditions.

    PubMed

    Grindheim, Ann Kari; Vedeler, Anni

    2016-01-01

    Annexin A2 (AnxA2) is present in multiple cellular compartments and interacts with numerous ligands including calcium, proteins, cholesterol, negatively charged phospholipids and RNA. These interactions are tightly regulated by its post-translational modifications. The levels of AnxA2 and its Tyr23 phosphorylated form (pTyr23AnxA2) are increased in many cancers and the protein is involved in malignant cell transformation, metastasis and angiogenesis. Our previous studies of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells showed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce rapid, simultaneous and transient dephosphorylation of nuclear AnxA2, most likely associating with PML bodies, while AnxA2 associated with F-actin at the cell cortex undergoes Tyr23 phosphorylation. The pTyr23AnxA2 in the periphery of the cells is incorporated into intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes and subsequently released to the extracellular space. We show here that extracellular vesicles (EVs) from cells exposed to ROS prime untreated PC12 cells to better tolerate subsequent oxidative stress, thus enhancing their survival. There is an increase in the levels of pTyr23AnxA2 and AnxA2 in the primed cells, suggesting that AnxA2 is involved in their survival. This increase is due to an upregulation of AnxA2 expression both at the transcriptional and translational levels after relatively short term (2 h) exposure to primed EVs. PMID:27574537

  15. Activation of NK cells in subjects exposed to mild hyper- or hypothermic load.

    PubMed

    Lackovic, V; Borecký, L; Vigas, M; Rovenský, J

    1988-06-01

    The effect of mild hyper- and hypothermic stress on release of selected hormones (somatotropin, noradrenaline, etc.), interferon (IFN), and activity of NK cells in the blood was examined in groups of young males during a 30 min exposure to 39 degrees C and 4 degrees C. A quick release of somatotropin was registered in 44% of examinees in the hyperthermic group, while the persons exposed to 4 degrees C reacted with a release of noradrenaline only. Concurrently, an elevation of NK cell activity was observed both in the subgroup releasing somatotropin after hyperthermic stress and in the group exposed to cold. Since these forms of mild stress did not lead to an appearance of IFN in the serum, the possibility of an NK cell activating effect of somatotropin and/or the adrenal hormones was tested. While the adrenal hormones stimulated the NK cell activity in vitro, no support for a similar role for somatotropin was found. PMID:2457640

  16. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  17. SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES
    Y.M. Kim, A.G. Lenz, R. Silbajoris, I. Jaspers and J.M. Samet. Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, ...

  18. {sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Su Xiaoming; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

  19. T-cell activation in pulmonary lymph nodes of mice exposed to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Dziedzic, D.; White, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    Groups of Cd-1 female mice were exposed to ozone at 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 ppm, 20 hr per day, 7 days per week for 1-28 days. The effect of ozone exposure on lymphoid cells was determined by studying mediastinal lymph nodes at various times of exposure. It was found that lymphocyte numbers underwent a dose-dependent, four-phased change:cellular depletion (Days 1-2), followed by rapid hyperplasia (Days 3-4), incremental cell number reduction (Days 5-7), and a subsequent subacute phase of elevated lymphocyte numbers (Days 8-28). Using tritiated thymidine it was determined that cells underwent a rapid burst of division by Day 3 of exposure and that mitosis subsequently declined to near baseline values by 2 weeks of exposure. Autoradiographic analysis of histologic sections revealed that the paracortical T-cell areas of the nodes were particularly involved. In addition to the increase in thymidine uptake, several morphologic changes were evident in affected cells. By comparison, the B cells from ozone-exposed animals were virtually unaffected with respect to cell division or morphological alterations. Prior treatment of ozone-exposed animals with a monoclonal antibody that is cytotoxic for T cells eliminated the hyperplastic response. Immunologic aspects of T-cell reactivity were studied. T-cell responsiveness to mitogenic stimulation with concanavalin A showed little alteration during the first days of exposure; however, by Day 14 an increase in reactivity was observed. This change indicated that functional lymphocyte stimulation occurred during ozone exposure.

  20. Analysis of T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in the individuals exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Biswas, R; Ghosh, P; Banerjee, N; Das, J K; Sau, T; Banerjee, A; Roy, S; Ganguly, S; Chatterjee, M; Mukherjee, A; Giri, A K

    2008-05-01

    Over six million people in nine districts of West Bengal, India are exposed to very high levels of arsenic primarily through their drinking water. More than 300,000 people showed arsenic-induced skin lesions in these districts. This is regarded as the greatest arsenic calamity in the world. Chronic arsenicosis causes varied dermatological signs ranging from pigmentation changes, hyperkeratosis to non-melanocytic cancer of skin, and also malignancies in different internal organs. Higher incidences of opportunistic infections are found in the arsenic-exposed individuals, indicating that their immune systems may be impaired somehow. We have thus investigated the effect of arsenic on T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in 20 individuals with arsenic-induced skin lesions and compared the results with 18 arsenic-unexposed individuals. A marked dose-dependent suppression of Concanavalin A (Con A) induced T-cell proliferation was observed in the arsenic-exposed individuals compared with the unexposed (P < 0.001) individuals. This correlated with a significant decrease in the levels of secreted cytokines by the T cells (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL2, IL10, IL5, and IL4) in the exposed individuals (P < 0.001). Thus it can be inferred that arsenic exposure can cause immunosuppression in humans.

  1. In vitro metabolism study of normal and tumor cells when exposed to red LED light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbovskaya, Olga V.; Khairullin, Radik M.; Saenko, Yuri V.; Krasnikova, Ekaterina S.; Krasnikov, Aleksandr V.; Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Skaptsov, Aleksandr A.

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the results of studying the mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ROS, peculiarities of the cell cycle of cancer cells HCT-116 and the normal line of CHO cells when exposed to the red LED light with a wavelength range of 0.620-0.680 μm. A dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ROS concentration in cancer cells HCT-116 was established. In normal CHO cell line a dose-dependent reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and dose-dependent increase in intracellular ROS occur. It has been shown that the sensitivity of the studied cell lines to the red light depends on the stage of the cell cycle.

  2. Mature natural killer cells reset their responsiveness when exposed to an altered MHC environment

    PubMed Central

    Joncker, Nathalie T.; Shifrin, Nataliya; Delebecque, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    Some mature natural killer (NK) cells cannot be inhibited by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I molecules, either because they lack corresponding inhibitory receptors or because the host lacks the corresponding MHC I ligands for the receptors. Such NK cells nevertheless remain self-tolerant and exhibit a generalized hyporesponsiveness to stimulation through activating receptors. To address whether NK cell responsiveness is set only during the NK cell differentiation process, we transferred mature NK cells from wild-type (WT) to MHC I–deficient hosts or vice versa. Remarkably, mature responsive NK cells from WT mice became hyporesponsive after transfer to MHC I–deficient mice, whereas mature hyporesponsive NK cells from MHC I–deficient mice became responsive after transfer to WT mice. Altered responsiveness was evident among mature NK cells that had not divided in the recipient animals, indicating that the cells were mature before transfer and that alterations in activity did not require cell division. Furthermore, the percentages of NK cells expressing KLRG1, CD11b, CD27, and Ly49 receptors specific for H-2b were not markedly altered after transfer. Thus, the functional activity of mature NK cells can be reset when the cells are exposed to a changed MHC environment. These findings have important implications for how NK cell functions may be curtailed or enhanced in the context of disease. PMID:20819928

  3. Ca2+ ion transport through patch-clamped cells exposed to magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Höjevik, P; Sandblom, J; Galt, S; Hamnerius, Y

    1995-01-01

    The total current of Ca2+ ions through patch-clamped cell membranes was measured while exposing clonal insulin-producing beta-cells (RINm5F) to a combination of DC and AC magnetic fields at so-called cyclotron resonance conditions. Previous experimental evidence supports the theory that a resonant interaction between magnetic fields and organisms can exist. This experiment was designed to test one possible site of interaction: channels in the cell membrane. The transport of Ca2+ ions through the protein channels of the plasma membrane did not show any resonant behavior in the frequency range studied. PMID:7748201

  4. Arsenic-induced mitochondrial instability leading to programmed cell death in the exposed individuals.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Nilanjana; Banerjee, Mayukh; Ganguly, Sudipto; Bandyopadhyay, Santu; Das, Jayanta K; Bandyopadhay, Apurba; Chatterjee, Mitali; Giri, Ashok K

    2008-04-18

    In West Bengal, India, more than 6 million people in nine districts are exposed to arsenic through drinking water. It is regarded as the greatest arsenic calamity in the world. Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen, which does not induce cancer in any other animal model. Interestingly, at lower concentrations, arsenic is known to induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines in vitro. We have studied apoptosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 30 arsenic exposed skin lesion individuals by annexin V-FITC staining and compared with 28 unexposed individuals. The percentage of apoptotic cells in individuals with skin lesions was significantly higher (p<0.001) in comparison to unexposed individuals. In the exposed individuals with skin lesions, there were elevated levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane permeability and increased cytochrome c release, leading to increased downstream caspase activity. Arsenic-induced DNA damage was confirmed by DNA ladder formation and confocal microscopy. We also observed that chronic arsenic exposure reduced Bcl-2/Bax ratio and also resulted in cell cycle arrest of PBMC in G0/G1 phase. All these observations indicate that mitochondria-mediated pathway may be responsible for arsenic-induced apoptosis.

  5. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Reena; Jiang, Di; Wu, Qun; Chu, Hong Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS) increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air–liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS) with or without HRV-16 (5×104 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell) infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection. PMID:27354786

  6. Endometrial stem cell transplantation in MPTP- exposed primates: an alternative cell source for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Erin F; Mutlu, Levent; Massasa, Efi E; Elsworth, John D; Eugene Redmond, D; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Cell-replacement therapies have emerged as a promising strategy to slow down or replace neuronal loss. Compared to other stem cell types, endometrium-derived stem cells (EDSCs) are an attractive source of stem cells for cellular therapies because of their ease of collection and vast differentiation potential. Here we demonstrate that endometrium-derived stem cells may be transplanted into an MPTP exposed monkey model of PD. After injection into the striatum, endometrium-derived stem cells engrafted, exhibited neuron-like morphology, expressed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and increased the numbers of TH positive cells on the transplanted side and dopamine metabolite concentrations in vivo. Our results suggest that endometrium-derived stem cells may provide a therapeutic benefit in the primate model of PD and may be used in stem cell based therapies.

  7. Effect of photobiomodulation on endothelial cell exposed to Bothrops jararaca venom.

    PubMed

    Franco, Ana Tereza Barufi; Silva, Luciana Miato Gonçalves; Costa, Marcília Silva; Zamuner, Silvia Fernanda; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; de Fatima Pereira Teixeira, Catarina; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2016-07-01

    Bleeding is a common feature in envenoming caused by Bothrops snake venom due to extensive damage to capillaries and venules, producing alterations in capillary endothelial cell morphology. It has been demonstrated, in vivo, that photobiomodulation (PBM) decreases hemorrhage after venom inoculation; however, the mechanism is unknown. Thus, the objective was to investigate the effects of PBM on a murine endothelial cell line (tEnd) exposed to Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV). Cells were exposed to BjV and irradiated once with either 660- or 780-nm wavelength laser light at energy densities of 4 and 5 J/cm(2), respectively, and irradiation time of 10 s. Cell integrity was analyzed by crystal violet and cell viability/mitochondrial metabolism by MTT assay. The release of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) was quantified as a measure of cell damage. In addition, cytokine IL1-β levels were measured in the supernatant. PBM at 660 and 780 nm wavelength was able to increase cellular viability and decrease the release of LDH and the loss of cellular integrity. In addition, the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1-β was reduced after PBM by both wavelengths. The data reported herein indicates that irradiation with red or near-infrared laser resulted in protection on endothelial cells after exposure to Bothrops venom and could be, at least in part, a reasonable explanation by the beneficial effects of PBM inhibiting the local effects induced by Bothrops venoms, in vivo. PMID:27147074

  8. BOSS on EXPOSE-R2-Comparative Investigations on Biofilm and Planktonic cells of Deinococcus geothermalis as Mission Preparation Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, C.; Rettberg, P.; Frösler, J.; Flemming, H.-C.; Rabbow, E.; Reitz, G.

    2013-09-01

    Biofilms are of interest for Astrobiological investigations since they are one of the oldest clear signs of life on Earth. In the experiment BOSS the hypothesis will be tested if the biofilm form of life with microorganisms embedded and aggregated in their EPS matrix is suited to support long-term survival of microorganisms under the harsh environmental conditions as they exist in space and on Mars and is superior to the same bacteria in the form of planktonic cultures. An additional protective role may be provided by particles associated in biofilms which may shield the organisms against radiation. The experiment will be flown on EXPOSE-R2 attached outside of the ISS on the Russian module. BOSS has participated the Experiment verification tests and will attend the upcoming Science verification test carried out in the Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities at DLR. The launch is scheduled for April 2014.

  9. DNA DAMAGE IN BUCCAL EPITHELIAL CELLS FROM INDIVIDUALS CHRONICALLY EXPOSED TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess DNA damage in buccal cells from individuals chronically exposed to arsenic via drinking water in Ba Men, Inner Mongolia. Buccal cells were collected from 19 Ba Men residents exposed to arsenic at 527.5 ? 23.7 g/L (mean ? SEM) and ...

  10. Phospholipidomic Profile Variation on THP-1 Cells Exposed to Skin or Respiratory Sensitizers and Respiratory Irritant.

    PubMed

    Martins, João D; Maciel, Elisabete A; Silva, Ana; Ferreira, Isabel; Ricardo, Fernando; Domingues, Pedro; Neves, Bruno M; Domingues, Maria Rosário M; Cruz, Maria Teresa

    2016-12-01

    Occupational exposure to low molecular weight reactive chemicals often leads to development of allergic reactions such as allergic contact dermatitis and respiratory allergies. Further insights into the interaction of these chemicals with physiopathological relevant cellular models might provide the foundations for novel non-animal approaches to safety assessment. In this work we used the human THP-1 cell line to determine phospholipidome changes induced by the skin sensitizer 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB), the respiratory allergen hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), and the irritant methyl salicylate (MESA). We detected that these chemicals differently induce lipid peroxidation and modulate THP-1 IL-1β, IL-12B, IL-8, CD86, and HMOX1 transcription. Decreased phosphatidylethanolamine content was detected in cells exposed to MESA, while profound alterations in the relative abundance of cardiolipin species were observed in cells exposed to DNFB. All chemicals tested induced a decrease in the relative abundance of plasmanyl phosphatidylcholine species PC (O-16:0e/18:1) and phosphatidylinositol species PI (34:1), while increasing PI (38:4). An increased abundance of oleic acid was observed in the phospholipids of cells exposed to DNFB while a decreased abundance of palmitic acid was detected in cells treated with MESA or DNFB. We conclude that both specific and common alterations at phospholipidome levels are triggered by the different chemicals, while not allowing a complete distinction between them using a Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates (CAP). The common effects observed at phospholipids level with all the chemicals tested might be related to unspecific cell cytotoxic mechanisms that nevertheless may contribute to the elicitation of specific immune responses. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2639-2651, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26946329

  11. Transcriptional modulation of a human monocytic cell line exposed to PM(10) from an urban area.

    PubMed

    Bastonini, Emanuela; Verdone, Loredana; Morrone, Stefania; Santoni, Angela; Settimo, Gaetano; Marsili, Giovanni; La Fortezza, Marco; Di Mauro, Ernesto; Caserta, Micaela

    2011-08-01

    Insight into the mechanisms by which ambient air particulate matter mediates adverse health effects is needed to provide biological plausibility to epidemiological studies demonstrating an association between PM(10) exposure and increased morbidity and mortality. In vitro studies of the effects of air pollution on human cells help to establish conditions for the analysis of cause-effect relationships. One of the major challenges is to test native atmosphere in its complexity, rather than the various components individually. We have developed an in vitro system in which human monocyte-macrophage U937 cells are directly exposed to filters containing different amounts of PM(10) collected in the city of Rome. Transcriptional profiling obtained after short exposure (1h) of cells to a filter containing 1666μg PM(10) (77.6μg/cm(2)) using a macroarray panel of 1176 genes reveals a significant change in the mRNA level (>2 fold) for 87 genes relative to cells exposed to a control filter. Overall, 9 out of 87 modulated genes were annotated as "lung cancer". qRT-PCR confirmed the induction of relevant genes involved in DNA repair and apoptosis, specifically: ERCC1, TDG, DAD1 and MCL1. In cells exposed for 10min, 1h and 3h to different amounts of PM(10), transcription of TNFα and TRAP1, which code for a key pro-inflammatory cytokine and a mitochondrial protein involved in cell protection from oxidative stress, respectively, was shown to be modulated in a time-dependent, but not a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these data indicate that it is possible to analyze the effects of untreated particulate matter on human cells by the direct-exposure approach we have developed, possibly providing new clues to traffic-related health hazard.

  12. Clear cell renal carcinoma in a pregnant DES-exposed patient.

    PubMed

    Mansi, M L

    1989-07-01

    Several decades ago, diethylstilbestrol (DES) was prescribed to support the pregnancy of women who were diabetic, who had had consecutive abortions, or who were threatening to abort. The use of this estrogen substitute to support human gestation had ceased by the 1960s. In 1971, the first report was published in which DES exposure was linked with clear cell carcinoma of the vagina and cervix. Since then, many other documentations have been published on upper genital tract anomalies, poor reproductive performance, and the high incidence of fetal wastage in DES-exposed women. The author describes a case of clear cell carcinoma of the kidney in an 18-year-old pregnant woman with a prior history of vaginal adenosis who had been exposed to DES in utero.

  13. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity in gill erythrocyte cells of Poecilia reticulata exposed to a glyphosate formulation.

    PubMed

    De Souza Filho, José; Sousa, Caio César Neves; Da Silva, Cláudio Carlos; De Sabóia-Morais, Simone Maria Teixeira; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2013-11-01

    Poecilia reticulata were exposed to herbicide Roundup Transorb(®) for micronucleus test, nuclear abnormalities and comet assay. The exposure-concentrations were based on CL50-96 h following 0, 1.41, 2.83, 4.24 and 5.65 μL L(-1) for 24 h. Micronucleus and comets were significantly increased in the gill erythrocyte cells after herbicide exposure compared with the non-exposed group. Results showed a gradual increase in the number of damaged cells, indicating a concentration-dependent effect and that this herbicide was mutagenic and genotoxic to P. reticulata and this effect could be attributed to a combination of compounds contained in the formulation with the active ingredient glyphosate. PMID:24042842

  14. Structural and function changes in organelles of liver cells in rats exposed to magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczynska, E. ); Wegrzynowicz, R. )

    1991-08-01

    Exposure of rats to magnetic fields of 10{sup {minus}3} and 10{sup {minus}2} T for 1 hr daily generated structural changes in hepatocytes mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and ribosomes. Simultaneously there was an increase in the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes: NADH dehydrogenase, succinic dehydrogenase, and cytochrome oxidase. The extent of the changes in liver cell properties following exposure depend on the duration of exposure to and the strength of the applied magnetic fields. Ultrastructural studies did not reveal any changes in external membranes of hepatocytes or in the membranes of cell nuclei. An increase in the amount of glycogen in hepatocytes of rats exposed to both 10{sup {minus}3} and 10{sup {minus}2} T was noted. The high level of cortisol in serum of exposed rats suggests that magnetic field may be a stress generating factor.

  15. Natural killer cells in highly exposed hepatitis C-seronegative injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Mina, M M; Cameron, B; Luciani, F; Vollmer-Conna, U; Lloyd, A R

    2016-06-01

    Injecting drug use remains the major risk factor for hepatitis C (HCV) transmission. A minority of long-term injecting drug users remain seronegative and aviraemic, despite prolonged exposure to HCV - termed highly exposed seronegative subjects. Natural killer (NK) cells have been implicated in this apparent protection. A longitudinal nested, three group case-control series of subjects was selected from a prospective cohort of seronegative injecting drug users who became incident cases (n = 11), remained seronegative (n = 11) or reported transient high-risk behaviour and remained uninfected (n = 11). The groups were matched by age, sex and initial risk behaviour characteristics. Stored peripheral blood mononuclear cells were assayed in multicolour flow cytometry to enumerate natural killer cell subpopulations and to assess functional activity using Toll-like receptor ligands before measurement of activation, cytokine production and natural cytotoxicity receptor expression. Principal components were derived to describe the detailed phenotypic characteristics of the major NK subpopulations (based on CD56 and CD16 co-expression), before logistic regression analysis to identify associations with exposed, seronegative individuals. The CD56(dim) CD16(+) (P = 0.05, OR 6.92) and CD56(dim) CD16(-) (P = 0.05, OR 6.07) principal components differed between exposed, seronegative individuals and pre-infection samples of the other two groups. These included CD56(dim) CD16(+) and CD56(dim) CD16(-) subsets with CD56(dim) CD16(+) IFN-γ and TNF-α on unstimulated cells, and CD56(dim) CD16(-) CD69(+) , CD107a(+) , IFN-γ and TNF-α following TLR stimulation. The cytotoxic CD56(dim) NK subset thus distinguished highly exposed, seronegative subjects, suggesting NK cytotoxicity may contribute to protection from HCV acquisition. Further investigation of the determinants of this association and prospective assessment of protection against HCV infection are warranted.

  16. Mechanisms of mutagenesis in human cells exposed to 55 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauny, S.; Wiese, C.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Protons represent the major type of charged particle radiation in spaceflight environments. The purpose of this study was to assess mutations arising in human lymphoid cells exposed to protons. Mutations were quantitated at the thymidine kinase (TK1) locus in cell lines derived from the same donor: TK6 cells (wt TP53) and WTK1 cells (mutant TP53). WTK1 cells were much more susceptible to mutagenesis following proton exposure than TK6 cells. Intragenic deletions were observed among early-arising TK1 mutants in TK6 cells, but not in WTK1 cells where all of the mutants arose by LOH. Deletion was the predominant mode of LOH in TK6 cells, while allelic recombination was the major mode of LOH in WTK1 cells. Deletions were of variable lengths, from <1 cM to 64 cM, while mutations that arose by allelic recombination often extended to the telomere. In summary, proton exposures elicited many types of mutations at an autosomal locus in human cells. Most involved large scale loss of genetic information, either through deletion or by recombination.

  17. Inducible expression of beta defensins by human respiratory epithelial cells exposed to Aspergillus fumigatus organisms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus, a saprophytic mould, is responsible for life-threatening, invasive pulmonary diseases in immunocompromised hosts. The role of the airway epithelium involves a complex interaction with the inhaled pathogen. Antimicrobial peptides with direct antifungal and chemotactic activities may boost antifungal immune response. Results The inducible expression of defensins by human bronchial epithelial 16HBE cells and A549 pneumocyte cells exposed to A. fumigatus was investigated. Using RT-PCR and real time PCR, we showed an activation of hBD2 and hBD9 defensin genes: the expression was higher in cells exposed to swollen conidia (SC), compared to resting conidia (RC) or hyphal fragments (HF). The kinetics of defensin expression was different for each one, evoking a putative distinct function for each investigated defensin. The decrease of defensin expression in the presence of heat-inactivated serum indicated a possible link between defensins and the proteins of the host complement system. The presence of defensin peptide hBD2 was revealed using immunofluorescence that showed a punctual cytoplasmic and perinuclear staining. Quantification of the cells stained with anti hBD2 antibody demonstrated that SC induced a greater number of cells that synthesized hBD2, compared to RC or HF. Labelling of the cells with anti-hBD-2 antibody showed a positive immunofluorescence signal around RC or SC in contrast to HF. This suggests co-localisation of hBD2 and digested conidia. The HBD2 level was highest in the supernatants of cells exposed to SC, as was determined by sandwich ELISA. Experiments using neutralising anti-interleukine-1β antibody reflect the autocrine mechanism of defensin expression induced by SC. Investigation of defensin expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels demonstrated the requirement of transcription as well as new protein synthesis during A. fumigatus defensin induction. Finally, induced defensin expression in

  18. Effects of selenocystine on lead-exposed Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and PC-12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Ercal, Nuran . E-mail: nercal@umr.edu

    2006-07-15

    Lead is a pervasive environmental toxin that affects multiple organ systems, including the nervous, renal, reproductive, and hematological systems. Even though it is probably the most studied toxic metal, some of the symptoms of lead toxicity still cannot be explained by known molecular mechanisms. Therefore, lead-induced oxidative stress has recently started to gain attention. This in vitro study confirms the existence of oxidative stress due to lead exposure. Administration of lead acetate (PbA) to cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) had a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on colony formation and cell proliferation. This inhibition was eliminated by 5 {mu}M selenocystine (SeCys). In order to evaluate the nature of SeCys's effect, we measured glutathione (GSH), its oxidized form glutathione disulfide (GSSG), malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase, and GSH peroxidase (GPx) activities in lead-exposed CHO cells both in the presence and absence of SeCys. Increases in MDA, catalase, and GPx activities were observed in cultures that received only PbA, but supplementation with SeCys returned these measures to pretreatment levels. The ratio of GSH to GSSG increased in lead-exposed cells incubated in SeCys-enhanced media but declined in cultures treated with PbA only. In order to determine whether SeCys also reverses lead-induced neurotoxicity, a neuronal cell line, PC-12 cells, was used. Lead's inhibition on neurite formation was significantly eliminated by SeCys in PC-12 cells. Our results suggest that SeCys can confer protection against lead-induced toxicity in CHO cells and neurotoxicity in PC-12 cells.

  19. Expression of AS3MT alters transcriptional profiles in human urothelial cells exposed to arsenite.

    PubMed

    Hester, Sd; Drobná, Z; Andrews, Dmk; Liu, J; Waalkes, Mp; Thomas, Dj; Styblo, M

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is an environmental toxicant and human carcinogen. The enzymatic methylation of iAs that is catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state)-methyltransferase (AS3MT) generates reactive methylated intermediates that contribute to the toxic and carcinogenic effects of iAs. We have shown that clonal human urothelial cells (UROtsa/F35) that express rat AS3MT and methylate iAs are more susceptible to acute toxicity of arsenite (iAs(III)) than parental UROtsa cells that do not express AS3MT and do not methylate iAs. The current work examines transcriptional changes associated with AS3MT expression and identifies specific categories of genes expressed in UROtsa and UROtsa/F35 cells in response to a 24-h exposure to 1 or 50 microM iAs(III). Here, the expression of 21,073 genes was assessed using Agilent Human 1A(V2) arrays. Venn analysis showed marked concentration-dependent differences between gene expression patterns in UROtsa and UROTsa/F35 cells exposed to iAs(III). Among 134 genes altered by exposure to subtoxic 1 microM iAs(III), only 14 were shared by both cell lines. Exposure to cytotoxic 50 microM iAs(III) uniquely altered 1389 genes in UROtsa/F35 and 649 genes in UROtsa cells; 5033 altered genes were associated with the chemical alone. In UROtsa, but not UROtsa/F35 cells exposure to 1 microM iAs(III) altered expression of genes associated with cell adhesion. In contrast, expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation was significantly altered in UROtsa/F35 cells at this exposure level. At 50 microM iAs(III), pathways regulating cell cycle, cell death, transcription, and metabolism were affected in both cell lines. However, only Urotsa/F35 cells showed numerous G-protein and kinase pathway alterations as well as alterations in pathways involved in cell growth and differentiation. These data link the AS3MT-catalyzed methylation of iAs to specific genomic responses in human cells exposed to iAs(III). Further analysis of these responses will

  20. Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (α)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving α-particles. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of α-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Results Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either α-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the α-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no α-particle specific transcripts were identified. Conclusion Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in α-particle radiation biodosimetry. PMID:25017500

  1. Cell surface differences of Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis exposed with surface markers.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Arturo; Castañón, Guadalupe; Cristóbal-Ramos, Ana Ruth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2007-12-01

    Differences in the distribution of diverse cell surface coat markers were found between Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis. The presence of carbohydrate-containing components in the cell coat of the two species was detected by selective staining with ruthenium red and alcian blue. Using both markers, N. fowleri presented a thicker deposit than N. lovaniensis. The existence of exposed mannose or glucose residues was revealed by discriminatory agglutination with the plant lectin Concanavalin A. These sugar residues were also visualized at the cell surface of these parasites either by transmission electron microscopy or by fluorescein-tagged Concanavalin A. Using this lectin cap formation was induced only in N. fowleri. The anionic sites on the cell surface detected by means of cationized ferritin were more apparent in N. fowleri. Biotinylation assays confirmed that even though the two amoebae species have some analogous plasma membrane proteins, there is a clear difference in their composition.

  2. Phenotypic Modifications in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Exposed to High Concentrations of Vancomycin and Teicoplanin

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Fábio D. A.; de Carvalho, Carla C. C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cells are known to change the fatty acid (FA) composition of the phospholipids as a phenotypic response to environmental conditions and to the presence of toxic compounds such as antibiotics. In the present study, Staphylococcus aureus cells collected during the exponential growth phase were challenged with 50 and 100 mg/L of vancomycin and teicoplanin, which are concentrations high enough to kill the large majority of the cell population. Colony-forming unit counts showed biphasic killing kinetics, typical for persister cell enrichment, in both antibiotics and concentrations tested. However, fluorescence microscopy showed the existence of viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells in a larger number than that of possible persister cells. The analysis of the FA composition of the cells showed that, following antibiotic exposure up to 6 h, the survivor cells have an increased percentage of saturated FAs, a significant reduced percentage of branched FAs and an increased iso/anteiso branched FA ratio when compared to cells exhibiting a regular phenotype. This should result in lower membrane fluidity. However, cells exposed for 8–24 h presented an increased branched/saturated and lower iso/anteiso branched FA ratios, and thus increased membrane fluidity. Furthermore, the phenotypic changes were transmitted to daughter cells grown in drug-free media. The fact that VBNC cells presented nearly the same FA composition as those obtained after cell growth in drug-free media, which could only be the result of growth of persister cells, suggest that VBNC and persister phenotypes share the same type of response to antibiotics at the lipid level. PMID:26834731

  3. Phenotypic Modifications in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Exposed to High Concentrations of Vancomycin and Teicoplanin.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Fábio D A; de Carvalho, Carla C C R

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cells are known to change the fatty acid (FA) composition of the phospholipids as a phenotypic response to environmental conditions and to the presence of toxic compounds such as antibiotics. In the present study, Staphylococcus aureus cells collected during the exponential growth phase were challenged with 50 and 100 mg/L of vancomycin and teicoplanin, which are concentrations high enough to kill the large majority of the cell population. Colony-forming unit counts showed biphasic killing kinetics, typical for persister cell enrichment, in both antibiotics and concentrations tested. However, fluorescence microscopy showed the existence of viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells in a larger number than that of possible persister cells. The analysis of the FA composition of the cells showed that, following antibiotic exposure up to 6 h, the survivor cells have an increased percentage of saturated FAs, a significant reduced percentage of branched FAs and an increased iso/anteiso branched FA ratio when compared to cells exhibiting a regular phenotype. This should result in lower membrane fluidity. However, cells exposed for 8-24 h presented an increased branched/saturated and lower iso/anteiso branched FA ratios, and thus increased membrane fluidity. Furthermore, the phenotypic changes were transmitted to daughter cells grown in drug-free media. The fact that VBNC cells presented nearly the same FA composition as those obtained after cell growth in drug-free media, which could only be the result of growth of persister cells, suggest that VBNC and persister phenotypes share the same type of response to antibiotics at the lipid level. PMID:26834731

  4. Adaptive responses and apoptosis in endothelial cells exposed to carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Stephen R.; Fisher, Donald; Xu, Y. Anne; Notarfrancesco, Kathy; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2000-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) will elevate the steady-state concentration of nitric oxide (⋅NO) in several cell types and body organs and that some toxic effects of CO are directed toward endothelial cells. Studies reported in this paper were conducted with bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells exposed to 10 to 100 ppm CO to achieve concentrations between 11 and 110 nM in air-saturated buffer. Exposure to 11 nM CO increased synthesis of manganous superoxide dismutase and conferred resistance against the lethal effects of 110 nM CO. At concentrations of 88 nM CO or more, exposures for 1 h or longer caused cell death that became apparent 18 h after the exposure ceased. Caspase-1 was activated in response to CO, and cell death was inhibited by a caspase-1 inhibitor. Alteration of proteolytic pathways by CO was indicated by the presence of ubiquitin-containing intracellular inclusion bodies. Morphological changes and caspase activation indicated that cell death was an apoptotic process. Cells exposed to 110 nM CO had higher concentrations of manganous superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase-1 but no changes in glutathione peroxidase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, thiols, or catalase. Elevated levels of antioxidant enzymes and apoptosis were inhibited by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, S-isopropylisothiourea, and the peroxynitrite scavenger, selenomethionine. These results show that biochemical effects of CO occur at environmentally relevant concentrations, that apoptotic cell death follows exposure to relatively high concentrations of CO, and that these actions of CO are mediated by nitric oxide. PMID:10655526

  5. Assessment of DNA integrity (COMET assay) in sperm cells of boron-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Duydu, Yalçin; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydin, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçin; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Britta Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann M

    2012-01-01

    An extension of a male reproductive study conducted in a boric acid/borate production zone at Bandırma, Turkey, is presented. The relation between DNA-strand breaks (COMET assay, neutral and alkaline version) in sperm cells and previously described sperm quality parameters was investigated in boron-exposed males. A correlation between blood boron levels and mean DNA-strand breaks in sperm was weak, and DNA-strand breaks in sperm were statistically not different between control and exposed groups. Therefore, increasing boron exposures had no additional contribution in addition to already pre-existing DNA-strand breaks in the sperm cells. Weak but statistically significant correlations between DNA-strand breaks and motility/morphology parameters of sperm samples were observed in the neutral version of the COMET assay, while correlations between the same variables were statistically not significant in the alkaline version. A likely reason for these negative results, even in highly exposed humans, is that experimental exposures that had led to reproductive toxicity in animals were significantly higher than any boron exposures, which may be reached under realistic human conditions.

  6. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  7. Competitive binding of pentraxins and IgM to newly exposed epitopes on late apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ciurana, Caroline L F; Hack, C Erik

    2006-01-01

    A random distribution of phospholipids among the inner and outer leaflet of the cell membrane occurs during apoptosis and is known as membrane flip-flop. Flip-flopped cells have binding sites for various plasma proteins, such as IgM and the pentraxins C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). In this study, we investigated whether pentraxins and IgM antibodies recognize the same binding sites on apoptotic cells, and whether phospholipids constitute these binding sites. Except for SAP which also bound to early apoptotic cells, pentraxins and IgM preferentially bound to late apoptotic cells. Competition experiments with different phosphatemonoesters revealed that CRP and SAP as well as part of the IgM bound to the phospholipids head groups, SAP mainly to phosphorylethanolamine, CRP to phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine and to a lesser extent to phosphorylserine, and IgM to phosphorylcholine and phosphorylserine. These results were confirmed in experiments in which proteins were adsorbed from plasma with artificial phospholipids particles. IgM and the pentraxins variably competed for the same binding sites on late apoptotic cells, SAP having the highest and CRP the lowest apparent affinity. We conclude that CRP, SAP, and part of the IgM bind to the phospholipid head groups exposed on apoptotic cells. This shared specificity as well as their shared capability to activate complement, suggest that IgM and the pentraxins CRP and SAP exert similar functions in the removal of apoptotic cells.

  8. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis. PMID:27502666

  9. Cytoskeleton Modifications and Autophagy Induction in TCam-2 Seminoma Cells Exposed to Simulated Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Ferranti, Francesca; Caruso, Maria; Cammarota, Marcella; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Schiraldi, Chiara; Catizone, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The study of how mechanical forces may influence cell behavior via cytoskeleton remodeling is a relevant challenge of nowadays that may allow us to define the relationship between mechanics and biochemistry and to address the larger problem of biological complexity. An increasing amount of literature data reported that microgravity condition alters cell architecture as a consequence of cytoskeleton structure modifications. Herein, we are reporting the morphological, cytoskeletal, and behavioral modifications due to the exposition of a seminoma cell line (TCam-2) to simulated microgravity. Even if no differences in cell proliferation and apoptosis were observed after 24 hours of exposure to simulated microgravity, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed that the change of gravity vector significantly affects TCam-2 cell surface morphological appearance. Consistent with this observation, we found that microtubule orientation is altered by microgravity. Moreover, the confocal analysis of actin microfilaments revealed an increase in the cell width induced by the low gravitational force. Microtubules and microfilaments have been related to autophagy modulation and, interestingly, we found a significant autophagic induction in TCam-2 cells exposed to simulated microgravity. This observation is of relevant interest because it shows, for the first time, TCam-2 cell autophagy as a biological response induced by a mechanical stimulus instead of a biochemical one. PMID:25140323

  10. Insights on cryoprotectant toxicity from gene expression profiling of endothelial cells exposed to ethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rui Martins; Stirling, Soren; Fahy, Gregory M; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2015-12-01

    Cryopreservation consists of preserving living cells or tissues generally at -80 °C or below and has many current applications in cell and tissue banking, and future potential for organ banking. Cryoprotective agents such as ethylene glycol (EG) are required for successful cryopreservation of most living systems, but have toxic side effects whose mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this work, we investigated the mechanisms of toxicity of ethylene glycol in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a model of the vascular endothelium in perfused organs. Exposing cells to 60% v/v EG for 2 h at 4 °C resulted in only a slight decrease in subsequent cell growth, suggesting only modest toxicity of EG for this cell type. Gene expression analysis with whole genome microarrays revealed signatures indicative of a generalized stress response at 24 h after EG exposure and a trend toward partial recovery at 72 h. The observed changes involved signalling pathways, glycoproteins, and genes involved in extracellular and transmembrane functions, the latter suggesting potential effects of ethylene glycol on membranes. These results continue to develop a new paradigm for understanding cryoprotectant toxicity and reveal molecular signatures helpful for future experiments in more completely elucidating the toxic effects of ethylene glycol in vascular endothelial cells and other cell types. PMID:26471925

  11. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hengguang; Hu, Shanglian; Huang, Peng; Song, Hua; Wang, Kan; Ruan, Jing; He, Rong; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-12-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  12. Cytoskeleton modifications and autophagy induction in TCam-2 seminoma cells exposed to simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Ferranti, Francesca; Caruso, Maria; Cammarota, Marcella; Masiello, Maria Grazia; Corano Scheri, Katia; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Schiraldi, Chiara; Cucina, Alessandra; Catizone, Angela; Ricci, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    The study of how mechanical forces may influence cell behavior via cytoskeleton remodeling is a relevant challenge of nowadays that may allow us to define the relationship between mechanics and biochemistry and to address the larger problem of biological complexity. An increasing amount of literature data reported that microgravity condition alters cell architecture as a consequence of cytoskeleton structure modifications. Herein, we are reporting the morphological, cytoskeletal, and behavioral modifications due to the exposition of a seminoma cell line (TCam-2) to simulated microgravity. Even if no differences in cell proliferation and apoptosis were observed after 24 hours of exposure to simulated microgravity, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed that the change of gravity vector significantly affects TCam-2 cell surface morphological appearance. Consistent with this observation, we found that microtubule orientation is altered by microgravity. Moreover, the confocal analysis of actin microfilaments revealed an increase in the cell width induced by the low gravitational force. Microtubules and microfilaments have been related to autophagy modulation and, interestingly, we found a significant autophagic induction in TCam-2 cells exposed to simulated microgravity. This observation is of relevant interest because it shows, for the first time, TCam-2 cell autophagy as a biological response induced by a mechanical stimulus instead of a biochemical one.

  13. Live-cell imaging study of mitochondrial morphology in mammalian cells exposed to X-rays.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, M; Kanari, Y; Yokoya, A; Narita, A; Fujii, K

    2015-09-01

    Morphological changes in mitochondria induced by X-irradiation in normal murine mammary gland cells were studied with a live-cell microscopic imaging technique. Mitochondria were visualised by staining with a specific fluorescent probe in the cells, which express fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator 2 (Fucci2) probes to visualise cell cycle. In unirradiated cells, the number of cells with fragmented mitochondria was about 20 % of the total cells through observation period (96 h). In irradiated cells, the population with fragmented mitochondria significantly increased depending on the absorbed dose. Particularly, for 8 Gy irradiation, the accumulation of fragmentation persists even in the cells whose cell cycle came to a stand (80 % in G1 (G0-like) phase). The fraction reached to a maximum at 96 h after irradiation. The kinetics of the fraction with fragmented mitochondria was similar to that for cells in S/G2/M phase (20 %) through the observation period (120 h). The evidences show that, in irradiated cells, some signals are continually released from a nucleus or cytoplasm even in the G0-like cells to operate some sort of protein machineries involved in mitochondrial fission. It is inferred that this delayed mitochondrial fragmentation is strongly related to their dysfunction, and hence might modulate radiobiological effects such as mutation or cell death.

  14. The experiment on the protein exposed to acoustic wave in model of hair cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, H

    1976-01-01

    Why do animals have intense troubles mainly in the basal turns of their cochleae by exposure to sound and the ototoxity? I thought that the protein in cells had an important relation to this subject. So I performed this experiment. I made model of hair cells of silicon and poured three kinds of solutions of protein into them. And I checked the ionization of the protein and its denaturation by giving strong energy of oscillation to them like the same idea of photoelectric effect. As the result, as for the protein liquid, I noticed the increase of volts just after it was exposed to sound and about 3 hours later, I observed the figure decreased gradually. From this phenomenon, I presumed that the protein in sensory cells became a factor of the stimulation by receiving strong energy conversely. Low-percent protein liquid had less effect caused by sound. PMID:7097

  15. QSAR model for predicting cell viability of human embryonic kidney cells exposed to SiO₂ nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Serena; Leone, Caterina; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Benfenati, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    A predictive model for the viability (%) of cultured human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) exposed to 20 and 50 nm silica nanoparticles was built using 'optimal descriptors' as mathematical functions of size, concentration and exposure time. The calculation was carried out with CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral/) on five random splits of combined systems (particle size-particle concentration-cell exposure time) into training, calibration, and validation sets. The R(2) values of the best models were above 0.68. The average statistical quality of the model for the viability (%) of HEK293 exposed to different concentrations of silica nanoparticles measured by MTT assay is satisfactory. PMID:26439516

  16. Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia-Telangiectasia Cells Exposed to Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Ito, H.; Liu, C.; Shigematsu, N.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Although cells derived from Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients are known to exhibit abnormal responses to ionizing radiations, its underlying mechanism still remains unclear. Previously, the authors reported that at the same gamma-irradiation dose AT cells show higher frequencies of misrepair and deletions compared to normal human fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/m), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/m) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/m) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/m and then decreased at 440 keV/m. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/m there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for AT cells when it was compared at 185 keV/m but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types

  17. Fate of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to X-rays or carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Luft, S; Pignalosa, D; Nasonova, E; Arrizabalaga, O; Helm, A; Durante, M; Ritter, S

    2014-01-15

    The risk of radiation exposure during embryonic development is still a major problem in radiotoxicology. In this study we investigated the response of the murine embryonic stem cell (mESC) line D3 to two radiation qualities: sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions. We analyzed clonogenic cell survival, proliferation, induction of chromosome aberrations as well as the capability of cells to differentiate to beating cardiomyocytes up to 3 days after exposure. Our results show that, for all endpoints investigated, carbon ions are more effective than X-rays at the same radiation dose. Additionally, in long term studies (≥8 days post-irradiation) chromosomal damage and the pluripotency state were investigated. These studies reveal that pluripotency markers are present in the progeny of cells surviving the exposure to both radiation types. However, only in the progeny of X-ray exposed cells the aberration frequency was comparable to that of the control population, while the progeny of carbon ion irradiated cells harbored significantly more aberrations than the control, generally translocations. We conclude that cells surviving the radiation exposure maintain pluripotency but may carry stable chromosomal rearrangements after densely ionizing radiation.

  18. Antioxidative capacity and enzyme activity in Haematococcus pluvialis cells exposed to superoxide free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiaoli; Sun, Yanhong; Lin, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The antioxidative capacity of astaxanthin and enzyme activity of reactive oxygen eliminating enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) were studied in three cell types of Haematococcus pluvialis exposed to high concentrations of a superoxide anion radical (O{2/-}). The results show that defensive enzymes and astaxanthin-related mechanisms were both active in H. pluvialis during exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O{2/-}. Astaxanthin reacted with ROS much faster than did the protective enzymes, and had the strongest antioxidative capacity to protect against lipid peroxidation. The defensive mechanisms varied significantly between the three cell types and were related to the level of astaxanthin that had accumulated in those cells. Astaxanthin-enriched red cells had the strongest antioxidative capacity, followed by brown cells, and astaxanthin-deficient green cells. Although there was no significant increase in expression of protective enzymes, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in red cells was sustained at a low level because of the antioxidative effect of astaxanthin, which quenched O{2/-} before the protective enzymes could act. In green cells, astaxanthin is very low or absent; therefore, scavenging of ROS is inevitably reliant on antioxidative enzymes. Accordingly, in green cells, these enzymes play the leading role in scavenging ROS, and the expression of these enzymes is rapidly increased to reduce excessive ROS. However, because ROS were constantly increased in this study, the enhance enzyme activity in the green cells was not able to repair the ROS damage, leading to elevated MDA content. Of the four defensive enzymes measured in astaxanthin-deficient green cells, SOD eliminates O{2/-}, POD eliminates H2O2, which is a by-product of SOD activity, and APX and CAT are then initiated to scavenge excessive ROS.

  19. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in A549 Cells Exposed to 6 MV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuning; Xu, Jing; Shao, Weixian; Geng, Chong; Li, Jia; Guo, Feng; Miao, Hui; Shen, Wenbin; Ye, Tao; Liu, Yazhou; Xu, Haiting; Zhang, Xuguang

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the bystander effects in A549 cells that have been exposed to 6MV X-ray. Control group, irradiated group, irradiated conditioned medium (ICM)-received group, and fresh medium group were designed in this study. A549 cells in the logarithmic growth phase were irradiated with 6MV X-ray at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2. In ICM-received group, post-irradiation A549 cells were cultured for 3 h and were transferred into non-irradiated A549 cells for further cultivation. Clone forming test was applied to detect the survival fraction of cells. Annexin V-FITC/PI double-staining assay was used to detect the apoptosis of A549 cells 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation, and the curves of apoptosis were drawn. The changes in the cell cycles 4, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation were detected using PI staining flow cytometry. With the increase of irradiation dose, the survival fraction of A549 cells after the application of 0.5 Gy irradiation was decreasing continuously. In comparison to the control group, the apoptosis rate of the ICM-received group was increased in a time-dependent pattern, with the highest apoptosis rate observed at 72 h (p < 0.05). Cell count in G2/M stages was obviously increased compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05), with the highest count observed at 72 h, after which G2/M stage arrest was diminished. ICM can cause apparent A549 cell damage, indicating that 6MV X-ray irradiation can induce bystander effect on A549 cells, which reaches a peak at 72 h.

  20. Detection of 8-oxodG in Dreissena polymorpha gill cells exposed to model contaminants.

    PubMed

    Michel, Cécile; Vincent-Hubert, Françoise

    2012-01-24

    Genotoxic end-points are routinely measured in various sentinel organisms in aquatic environments in order to monitor the impact of water pollution on organisms. As a first step towards the evaluation of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxodG) in organisms exposed to chemical water pollution, we have optimized the association between the comet assay and the hOGG1 enzyme for use on zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) gill cells by in vitro exposure to H₂O₂. Firstly, we observed that in vitro exposure of D. polymorpha gill cells to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, 98.4nM) induced an increase of the Olive Tail Moment (OTM) in both the comet-hOGG1 and comet-Fpg assays, indicating that B[a]P causes oxidative DNA damage. By contrast, methylmethane sulfonate (MMS, 33μM) only induced an increase of the Fpg-sensitive sites, indicating that MMS caused alkylating DNA damage and confirming that hOGG1 does not detect alkylating damage. Thus, the hOGG1 enzyme seems to be more specific towards oxidative DNA damage, such as 8-oxodG than Fpg. Secondly, as was observed in vitro, the in vivo exposure of D. polymorpha to B[a]P (24.6 and 98.4nM) increased oxidative DNA damage in gill cells, whereas only Fpg-sensitive sites were detected in mussels exposed to MMS (240μM). These results show that the comet-hOGG1 assay detects oxidative DNA lesions induced in vitro by H₂O₂ and in vivo with BaP. The comet-hOGG1 assay will be used to detect oxidative DNA lesions (8-oxodG) in mussels exposed in situ. PMID:22009068

  1. Diesel Exhaust Particle-Exposed Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Induce Dendritic Cell Maturation and Polarization via Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin

    PubMed Central

    Bleck, Bertram; Tse, Doris B.; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria A.; Zhang, Feijie

    2009-01-01

    Human exposure to air pollutants, including ambient particulate matter, has been proposed as a mechanism for the rise in allergic disorders. Diesel exhaust particles, a major component of ambient particulate matter, induce sensitization to neoallergens, but the mechanisms by which sensitization occur remain unclear. We show that diesel exhaust particles upregulate thymic stromal lymphopoietin in human bronchial epithelial cells in an oxidant-dependent manner. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin induced by diesel exhaust particles was associated with maturation of myeloid dendritic cells, which was blocked by anti-thymic stromal lymphopoietin antibodies or silencing epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Dendritic cells exposed to diesel exhaust particle-treated human bronchial epithelial cells induced Th2 polarization in a thymic stromal lymphopoietin-dependent manner. These findings provide new insight into the mechanisms by which diesel exhaust particles modify human lung mucosal immunity. PMID:18049884

  2. Proteomic signature of Arabidopsis cell cultures exposed to magnetically induced hyper- and microgravity environments.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Raul; Manzano, Ana I; van Loon, Jack J W A; Christianen, Peter C M; Medina, F Javier

    2013-03-01

    Earth-based microgravity simulation techniques are required due to space research constraints. Using diamagnetic levitation, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana in vitro callus cultures to environments with different levels of effective gravity and magnetic field strengths (B) simultaneously. The environments included simulated 0 g* at B=10.1 T, an internal 1 g* control (B=16.5 T), and hypergravity (2 g* at B=10.1 T). Furthermore, samples were also exposed to altered gravity environments that were created with mechanical devices, such as the Random Positioning Machine (simulated μg) and the Large Diameter Centrifuge (2 g). We have determined the proteomic signature of cell cultures exposed to these altered-gravity environments by means of the difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) technique, and we have compared the results with microarray-based transcriptomes from the same samples. The magnetic field itself produced a low number of proteomic alterations, but the combination of gravitational alteration and magnetic field exposure produced synergistic effects on the proteome of plants (the number of significant changes is 3-7 times greater). Tandem mass spectrometry identification of 19 overlapping spots in the different conditions corroborates a major role of abiotic stress and secondary metabolism proteins in the molecular adaptation of plants to unusual environments, including microgravity.

  3. Proteomic signature of Arabidopsis cell cultures exposed to magnetically induced hyper- and microgravity environments.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Raul; Manzano, Ana I; van Loon, Jack J W A; Christianen, Peter C M; Medina, F Javier

    2013-03-01

    Earth-based microgravity simulation techniques are required due to space research constraints. Using diamagnetic levitation, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana in vitro callus cultures to environments with different levels of effective gravity and magnetic field strengths (B) simultaneously. The environments included simulated 0 g* at B=10.1 T, an internal 1 g* control (B=16.5 T), and hypergravity (2 g* at B=10.1 T). Furthermore, samples were also exposed to altered gravity environments that were created with mechanical devices, such as the Random Positioning Machine (simulated μg) and the Large Diameter Centrifuge (2 g). We have determined the proteomic signature of cell cultures exposed to these altered-gravity environments by means of the difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) technique, and we have compared the results with microarray-based transcriptomes from the same samples. The magnetic field itself produced a low number of proteomic alterations, but the combination of gravitational alteration and magnetic field exposure produced synergistic effects on the proteome of plants (the number of significant changes is 3-7 times greater). Tandem mass spectrometry identification of 19 overlapping spots in the different conditions corroborates a major role of abiotic stress and secondary metabolism proteins in the molecular adaptation of plants to unusual environments, including microgravity. PMID:23510084

  4. Evaluation of cell types for assessment of cytogenetic damage in arsenic exposed population

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Pritha; Basu, Arindam; Singh, Keshav K; Giri, Ashok K

    2008-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic biomarkers are essential for assessing environmental exposure, and reflect adverse human health effects such as cellular damage. Arsenic is a potential clastogen and aneugen. In general, the majority of the studies on clastogenic effects of arsenic are based on frequency of micronuclei (MN) study in peripheral lymphocytes, urothelial and oral epithelial cells. To find out the most suitable cell type, here, we compared cytogenetic damage through MN assay in (a) various populations exposed to arsenic through drinking water retrieved from literature review, as also (b) arsenic-induced Bowen's patients from our own survey. Results For literature review, we have searched the Pubmed database for English language journal articles using the following keywords: "arsenic", "micronuclei", "drinking water", and "human" in various combinations. We have selected 13 studies consistent with our inclusion criteria that measured micronuclei in either one or more of the above-mentioned three cell types, in human samples. Compared to urothelial and buccal mucosa cells, the median effect sizes measured by the difference between people with exposed and unexposed, lymphocyte based MN counts were found to be stronger. This general pattern pooled from 10 studies was consistent with our own set of three earlier studies. MN counts were also found to be stronger for lymphocytes even in arsenic-induced Bowen's patients (cases) compared to control individuals having arsenic-induced non-cancerous skin lesions. Conclusion Overall, it can be concluded that MN in lymphocytes may be superior to other epithelial cells for studying arsenic-induced cytogenetic damage. PMID:18505595

  5. Cell wall chitosaccharides are essential components and exposed patterns of the phytopathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches.

    PubMed

    Badreddine, Ilham; Lafitte, Claude; Heux, Laurent; Skandalis, Nicholas; Spanou, Zacharoula; Martinez, Yves; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Bulone, Vincent; Dumas, Bernard; Bottin, Arnaud

    2008-11-01

    Chitin is an essential component of fungal cell walls, where it forms a crystalline scaffold, and chitooligosaccharides derived from it are signaling molecules recognized by the hosts of pathogenic fungi. Oomycetes are cellulosic fungus-like microorganisms which most often lack chitin in their cell walls. Here we present the first study of the cell wall of the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches, a major parasite of legume plants. Biochemical analyses demonstrated the presence of ca. 10% N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) in the cell wall. Further characterization of the GlcNAc-containing material revealed that it corresponds to noncrystalline chitosaccharides associated with glucans, rather than to chitin per se. Two putative chitin synthase (CHS) genes were identified by data mining of an A. euteiches expressed sequence tag collection and Southern blot analysis, and full-length cDNA sequences of both genes were obtained. Phylogeny analysis indicated that oomycete CHS diversification occurred before the divergence of the major oomycete lineages. Remarkably, lectin labeling showed that the Aphanomyces euteiches chitosaccharides are exposed at the cell wall surface, and study of the effect of the CHS inhibitor nikkomycin Z demonstrated that they are involved in cell wall function. These data open new perspectives for the development of antioomycete drugs and further studies of the molecular mechanisms involved in the recognition of pathogenic oomycetes by the host plants. PMID:18806214

  6. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L; Morrell, Nicholas W; Lever, Andrew M L

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm(2). The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair.

  7. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L; Morrell, Nicholas W; Lever, Andrew M L

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm(2). The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair. PMID:27413378

  8. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm2. The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair. PMID:27413378

  9. Transcriptional and Secretomic Profiling of Epidermal Cells Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Greene, Hillary Boulay; Wilkins, Ruth C

    2012-01-01

    Alpha (α)-particle emitters are probable isotopes to be used in a terrorist attack. The development of biological assessment tools to identify those who have handled these difficult to detect materials would be an asset to our current forensic capacity. In this study, for the purposes of biomarker discovery, human keratinocytes were exposed to α-particle and X-radiation (0.98 Gy/h at 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 Gy) and assessed for differential gene and protein expression using microarray and Bio-Plex technology, respectively. Secretomic analysis of supernatants showed expression of two pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-13 and PDGF-bb) to be exclusively affected in α-particle exposed cells. The highest dose of α-particle radiation modulated a total of 67 transcripts (fold change>|1.5|, (False discovery rate) FDR<0.05) in exposed cells. Several genes which responded with high expression levels (>2 fold) included KIF20A, NEFM, C7orf10, HIST1H2BD, BMP6, and HIST1H2AC. Among the high expressing genes, five (CCNB2, BUB1, NEK2, CDC20, AURKA) were also differentially expressed at the medium (1.0 Gy) dose however, these genes were unmodulated following exposure to X-irradiation. Networks of these genes clustered around tumor protein-53 and transforming growth factor-beta signaling. This study has identified some potential gene /protein responses and networks that may be validated further to confirm their specificity and potential to be signature biomarkers of α-particle exposure. PMID:23002402

  10. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells exposed to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G M; Pandey, J P; Schmidt, M G; Arnaud, P; Goust, J M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease, which results from occupational exposure to particulate beryllium, is characterized by the development of lung granulomas and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta) by pulmonary alveolar macrophages occurs in many chronic fibrotic lung diseases and is thought to contribute to the disease process. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytokine production by human monocytic cells exposed to beryllium in vitro. The results indicated that such cells respond to beryllium ions in the presence of fluoride by accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid for both tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that inhaled beryllium may directly stimulate the production of these cytokines by alveolar macrophages in vitro. PMID:8629860

  11. From the Cover: Exposing Imidacloprid Interferes With Neurogenesis Through Impacting on Chick Neural Tube Cell Survival.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Wang, Guang; Zhang, Shi-Yao; Zhong, Shan; Qi, Guo-Long; Wang, Chao-Jie; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-09-01

    As a neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid is widely used to control insects in agriculture and fleas on domestic animals. However, it is not known whether imidacloprid exposure negatively affects neurogenesis during embryonic development. In this study, using a chick embryo model, we investigated the effects of imidacloprid exposure on neurogenesis at the earliest stage and during late-stage embryo development. Exposing HH0 chick embryos to imidacloprid in EC culture caused neural tube defects (NTDs) and neuronal differentiation dysplasia as determined by NF/Tuj1 labeling. Furthermore, we found that F-actin accumulation on the apical side of the neural tube was suppressed by exposure to imidacloprid, and the expression of BMP4 and Shh on the dorsal and ventral sides of the neural tubes, respectively, were also reduced, which in turn affects the dorsolateral hinge points during bending of the neural plate. In addition, exposure to imidacloprid reduced cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis, as determined by pHIS3 labeling and TUNEL staining, respectively, also contributing to the malformation. We obtained similar results in late-stage embryos exposed to imidacloprid. Finally, a bioinformatics analysis was employed to determine which genes identified in this study were involved in NTDs. The experimental evidence and bioinformatics analysis suggested that imidacloprid exposure during chick embryo development could increase the risk of NTDs and neural dysplasia.

  12. From the Cover: Exposing Imidacloprid Interferes With Neurogenesis Through Impacting on Chick Neural Tube Cell Survival.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Wang, Guang; Zhang, Shi-Yao; Zhong, Shan; Qi, Guo-Long; Wang, Chao-Jie; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-09-01

    As a neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid is widely used to control insects in agriculture and fleas on domestic animals. However, it is not known whether imidacloprid exposure negatively affects neurogenesis during embryonic development. In this study, using a chick embryo model, we investigated the effects of imidacloprid exposure on neurogenesis at the earliest stage and during late-stage embryo development. Exposing HH0 chick embryos to imidacloprid in EC culture caused neural tube defects (NTDs) and neuronal differentiation dysplasia as determined by NF/Tuj1 labeling. Furthermore, we found that F-actin accumulation on the apical side of the neural tube was suppressed by exposure to imidacloprid, and the expression of BMP4 and Shh on the dorsal and ventral sides of the neural tubes, respectively, were also reduced, which in turn affects the dorsolateral hinge points during bending of the neural plate. In addition, exposure to imidacloprid reduced cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis, as determined by pHIS3 labeling and TUNEL staining, respectively, also contributing to the malformation. We obtained similar results in late-stage embryos exposed to imidacloprid. Finally, a bioinformatics analysis was employed to determine which genes identified in this study were involved in NTDs. The experimental evidence and bioinformatics analysis suggested that imidacloprid exposure during chick embryo development could increase the risk of NTDs and neural dysplasia. PMID:27444676

  13. Altered gene expression in HepG2 cells exposed to a methanolic coal dust extract.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Castilla, Angelica; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2014-11-01

    Exposure to coal dust has been associated with different chronic diseases and mortality risk. This airborne pollutant is produced during coal mining and transport activities, generating environmental and human toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a coal dust methanolic extract on HepG2, a human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. Cells were exposed to 5-100ppm methanolic coal extract for 12h, using DMSO as control. MTT and comet assays were used for the evaluation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively. Real time PCR was utilized to quantify relative expression of genes related to oxidative stress, xenobiotic metabolism and DNA damage. Coal extract concentrations did not induce significant changes in HepG2 cell viability after 12h exposure; however, 50 and 100ppm of the coal extract produced a significant increase in genetic damage index with respect to negative control. Compared to vehicle control, mRNA CYP1A1 (up to 163-fold), NQO1 (up to 4.7-fold), and GADD45B (up to 4.7-fold) were up regulated, whereas PRDX1, SOD, CAT, GPX1, XPA, ERCC1 and APEX1 remained unaltered. This expression profile suggests that cells exposed to coal dust extract shows aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated alterations, changes in cellular oxidative status, and genotoxic effects. These findings share some similarities with those observed in liver of mice captured near coal mining areas, and add evidence that living around these industrial operations may be negatively impacting the biota and human health. PMID:25305735

  14. Altered gene expression in HepG2 cells exposed to a methanolic coal dust extract.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Castilla, Angelica; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2014-11-01

    Exposure to coal dust has been associated with different chronic diseases and mortality risk. This airborne pollutant is produced during coal mining and transport activities, generating environmental and human toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a coal dust methanolic extract on HepG2, a human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. Cells were exposed to 5-100ppm methanolic coal extract for 12h, using DMSO as control. MTT and comet assays were used for the evaluation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively. Real time PCR was utilized to quantify relative expression of genes related to oxidative stress, xenobiotic metabolism and DNA damage. Coal extract concentrations did not induce significant changes in HepG2 cell viability after 12h exposure; however, 50 and 100ppm of the coal extract produced a significant increase in genetic damage index with respect to negative control. Compared to vehicle control, mRNA CYP1A1 (up to 163-fold), NQO1 (up to 4.7-fold), and GADD45B (up to 4.7-fold) were up regulated, whereas PRDX1, SOD, CAT, GPX1, XPA, ERCC1 and APEX1 remained unaltered. This expression profile suggests that cells exposed to coal dust extract shows aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated alterations, changes in cellular oxidative status, and genotoxic effects. These findings share some similarities with those observed in liver of mice captured near coal mining areas, and add evidence that living around these industrial operations may be negatively impacting the biota and human health.

  15. Gene expression profile of Jurkat cells exposed to high power terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundt, Jessica E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Rivest, Benjamin D.; Doroski, Michael L.; Payne, Jason; Ibey, Bennett L.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2011-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation sources are now being used in a host of military, defense, and medical applications. Widespread employment of these applications has prompted concerns regarding the health effects associated with THz radiation. In this study, we examined the gene expression profile of mammalian cells exposed to THz radiation. We hypothesized that if THz radiation couples directly to cellular constituents, then exposed cells may express a specific gene expression profile indicative of ensuing damage. To test this hypothesis, Jurkat cells were irradiated with a molecular gas THz laser (2.52 THz, 636 mWcm-2, durations: 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, or 50 minutes). Viability was assessed 24 h post-exposure using MTT assays, and gene expression profiles were evaluated 4 h post-exposure using mRNA microarrays. Comparable analyses were also performed for hyperthermic positive controls (44°C for 40 minutes). We found that cellular temperatures increased by ~6 °C during THz exposures. We also found that cell death increased with exposure duration, and the median lethal dose (LD50) was calculated to be ~44 minutes. The microarray data showed that THz radiation induced the transcriptional activation of genes associated with cellular proliferation, differentiation, transcriptional activation, chaperone protein stabilization, and apoptosis. For most genes, we found that the magnitude of differential expression was comparable for both the THz and thermal exposure groups; however, several genes were specifically activated by the THz exposure. These results suggest that THz radiation may elicit effects that are not exclusively due to the temperature rise created during THz exposures (i.e. thermal effects). In future work, we plan to verify the results of our microarray experiments using qPCR techniques.

  16. Genotoxic changes to rodent cells exposed in vitro to tungsten, nickel, cobalt and iron.

    PubMed

    Bardack, Stephanie; Dalgard, Clifton L; Kalinich, John F; Kasper, Christine E

    2014-03-10

    Tungsten-based materials have been proposed as replacements for depleted uranium in armor-penetrating munitions and for lead in small-arms ammunition. A recent report demonstrated that a military-grade composition of tungsten, nickel, and cobalt induced a highly-aggressive, metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats to simulate a shrapnel wound. The early genetic changes occurring in response to embedded metal fragments are not known. In this study, we utilized two cultured rodent myoblast cell lines, exposed to soluble tungsten alloys and the individual metals comprising the alloys, to study the genotoxic effects. By profiling cell transcriptomes using microarray, we found slight, yet distinct and unique, gene expression changes in rat myoblast cells after 24 h metal exposure, and several genes were identified that correlate with impending adverse consequences of ongoing exposure to weapons-grade tungsten alloy. These changes were not as apparent in the mouse myoblast cell line. This indicates a potential species difference in the cellular response to tungsten alloy, a hypothesis supported by current findings with in vivo model systems. Studies examining genotoxic-associated gene expression changes in cells from longer exposure times are warranted.

  17. Ultrastructure and calcium balance in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to extremely low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    Investigations of low magnetic field (LMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planned space flights to other planets where the field intensity does not exceed 10 -5 Oe. Pea ( Pisum sativum L.) seeds were grown in an environment of LMF 3 days. In meristem cells of roots exposed to LMF, one could observe such ultrastructural peculiarities as a noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids. Mitochondria were the most sensitive organelle to LMF application. Their size and relative volume in cells increased, matrix was electron-transparent, and cristae reduced. Because of the significant role of calcium signalling in plant responses to different environmental factors, calcium participation in LMF effects was investigated using a pyroantimonate method to identify the localization of free calcium ions. The intensity of cytochemical reaction in root cells after LMF application was strong. The Ca 2+ pyroantimonate deposits were observed both in all organelles and in a hyaloplasm of the cells. Data obtained suggest that the observed LMF effects on ultrastructure of root cells were due to disruptions in different metabolic systems including effects on Ca 2+ homeostasis.

  18. PD-L2 induction on dendritic cells exposed to Mycobacterium avium downregulates BCG-specific T cell response.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Coronel, Elizabeth; Camacho-Sandoval, Rosa; Bonifaz, Laura C; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    The exposure to certain species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) can modulate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Mycobacterium avium has been postulated as a weak inducer of dendritic cell (DC) maturation. However, how the DC exposure to M. avium could contribute to the modulation of a BCG-specific CD4+ T cell response and the molecules involved remain unknown. Here, we exposed bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) to M. avium either prior to exposure to BCG or as a unique stimulus. We found that M. avium induces high expression of PD-L2 (B7-DC) in BMDCs. This was dependent on IL-10 production through the TLR2-p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Exposure to M. avium prior to BCG results in BMDCs that do not express co-stimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines, while the expression of PD-L2 and IL-10 was maintained. BMDCs exposed to M. avium impaired the activation of BCG-specific T cells through the PD-1: PD-L interaction. This suggests that a M. avium-induced phenotype in DCs might be implicated in the induction of mechanisms of tolerance that could impact the T cell response induced by BCG vaccination.

  19. Human epithelial cells exposed to functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: interactions and cell surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Fanizza, C; Casciardi, S; Incoronato, F; Cavallo, D; Ursini, C L; Ciervo, A; Maiello, R; Fresegna, A M; Marcelloni, A M; Lega, D; Alvino, A; Baiguera, S

    2015-09-01

    With the expansion of the production and applications of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in several industrial and science branches, the potential adverse effects on human health have attracted attention. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate how chemical functionalization may affect MWCNT effects; however, controversial data have been reported, showing either increased or reduced toxicity. In particular, the impact of carboxylation on MWCNT cytotoxicity is far from being completely understood. The aim of this work was the evaluation of the modifications induced by carboxylated-MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) on cell surface and the study of cell-MWCNT-COOH interactions by means of field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) were incubated with MWCNTs-COOH for different exposure times and concentrations (10 μg/mL for 1, 2, 4 h; 5, 10, 20 μg/mL for 24 h). At short incubation time, MWCNTs-COOH were easily observed associated with plasma membrane and in contact with microvilli. After 24 h exposure, FESEM analysis revealed that MWCNTs-COOH induced evident changes in the cellular surface in comparison to control cells: treated cells showed blebs, holes and a depletion of the microvilli density in association with structure modifications, such as widening and/or lengthening. In particular, an increase of cells showing holes and microvilli structure alterations was observed at 20 μg/mL concentration. FESEM analysis showed nanotube agglomerates, of different sizes, entering into the cell with two different mechanisms: inward bending of the membrane followed by nanotube sinking, and nanotube internalization directly through holes. The observed morphological microvilli modifications, induced by MWCNTs-COOH, could affect epithelial functions, such as the control of surfactant production and secretion, leading to pathological conditions, such as alveolar proteinosis. More detailed studies will be, however, necessary to

  20. Global gene expression profiling in human lung cells exposed to cobalt

    PubMed Central

    Malard, Veronique; Berenguer, Frederic; Prat, Odette; Ruat, Sylvie; Steinmetz, Gerard; Quemeneur, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that more than 1 million workers in the United States are exposed to cobalt. Occupational exposure to 59 Co occurs mainly via inhalation and leads to various lung diseases. Cobalt is classified by the IARC as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B). Although there is evidence for in vivo and in vitro toxicity, the mechanisms of cobalt-induced lung toxicity are not fully known. The purpose of this work was to identify potential signatures of acute cobalt exposure using a toxicogenomic approach. Data analysis focused on some cellular processes and protein targets that are thought to be relevant for carcinogenesis, transport and biomarker research. Results A time course transcriptome analysis was performed on A549 human pulmonary cells, leading to the identification of 85 genes which are repressed or induced in response to soluble 59 Co. A group of 29 of these genes, representing the main biological functions, was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. The expression profiles of six of them were then tested by quantitative RT-PCR in a time-dependent manner and three modulations were confirmed by Western blotting. The 85 modulated genes include potential cobalt carriers (FBXL2, ZNT1, SLC12A5), tumor suppressors or transcription factors (MAZ, DLG1, MYC, AXL) and genes linked to the stress response (UBC, HSPCB, BNIP3L). We also identified nine genes coding for secreted proteins as candidates for biomarker research. Of those, TIMP2 was found to be down-regulated and this modulation was confirmed, in a dose-dependent manner, at protein level in the supernatant of exposed cells. Conclusion Most of these genes have never been described as related to cobalt stress and provide original hypotheses for further study of the effects of this metal ion on human lung epithelial cells. A putative biomarker of cobalt toxicity was identified. PMID:17553155

  1. Induction of micronuclei in haemocytes and gill cells of zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, exposed to clastogens.

    PubMed

    Mersch, J; Beauvais, M N; Nagel, P

    1996-11-01

    Zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, were exposed to four directly acting reference clastogens (mitomycin C, bleomycin, dimethylarsinic acid and potassium chromate) under laboratory conditions. The aim was to examine the inducibility of micronuclei (MN) in haemocytes and gill cells. Positive responses were observed in both tissues for all four substances used under the given test conditions. The mean MN frequencies in treated mussels ranged between 3.2 and 6.9/1000 in haemocytes and between 5.4 and 6.7/1000 in gill cells. The spontaneous MN levels averaged 1.2 and 2.8/1000 in haemocytes and gill cells, respectively. The MN induction capacity of the different chemicals was equivalent in both tissues, except for the treatment with dimethylarsinic acid which generated a significantly higher MN rate in gill cells than in haemocytes. Several characteristics suggest that haemolymph is the more appropriate test tissue for environmental genotoxicity assessment: (1) a shorter preparation time of slides, (2) a more accurate identification of unambiguous MN, (3) a lower baseline MN frequency and a higher induction factor.

  2. The Bioeffects Resulting from Prokaryotic Cells and Yeast Being Exposed to an 18 GHz Electromagnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, The Hong Phong; Pham, Vy T H; Nguyen, Song Ha; Baulin, Vladimir; Croft, Rodney J; Phillips, Brian; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which various biological effects are triggered by exposure to an electromagnetic field are not fully understood and have been the subject of debate. Here, the effects of exposing typical representatives of the major microbial taxa to an 18 GHz microwave electromagnetic field (EMF)were studied. It appeared that the EMF exposure induced cell permeabilisation in all of the bacteria and yeast studied, while the cells remained viable (94% throughout the exposure), independent of the differences in cell membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition. The resulting cell permeabilisation was confirmed by detection of the uptake of propidium iodine and 23 nm fluorescent silica nanospheres using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Upon EMF exposure, the bacterial cell membranes are believed to become permeable through quasi-endocytosis processes. The dosimetry analysis revealed that the EMF threshold level required to induce the uptake of the large (46 nm) nanopsheres was between three and six EMF doses, with a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3 kW/kg and 5 kW/kg per exposure, respectively, depending on the bacterial taxa being studied. It is suggested that the taxonomic affiliation and lipid composition (e.g. the presence of phosphatidyl-glycerol and/or pentadecanoic fatty acid) may affect the extent of uptake of the large nanospheres (46 nm). Multiple 18 GHz EMF exposures over a one-hour period induced periodic anomalous increases in the cell growth behavior of two Staphylococcus aureus strains, namely ATCC 25923 and CIP 65.8T.

  3. The Bioeffects Resulting from Prokaryotic Cells and Yeast Being Exposed to an 18 GHz Electromagnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Vy T. H.; Nguyen, Song Ha; Baulin, Vladimir; Croft, Rodney J.; Phillips, Brian; Crawford, Russell J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which various biological effects are triggered by exposure to an electromagnetic field are not fully understood and have been the subject of debate. Here, the effects of exposing typical representatives of the major microbial taxa to an 18 GHz microwave electromagnetic field (EMF)were studied. It appeared that the EMF exposure induced cell permeabilisation in all of the bacteria and yeast studied, while the cells remained viable (94% throughout the exposure), independent of the differences in cell membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition. The resulting cell permeabilisation was confirmed by detection of the uptake of propidium iodine and 23 nm fluorescent silica nanospheres using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Upon EMF exposure, the bacterial cell membranes are believed to become permeable through quasi-endocytosis processes. The dosimetry analysis revealed that the EMF threshold level required to induce the uptake of the large (46 nm) nanopsheres was between three and six EMF doses, with a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3 kW/kg and 5 kW/kg per exposure, respectively, depending on the bacterial taxa being studied. It is suggested that the taxonomic affiliation and lipid composition (e.g. the presence of phosphatidyl-glycerol and/or pentadecanoic fatty acid) may affect the extent of uptake of the large nanospheres (46 nm). Multiple 18 GHz EMF exposures over a one-hour period induced periodic anomalous increases in the cell growth behavior of two Staphylococcus aureus strains, namely ATCC 25923 and CIP 65.8T. PMID:27391488

  4. The Bioeffects Resulting from Prokaryotic Cells and Yeast Being Exposed to an 18 GHz Electromagnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, The Hong Phong; Pham, Vy T H; Nguyen, Song Ha; Baulin, Vladimir; Croft, Rodney J; Phillips, Brian; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which various biological effects are triggered by exposure to an electromagnetic field are not fully understood and have been the subject of debate. Here, the effects of exposing typical representatives of the major microbial taxa to an 18 GHz microwave electromagnetic field (EMF)were studied. It appeared that the EMF exposure induced cell permeabilisation in all of the bacteria and yeast studied, while the cells remained viable (94% throughout the exposure), independent of the differences in cell membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition. The resulting cell permeabilisation was confirmed by detection of the uptake of propidium iodine and 23 nm fluorescent silica nanospheres using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Upon EMF exposure, the bacterial cell membranes are believed to become permeable through quasi-endocytosis processes. The dosimetry analysis revealed that the EMF threshold level required to induce the uptake of the large (46 nm) nanopsheres was between three and six EMF doses, with a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3 kW/kg and 5 kW/kg per exposure, respectively, depending on the bacterial taxa being studied. It is suggested that the taxonomic affiliation and lipid composition (e.g. the presence of phosphatidyl-glycerol and/or pentadecanoic fatty acid) may affect the extent of uptake of the large nanospheres (46 nm). Multiple 18 GHz EMF exposures over a one-hour period induced periodic anomalous increases in the cell growth behavior of two Staphylococcus aureus strains, namely ATCC 25923 and CIP 65.8T. PMID:27391488

  5. Enhanced histamine release from lung mast cells of guinea pigs exposed to sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu ); Katayama, Noboru; Wakamori, Kazuo )

    1992-06-01

    To clarify the relationship between air pollution and mast cell response, the effects of sulfuric acid aerosols on histamine release from lung mast cells of guinea pigs were investigated. Guinea pigs were exposed to 0.3, 1.0 and 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) aerosols or 4 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) for 2 and 4 weeks. After the exposure, lung mast cell suspensions were isolated by collagenase treatment and antigen- or A23187-induced histamine release was measured. Antigen-induced histamine release from mast cells was significantly enhanced by the exposure to 1.0 and 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 2 weeks, but exposure to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 4 weeks did not show the enhancement of antigen-induced histamine release. A23187-induced histamine release was significantly enhanced by the exposure to 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or 4 ppm NO{sub 2} for 2 weeks, but suppression of histamine release from lung mast cells stimulated with A23187 was observed by the exposure to 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} for 4 weeks. The exposure to 0.3 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} showed no changes in antigen- and A23187-induced histamine release. The combination of 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} with 4 ppm NO{sub 2} for 2 weeks resulted in no changes in antigen- and A23187-induced histamine release. These results suggested that functional properties of lung mast cells may be altered by a low concentration of H{sub 2}So{sub 4} aerosol exposure.

  6. Large heterogeneity of mitochondrial DNA transcription and initiation of replication exposed by single-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Chatre, Laurent; Ricchetti, Miria

    2013-02-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription are crucial for cell function, but these processes are poorly understood at the single-cell level. We describe a novel fluorescence in situ hybridization protocol, called mTRIP (mitochondrial transcription and replication imaging protocol), that reveals simultaneously mtDNA and RNA, and that can also be coupled to immunofluorescence for in situ protein examination. mTRIP reveals mitochondrial structures engaged in initiation of DNA replication by identification of a specific sequence in the regulatory D-loop, as well as unique transcription profiles in single human cells. We observe and quantify at least three classes of mitochondrial structures: (i) replication initiation active and transcript-positive (Ia-Tp); (ii) replication initiation silent and transcript-positive (Is-Tp); and (iii) replication initiation silent and transcript-negative (Is-Tn). Thus, individual mitochondria are dramatically heterogeneous within the same cell. Moreover, mTRIP exposes a mosaic of distinct nucleic acid patterns in the D-loop, including H-strand versus L-strand transcripts, and uncoupled rRNA transcription and mtDNA initiation of replication, which might have functional consequences in the regulation of the mtDNA. Finally, mTRIP identifies altered mtDNA processing in cells with unbalanced mtDNA content and function, including in human mitochondrial disorders. Thus, mTRIP reveals qualitative and quantitative alterations that provide additional tools for elucidating the dynamics of mtDNA processing in single cells and mitochondrial dysfunction in diseases.

  7. Natural Products Mediated Regulation of Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in Ultraviolet Exposed Skin Cells.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Ammad A; Li, Ruei-Nian; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Ismail, Muhammad; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou F; Wang, Hui-Min D; Liu, Jing-Ru; Tang, Jen-Yang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Data obtained through high-throughput technologies have gradually revealed that a unique stratified epithelial architecture of human skin along with the antioxidant-response pathways provided vital defensive mechanisms against UV radiation. However, it is noteworthy that skin is a major target for toxic insult by UV radiations that can alter its structure and function. Substantial fraction of information has been added into the existing pool of knowledge related to natural products mediated biological effects in UV exposed skin cells. Accumulating evidence has started to shed light on the potential of these bioactive ingredients as protective natural products in cosmetics against UV photodamage by exerting biological effects mainly through wide ranging intracellular signalling cascades of oxidative stress and modulation of miRNAs. In this review, we have summarized recently emerging scientific evidences addressing underlying mechanisms of UV induced oxidative stress and deregulation of signalling cascades and how natural products can be used tactfully to protect against UV induced harmful effects.

  8. Formation of lipofuscin in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to pre-oxidized photoreceptor outer segments.

    PubMed

    Wihlmark, U; Wrigstad, A; Roberg, K; Brunk, U T; Nilsson, S E

    1996-04-01

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with increasing age may affect essential supportive functions for the photoreceptors. Earlier, we described a model system for the study of lipofuscinogenesis in RPE cell cultures and showed that mild oxidative stress enhances lipofuscin formation from phagocytized photoreceptor outer segments (POS). In the present study, bovine POS were photo-oxidized, and turned into a lipofuscin-like material, by irradiation with UV light. Transmission electron microscopy of irradiated POS showed loss of the normal stacks of the disk membranes with conversion into an amorphous osmiophilic electron-dense mass. The formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), estimated during the irradiation process, indicated lipid peroxidation. Irradiated POS also showed a strong granular yellow autofluorescence. RPE cell cultures, kept at 21% ambient oxygen, were fed daily for 3, 5 or 7 days with either (i) UV-peroxidized POS, (ii) native POS or (iii) culture medium only. RPE cells fed irradiated POS showed significantly higher levels of lipofuscin-specific autofluorescence compared to cells exposed to native POS after 3 days (p = 0.0056), 5 days (p = 0.0037) and 7 days (p = 0.0020), and to the non-exposed control cells (3 days: p = 0.005, 5 days: p = 0.0037, 7 days: p = 0.0094). The lipofuscin content of cells exposed to irradiated POS increased significantly between days 3 and 7 (p = 0.0335). Ultrastructural studies showed much more numerous and larger lipofuscin-like inclusions in RPE cells fed irradiated POS compared to cells exposed to native POS. In the control cells, lipofuscin-like granules were small and sparse. It appears that exposing RPE cells to previously peroxidized POS, thus artificially converted to lipofuscin and obviously not digestible by the lysosomal enzymes, accelerates the formation of severely lipofuscin-loaded cells. The results will be useful for further studies of possible harmful

  9. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to p-dichlorobenzene.

    PubMed

    Tani, Hidenori; Takeshita, Jun-Ichi; Aoki, Hiroshi; Abe, Ryosuke; Toyoda, Akinobu; Endo, Yasunori; Miyamoto, Sadaaki; Gamo, Masashi; Torimura, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    Because of the limitations of whole animal testing approaches for toxicological assessment, new cell-based assay systems have been widely studied. In this study, we focused on two biological products for toxicological assessment: mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). mESCs possess the abilities of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell types. LlncRNAs are an important class of pervasive non-protein-coding transcripts involved in the molecular mechanisms associated with responses to chemicals. We exposed mESCs to p-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB) for 1 or 28 days (daily dose), extracted total RNA, and performed deep sequencing analyses. The genome-wide gene expression analysis indicated that mechanisms modulating proteins occurred following acute and chronic exposures, and mechanisms modulating genomic DNA occurred following chronic exposure. Moreover, our results indicate that three novel lncRNAs (Snora41, Gm19947, and Scarna3a) in mESCs respond to p-DCB exposure. We propose that these lncRNAs have the potential to be surrogate indicators of p-DCB responses in mESCs. PMID:26975756

  10. Proteomic analysis of cell wall in four pathogenic species of Candida exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Quijas, Mayra Denisse; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2015-10-01

    In order for Candida species to adhere and colonize human host cells they must express cell wall proteins (CWP) and adapt to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by phagocytic cells of the human host during the respiratory burst. However, how these pathogens change the expression of CWP in response to oxidative stress (OSR) is not known. Here, fifteen moonlight-like CWP were identified that expressed differentially in four species of Candida after they were exposed to H2O2 or menadione (O2(-)). These proteins included: (i) glycolytic enzymes, such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gapdh), fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (Fba1), phosphoglycerate mutase (Gpm1), phosphoglycerate kinase (Pgk), pyruvate kinase (Pk) and enolase (Eno1); (ii) the heat shock proteins Ssb1 and Ssa2; (iii) OSR proteins such as peroxyredoxin (Tsa1), the stress protein Ddr48 (Ddr48) and glutathione reductase (Glr1); (iv) other metabolic enzymes such as ketol-acid reductoisomerase (Ilv5) and pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc1); and (v) other proteins such as elongation factor 1-beta (Efb1) and the 14-3-3 protein homolog. RT-PCR revealed that transcription of the genes coding for some of the identified CWP are differentially regulated. To our knowledge this is the first report showing that moonlight-like CWP are the first line of defense of Candida against ROS, and that they are differentially regulated in each of these pathogens.

  11. Investigation of micronucleus induction in MTH1 knockdown cells exposed to UVA, UVB or UVC.

    PubMed

    Fotouhi, Asal; Cornella, Nicola; Ramezani, Mehrafarin; Wojcik, Andrzej; Haghdoost, Siamak

    2015-11-01

    The longer wave parts of UVR can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can oxidize nucleotides in the DNA or in the nucleotide pool leading to mutations. Oxidized bases in the DNA are repaired mainly by the DNA base excision repair system and incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into newly synthesized DNA can be prevented by the enzyme MTH1. Here we hypothesize that the formation of several oxidized base damages (from pool and DNA) in close proximity, would cause a high number of base excision repair events, leading to DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and therefore giving rise to cytogenetic damage. If this hypothesis is true, cells with low levels of MTH1 will show higher cytogenetic damage after the longer wave parts of UVR. We analyzed micronuclei induction (MN) as an endpoint for cytogenetic damage in the human lymphoblastoid cell line, TK6, with a normal and a reduced level of MTH1 exposed to UVR. The results indicate a higher level of micronuclei at all incubation times after exposure to the longer wave parts of UVR. There is no significant difference between wildtype and MTH1-knockdown TK6 cells, indicating that MTH1 has no protective role in UVR-induced cytogenetic damage. This indicates that DSBs induced by UV arise from damage forms by direct interaction of UV or ROS with the DNA rather than through oxidation of dNTP. PMID:26520386

  12. Oxidative stress response in neural stem cells exposed to different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pongrac, Igor M; Pavičić, Ivan; Milić, Mirta; Brkić Ahmed, Lada; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatibility, safety, and risk assessments of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are of the highest priority in researching their application in biomedicine. One improvement in the biological properties of SPIONs may be achieved by different functionalization and surface modifications. This study aims to investigate how a different surface functionalization of SPIONs - uncoated, coated with d-mannose, or coated with poly-l-lysine - affects biocompatibility. We sought to investigate murine neural stem cells (NSCs) as important model system for regenerative medicine. To reveal the possible mechanism of toxicity of SPIONs on NSCs, levels of reactive oxygen species, intracellular glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell-membrane potential, DNA damage, and activities of SOD and GPx were examined. Even in cases where reactive oxygen species levels were significantly lowered in NSCs exposed to SPIONs, we found depleted intracellular glutathione levels, altered activities of SOD and GPx, hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, dissipated cell-membrane potential, and increased DNA damage, irrespective of the surface coating applied for SPION stabilization. Although surface coating should prevent the toxic effects of SPIONs, our results showed that all of the tested SPION types affected the NSCs similarly, indicating that mitochondrial homeostasis is their major cellular target. Despite the claimed biomedical benefits of SPIONs, the refined determination of their effects on various cellular functions presented in this work highlights the need for further safety evaluations. This investigation helps to fill the knowledge gaps on the criteria that should be considered in evaluating the biocompatibility and safety of novel nanoparticles. PMID:27217748

  13. DNA damage in buccal epithelial cells from individuals chronically exposed to arsenic via drinking water in Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Z; Xia, Y; Tian, D; Wu, K; Schmitt, M; Kwok, R K; Mumford, J L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess DNA damage in buccal cells from individuals chronically exposed to arsenic via drinking water in Ba Men, Inner Mongolia. Buccal cells were collected from 19 Ba Men residents exposed to arsenic at 527.5 +/- 23.7 micrograms/L (mean +/- SEM) and 13 controls exposed to arsenic at 4.4 +/- 1.0 micrograms/L. DNA fragmentation by the DNA ladder and TUNEL assay were used to detect DNA damage in buccal cells. In the DNA ladder assay, 89% (17/19) of the arsenic-exposed group showed < 100 bp DNA fragments, in contrast to 15% (2/13) of the controls (p < 0.0001). For the TUNEL assay, the mean frequencies of positive cells were higher in the exposed group (15.1%) than in the controls (2.0%) (p < 0.0001). This study showed that high arsenic exposure via drinking water resulted in DNA damage and DNA fragmentation in buccal cells thus may be an appropriate biomarker for assessing chronic effects of arsenic in humans. A study investigating DNA fragmentation from the individuals with low levels of arsenic exposure in this population is in progress.

  14. Study of damage to red blood cells exposed to different doses of γ-ray irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Deyi; Peng, Mingxi; Zhang, Zhe; Dong, Guofei; Zhang, Yiqin; Yu, Hongwei

    2012-01-01

    Background. The aims of this research were to study alterations in the ultrastructure of red blood cells, the changes in concentrations of plasma electrolytes and the killing effect of lymphocytes in samples of blood exposed to different doses of γ-ray irradiation. Materials and methods. Blood samples were treated with different doses of γ-ray irradiation and then preserved for different periods. Specimens were prepared for standard electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. At the same time, changes in the concentrations of Na+, K+ and Cl− and pH values in the plasma as well as Fas and FasL expression of lymphocytes before and after irradiation were determined. Results. The proportions of reversibly and irreversibly transformed cells, for example, echinocytes, sphero-echinocytes, and degenerated forms, increased with increasing doses of irradiation and storage period, while the number of discocyte shaped red blood cells decreased. The change in K+ concentration was greater than that of Na+ or Cl− after irradiation and was dosage-dependent. Plasma pH was influenced by different doses of radiation and storage time. After exposure to 137Cs γ-irradiation, the expression of both Fas and FasL in lymphocytes differed significantly from that in the control group: the expression was positively correlated with irradiation dose (r=0.95, 0.96), but no significant difference in the Fas/FasL ratio was observed (P>0.05). Discussion. We conclude that the ultrastructure of red blood cells is not changed obviously by irradiation with some doses of γ-rays and various periods of storage. However, irradiation does have some dose-dependent and time-dependent adverse effects on the erythrocytes. PMID:22682338

  15. Early and delayed reproductive death in human cells exposed to high energy iron-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettega, D.; Calzolari, P.; Doneda, L.; Durante, M.; Tallone, L.

    For radiation protection of the astronauts it is important to know both the acute and the late effects of charged particles. Iron is the most abundant high charge and energy (HZE) specie in galactic cosmic radiation. (HZE) ions are considered to be the major contributors to equivalent dose in space, but the Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE particles has large uncertainties, expecially for late effects. We have determined early and delayed reproductive death in human fibroblast cells (AG1522) exposed to iron ion beams of energies between 0.2 and 1 GeV/n. The cells were irradiated at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (0.2 and 0.5 GeV/n) and at the AGS accelerator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven (1 GeV/n). For each beam the dose--effect curves were measured at least twice in the dose range between 0.5 and 2 Gy. 60 Co gamma rays were used as reference radiation. The following results were obtained: 1) the 1 GeV/n beam effectiveness for inactivation of the AG1522 cells is higher than that of any other beam. 2) the progeny of the irradiated cells show the presence of delayed damage in the form of reproductive death for all the beams with the 1 GeV/n being the most effective. 3) the relative biological effectiveness of the iron beams is higher for delayed compared to early reproductive death. A comparison with preliminary results obtained with 970 MeV/n Ti and 490 MeV/n Si ions will be also reported .

  16. Antioxidant status and selected biochemical parameters of porcine ovarian granulosa cells exposed to lead in vitro.

    PubMed

    Capcarová, Marcela; Kolesárová, Adriana; Lukác, Norbert; Sirotkin, Alexander; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant status (TAS) and release of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, total lipids, totals proteins, glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides by porcine ovarian granulosa cells cultured in vitro after lead acetate administration. The parameters were analyzed using semi-automated clinical chemistry analyzer Microlab 300, microprocessor-controlled analyzer EasyLite and spectrophotometer Genesys 10. Cells were cultured with lead acetate trihydrate [Pb(CH(3)COO)(2).3H(2)O] as follows: group Max (5 mg Pb(CH(3)COO)(2).3H(2)O/10 mL), group A (2.5 mg/10 mL), group B (0.83 mg/10 mL), group C (0.625 mg/10 mL), group D (0.455 mg/10 mL) and the control group without lead exposure for 18 hrs. The highest TAS was estimated in the control group without lead treatment in comparison with other groups (MAX, A, B, C, D). Statistical analyses showed significantly lower value (P < 0.05) in group B. The activity of SOD was the lowest in the control group in comparison to those exposed to in vitro lead culture. A significant decrease (P < 0.05) of calcium content in group MAX in comparison with control group was determined. Release of phosphorus by ovarian granulosa cells was significantly lower (P < 0.05; 0.01; 0.001) in all the treated groups in comparison with control group. Lead was found to stimulate the release of magnesium and potassium by granulosa cells, but the increase remained statistically insignificant. The highest concentration of glucose was noted in control group, but the differences were not significant either. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were detected in concentration of other studied parameters among observed groups, too.

  17. Expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 by monocytes and endothelial cells exposed to thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Colotta, F.; Sciacca, F. L.; Sironi, M.; Luini, W.; Rabiet, M. J.; Mantovani, A.

    1994-01-01

    Thrombin, in addition to being a key enzyme in hemostasis, affects a series of endothelial and leukocyte functions and thus may be involved in the regulation of inflammatory reactions. Because leukocyte recruitment and activation are important events in inflammatory and thrombotic processes, in this study we have examined the possibility that thrombin induces the production of a cytokine chemotactic for mononuclear phagocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed in vitro to thrombin expressed transcripts of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1; alternative acronyms: JE, monocyte chemotactic and activating factor, tumor-derived chemotactic factor). Thrombin was two- to threefold less effective than endotoxin in inducing MCP-1 transcripts in PBMC. Among circulating mononuclear cells, monocytes were identified as the cells expressing MCP-1 in response to thrombin. Monocytes expressed thrombin receptor transcripts. Boiling, hirudin, antithrombin III, and mutation of the catalytic site serine 205 into alanine) blocked the capacity of thrombin to induce MCP-1 expression. The thrombin receptor-activating peptide mimicked the effect of thrombin in inducing MCP-1 expression. Induction of MCP-1 transcript by thrombin was not reduced by blocking interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor, suggesting that these mediators are not involved in thrombin-induced expression of MCP-1. In addition to monocytes, endothelial cells (EC) also expressed MCP-1 in response to thrombin, although at lower levels compared with monocytes. Actinomycin D experiments indicated that induction of MCP-1 by thrombin in PBMC and EC was gene transcription dependent. The inhibition of protein synthesis blocked thrombin-induced MCP-1 expression in PBMC, whereas it superinduced both constitutive and thrombin-inducible expression of MCP-1 in EC, indicating different mechanisms of regulation of this gene in mononuclear phagocytes versus endothelial cells. Thrombin stimulated mononuclear

  18. Proliferation assay of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taichi; Ando, Ayumi; Hirano, Kazumi; Ogura, Chika; Kanazawa, Tatsuya; Ikeguchi, Masamichi; Seki, Atsushi; Nishihara, Shoko; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    Proliferation assays of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have been performed with cell culture media exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs), which generate reactive species in the media at room temperature. It is found that serum in cell culture media functions as a scavenger of highly reactive species and tends to protect cells in the media against cellular damage. On the other hand, if serum is not present in a cell culture medium when it is exposed to APP, the medium becomes cytotoxic and cannot be detoxified by serum added afterwards. Plasma-induced cytotoxic media hinder proliferation of mouse ES cells and may even cause cell death. It is also shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that organic compounds in cell culture media are in general not significantly modified by plasma exposure. These results indicate that if there is no serum in media when they are exposed to APPs, highly reactive species (such as OH radicals) generated in the media by the APP exposure are immediately converted to less reactive species (such as H2O2), which can no longer readily react with serum that is added to the medium after plasma exposure. This study has clearly shown that it is these less reactive species, rather than highly reactive species, that make the medium cytotoxic to mouse ES cells.

  19. Distribution of Chromosome Breakpoints in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed to Low- and High-LET Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is not only its ability to identify simultaneously both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges, but also the ability to measure the breakpoint location along the length of the chromosome in a precision that is unmatched with other traditional banding techniques. Breakpoints on specific regions of a chromosome have been known to associate with specific cancers. The breakpoint distribution in cells after low- and high-LET radiation exposures will also provide the data for biophysical modeling of the chromatin structure, as well as the data for the modeling the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. In a series of experiments, we studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations using the mBAND technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 different colored bands. Human epithelial cells (CH1 84B5F5/M10) were exposed in vitro to Cs- 137 rays at both low and high dose rates, secondary neutrons with a broad energy spectrum at a low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions at a high dose rate. The data of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations involving the painted chromosome have been reported previously. Here we present data of the location of the chromosome breaks along the length of chromosome 3 in the cells after exposures to each of the four radiation scenarios. In comparison to the expected breakpoint distribution based on the length of the bands, the observed distribution appeared to be non-random for both the low- and high-LET radiations. In particular, hot spots towards both ends of the chromosome were found after low-LET irradiations of either low or high dose rates. For both high-LET radiation types (Fe ions and neutrons), the breakpoint distributions were similar, and were much smoother than that for low-LET radiation. The dependence of the breakpoint distribution on the radiation quality requires further investigations.

  20. Proteomic responses of human intestinal Caco-2 cells exposed to silver nanoparticles and ionic silver.

    PubMed

    Oberemm, Axel; Hansen, Ulf; Böhmert, Linda; Meckert, Christine; Braeuning, Albert; Thünemann, Andreas F; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    Even although quite a number of studies have been performed so far to demonstrate nanoparticle-specific effects of substances in living systems, clear evidence of these effects is still under debate. The present study was designed as a comparative proteomic analysis of human intestinal cells exposed to a commercial silver nanoparticle reference material and ions from AgNO3. A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/MALDI mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis was conducted after 24-h incubation of differentiated Caco-2 cells with non-cytotoxic and low cytotoxic silver concentrations (2.5 and 25 µg ml(-1) nanosilver, 0.5 and 5 µg ml(-1) AgNO3). Out of an overall number of 316 protein spots differentially expressed at a fold change of ≥ 1.4 or ≤ -1.4 in all treatments, 169 proteins could be identified. In total, 231 spots were specifically deregulated in particle-treated groups compared with 41 spots, which were limited to AgNO3-treatments. Forty-four spots (14 %) were commonly deregulated by both types of treatment. A considerable fraction of the proteins differentially expressed after treatment with nanoparticles is related to protein folding, synthesis or modification of proteins as well as cellular assembly and organization. Overlays of networks obtained for particulate and ionic treatments showed matches, indicating common mechanisms of combined particle and ionic silver exposure and exclusive ionic silver treatment. However, proteomic responses of Caco-2 cells treated with higher concentrations of silver species also showed some differences, for example regarding proteins related to fatty acid and energy metabolism, suggesting an induction of also some different molecular mechanisms for particle exposure and ionic treatment.

  1. Comet assay in gill cells of Prochilodus lineatus exposed in vivo to cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Poletta, G L; Gigena, F; Loteste, A; Parma, M J; Kleinsorge, E C; Simoniello, M F

    2013-11-01

    Agricultural chemicals can induce genetic alterations on aquatic organisms that have been associated with effects on growth, reproduction and population dynamics. The evaluation of DNA damage in fish using the comet assay (CA) frequently involves the utilization of erythrocytes. However, epithelial gill cells (EGC) can be more sensitive, as they are constantly dividing and in direct contact with potentially stressing compounds from the aquatic environment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate (1) the sensitivity and suitability of epithelial gill cells of Prochilodus lineatus in response to different genotoxic agents through the application of the CA, (2) the induction of DNA damage in this cell population after in vivo exposure to cypermethrin. Baseline value of the CA damage index (DI) for EGC of juvenile P. lineatus was 144.68±5.69. Damage increased in a dose-dependent manner after in vitro exposure of EGC to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and H2O2, two known genotoxic agents. In vivo exposure of fish to cypermethrin induced a significant increase in DNA DI of EGC at 0.150μg/l (DI: 239.62±6.21) and 0.300μg/l (270.63±2.09) compared to control (150.25±4.38) but no effect was observed at 0.075μg/l (168.50±10.77). This study shows that EGC of this species are sensitive for the application of the CA, demonstrating DNA damage in response to alkylation (MMS), oxidative damage (H2O2), and to the insecticide cypermethryn. These data, together with our previous study on DNA damage induction on erythrocytes of this species, provides useful information for future work involving biomonitoring in regions where P. lineatus is naturally exposed to pesticides and other genotoxic agents.

  2. Oxidative stress response in neural stem cells exposed to different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pongrac, Igor M; Pavičić, Ivan; Milić, Mirta; Brkić Ahmed, Lada; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatibility, safety, and risk assessments of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are of the highest priority in researching their application in biomedicine. One improvement in the biological properties of SPIONs may be achieved by different functionalization and surface modifications. This study aims to investigate how a different surface functionalization of SPIONs – uncoated, coated with d-mannose, or coated with poly-l-lysine – affects biocompatibility. We sought to investigate murine neural stem cells (NSCs) as important model system for regenerative medicine. To reveal the possible mechanism of toxicity of SPIONs on NSCs, levels of reactive oxygen species, intracellular glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell-membrane potential, DNA damage, and activities of SOD and GPx were examined. Even in cases where reactive oxygen species levels were significantly lowered in NSCs exposed to SPIONs, we found depleted intracellular glutathione levels, altered activities of SOD and GPx, hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, dissipated cell-membrane potential, and increased DNA damage, irrespective of the surface coating applied for SPION stabilization. Although surface coating should prevent the toxic effects of SPIONs, our results showed that all of the tested SPION types affected the NSCs similarly, indicating that mitochondrial homeostasis is their major cellular target. Despite the claimed biomedical benefits of SPIONs, the refined determination of their effects on various cellular functions presented in this work highlights the need for further safety evaluations. This investigation helps to fill the knowledge gaps on the criteria that should be considered in evaluating the biocompatibility and safety of novel nanoparticles. PMID:27217748

  3. Transcriptomic analysis of cultured whale skin cells exposed to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)].

    PubMed

    Pabuwal, Vagmita; Boswell, Mikki; Pasquali, Amanda; Wise, Sandra S; Kumar, Suresh; Shen, Yingjia; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Lacerte, Carolyne; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce; Warren, Wesley; Walter, Ronald B

    2013-06-15

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is known to produce cytotoxic effects in humans and is a highly toxic environmental contaminant. Interestingly, it has been shown that free ranging sperm whales (Phyester macrocephalus) may have exceedingly high levels of Cr in their skin. Also, it has been demonstrated that skin cells from whales appear more resistant to both cytotoxicity and clastogenicity upon Cr exposure compared to human cells. However, the molecular genetic mechanisms employed in whale skin cells that might lead to Cr tolerance are unknown. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms of Cr(VI) tolerance and to illuminate global gene expression patterns modulated by Cr, we exposed whale skin cells in culture to varying levels of Cr(VI) (i.e., 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 μg/cm²) followed by short read (100 bp) next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq reads from all exposures (≈280 million reads) were pooled to generate a de novo reference transcriptome assembly. The resulting whale reference assembly had 11K contigs and an N50 of 2954 bp. Using the reads from each dose (0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 μg/cm²) we performed RNA-seq based gene expression analysis that identified 35 up-regulated genes and 19 down-regulated genes. The experimental results suggest that low dose exposure to Cr (1.0 μg/cm²) serves to induce up-regulation of oxidative stress response genes, DNA repair genes and cell cycle regulator genes. However, at higher doses (5.0 μg/cm²) the DNA repair genes appeared down-regulated while other genes that were induced suggest the initiation of cytotoxicity. The set of genes identified that show regulatory modulation at different Cr doses provide specific candidates for further studies aimed at determination of how whales exhibit resistance to Cr toxicity and what role(s) reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play in this process.

  4. Apoptosis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in children exposed to arsenic and fluoride.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Amador, Diana O; Calderón, Jaqueline; Carrizales, Leticia; Costilla-Salazar, Rogelio; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván Nelinho

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated apoptosis induction in human immune cells in children exposed to arsenic (As) and fluoride (F). Children living in two areas in Mexico (Soledad de Graciano Sanchez (SGS) in San Luis Potosí and Colonia 5 de Febrero in Durango) were studied. Water, urine and blood samples were collected. Approximately 90% of the water samples in 5 de Febrero had As and F levels above the World Health Organization intervention guideline (10 μg/L and 1.5mg/L, respectively). In SGS, 0% of the water samples exceeded Mexican guidelines. Urinary As and F levels in children living in 5 de Febrero were significantly higher than the levels found in children living in SGS. In addition, the level of apoptosis was higher in children from the 5 de Febrero community when compared with the level of apoptosis in children living in SGS. Thus, in a worldwide context, our study demonstrates the health risks to children living in these regions. PMID:22004959

  5. Ion transport into cells exposed to monopolar and bipolar nanosecond pulses

    PubMed Central

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N.; Ibey, Bennet L.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with CHO cells exposed to 60 and 300 ns pulsed electric fields with amplitudes in the range from several kV/cm to tens of kV/cm, showed a decrease of the uptake of calcium ions by more than an order of magnitude when, immediately after a first pulse, a second one of opposite polarity was applied. This effect is assumed to be due to the reversal of the electrophoretic transport of ions through the electroporated membrane during the second phase of the bipolar pulse. This assumption, however, is only valid if electrophoresis is the dominant transport mechanism, rather than diffusion. Comparison of calculated calcium ion currents with experimental results showed that for nanosecond pulses, electrophoresis is at least as important as diffusion. By delaying the second pulse with respect to the first one, the effect of reverse electrophoresis is reduced. Consequently, separating nanosecond pulses of opposite polarity by up to approximately hundred microseconds allows us to vary the uptake of ions from very small values to that obtained with two pulses of the same polarity. The measured calcium ion uptake obtained with bipolar pulses also allowed us to determine the membrane pore recovery time. The calculated recovery time constants are on the order of ten microseconds. PMID:25212701

  6. A biosensor of SRC family kinase conformation by exposable tetracysteine useful for cell-based screening.

    PubMed

    Irtegun, Sevgi; Wood, Rebecca; Lackovic, Kurt; Schweiggert, Jörg; Ramdzan, Yasmin M; Huang, David C S; Mulhern, Terrence D; Hatters, Danny M

    2014-07-18

    We developed a new approach to distinguish distinct protein conformations in live cells. The method, exposable tetracysteine (XTC), involved placing an engineered tetracysteine motif into a target protein that has conditional access to biarsenical dye binding by conformational state. XTC was used to distinguish open and closed regulatory conformations of Src family kinases. Substituting just four residues with cysteines in the conserved SH2 domain of three Src-family kinases (c-Src, Lck, Lyn) enabled open and closed conformations to be monitored on the basis of binding differences to biarsenical dyes FlAsH or ReAsH. Fusion of the kinases with a fluorescent protein tracked the kinase presence, and the XTC approach enabled simultaneous assessment of regulatory state. The c-Src XTC biosensor was applied in a boutique screen of kinase inhibitors, which revealed six compounds to induce conformational closure. The XTC approach demonstrates new potential for assays targeting conformational changes in key proteins in disease and biology.

  7. Disrupted NOS signaling in lymphatic endothelial cells exposed to chronically increased pulmonary lymph flow.

    PubMed

    Datar, Sanjeev A; Gong, Wenhui; He, Youping; Johengen, Michael; Kameny, Rebecca J; Raff, Gary W; Maltepe, Emin; Oishi, Peter E; Fineman, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    Associated abnormalities of the lymphatic circulation are well described in congenital heart disease. However, their mechanisms remain poorly elucidated. Using a clinically relevant ovine model of a congenital cardiac defect with chronically increased pulmonary blood flow (shunt), we previously demonstrated that exposure to chronically elevated pulmonary lymph flow is associated with: 1) decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) in pulmonary lymph; and 2) attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxation of thoracic duct rings, suggesting disrupted lymphatic endothelial NO signaling in shunt lambs. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this altered NO signaling, primary lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) were isolated from the efferent lymphatic of the caudal mediastinal node in 4-wk-old control and shunt lambs. We found that shunt LECs (n = 3) had decreased bioavailable NO and decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and protein expression compared with control LECs (n = 3). eNOS activity was also low in shunt LECs, but, interestingly, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and activity were increased in shunt LECs, as were total cellular nitration, including eNOS-specific nitration, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pharmacological inhibition of iNOS reduced ROS in shunt LECs to levels measured in control LECs. These data support the conclusion that NOS signaling is disrupted in the lymphatic endothelium of lambs exposed to chronically increased pulmonary blood and lymph flow and may contribute to decreased pulmonary lymphatic bioavailable NO.

  8. Ion transport into cells exposed to monopolar and bipolar nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Schoenbach, Karl H; Pakhomov, Andrei G; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N; Ibey, Bennett L

    2015-06-01

    Experiments with CHO cells exposed to 60 and 300 ns pulsed electric fields with amplitudes in the range from several kV/cm to tens of kV/cm showed a decrease of the uptake of calcium ions by more than an order of magnitude when, immediately after a first pulse, a second one of opposite polarity was applied. This effect is assumed to be due to the reversal of the electrophoretic transport of ions through the electroporated membrane during the second phase of the bipolar pulse. This assumption, however, is only valid if electrophoresis is the dominant transport mechanism, rather than diffusion. Comparison of calculated calcium ion currents with experimental results showed that for nanosecond pulses, electrophoresis is at least as important as diffusion. By delaying the second pulse with respect to the first one, the effect of reverse electrophoresis is reduced. Consequently, separating nanosecond pulses of opposite polarity by up to approximately hundred microseconds allows us to vary the uptake of ions from very small values to those obtained with two pulses of the same polarity. The measured calcium ion uptake obtained with bipolar pulses also allowed us to determine the membrane pore recovery time. The calculated recovery time constants are on the order of 10 μs.

  9. Apoptosis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in children exposed to arsenic and fluoride.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Amador, Diana O; Calderón, Jaqueline; Carrizales, Leticia; Costilla-Salazar, Rogelio; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván Nelinho

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated apoptosis induction in human immune cells in children exposed to arsenic (As) and fluoride (F). Children living in two areas in Mexico (Soledad de Graciano Sanchez (SGS) in San Luis Potosí and Colonia 5 de Febrero in Durango) were studied. Water, urine and blood samples were collected. Approximately 90% of the water samples in 5 de Febrero had As and F levels above the World Health Organization intervention guideline (10 μg/L and 1.5mg/L, respectively). In SGS, 0% of the water samples exceeded Mexican guidelines. Urinary As and F levels in children living in 5 de Febrero were significantly higher than the levels found in children living in SGS. In addition, the level of apoptosis was higher in children from the 5 de Febrero community when compared with the level of apoptosis in children living in SGS. Thus, in a worldwide context, our study demonstrates the health risks to children living in these regions.

  10. Persistent oxidative stress in human neural stem cells exposed to low fluences of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Baulch, Janet E; Craver, Brianna M; Tran, Katherine K; Yu, Liping; Chmielewski, Nicole; Allen, Barrett D; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to the space radiation environment poses risks for a range of deleterious health effects due to the unique types of radiation encountered. Galactic cosmic rays are comprised of a spectrum of highly energetic nuclei that deposit densely ionizing tracks of damage along the particle trajectory. These tracks are distinct from those generated by the more sparsely ionizing terrestrial radiations, and define the geometric distribution of the complex cellular damage that results when charged particles traverse the tissues of the body. The exquisite radiosensitivity of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells found within the neurogenic regions of the brain predispose the central nervous system to elevated risks for radiation induced sequelae. Here we show that human neural stem cells (hNSC) exposed to different charged particles at space relevant fluences exhibit significant and persistent oxidative stress. Radiation induced oxidative stress was found to be most dependent on total dose rather than on the linear energy transfer of the incident particle. The use of redox sensitive fluorogenic dyes possessing relative specificity for hydroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial superoxide confirmed that most irradiation paradigms elevated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) in hNSC over a 1 week interval following exposure. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was not the major source of elevated nitric oxides, as the use of NOS inhibitors had little effect on NO dependent fluorescence. Our data provide extensive evidence for the capability of low doses of charged particles to elicit marked changes in the metabolic profile of irradiated hNSC. Radiation induced changes in redox state may render the brain more susceptible to the development of neurocognitive deficits that could affect an astronaut's ability to perform complex tasks during extended missions in deep space. PMID:25800120

  11. Fibrogenic response of hepatic stellate cells in ovariectomised rats exposed to ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Bobowiec, R; Wojcik, M; Jaworska-Adamu, J; Tusinska, E

    2013-02-01

    The discrepancy about the role of estrogens in hepatic fibrogenesis and lack of studies addressed of ketogenic diet (KD) on hepatic stellate cells (HSC), prompted us to investigate the activity of HSC in control, KD- and thioacetamide (TAA)-administrated rats with different plasma concentration of estradiol (E2). HSC were isolated by the collagenase perfusion methods and separated by the Percoll gradient centrifugation. After the 4(th) and 8(th) day of incubation, lysates of HSC and the media were collected for further analysis. The HSC derived from KD-rats released remarkably more transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 than cells obtained from animals fed with a standard diet. The ovariectomy of KD-rats markedly intensified the secretion of this fibrogenic cytokine on the 8(th) day of incubation (201.33 ±1 7.15 pg/ml). In HSC of rats exposed to E2, the TGF-β1 concentration did not exceed 157 ± 34.39 pg/ml. In respect to the collagen type I, the HSC obtained from ovariectomised KD-rats released an augmented amount of this ECM protein after the 8(th) day of culture (1.83 ± 0.14 U/ml). In the same time, higher quantities of ASMA appeared in the KD rats (1.41 ± 0.3 pg/mg protein). Exposition of rats to E2 did not markedly decrease the amount of ASMA. In summary, KD was able to induce morphological and functional changes in HSC, especially derived from rats deprived of ovarian estrogens. However, the preservation of E2 in ovariectomised rats didn't substantially alter the activation of HSC.

  12. Persistent oxidative stress in human neural stem cells exposed to low fluences of charged particles

    PubMed Central

    Baulch, Janet E.; Craver, Brianna M.; Tran, Katherine K.; Yu, Liping; Chmielewski, Nicole; Allen, Barrett D.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the space radiation environment poses risks for a range of deleterious health effects due to the unique types of radiation encountered. Galactic cosmic rays are comprised of a spectrum of highly energetic nuclei that deposit densely ionizing tracks of damage along the particle trajectory. These tracks are distinct from those generated by the more sparsely ionizing terrestrial radiations, and define the geometric distribution of the complex cellular damage that results when charged particles traverse the tissues of the body. The exquisite radiosensitivity of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells found within the neurogenic regions of the brain predispose the central nervous system to elevated risks for radiation induced sequelae. Here we show that human neural stem cells (hNSC) exposed to different charged particles at space relevant fluences exhibit significant and persistent oxidative stress. Radiation induced oxidative stress was found to be most dependent on total dose rather than on the linear energy transfer of the incident particle. The use of redox sensitive fluorogenic dyes possessing relative specificity for hydroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial superoxide confirmed that most irradiation paradigms elevated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) in hNSC over a 1 week interval following exposure. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was not the major source of elevated nitric oxides, as the use of NOS inhibitors had little effect on NO dependent fluorescence. Our data provide extensive evidence for the capability of low doses of charged particles to elicit marked changes in the metabolic profile of irradiated hNSC. Radiation induced changes in redox state may render the brain more susceptible to the development of neurocognitive deficits that could affect an astronaut’s ability to perform complex tasks during extended missions in deep space. PMID:25800120

  13. Host cell reactivation of sunlamp-exposed adenovirus in fibroblasts from patients with Bloom's syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia, and Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rainbow, A.J. )

    1991-01-01

    In this study, a sensitive host cell reactivation (HCR) technique was used to examine the repair capacity for DNA damaged by sunlamp exposure in fibroblast strains derived from 5 normal individuals and 8 patients representing three different diseases associated with DNA repair deficiencies. Adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) was exposed to radiation from a GE 275 W sunlamp and subsequently used to infect fibroblast monolayers. At 48 hr after infection, cells were scored for the presence of viral structural antigens (Vag) using indirect immunofluorescent staining. Previous reports using this technique showed a substantial reduction in the HCR of sunlamp-exposed Ad 2 for infection of excision repair deficient fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. In contrast, the HCR of Vag synthesis for sunlamp-exposed Ad 2 was in the normal range for the three ataxia telangiectasia, three Bloom's syndrome, and two Huntington's disease fibroblasts strains.

  14. Unirradiated cells rescue cells exposed to ionizing radiation: Activation of NF-κB pathway in irradiated cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, R K K; Han, Wei; Yu, K N

    2015-12-01

    We studied the involvement of NF-κB pathway activation in the rescue effect in HeLa and NIH/3T3 cells irradiated by α particles. Firstly, upon irradiation by 5 cGy of α particles, for both cell lines, the numbers of 53BP1 foci/cell at 12 h post-irradiation were significantly smaller when only 2.5% of the cell population was irradiated as compared to 100% irradiation, which demonstrated the rescue effect. Secondly, we studied the effect of NF-κB on the rescue effect through the use of the NF-κB activation inhibitor BAY-11-7082. Novel experimental setup and procedures were designed to prepare the medium (CM) which had conditioned the bystander cells previously partnered with irradiated cells, to ensure physical separation between rescue and bystander signals. BAY-11-7082 itself did not inflict DNA damages in the cells or have effects on activation of the NF-κB response pathway in the irradiated cells through direct irradiation. The rescue effect was induced in both cell lines by the CM, which was abrogated if BAY-11-7082 was added to the CM. Thirdly, we studied the effect of NF-κB on the rescue effect through staining for phosphorylated NF-κB (p-NF-κB) expression using the anti-NF-κB p65 (phospho S536) antibody. When the fraction of irradiated cells dropped from 100% to 2.5%, the p-NF-κB expression in the cell nuclei of irradiated NIH/3T3 cells increased significantly, while that in the cell nuclei of irradiated HeLa cells also increased although not significantly. Moreover, the p-NF-κB expression in the cell nuclei of irradiated HeLa cells and NIH/3T3 cells treated with CM also increased significantly. PMID:26524645

  15. Unirradiated cells rescue cells exposed to ionizing radiation: Activation of NF-κB pathway in irradiated cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, R K K; Han, Wei; Yu, K N

    2015-12-01

    We studied the involvement of NF-κB pathway activation in the rescue effect in HeLa and NIH/3T3 cells irradiated by α particles. Firstly, upon irradiation by 5 cGy of α particles, for both cell lines, the numbers of 53BP1 foci/cell at 12 h post-irradiation were significantly smaller when only 2.5% of the cell population was irradiated as compared to 100% irradiation, which demonstrated the rescue effect. Secondly, we studied the effect of NF-κB on the rescue effect through the use of the NF-κB activation inhibitor BAY-11-7082. Novel experimental setup and procedures were designed to prepare the medium (CM) which had conditioned the bystander cells previously partnered with irradiated cells, to ensure physical separation between rescue and bystander signals. BAY-11-7082 itself did not inflict DNA damages in the cells or have effects on activation of the NF-κB response pathway in the irradiated cells through direct irradiation. The rescue effect was induced in both cell lines by the CM, which was abrogated if BAY-11-7082 was added to the CM. Thirdly, we studied the effect of NF-κB on the rescue effect through staining for phosphorylated NF-κB (p-NF-κB) expression using the anti-NF-κB p65 (phospho S536) antibody. When the fraction of irradiated cells dropped from 100% to 2.5%, the p-NF-κB expression in the cell nuclei of irradiated NIH/3T3 cells increased significantly, while that in the cell nuclei of irradiated HeLa cells also increased although not significantly. Moreover, the p-NF-κB expression in the cell nuclei of irradiated HeLa cells and NIH/3T3 cells treated with CM also increased significantly.

  16. INCREASED IL-8 AND IL-6 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    INCREASED IL-6 AND IL-8 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES.
    R Silbajoris1, A G Lenz2, I Jaspers3, J M Samet1. 1NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2GSF-Institute for Inhalation Biology, Neuherberg, Germany; 3 CEMLB, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, ...

  17. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN HUMAN AND RAT VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) AND VANADIUM (V)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression profiles in human and rat vascular endothelial cells exposed to residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or vanadium (V).
    Srikanth S. Nadadur, Darrell W. Winsett and Daniel L. Costa, US EPA, ORD, NHEERL (ETD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch), Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

  18. IN VITRO EFFECTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER ON AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS ISOLATED FROM CONCENTRATED AIR PARTICLES-EXPOSED SPONTANEOUS HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro effects of particulate matter on airway epithelial cells isolated from concentrated air particles-exposed spontaneous hypertensive rats

    Ines Pagan, Urmila Kodavanti, Paul Evansky, Daniel L Costa and Janice A Dye. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, National...

  19. Responses of well-differentiated nasal epithelial cells exposed to particles: Role of the epithelium in airway inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, Floriane; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Chamot, Christophe; Marano, Francelyne; Dazy, Anne-Catherine . E-mail: dazy@paris7.jussieu.fr

    2006-09-15

    Numerous epidemiological studies support the contention that ambient air pollution particles can adversely affect human health. To explain the acute inflammatory process in airways exposed to particles, a number of in vitro studies have been performed on cells grown submerged on plastic and poorly differentiated, and on cell lines, the physiology of which is somewhat different from that of well-differentiated cells. In order to obtain results using a model system in which epithelial cells are similar to those of the human airway in vivo, apical membranes of well-differentiated human nasal epithelial (HNE) cells cultured in an air-liquid interface (ALI) were exposed for 24 h to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and Paris urban air particles (PM{sub 2.5}). DEP and PM{sub 2.5} (10-80 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}) stimulated both IL-8 and amphiregulin (ligand of EGFR) secretion exclusively towards the basal compartment. In contrast, there was no IL-1{beta} secretion and only weak non-reproducible secretion of TNF-{alpha}. IL-6 and GM-CSF were consistently stimulated towards the apical compartment and only when cells were exposed to PM{sub 2.5}. ICAM-1 protein expression on cell surfaces remained low after particle exposure, although it increased after TNF-{alpha} treatment. Internalization of particles, which is believed to initiate oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine expression, was restricted to small nanoparticles ({<=} 40 nm). Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected, and DEP were more efficient than PM{sub 2.5}. Collectively, our results suggest that airway epithelial cells exposed to particles augment the local inflammatory response in the lung but cannot alone initiate a systemic inflammatory response.

  20. Increased frequency of CD4-8-T cells bearing T-cell receptor alpha beta chains in peripheral blood of atomic bomb survivors exposed to high doses.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Y; Kyoizumi, S; Hirai, Y; Fujita, S; Akiyama, M

    1994-07-01

    A rare T-cell subpopulation, CD4-8- alpha beta T cells, may be differentiated through a pathway (or pathways) different from the pathway(s) of conventional CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. In the present study, the frequencies of CD4-8-T cells in peripheral-blood alpha beta T cells in 409 atomic bomb survivors (160 estimated to have been exposed to 1.5 Gy or more and 249 controls) were determined to investigate late effects of radiation on the composition of human T-cell subpopulations. The frequency of CD4-8- alpha beta T-cell decreased significantly with the subject's age and was higher in females than males. A significant increase in the frequency was found in the survivors exposed to more than 1.5 Gy, suggesting that the previous radiation exposure altered differentiation and development of T cells.

  1. Relationship of CD86 surface marker expression and cytotoxicity on dendritic cells exposed to chemical allergen

    SciTech Connect

    Hulette, Ben C.; Ryan, Cindy A.; Gildea, Lucy A.; Gerberick, G. Frank . E-mail: gerberick.gf@pg.com

    2005-12-01

    Human peripheral blood-derived dendritic cells (DC) respond to a variety of chemical allergens by up-regulating expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86. It has been postulated that this measure might provide the basis for an in vitro alternative approach for the identification of skin sensitizing chemicals. We recently reported that DC, exposed in culture to the highest non-cytotoxic concentrations of various chemical allergens, displayed marginal up-regulation of membrane CD86 expression; the interpretation being that such changes were insufficiently sensitive for the purposes of hazard identification. For the work presented here, immature DC were derived from human monocytes and treated with the chemical allergens 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS), nickel sulfate (NiSO{sub 4}), p-phenylenediamine (PPD), Bandrowski's base (BB), hydroquinone (HQ) and propyl gallate (PG) for 48 h at concentrations which induced both no to slight to moderate cytotoxicity. For comparison, DC were treated with the irritants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), benzoic acid (BA), and benzalkonium chloride (BZC) at concentrations resulting in comparable levels of cytotoxicity. CD86 expression, as measured by flow cytometry, was consistently up-regulated (ranging from 162 to 386% control) on DC treated with concentrations of chemical allergens that induced approximately 10-15% cytotoxicity. The irritants BA and BZC did not induce up-regulation of CD86 expression when tested at concentrations that induced similar levels of cytotoxicity. SDS, however, up-regulated CD86 expression to 125-138% of control in 2/4 preparations when tested at concentrations which induced similar toxicity. Our results confirm that chemical allergens up-regulate CD86 expression on blood-derived DC and illustrate further that up-regulation of CD86 surface marker expression is more robust when DC are treated with concentrations of chemical allergen that induce slight to moderate cytotoxicity.

  2. BIGEL analysis of gene expression in HL60 cells exposed to X rays or 60 Hz magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Zhang, X. F.; Han, L. H.; Harrison, G. H.; Davis, C. C.; Zhou, X. J.; Ioffe, V.; McCready, W. A.; Abraham, J. M.; Meltzer, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    We screened a panel of 1,920 randomly selected cDNAs to discover genes that are differentially expressed in HL60 cells exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields (2 mT) or X rays (5 Gy) compared to unexposed cells. Identification of these clones was accomplished using our two-gel cDNA library screening method (BIGEL). Eighteen cDNAs differentially expressed in X-irradiated compared to control HL60 cells were recovered from a panel of 1,920 clones. Differential expression in experimental compared to control cells was confirmed independently by Northern blotting of paired total RNA samples hybridized to each of the 18 clone-specific cDNA probes. DNA sequencing revealed that 15 of the 18 cDNA clones produced matches with the database for genes related to cell growth, protein synthesis, energy metabolism, oxidative stress or apoptosis (including MYC, neuroleukin, copper zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase, TC4 RAS-like protein, peptide elongation factor 1alpha, BNIP3, GATA3, NF45, cytochrome c oxidase II and triosephosphate isomerase mRNAs). In contrast, BIGEL analysis of the same 1,920 cDNAs revealed no differences greater than 1.5-fold in expression levels in magnetic-field compared to sham-exposed cells. Magnetic-field-exposed and control samples were analyzed further for the presence of mRNA encoding X-ray-responsive genes by hybridization of the 18 specific cDNA probes to RNA from exposed and control HL60 cells. Our results suggest that differential gene expression is induced in approximately 1% of a random pool of cDNAs by ionizing radiation but not by 60 Hz magnetic fields under the present experimental conditions.

  3. USING PROTEOMICS TO MONITOR PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN HUMAN CELLS EXPOSED TO CARCINOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    People are continuously exposed exogenously to varying amounts of chemicals that have been shown to have carcinogenic properties in experimental systems. It has been estimated that exposure to environmental chemical carcinogens in the environment may contribute significantly to t...

  4. Upregulation of TRPM7 augments cell proliferation and interleukin-8 release in airway smooth muscle cells of rats exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    LIN, XIAOLING; YANG, CHENG; HUANG, LINJIE; CHEN, MING; SHI, JIANTING; OUYANG, LIHUA; TANG, TIANTIAN; ZHANG, WEI; LI, YIQUN; LIANG, RUIYUN; JIANG, SHANPING

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and synthetic function (i.e. the capacity to release numerous chemokines and cytokines) of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) are important in airway remodeling induced by cigarette smoke exposure. However, the molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 7 (TRPM7) is expressed ubiquitously and is crucial for the cellular physiological function of many cell types. The present study aimed to detect the expression of TRPM7 in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats and determine the importance of TRPM7 in proliferation and interleukin-8 (IL-8) release. ASMCs were isolated and cultured from smoke-exposed rats. Expression levels of TRPM7 were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 was silenced with TRPM7-short hairpin RNA lentivirus vector. DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release of ASMCs induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed using [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay, hemocytometer and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. It was determined that mRNA and protein expression levels of TRPM7 were increased in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. Stimulation with CSE or TNF-α elevated DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release were more marked in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. Silencing of TRPM7 reduced DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release induced by CSE or TNF-α in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. In conclusion, expression of TRPM7 increased significantly in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats and the upregulation of TRPM7 led to augmented cell proliferation and IL-8 release in ASMCs from rats exposed to cigarette smoke. PMID:27108806

  5. Increase in DNA damage in lymphocytes and micronucleus frequency in buccal cells in silica-exposed workers

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Ajanta; De, Madhusnata

    2012-01-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was applied to study the genotoxic properties of silica in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The study was designed to evaluate the DNA damage of lymphocytes and the end points like micronuclei from buccal smears in a group of 45 workers, occupationally exposed to silica, from small mines and stone quarries. The results were compared to 20 sex and age matched normal individuals. There was a statistically significant difference in the damage levels between the exposed group and the control groups. The types of damages (type I –type 1V) were used to measure the DNA damage. The numbers of micronuclei were higher in the silica-exposed population. The present study suggests that the silica exposure can induce lymphocyte DNA damage and produces significant variation of micronuclei in buccal smear. PMID:23112505

  6. Comparison of hematological alterations and markers of B-cell activation in workers exposed to benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Bassig, Bryan A; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Tang, Xiaojiang; Li, Guilan; Hu, Wei; Guo, Weihong; Purdue, Mark P; Yin, Songnian; Rappaport, Stephen M; Shen, Min; Ji, Zhiying; Qiu, Chuangyi; Ge, Yichen; Hosgood, H Dean; Reiss, Boris; Wu, Banghua; Xie, Yuxuan; Li, Laiyu; Yue, Fei; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Blair, Aaron; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Benzene, formaldehyde (FA) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are ubiquitous chemicals in workplaces and the general environment. Benzene is an established myeloid leukemogen and probable lymphomagen. FA is classified as a myeloid leukemogen but has not been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), whereas TCE has been associated with NHL but not myeloid leukemia. Epidemiologic associations between FA and myeloid leukemia, and between benzene, TCE and NHL are, however, still debated. Previously, we showed that these chemicals are associated with hematotoxicity in cross-sectional studies of factory workers in China, which included extensive personal monitoring and biological sample collection. Here, we compare and contrast patterns of hematotoxicity, monosomy 7 in myeloid progenitor cells (MPCs), and B-cell activation biomarkers across these studies to further evaluate possible mechanisms of action and consistency of effects with observed hematologic cancer risks. Workers exposed to benzene or FA, but not TCE, showed declines in cell types derived from MPCs, including granulocytes and platelets. Alterations in lymphoid cell types, including B cells and CD4+ T cells, and B-cell activation markers were apparent in workers exposed to benzene or TCE. Given that alterations in myeloid and lymphoid cell types are associated with hematological malignancies, our data provide biologic insight into the epidemiological evidence linking benzene and FA exposure with myeloid leukemia risk, and TCE and benzene exposure with NHL risk. PMID:27207665

  7. Levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA of white blood cells from workers highly exposed to asbestos in Germany.

    PubMed

    Marczynski, B; Rozynek, P; Kraus, T; Schlösser, S; Raithel, H J; Baur, X

    2000-07-10

    Asbestos fibers have genotoxic effects and are a potential carcinogenic hazard to occupationally exposed workers. The ability of inhaled asbestos fibers to induce the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the DNA of white blood cells (WBC) of workers highly exposed at the workplace has been studied. The 8-OHdG adduct level of asbestos-exposed workers was significantly increased (p<0.001) compared to that in the control group in all three years of the study. Asbestos-exposed individuals showed a mean value of 2.61+/-0.91 8-OHdG/10(5) dG (median 2.49, n=496) in 1994-1995, 2.96+/-1.10 8-OHdG/10(5) dG (median 2.76, n=437) in 1995-1996 and 2.55+/-0.56 8-OHdG/10(5) dG (median 2.53, n=447) in 1996-1997. For the control subjects, a mean of 1.52+/-0.39 (median 1.51, n=214) was determined. The results indicate that human DNA samples from exposed individuals contain between 1.7 times and twice the level of oxidative damage relative to that found in control samples in all 3 years of the study. The studies presented here show that asbestos exposure can result in oxidative DNA damage. Our data confirm that oxidative DNA damage occurs in the WBC of workers highly exposed to asbestos fibers, thus supporting the hypothesis that asbestos fibers damage cells through an oxidative mechanism. These in vivo findings underline the importance of oxidative damage in asbestos-induced carcinogenesis and highlight the need for exploring the molecular basis of asbestos-induced diseases, and for more effective diagnosis, prevention and therapy of mesothelioma, lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, preventive and therapeutic approaches using antioxidants may be relevant.

  8. Acute respiratory bronchiolitis: an ultrastructural and autoradiographic study of epithelial cell injury and renewal in rhesus monkeys exposed to ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Dungworth, D. L.; Schwartz, L. W.; Tyler, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute respiratory bronchiolitis was examined in rhesus monkeys exposed to 0.8 ppm ozone fpr 4--50 hours. Epithelial injury and renewal was qualitatively and quantitatively characterized by correlated techniques of scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as by light-microscopic autoradiography following labeling with tritiated thymidine. Extensive degeneration and necrosis of Type 1 epithelial cells occurred on the respiratory bronchiolar wall during the initial 4--12 hours of exposure. Increased numbers of labeled epithelial cells were present in this region after 18 hours of exposure, and the highest labeling index (18% was measured after 50 hours of exposure. Most (67--80%) of the labeled cells and all the mitotic epithelial cells (22) observed ultrastructurally were cuboidal bronchiolar epithelial cells. Of the labeled epithelial cells, 20--33% were Type 2 epithelial cells. After 50 hours of exposure the respiratory bronchiolar epithelium was hyperplastic. The predominant inflammatory cell in respiratory bronchiolar exudate was the alveolar macrophage. Monkeys that were exposed for 50 hours and allowed to recover in unozonized air for 7 days had incomplete resolution of respiratory bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia. The results indicate that Type 1 epithelial cells lining respiratory bronchioles are the cell type most sensitive to injury and that both cuboidal bronchiolar epithelial cells and Type 2 epithelial cells function as stem cells in epithelial renewal. Images Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:6767409

  9. Modulation of endothelial cell network formation in vitro by molecular signaling of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) exposed to cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Jouan-Hureaux, Valérie; Boura, Cédric; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Faivre, Béatrice

    2012-03-01

    Overexpression of EGFR plays a key-role in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and justifies the extensive use of cetuximab, a monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody, as well as EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI), which have been reported to inhibit tumor cell growth and the secretion of pro-angiogenic factors by tumor cells, such as VEGF and IL-8. Moreover, vessel normalization in tumors, suggesting a more complex mediation of endothelial cell growth control has also been observed in vivo. The present study was designed to investigate the angiogenic consequences of exposure of HNSCC tumor cell lines to cetuximab and intercellular signaling between tumor and endothelial cells by secretion of pro- and anti-angiogenic mediators in the conditioned media (CM). The results achieved showed that cetuximab decreased the secretion of VEGF by HNSCC cells and that exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to CM from HNSCC cells exposed to cetuximab induced an increase in endothelial cell network formation. Angiogenesis proteome profiling showed that cetuximab induced a complex alteration of the secretion of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors by HNSCC cells without enabling to identify a unique molecular marker. Expression of endothelial membrane receptors (VEGFR-2, EGFR, PECAM-1 and Notch-4) was investigated and only EGFR expression was found influenced when HUVEC were exposed to CM from cetuximab-exposed HNSCC cells. These results showed that the decrease in the secretion of pro-angiogenic agents like VEGF by HNSCC cells exposed to cetuximab could not be sufficient to justify its anti-angiogenic activity in vitro. PMID:21820450

  10. Controversial cytogenetic observations in mammalian somatic cells exposed to extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation: a review and future research recommendations.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Obe, Guenter

    2005-07-01

    During the years 1990-2003, a large number of investigations were conducted using animals, cultured rodent and human cells as well as freshly collected human blood lymphocytes to determine the genotoxic potential of exposure to nonionizing radiation emitted from extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF). Among the 63 peer reviewed scientific reports, the conclusions from 29 studies (46%) did not indicate increased damage to the genetic material, as assessed from DNA strand breaks, incidence of chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronuclei (MN), and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), in EMF exposed cells as compared with sham exposed and/or unexposed cells, while those from 14 investigations (22%) have suggested an increase in such damage in EMF exposed cells. The observations from 20 other studies (32%) were inconclusive. This study reviews the investigations published in peer reviewed scientific journals during 1990-2003 and attempts to identify probable reason(s) for the conflicting results. Recommendations are made for future research to address some of the controversial observations.

  11. Chromosome-wide aneuploidy study of cultured circulating myeloid progenitor cells from workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Lan, Qing; Smith, Martyn T; Tang, Xiaojiang; Guo, Weihong; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Hu, Wei; Hubbard, Alan E; Shen, Min; McHale, Cliona M; Qiu, Chuangyi; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Blair, Aaron; Ge, Yichen; Xiong, Jun; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M; Huang, Hanlin; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an economically important industrial chemical to which millions of people worldwide are exposed environmentally and occupationally. Recently, the International Agency for Cancer Research concluded that there is sufficient evidence that FA causes leukemia, particularly myeloid leukemia. To evaluate the biological plausibility of this association, we employed a chromosome-wide aneuploidy study approach, which allows the evaluation of aneuploidy and structural chromosome aberrations (SCAs) of all 24 chromosomes simultaneously, to analyze cultured myeloid progenitor cells from 29 workers exposed to relatively high levels of FA and 23 unexposed controls. We found statistically significant increases in the frequencies of monosomy, trisomy, tetrasomy and SCAs of multiple chromosomes in exposed workers compared with controls, with particularly notable effects for monosomy 1 [P = 6.02E-06, incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 2.31], monosomy 5 (P = 9.01E-06; IRR = 2.24), monosomy 7 (P = 1.57E-05; IRR = 2.17), trisomy 5 (P = 1.98E-05; IRR = 3.40) and SCAs of chromosome 5 (P = 0.024; IRR = 4.15). The detection of increased levels of monosomy 7 and SCAs of chromosome 5 is particularly relevant as they are frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia. Our findings provide further evidence that leukemia-related cytogenetic changes can occur in the circulating myeloid progenitor cells of healthy workers exposed to FA, which may be a potential mechanism underlying FA-induced leukemogenesis.

  12. Chromosome-wide aneuploidy study of cultured circulating myeloid progenitor cells from workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Lan, Qing; Smith, Martyn T; Tang, Xiaojiang; Guo, Weihong; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Hu, Wei; Hubbard, Alan E; Shen, Min; McHale, Cliona M; Qiu, Chuangyi; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Blair, Aaron; Ge, Yichen; Xiong, Jun; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M; Huang, Hanlin; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an economically important industrial chemical to which millions of people worldwide are exposed environmentally and occupationally. Recently, the International Agency for Cancer Research concluded that there is sufficient evidence that FA causes leukemia, particularly myeloid leukemia. To evaluate the biological plausibility of this association, we employed a chromosome-wide aneuploidy study approach, which allows the evaluation of aneuploidy and structural chromosome aberrations (SCAs) of all 24 chromosomes simultaneously, to analyze cultured myeloid progenitor cells from 29 workers exposed to relatively high levels of FA and 23 unexposed controls. We found statistically significant increases in the frequencies of monosomy, trisomy, tetrasomy and SCAs of multiple chromosomes in exposed workers compared with controls, with particularly notable effects for monosomy 1 [P = 6.02E-06, incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 2.31], monosomy 5 (P = 9.01E-06; IRR = 2.24), monosomy 7 (P = 1.57E-05; IRR = 2.17), trisomy 5 (P = 1.98E-05; IRR = 3.40) and SCAs of chromosome 5 (P = 0.024; IRR = 4.15). The detection of increased levels of monosomy 7 and SCAs of chromosome 5 is particularly relevant as they are frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia. Our findings provide further evidence that leukemia-related cytogenetic changes can occur in the circulating myeloid progenitor cells of healthy workers exposed to FA, which may be a potential mechanism underlying FA-induced leukemogenesis. PMID:25391402

  13. Phenotypic malignant changes and untargeted lipidomic analysis of long-term exposed prostate cancer cells to endocrine disruptors

    SciTech Connect

    Bedia, Carmen Dalmau, Núria Jaumot, Joaquim Tauler, Romà

    2015-07-15

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are a class of environmental toxic molecules able to interfere with the normal hormone metabolism. Numerous studies involve EDs exposure to initiation and development of cancers, including prostate cancer. In this work, three different EDs (aldrin, aroclor 1254 and chlorpyrifos (CPF)) were investigated as potential inducers of a malignant phenotype in DU145 prostate cancer cells after a chronic exposure. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction, proliferation, migration, colony formation and release of metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) were analyzed in 50-day exposed cells to the selected EDs. As a result, aldrin and CPF exposure led to an EMT induction (loss of 16% and 14% of E-cadherin levels, respectively, compared to the unexposed cells). Aroclor and CPF presented an increased migration (134% and 126%, respectively), colony formation (204% and 144%, respectively) and MMP-2 release (137% in both cases) compared to the unexposed cells. An untargeted lipidomic analysis was performed to decipher the lipids involved in the observed transformations. As general results, aldrin exposure showed a global decrease in phospholipids and sphingolipids, and aroclor and CPF showed an increase of certain phospholipids, glycosphingolipids as well as a remarkable increase of some cardiolipin species. Furthermore, the three exposures resulted in an increase of some triglyceride species. In conclusion, some significant changes in lipids were identified and thus we postulate that some lipid compounds and lipid metabolic pathways could be involved in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype in exposed prostate cancer cells to the selected EDs. - Highlights: • Aldrin, aroclor and chlorpyrifos induced an aggressive phenotype in DU145 cells. • An untargeted lipidomic analysis has been performed on chronic exposed cells. • Lipidomic results showed changes in specific lipid species under chronic exposure. • These lipids may have a role in the

  14. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, morphological alterations and oxidative stress in Chinook salmon cells exposed to copper oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Koigoora; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando C; Rao, Janapala Venkateswara

    2016-05-01

    The current study is aimed to study cytotoxicity and oxidative stress mediated changes induced by copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) in Chinook salmon cells (CHSE-214). To this end, a number of biochemical responses are evaluated in CHSE-214 cells which are as follows [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide] MTT, neutral red uptake (NRU), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), protein carbonyl (PC), lipid peroxidation (LPO), oxidised glutathione (GSSG), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione sulfo-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), respectively. The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) of CuO NPs to CHSE-214 cells after 24 h exposure was found to be 19.026 μg ml(-1). Viability of cells was reduced by CuO NPs, and the decrease was dose dependent as revealed by the MTT and NRU assay. CHSE-214 cells exposed to CuO NPs induced morphological changes. Initially, cells started to detach from the surface (12 h), followed by polyhedric, fusiform appearance (19 h) and finally the cells started to shrink. Later, the cells started losing their cellular contents leading to their death only after 24 h. LDH, PC, LPO, GSH, GPx, GST, SOD, CAT, 8-OHdG and ROS responses were seen significantly increased with the increase in the concentration of CuO NPs when compared to their respective controls. However, significant decrease in GSSG was perceptible in CHSE-214 cells exposed to CuO NPs in a dose-dependent manner. Our data demonstrated that CuO NPs induced cytotoxicity in CHSE-214 cells through the mediation of oxidative stress. The current study provides a baseline for the CuO NPs-mediated cytotoxic assessment in CHSE-214 cells for the future studies. PMID:26115719

  15. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells.

  16. Global transcriptomic analysis of model human cell lines exposed to surface-modified gold nanoparticles: the effect of surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Grzincic, E M; Yang, J A; Drnevich, J; Falagan-Lotsch, P; Murphy, C J

    2015-01-28

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are attractive for biomedical applications not only for their remarkable physical properties, but also for the ease of which their surface chemistry can be manipulated. Many applications involve functionalization of the Au NP surface in order to improve biocompatibility, attach targeting ligands or carry drugs. However, changes in cells exposed to Au NPs of different surface chemistries have been observed, and little is known about how Au NPs and their surface coatings may impact cellular gene expression. The gene expression of two model human cell lines, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and prostate cancer cells (PC3) was interrogated by microarray analysis of over 14,000 human genes. The cell lines were exposed to four differently functionalized Au NPs: citrate, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), and lipid coatings combined with alkanethiols or PAH. Gene functional annotation categories and weighted gene correlation network analysis were used in order to connect gene expression changes to common cellular functions and to elucidate expression patterns between Au NP samples. Coated Au NPs affect genes implicated in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metabolism in HDF cells, and inflammation, angiogenesis, proliferation apoptosis regulation, survival and invasion in PC3 cells. Subtle changes in surface chemistry, such as the initial net charge, lability of the ligand, and underlying layers greatly influence the degree of expression change and the type of cellular pathway affected.

  17. Mutagenic adaptive response to high-LET radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells exposed to X-rays.

    PubMed

    Varès, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Kakimoto, Ayana; Eguchi-Kasai, Kyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-10

    The ability of cells to adapt low-dose or low-dose rate radiation is well known. High-LET radiation has unique characteristics, and the data concerning low doses effects and high-LET radiation remain fragmented. In this study, we assessed in vitro the ability of low doses of X-rays to induce an adaptive response (AR) to a subsequent challenging dose of heavy-ion radiation. Lymphoblastoid cells (TK6, AHH-1, NH32) were exposed to priming 0.02-0.1Gy X-rays, followed 6h later by challenging 1Gy heavy-ion radiation (carbon-ion: 20 and 40keV/μm, neon-ion: 150keV/μm). Pre-exposure of p53-competent cells resulted in decreased mutation frequencies at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus and different H2AX phosphorylation kinetics, as compared to cells exposed to challenging radiation alone. This phenomenon did not seem to be linked with cell cycle effects or radiation-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggested the existence of an AR to mutagenic effects of heavy-ion radiation in lymphoblastoid cells and the involvement of double-strand break repair mechanisms.

  18. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells. PMID:26886589

  19. LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION AND GENE ARRAY ANALYSIS OF PALATAL EPITHELIAL AND MESENCHYMAL CELLS EXPOSED TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Palatal shelves from embryos exposed on gestation day (GD) 12 to either retinoic acid (RA) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) contact but fail to fuse. It is of interest to know if diverse agents that induce clefting via the same etiology also activate the same biochem...

  20. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis of human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to airborne particulate matter collected from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Shamy, Magdy; Kluz, Thomas; Muñoz, Alexandra B.; Zhong, Mianhua; Laulicht, Freda; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have established a positive correlation between human mortality and increased concentration of airborne particulate matters (PM). However, the mechanisms underlying PM related human diseases, as well as the molecules and pathways mediating the cellular response to PM, are not fully understood. This study aims to investigate the global gene expression changes in human cells exposed to PM10 and to identify genes and pathways that may contribute to PM related adverse health effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to PM10 collected from Saudi Arabia for 1 or 4 days, and whole transcript expression was profiled using the GeneChip human gene 1.0 ST array. A total of 140 and 230 genes were identified that significantly changed more than 1.5 fold after PM10 exposure for 1 or 4 days, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that different exposure durations triggered distinct pathways. Genes involved in NRF2-mediated response to oxidative stress were up-regulated after 1 day exposure. In contrast, cells exposed for 4 days exhibited significant changes in genes related to cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways. These observed changes in cellular oxidative stress and lipid synthesis might contribute to PM related respiratory and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23085030

  1. Evaluation of DNA damage in agricultural workers exposed to pesticides using single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Raminderjeet; Kaur, Satbir; Lata, Mukesh

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pesticides are used in agriculture to protect crops, but they pose a potential risk to farmers and environment. The aim of the present study is to investigate the relation between the occupational exposure to various pesticides and the presence of DNA damage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood samples of 210 exposed workers (after a day of intense spraying) and 50 control subjects belonging to various districts of Punjab (India) were evaluated using Comet assay. Sixty workers who showed DNA damage were selected for follow up at 5-6 months after the first sampling during a low or null spraying period. RESULTS: Significant differences were found in DNA damage between freshly exposed workers and controls and freshly exposed and followed up cases. There was significant increase in the comet parameters viz. mean comet tail length and frequency of cells showing migration in exposed workers as compared to controls (72.22 ± 20.76 vs. 46.92 ± 8.17, P<0.001; 31.79 vs. 5.77, P<0.001). In the second samples, followed up cases showed significant decrease in frequency of damaged cells as compared to freshly exposed workers of first sampling (P<0.05). The confounding factors such as variable duration of pesticide exposure, age, smoking, drinking and dietary habits etc which were expected to modulate the damage, were instead found to have no significant effect on DNA fragmentation. CONCLUSION: The evidence of a genetic hazard related to exposure resulting from the intensive use of pesticides stresses the need for educational programs for agricultural workers to reduce the use of chemicals in agriculture. PMID:22345990

  2. Signs of Müller cell gliotic response found in the retina of newts exposed to real and simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E. N.; Anton, H. J.; Poplinskaya, V. A.; Aleinikova, K. S.; Domaratskaya, E. I.; Novikova, Y. P.; Almeida, E.

    2012-05-01

    The effects of real and simulated microgravity on the eye tissue regeneration of newts were investigated. For the first time changes in Müller glial cells in the retina of eyes regenerating after retinal detachment were detected in newts exposed to clinorotation. The cells divided, were hypertrophied, and their processes were thickened. Such changes suggested reactive gliosis and were more significant in animals exposed to rotation when compared with desk-top controls. Later experiments onboard the Russian biosatellite Bion-11 showed similar changes in the retinas that were regenerating in a two-week spaceflight. In the Bion-11 animals, GFAP, the major structural protein of retinal macroglial cells, was found to be upregulated. In a more recent experiment onboard Foton-M3 (2007), GFAP expression in retinas of space-flown, ground control (kept at 1 g), and basal control (sacrificed on launch day) newts was quantified, using microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and digital image analysis. A low level of immunoreactivity was observed in basal controls. In contrast, retinas of space-flown animals showed greater GFAP immunoreactivity associated with both an increased cell number and a higher thickness of intermediate filaments. This, in turn, was accompanied by up-regulation of stress protein (HSP90) and growth factor (FGF2) expressions. It can be postulated that such a response of Müller cells was to mitigate the retinal stress in newts exposed to microgravity. Taken together, the data suggest that the retinal population of macroglial cells could be sensitive to gravity changes and that in space it can react by enhancing its neuroprotective function.

  3. A new method specifically designed to expose cells isolated in vitro to radon and its decay products.

    PubMed

    Petitot, F; Morlier, J P; Debroche, M; Pineau, J F; Chevillard, S

    2002-06-01

    A system was set up to provide direct exposure of cells cultured in vitro to radon and its decay products. Radon gas emanating from a uranium source was introduced at a measured concentration in a closed 10-m(3) exposure chamber. Cells were cultured on the microporous membrane of an insert that was floating over the culture medium in a six-well cluster plate. Plates with cells were placed in an open thermoregulated bath within the chamber. Under these conditions, cells were irradiated by direct deposition of radon and radon decay products. During exposure, all parameters, including radon gas concentrations, decay product activities, and potential alpha-particle energy concentrations, were determined by periodic air-grab samplings inside the chamber. The energy spectrum of deposited decay products was characterized. An estimation of alpha-particle flux density on the area containing cells was performed using CR-39 detector films that were exposed in cell-free wells during the cell exposure. The number of alpha-particle traversals per cell was deduced both from the mean number of CR-39 tracks per surface unit and from measurements of entire cells or nuclear surfaces. This paper describes the design of experiment, the dosimetry of radon and radon decay product, and the procedures for aerosol measurements. Our preliminary data show the usefulness of the in vitro cell culture approach to the study of the early cellular effects of radon and its decay products.

  4. Increased frequency of spontaneous neoplastic transformation in progeny of bystander cells from cultures exposed to densely ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, Manuela; de Toledo, Sonia M; Azzam, Edouard I

    2011-01-01

    An increased risk of carcinogenesis caused by exposure to space radiation during prolonged space travel is a limiting factor for human space exploration. Typically, astronauts are exposed to low fluences of ionizing particles that target only a few cells in a tissue at any one time. The propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to neighboring bystander cells and their transmission to progeny cells would be of importance in estimates of the health risks of exposure to space radiation. With relevance to the risk of carcinogenesis, we investigated, in model C3H 10T½ mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), modulation of the spontaneous frequency of neoplastic transformation in the progeny of bystander MEFs that had been in co-culture 10 population doublings earlier with MEFs exposed to moderate doses of densely ionizing iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon) or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV). An increase (P<0.05) in neoplastic transformation frequency, likely mediated by intercellular communication through gap junctions, was observed in the progeny of bystander cells that had been in co-culture with cells irradiated with iron ions, but not with protons. PMID:21738697

  5. Increased frequency of spontaneous neoplastic transformation in progeny of bystander cells from cultures exposed to densely ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, Manuela; de Toledo, Sonia M; Azzam, Edouard I

    2011-01-01

    An increased risk of carcinogenesis caused by exposure to space radiation during prolonged space travel is a limiting factor for human space exploration. Typically, astronauts are exposed to low fluences of ionizing particles that target only a few cells in a tissue at any one time. The propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to neighboring bystander cells and their transmission to progeny cells would be of importance in estimates of the health risks of exposure to space radiation. With relevance to the risk of carcinogenesis, we investigated, in model C3H 10T½ mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), modulation of the spontaneous frequency of neoplastic transformation in the progeny of bystander MEFs that had been in co-culture 10 population doublings earlier with MEFs exposed to moderate doses of densely ionizing iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon) or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV). An increase (P<0.05) in neoplastic transformation frequency, likely mediated by intercellular communication through gap junctions, was observed in the progeny of bystander cells that had been in co-culture with cells irradiated with iron ions, but not with protons.

  6. NF-κB signaling maintains the survival of cadmium-exposed human renal glomerular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Liqun; Wang, Yifan; Dong, Fengyun; Chen, Xiaocui; Liu, Fuhong; Xu, Dongmei; Yi, Fan; Kapron, Carolyn M.; Liu, Ju

    2016-01-01

    The kidney is one of the primary organs targeted by cadmium (Cd), a widely distributed environmental pollutant. The glomerular endothelium is the major component of the glomerular filtration barrier. However, the effects of Cd on glomerular endothelial cells remain largely unknown. For this purpose, we aimed to determine the effects of low dose Cd on the survival of human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs). Cultured HRGECs were exposed to 4 µM cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and examined at different time-points. We found that Cd activates the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway without inducing the apoptosis of HRGECs. Pre-treating the cells with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), a potent NF-κB inhibitor, prior to Cd exposure triggered extensive cell death (73.5%). In addition, Cd activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, and inhibition of the NF-κB pathway significantly elevates Cd-induced JNK phosphorylation in HRGECs (p<0.01). The combination treatment of PDTC and SP600125, a JNK pathway inhibitor, increased the survival of Cd-stimulated HRGECs compared with those cells treated with PDTC alone (p<0.05). Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the NF-κB pathway plays an essential role in maintaining the survival of Cd-exposed HRGECs. PMID:27315281

  7. NF-κB signaling maintains the survival of cadmium-exposed human renal glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Liqun; Wang, Yifan; Dong, Fengyun; Chen, Xiaocui; Liu, Fuhong; Xu, Dongmei; Yi, Fan; Kapron, Carolyn M; Liu, Ju

    2016-08-01

    The kidney is one of the primary organs targeted by cadmium (Cd), a widely distributed environmental pollutant. The glomerular endothelium is the major component of the glomerular filtration barrier. However, the effects of Cd on glomerular endothelial cells remain largely unknown. For this purpose, we aimed to determine the effects of low dose Cd on the survival of human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs). Cultured HRGECs were exposed to 4 µM cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and examined at different time-points. We found that Cd activates the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway without inducing the apoptosis of HRGECs. Pre-treating the cells with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), a potent NF-κB inhibitor, prior to Cd exposure triggered extensive cell death (73.5%). In addition, Cd activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, and inhibition of the NF-κB pathway significantly elevates Cd-induced JNK phosphorylation in HRGECs (p<0.01). The combination treatment of PDTC and SP600125, a JNK pathway inhibitor, increased the survival of Cd-stimulated HRGECs compared with those cells treated with PDTC alone (p<0.05). Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the NF-κB pathway plays an essential role in maintaining the survival of Cd-exposed HRGECs. PMID:27315281

  8. Cytoprotective effect of kaempferol on paraquat-exposed BEAS-2B cells via modulating expression of MUC5AC.

    PubMed

    Podder, Biswajit; Song, Kyoung Seob; Song, Ho-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Mucins are highly glycosylated secretary proteins produced by most epithelial cells. Hypersecretion of mucins is one of the prominent symptoms of several airway diseases, including asthma, cystic fibrosis, nasal allergy, rhinitis, and sinusitis. Paraquat (PQ), a common herbicide, has been associated with pulmonary damage and is a potent reactive oxygen species (ROS) producer. However, until now the role of PQ on mucin overproduction has not been studied. The aim of this study is to explore how kaempferol (KM), a widely used dietary flavonoid, affects the protection of human PQ-exposed bronchial epithelium BEAS-2B cells by suppressing Mucin gene expression via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). We observed that PQ generates intracellular ROS, and also induces lipid peroxidation in BEAS-2B cells. Additionally, we found that PQ effectively induces the expression of the MUC5AC gene; however, co-treatment of PQ with KM drastically reduces its expression. Furthermore, we observed that PQ activates NF-κB, while co-treatment with KM occludes its nuclear translocation, and additionally KM repressed the PQ phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in BEAS-2B cells. Based on our data, we believe that KM can suppress the over-expression of the MUC5AC gene. This would contribute to the protection of PQ cytotoxicity to exposed BEAS-2B cells, and allow further study toward a better understanding of ROS-associated diseases. PMID:25177032

  9. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C.; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures. PMID:24832689

  10. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M

    2015-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures.

  11. Modulation by retinoic acid of cellular, surface-exposed, and secreted glycoconjugates in cultured human sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Meromsky, L; Lotan, R

    1984-02-01

    The effect of beta-all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) on the synthesis of cellular, cell surface, and secreted glycoconjugates by human Hs705 chondrosarcoma and Hs791 osteosarcoma cells was investigated in vitro. Untreated and RA-treated cells were labeled either metabolically with radioactive precursors or by oxidation of externally exposed cell membrane glycoprotein(s) (GP) by treatment with NalO4 or neuraminidase and galactose oxidase followed by reduction with NaB[3H]4. The cells were solubilized and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography. RA enhanced the labeling of sialic acid and galactose residues on the GP of relative molecular weight(s) (Mr) in the range 95,000-300,000 on the surfaces of both cell types. [3H]glycosamine incorporation into GP with Mr of 100,000, 150,000, and 190,000 in both cell lines was also stimulated. In the Hs705 cells there was also an increase in the labeling of a 290,000-Mr GP. In contrast, [3H]glucosamine incorporation into glycoconjugates greater than 400,000 Mr in both the cells and the conditioned medium of Hs705 cells decreased. The latter glycoconjugates were susceptible to hyaluronidase and chondroitinases. [3H]glucosamine incorporation into a secreted 230,000-Mr GP, identified as fibronectin, was also reduced. Analyses of conditioned media of cells labeled with [35S]methionine or [14C]proline demonstrated that RA decreased the secretion of procollagen chains and fibronectin. Immunofluorescence revealed that RA alters the distribution of cell-associated fibronectin. These results demonstrated that RA increases the glycosylation of specific cellular and cell surface GP and decreases the production of secreted GP and glycosaminoglycans by the sarcoma cells.

  12. Mast cells in the intestine and gills of the sea bream, Sparus aurata, exposed to a polychlorinated biphenyl, PCB 126.

    PubMed

    Lauriano, Eugenia Rita; Calò, Margherita; Silvestri, Giuseppa; Zaccone, Daniele; Pergolizzi, Simona; Lo Cascio, Patrizia

    2012-02-01

    The presence of mast cells has been reported in all classes of vertebrates, including many teleost fish families. The mast cells of teleosts, both morphologically and functionally, show a close similarity to the mast cells of mammals. Mast cells of teleosts, localized in the vicinity of blood vessels of the intestine, gills and skin, may play an important role in the mechanisms of inflammatory response, because they express a number of functional proteins, including piscidins, which are antimicrobical peptides that act against a broad-spectrum of pathogens. An increase in the number of mast cells in various tissues and organs of teleosts seems to be linked to a wide range of stressful conditions, such as exposure to heavy metals (cadmium, copper, lead and mercury), exposure to herbicides and parasitic infections. This study analyzed the morphological localization and abundance of mast cells in the intestine and gills of sea bream, Sparus aurata, after a 12, 24 or 72 h exposure to PCB 126, a polychlorinated biphenyl, which is a potent immunotoxic agent. In the organs of fish exposed to PCB 126, it was observed that in addition to congestion of blood vessels, there was extravasation of red blood cells, infiltration of lymphocytes, and a progressive increase in numbers of mast cells. These data confirm the immunotoxic action of PCB, and the involvement of mast cells in the inflammatory response. PMID:21565388

  13. Immunostimulatory Activity of the Cytokine-Based Biologic, IRX-2, on Human Papillomavirus-Exposed Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Diane M.; Woodham, Andrew W.; Naylor, Paul H.; Egan, James E.; Berinstein, Neil L.

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the antigen-presenting cells of the epithelial layer and are responsible for initiating immune responses against skin and mucosa-invading viruses. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated suppression of LC function is a crucial mechanism of HPV immune evasion, which can lead to persistent infection and development of several human cancers, including cervical, anal, and head and neck cancers. The cell-derived cytokine-based biologic, IRX-2, consists of multiple well-defined cytokines and is broadly active on various immune cell subsets. In this study, we investigated primary human LC activation after exposure to HPV16, followed by treatment with IRX-2 in vitro, and evaluated their subsequent ability to induce HPV16-specific T cells. In contrast to its activity on dendritic cells, HPV16 alone is not sufficient to induce phenotypic and functional activation of LCs. However, IRX-2 induces a significant upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory molecules, T helper 1 (Th1)-associated cytokine release, and chemokine-directed migration of LCs pre-exposed to HPV16. Furthermore, LCs treated with IRX-2 after HPV16 exposure induced CD8+ T-cell responses against specific HLA-A*0201-binding HPV16 T-cell epitopes. The present study suggests that IRX-2 is an attractive immunomodulator for assisting the immune response in eradication of HPV-infected cells, thereby potentially preventing HPV-induced cancers. PMID:26653678

  14. Abnormal regulation of DNA replication and increased lethality in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to carcinogenic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Jaspers, N.G.; de Wit, J.; Regulski, M.R.; Bootsma, D.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of different carcinogenic agents on the rate of semiconservative DNA replication in normal and ataxia telangiectasis (AT) cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in all AT cell strains tested was depressed to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells after exposure to X-rays under oxia or hypoxia or to bleomycin, agents to which AT cells are hypersensitive. In contrast, inhibition of DNA replication in normal human and AT cells was similar after treatment with some DNA-methylating agents or mitomycin C. Colony-forming ability of AT cells treated with these agents was not different from normal cells. Treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide elicited a variable response in both AT and normal cell strains. In some strains, including those shown to be hypersensitive to the drug by other workers, the inhibition of DNA synthesis was more pronounced than in other cell strains, but no significant difference between AT and normal cells could be detected. The rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rays, measured by DNA elution techniques, occurred within l2 hr after treatment and could not be correlated with the difference in DNA synthesis inhibition in AT and normal cells. After low doses of X-rays, AT cells rejoined single-strand breaks slightly more slowly than did normal cells. The rate of DNA replication in X-irradiation AT and normal cells was not affected by nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis. These data indicate that the diminished inhibition of DNA replication in carcinogen-treated AT cells (a) is a general characteristic of all AT cell strains, (b) correlates with AT cellular hypersensitivity, (c) is not directly caused by the bulk of the DNA strand breaks produced by carcinogenic agents, and (d) is not based on differences in the induction of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis between X-irradiated AT and normal cells.

  15. Proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioma cells exposed to paclitaxel (Taxol) in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Terzis, A. J.; Thorsen, F.; Heese, O.; Visted, T.; Bjerkvig, R.; Dahl, O.; Arnold, H.; Gundersen, G.

    1997-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol), an anti-cancer drug derived from Taxus species, was tested for its anti-migrational, anti-invasive and anti-proliferative effect on two human glioma cell lines (GaMg and D-54Mg) grown as multicellular tumour spheroids. In addition, the direct effect of paclitaxel on glioma cells was studied using flow cytometry and scanning confocal microscopy. Both cell lines showed a dose-dependent growth and migratory response to paclitaxel. The GaMg cells were found to be 5-10 times more sensitive to paclitaxel than D-54Mg cells. Paclitaxel also proved to be remarkably effective in preventing invasion in a co-culture system in which tumour spheroids were confronted with fetal rat brain cell aggregates. Control experiments with Cremophor EL (the solvent of paclitaxel for clinical use) in this study showed no effect on tumour cell migration, cell proliferation or cell invasion. Scanning confocal microscopy of both cell lines showed an extensive random organization of the microtubules in the cytoplasm. After paclitaxel exposure, the GaMg and the D-54Mg cells exhibited a fragmentation of the nuclear material, indicating a possible induction of apoptosis. In line with this, flow cytometric DNA histograms showed an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle after 24 h of paclitaxel exposure. After 48 h, a deterioration of the DNA histograms was observed indicating nuclear fragmentation. Images Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:9192976

  16. Lycopene supplementation prevents reactive oxygen species mediated apoptosis in Sertoli cells of adult albino rats exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Gunasekaran; Selvakumar, Kandaswamy; Venkataraman, Prabhu; Elumalai, Perumal

    2013-01-01

    Sertoli cell proliferation is attenuated before attaining puberty and the number is fixed in adult testes. Sertoli cells determine both testis size and daily sperm production by providing physical and metabolic support to spermatogenic cells. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exposure disrupts functions of Sertoli cells causing infertility with decreased sperm count. On the other hand, lycopene is improving sperm count and motility by reducing oxidative stress in humans and animals. Hence we hypothesized that PCBs-induced infertility might be due to Sertoli cell apoptosis mediated by oxidative stress and lycopene might prevent PCBs-induced apoptosis by acting against oxidative stress. To test this hypothesis, animals were treated with vehicle control, lycopene, PCBs and PCBs + lycopene for 30 days. After the experimental period, the testes and cauda epididymidis were removed for isolation of Sertoli cells and sperm, respectively. We observed increased levels of oxidative stress markers (H2O2 and LPO) levels, increased expression of apoptotic molecules (caspase-8, Bad, Bid, Bax, cytochrome C and caspase-3), decreased anti-apoptotic (Bcl2) molecule and elevated apoptotic marker activity (caspase-3) in Sertoli cells of PCBs-exposed animals. These results were associated with decreased sperm count and motility in PCBs exposed animals. On the other hand, lycopene prevented the elevation of Sertoli cellular apoptotic parameters and prevented the reduction of sperm parameters (count and motility). The data confirmed that lycopene as an antioxidant scavenged reactive oxygen substances, prevented apoptosis, maintained normal function in Sertoli cells and helped to provide physical and metabolic support for sperm production, thereby treating infertility in men. PMID:24179434

  17. Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories

    SciTech Connect

    Oleru, U.G.; Elegbeleye, O.O.; Enu, C.C.; Olumide, Y.M.

    1983-02-01

    The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m/sup 3/ and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

  18. Chromosome aberration and micronucleus frequencies in Allium cepa cells exposed to petroleum polluted water--a case study.

    PubMed

    Leme, Daniela Morais; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2008-01-31

    In the present study, we applied Chromosome Aberration (CA) and Micronucleus (MN) tests to Allium cepa root cells, in order to evaluate the water quality of Guaecá river. This river, located in the city of São Sebastião, SP, Brazil, had been affected by an oil pipeline leak. Chemical analyses of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPHs) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also carried out in water samples, collected in July 2005 (dry season) and February 2006 (rainy season) in 4 different river sites. The largest CA and MN incidence in the meristematic cells of A. cepa was observed after exposure to water sample collected during the dry season, at the spring of the river, where the oil leak has arisen. The F(1) cells from roots exposed to such sample (non-merismatic region) were also analyzed for the incidence of MN, showing a larger frequency of irregularities, indicating a possible development of CA into MN. Lastly, our study reveals a direct correlation between water chemical analyses (contamination by TPHs and PAHs) and both genotoxic and mutagenic effects observed in exposed A. cepa cells. PMID:18068420

  19. Global transcriptomic analysis of model human cell lines exposed to surface-modified gold nanoparticles: the effect of surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzincic, E. M.; Yang, J. A.; Drnevich, J.; Falagan-Lotsch, P.; Murphy, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are attractive for biomedical applications not only for their remarkable physical properties, but also for the ease of which their surface chemistry can be manipulated. Many applications involve functionalization of the Au NP surface in order to improve biocompatibility, attach targeting ligands or carry drugs. However, changes in cells exposed to Au NPs of different surface chemistries have been observed, and little is known about how Au NPs and their surface coatings may impact cellular gene expression. The gene expression of two model human cell lines, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and prostate cancer cells (PC3) was interrogated by microarray analysis of over 14 000 human genes. The cell lines were exposed to four differently functionalized Au NPs: citrate, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), and lipid coatings combined with alkanethiols or PAH. Gene functional annotation categories and weighted gene correlation network analysis were used in order to connect gene expression changes to common cellular functions and to elucidate expression patterns between Au NP samples. Coated Au NPs affect genes implicated in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metabolism in HDF cells, and inflammation, angiogenesis, proliferation apoptosis regulation, survival and invasion in PC3 cells. Subtle changes in surface chemistry, such as the initial net charge, lability of the ligand, and underlying layers greatly influence the degree of expression change and the type of cellular pathway affected.Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are attractive for biomedical applications not only for their remarkable physical properties, but also for the ease of which their surface chemistry can be manipulated. Many applications involve functionalization of the Au NP surface in order to improve biocompatibility, attach targeting ligands or carry drugs. However, changes in cells exposed to Au NPs of different surface chemistries have been observed, and little is known about how

  20. Friend leukemia virus transformed cells exposed to microgravity in the presence of DMSO (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to study the adaptation of living cells to microgravity. The in vitro transformation of Friend cells by Dimethylsufoxide (DMSO) is a good model for the study of cell differentiation and protein biosynthesis. Cultures of cells will be prepared shortly before launch. Once in space, transformation will be induced by injection of DMSO. One set of cultures will be chemically fixed with glutaraldehyde for electron microscope investigations; another set will be preserved for determining the amount of hemogloben produced and the extent of cell proliferation.

  1. Comparison of photovoltaic cell temperatures in modules operating with exposed and enclosed back surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.; Simon, F. F.

    1981-01-01

    Four different photovoltaic module designs were tested to determine the cell temperature of each design. The cell temperatures were compared to those obtained on identical design, using the same nominal operating cell temperature (NOCT) concept. The results showed that the NOCT procedure does not apply to the enclosed configurations due to continuous transient conditions. The enclosed modules had higher cell temperatures than the open modules, and insulated modules higher than the uninsulated. The severest performance loss - when translated from cell temperatures - 17.5 % for one enclosed, insulated module as a compared to that module mounted openly.

  2. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis of human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to airborne particulate matter collected from Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hong; Shamy, Magdy; Kluz, Thomas; Muñoz, Alexandra B.; Zhong, Mianhua; Laulicht, Freda; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Costa, Max

    2012-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have established a positive correlation between human mortality and increased concentration of airborne particulate matters (PM). However, the mechanisms underlying PM related human diseases, as well as the molecules and pathways mediating the cellular response to PM, are not fully understood. This study aims to investigate the global gene expression changes in human cells exposed to PM{sub 10} and to identify genes and pathways that may contribute to PM related adverse health effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to PM{sub 10} collected from Saudi Arabia for 1 or 4 days, and whole transcript expression was profiled using the GeneChip human gene 1.0 ST array. A total of 140 and 230 genes were identified that significantly changed more than 1.5 fold after PM{sub 10} exposure for 1 or 4 days, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that different exposure durations triggered distinct pathways. Genes involved in NRF2-mediated response to oxidative stress were up-regulated after 1 day exposure. In contrast, cells exposed for 4 days exhibited significant changes in genes related to cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways. These observed changes in cellular oxidative stress and lipid synthesis might contribute to PM related respiratory and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► PM exposure modulated gene expression and associated pathways in BEAS-2B cells. ► One-day exposure to PM induced genes involved in responding to oxidative stress. ► 4-day exposure to PM changed genes associated to cholesterol and lipid synthesis.

  3. Frequency Patterns of T-Cell Exposed Amino Acid Motifs in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Peptides Presented by MHCs

    PubMed Central

    Bremel, Robert D.; Homan, E. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV) to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEMs). TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide, which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM). Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of TCEM re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by T-cell clonal expansion that develops along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs. PMID:25389426

  4. Global analysis of fungal morphology exposes mechanisms of host cell escape

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Veri, Amanda O.; Ketela, Troy; Jiang, Bo; Roemer, Terry; Cowen, Leah E.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental transitions between single-cell yeast and multicellular filaments underpin virulence of diverse fungal pathogens. For the leading human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, filamentation is thought to be required for immune cell escape via induction of an inflammatory programmed cell death. Here we perform a genome-scale analysis of C. albicans morphogenesis and identify 102 negative morphogenetic regulators and 872 positive regulators, highlighting key roles for ergosterol biosynthesis and N-linked glycosylation. We demonstrate that C. albicans filamentation is not required for escape from host immune cells; instead, macrophage pyroptosis is driven by fungal cell-wall remodelling and exposure of glycosylated proteins in response to the macrophage phagosome. The capacity of killed, previously phagocytized cells to drive macrophage lysis is also observed with the distantly related fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. This study provides a global view of morphogenetic circuitry governing a key virulence trait, and illuminates a new mechanism by which fungi trigger host cell death. PMID:25824284

  5. Metabolomics reveals metabolic changes in male reproductive cells exposed to thirdhand smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bo; Chen, Minjian; Yao, Mengmeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Mao, Zhilei; Tang, Wei; Qiao, Shanlei; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hang, Bo; Xia, Yankai

    2015-10-01

    Thirdhand smoke (THS) is a new term for the toxins in cigarette smoke that linger in the environment long after the cigarettes are extinguished. The effects of THS exposure on male reproduction have not yet been studied. In this study, metabolic changes in male germ cell lines (GC-2 and TM-4) were analyzed after THS treatment for 24 h. THS-loaded chromatography paper samples were generated in a laboratory chamber system and extracted in DMEM. At a paper: DMEM ratio of 50 μg/ml, cell viability in both cell lines was normal, as measured by the MTT assay and markers of cytotoxicity, cell cycle, apoptosis and ROS production were normal as measured by quantitative immunofluorescence. Metabolomic analysis was performed on methanol extracts of GC-2 and TM-4 cells. Glutathione metabolism in GC-2 cells, and nucleic acid and ammonia metabolism in TM-4 cells, was changed significantly by THS treatment. RT-PCR analyses of mRNA for enzyme genes Gss and Ggt in GC-2 cells, and TK, SMS and Glna in TM-4 cells reinforced these findings, showing changes in the levels of enzymes involved in the relevant pathways. In conclusion, exposure to THS at very low concentrations caused distinct metabolic changes in two different types of male reproductive cell lines.

  6. Metabolomics reveals metabolic changes in male reproductive cells exposed to thirdhand smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Bo; Chen, Minjian; Yao, Mengmeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Mao, Zhilei; Tang, Wei; Qiao, Shanlei; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hang, Bo; Xia, Yankai

    2015-10-22

    Thirdhand smoke (THS) is a new term for the toxins in cigarette smoke that linger in the environment long after the cigarettes are extinguished. The effects of THS exposure on male reproduction have not yet been studied. In this study, metabolic changes in male germ cell lines (GC-2 and TM-4) were analyzed after THS treatment for 24 h. THS-loaded chromatography paper samples were generated in a laboratory chamber system and extracted in DMEM. At a paper: DMEM ratio of 50 μg/ml, cell viability in both cell lines was normal, as measured by the MTT assay and markers of cytotoxicity, cell cycle, apoptosis and ROS production were normal as measured by quantitative immunofluorescence. Metabolomic analysis was performed on methanol extracts of GC-2 and TM-4 cells. Furthermore, glutathione metabolism in GC-2 cells, and nucleic acid and ammonia metabolism in TM-4 cells, was changed significantly by THS treatment. RT-PCR analyses of mRNA for enzyme genes Gss and Ggt in GC-2 cells, and TK, SMS and Glna in TM-4 cells reinforced these findings, showing changes in the levels of enzymes involved in the relevant pathways. In conclusion, exposure to THS at very low concentrations caused distinct metabolic changes in two different types of male reproductive cell lines.

  7. Glutaraldehyde fixation preserves the trend of elasticity alterations for endothelial cells exposed to TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Targosz-Korecka, Marta; Brzezinka, Grzegorz Daniel; Danilkiewicz, Joanna; Rajfur, Zenon; Szymonski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Among the users of atomic force microscopy based techniques, there is an ongoing discussion, whether cell elasticity measurements performed on fixed cells could be used for determination of the relative elasticity changes of the native (unfixed) cells subjected to physiologically active external agents. In this article, we present a case, for which the legitimacy of cell fixation for elasticity measurements is justified. We provide an evidence that the alterations of cell elasticity triggered by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells are preserved after glutaraldehyde (GA) fixation. The value of post-fixation elasticity parameter is a product of the elasticity parameter obtained for living cells and a constant value, dependent on the GA concentration. The modification of the initial value of elasticity parameter caused by remodeling of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is reflected in the elasticity measurements performed on fixed cells. Thus, such fixation procedure may be particularly helpful for experiments, where the influence of an external agent on the cell cortex should be assessed and AFM measurements of living cells are problematic or better statistics is needed.

  8. Metabolomics reveals metabolic changes in male reproductive cells exposed to thirdhand smoke

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bo; Chen, Minjian; Yao, Mengmeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Mao, Zhilei; Tang, Wei; Qiao, Shanlei; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hang, Bo; Xia, Yankai

    2015-01-01

    Thirdhand smoke (THS) is a new term for the toxins in cigarette smoke that linger in the environment long after the cigarettes are extinguished. The effects of THS exposure on male reproduction have not yet been studied. In this study, metabolic changes in male germ cell lines (GC-2 and TM-4) were analyzed after THS treatment for 24 h. THS-loaded chromatography paper samples were generated in a laboratory chamber system and extracted in DMEM. At a paper: DMEM ratio of 50 μg/ml, cell viability in both cell lines was normal, as measured by the MTT assay and markers of cytotoxicity, cell cycle, apoptosis and ROS production were normal as measured by quantitative immunofluorescence. Metabolomic analysis was performed on methanol extracts of GC-2 and TM-4 cells. Glutathione metabolism in GC-2 cells, and nucleic acid and ammonia metabolism in TM-4 cells, was changed significantly by THS treatment. RT-PCR analyses of mRNA for enzyme genes Gss and Ggt in GC-2 cells, and TK, SMS and Glna in TM-4 cells reinforced these findings, showing changes in the levels of enzymes involved in the relevant pathways. In conclusion, exposure to THS at very low concentrations caused distinct metabolic changes in two different types of male reproductive cell lines. PMID:26489853

  9. Metabolomics reveals metabolic changes in male reproductive cells exposed to thirdhand smoke.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Chen, Minjian; Yao, Mengmeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Mao, Zhilei; Tang, Wei; Qiao, Shanlei; Schick, Suzaynn F; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hang, Bo; Xia, Yankai

    2015-01-01

    Thirdhand smoke (THS) is a new term for the toxins in cigarette smoke that linger in the environment long after the cigarettes are extinguished. The effects of THS exposure on male reproduction have not yet been studied. In this study, metabolic changes in male germ cell lines (GC-2 and TM-4) were analyzed after THS treatment for 24 h. THS-loaded chromatography paper samples were generated in a laboratory chamber system and extracted in DMEM. At a paper: DMEM ratio of 50 μg/ml, cell viability in both cell lines was normal, as measured by the MTT assay and markers of cytotoxicity, cell cycle, apoptosis and ROS production were normal as measured by quantitative immunofluorescence. Metabolomic analysis was performed on methanol extracts of GC-2 and TM-4 cells. Glutathione metabolism in GC-2 cells, and nucleic acid and ammonia metabolism in TM-4 cells, was changed significantly by THS treatment. RT-PCR analyses of mRNA for enzyme genes Gss and Ggt in GC-2 cells, and TK, SMS and Glna in TM-4 cells reinforced these findings, showing changes in the levels of enzymes involved in the relevant pathways. In conclusion, exposure to THS at very low concentrations caused distinct metabolic changes in two different types of male reproductive cell lines. PMID:26489853

  10. Area Expansivity Moduli of Regenerating Plant Protoplast Cell Walls Exposed to Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Iino, Masaaki; Watanabe, Ugai

    2005-05-01

    To control the elasticity of the plant cell wall, protoplasts isolated from cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were regenerated in shear flows of 115 s-1 (high shear) and 19.2 s-1 (low shear, as a control). The surface area expansivity modulus and the surface breaking strength of these regenerating protoplasts were measured by a micropipette aspiration technique. Cell wall synthesis was also measured using a cell wall-specific fluorescent dye. High shear exposure for 3 h doubled both the surface area modulus and breaking strength observed under low shear, significantly decreased cell wall synthesis, and roughly quadrupled the moduli of the cell wall. Based on the cell wall synthesis data, we estimated the three-dimensional modulus of the cell wall to be 4.1± 1.2 GPa for the high shear, and 0.35± 0.2 GPa for the low shear condition, using the surface area expansivity modulus divided by the cell wall thickness, which is identical with the Young’s modulus divided by 2(1-σ), where σ is Poisson's ratio. We concluded that high shear exposure considerably strengthens the newly synthesized cell wall.

  11. Effects of low intensity static electromagnetic radiofrequency fields on leiomyosarcoma and smooth muscle cell lines.

    PubMed

    Karkabounas, Spyridon; Havelas, Konstantinos; Kostoula, Olga K; Vezyraki, Patra; Avdikos, Antonios; Binolis, Jayne; Hatziavazis, George; Metsios, Apostolos; Verginadis, Ioannis; Evangelou, Angelos

    2006-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of low intensity static radiofrequency electromagnetic field (EMF) causing no thermal effects, on leiomyosarcoma cells (LSC), isolated from tumors of fifteen Wistar rats induced via a 3,4-benzopyrene injection. Electromagnetic resonance frequencies measurements and exposure of cells to static EMF were performed by a device called multi channel dynamic exciter 100 V1 (MCDE). The LSC were exposed to electromagnetic resonance radiofrequencies (ERF) between 10 kHz to 120 kHz, for 45 min. During a 24h period, after the exposure of the LSC to ERF, there was no inhibition of cells proliferation. In contrast, at the end of a 48 h incubation period, LSC proliferation dramatically decreased by more than 98% (P<0.001). At that time, the survived LSC were only 2% of the total cell population exposed to ERF, and under the same culture conditions showed significant decrease of proliferation. These cells were exposed once again to ERF for 45 min (totally 4 sessions of exposure, of 45 min duration each) and tested using a flow cytometer. Experiments as above were repeated five times. It was found that 45% of these double exposed to ERF, LSC (EMF cells) were apoptotic and only a small percentage 2%, underwent mitosis. In order to determinate their metastatic potential, these EMF cells were also counted and tested by an aggregometer for their ability to aggregate platelets and found to maintain this ability., since they showed no difference in platelet aggregation ability compared to the LSC not exposed to ERF (control cells). In conclusion, exposure of LSC to specific ERF, decreases their proliferation rate and induces cell apoptosis. Also, the LSC that survived after exposed to ERF, had a lower proliferation rate compared to the LSC controls (P<0.05) but did not loose their potential for metastases (platelet aggregation ability). The non-malignant SMC were not affected by the EMF exposure (P<0.4). The specific ERF generated from the MCDE

  12. Steroidogenic differential effects in neonatal porcine Leydig cells exposed to persistent organic pollutants derived from cod liver oil.

    PubMed

    Granum, Cesilie; Anchersen, Sara; Karlsson, Camilla; Berg, Vidar; Olsaker, Ingrid; Verhaegen, Steven; Ropstad, Erik

    2015-11-01

    Seafood products, including fish and fish oils, are major sources of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which may cause endocrine disruption related to reproductive dysfunction in males. Primary porcine neonatal Leydig cells were exposed to three extracts of POPs obtained from different stages in production of cod liver oil dietary supplement, in the absence and presence of luteinizing hormone (LH). No reduced viability was observed and all POP extracts showed increased testosterone and estradiol levels in unstimulated cells and decreased testosterone and estradiol secretion in LH-stimulated cells. A decrease in central steriodogenic genes including STAR, CYP11A1, HSD3B and CYP17A1 was obtained in both culture conditions with all POP extracts. We implicate both small differences in composition and concentration of compounds as well as "old" POPs to be important for the observed steroidogenic effects. PMID:26055946

  13. MRP1 expression in bronchoalveolar lavage cells in subjects with lung cancer who were chronically exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Dena-Cazares, Jose Angel; Ramirez-de la Peña, Jorge Luis; Jacobo-Ávila, Antonio; Portales-Castanedo, Arnulfo; Gallegos-Arreola, Martha Patricia; Ocampo-Gomez, Guadalupe; Michel-Ramirez, Gladis

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1) expression has been associated with certain lung diseases, and this protein may be pivotal in protecting the lungs against endogenous or exogenous toxic compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression of MRP1 in bronchoalveolar cells from subjects with and without lung cancer who had been chronically exposed to arsenic through drinking water. MRP1 expression was assessed in bronchoalveolar cells in a total of 102 participants. MRP1 expression was significantly decreased in those with arsenic urinary levels >50 μg/L when compared with the controls. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure negatively correlates with the expression of MRP1 in BAL cells in patients with lung cancer.

  14. Cadmium overkill: autophagy, apoptosis and necrosis signalling in endothelial cells exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Messner, Barbara; Türkcan, Adrian; Ploner, Christian; Laufer, Günther; Bernhard, David

    2016-04-01

    Apoptosis, necrosis, or autophagy-it is the mode of cell demise that defines the response of surrounding cells and organs. In case of one of the most toxic substances known to date, cadmium (Cd), and despite a large number of studies, the mode of cell death induced is still unclear. As there exists conflicting data as to which cell death mode is induced by Cd both across various cell types and within a single one, we chose to analyse Cd-induced cell death in primary human endothelial cells by investigating all possibilities that a cell faces in undergoing cell death. Our results indicate that Cd-induced death signalling starts with the causation of DNA damage and a cytosolic calcium flux. These two events lead to an apoptosis signalling-related mitochondrial membrane depolarisation and a classical DNA damage response. Simultaneously, autophagy signalling such as ER stress and phagosome formation is initiated. Importantly, we also observed lysosomal membrane permeabilization. It is the integration of all signals that results in DNA degradation and a disruption of the plasma membrane. Our data thus suggest that Cd causes the activation of multiple death signals in parallel. The genotype (for example, p53 positive or negative) as well as other factors may determine the initiation and rate of individual death signals. Differences in the signal mix and speed may explain the differing results recorded as to the Cd-induced mode of cell death thus far. In human endothelial cells it is the sum of most if not all of these signals that determine the mode of Cd-induced cell death: programmed necrosis.

  15. Metabolomics reveals metabolic changes in male reproductive cells exposed to thirdhand smoke

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Bo; Chen, Minjian; Yao, Mengmeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Mao, Zhilei; Tang, Wei; Qiao, Shanlei; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hang, Bo; et al

    2015-10-22

    Thirdhand smoke (THS) is a new term for the toxins in cigarette smoke that linger in the environment long after the cigarettes are extinguished. The effects of THS exposure on male reproduction have not yet been studied. In this study, metabolic changes in male germ cell lines (GC-2 and TM-4) were analyzed after THS treatment for 24 h. THS-loaded chromatography paper samples were generated in a laboratory chamber system and extracted in DMEM. At a paper: DMEM ratio of 50 μg/ml, cell viability in both cell lines was normal, as measured by the MTT assay and markers of cytotoxicity, cellmore » cycle, apoptosis and ROS production were normal as measured by quantitative immunofluorescence. Metabolomic analysis was performed on methanol extracts of GC-2 and TM-4 cells. Furthermore, glutathione metabolism in GC-2 cells, and nucleic acid and ammonia metabolism in TM-4 cells, was changed significantly by THS treatment. RT-PCR analyses of mRNA for enzyme genes Gss and Ggt in GC-2 cells, and TK, SMS and Glna in TM-4 cells reinforced these findings, showing changes in the levels of enzymes involved in the relevant pathways. In conclusion, exposure to THS at very low concentrations caused distinct metabolic changes in two different types of male reproductive cell lines.« less

  16. Enhancement of B cell and monocyte populations in rats exposed to chlorpheniramine.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Woo-Hyuck; Park, Shin-Young; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Yoo, Jin-San; Koh, Woo Suk

    2012-12-01

    Chlorpheniramine is an anti-histamine agent on IgE-mediated inflammation. In order to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of chlorpheniramine, we assessed the changes of peripheral mononuclear cell populations and other general clinical parameters, including hematology and clinical chemistry, following chlorpheniramine administration in rats. Since prednisolone is commonly co-prescribed with anti-histamine in many hypersensitive reactions, we also examined the changes to compare the results after the prednisolone administration. Chlorpheniramine (50, 100 and 200 μg/kg) and prednisolone (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg) were intramuscularly administered to female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats 3 times, at intervals of 1 week. Except the clinical signs, such as stiffness and abnormal gait due to the local toxicity at injection sites, no other significant changes in body weights, urinalysis, and macroscopic examination were noted in the animals given chlorpheniramine. On the other hand, white blood cells, especially B cells and monocytes, showed a dose-dependent increase in the chlorpheniramine-treated animals; whereas, the numbers of both B and T cells (helper T and cytotoxic T, NKT cells) were decreased in the prednisolone-treated animals. Taken together, these results suggest that chloropheniramine administration enhances white blood cells in the peripheral blood, mostly due to increases of the B cells and monocytes, but no T cells and NK cells.

  17. Chrondrogenesis in micromass cultures of embryonic mouse limb mesenchymal cells exposed to microgravity (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Jackie

    1992-01-01

    A basic question of space biology is whether changes in gravity are perceived at the cellular level. Previous studies with a variety of cells have shown that this is the case, but to date the response of skeletal cells has not been examined, even though the skeleton is sensitive to gravitational changes. The objective of the CELLS Experiment is to examine the effect of microgravity in vitro on a skeletal cell known to be sensitive to gravitational changes both in vivo and in vitro - the mammalian chondrocyte. Various aspects of the experiment are discussed.

  18. Light-induced transpiration alters cell water relations in figleaf gourd (Cucurbita ficifolia) seedlings exposed to low root temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Hee; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Chung, Gap Chae

    2008-06-01

    Water relation parameters including elastic modulus (epsilon), half-times of water exchange (T(w)(1/2)), hydraulic conductivity and turgor pressure (P) were measured in individual root cortical and cotyledon midrib cells in intact figleaf gourd (Cucurbita ficifolia) seedlings, using a cell pressure probe. Transpiration rates (E) of cotyledons were also measured using a steady-state porometer. The seedlings were exposed to low ambient (approximately 10 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) or high supplemental irradiance (approximately 300 micromol m(-2) s(-1) PPF density) at low (8 degrees C) or warm (22 degrees C) root temperatures. When exposed to low irradiance, all the water relation parameters of cortical cells remained similar at both root temperatures. The exposure of cotyledons to supplemental light at warm root temperatures, however, resulted in a two- to three-fold increase in T(w)(1/2) values accompanied with the reduced hydraulic conductivity in both root cortical (Lp) and cotyledon midrib cells (Lp(c)). Low root temperature (LRT) further reduced Lp(c) and E, whether it was measured under low or high irradiance levels. The reductions of Lp as the result of respective light and LRT treatments were prevented by the application of 1 microM ABA. Midrib cells required higher concentrations of ABA (2 microM) in order to prevent the reduction in Lp(c). When the exposure of cotyledons to light was accompanied by LRT, however, ABA proved ineffective in reversing the inhibition of Lp. LRT combined with high irradiance triggered a drastic 10-fold reduction in water permeability of cortical and midrib cells and increased epsilon and T(w)(1/2) values. Measurement of E indicated that the increased water demand by the transpiring plants was fulfilled by an increase in the apoplastic pathway as principal water flow route. The importance of water transport regulation by transpiration affecting the hydraulic conductivity of the roots is discussed. PMID:18346079

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract in THP-1 Cells Exposed to Particulate Matter PM10

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojin; Seok, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Jun Yup; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Young Mi; Boo, Yong Chool

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence support health risks associated with the exposure to airborne particulate matter with a diameter of <10 μM (PM10). PM10 stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory mediators. Thus, we assumed that natural antioxidants might provide health benefits attenuating hazardous effects of PM10. In the present study, we examined the effects of pomegranate peel extract (PPE) on THP-1 monocytic cells exposed to PM10. PM10 induced cytotoxicity and the production of ROS. It also increased the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cell adhesion molecules, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). PPE at 10–100 μg mL−1 attenuated the production of ROS and the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, and ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1, in THP-1 cells stimulated by PM10 (100 μg mL−1). PPE also attenuated the adhesion of PM10-stimulated THP-1 cells to EA.hy926 endothelial cells. PPE constituents, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated PM10-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, and punicalagin was less cytotoxic compared to ellagic acid. The present study suggests that PPE and punicalagin may be useful in alleviating inflammatory reactions due to particulate matter. PMID:27247608

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract in THP-1 Cells Exposed to Particulate Matter PM10.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Seok, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Jun Yup; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Young Mi; Boo, Yong Chool

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence support health risks associated with the exposure to airborne particulate matter with a diameter of <10 μM (PM10). PM10 stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory mediators. Thus, we assumed that natural antioxidants might provide health benefits attenuating hazardous effects of PM10. In the present study, we examined the effects of pomegranate peel extract (PPE) on THP-1 monocytic cells exposed to PM10. PM10 induced cytotoxicity and the production of ROS. It also increased the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cell adhesion molecules, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). PPE at 10-100 μg mL(-1) attenuated the production of ROS and the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, and ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1, in THP-1 cells stimulated by PM10 (100 μg mL(-1)). PPE also attenuated the adhesion of PM10-stimulated THP-1 cells to EA.hy926 endothelial cells. PPE constituents, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated PM10-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, and punicalagin was less cytotoxic compared to ellagic acid. The present study suggests that PPE and punicalagin may be useful in alleviating inflammatory reactions due to particulate matter. PMID:27247608

  1. Apoptotic regulation and mutagenesis in human cells exposes to charged particles of importance for spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S.; Hain, J.; Wu, P.; Wiese, C.

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can elicit two modes of cell death - necrosis or apoptosis. In human lymphoid cells, the predominant mechanism of radiation- induced cell death is apoptosis. The most likely exposure of individual human cells to heavy ions (e.g. Fe or Si) during spaceflight will result from single particle traversals. Here we report the fluence-response for apoptosis in human TK6 B- lymp hoblasts and provide evidence that single Fe ion traversals can stimulate an apoptotic response. The apoptotic response to charged particle exposures includes scrambling of the phospholipid bilayer in the cell membrane, activation of caspase signaling cascades and degradation of DNA into oligonucleosomes. We have also explored the importance of apoptotic regulation on the frequency and spectrum of mutations arising after exposure to charged particles. We used isogenic derivatives of TK6 cells stably transfected with pSFFV-neo-bcl-xL (encoding the anti-apoptotic gene BCL-XL and the neomycin resistance gene) or with pSFFV neo (encoding only- the neomycin resistance gene). TK6-bclxL cells were more susceptible to mutations at the TK1 locus than TK6-neo cells following exposure to protons, silicon ions or Fe ions. Molecular analysis demonstrated that most Fe-ion-induced mutations arose by loss of heterozygosity (LOH). In TK6-bclxL cells, more of the LOH occurred via mitotic recombination than in TK6-neo cells where the predominant mode of LOH was via deletion. We are currently mapping the LOH tracts to further define the biological bases for the differential sensitivity to Fe-ion-induced mutagenesis as a function of the genotype of the cell at risk. Supported by NASA grant T-964W to A. Kronenberg

  2. Gene expression signatures in CD34+-progenitor-derived dendritic cells exposed to the chemical contact allergen nickel sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeters, Elke . E-mail: elke.schoeters@vito.be; Nuijten, Jean-Marie; Heuvel, Rosette L. van den; Nelissen, Inge; Witters, Hilda; Schoeters, Greet E.R.; Tendeloo, Vigor F.I. van; Berneman, Zwi N.; Verheyen, Geert R.

    2006-10-01

    The detection of the sensitizing potential of chemicals is of great importance to industry. A promising in vitro alternative to the currently applied animal assays for sensitization testing makes use of dendritic cells (DCs) that have the capability to process and present antigens to naive T cells and induce their proliferation. Here, we studied changes in gene expression profiles after exposing DCs to the contact allergen nickel sulfate. CD34+-progenitor-derived DCs, initiated from 3 different donors, were exposed to 60 {mu}M nickel sulfate, during 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h. cDNA microarrays were used to assess the transcriptional activity of about 11,000 genes. Significant changes in the expression of 283 genes were observed; 178 genes were up-regulated and 93 down-regulated. These genes were involved in metabolism, cell structure, immune response, transcription, signal transduction, transport, and apoptosis. No functional information was found for 74 genes. Real-time RT-PCR was used to confirm the microarray results of 12 genes. In addition, 3 DC maturation markers not present on the microarrays (DEC205, DC LAMP and CCR7) were analyzed using real-time RT-PCR and found to be up-regulated at several time points. Our data indicate that a broad range of biological processes is influenced by nickel. Some processes are clearly linked to the immune response and DC maturation, others may indicate a toxic effect of nickel.

  3. An Inactivated Antibiotic-Exposed Whole-Cell Vaccine Enhances Bactericidal Activities Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Meng-Hooi; MatRahim, NorAziyah; NorAmdan, NurAsyura; Pang, Sui-Ping; Hashim, Sharina H.; Phoon, Wai-Hong; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination may be an alternative treatment for infection with multidrug-resistance (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. The study reported here evaluated the bactericidal antibody responses following immunization of mice using an inactivated whole-cell vaccine derived from antibiotic-exposed MDR A. baumannii (I-M28-47-114). Mice inoculated with I-M28-47 (non-antibiotic-exposed control) and I-M28-47-114 showed a high IgG antibody response by day 5 post-inoculation. Sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47-114 collected on day 30 resulted in 80.7 ± 12.0% complement-mediated bacteriolysis in vitro of the test MDR A. baumannii treated with imipenem, which was a higher level of bacteriolysis over sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47. Macrophage-like U937 cells eliminated 49.3 ± 11.6% of the test MDR A. baumannii treated with imipenem when opsonized with sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47-114, which was a higher level of elimination than observed for test MDR A. baumannii opsonized with sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47. These results suggest that vaccination with I-M28-47-114 stimulated antibody responses capable of mounting high bactericidal killing of MDR A. baumannii. Therefore, the inactivated antibiotic-exposed whole-cell vaccine (I-M28-47-114) has potential for development as a candidate vaccine for broad clearance and protection against MDR A. baumannii infections. PMID:26923424

  4. Modelling induced currents in biological cells exposed to low-frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Stuchly, M A; Xi, W

    1994-09-01

    Interactions of low-frequency magnetic fields with biological systems have been a subject of intense scientific inquiry and public concern. Most research has been done at powerline frequencies of 50 Hz or 60 Hz. One of the key questions related to interactions of low-frequency magnetic fields with biological systems is which parameters of the exposure field are responsible for observed effects. Knowledge of the induced electric field and current in various experimental in vitro systems is important for this purpose. The 3D impedance method is used in this research to model spatial patterns of induced electric fields and current in two preparations of cells. A cell monolayer with a random distribution of cells and a confluent monolayer of cells with gap junctions are considered; because of the limitations of the computational method, biological cells are represented by cubes rather than more realistic shapes (e.g. spheres). The random model indicates that for higher cell densities the pattern of the induced current flow has a limited dependence on the size and shape of the container in which the cells are placed, it depends mostly on the actual cell placement. Gap junctions, not surprisingly, are shown to increase the current density, but only if their resistance is sufficiently low. The highest current density occurs in the gaps.

  5. Overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase promotes the survival of prostate cancer cells exposed to hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Sujatha; Wagner, Brett A; Jiang, Xiaohong; Wang, Hong P; Schafer, Freya Q; Ritchie, Justine M; Patrick, Burns C; Oberley, Larry W; Buettner, Garry R

    2004-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that exposure of cells to hyperthermia results in an increased flux of reactive oxygen species (ROS), primarily superoxide anion radicals, and that increasing antioxidant enzyme levels will result in protection of cells from the toxicity of these ROS. In this study, the prostate cancer cell line, PC-3, and its manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)-overexpressing clones were subjected to hyperthermia (43 degrees C, 1 h). Increased expression of MnSOD increased the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Hyperthermic exposure of PC-3 cells resulted in increased ROS production, as determined by aconitase inactivation, lipid peroxidation, and H2O2 formation with a reduction in cell survival. In contrast, PC-3 cells overexpressing MnSOD had less ROS production, less lipid peroxidation, and greater cell survival compared to PC-3 Wt cells. Since MnSOD removes superoxide, these results suggest that superoxide free radical or its reaction products are responsible for part of the cytotoxicity associated with hyperthermia and that MnSOD can reduce cellular injury and thereby enhance heat tolerance. PMID:15512801

  6. Reduced Neurite Density in Neuronal Cell Cultures Exposed to Serum of Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wollenhaupt-Aguiar, Bianca; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Chagas, Vinicius de Saraiva; Castro, Mauro A A; Passos, Ives Cavalcante; Kauer-Sant’Anna, Márcia; Kapczinski, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased inflammatory markers and oxidative stress have been reported in serum among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this study is to assess whether biochemical changes in the serum of patients induces neurotoxicity in neuronal cell cultures. Methods: We challenged the retinoic acid-differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with the serum of BD patients at early and late stages of illness and assessed neurite density and cell viability as neurotoxic endpoints. Results: Decreased neurite density was found in neurons treated with the serum of patients, mostly patients at late stages of illness. Also, neurons challenged with the serum of late-stage patients showed a significant decrease in cell viability. Conclusions: Our findings showed that the serum of patients with bipolar disorder induced a decrease in neurite density and cell viability in neuronal cultures. PMID:27207915

  7. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Katika, Madhumohan R.; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Shao, Jia; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  8. Increased frequency of circulating Tc22/Th22 cells and polyfunctional CD38(-) T cells in HIV-exposed uninfected subjects.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luanda M S; Lima, Josenilson F; Cervantes, Cesar A C; Casseb, Jorge S; Mendonça, Marcelo; Duarte, Alberto J S; Sato, Maria N

    2015-09-08

    Some individuals are resistant to HIV-1 infection despite repeated exposure to the virus, suggesting the presence of a complex antiviral response. Innate factors like IL-22 exert gut mucosal protection and polyfunctional T cells have been associated with low progression in HIV infection; therefore, we evaluated the frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-secreting cytokines, including Tc22/Th22 cells and polyfunctional T cells in HIV-1-exposed uninfected individuals (EUs), their HIV-1-infected partners and healthy controls. EUs exhibited an increased frequency of p15 Gag CD4+ IL-22+ secreting T cells, whereas HIV-infected partners demonstrated a high frequency of CD4+ IL-17+ T cells in response to p24. Similar responses of Th22 and Tc22 cells to Gag peptides and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) stimulation were detected in the serodiscordant couples. However, polyfunctionality in HIV subjects was associated with an HIV Gag response of CD38+ T cells, whereas polyfunctionality for EUs was induced upon SEB stimulation by CD38- T cells. EUs demonstrated the presence of Tc22/Th22 cells and polyfunctional CD38- T cells with a low activation profile. These data suggest that SEB-induced polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells together with Tc22/Th22 cells in EU individuals can provide an immunological advantage in the response to pathogens such as HIV-1.

  9. Potentially-lethal damage and radioprotection in human cells exposed to californium-252

    SciTech Connect

    Schroy, C.B.; Goud, S.N.; Magura, C.; Feola, J.M.; Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Cultured human T-1E cells were irradiated with californium-252 neutrons and gamma rays. When 2 mm caffeine was present in the medium for 47 h after irradiation cell survival (assayed by colony formation) was decreased significantly. When 2 m dimethylsulfoxide was present during the irradiations radioprotection was observed using the same assay. The caffeine data indicate that potentially-lethal lesions exist in cells after californium exposure and that these lesions can be made lethal when they would otherwise be repaired. The DMSO data indicate that radioprotection from californium exposure can be achieved and that scanvengable free radicals play an important role in Cf-252 lethality.

  10. Effect of Distance and Duration of Illumination on Retinal Ganglion Cells Exposed to Varying Concentrations of Brilliant Blue Green

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, Kakarla V.; Li, Wenhua; Koushan, Keyvan; Grover, Sandeep; Balaiya, Sankarathi

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to determine the safety parameters of using brilliant blue green (BBG) for chromovitrectomy by assessing the cytotoxicity of BBG on cultured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) exposed to illumination. Methods RGCs were exposed to two concentrations of BBG (0.25 and 0.5 mg/mL) under metal halide illumination at varying distances (1 and 2.5 cm), intensities (990 and 2,000 Fc), and durations (1, 5 and 15 minutes). Cell viability was assessed using the WST-1 and CellTiter 96® AQueous One solution cell proliferation assays. Results Using the WST-1 assay, with high-intensity illumination, viability of RGCs ranged from 97.5±16.4% of controls with minimum BBG and light exposure (0.25 mg/mL BBG and illuminated for 1 minute at 2.5 cm distance) to 53.1±11.3% of controls with maximum BBG and light exposure (0.50 mg/mL and illuminated for 15 minutes at 1 cm distance; P < 0.01). With medium-intensity illumination, RGCs showed better viability, ranging from 95.1±7.2% of controls with minimum BBG and light exposure to 72.3±12.8% of controls with maximum BBG and light exposure. CellTiter 96® AQueous One assay showed similar results. Conclusion RGCs seem to safely tolerate up to 5 minutes of exposure to 0.5 mg/mL BBG under diffuse medium-intensity illumination (990 Fc). PMID:26015816

  11. Rcan1-1L overexpression induces mitochondrial autophagy and improves cell survival in angiotensin II-exposed cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hongyan; Li, Yongqiang; Yan, Lijie; Yang, Haitao; Wu, Jintao; Qian, Peng; Li, Bing; Wang, Shanling

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial autophagy is an important adaptive stress response and can be modulated by various key molecules. A previous study found that the regulator of calcineurin 1-1L (Rcan1-1L) may regulate mitochondrial autophagy and cause mitochondria degradation in neurocytes. However, the effect of Rcan1-1L on cardiomyocytes has not been determined. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of Rcan1-1L in angiotensin II (Ang II)-exposed human cardiomyocytes. Above all, Human adult cardiac myocytes (HACMs) were exposed to 200 nmol/L Ang II for 4 days. Enhanced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production, cytochrome C release and mitochondrial permeability were observed in these cells, which were blocked by valsartan. Consistently, Ang II exposure significantly reduced cardiomyocyte viability. However, transfection of Rcan1-1L vector promoted cell viability and ameliorated the apoptosis caused by Ang II. Rcan1-1L clearly promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs, with elevated autophagy protein (ATG) 5 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression. Transient mitochondrial biogenesis and reduced cytochrome C release was also induced by Rcan1-1L. Additionally, Rcan1-1L significantly inhibited calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling. We thus conclude that Rcan1-1L may play a protective role in Ang II-treated cardiomyocytes through the induction of mitochondrial autophagy, and may be an alternative method of cardiac protection. - Highlights: • Transfection of Rcan1-1L into HACMs promoted cell viability and reduced apoptosis. • Transfection of Rcan1-1L promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs. • Rcan1-1L inhibited the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling.

  12. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to High and Low LET Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Wilkins, R.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2006-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, high energy neutron at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) or Cs-137-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center. After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The results of the mBAND study showed a higher ratio of inversion involved with interchromosomal exchange in heavy ions compared to -ray irradiation. Analysis of chromosome aberrations using mBAND has the potential to provide useful information on human cell response to space-like radiation.

  13. DNA damage and apoptosis of endometrial cells cause loss of the early embryo in mice exposed to carbon disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingzhen; Shen, Chunzi; Yang, Liu; Li, Chunhui; Yi, Anji; Wang, Zhiping

    2013-12-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) may lead to spontaneous abortion and very early pregnancy loss in women exposed in the workplace, but the mechanism remains unclear. We designed an animal model in which gestating Kunming strain mice were exposed to CS{sub 2} via i.p. on gestational day 4 (GD4). We found that the number of implanted blastocysts on GD8 was significantly reduced by each dose of 0.1 LD{sub 50} (157.85 mg/kg), 0.2 LD{sub 50} (315.7 mg/kg) and 0.4 LD{sub 50} (631.4 mg/kg). In addition, both the level of DNA damage and apoptosis rates of endometrial cells on GD4.5 were increased, showed definite dose–response relationships, and inversely related to the number of implanted blastocysts. The expressions of mRNA and protein for the Bax and caspase-3 genes in the uterine tissues on GD4.5 were up-regulated, while the expressions of mRNA and protein for the Bcl-2 gene were dose-dependently down-regulated. Our results indicated that DNA damage and apoptosis of endometrial cells were important reasons for the loss of implanted blastocysts induced by CS{sub 2}. - Highlights: • We built an animal model of CS2 exposure during blastocyst implantation. • Endometrial cells were used in the comet assay to detect DNA damage. • CS2 exposure caused DNA damage and endometrial cell apoptosis. • DNA damage and endometrial cell apoptosis were responsible for embryo loss.

  14. Transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches to investigate the molecular responses of human cell lines exposed to the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinkang; Williams, Timothy D; Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Harrad, Stuart; Chipman, James K; Viant, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    The potential for human exposure to the brominated flame retardant, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) has given rise to health concerns, yet there is relatively limited knowledge about its possible toxic effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms that may mediate any impacts on health. In this study, unbiased transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches were employed to investigate the potential molecular changes that could lead to the toxicity of HBCD under concentrations relevant to human exposure conditions using in vitro models. A concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect of HBCD to A549 and HepG2/C3A cells was observed based on MTT assays or CCK-8 assays with EC50 values of 27.4 μM and 63.0 μM, respectively. Microarray-based transcriptomics and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics revealed few molecular changes in A549 cells or HepG2/C3A cells following a 24-hour exposure to several sub-lethal concentrations (2 to 4000 nM) of HBCD. Quantification of the level of HBCD in the HepG2/C3A exposed cells suggested that the flame retardant was present at concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than those reported to occur in human tissues. We conclude that at the concentrations known to be achievable following exposure in humans, HBCD exhibits no detectable acute toxicity in A549 cells, representative of the lung, or in HepG2/C3A cells, that are hepatocytes with some xenobiotic metabolic capacity.

  15. Brucella outer membrane lipoprotein shares antigenic determinants with Escherichia coli Braun lipoprotein and is exposed on the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; López, J

    1987-01-01

    In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), purified Brucella abortus and Escherichia coli peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins gave a strong cross-reaction with sera from rabbits hyperimmunized with the heterologous lipoprotein. When smooth E. coli cells were used as ELISA antigens, the immunological cross-reaction was not observed unless the cells were treated to remove lipopolysaccharide and other outer membrane components. In contrast, intact cells from smooth strains of B. abortus and Brucella melitensis bound anti-lipoprotein immunoglobulin G, and the controls performed by ELISA showed that this reaction was not due to antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide, group 3 outer membrane proteins, or porins. Electron microscopy of cells labeled with antilipoprotein serum and protein A-colloidal gold showed specific labeling of smooth cells from both B. abortus and B. melitensis, even though unspecific labeling by nonimmune serum was observed with rough B. abortus. These results confirm the close similarity between E. coli and Brucella peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins and show that, in contrast to E. coli, the lipoprotein of B. abortus and B. melitensis is partially exposed on the surface of smooth cells. Images PMID:2432014

  16. Nitric oxide measurements in hTERT-RPE cells and subcellular fractions exposed to low levels of red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Denton, Michael L.; Holwitt, Eric A.

    2014-02-01

    Cells in a tissue culture model for laser eye injury exhibit increased resistance to a lethal pulse of 2.0-μm laser radiation if the cells are first exposed to 2.88 J/cm2 of red light 24 hr prior to the lethal laser exposure. Changes in expression of various genes associated with apoptosis have been observed, but the biochemical link between light absorption and gene expression remains unknown. Cytochome c oxidase (CCOX), in the electron transport chain, is the currentlyhypothesized absorber. Absorption of the red light by CCOX is thought to facilitate displacement of nitric oxide (NO) by O2 in the active site, increasing cellular respiration and intracellular ATP. However, NO is also an important regulator and mediator of numerous physiological processes in a variety of cell and tissue types that is synthesized from l-arginine by NO synthases. In an effort to determine the relative NO contributions from these competing pathways, we measured NO levels in whole cells and subcellular fractions, with and without exposure to red light, using DAF-FM, a fluorescent dye that stoichiometrically reacts with NO. Red light induced a small, but consistently reproducible, increase in fluorescence intensity in whole cells and some subcellular fractions. Whole cells exhibited the highest overall fluorescence intensity followed by (in order) cytosolic proteins, microsomes, then nuclei and mitochondria.

  17. Monitoring Intracellular Redox Changes in Ozone-exposed airway epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The toxicity of many compounds involves oxidative injury to cells. Direct assessment of mechanistic events involved in xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress is not easily achievable. Development of genetically-encoded probes designed for monitoring intracellular redox s...

  18. Nucleoside transporters, bcl-2 and apoptosis in CLL cells exposed to nucleoside analogues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petersen, A J; Brown, R D; Gibson, J; Pope, B; Luo, X F; Schutz, L; Wiley, J S; Joshua, D E

    1996-04-01

    The purine nucleoside analogues fludarabine (F1) and chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA) are considered to be cell cycle specific agents which require DNA synthesis for cytotoxicity. However, their efficacy in the treatment of CLL, an indolent lymphoid malignancy suggests additional mechanisms of action. Like cytosine arabinoside (AraC), F1 and 2-CdA gain access to the cell via a specific nucleoside transporter (NST) protein. To investigate the mode of action of these drugs in CLL, we used a fluorescent ligand for the NST (5'-(SAENTA- x8)-fluorescein) and 3-colour flow cytometry to determine NST expression on CD5+/CD19+ B-cells from the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with CLL. NST levels on these cells was found to be not significantly different from normal control lymphocytes (mean = 485 +/- 425) vs. (mean = 553 +/- 178). Exposure to varying concentrations (0, 3 microM and 30 microM) of F1 and 2-CdA, however, resulted in an upregulation of NST (mean = 1552 +/- 775 with 30 microM FL; mean = 3392 +/- 2197 with 30 microM 2-CdA) after 48. "Large" lymphoid cells (not present in normal PB) were found to express significantly more NST (mean = 2540 +/- 2861) and have a higher proliferative capacity than "small" cells (mean = 357 +/- 517 NST/cell). Incubation of CLL cells with F1 (n = 6) and 2-CdA (n = 8) in vitro over 48 h also resulted in an increase in the proportion of cells in S-phase (0 microM = 0.2 + 2 - 0.1; 30 microM FL = 2.4 +/- 2.0; 30 microM 2-CdA = 3.3 +/- 1.3) and a significant increase in morphologically identifiable apoptosis. Apoptosis was confirmed by flow cytometric DNA analysis (0 microM = 13 +/- 8%; 30 microM FL = 40 +/- 20%; 30 microM 2-CdA = 48 +/- 11%). In situ hybridization using a biotinylated cDNA bcl-2 probe demonstrated that bcl-2 mRNA expression was markedly decreased in treated cells after 24 h. These studies have demonstrated that: (1) NST expression on CLL lymphocytes is low; (2) in vitro exposure to the analogues increases both the level of

  19. Evaluation of DNA damage in exfoliated tear duct epithelial cells from individuals exposed to air pollution assessed by single cell gel electrophoresis assay.

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Valverde, M; Lopez, M C; Naufal, I; Sanchez, I; Bizarro, P; Lopez, I; Fortoul, T I; Ostrosky-Wegman, P

    2000-06-22

    The search for relevant target cells for human monitoring purposes has increased during the last few years. Cells such as sperm, buccal or nasal and gastric epithelium are being used. In this study, we report the use of exfoliated tear duct epithelial cells as a potential material for human biomonitoring studies, since these cells are a target for environmental pollutants. We employed the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay to evaluate for differences in the basal level of DNA damage between young adults from the south (exposed mainly to high levels of ozone) and from the north (exposed principally to hydrocarbons) regions of Mexico City. We found an increase in DNA migration in tear duct epithelial cells from individuals who live in the southern part of the city compared to those living in the northern part. Moreover, young people who live in the southwest part of the city with the highest values of ozone presented the highest values of DNA damage. These results show the feasibility of using exfoliated tear duct epithelial cells in human biomonitoring studies. PMID:10863153

  20. Antimutagenicity of WR-1065 in L5178Y cells exposed to accelerated (56)Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Evans, T. E.; Horng, M. F.

    2002-01-01

    The ability of the aminothiol WR-1065 [N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane] to protect L5178Y (LY) cells against the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of exposure to accelerated (56)Fe ions (1.08 GeV/nucleon) was determined. It was found that while WR-1065 reduced the mutagenicity in both cell lines when it was present during the irradiation, the addition of WR-1065 after the exposure had no effect on the mutagenicity of the radiation in either cell line. No marked protection against the cytotoxic effects of exposure to (56)Fe ions was provided by WR-1065 when added either during or after irradiation in either cell line. We reported previously that WR-1065 protected the LY-S1 and LY-SR1 cell lines against both the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of X radiation when present during exposure, but that its protection when administered after exposure was limited to the mutagenic effects in the radiation-hypersensitive cell line, LY-S1. The results indicate that the mechanisms involved differ in the protection against cytotoxic compared to mutagenic effects and in the protection against damage caused by accelerated (56)Fe ions compared to X radiation.

  1. Monte-Carlo dosimetry on a realistic cell monolayer geometry exposed to alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberet, Ph; Vianna, F.; Karamitros, M.; Brun, T.; Gordillo, N.; Moretto, Ph; Incerti, S.; Seznec, H.

    2012-04-01

    The energy and specific energy absorbed in the main cell compartments (nucleus and cytoplasm) in typical radiobiology experiments are usually estimated by calculations as they are not accessible for a direct measurement. In most of the work, the cell geometry is modelled using the combination of simple mathematical volumes. We propose a method based on high resolution confocal imaging and ion beam analysis (IBA) in order to import realistic cell nuclei geometries in Monte-Carlo simulations and thus take into account the variety of different geometries encountered in a typical cell population. Seventy-six cell nuclei have been imaged using confocal microscopy and their chemical composition has been measured using IBA. A cellular phantom was created from these data using the ImageJ image analysis software and imported in the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation toolkit. Total energy and specific energy distributions in the 76 cell nuclei have been calculated for two types of irradiation protocols: a 3 MeV alpha particle microbeam used for targeted irradiation and a 239Pu alpha source used for large angle random irradiation. Qualitative images of the energy deposited along the particle tracks have been produced and show good agreement with images of DNA double strand break signalling proteins obtained experimentally. The methodology presented in this paper provides microdosimetric quantities calculated from realistic cellular volumes. It is based on open-source oriented software that is publicly available.

  2. Beneficial effect of Lisosan G on cultured human microvascular endothelial cells exposed to oxidised low density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lubrano, Valter; Baldi, Simona; Napoli, Debora; Longo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Nutritional compounds which display anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects have specific applications in preventing oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. In this study we evaluated the effect of Lisosan G (powder of Triticum sativum grains) on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) exposed to oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Methods: The protective effects of Lisosan G were evaluated on human microvascular endothelial cells exposed to ox-LDL. Intercellular adhesion molecular-1 (ICAM-1), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations and the expression of the respective genes were evaluated in response to incubation with ox-LDL, after co-incubation with ox-LDL and Lisosan G or exposed to Lisosan G alone. The analysis of LOX-1 gene was performed with RT-PCR semi quantitative method. The degree of oxidation induced in relation to control, was established by measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) production. Results: The incubation with ox-LDL induced a significant increase in ICAM-1, IL-6 and ET-1 levels compared to the basal condition (P<0.01, P<0.05, and P<0.01, respectively), while in presence of Lisosan G, ICAM-1 levels showed a significant reduction both compared to the cultures treated with ox-LDL and control (P<0.01). IL-6 levels did not show any difference; ET-1 levels showed a partial reduction after co-treatment with Lisosan G, and also with Lisosan G alone, reduced the concentration below control (P<0.01). The modulation of these markers was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. An association between MDA formation and the three markers production was observed. Semi-quantitative analysis of LOX-1 gene expression showed a significant up-regulation only after ox-LDL exposure. Interpretation & conclusions: The results demonstrate that Lisosan G may have an important role in the prevention of microcirculatory dysfunction. PMID:22885268

  3. Induction of anchorage-independent growth in primary human cells exposed to protons or HZE ions separately or in dual exposures.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, B M; Cuomo, N C; Bennett, P V

    2005-10-01

    Travelers on space missions will be exposed to a complex radiation environment that includes protons and heavy charged particles. Since protons are present at much higher levels than are heavy ions, the most likely scenario for cellular radiation exposure will be proton exposure followed by a hit by a heavy ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells are being investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to both radiation types. One useful measure of mammalian cell damage is induction of the ability to grow in a semi-solid agar medium highly inhibitory to the growth of normal human cells, termed neoplastic transformation. Using primary human cells, we evaluated induction of soft-agar growth and survival of cells exposed to protons only or to heavy charged particles (600 MeV/nucleon silicon) only as well as of cells exposed to protons followed after a 4-day interval by silicon ions. Both ions alone efficiently transformed the human cells to anchorage-independent growth. Initial experiments indicate that the dose responses for neoplastic transformation of cells exposed to protons and then after 4 days to silicon ions appear similar to that of cells exposed to silicon ions alone.

  4. Induction of anchorage-independent growth in primary human cells exposed to protons or HZE ions separately or in dual exposures.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, B M; Cuomo, N C; Bennett, P V

    2005-10-01

    Travelers on space missions will be exposed to a complex radiation environment that includes protons and heavy charged particles. Since protons are present at much higher levels than are heavy ions, the most likely scenario for cellular radiation exposure will be proton exposure followed by a hit by a heavy ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells are being investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to both radiation types. One useful measure of mammalian cell damage is induction of the ability to grow in a semi-solid agar medium highly inhibitory to the growth of normal human cells, termed neoplastic transformation. Using primary human cells, we evaluated induction of soft-agar growth and survival of cells exposed to protons only or to heavy charged particles (600 MeV/nucleon silicon) only as well as of cells exposed to protons followed after a 4-day interval by silicon ions. Both ions alone efficiently transformed the human cells to anchorage-independent growth. Initial experiments indicate that the dose responses for neoplastic transformation of cells exposed to protons and then after 4 days to silicon ions appear similar to that of cells exposed to silicon ions alone. PMID:16187755

  5. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to Space-like Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells and lymphocytes were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) or Cs-137 gamma radiation source at the Baylor College (Houston, TX). After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The possible relationship between the frequency of inter- and intra-chromosomal exchanges and the track structure of radiation is discussed. The work was supported by the NASA Space Radiation Health Program.

  6. Morphological changes among hippocampal dentate granule cells exposed to early kindling-epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shatrunjai P; He, Xiaoping; McNamara, James O; Danzer, Steve C

    2013-12-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with changes in the morphology of hippocampal dentate granule cells. These changes are evident in numerous models that are associated with substantial neuron loss and spontaneous recurrent seizures. By contrast, previous studies have shown that in the kindling model, it is possible to administer a limited number of stimulations sufficient to produce a lifelong enhanced sensitivity to stimulus evoked seizures without associated spontaneous seizures and minimal neuronal loss. Here we examined whether stimulation of the amygdala sufficient to evoke five convulsive seizures (class IV or greater on Racine's scale) produce morphological changes similar to those observed in models of epilepsy associated with substantial cell loss. The morphology of GFP-expressing granule cells from Thy-1 GFP mice was examined either 1 day or 1 month after the last evoked seizure. Interestingly, significant reductions in dendritic spine density were evident 1 day after the last seizure, the magnitude of which had diminished by 1 month. Further, there was an increase in the thickness of the granule cell layer 1 day after the last evoked seizure, which was absent a month later. We also observed an increase in the area of the proximal axon, which again returned to control levels a month later. No differences in the number of basal dendrites were detected at either time point. These findings demonstrate that the early stages of kindling epileptogenesis produce transient changes in the granule cell body layer thickness, molecular layer spine density, and axon proximal area, but do not produce striking rearrangements of granule cell structure.

  7. DNA damage in bone marrow and blood cells of mice exposed to municipal sludge leachates.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Anamika; Dhawan, Alok; Gupta, Shrawan Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Leachates of municipal solid waste from unsecured disposal sites contaminate sources of potable water and affect human health. In the present study, we have used the Comet assay to evaluate the DNA damage in mice exposed to municipal sludge leachates. Ten percent leachates were prepared from municipal sludge obtained from two different disposal drains. Male Swiss albino mice were treated daily with 0.1-0.4 ml of the leachates by oral gavage for 15 days, and the DNA damage was evaluated in bone marrow and blood using Olive tail moment, % tail DNA, and tail length as measures of DNA damage. Physicochemical and metal analysis of the leachates detected the presence of cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc, as well as elevated concentrations of sulfate and nitrate. Both of the leachates produced significant dose-responsive increases in DNA damage in both mouse tissues. There were no significant differences in the responses for any of the Comet endpoints between tissues (for the same leachate sample) or between leachate samples (for the same tissue). The results of this study indicate that municipal waste leachates produce DNA damage in vivo. PMID:16470523

  8. Transcriptomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to thalidomide during spontaneous differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiugong; Sprando, Robert L; Yourick, Jeffrey J

    2015-09-01

    Thalidomide is a potent developmental toxicant that induces a range of birth defects, notably severe limb malformations. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underpinning the teratogenic effects of thalidomide, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), and published the major findings in a research article entitled "Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells" [1]. The data presented herein contains complementary information related to the aforementioned research article.

  9. Mutant quantity and quality in mammalian cells (AL) exposed to cesium-137 gamma radiation: effect of caffeine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuinness, S. M.; Shibuya, M. L.; Ueno, A. M.; Vannais, D. B.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We examined the effect of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) on the quantity and quality of mutations in cultured mammalian AL human-hamster hybrid cells exposed to 137Cs gamma radiation. At a dose (1.5 mg/ml for 16 h) that reduced the plating efficiency (PE) by 20%, caffeine was not itself a significant mutagen, but it increased by approximately twofold the slope of the dose-response curve for induction of S1- mutants by 137Cs gamma radiation. Molecular analysis of 235 S1- mutants using a series of DNA probes mapped to the human chromosome 11 in the AL hybrid cells revealed that 73 to 85% of the mutations in unexposed cells and in cells treated with caffeine alone, 137Cs gamma rays alone or 137Cs gamma rays plus caffeine were large deletions involving millions of base pairs of DNA. Most of these deletions were contiguous with the region of the MIC1 gene at 11p13 that encodes the S1 cell surface antigen. In other mutants that had suffered multiple marker loss, the deletions were intermittent along chromosome 11. These "complex" mutations were rare for 137Cs gamma irradiation (1/63 = 1.5%) but relatively prevalent (23-50%) for other exposure conditions. Thus caffeine appears to alter both the quantity and quality of mutations induced by 137Cs gamma irradiation.

  10. Gypenosides Protected the Neural Stem Cells in the Subventricular Zone of Neonatal Rats that Were Prenatally Exposed to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lun; Yang, Kun-Qi; Fu, Wen-Yan; Shang, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Jing, Fang-Miao; Li, Lin-Lin; Xin, Hua; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) can cause severe mental retardation in children who are prenatally exposed to ethanol. The effects of prenatal and early postnatal ethanol exposure on adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been investigated; however, the effects of prenatal ethanol exposure on the subventricular zone (SVZ) have not. Gypenosides (GPs) have been reported to have neuroprotective effects in addition to other bioactivities. The effects of GPs on neural stem cells (NSCs) in the FASD model are unknown. Here, we test the effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on the neonatal SVZ, and the protection potential of GPs on NSCs in FASD rats. Our results show that prenatal ethanol exposure can suppress the cell proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the neonatal SVZ and that GPs (400 mg/kg/day) can significantly increase the cell proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells inhibited by ethanol. Our data indicate that GPs have neuroprotective effects on the NSCs and can enhance the neurogenesis inhibited by ethanol within the SVZ of neonatal rats. These findings provide new evidence for a potential therapy involving GPs for the treatment of FASD. PMID:25464383

  11. A study of sister chromatid exchange and somatic cell mutation in hospital workers exposed to ethylene oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Tomkins, D J; Haines, T; Lawrence, M; Rosa, N

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the risks of exposure to ethylene oxide (EO) at current permissible levels and at past higher levels, an inception cohort of sterilizer operators and supervisors from the Central Processing Department (CPD), respiratory therapists, and engineers exposed to EO were identified at the McMaster University Medical Centre. A comparison group from Nutrition Services (NUTR) were matched with the CPD workers on the basis of sex, age, and smoking habit. The present report is based on genetic test results for the 94 CPD and matched NUTR workers only. Statistical analysis based on the mean SCE frequency in the top 5, top 10, and all cells (50 cells scored per individual) and high frequency cells (HFC) based on the 95th percentile for nonsmoking control subjects showed a direct association with current smoking but not with EO exposure. Similarly, statistical analysis of the somatic cell mutation (SCMT) variant frequencies did not demonstrate an association with EO exposure, nor with smoking. Regression analysis indicated that sex was the only other covariate that significantly affected SCE. Age was weakly associated with SCMT. A statistically significant interaction between occupational exposure and smoking habits was observed only for the mean SCE frequency of the top 5 and top 10 cells when the 11 current CPD/NUTR pairs were not included. Thus, this interaction should be interpreted with caution. PMID:8143611

  12. Toxic cyanobacterial cells containing microcystins induce oxidative stress in exposed tilapia fish (Oreochromis sp.) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Jos, Angeles; Pichardo, Silvia; Prieto, Ana I; Repetto, Guillermo; Vázquez, Carmen M; Moreno, Isabel; Cameán, Ana M

    2005-04-30

    The effects of microcystins from cyanobacterial cells on various oxidative stress biomarkers in liver, kidney and gill tissues in freshwater tilapia fish (Oreochromis sp.) were investigated under laboratory conditions. Microcystins are a family of cyclic peptide toxins produced by species of freshwater cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). Fish were exposed to the cyanobacterial cells in two ways: mixed with a commercial fish food or crushed into a commercial fish food so that the toxins were released. Two different exposure times were studied: 14 and 21 days. The oxidative status of fish was evaluated by analyzing the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR). The findings of the present investigation show that microcystins induce oxidative stress in a time-dependent manner and that the type of administration of the cyanobacterial cells influences the extent of these effects. Thus, the crushed cyanobacterial cells (released toxins) induced the antioxidant defences studied and increased the LPO level to a greater extent than the non-crushed cells. The liver was the most affected organ followed by kidney and gills. These results together with reports that fish can accumulate microcystins mean that cyanobacterial blooms are an important health, environmental and economic problem. PMID:15820106

  13. Induction of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase in Mouse Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Exposed to 900 MHz Radiofrequency Fields: Preliminary Observations

    PubMed Central

    He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Zong, Lin; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Several investigators have reported increased levels of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a nuclear enzyme which plays an important role in the repair of damaged DNA, in cells exposed to extremely low dose ionizing radiation which does not cause measurable DNA damage. Objective. To examine whether exposure of the cells to nonionizing radiofrequency fields (RF) is capable of increasing messenger RNA of PARP-1 and its protein levels in mouse bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Methods. BMSCs were exposed to 900 MHz RF at 120 μW/cm2 power intensity for 3 hours/day for 5 days. PARP-1 mRNA and its protein levels were examined at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 hours after exposure using RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Sham-exposed (SH) cells and those exposed to ionizing radiation were used as unexposed and positive control cells. Results. BMSCs exposed to RF showed significantly increased expression of PARP-1 mRNA and its protein levels after exposure to RF while such changes were not observed in SH-exposed cells. Conclusion. Nonionizing RF exposure is capable of inducing PARP-1. PMID:27190989

  14. Omeprazole does not Potentiate Acute Oxygen Toxicity in Fetal Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Exposed to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ananddeep; Zhang, Shaojie; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to the pathogenesis of broncho-pulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is a developmental lung disease of premature infants that is characterized by an interruption of lung alveolar and pulmonary vascular development. Omeprazole (OM) is a proton pump inhibitor that is used to treat humans with gastric acid related disorders. Earlier we observed that OM-mediated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation attenuates acute hyperoxic lung injury in adult mice and oxygen toxicity in adult human lung cells. However, our later studies in newborn mice demonstrated that OM potentiates hyperoxia-induced developmental lung injury. Whether OM exerts a similar toxicity in primary human fetal lung cells is unknown. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that OM potentiates hyperoxia-induced cytotoxicity and ROS generation in the human fetal lung derived primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). OM activated AhR as evident by a dose-dependent increase in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 mRNA levels in OM-treated cells. Furthermore, OM at a concentration of 100 μM (OM 100) increased NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) expression. Surprisingly, hyperoxia decreased rather than increase the NQO1 protein levels in OM 100-treated cells. Exposure to hyperoxia increased cytotoxicity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. Interestingly, OM 100-treated cells exposed to air had increased H2O2 levels. However, hyperoxia did not further augment H2O2 levels in OM 100-treated cells. Additionally, hyperoxia-mediated oxygen toxicity was similar in both vehicle- and OM-treated cells. These findings contradict our hypothesis and support the hypothesis that OM does not potentiate acute hyperoxic injury in HPMEC in vitro. PMID:26779382

  15. In vitro measurements of oxygen consumption rates in hTERT-RPE cells exposed to low levels of red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Castellanos, Cherry C.

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to 2.88 J/cm2 of red light induces an adaptive response against a lethal pulse of 2.0 μm laser radiation in hTERT-RPE cells in vitro, but not in a knockdown mutant for vascular endothelial growth factor c (VEGF-C). The generally accepted initiation sequence for photobiomodulation is that absorption of red light by cytochome c oxidase (CCOX) of the electron transport chain increases the binding affinity of CCOX for O2 vs. nitric oxide (NO). This results in displacement of NO by O2 in the active site of CCOX, thereby increasing cellular respiration and intracellular ATP. We've previously reported that red-light exposure induces a small, but consistently reproducible, increase in NO levels in these cells. But the relative importance of NO and oxidative phosphorylation is unclear because little is known about the relative contributions of NO and ATP to the response. However, if NO dissociation from CCOX actually increases oxidative phosphorylation, one should see a corresponding increase in oxygen consumption. A Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer was used to measure oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in normal and mutant cells as a proxy for oxidative phosphorylation. Both basal respiration and maximum respiration rates in normal cells are significantly higher than in the mutant. The normal cells have a significant amount of "excess capacity," whereas the VEGF-C(KD) have little or none. The OCR in exposed normal cells is lower than in unexposed cells when measured immediately after exposure. The exposures used for these experiments had no effect on the OCR in mutant cells.

  16. Induction of brown cells in Venerupis philippinarum exposed to benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Boscolo Papo, Michele; Bertotto, Daniela; Pascoli, Francesco; Locatello, Lisa; Vascellari, Marta; Poltronieri, Carlo; Quaglio, Francesco; Radaelli, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene is an important polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) commonly present in the marine environment and responsible for carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic effects in various animal species. In the present study, we investigated by both histochemical and immunohistochemical approaches the effect of an acute exposure to different concentrations of B(a)P in the Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum. The general morphology of the different clam tissues, which was investigated histologically, evidenced a significant increase in the number of intestinal brown cells after B(a)P exposure. An increasing trend response to B(a)P was detected. The histochemical analysis for lipofuscin revealed the presence of lipofuscin-like substances inside the cytoplasm of intestinal brown cells. The same cells exhibited a PAS positivity and a reactivity to Schmorl's solution for melanin pigment. Moreover, intestinal brown cells exhibited an immunopositivity to HSP70 antibody confirming the increasing trend response to B(a)P detected by the histochemical analysis. Our results suggest that histological tissue changes resulting from exposure to B(a)P can be an useful marker in biomonitoring studies.

  17. c-jun gene expression in human cells exposed to either ionizing radiation or hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Horio, M.; Huberman, E.

    1993-06-01

    We investigated the role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and protein kinase C (PKC) in radiation- and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-evoked c-jun gene expression in human HL-205 cells. This induction of c-jun gene expression could be prevented by pretreatment of the cells with Nacetylcysteine (an antioxidant) or H7 (a PKC and PKA inhibitor) but not by HA1004, a PKA inhibitor, suggesting a role for ROls and PKC in mediating c-jun gene expression. We also investigated potential differences in c-jun gene expression in a panel of normal and tumor cells untreated or treated with ionizing radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Treatment with radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced a varied response, from some reduction to an increase of more than an order of magnitude in the steady-state level of c-jun mRNA. These data indicate that although induction of c-jun may be a common response to ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, this response was reduced or absent in some cell types.

  18. Differential expression profile of membrane proteins in L-02 cells exposed to trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Huang, Aibo; Lin, Sheng; Yang, Xifei; Yang, Linqing; Zhou, Li; Huang, Haiyan; Wu, Desheng; Huang, Xinfeng; Xu, Hua; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-10-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a halogenated organic solvent widely used in industries, is known to cause severe hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms underlying TCE hepatotoxicity are still not well understood. It is predicted that membrane proteins are responsible for key biological functions, and recent studies have revealed that TCE exposure can induce abnormal levels of membrane proteins in body fluids and cultured cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the TCE-induced alterations of membrane proteins profiles in human hepatic L-02 liver cells. A comparative membrane proteomics analysis was performed in combination with two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 15 proteins were identified as differentially expressed (4 upregulated and 11 downregulated) between TCE-treated cells and normal controls. Among this, 14 of them are suggested as membrane-associated proteins by their transmembrane domain and/or subcellular location. Furthermore, the differential expression of β subunit of adenosine triphosphate synthase (ATP5B) and prolyl 4-hydroxylase, β polypeptide (P4HB) were verified by Western blot analysis in TCE-treated L-02 cells. Our work not only reveals the association between TCE exposure and altered expression of membrane proteins but also provides a novel strategy to discover membrane biomarkers and elucidate the potential mechanisms involving with membrane proteins response to chemical-induced toxic effect.

  19. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T98G cells. Our results indicate that testosterone improves cell survival and mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces nuclear fragmentation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These effects were accompanied by a positive regulation of neuroglobin, an oxygen-binding and sensor protein, which may serve as a regulator of ROS and nitrogen reactive species (NOS), and these protective effects of testosterone may be at least in part mediated by estradiol and DHT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that astroglia may mediate some of the protective actions of testosterone in the brain upon pathological conditions. PMID:27445795

  20. Expression of tissue transglutaminase on primary olfactory ensheathing cells cultures exposed to stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Agata; Spatuzza, Michela; Russo, Antonella; Raciti, Giuseppina; Vanella, Angelo; Stanzani, Stefania; Pellitteri, Rosalia

    2012-04-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2), a multifunctional enzyme implicated in cellular proliferation and differentiation processes, plays a modulatory role in the cell response to stressors. Herein, we used olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), representing an unusual population of glial cells to promote axonal regeneration and to provide trophic support, as well as to assess whether the effect of some Growth Factors (GFs), NGF, bFGF or GDNF, on TG2 overexpression induced by stress conditions, such as glutamate or lipopolysaccaride (LPS). Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and vimentin were used as markers of astroglial differentiation and cytoskeleton component, respectively. Glutamate or LPS treatment induced a particular increase of TG2 expression. A pre-treatment of the cells with the GFs restored the levels of the protein to that of untreated ones. Our results demonstrate that the treatment of OECs with the GFs was able to restore the OECs oxidative status as modified by stress, also counteracting TG2 overexpression. It suggests that, in OECs, TG2 modulation or inhibition induced by GFs might represent a therapeutic target to control the excitotoxicity and/or inflammation, which are involved in several acute and chronic brain diseases.

  1. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T98G cells. Our results indicate that testosterone improves cell survival and mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces nuclear fragmentation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These effects were accompanied by a positive regulation of neuroglobin, an oxygen-binding and sensor protein, which may serve as a regulator of ROS and nitrogen reactive species (NOS), and these protective effects of testosterone may be at least in part mediated by estradiol and DHT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that astroglia may mediate some of the protective actions of testosterone in the brain upon pathological conditions.

  2. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF NORMAL HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO TRIVALENT ARSENICALS AND DIMETHYLTHIOARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung is a major target for arsenic carcinogenesis in humans. However, the carcinogenic mode of action of arsenicals is unknown. We investigated, in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS2B) cells, the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAsIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), dimethylarsi...

  3. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T98G cells. Our results indicate that testosterone improves cell survival and mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces nuclear fragmentation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These effects were accompanied by a positive regulation of neuroglobin, an oxygen-binding and sensor protein, which may serve as a regulator of ROS and nitrogen reactive species (NOS), and these protective effects of testosterone may be at least in part mediated by estradiol and DHT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that astroglia may mediate some of the protective actions of testosterone in the brain upon pathological conditions. PMID:27445795

  4. Coordination of cell cycle, DNA repair and muscle gene expression in myoblasts exposed to genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, Giulia Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Upon exposure to genotoxic stress, skeletal muscle progenitors coordinate DNA repair and the activation of the differentiation program through the DNA damage-activated differentiation checkpoint, which holds the transcription of differentiation genes while the DNA is repaired. A conceptual hurdle intrinsic to this process relates to the coordination of DNA repair and muscle-specific gene transcription within specific cell cycle boundaries (cell cycle checkpoints) activated by different types of genotoxins. Here, we show that, in proliferating myoblasts, the inhibition of muscle gene transcription occurs by either a G1- or G2-specific differentiation checkpoint. In response to genotoxins that induce G1 arrest, MyoD binds target genes but is functionally inactivated by a c-Abl-dependent phosphorylation. In contrast, DNA damage-activated G2 checkpoint relies on the inability of MyoD to bind the chromatin at the G2 phase of the cell cycle. These results indicate an intimate relationship between DNA damage-activated cell cycle checkpoints and the control of tissue-specific gene expression to allow DNA repair in myoblasts prior to the activation of the differentiation program. PMID:21685725

  5. Nanomimics of host cell membranes block invasion and expose invasive malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Bieri, Andrej; Brand, Françoise; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2014-12-23

    The fight against most infectious diseases, including malaria, is often hampered by the emergence of drug resistance and lack or limited efficacies of vaccines. Therefore, new drugs, vaccines, or other strategies to control these diseases are needed. Here, we present an innovative nanotechnological strategy in which the nanostructure itself represents the active substance with no necessity to release compounds to attain therapeutic effect and which might act in a drug- and vaccine-like dual function. Invasion of Plasmodium falciparum parasites into red blood cells was selected as a biological model for the initial validation of this approach. Stable nanomimics-polymersomes presenting receptors required for parasite attachment to host cells-were designed to efficiently interrupt the life cycle of the parasite by inhibiting invasion. A simple way to build nanomimics without postformation modifications was established. First, a block copolymer of the receptor with a hydrophobic polymer was synthesized and then mixed with a polymersome-forming block copolymer. The resulting nanomimics bound parasite-derived ligands involved in the initial attachment to host cells and they efficiently blocked reinvasion of malaria parasites after their egress from host cells in vitro. They exhibited efficacies of more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than the soluble form of the receptor, which can be explained by multivalent interactions of several receptors on one nanomimic with multiple ligands on the infective parasite. In the future, our strategy might offer interesting treatment options for severe malaria or a way to modulate the immune response. PMID:25435059

  6. ACTIVATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING PATHWAY IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that exposure to combustion-derived metals rapidly (within 20 min) activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), in the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS. To study the mechanisms respons...

  7. Photobiomodulation Protects and Promotes Differentiation of C2C12 Myoblast Cells Exposed to Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Aline; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Cogo, José Carlos; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2016-01-01

    Background Snakebites is a neglected disease and in Brazil is considered a serious health problem, with the majority of the snakebites caused by the genus Bothrops. Antivenom therapy and other first-aid treatments do not reverse local myonecrose which is the main sequel caused by the envenomation. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of low level laser (LLL) therapy in reducing local myonecrosis induced by Bothropic venoms, however the mechanism involved in this effect is unknown. In this in vitro study, we aimed to analyze the effect of LLL irradiation against cytotoxicity induced by Bothrops jararacussu venom on myoblast C2C12 cells. Methodology C2C12 were utilized as a model target and were incubated with B. jararacussu venom (12.5 μg/mL) and immediately irradiated with LLL at wavelength of red 685 nm or infrared 830 nm with energy density of 2.0, 4.6 and 7.0 J/cm2. Effects of LLL on cellular responses of venom-induced cytotoxicity were examined, including cell viability, measurement of cell damage and intra and extracellular ATP levels, expression of myogenic regulatory factors, as well as cellular differentiation. Results In non-irradiated cells, the venom caused a decrease in cell viability and a massive release of LDH and CK levels indicating myonecrosis. Infrared and red laser at all energy densities were able to considerably decrease venom-induced cytotoxicity. Laser irradiation induced myoblasts to differentiate into myotubes and this effect was accompanied by up regulation of MyoD and specially myogenin. Moreover, LLL was able to reduce the extracellular while increased the intracellular ATP content after venom exposure. In addition, no difference in the intensity of cytotoxicity was shown by non-irradiated and irradiated venom. Conclusion LLL irradiation caused a protective effect on C2C12 cells against the cytotoxicity caused by B. jararacussu venom and promotes differentiation of these cells by up regulation of myogenic factors. A modulatory

  8. Hyperosmolaric contrast agents in cartilage tomography may expose cartilage to overload-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Turunen, M J; Töyräs, J; Lammi, M J; Jurvelin, J S; Korhonen, R K

    2012-02-01

    In clinical arthrographic examination, strong hypertonic contrast agents are injected directly into the joint space. This may reduce the stiffness of articular cartilage, which is further hypothesized to lead to overload-induced cell death. We investigated the cell death in articular cartilage while the tissue was compressed in situ in physiological saline solution and in full strength hypertonic X-ray contrast agent Hexabrix(TM). Samples were prepared from bovine patellae and stored in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium overnight. Further, impact tests with or without creep were conducted for the samples with contact stresses and creep times changing from 1 MPa to 10 MPa and from 0 min to 15 min, respectively. Finally, depth-dependent cell viability was assessed with a confocal microscope. In order to characterize changes in the biomechanical properties of cartilage as a result of the use of Hexabrix™, stress-relaxation tests were conducted for the samples immersed in Hexabrix™ and phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Both dynamic and equilibrium modulus of the samples immersed in Hexabrix™ were significantly (p<0.05) lower than those of the samples immersed in PBS. Cartilage samples immersed in physiological saline solution showed load-induced cell death primarily in the superficial and middle zones. However, under high 8-10 MPa contact stresses, the samples immersed in full strength Hexabrix™ showed significantly (p<0.05) higher number of dead cells than the samples compressed in physiological saline, especially in the deep zone of cartilage. In conclusion, excessive loading stresses followed by tissue creep might increase the risk for chondrocyte death in articular cartilage when immersed in hypertonic X-ray contrast agent, especially in the deep zone of cartilage.

  9. Biocompatibility and degradation of gold-covered magneto-elastic biosensors exposed to cell culture.

    PubMed

    Menti, C; Beltrami, M; Possan, A L; Martins, S T; Henriques, J A P; Santos, A D; Missell, F P; Roesch-Ely, M

    2016-07-01

    Magneto-elastic materials (ME) have important advantages when applied as biosensors due to the possibility of wireless monitoring. Commercial Metglas 2826MB3™ (FeNiMoB) is widely used, however sensor stabilization is an important factor for biosensor performance. This study compared the effects of biocompatibility and degradation of the Metglas 2826MB3™ alloy, covered or not with a gold layer, when in contact with cell culture medium. Strips of amorphous Metglas 2826MB3™ were cut and coated with thin layers of Cr and Au, as verified by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES), the presence of metals in the culture medium was quantitatively determined for up to seven days after alloy exposure. Biocompatibility of fibroblast Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cultures was tested and cytotoxicity parameters were investigated by indirect means of reduction of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) at 1, 2 and 7 days. Cell death was further evaluated through in situ analysis using Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide (AO/EB) staining and images were processed with ImageJ software. Ions from Metglas(®) 2826MB3™ induced a degradation process in living organisms. The cytotoxicity assay showed a decrease in the percentage of live cells compared to control for the ME strip not coated with gold. AO/EB in situ staining revealed that most of the cells grown on top of the gold-covered sensor presented a normal morphology (85.46%). Covering ME sensors with a gold coating improved their effectiveness by generating protection of the transducer by reducing the release of ions and promoting a significant cell survival. PMID:26998872

  10. The Morphological and Molecular Changes of Brain Cells Exposed to Direct Current Electric Field Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Simon J.; Lagacé, Marie; St-Amour, Isabelle; Arsenault, Dany; Cisbani, Giulia; Chabrat, Audrey; Fecteau, Shirley; Lévesque, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The application of low-intensity direct current electric fields has been experimentally used in the clinic to treat a number of brain disorders, predominantly using transcranial direct current stimulation approaches. However, the cellular and molecular changes induced by such treatment remain largely unknown. Methods: Here, we tested various intensities of direct current electric fields (0, 25, 50, and 100V/m) in a well-controlled in vitro environment in order to investigate the responses of neurons, microglia, and astrocytes to this type of stimulation. This included morphological assessments of the cells, viability, as well as shape and fiber outgrowth relative to the orientation of the direct current electric field. We also undertook enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and western immunoblotting to identify which molecular pathways were affected by direct current electric fields. Results: In response to direct current electric field, neurons developed an elongated cell body shape with neurite outgrowth that was associated with a significant increase in growth associated protein-43. Fetal midbrain dopaminergic explants grown in a collagen gel matrix also showed a reorientation of their neurites towards the cathode. BV2 microglial cells adopted distinct morphological changes with an increase in cyclooxygenase-2 expression, but these were dependent on whether they had already been activated with lipopolysaccharide. Finally, astrocytes displayed elongated cell bodies with cellular filopodia that were oriented perpendicularly to the direct current electric field. Conclusion: We show that cells of the central nervous system can respond to direct current electric fields both in terms of their morphological shape and molecular expression of certain proteins, and this in turn can help us to begin understand the mechanisms underlying the clinical benefits of direct current electric field. PMID:25522422

  11. Gene expression profile of human lung epithelial cells chronically exposed to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongquan; Stueckle, Todd A.; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Rojanasakul, Yon; Lu, Yongju; Wang, Liying

    2015-01-01

    A rapid increase in utility of engineered nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), has raised a concern over their safety. Based on recent evidence from animal studies, pulmonary exposure of CNTs may lead to nanoparticle accumulation in the deep lung without effective clearance which could interact with local lung cells for a long period of time. Physicochemical similarities of CNTs to asbestos fibers may contribute to their asbestos-like carcinogenic potential after long-term exposure, which has not been well addressed. More studies are needed to identify and predict the carcinogenic potential and mechanisms for promoting their safe use. Our previous study reported a long-term in vitro exposure model for CNT carcinogenicity and showed that 6-month sub-chronic exposure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) causes malignant transformation of human lung epithelial cells. In addition, the transformed cells induced tumor formation in mice and exhibited an apoptosis resistant phenotype, a key characteristic of cancer cells. Although the potential role of p53 in the transformation process was identified, the underlying mechanisms of oncogenesis remain largely undefined. Here, we further examined the gene expression profile by using genome microarrays to profile molecular mechanisms of SWCNT oncogenesis. Based on differentially expressed genes, possible mechanisms of SWCNT-associated apoptosis resistance and oncogenesis were identified, which included activation of pAkt/p53/Bcl-2 signaling axis, increased gene expression of Ras family for cell cycle control, Dsh-mediated Notch 1, and downregulation of apoptotic genes BAX and Noxa. Activated immune responses were among the major changes of biological function. Our findings shed light on potential molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in SWCNT oncogenic potential.

  12. Müller cell gliotic response in the retina of the newts exposed to real and simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Domaratskaya; Aleinikova, Karina; Novikova, Julia; Anton, Hermann J.; Almeida, Eduardo

    The effects of real and simulated microgravity on the eye tissue regeneration of newts (Pl. waltli) after lens and/or retina removal were investigated. Changes in Müller glial cells in the retina of eyes regenerating after lens extirpation were detected in newts exposed to clinostat-ing. The cells were hypertrophied, and their processes thickened. Such changes were viewed as specific of reactive gliosis [1]. Later experiments onboard the Russian biosatellite Bion-11 showed similar changes in the retinas of newts regenerating after a two-week spaceflight. In the Bion-11 animals, GFAP, the major structural protein of macroglial cells was found to be up-regulated [2]. In more recent experiments onboard Foton-2 (2005) and Foton-M3 (2007), GFAP expression in retinas of space-flown, ground control (kept at 1 g), and basal control (sacrificed on launch day) newts was quantified, using microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and digital image analysis. It was found that Müller cell processes of non-operated animals dis-u played low GFAP immunolabeling. A low level of immunoreactivity was also observed in basal controls. In contrast, retinas of space-flown animals showed greater GFAP immunoreactivity associated with both an increased cell number and a higher density of intermediate filaments [3]. This, in turn, was accompanied by up-regulation of stress protein (HSP90) and growth factor (FGF2) expressions. It can be postulated that such a response of Müller cells was to mitigate the retinal stress in newts exposed to microgravity. Although the exact mechanisms remain unknown, it can be hypothesized that GFAP up-regulation is mediated by HSPs and growth factors, particularly by FGF2. Taken together, these data suggest that the retinal population of macroglial cells is sensitive to gravity changes and that in space it can react by enhancing its neuroprotective function. [1] Grigoryan E.N., Anton H.J., Mitashov V.I. Adv. Space Res. 1998. V. 22. N.2. P. 293-301. [2] Grigoryan E

  13. Arachidonic acid release and prostaglandin synthesis in a macrophage-like cell line exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed

    Brown, R C; Poole, A

    1984-10-01

    A macrophage-like cell line (P388D1) has been treated with asbestos and the release of arachidonic acid and its metabolites has been studied using two methods. In the first monolayer cultures of the cells were labelled with tritiated arachidonic acid and the release of label into the medium was quantified: secondly the synthesis and release of prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha were followed using radioimmune assay. Crocidolite asbestos caused the greatest release of tritium while the medium from chrysotile-treated cultures contained more of both prostaglandins. Both of the fibrous dusts were significantly more active in both test systems than were the two 'inert' materials--titanium dioxide and milled sample of crocidolite. It is suggested that these phenomena are due to the effect of mineral dusts on phospholipase activity and that differences in this activity are associated with differences in the pathogenicity of various mineral dusts. PMID:6098173

  14. DNA Repair in Human Cells Exposed to Combinations of Carcinogenic Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R. B.; Ahmed, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP2 fibroblasts were treated with UV plus UV-mimetic chemicals. The UV dose used was sufficient to saturate the UV excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a UV specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from UV and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of UV and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from UV or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170.

  15. Analysis of lysosomal membrane proteins exposed to melanin in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There have been developed to use targeting ability for antimicrobial, anticancerous, gene therapy and cosmetics through analysis of various membrane proteins isolated from cell organelles. Methods It was examined about the lysosomal membrane protein extracted from lysosome isolated from HeLa cell treated by 100 ppm melanin for 24 hours in order to find associated with targeting ability to melanin using by 2-dimensional electrophoresis. Results The result showed 14 up-regulated (1.5-fold) and 13 down-regulated (2.0-fold) spots in relation to melanin exposure. Conclusions It has been found that lysosomal membrane proteins are associated with melanin to decolorize and quantity through cellular activation of lysosome. PMID:27158002

  16. Modeling of Nanoparticle-Mediated Electric Field Enhancement Inside Biological Cells Exposed to AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pawan K.; Kang, Sung Kil; Kim, Gon Jun; Choi, Jun; Mohamed, A.-A. H.; Lee, Jae Koo

    2009-08-01

    We present in this article the effect of alternating electric field at kilohertz (kHz) and megahertz (MHz) frequencies on the biological cells in presence and absence of nanoparticles. The induced electric field strength distribution in the region around cell membrane and nucleus envelope display different behavior at kHz and MHz frequencies. The attachment of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), especially gold nanowires around the surface of nucleus induce enhanced electric field strengths. The induced field strengths are dependent on the length of nanowire and create varying field regions when the length of nanowire is increased from 2 to 4 µm. The varying nanowire length increased the induced field strengths inside nucleoplasm and region adjacent to the nucleus in the cytoplasm. We investigated a process of electrostatic disruption of nucleus membrane when the induced electric field strength across the nucleus exceeds its tensile strength.

  17. Distribution of Chromosome Breakpoints in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed to Low- and High-LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Zhang, Ye; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Feiveson, Alan; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Low-and high-LET radiations produced distinct breakpoint distributions. The difference of the breakpoint distributions between low-and high-LET only appeared in break ends involved in interchromosome exchanges. The breakpoint distributions for break ends participating in intrachromosome exchanges were similar. Gene-rich regions do not necessarily have more chromosome breaks. High-LET appeared to produce long live (data not shown) or longer live breaks that can migrate a longer distance before rejoining with other breaks. Domains occupied by different segments of the chromosomes may be responsible for the breakpoint distribution. The dose responses for interchromosomal exchanges were linear in all four exposures. However, the dose response for intrachromosomal exchanges were none linear. Increasing dose of high dose rate exposure (Fe-ions or -rays) increase the fraction of cells with intrachromosome aberrations, whereas increasing dose of low dose rate exposure (neutrons or -rays) does not affect the fraction of cells with intrachromosome aberrations.

  18. Analysis of changes in cell volume of a mouse early embryo exposed to osmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Pogorelova, M A; Goldshtein, D V; Pogorelov, A G; Golichenkov, V A

    2009-07-01

    The impact of the osmotic component of the incubation medium for the volume of mouse early embryonic cell was studied by laser scanning microscopy. Common Dulbecco's medium caused a prolonged hyperosmotic effect. Adaptive phase of regulatory compensation for the osmotic shock was observed under hypotonic conditions. From these data, water permeability of the blastomer membrane is evaluated as 0.4 micro/(minxatm). PMID:19902118

  19. Changes in protein expression of U937 and Jurkat cells exposed to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, Erick K.; Roth, Caleb C.; Cerna, Caesar; Estalck, Larry; Wilmink, Gerald; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2013-02-01

    Application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) to various biological cell lines has been to shown to cause many diverse effects, including poration of the plasma membrane, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, blebbing, apoptosis, and intracellular calcium bursts. The underlying mechanism(s) responsible for these diverse responses are poorly understood. Of specific interest in this paper are the long-term effects of nsPEF on cellular processes, including the regulation of genes and production of proteins. Previous studies have reported transient activation of select signaling pathways involving mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), protein phosphorylation and downstream gene expression following nsPEF application. We hypothesize that nsPEF represents a unique stimulus that could be used to externally modulate cellular processes. To validate our hypothesis, we performed a series of cuvette-based exposures at 10 and 600ns pulse widths using a custom Blumlien line pulser system. We measured acute changes in the plasma membrane structure using flow cytometry by tracking phosphatidylserine externalization via FITC-Annexin V labeling and poration via propidium iodide uptake. We then compared these results to viability of the cells at 24 hours post exposure using MTT assay and changes in the MAPK family of proteins at 8 hours post-exposure using Luminex assay. By comparing exposures at 10 and 600ns duration, we found that most MAPK family-protein expression increased in Jurkat and U937 cell lines following exposure and compared well with drops in viability and changes in plasma membrane asymmetry. What proved interesting is that some MAPK family proteins (e.g. p53, STAT1), were expressed in one cell line, but not the other. This difference may point to an underlying mechanism for observed difference in cellular sensitivity to nsPEFinduced stresses.

  20. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 activation in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, M.; Takei, T.; Mills, I.; Kito, H.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/ERK2) are activated and might play a role in enhanced proliferation and morphological change induced by strain. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were subjected to an average of 6 or 10% strain at a rate of 60 cycles/min for up to 4 h. Cyclic strain caused strain- and time-dependent phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/ERK2. Peak phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/ERK2 induced by 10% strain were at 10 min. A specific ERK1/ERK2 kinase inhibitor, PD-98059, inhibited phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/ERK2 but did not inhibit the increased cell proliferation and cell alignment induced by strain. Treatment of BAEC with 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1, 4-benzohydroquinone, to deplete inositol trisphosphate-sensitive calcium storage, and gadolinium chloride, a Ca2+ channel blocker, did not inhibit the activation of ERK1/ERK2. Strain-induced ERK1/ERK2 activation was partly inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitor calphostin C and completely inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. These data suggest that 1) ERK1/ERK2 are not critically involved in the strain-induced cell proliferation and orientation, 2) strain-dependent activation of ERK1/ERK2 is independent of intracellular and extracellular calcium mobilization, and 3) protein kinase C activation and tyrosine kinase regulate strain-induced activation of ERK1/ERK2.

  1. Differential effects of antipsychotics on the development of rat oligodendrocyte precursor cells exposed to cuprizone.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyun; Yang, Hong-Ju; Li, Xin-Min

    2014-03-01

    Cuprizone (CPZ) is a copper-chelating agent and has been shown to induce white matter damage in mice and rats. The compromised white matter and oligodendrocytes (OLs) respond to some antipsychotics in vivo. However, little is known about the effects of antipsychotics on cultured OLs in the presence of CPZ. The aim of this study was to examine effects of some antipsychotics on developing OLs in the presence of CPZ. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) were prepared from rat embryos; OLs at different developing stages were labeled with specific antibodies; levels of CNP and MBP proteins in mature OLs were assessed by Western-blot analysis; malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and activity of catalase were evaluated as well for an assessment of oxidative stress and antioxidative status. In immunofluorescent staining, CPZ was shown to inhibit the differentiation of cultured OPCs into O4-positive cells, reduce the maturation of O4-positive cells into CNP- and MBP-positive cells, and decrease levels of CNP and MBP in mature OLs. These inhibitory effects of CPZ were ameliorated by clozapine and quetiapine (QUE), but not by haloperidol and olanzapine. Further experiments were performed to explore the mechanism of the protective effects of QUE. QUE attenuated the decreases in CNP and MBP in CPZ-treated OLs, and blocked the CPZ-induced increase in MDA and decrease in catalase activity in cultured OLs. These results are relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of schizophrenia considering the aberrant white matter development and evidence suggesting the derangement of the oxidant and antioxidant defense system in some of the patients with schizophrenia. PMID:23728937

  2. Two-photon microscopy reveals early rod photoreceptor cell damage in light-exposed mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Palczewska, Grazyna; Golczak, Marcin; Kohno, Hideo; Dong, Zhiqian; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Atrophic age-related and juvenile macular degeneration are especially devastating due to lack of an effective cure. Two retinal cell types, photoreceptor cells and the adjacent retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), reportedly display the earliest pathological changes. Abca4−/−Rdh8−/− mice, which mimic many features of human retinal degeneration, allowed us to determine the sequence of light-induced events leading to retinal degeneration. Using two-photon microscopy with 3D reconstruction methodology, we observed an initial strong retinoid-derived fluorescence and expansion of Abca4−/−Rdh8−/− mouse rod cell outer segments accompanied by macrophage infiltration after brief exposure of the retina to bright light. Additionally, light-dependent fluorescent compounds produced in rod outer segments were not transferred to the RPE of mice genetically defective in RPE phagocytosis. Collectively, these findings suggest that for light-induced retinopathies in mice, rod photoreceptors are the primary site of toxic retinoid accumulation and degeneration, followed by secondary changes in the RPE. PMID:24706832

  3. Regulation of SUMO2 target proteins by the proteasome in human cells exposed to replication stress.

    PubMed

    Bursomanno, Sara; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M; Hickson, Ian D; Liu, Ying

    2015-04-01

    In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role of the proteasome in determining the fate of proteins conjugated to SUMO2 when cells are treated with DNA replication stress conditions. We conducted a quantitative proteomic analysis in a U2OS cell line stably expressing SUMO2(Q87R) tagged with StrepHA in the presence or absence of epoxomicin (EPOX), a proteasome inhibitor. We identified subgroups of putative SUMO2 targets that were either degraded or stabilized by EPOX upon SUMO2 conjugation in response to replication stress. Interestingly, the subgroup of proteins degraded upon SUMO2 conjugation was enriched in proteins playing roles in DNA damage repair and replication, while the proteins stabilized upon SUMOylation were mainly involved in chromatin maintenance. In addition, we identified 43 SUMOylation sites in target proteins, of which 17 are located in the proximity of phosphorylated residues. Considering that DNA replication stress is a major source of genome instability, which is suggested to drive tumorigenesis and possibly aging, our data will facilitate future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology. PMID:25748227

  4. Protective Pleiotropic Effect of Flavonoids on NAD+ Levels in Endothelial Cells Exposed to High Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Boesten, Daniëlle M. P. H. J.; von Ungern-Sternberg, Saskia N. I.; den Hartog, Gertjan J. M.; Bast, Aalt

    2015-01-01

    NAD+ is important for oxidative metabolism by serving as an electron transporter. Hyperglycemia decreases NAD+ levels by activation of the polyol pathway and by overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP). We examined the protective role of three structurally related flavonoids (rutin, quercetin, and flavone) during high glucose conditions in an in vitro model using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Additionally we assessed the ability of these flavonoids to inhibit aldose reductase enzyme activity. We have previously shown that flavonoids can inhibit PARP activation. Extending these studies, we here provide evidence that flavonoids are also able to protect endothelial cells against a high glucose induced decrease in NAD+. In addition, we established that flavonoids are able to inhibit aldose reductase, the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. We conclude that this protective effect of flavonoids on NAD+ levels is a combination of the flavonoids ability to inhibit both PARP activation and aldose reductase enzyme activity. This study shows that flavonoids, by a combination of effects, maintain the redox state of the cell during hyperglycemia. This mode of action enables flavonoids to ameliorate diabetic complications. PMID:26180598

  5. Cytotoxicity and induction of protective mechanisms in HepG2 cells exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Urani, C; Melchioretto, P; Canevali, C; Crosta, G F

    2005-10-01

    Cadmium is a widespread industrial pollutant. The primary route of exposure occurs via contaminated drinking water or food supplies, and tobacco. Its chronic introduction and ingestion lead to bio-magnification in target organs, as the liver. The aim of this paper is to determine Cd cytotoxic concentrations in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Further aims are the study of the activation and involvement of protection mechanisms against Cd hepatotoxicity. Cd was accumulated within the cells, as measured by ICP-AES. Metallothioneins (MT-1 and -2), a family of metal-binding proteins, were induced in a dose-dependent way after treatment with concentrations below the IC(50) value (mean value 22 microM). The over-expression of MT by Zn pre-treatment was able to defend against Cd cytotoxicity. Heat shock protein 70 kDa (hsp70) was induced at high non-cytotoxic concentrations (5, 10 microM) probably as a consequence of proteotoxicity, but its over-expression by a sub-lethal heat shock was not able to protect the cells from Cd cytotoxic concentrations (20, 50, 100 microM).

  6. MicroRNA-1228(*) inhibit apoptosis in A549 cells exposed to fine particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Ding, Zhen; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Xin; Meng, Qingtao; Wu, Shenshen; Wang, Shizhi; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Chen, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Studies have reported associations between fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and respiratory disorders; however, the underlying mechanism is not completely clear owing to the complex components of PM2.5. microRNAs (miRNAs) demonstrate tremendous regulation to target genes, which are sensitive to exogenous stimulation, and facilitate the integrative understood of biological responses. Here, significantly modulated miRNA were profiled by miRNA microarray, coupled with bioinformatic analysis; the potential biological function of modulated miRNA were predicted and subsequently validated by cell-based assays. Downregulation of miR-1228-5p (miR-1228(*)) expression in human A549 cells were associated with PM2.5-induced cellular apoptosis through a mitochondria-dependent pathway. Further, overexpression of miR-1228(*) rescued the cellular damages induced by PM2.5. Thus, our results demonstrate that PM2.5-induced A549 apoptosis is initiated by mitochondrial dysfunction and miR-1228(*) could protect A549 cells against apoptosis. The involved pathways and target genes might be used for future mechanistic studies.

  7. Reversible alterations in epithelial cell turnover in digestive gland of winkles (Littorina littorea) exposed to cadmium and their implications for biomarker measurements.

    PubMed

    Zaldibar, B; Cancio, I; Marigómez, I

    2007-02-28

    In marine molluscs, the epithelium of the digestive gland is composed of two cell types, namely, digestive and basophilic cells. Under normal physiological conditions digestive cells outnumber basophilic cells, but under different stress situations the composition of the epithelium changes, basophilic cells apparently replace digestive cell. Winkles, Littorina littorea, were exposed to 1.25mg/l Cd for 20 days to provoke cell type replacement. Then, animals were depurated in clean seawater for 10 days to determine whether cell type replacement was reversible. Digestive glands were fixed in Carnoy and paraffin embedded for histological analysis. The volume densities of basophilic cells (Vv(BAS)) and digestive cells (Vv(DIG)) were calculated by stereology on hematoxylin-eosin stained sections. Vv(BAS) increased and Vv(DIG) decreased in Cd-exposed animals. After estimation of cell size and absolute cell numbers, these changes were attributed to digestive cell loss and concomitant basophilic cell hypertrophy but not to increased numbers of basophilic cells. Cell type composition and cell size almost fully returned to normal values after 10-day depuration. Accordingly, PCNA immunohistochemistry demonstrated that proliferating digestive cells were more abundant in winkles exposed to Cd and after 10-day depuration than in control specimens, suggesting that net digestive cell loss was accompanied by increased digestive cell proliferation. Thus, Cd-exposure seems to provoke an enhanced digestive cell turnover in order to cope with Cd detoxification. Intralysosomal accumulation of metals (autometallographied black silver deposits; BSD) was used as a biomarker of exposure to Cd and lysosomal structural changes as an effect biomarker to see whether cell type composition might have any effect on these endpoints. BSD formed around Cd ions, in digestive cell lysosomes of Cd-exposed winkles whereas basophilic cells appeared devoid of them. After depuration, BSD were less

  8. Induction of Cell Death Through Alteration of Oxidants and Antioxidants in Epithelial Cells Exposed to High Energy Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    2012-07-01

    Radiation affects several cellular and molecular processes including double strand breakage, modifications of sugar moieties and bases. In outer space, protons are the primary radiation source which poses a range of potential health risks to astronauts. On the other hand, the use of proton radiation for tumor radiation therapy is increasing as it largely spares healthy tissues while killing tumor tissues. Although radiation related research has been conducted extensively, the molecular toxicology and cellular mechanisms affected by proton radiation remain poorly understood. Therefore, in the present study, we irradiated rat epithelial cells (LE) with different doses of protons and investigated their effects on cell proliferation and cell death. Our data showed an inhibition of cell proliferation in proton irradiated cells with a significant dose dependent activation and repression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, glutathione and superoxide dismutase respectively as compared to control cells. In addition, apoptotic related genes such as caspase-3 and -8 activities were induced in a dose dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in proton irradiated cells than control cells. Together, our results show that proton radiation alters oxidant and antioxidant levels in the cells to activate apoptotic pathway for cell death.

  9. Induction of Cell Death through Alteration of Oxidants and Antioxidants in Epithelial Cells Exposed to High Energy Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    2012-01-01

    Radiation affects several cellular and molecular processes including double strand breakage, modifications of sugar moieties and bases. In outer space, protons are the primary radiation source which poses a range of potential health risks to astronauts. On the other hand, the use of proton radiation for tumor radiation therapy is increasing as it largely spares healthy tissues while killing tumor tissues. Although radiation related research has been conducted extensively, the molecular toxicology and cellular mechanisms affected by proton radiation remain poorly understood. Therefore, in the present study, we irradiated rat epithelial cells (LE) with different doses of protons and investigated their effects on cell proliferation and cell death. Our data showed an inhibition of cell proliferation in proton irradiated cells with a significant dose dependent activation and repression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, glutathione and superoxide dismutase respectively as compared to control cells. In addition, apoptotic related genes such as caspase-3 and -8 activities were induced in a dose dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in proton irradiated cells than control cells. Together, our results show that proton radiation alters oxidant and antioxidant levels in the cells to activate apoptotic pathway for cell death.

  10. Matrix-degrading and pro-inflammatory changes in human vascular endothelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke condensate.

    PubMed

    Nordskog, Brian K; Blixt, Allison D; Morgan, Walter T; Fields, Wanda R; Hellmann, Gary M

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been associated with an increase in the severity and prevalence of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. To begin our investigation of this finding, we used an integrated approach combining gene expression profiling, protein analysis, cytokine measurements, and cytotoxicity determinations to examine molecular responses of cultured human aortic and coronary endothelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and nicotine. Exposure of endothelial cells to CSC (30 and 60 microg/mL TPM) for 24 h resulted in minimal cytotoxicity, and the upregulation of genes involved in matrix degradation (MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-9), xenobiotic metabolism (HO-1 and CYP1A2), and downregulation of genes involved in cell cycle regulation (including TOP2A, CCNB1, CCNA, CDKN3). Exposure of cells to a high physiological concentration of nicotine resulted in few differentially expressed genes. Immunoblot analysis of proteins selected from genes shown to be differentially regulated by microarray analysis revealed similar responses. Finally, a number of inflammatory cytokines measured in culture media were elevated in response to CSC. Together, these results describe a complex proinflammatory response, possibly mediating the recruitment of leukocytes through cytokine signaling. Additionally, fibrous cap destabilization may be facilitated by matrix metalloproteinase upregulation.

  11. PACAP and VIP Inhibit the Invasiveness of Glioblastoma Cells Exposed to Hypoxia through the Regulation of HIFs and EGFR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Grazia; Grazia D’Amico, Agata; Reitano, Rita; Magro, Gaetano; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; Salomone, Salvatore; D’Agata, Velia

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) through the binding of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors (VIPRs), perform a wide variety of effects in human cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This tumor is characterized by extensive areas of hypoxia, which triggers the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIFs not only mediate angiogenesis but also tumor cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, HIFs activation is linked to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression. Previous studies have shown that VIP interferes with the invasive nature of gliomas by regulating cell migration. However, the role of VIP family members in GBM infiltration under low oxygen tension has not been clarified yet. Therefore, in the present study we have investigated, for the first time, the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-invasive effect of PACAP or VIP in U87MG glioblastoma cells exposed to hypoxia induced by treatment with desferrioxamine (DFX). The results suggest that either PACAP or VIP exert an anti-infiltrative effect under low oxygen tension by modulating HIFs and EGFR expression, key elements involved in cell migration and angiogenesis. These peptides act through the inhibition of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways, which are known to have a crucial role in HIFs regulation. PMID:27303300

  12. Alpha-fetoprotein is a biomarker of unfolded protein response and altered proteostasis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells exposed to sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Houessinon, Aline; Gicquel, Albane; Bochereau, Flora; Louandre, Christophe; Nyga, Rémy; Godin, Corinne; Degonville, James; Fournier, Emma; Saidak, Zuzana; Drullion, Claire; Barbare, Jean-Claude; Chauffert, Bruno; François, Catherine; Pluquet, Olivier; Galmiche, Antoine

    2016-01-28

    Sorafenib is the treatment of reference for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A decrease in the serum levels of Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is reported to be the biological parameter that is best associated with disease control by sorafenib. In order to provide a biological rationale for the variations of AFP, we analyzed the various steps of AFP production in human HCC cell lines exposed to sorafenib. Sorafenib dramatically reduced the levels of AFP produced by HCC cells independently of its effect on cell viability. The mRNA levels of AFP decreased upon sorafenib treatment, while the AFP protein remained localized in the Golgi apparatus. Sorafenib activated the Regulated Inositol-Requiring Enzyme-1α (IRE-1α) and the PKR-like ER Kinase (PERK)-dependent arms of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The inhibition of IRE-1α partially restored the mRNA levels of AFP upon treatment with sorafenib. The inhibition of both pathways partially prevented the drop in the production of AFP induced by sorafenib. The findings provide new insights on the regulation of AFP, and identify it as a biomarker suitable for the exploration of HCC cell proteostasis in the context of therapeutic targeting. PMID:26546044

  13. Enhancement of water retention in UV-exposed fuel-cell proton exchange membranes studied using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shaumik; Devi, Nirmala; Dash, Jyotirmayee; Rambabu, Gutru; Bhat, Santoshkumar D.; Pesala, Bala

    2016-02-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are increasingly gaining importance as a clean energy source. PEMs need to possess high proton conductivity and should be chemically and mechanically stable in the fuel cell environment. Proton conductivity of PEM in fuel cells is directly proportional to water content in the membrane. Among the various PEMs available, Nafion has high proton conductivity even with low water content compared to SPEEK (Sulfonated Poly(ether ether ketone)) but is also expensive. SPEEK membranes and it's composites have better mechanical properties and have comparatively higher thermal stability. Operating the fuel cell at higher temperatures and at the same time maintaining the water content of the membrane is always a great challenge. In this paper, to increase water retention capacity, Nafion, SPEEK and it's composite (SPEEK PSSA-CNT) membranes are exposed to Ultra-Violet (UV) radiation for varied times. Terahertz Spectroscopy, in both pulsed and CW mode has been used as an efficient tool to quantify the water retention of the membrane. Results using Terahertz spectroscopy show that even though the initial water absorption capacity of Nafion membranes is more, SPEEK membranes and it's composites show considerable improvement in the water retention capacity upon high intensity UV irradiation.

  14. Anatase TiO(2) nanosheets with exposed (001) facets: improved photoelectric conversion efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaguo; Fan, Jiajie; Lv, Kangle

    2010-10-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are fabricated based on anatase TiO(2) nanosheets (TiO(2)-NSs) with exposed {001} facets, which were obtained by a simple one-pot hydrothermal route using HF as a morphology controlling agent and Ti(OC(4)H(9))(4) as precursor. The prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherms. The photoelectric conversion performances of TiO(2)-NSs solar cells are also compared with TiO(2) nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs) and commercial-grade Degussa P25 TiO(2) nanoparticle (P25) solar cells at the same film thickness, and their photoelectric conversion efficiencies (η) are 4.56, 4.24 and 3.64%, respectively. The enhanced performance of the TiO(2)-NS solar cell is due to their good crystallization, high pore volume, large particle size and enhanced light scattering. The prepared TiO(2) nanosheet film electrode should also find wide-ranging potential applications in various fields including photocatalysis, catalysis, electrochemistry, separation, purification and so on.

  15. Anatase TiO2 nanosheets with exposed (001) facets: improved photoelectric conversion efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiaguo; Fan, Jiajie; Lv, Kangle

    2010-10-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are fabricated based on anatase TiO2 nanosheets (TiO2-NSs) with exposed {001} facets, which were obtained by a simple one-pot hydrothermal route using HF as a morphology controlling agent and Ti(OC4H9)4 as precursor. The prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The photoelectric conversion performances of TiO2-NSs solar cells are also compared with TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) and commercial-grade Degussa P25 TiO2 nanoparticle (P25) solar cells at the same film thickness, and their photoelectric conversion efficiencies (η) are 4.56, 4.24 and 3.64%, respectively. The enhanced performance of the TiO2-NS solar cell is due to their good crystallization, high pore volume, large particle size and enhanced light scattering. The prepared TiO2 nanosheet film electrode should also find wide-ranging potential applications in various fields including photocatalysis, catalysis, electrochemistry, separation, purification and so on.

  16. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cabernet sauvignon grape cells exposed to thermal stresses reveals alterations in sugar and phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    George, Iniga S; Pascovici, Dana; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Haynes, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Grapes (Vitis vinifera) are a valuable fruit crop and wine production is a major industry. Global warming and expanded range of cultivation will expose grapes to more temperature stresses in future. Our study investigated protein level responses to abiotic stresses, with particular reference to proteomic changes induced by the impact of four different temperature stress regimes, including both hot and cold temperatures, on cultured grape cells. Cabernet Sauvignon cell suspension cultures grown at 26°C were subjected to 14 h of exposure to 34 and 42°C for heat stress, and 18 and 10°C for cold stress. Cells from the five temperatures were harvested in biological triplicates and label-free quantitative shotgun proteomic analysis was performed. A total of 2042 non-redundant proteins were identified from the five temperature points. Fifty-five proteins were only detected in extreme heat stress conditions (42°C) and 53 proteins were only detected at extreme cold stress conditions (10°C). Gene Ontology (GO) annotations of differentially expressed proteins provided insights into the metabolic pathways that are involved in temperature stress in grape cells. Sugar metabolism displayed switching between alternative and classical pathways during temperature stresses. Additionally, nine proteins involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway were greatly increased in abundance at extreme cold stress, and were thus found to be cold-responsive proteins. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000977 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000977).

  17. p16INK4A inactivation mechanisms in non-small-cell lung cancer patients occupationally exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed

    Andujar, Pascal; Wang, Jinhui; Descatha, Alexis; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; Abd-Alsamad, Issam; Billon-Galland, Marie-Annick; Blons, Hélène; Clin, Bénédicte; Danel, Claire; Housset, Bruno; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Le Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise; Letourneux, Marc; Monnet, Isabelle; Régnard, Jean-François; Renier, Annie; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that asbestos fibers constitute the major occupational risk factor and that asbestos acts synergistically with tobacco smoking to induce lung cancer. Although some somatic gene alterations in lung cancer have been linked to tobacco smoke, few data are available on the role of asbestos fibers. P16/CDKN2A is an important tumor suppressor gene that is frequently altered in lung cancer via promoter 5'-CpG island hypermethylation and homozygous deletion, and rarely via point mutation. Many studies suggest that tobacco smoking produces P16/CDKN2A promoter hypermethylation in lung cancer, but the status of this gene in relation to asbestos exposure has yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of P16/CDKN2A alterations in lung cancer in asbestos-exposed patients. P16/CDKN2A gene status was studied in 75 human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases with well-defined smoking habits, and detailed assessment of asbestos exposure, based on occupational questionnaire and determination of asbestos bodies in lung tissue. The results of this study confirm published data on the effect of tobacco smoke on P16/CDKN2A gene alterations, characterized by significantly higher P16/CDKN2A promoter hypermethylation in heavy smokers (more than 40 pack-years (P-Y)) than in smokers of less than 40 P-Y. These results also demonstrate a higher incidence of loss of heterozygosity and homozygous deletion in asbestos-exposed cases, after adjustment for age and cumulative tobacco consumption, than in unexposed cases (P=0.0062). This study suggests that P16/CDKN2A gene inactivation in asbestos-exposed NSCLC cases mainly occurs via deletion, a feature also found in malignant mesothelioma, a tumor independent of tobacco smoking but associated with asbestos exposure, suggesting a possible relationship with an effect of asbestos fibers.

  18. Phosphorylation of p53 at serine 15 in A549 pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to vanadate: Involvement of ATM pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Katsura; Inageda, Kiyoshi; Nishitai, Gen; Matsuoka, Masato . E-mail: matsuoka@research.twmu.ac.jp

    2007-04-01

    When A549 cells were exposed to sodium metavanadate (NaVO{sub 3}), the pentavalent species of vanadium (vanadate), phosphorylation of p53 protein at Ser15 was found in a time (8-48 h)- and dose (10-200 {mu}M)-dependent manner. After the incubation with 50 or 100 {mu}M NaVO{sub 3} for 48 h, accumulation of p53 protein was accompanied with Ser15 phosphorylation. Among serines in p53 protein immunoprecipitated from A549 cells treated with 100 {mu}M NaVO{sub 3} for 48 h, only Ser15 was markedly phosphorylated. Treatment with other vanadate compounds, sodium orthovanadate (Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4}) and ammonium metavanadate (NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3}), also induced Ser15 phosphorylation and accumulation of p53 protein. While phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) was found in cells treated with NaVO{sub 3}, treatment with U0126 did not suppress Ser15 phosphorylation. On the other hand, treatment with wortmannin or caffeine, the inhibitors to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase related kinases (PIKKs), suppressed both NaVO{sub 3}-induced Ser15 phosphorylation and accumulation of p53 protein. The silencing of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) expression using short-interference RNA resulted in the marked suppression of Ser15 phosphorylation in A549 cells exposed to NaVO{sub 3}. However, treatment with antioxidants such as catalase and N-acetylcysteine did not suppress NaVO{sub 3}-induced Ser15 phosphorylation. Transcriptional activation of p53 and DNA fragmentation in A549 cells treated with NaVO{sub 3} were suppressed only slightly by S15A mutation, suggesting that Ser15 phosphorylation is not essential for these responses. The present results showed that vanadate induces the phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 depending on ATM, one of the members of PIKK family, in this human pulmonary epithelial cell line.

  19. Lineage-related cytotoxicity and clonogenic profile of 1,4-benzoquinone-exposed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Paik Wah; Abdul Hamid, Zariyantey; Chan, Kok Meng; Inayat-Hussain, Salmaan Hussain; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2015-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are sensitive targets for benzene-induced hematotoxicity and leukemogenesis. The impact of benzene exposure on the complex microenvironment of HSCs and HPCs remains elusive. This study aims to investigate the mechanism linking benzene exposure to targeting HSCs and HPCs using phenotypic and clonogenic analyses. Mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were exposed ex vivo to the benzene metabolite, 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ), for 24 h. Expression of cellular surface antigens for HSC (Sca-1), myeloid (Gr-1, CD11b), and lymphoid (CD45, CD3e) populations were confirmed by flow cytometry. The clonogenicity of cells was studied using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assay for multilineage (CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM) and single-lineage (CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-G, and CFU-M) progenitors. 1,4-BQ demonstrated concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in mouse BM cells. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased (p < 0.05) following 1,4-BQ exposure. Exposure to 1,4-BQ showed no significant effect on CD3e{sup +} cells but reduced the total counts of Sca-1{sup +}, CD11b{sup +}, Gr-1{sup +}, and CD45{sup +} cells at 7 and 12 μM (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the CFU assay showed reduced (p < 0.05) clonogenicity in 1,4-BQ-treated cells. 1,4-BQ induced CFU-dependent cytotoxicity by significantly inhibiting colony growth for CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-G, and CFU-M starting at a low concentration of exposure (5 μM); whereas for the CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM, the inhibition of colony growth was remarkable only at 7 and 12 μM of 1,4-BQ, respectively. Taken together, 1,4-BQ caused lineage-related cytotoxicity in mouse HPCs, demonstrating greater toxicity in single-lineage progenitors than in those of multi-lineage. - Highlights: • We examine 1,4-BQ toxicity targeting mouse hematopoietic cell lineages. • 1,4-BQ induces concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in bone marrow (BM) cells. • 1,4-BQ shows lineage-related toxicity on hematopoietic stem and

  20. Gamma-H2AX foci in cells exposed to a mixed beam of X-rays and alpha particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the cellular effects of exposure to mixed beams of high and low linear energy transfer radiation. So far, the effects of combined exposures have mainly been assessed with clonogenic survival or cytogenetic methods, and the results are contradictory. The gamma-H2AX assay has up to now not been applied in this context, and it is a promising tool for investigating the early cellular response to mixed beam irradiation. Purpose To determine the dose response and repair kinetics of gamma-H2AX ionizing radiation-induced foci in VH10 human fibroblasts exposed to mixed beams of 241Am alpha particles and X-rays. Results VH10 human fibroblasts were irradiated with each radiation type individually or both in combination at 37°C. Foci were scored for repair kinetics 0.5, 1, 3 and 24 h after irradiation (one dose per irradiation type), and for dose response at the 1 h time point. The dose response effect of mixed beam was additive, and the relative biological effectiveness for alpha particles (as compared to X-rays) was of 0.76 ± 0.52 for the total number of foci, and 2.54 ± 1.11 for large foci. The repair kinetics for total number of foci in cells exposed to mixed beam irradiation was intermediate to that of cells exposed to alpha particles and X-rays. However, for mixed beam-irradiated cells the frequency and area of large foci were initially lower than predicted and increased during the first 3 hours of repair (while the predicted number and area did not). Conclusions The repair kinetics of large foci after mixed beam exposure was significantly different from predicted based on the effect of the single dose components. The formation of large foci was delayed and they did not reach their maximum area until 1 h after irradiation. We hypothesize that the presence of low X-ray-induced damage engages the DNA repair machinery leading to a delayed DNA damage response to the more complex DNA damage induced by alpha particles. PMID:23121736

  1. Modulation of mitochondrial gene expression in pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to oxidants.

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Y M; Driscoll, K E; Timblin, C R; Hassenbein, D; Mossman, B T

    1998-01-01

    Oxidants are important in the regulation of signal transduction and gene expression. Multiple classes of genes are transcriptionally activated by oxidants and are implicated in different phenotypic responses. In the present study, we performed differential mRNA display to elucidate genes that are induced or repressed after exposure of rat lung epithelial (RLE) cells to H2O2 or crocidolite asbestos, a pathogenic mineral that generates oxidants. After 8 or 24 hr of exposure, RNA was extracted, reverse transcribed, and amplified by polymerase chain reaction with degenerate primers to visualize alterations in gene expression. The seven clones obtained were sequenced and encoded the mitochondrial genes, NADH dehydrogenase subunits ND5 and ND6, and 16S ribosomal RNA. Evaluation of their expression by Northern blot analysis revealed increased expression of 16S rRNA after 1 or 2 hr of exposure to H2O2. At later time periods (4 and 24 hr), mRNA levels of 16S rRNA and NADH dehydrogenase were decreased in H2O2-treated RLE cells when compared to sham controls. Crocidolite asbestos caused increases in 16S rRNA levels after 8 hr of exposure, whereas after 24 hr of exposure to asbestos, 16S rRNA levels were decreased in comparison to sham controls. In addition to these oxidants, the nitric oxide generator spermine NONOate caused similar decreases in NADH dehydrogenase mRNA levels after 4 hr of exposure. The present data and previous studies demonstrated that all oxidants examined resulted in apoptosis in RLE cells during the time frame where alterations of mitochondrial gene expression were observed. As the mitochondrion is a major organelle that controls apoptosis, alterations in expression of mitochondrial genes may be involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9788897

  2. Stress responses and conditioning effects in mesothelial cells exposed to peritoneal dialysis fluid.

    PubMed

    Kratochwill, Klaus; Lechner, Michael; Siehs, Christian; Lederhuber, Hans C; Rehulka, Pavel; Endemann, Michaela; Kasper, David C; Herkner, Kurt R; Mayer, Bernd; Rizzi, Andreas; Aufricht, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    Renal replacement therapy by peritoneal dialysis is frequently complicated by technical failure. Peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDF) cause injury to the peritoneal mesothelial cell layer due to their cytotoxicity. As only isolated elements of the involved cellular processes have been studied before, we aimed at a global assessment of the mesothelial stress response to PDF. Following single or repeated exposure to PDF or control medium, proteomics and bioinformatics techniques were combined to study effects in mesothelial cells (MeT-5A). Protein expression was assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and significantly altered spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and MS2 techniques. The lists of experimentally derived candidate proteins were expanded by a next neighbor approach and analyzed for significantly enriched biological processes. To address the problem of an unknown portion of false positive spots in 2DGE, only proteins showing significant p-values on both levels were further interpreted. Single PDF exposure resulted in reduction of biological processes in favor of reparative responses, including protein metabolism, modification and folding, with chaperones as a major subgroup. The observed biological processes triggered by this acute PDF exposure mainly contained functionally interwoven multitasking proteins contributing as well to cytoskeletal reorganization and defense mechanisms. Repeated PDF exposure resulted in attenuated protein regulation, reflecting inhibition of stress responses by high levels of preinduced chaperones. The identified proteins were less attributable to acute cellular injury but rather to specialized functions with a reduced number of involved multitasking proteins. This finding agrees well with the concept of conditioning effects and cytoprotection. In conclusion, this study describes the reprogrammed proteome of mesothelial cells during recovery from PDF exposure and adaption to repetitive stress. A broad stress response with

  3. Measurement of oxidative damage to DNA in nanomaterial exposed cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Roursgaard, Martin; Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Klingberg, Henrik; Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Loft, Steffen

    2015-03-01

    Increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA have been documented in studies of metal, metal oxide, carbon-based and ceramic engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). In particular, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) is widely assessed as a DNA nucleobase oxidation product, measured by chromatographic assays, antibody-based methods or the comet assay with DNA repair enzymes. However, spurious oxidation of DNA has been a problem in certain studies applying chromatographic assays, yielding high baseline levels of 8-oxodG. Antibody-based assays detect high 8-oxodG baseline levels, related to cross-reactivity with other molecules in cells. This review provides an overview of efforts to reliably detect oxidatively damaged DNA and a critical assessment of the published studies on DNA damage levels. Animal studies with high baseline levels of oxidatively damaged DNA are more likely to show positive associations between exposure to ENMs and oxidized DNA in tissue than studies showing acceptable baseline levels (odds ratio = 12.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-124). Nevertheless, reliable studies indicate that intratracheal instillation of nanosized carbon black is associated with increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung tissue. Oral exposure to nanosized carbon black, TiO2 , carbon nanotubes and ZnO is associated with elevated levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in tissues. These observations are supported by cell culture studies showing concentration-dependent associations between ENM exposure and oxidatively damaged DNA measured by the comet assay. Cell culture studies show relatively high variation in the ability of ENMs to oxidatively damage DNA; hence, it is currently impossible to group ENMs according to their DNA damaging potential. PMID:25196723

  4. Reactive oxygen species regulated mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in PC12 cells exposed to chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, Jae Hyeon; Shin, In Chul; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxidative species (ROS) generated by environmental toxicants including pesticides could be one of the factors underlying the neuronal cell damage in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we found that chlorpyrifos (CPF) induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neuronal components of PC12 cells as demonstrated by the activation of caspases and nuclear condensation. Furthermore, CPF also reduced the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreactivity in substantia nigra of the rat. In addition, CPF induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity. Importantly, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment effectively blocked apoptosis via the caspase-9 and caspase-3 pathways while NAC attenuated the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity as well as the oxidative metabolism of dopamine (DA). These results demonstrated that CPF-induced apoptosis was involved in mitochondrial dysfunction through the production of ROS. In the response of cellular antioxidant systems to CPF, we found that CPF treatment increased HO-1 expression while the expression of CuZnSOD and MnSOD was reduced. In addition, we found that CPF treatment activated MAPK pathways, including ERK 1/2, the JNK, and the p38 MAP kinase in a time-dependent manner. NAC treatment abolished MAPK phosphorylation caused by CPF, indicating that ROS are upstream signals of MAPK. Interestingly, MAPK inhibitors abolished cytotoxicity and reduced ROS generation by CPF treatment. Our results demonstrate that CPF induced neuronal cell death in part through MAPK activation via ROS generation, suggesting its potential to generate oxidative stress via mitochondrial damage and its involvement in oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative disease. -- Highlights: ► Chlorpyrifos induces apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity. ► ROS is involved in chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos affects cellular antioxidant systems. ► Chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis mediates activation of MAPK.

  5. Transcriptomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to thalidomide during spontaneous differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiugong; Sprando, Robert L.; Yourick, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Thalidomide is a potent developmental toxicant that induces a range of birth defects, notably severe limb malformations. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underpinning the teratogenic effects of thalidomide, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), and published the major findings in a research article entitled “Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells” [1]. The data presented herein contains complementary information related to the aforementioned research article. PMID:26217789

  6. Discoloration of poly(vinyl butyral) in cells exposed to real and simulated solar environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Shumka, A.

    1984-01-01

    The discoloration of poly(vinl butyral) (PVB) films used in solar cell modules is described. Transmission absorption, Fourier transformation IR absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy were used for this study. The discoloration of the PVB has been found to be affected by oxygen, moisture, temperature and light. However, the most severe discoloration observed is clearly associated with the migration of positive silver ions, which can be accelerated in the presence of electric fields. The metallization is the source of the silver, and the data are consistent with an interfacial reaction between the silver and PVB followed by transport into the polymer.

  7. Evaluation of respiration of mitochondria in cancer cells exposed to mitochondria-targeted agents.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, Katarina; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bajzikova, Martina; Rohlena, Jakub; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Respiration is one of the major functions of mitochondria, whereby these vital organelles use oxygen to produce energy. Many agents that may be of potential clinical relevance act by targeting mitochondria, where they may suppress mitochondrial respiration. It is therefore important to evaluate this process and understand how this is modulated by small molecules. Here, we describe the general methodology to assess respiration in cultured cells, followed by the evaluation of the effect of one anticancer agent targeted to mitochondria on this process, and also how to assess this in tumor tissue.

  8. [Cytogenetic investigations of bone marrow cells from mice exposed onboard biosatellite "Bion-M1"].

    PubMed

    Dorozhkina, O V; Ivanov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The results of studying the mitotic activities and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells from C57/BL6N mice with the help of the anaphase technique in 12 hours after completion of the 30-day "Bion-M1" mission and ground-based experiment using flight equipment are presented. A statistically reliable decline of the mitotic activity (0.74%) was found in cells taken from the space flown animals. In the ground-based experiment, a statistically reliable downward trend in proliferative activity (1.37%) was revealed after the comparison with groups of vivarium control (1.46-1.53%). In both experiments mice increased the number of initial mitotic phases (prophase + metaphase) relative to the sum of anaphases and telophases. The number of aberrant mitoses grew reliably in the group of flight animals by 29.7%, whereas in the ground-based experiment an upward trend was insignificant as their number increased up to 2.3% only. In the vivarium controls aberrant mitoses constituted 1.75-1.8%. An increase in chromosomal aberrations was largely due to such abnormalities as fragments. These findings seem to have been a result of summation of the effects of radiation and other stressful factors in space flight.

  9. Metabolic and osmoregulatory changes and cell proliferation in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Santos, Sofia; Vargas-Chacoff, L; Ruiz-Jarabo, I; Varela, J L; Mancera, J M; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, A; Wilson, J M

    2011-03-01

    The impact of cadmium on metabolism and osmoregulation was assessed in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata). Seawater acclimated fish were injected intraperitoneally with a sublethal dose of cadmium (1.25 mg Cd/kg body wt). After 7 days, half of the injected fish were sampled. The remaining fish were transferred to hypersaline water and sampled 4 days later. Gill and kidney Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities, plasma levels of cortisol, several metabolites and osmolytes, as well as osmolality were measured. Hepatosomatic index and condition factor were calculated. The expression levels of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, heat shock proteins (HSP70, HSP90) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen was assessed by western blotting. Cadmium treatment adversely affected the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, although, there was no perturbation in ion homeostasis and the animals were not compromised following transfer to hypersaline water. Increased cell proliferation and Hsp90 expression likely contributed to the attenuation of the deleterious effects of cadmium exposure. PMID:20933284

  10. [Cytogenetic investigations of bone marrow cells from mice exposed onboard biosatellite "Bion-M1"].

    PubMed

    Dorozhkina, O V; Ivanov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The results of studying the mitotic activities and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells from C57/BL6N mice with the help of the anaphase technique in 12 hours after completion of the 30-day "Bion-M1" mission and ground-based experiment using flight equipment are presented. A statistically reliable decline of the mitotic activity (0.74%) was found in cells taken from the space flown animals. In the ground-based experiment, a statistically reliable downward trend in proliferative activity (1.37%) was revealed after the comparison with groups of vivarium control (1.46-1.53%). In both experiments mice increased the number of initial mitotic phases (prophase + metaphase) relative to the sum of anaphases and telophases. The number of aberrant mitoses grew reliably in the group of flight animals by 29.7%, whereas in the ground-based experiment an upward trend was insignificant as their number increased up to 2.3% only. In the vivarium controls aberrant mitoses constituted 1.75-1.8%. An increase in chromosomal aberrations was largely due to such abnormalities as fragments. These findings seem to have been a result of summation of the effects of radiation and other stressful factors in space flight. PMID:25958465

  11. Increased frequencies of micronucleated reticulocytes and T-cell receptor mutation in Aldh2 knockout mice exposed to acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Kunugita, Naoki; Isse, Toyohi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Ogawa, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Tetsunosuke; Kinaga, Tsuyoshi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2008-02-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) metabolizes acetaldehyde produced from ethanol into acetate and plays a major role in the oxidation of acetaldehyde in vivo. About half of all Japanese people have inactive ALDH2. We generated homozygous Aldh2 null (Aldh2-/-) mice by gene targeting knockout as a model of ALDH2-deficient humans. To investigate the mutagenicity of acetaldehyde, a micronucleus assay and a T-cell receptor (TCR) gene mutation assay were performed in Aldh2-/- mice and wild-type (Aldh2 +/+) mice exposed to acetaldehyde. The mice were continuously exposed to 125 and 500 ppm of acetaldehyde vapor for 2 weeks. Another group was orally administered 100 mg/kg once a day for 2 weeks continuously. The mice were killed after 2 weeks of exposure to acetaldehyde, and the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes was measured by flow cytometry. We also observed the incidence of TCR gene mutations in T-lymphocytes by measuring the variant CD3(-CD4+) expression by flow cytometry. The frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes induced by acetaldehyde was significantly increased in Aldh2 -/- mice, but not in Aldh2 +/+ mice. TCR mutant frequency was also associated with acetaldehyde exposure in Aldh2-/ - mice, especially after oral administration; however, it was not associated with acetaldehyde exposure in Aldh2 +/+ mice. In conclusion, Aldh2 -/- mice showed high sensitivity in the micronuclei and TCR mutation assays compared with Aldh2 +/+ mice after exposure to acetaldehyde. PMID:18303182

  12. Decline of FoxP3+ Regulatory CD4 T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Children Heavily Exposed to Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Michelle J.; Jagannathan, Prasanna; Farrington, Lila A.; Eccles-James, Ijeoma; Wamala, Samuel; McIntyre, Tara I; Vance, Hilary M.; Bowen, Katherine; Nankya, Felistas; Auma, Ann; Nalubega, Mayimuna; Sikyomu, Esther; Naluwu, Kate; Rek, John; Katureebe, Agaba; Bigira, Victor; Kapisi, James; Tappero, Jordan; Muhindo, Mary K; Greenhouse, Bryan; Arinaitwe, Emmanuel; Dorsey, Grant; Kamya, Moses R.; Feeney, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    FoxP3+ regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs) help to maintain the delicate balance between pathogen-specific immunity and immune-mediated pathology. Prior studies suggest that Tregs are induced by P. falciparum both in vivo and in vitro; however, the factors influencing Treg homeostasis during acute and chronic infections, and their role in malaria immunopathogenesis, remain unclear. We assessed the frequency and phenotype of Tregs in well-characterized cohorts of children residing in a region of high malaria endemicity in Uganda. We found that both the frequency and absolute numbers of FoxP3+ Tregs in peripheral blood declined markedly with increasing prior malaria incidence. Longitudinal measurements confirmed that this decline occurred only among highly malaria-exposed children. The decline of Tregs from peripheral blood was accompanied by reduced in vitro induction of Tregs by parasite antigen and decreased expression of TNFR2 on Tregs among children who had intense prior exposure to malaria. While Treg frequencies were not associated with protection from malaria, there was a trend toward reduced risk of symptomatic malaria once infected with P. falciparum among children with lower Treg frequencies. These data demonstrate that chronic malaria exposure results in altered Treg homeostasis, which may impact the development of antimalarial immunity in naturally exposed populations. PMID:26182204

  13. Caffeic Acid Reduces the Viability and Migration Rate of Oral Carcinoma Cells (SCC-25) Exposed to Low Concentrations of Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Kubina, Robert; Kabała-Dzik, Agata; Wojtyczka, Robert D.; Morawiec, Tadeusz; Bułdak, Rafał J.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol increases the risk of carcinoma originated from oral epithelium, but the biological effects of ultra-low doses of ethanol on existing carcinoma cells in combination with natural substances are still unclear. A role for ethanol (EtOH), taken in small amounts as an ingredient of some beverages or mouthwashes to change the growth behavior of established squamous cell carcinoma, has still not been examined sufficiently. We designed an in vitro study to determine the effect of caffeic acid (CFA) on viability and migration ability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, exposed to ultra-low concentrations (maximum 100 mmol/L) EtOH. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-dimethyltetrazolium bromide) and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) assays were used to assess the cytotoxic effect of EtOH/CFA and the viability of squamous carcinoma SCC-25 cells (ATCC CRL-1628, mobile part of the tongue). Tested EtOH concentrations were: 2.5, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mmol/L, along with an equal CFA concentration of 50 μmol/L. Carcinoma cells’ migration was investigated by monolayer “wound” healing assay. We demonstrated that very low concentrations of EtOH ranging between 2.5 and 10 mmol/L may induce the viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, while the results following addition of CFA reveal an antagonistic effect, attenuating pro-proliferative EtOH activity. The migration rate of oral squamous carcinoma cells can be significantly inhibited by the biological activity of caffeic acid. PMID:25329614

  14. Analysis of the cellular stress response in MCF10A cells exposed to combined radio frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Na; Han, Na-Kyung; Hong, Mi-Na; Chi, Sung-Gil; Lee, Yun-Sil; Kim, Taehong; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Nam; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to environmental stressors can be measured by monitoring the cellular stress response in target cells. Here, we used the cellular stress response to investigate whether single or combined radio frequency (RF) radiation could induce stress response in human cells. Cellular stress responses in MCF10A human breast epithelial cells were characterized after exposure to 4 h of RF radiation [code division multiple access (CDMA) or CDMA plus wideband CDMA (WCDMA)] or 2 h RF radiation on 3 consecutive days. Specific absorption rate (SAR) was 4.0 W/kg for CDMA signal alone exposure and 2.0 W/kg each, 4.0 W/kg in total for combined CDMA plus WCDMA signals. Expression levels and phosphorylation states of specific heat shock proteins (HSPs) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were analyzed by Western blot. It was found that HSP27 and ERK1/2 phosphorylations are the most sensitive markers of the stress response in MCF10A cells exposed to heat shock or ionizing radiation. Using these markers, we demonstrated that neither one-time nor repeated single (CDMA alone) or combined (CDMA plus WCDMA) RF radiation exposure significantly altered HSP27 and ERK1/2 phosphorylations in MCF10A cells (p > 0.05). The lack of a statistically significant alteration in HSP27 and ERK1/2 phosphorylations suggests that single or combined RF radiation exposure did not elicit activation of HSP27 and ERK1/2 in MCF10A cells.

  15. Investigating longitudinal changes in the mechanical properties of MCF-7 cells exposed to paclitaxol using particle tracking microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kaffas, Ahmed; Bekah, Devesh; Rui, Min; Kumaradas, J. Carl; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-02-01

    Evidence suggests that compression and shear wave elastography are sensitive to the mechanical property changes occuring in dying cells following chemotherapy, and can hence be used to monitor cancer treatment response. A qualitative and quantitative understanding of the mechanical changes at the cellular level would allow to better infer how these changes affect macroscopic tissue mechanical properties and therefore allow the optimization of elastographic techniques (such as shear wave elastography) for the monitoring of cancer therapy. We used intracellular particle tracking microrheology (PTM) to investigate the mechanical property changes of cells exposed to paclitaxol, a mitotic inhibitor used in cancer chemotherapy. The average elastic and viscous moduli of the cytoplasm of treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells were calculated for frequency ranges between 0.2 and 100 rad s-1 (corresponding to 0.03 and 15.92 Hz, respectively). A significant increase in the complex shear modulus of the cell cytoplasm was detected at 12 h post treatment. At 24 h after drug exposure, the elastic and viscous moduli increased by a total of 191.3 Pa (>8000×) and 9 Pa (˜9×), respectively for low frequency shear modulus measurements (at 1 rad s-1). At higher frequencies (10 rad s-1), the elastic and viscous moduli increased by 188.5 Pa (˜60×) and 1.7 Pa (˜1.1×), respectively. Our work demonstrates that PTM can be used to measure changes in the mechanical properties of treated cells and that cell elasticity significantly increases by 24 h after chemotherapy exposure.

  16. Radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines and human normal liver cell lines exposed to 12C6+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, X.; Yang, J.; Li, W.; Guo, C.; Dang, B.; Wang, J.; Zhou, L.; Wei, W.; Gao, Q.

    AIM To investigate the radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines and human normal liver cell lines METHODS Accelerated carbon ions by heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou HIRFL have high LET We employed it to study the radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines SMMC-7721 and human normal liver cell lines L02 using premature chromosome condensation technique PCC Cell survive was documented by a colony assay Chromatid breaks were measured by counting the number of chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks immediately after prematurely chromosome condensed by Calyculin-A RESULTS The survival curve of the two cell lines presented a good linear relationship and the survival fraction of L02 is higher than that of SMMC-7721 Additionally the two types of G 2 phase chromosome breaks chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks of L02 are lower than that of SMMC-7721 CONCLUSION Human normal liver cell line have high radioresistance than that of hepatoma cell line It imply that it is less damage to normal organs when radiotherapy to hepatoma

  17. Influence of serum on in situ proliferation and genotoxicity in A549 human lung cells exposed to nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Sara; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Thomassen, Leen C J; Bilaničová, Dagmar; Birkedal, Renie K; Pojana, Giulio; Marcomini, Antonio; Jensen, Keld A; Leyns, Luc; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline

    2012-06-14

    In this work in situ proliferation of A549 human lung epithelial carcinoma cells exposed to nanomaterials (NMs) was investigated in the presence or absence of 10% serum. NMs were selected based on chemical composition, size, charge and shape (Lys-SiO(2), TiO(2), ZnO, and multi walled carbon nanotubes, MWCNTs). Cells were treated with NMs and 4h later, cytochalasin-B was added. 36 h later, cell morphology was analyzed under a light microscope. Nuclearity was scored to determine the cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI). CBPI, based on percentage of mono-, bi- and multi-nucleated cells, reflects cell toxicity and cell cycle delay. For some conditions depending on NM type (TiO(2) and MWCNT) and serum concentration (0%) scoring of CBPI was impossible due to overload of agglomerated NMs. Moreover, where heavy agglomeration occurs, micronuclei (MN) detection and scoring under microscope was prevented. A statistically significant decrease of CBPI was found for ZnO NM suspended in medium in the absence or presence of 10% serum at 25 μg/ml and 50 μg/ml, respectively and for Lys-SiO(2) NM at 3.5 μg/ml in 0% serum. Increase in MN frequency was observed in cells treated in 10% serum with 50 μg/ml ZnO. In 0% serum, the concentrations tested led to high toxicity. No genotoxic effects were induced by Lys-SiO(2) both in the absence or presence of serum up to 5 μg/ml. No toxicity was detected for TiO(2) and MWCNTs in both 10% and 0% serum, up to the dose of 250 μg/ml. Restoration of CBPI comparable to untreated control was shown for cells cultured without serum and treated with 5 μg/ml of Lys-SiO(2) NM pre-incubated in 100% serum. This observation confirms the protective effect of serum on Lys-SiO(2) NM cell toxicity. In conclusion in situ CBPI is proposed as a simple preliminary assay to assess both NMs induced cell toxicity and feasibility of MN scoring under microscope.

  18. Signalling of DNA damage and cytokines across cell barriers exposed to nanoparticles depends on barrier thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, A.; Salih, S.; Roh, D.; Lacharme-Lora, L.; Parry, M.; Hardiman, B.; Keehan, R.; Grummer, R.; Winterhager, E.; Gokhale, P. J.; Andrews, P. W.; Abbott, C.; Forbes, K.; Westwood, M.; Aplin, J. D.; Ingham, E.; Papageorgiou, I.; Berry, M.; Liu, J.; Dick, A. D.; Garland, R. J.; Williams, N.; Singh, R.; Simon, A. K.; Lewis, M.; Ham, J.; Roger, L.; Baird, D. M.; Crompton, L. A.; Caldwell, M. A.; Swalwell, H.; Birch-Machin, M.; Lopez-Castejon, G.; Randall, A.; Lin, H.; Suleiman, M.-S.; Evans, W. H.; Newson, R.; Case, C. P.

    2011-12-01

    The use of nanoparticles in medicine is ever increasing, and it is important to understand their targeted and non-targeted effects. We have previously shown that nanoparticles can cause DNA damage to cells cultured below a cellular barrier without crossing this barrier. Here, we show that this indirect DNA damage depends on the thickness of the cellular barrier, and it is mediated by signalling through gap junction proteins following the generation of mitochondrial free radicals. Indirect damage was seen across both trophoblast and corneal barriers. Signalling, including cytokine release, occurred only across bilayer and multilayer barriers, but not across monolayer barriers. Indirect toxicity was also observed in mice and using ex vivo explants of the human placenta. If the importance of barrier thickness in signalling is a general feature for all types of barriers, our results may offer a principle with which to limit the adverse effects of nanoparticle exposure and offer new therapeutic approaches.

  19. Glycosylation of stress glycoprotein GP62 in cells exposed to heat-shock and subculturing.

    PubMed

    Dumić, J; Lauc, G; Flögel, M

    1999-11-01

    GP62 is a member of the stress glycoprotein family that was proposed to have a chaperone-like function in the heat-shock response. Using lectin blotting we have studied glycosylation of GP62 and determined that in addition to heat-shock, even simple subculturing of cells is a sufficient stimulus to provoke induction of GP62. Interestingly, both kinetics of induction and glycosylation of GP62 induced by subculturing were different than when GP62 was induced by heat-shock. While GP62 induced by heat-shock was recognized by SNA, DSA and PHA-E lectins, and not by BSA I, Con A, RCA I, SJA, UEA I, VVA, and WGA lectins, GP62 induced by subculturing was also recognized by RCA I and WGA lectins.

  20. Calcium homeostasis of isolated heart muscle cells exposed to pulsed high-frequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wolke, S.; Gollnick, F.; Meyer, R.; Neibig, U.; Elsner, R.

    1996-05-01

    The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) of isolated ventricular cardiac myocytes of the guinea pig was measured during the application of pulsed high-frequency electromagnetic fields. The high-frequency fields were applied in a transverse electromagnetic cell designed to allow microscopic observation of the myocytes during the presence of the high-frequency fields. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was measured as fura-2 fluorescence by means of digital image analysis. Both the carrier frequency and the square-wave pulse-modulation pattern were varied during the experiments (carrier frequencies: 900, 1,300, and 1,800 MHz pulse modulated at 217 Hz with 14% duty cycle; pulsation pattern at 900 MHz; continuous wave, 16 Hz,and 50 Hz modulation with 50% duty cycle and 30 kHz modulation with 80% duty cycle). The mean specific absorption rate (SAR) values in the solution were within one order of magnitude of 1 mW/kg. They varied depending on the applied carrier frequency and pulse pattern. The experiments were designed in three phases: 500 s of sham exposure, followed by 500 s of field exposure, then chemical stimulation without field. The chemical stimulation (K{sup +}-depolarization) indicated the viability of the cells. The K{sup +} depolarization yielded a significant increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Significant differences between sham exposure and high-frequency field exposure were not found except when a very small but statistically significant difference was detected in the case of 900 MHz/50 Hz. However, this small difference was not regarded as a relevant effect of the exposure.

  1. Genomic Profiling of a Human Leukemic Monocytic Cell-Line (THP-1) Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This study examined alpha (α-) particle radiation effects on global changes in gene expression in human leukemic monocytic cells (THP-1) for the purposes of mining for candidate biomarkers that could be used for the development of a biological assessment tool. THP-1 cells were exposed to α-particle radiation at a dose range of 0 to 1.5 Gy. Twenty-four hours and three days after exposure gene expression was monitored using microarray technology. A total of 16 genes were dose responsive and classified as early onset due to their expression 24 h after exposure. Forty-eight transcripts were dose responsive and classified as late-onset as they were expressed 72 h after exposure. Among these genes, 6 genes were time and dose responsive and validated further using alternate technology. These transcripts were upregulated and associated with biological processes related to immune function, organelle stability and cell signalling/communication. This panel of genes merits further validation to determine if they are strong candidate biomarkers indicative of α-particle exposure. PMID:23097634

  2. No DNA damage response and negligible genome-wide transcriptional changes in human embryonic stem cells exposed to terahertz radiation.

    PubMed

    Bogomazova, A N; Vassina, E M; Goryachkovskaya, T N; Popik, V M; Sokolov, A S; Kolchanov, N A; Lagarkova, M A; Kiselev, S L; Peltek, S E

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation was proposed recently for use in various applications, including medical imaging and security scanners. However, there are concerns regarding the possible biological effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation in the THz range on cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are extremely sensitive to environmental stimuli, and we therefore utilised this cell model to investigate the non-thermal effects of THz irradiation. We studied DNA damage and transcriptome responses in hESCs exposed to narrow-band THz radiation (2.3 THz) under strict temperature control. The transcription of approximately 1% of genes was subtly increased following THz irradiation. Functional annotation enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed 15 functional classes, which were mostly related to mitochondria. Terahertz irradiation did not induce the formation of γH2AX foci or structural chromosomal aberrations in hESCs. We did not observe any effect on the mitotic index or morphology of the hESCs following THz exposure. PMID:25582954

  3. No DNA damage response and negligible genome-wide transcriptional changes in human embryonic stem cells exposed to terahertz radiation.

    PubMed

    Bogomazova, A N; Vassina, E M; Goryachkovskaya, T N; Popik, V M; Sokolov, A S; Kolchanov, N A; Lagarkova, M A; Kiselev, S L; Peltek, S E

    2015-01-13

    Terahertz (THz) radiation was proposed recently for use in various applications, including medical imaging and security scanners. However, there are concerns regarding the possible biological effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation in the THz range on cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are extremely sensitive to environmental stimuli, and we therefore utilised this cell model to investigate the non-thermal effects of THz irradiation. We studied DNA damage and transcriptome responses in hESCs exposed to narrow-band THz radiation (2.3 THz) under strict temperature control. The transcription of approximately 1% of genes was subtly increased following THz irradiation. Functional annotation enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed 15 functional classes, which were mostly related to mitochondria. Terahertz irradiation did not induce the formation of γH2AX foci or structural chromosomal aberrations in hESCs. We did not observe any effect on the mitotic index or morphology of the hESCs following THz exposure.

  4. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kondo, Takashi; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. • ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. • HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  5. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity in human hepatocyte and embryonic kidney cells exposed to ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Rongfa; Kang, Tianshu; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Shen, Haitao; Liu, Mingqi

    2012-10-01

    Traces of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) used may be found in the liver and kidney. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal viability assay for using with ZnO NPs and to assess their toxicity to human hepatocyte (L02) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (MTT assay), and oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were assessed under control and exposed to ZnO NPs conditions for 24 h. The results demonstrated that ZnO NPs lead to cellular morphological modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cause reduction of SOD, depletion of GSH, and oxidative DNA damage. The exact mechanism behind ZnO NPs toxicity suggested that oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation played an important role in ZnO NPs-elicited cell membrane disruption, DNA damage, and subsequent cell death. Our preliminary data suggested that oxidative stress might contribute to ZnO NPs cytotoxicity.

  6. Determine the yield of micronucleated cells in primary human fibroblasts exposed to focused soft X-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Prise

    2007-01-02

    This project was a small part of a larger collaborative study headed by Dr Aloke Chatterjee, (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) and including Drs Les Braby, John Ford (Texas A&M) and Kathy Held (MGH Boston), which was developing an integrated theoretical and experimental model of the radiation-induced bystander response. Our part of the study has been to determine the effectiveness of soft X-rays at inducing chromosomal damage under conditions of direct and bystander exposure. The aim was to compare this with the effectiveness of the low energy 60 kV electron microbeam available at Texas A&M. Previous studies have been performed with primary human fibroblasts measuring micronuclei formation to determine the relative yields of direct versus bystander mediated micronuclei formation after cells were individually irradiated utilizing our novel focused soft X-ray microprobe, which is capable of producing localized submicron beams of carbon-K (278 eV) X-rays. Only a brief overview is given here as the study has been published in several papers. Our original hypothesis was to study yields of bystander-induced micronucleated cells in both wild-type and mutant fibroblast from mouse embryo fibroblasts. Difficulties with the level of background micronuclei in the MEFs prevented systematic studies of bystander responses in the laboratories involved in the collaboration. We then performed these studies with AG1522 primary human fibroblast cells using a siRNA approach developed by John Ford at Texas A&M to knock down DNA PKcs in the first instance. Our soft X-ray source has been in routine use for carbon-K X-rays and is now available with Aluminium-K (1.49 keV) and titanium-K (4.5 keV), although the dose-rate from titanium is still too low at present for most experiments, where large numbers of cells need to be exposed. A separately funded project developed a new soft X-ray microprobe which will give much greater flexibility for changing energies and giving high dose

  7. DNA damage in human germ cell exposed to the some food additives in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pandir, Dilek

    2016-08-01

    The use of food additives has increased enormously in modern food technology but they have adverse effects in human healthy. The aim of this study was to investigate the DNA damage of some food additives such as citric acid (CA), benzoic acid (BA), brilliant blue (BB) and sunset yellow (SY) which were investigated in human male germ cells using comet assay. The sperm cells were incubated with different concentrations of these food additives (50, 100, 200 and 500 μg/mL) for 1 h at 32 °C. The results showed for CA, BA, BB and SY a dose dependent increase in tail DNA%, tail length and tail moment in human sperm when compared to control group. When control values were compared in the studied parameters in the treatment concentrations, SY was found to exhibit the highest level of DNA damage followed by BB > BA > CA. However, none of the food additives affected the tail DNA%, tail length and tail moment at 50 and 100 μg/mL. At 200 μg/mL of SY, the tail DNA% and tail length of sperm were 95.80 ± 0.28 and 42.56 ± 4.66, for BB the values were 95.06 ± 2.30 and 39.56 ± 3.78, whereas for BA the values were 89.05 ± 2.78 and 31.50 ± 0.71, for CA the values were 88.59 ± 6.45 and 13.59 ± 2.74, respectively. However, only the highest concentration of the used food additives significantly affected the studied parameters of sperm DNA. The present results indicate that SY and BB are more harmful than BA and CA to human sperm in vitro.

  8. Sodium nitrite induces acute central nervous system toxicity in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Paul W.; Butt, Omer I.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Toxicological implications associated with the use of NaNO{sub 2} therapy to treat systemic cell-free Hb exposure are not well-defined. {yields} Systemic Hb exposure followed by NaNO{sub 2} infusion induces acute CNS toxicities in guinea pigs. {yields} These CNS effects were not reproduced by the infusion of cell-free Hb or NaNO{sub 2} alone. {yields} NaNO{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of cell-free Hb may play a causative role in the observed CNS changes. -- Abstract: Systemic cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) released via hemolysis disrupts vascular homeostasis, in part, through the scavenging of nitric oxide (NO). Sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) therapy can attenuate the hypertensive effects of Hb. However, the chemical reactivity of NaNO{sub 2} with Hb may enhance heme- or iron-mediated toxicities. Here, we investigate the effect of NaNO{sub 2} on the central nervous system (CNS) in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free Hb. Intravascular infusion of NaNO{sub 2}, at doses sufficient to alleviate Hb-mediated blood pressure changes, reduced the expression of occludin, but not zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) or claudin-5, in cerebral tight junctions 4 h after Hb infusion. This was accompanied by increased perivascular heme oxygenase-1 expression, neuronal iron deposition, increased astrocyte and microglial activation, and reduced expression of neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN). These CNS changes were not observed in animals treated with Hb or NaNO{sub 2} alone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of nitrite salts to treat systemic Hb exposure may promote acute CNS toxicity.

  9. Mutant quantity and quality in mammalian cells (A{sub L}) exposed to cesium-137 gamma radiation: Effect of caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, S.M.; Shibuya, M.L.; Ueno, A.M.

    1995-06-01

    We examined the effect of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) on the quantity and quality of mutations in cultured mammalian A{sub L} human-hamster hybrid cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} radiation. At a dose (1.5 mg/ml for 16 h) that reduced the plating efficiency (PE) by 20%, caffeine was not itself a significant mutagen, but it increased by approximately twofold the slope of the dose-response curve for induction of S1{sup {minus}} mutants by {sup 137}Cs {gamma} radiation. Molecular analysis of 235 S1{sup {minus}} mutants using a series of DNA probes mapped to the human chromosome 11 in the A{sub L} hybrid cells revealed that 73 to 85% of the mutations in unexposed cells and in cells treated with caffeine alone, {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays alone or {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays plus caffeine were large deletions involving millions of base pairs of DNA. Most of these deletions were contiguous with the region of the MIC1 gene at 11p13 that encodes the S1 cell surface antigen. In other mutants that had suffered multiple marker loss, the deletions were intermittent along chromosome 11. These {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} mutations were rare for {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation (1/63 = 1.5%) but relatively prevalent (23-50%) for other exposure conditions. Thus caffeine appears to alter both the quantity and quality of mutations induced by {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. 62 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Differential transcriptional regulation of IL-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells exposed to diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Tamara L.; Simmons, Steven O.; Silbajoris, Robert; Dailey, Lisa; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Ramabhadran, Ram; Linak, William; Reed, William; Bromberg, Philip A.; Samet, James M.

    2010-02-15

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces inflammatory signaling characterized by MAP kinase-mediated activation of NFkB and AP-1 in vitro and in bronchial biopsies obtained from human subjects exposed to DEP. NFkB and AP-1 activation results in the upregulation of genes involved in promoting inflammation in airway epithelial cells, a principal target of inhaled DEP. IL-8 is a proinflammatory chemokine expressed by the airway epithelium in response to environmental pollutants. The mechanism by which DEP exposure induces IL-8 expression is not well understood. In the current study, we sought to determine whether DEP with varying organic content induces IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells, as well as, to develop a method to rapidly evaluate the upstream mechanism(s) by which DEP induces IL-8 expression. Exposure to DEP with varying organic content differentially induced IL-8 expression and IL-8 promoter activity human airway epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of the IL-8 promoter was also performed using recombinant human cell lines expressing reporters linked to the mutated promoters. Treatment with a low organic-containing DEP stimulated IL-8 expression by a mechanism that is predominantly NFkB-dependent. In contrast, exposure to high organic-containing DEP induced IL-8 expression independently of NFkB through a mechanism that requires AP-1 activity. Our study reveals that exposure to DEP of varying organic content induces proinflammatory gene expression through multiple specific mechanisms in human airway epithelial cells. The approaches used in the present study demonstrate the utility of a promoter-reporter assay ensemble for identifying transcriptional pathways activated by pollutant exposure.

  11. Retrospective biodosimetry using translocation frequency in a stable cell of occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Su; Lee, Jin Kyung; Bae, Keum Seok; Han, Eun-Ae; Jang, Seong Jae; Ha, Wi-Ho; Lee, Seung-Sook; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Kim, Wan Tae

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of hematological malignancies were reported in an industrial radiography company over a year, which were reasonably suspected of being consequences of prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation because of the higher incidence than expected in the general population. We analyzed chromosomal aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes from the other workers who had been working under similar circumstances as the patients in the company. Among the subjects tested, 10 workers who belonged to the highest band were followed up periodically for 1.5 years since the first analysis. The aim of this study was to clarify pertinence of translocation analysis to an industrial set-up where chronic exposure was commonly expected. To be a useful tool for a retrospective biodosimetry, the aberrations need to be persistent for a decade or longer. Therefore we calculated the decline rates and half-lives of frequency for both a reciprocal translocation and a dicentric chromosome and compared them. In this study, while the frequency of reciprocal translocations was maintained at the initial level, dicentric chromosomes were decreased to 46.9% (31.0–76.5) of the initial frequency over the follow-up period. Our results support the long-term stability of reciprocal translocation through the cell cycle and validate the usefulness of translocation analysis as a retrospective biodosimetry for cases of occupational exposure. PMID:25922373

  12. Bioinformatic analysis of endothelial progenitor cells exposed to folic acid in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fang, D N; He, X D; Li, X H; Jia, H; Li, P Y; Lu, Q; Quan, Z; Wang, Q L

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) at the molecular level and assessed the therapeutic potential of folic acid (FA) in DM. We downloaded the gene expression profile of the EPCs from T1DM patients before and after treatment with FA and from healthy controls. We identified the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the EPCs from T1DM patients before and after a four-week period of FA treatment and compared them with those obtained from the healthy subjects by using limma package in R language. Then, functional annotation of the DEGs was performed using the online tool Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. The expression of 696 genes was altered in the EPCs from T1DM patients compared to those from the healthy controls. These genes were mainly involved in the pathways associated with immune response. FA can normalize majority of the altered gene expression profiles of EPCs from T1DM patients to resemble those of healthy subjects, albeit with some side effects. FA can be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of T1DM. However, focused efforts are required to ensure that the dose of FA falls within the permissible pharmacological range.

  13. Genomic instability in human lymphoid cells exposed to 1 GeV/amu Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosovsky, A.; Bethel, H.; Parks, K.; Ritter, L.; Giver, C.; Gauny, S.; Wiese, C.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess whether charged particle radiations of importance to spaceflight elicit genomic instability in human TK6 lymphoblasts. The incidence of genomic instability in TK6 cells was assessed 21 days after exposure to 2, 4, or 6 Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, LET= 146 keV/micrometers). Three indices of instability were used: intraclonal karyotypic heterogeneity, mutation rate analysis at the thymidine kinase (TK1) locus, and re-cloning efficiency. Fifteen of sixty clones demonstrated karyotypic heterogeneity. Five clones had multiple indicators of karyotypic change. One clone was markedly hypomutable and polyploid. Six clones were hypomutable, while 21 clones were mutators. Of these, seven were karyotypically unstable. Six clones had low re-cloning efficiencies, one of which was a mutator. All had normal karyotypes. In summary, many clones that survived exposure to a low fluence of Fe ions manifested one or more forms of genomic instability that may hasten the development of neoplasia through deletion or by recombination.

  14. [Values of the micronucleus test on animal epithelial cells exposed to titanium dioxide].

    PubMed

    Iurchenko, V V; Krivtsova, E K; Iuretseva, N A; Tul'skaia, E A; Mamonov, R A; Zholdakova, Z I; Sinitsyna, O O; Mal'tseva, M M; Pankratova, G P; Sycheva, L P

    2011-01-01

    The genetic safety of titanium dioxide (TD)-containing foods and cosmetic products has been little investigated. The study evaluated the mutagenic activity of TD in the micronucleus test with animal visceral mucosal epithelial cells. Two simethicone-coated anatase samples (mean size 160 and 33.2 nm) were inserted into the mouse stomach in doses of 40-200-1000 mg/kg seven times and applied as an ingredient of 10 and 25% cream (doses 250 and 625 mg/kg, respectively) to the hair-sheared rat skin once for 4 hours. Analysis of cytogenetic disorders (micronuclei, protrusions, and the atypical form of the nucleus) revealed no mutagenic properties of TD on the mucosal epithelium of the mouse and rat intestine, mouse prostomach, and rat uterine bladder. Enhanced mitotic activity was observed in all the study tissues after exposure of both samples to TD given in some or in all (in the rat urinary bladder mucosal epithelium) doses. PMID:22185006

  15. Nrf2-dependent repression of interleukin-12 expression in human dendritic cells exposed to inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Génard, Romain; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic, a well-known Nrf2 inducer, exerts immunosuppressive properties. In this context, we recently reported that the differentiation of human blood monocytes into immature dendritic cells (DCs), in the presence of low and noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenic, represses the ability of DCs to release key cytokines in response to different stimulating agents. Particularly, arsenic inhibits the expression of human interleukin-12 (IL-12, also named IL-12p70), a major proinflammatory cytokine that controls the differentiation of Th1 lymphocytes. In the present study, we determined if Nrf2 could contribute to these arsenic immunotoxic effects. To this goal, human monocyte-derived DCs were first differentiated in the absence of metalloid and then pretreated with arsenic just before DC stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Under these experimental conditions, arsenic rapidly and stably activates Nrf2 and increases the expression of Nrf2 target genes. It also significantly inhibits IL-12 expression in activated DCs, at both mRNA and protein levels. Particularly, arsenic reduces mRNA levels of IL12A and IL12B genes which encodes the p35 and p40 subunits of IL-12p70, respectively. tert-Butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a reference Nrf2 inducer, mimics arsenic effects and potently inhibits IL-12 expression. Genetic inhibition of Nrf2 expression markedly prevents the repression of both IL12 mRNA and IL-12 protein levels triggered by arsenic and tBHQ in human LPS-stimulated DCs. In addition, arsenic significantly reduces IL-12 mRNA levels in LPS-activated bone marrow-derived DCs from Nrf2+/+ mice but not in DCs from Nrf2-/- mice. Finally, we show that, besides IL-12, arsenic significantly reduces the expression of IL-23, another heterodimer containing the p40 subunit. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that arsenic represses IL-12 expression in human-activated DCs by specifically stimulating Nrf2 activity.

  16. Different Blood Cell-Derived Transcriptome Signatures in Cows Exposed to Vaccination Pre- or Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Weikard, Rosemarie; Demasius, Wiebke; Hadlich, Frieder; Kühn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Periparturient cows have been found to reveal immunosuppression, frequently associated with increased susceptibility to uterine and mammary infections. To improve understanding of the causes and molecular regulatory mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon around calving, we examined the effect of an antigen challenge on gene expression modulation on cows prior to (BC) or after calving (AC) using whole transcriptome sequencing (RNAseq). The transcriptome analysis of the cows’ blood identified a substantially higher number of loci affected in BC cows (2,235) in response to vaccination compared to AC cows (208) and revealed a divergent transcriptional profile specific for each group. In BC cows, a variety of loci involved in immune defense and cellular signaling processes were transcriptionally activated, whereas protein biosynthesis and posttranslational processes were tremendously impaired in response to vaccination. Furthermore, energy metabolism in the blood cells of BC cows was shifted from oxidative phosphorylation to the glycolytic system. In AC cows, the number and variety of regulated pathways involved in immunomodulation and maintenance of immnunocompetence are considerably lower after vaccination, and upregulation of arginine degradation was suggested as an immunosuppressive mechanism. Elevated transcript levels of erythrocyte-specific genes involved in gas exchange processes were a specific transcriptional signature in AC cows pointing to hematopoiesis activation. The divergent and substantially lower magnitude of transcriptional modulation in response to vaccination in AC cows provides evidence for a suppressed immune capacity of early lactating cows on the molecular level and demonstrates that an efficient immune response of cows is related to their physiological and metabolic status. PMID:26317664

  17. DNA damage caused by inorganic particulate matter on Raji and HepG2 cell lines exposed to ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Michael; Helsing, Albert V; Lynch, Philip M; El-Naggar, Atif; Alegre, Melissa M; Robison, Richard A; O'Neill, Kim L

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have correlated exposure to ultraviolet-irradiated particulate matter with cardiovascular, respiratory, and lung diseases. This study investigated the DNA damage induced by two major inorganic particulate matter compounds found in diesel exhaust, ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, on Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell lines. We found a dose-dependent positive correlation of accumulated DNA damage at concentrations of ammonium nitrate (25 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, 100 μg/ml, 200 μg/ml, 400 μg/ml) with ultraviolet exposure (250 J/m(2), 400 J/m(2), 600 J/m(2), 850 J/m(2)), as measured by the comet assay in both cell lines. There was a significant difference between the treated ammonium nitrate samples and negative control samples in Raji and HepG2 cells (p<0.001). Apoptosis was shown in Raji and HepG2 cells when exposed to high concentrations of ammonium nitrate (200 μg/ml and 400 μg/ml) for 1h in samples without ultraviolet exposure, as assessed by the comet assay. However, the level of apoptosis greatly diminished after ultraviolet exposure at these concentrations. Over a 24h period, at intervals of 1, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24h, we also observed that ammonium nitrate decreased viability in Raji and HepG2 cell lines and inhibited cell growth. Ammonium sulfate-induced DNA damage was minimal in both cell lines, but there remained a significant difference (p<0.05) between the ultraviolet radiation treated and negative control samples. These results indicate that the inorganic particulate compound, ammonium nitrate, induced DNA strand breaks at all concentrations, and indications of apoptosis at high concentrations in Raji and HepG2 cells, with ultraviolet radiation preventing apoptosis at high concentrations. We hypothesize that ultraviolet radiation may inhibit an essential cellular mechanism, possibly involving p53, thereby explaining this phenomenon. Further studies are necessary to characterize the roles of

  18. Cytogenetic effects in bone marrow cells of mice exposed on the biosatellite "BION-M1"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorozhkina, Olga; Ivanov, Alexander

    In studies of cytogenetic damage in blood lymphocytes of astronauts, conducted in recent years, have shown an increase in the frequency of chromosomal damage bound, as believe, with influence on an organism of astronauts of space radiation (B.S. Fedorenko, G.P. Snigireva, 2004). However, in recent years published evidence that both acute and chronic stress induce chromosomal aberrations and modified genome sensitivity to mutagens of different nature, including to ionizing radiation (F.I. Ingel et al, 2005 ). This question is especially actual for space biology and medicine due to a number of specific features of space flights, when the interaction of factors more pronounced than in normal terrestrial conditions. In experiment "BION - M1" by anaphase method was determined level of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of tibia of mice. Flight duration biosatellite "BION - M1" was 30 days in Earth orbit. Euthanasia of experimental animals was carried out at intervals of 15-20 minutes by method of cervical dislocation after 12 hours from the moment of landing satellite. Level of chromosomal aberrations in vivarium-housed control mice was 1,75 ± 0,6% and 1,8 ± 0,45%, while the mitotic index 1,46 ± 0,09% and 1,53 ± 0,05%. Differences are not significant. The maintenance of animals in experiment with the onboard equipment (ground experiment) led to some increase in aberrant mitoses (2,3 ± 0,4%) and to decrease in a mitotic index (1,37 ± 0,02%). In the flight experiment "BION - M1" statistically significant increase of level of chromosomal aberrations (29,7 ± 4,18%) and a decrease in the mitotic index (0,74 ± 0,07%). Since the mouse is a suitable experimental model , also had several ground experiments on research of combined effect of irradiation and other stress factors specific to space flight, with marked tendency to increase the level of aberrant mitoses under the combined action of radiation and stress exposure group housing male mice. Statistically

  19. Live-Cell Imaging Visualizes Frequent Mitotic Skipping During Senescence-Like Growth Arrest in Mammary Carcinoma Cells Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Senescence-like growth arrest in human solid carcinomas is now recognized as the major outcome of radiotherapy. This study was designed to analyze cell cycle during the process of senescence-like growth arrest in mammary carcinoma cells exposed to X-rays. Methods and Materials: Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators were introduced into the human mammary carcinoma cell line MCF-7. Cell cycle was sequentially monitored by live-cell imaging for up to 5 days after exposure to 10 Gy of X-rays. Results: Live-cell imaging revealed that cell cycle transition from G2 to G1 phase without mitosis, so-called mitotic skipping, was observed in 17.1% and 69.8% of G1- and G2-irradiated cells, respectively. Entry to G1 phase was confirmed by the nuclear accumulation of mKO{sub 2}-hCdt1 as well as cyclin E, which was inversely correlated to the accumulation of G2-specific markers such as mAG-hGeminin and CENP-F. More than 90% of cells skipping mitosis were persistently arrested in G1 phase and showed positive staining for the senescent biochemical marker, which is senescence-associated ss-galactosidase, indicating induction of senescence-like growth arrest accompanied by mitotic skipping. While G2 irradiation with higher doses of X-rays induced mitotic skipping in approximately 80% of cells, transduction of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for p53 significantly suppressed mitotic skipping, suggesting that ionizing radiation-induced mitotic skipping is associated with p53 function. Conclusions: The present study found the pathway of senescence-like growth arrest in G1 phase without mitotic entry following G2-irradiation.

  20. DMPS reverts morphologic and mitochondrial damage in OK cells exposed to toxic concentrations of HgCl2.

    PubMed

    Carranza-Rosales, Pilar; Guzmán-Delgado, Nancy E; Cruz-Vega, Delia E; Balderas-Rentería, Isaías; Gandolfi, A Jay

    2007-05-01

    Mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) is a highly toxic compound, which can cause nephrotoxic damage. In the present study effects of HgCl(2) on mitochondria integrity and energy metabolism, as well as antidotal effects of 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate (DMPS) were investigated in the opossum kidney derived cell line (OK). OK cell monolayers were incubated during 0, 1, 3, 6, and 9 h in serum-free culture medium containing 15 microM HgCl(2), either in the absence or in the presence of 60 microM DMPS in a 1:4 ratio. Intracellular ATP content, MTT reduction, and HSP70/HSP90 induction were studied; confocal, transmission electron microscopy, and light microscopy studies were also performed. For confocal analysis, a mitochondrial selective probe (MitoTracker Red CMXH2Ros) was used. Antioxidant activity of DMPS was also studied by the scavenging of the free radical 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) technique. A decrease of ATP content, an impaired ability to reduce tetrazolium, and dramatic changes on cellular and mitochondrial morphology, and energetic levels were found after either 6 or 9 h of HgCl(2) exposure. Increased expression of HSP90 and HSP70 were also seen. When OK cells were co-incubated with HgCl(2) and DMPS, cellular morphology, viability, intracellular ATP, and mitochondrial membrane potential were partially restored; a protective effect on mitochondrial morphology was also seen. DMPS also showed potent antioxidant activity in vitro. Mitochondrial protection could be the cellular mechanism mediated by DMPS in OK cells exposed to a toxic concentration of HgCl(2). PMID:17131097

  1. PI-103 and Quercetin Attenuate PI3K-AKT Signaling Pathway in T- Cell Lymphoma Exposed to Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Akhilendra Kumar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT) pathway has been considered as major drug target site due to its frequent activation in cancer. AKT regulates the activity of various targets to promote tumorigenesis and metastasis. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been linked to oxidative stress and regulation of signaling pathways for metabolic adaptation of tumor microenvironment. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this context is used as ROS source for oxidative stress preconditioning. Antioxidants are commonly considered to be beneficial to reduce detrimental effects of ROS and are recommended as dietary supplements. Quercetin, a ubiquitous bioactive flavonoid is a dietary component which has attracted much of interest due to its potential health-promoting effects. Present study is aimed to analyze PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in H2O2 exposed Dalton's lymphoma ascite (DLA) cells. Further, regulation of PI3K-AKT pathway by quercetin as well as PI-103, an inhibitor of PI3K was analyzed. Exposure of H2O2 (1mM H2O2 for 30min) to DLA cells caused ROS accumulation and resulted in increased phosphorylation of PI3K and downstream proteins PDK1 and AKT (Ser-473 and Thr-308), cell survival factors BAD and ERK1/2, as well as TNFR1. However, level of tumor suppressor PTEN was declined. Both PI-103 & quercetin suppressed the enhanced level of ROS and significantly down-regulated phosphorylation of AKT, PDK1, BAD and level of TNFR1 as well as increased the level of PTEN in H2O2 induced lymphoma cells. The overall result suggests that quercetin and PI3K inhibitor PI-103 attenuate PI3K-AKT pathway in a similar mechanism. PMID:27494022

  2. An Agrobacterium gene involved in tumorigenesis encodes an outer membrane protein exposed on the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y H; Li, L P; Hou, Q M; Pan, Shen Q

    2002-02-01

    A gene designated as aopB was identified which was involved in tumorigenesis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. aopB is located on the circular chromosome as a single copy. This gene shares high homology with ropB, a Rhizobium leguminosarum gene encoding an outer membrane protein. A transposon mutant CGI1 containing a gfp-tagged transposon insertion at aopB caused attenuated tumors on plants when inoculated at a low cell concentration (5x10(7) cells/ml). The mutation did not affect the bacterial growth on different media. A broad host range plasmid containing the wild type aopB could restore the tumor formation ability of CGI1 to the wild type level. When both aopB-gfp and aopB-phoA fusions were used to study the aopB gene expression, we found that the aopB gene was inducible by acidic pH but not by plant phenolic compound acetosyringone. aopB encodes a putative protein of 218 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 22.8 kDa. TnphoA transposon mutagenesis of aopB, subcellular fractionation and whole cell ELISA experiments indicated that AopB is an outer membrane protein exposed on the bacterial cell surface. It appeared that AopB was exclusively present in the outer membrane and not in other fractions. The vir gene induction assays showed that the aopB gene was not required for the expression of the Ti plasmid encoded vir genes that are essential for tumorigenesis. The C-terminal half of AopB is slightly homologous to some of the bacterial porin proteins and some of plant dehydrins. The role of AopB in Agrobacterium-plant interaction is discussed. PMID:11891052

  3. PI-103 and Quercetin Attenuate PI3K-AKT Signaling Pathway in T- Cell Lymphoma Exposed to Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Akhilendra Kumar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase—protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT) pathway has been considered as major drug target site due to its frequent activation in cancer. AKT regulates the activity of various targets to promote tumorigenesis and metastasis. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been linked to oxidative stress and regulation of signaling pathways for metabolic adaptation of tumor microenvironment. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this context is used as ROS source for oxidative stress preconditioning. Antioxidants are commonly considered to be beneficial to reduce detrimental effects of ROS and are recommended as dietary supplements. Quercetin, a ubiquitous bioactive flavonoid is a dietary component which has attracted much of interest due to its potential health-promoting effects. Present study is aimed to analyze PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in H2O2 exposed Dalton’s lymphoma ascite (DLA) cells. Further, regulation of PI3K-AKT pathway by quercetin as well as PI-103, an inhibitor of PI3K was analyzed. Exposure of H2O2 (1mM H2O2 for 30min) to DLA cells caused ROS accumulation and resulted in increased phosphorylation of PI3K and downstream proteins PDK1 and AKT (Ser-473 and Thr-308), cell survival factors BAD and ERK1/2, as well as TNFR1. However, level of tumor suppressor PTEN was declined. Both PI-103 & quercetin suppressed the enhanced level of ROS and significantly down-regulated phosphorylation of AKT, PDK1, BAD and level of TNFR1 as well as increased the level of PTEN in H2O2 induced lymphoma cells. The overall result suggests that quercetin and PI3K inhibitor PI-103 attenuate PI3K-AKT pathway in a similar mechanism. PMID:27494022

  4. Thrombospondin-1-dependent immune regulation by transforming growth factor-β2-exposed antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Mir, Fayaz Ahmad; Contreras-Ruiz, Laura; Masli, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    An important role of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in the development of regulatory T cells is well established. Although integrin-mediated activation of latent TGF-β1 is considered essential for the induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such an activation mechanism is not applicable to the TGF-β2 isoform, which lacks an integrin-binding RGD sequence in its latency-associated peptide. Mucosal and ocular tissues harbour TGF-β2-expressing APCs involved in Treg induction. The mechanisms that regulate TGF-β activation in such APCs remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that murine APCs exposed to TGF-β2 in the environment predominantly increase expression of TGF-β2. Such predominantly TGF-β2-expressing APCs use thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) as an integrin-independent mechanism to activate their newly synthesized latent TGF-β2 to induce Foxp3(+) Treg cells both in vitro and in vivo. Expression of Treg induction by TGF-β2-expressing APCs is supported by a TSP-1 receptor, CD36, which facilitates activation of latent TGF-β during antigen presentation. Our results suggest that APC-derived TSP-1 is essential for the development of an adaptive regulatory immune response induced by TGF-β2-expressing APCs similar to those located at mucosal and ocular sites. These findings introduce the integrin-independent mechanism of TGF-β activation as an integral part of peripheral immune tolerance associated with TGF-β2-expressing tissues.

  5. Antibacterial and antigelatinolytic effects of Satureja hortensis L. essential oil on epithelial cells exposed to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Keskin, Mutlu; Könönen, Eija; Uitto, Veli-Jukka; Söderling, Eva; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2015-04-01

    The present report examined the effects of essential oils (EOs) from Satureja hortensis L. and Salvia fruticosa M. on the viability and outer membrane permeability of the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum, a key bacteria in oral biofilms, as well as the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) activities in epithelial cells exposed to such bacteria. Membrane permeability was tested by measuring the N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake and bacterial viability by using the commercially available Live/Dead BacLight kit. In addition, gelatin zymography was performed to analyze the inhibition of F. nucleatum-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in HaCaT cells. We showed that 5, 10, and 25 μL/mL of Sat. hortensis L. EO decreased the ratio of live/dead bacteria and increased the outer membrane permeability in a range of time from 0 to 5 min. Treatments with 10 and 25 μL/mL of Sal. fruticosa M. also increased the membrane permeability and 5, 10, and 25 μL/mL of both EOs inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in keratinocytes induced after exposure of 24 h to F. nucleatum. We conclude that antibacterial and antigelatinolytic activities of Sat. hortensis L. EO have potential for the treatment of periodontal inflammation. PMID:24404975

  6. Antibacterial and antigelatinolytic effects of Satureja hortensis L. essential oil on epithelial cells exposed to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Keskin, Mutlu; Könönen, Eija; Uitto, Veli-Jukka; Söderling, Eva; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2015-04-01

    The present report examined the effects of essential oils (EOs) from Satureja hortensis L. and Salvia fruticosa M. on the viability and outer membrane permeability of the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum, a key bacteria in oral biofilms, as well as the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) activities in epithelial cells exposed to such bacteria. Membrane permeability was tested by measuring the N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake and bacterial viability by using the commercially available Live/Dead BacLight kit. In addition, gelatin zymography was performed to analyze the inhibition of F. nucleatum-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in HaCaT cells. We showed that 5, 10, and 25 μL/mL of Sat. hortensis L. EO decreased the ratio of live/dead bacteria and increased the outer membrane permeability in a range of time from 0 to 5 min. Treatments with 10 and 25 μL/mL of Sal. fruticosa M. also increased the membrane permeability and 5, 10, and 25 μL/mL of both EOs inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in keratinocytes induced after exposure of 24 h to F. nucleatum. We conclude that antibacterial and antigelatinolytic activities of Sat. hortensis L. EO have potential for the treatment of periodontal inflammation.

  7. Inhibition of semiconservative DNA synthesis in ICR 2A frog cells exposed to monochromatic uv wavelengths (252-313 nm) and photoreactivating light

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenstein, B.S.

    1982-06-01

    Exposure of ICR 2A frog cells to monochromatic uv wavelengths in the range 252-313 nm caused an inhibition of semiconservative DNA synthesis which was partially relieved in cells receiving a post irradiation treatment with photoreactivating light (>350 nm). Hence pyrimidine dimers acted as lesions blocking DNA synthesis in uv-irradiated cells based upon the specificity of photoreactivating enzyme for the light-dependent monomerization of dimers in DNA. Compared with the shorter wavelengths tested, however, this recovery of DNA synthesis was not as great in cells exposed to 302-nm radiation and was nearly absent in 313-nm-irradiated cells up to 12 hr after treatment. These results suggest that nondimer photoproducts also play an important role in causing DNA synthesis inhibition in cells exposed to wavelengths greater than 300 nm.

  8. Enhanced expression levels of aquaporin-1 and aquaporin-4 in A549 cells exposed to silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaohui; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Wei; Liu, Shupeng; Peng, Zihe; Sun, Yue; Zhao, Jinyuan; Jiang, Qiujie; Liu, Heliang

    2016-09-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins in the cell membranes of mammals, have been reported to be important in maintaining the water balance of the respiratory system. However, little is known regarding the role of AQP in occupational pulmonary diseases such as silicosis. The present study investigated the expression of AQP1 and AQP4 in the human A549 alveolar epithelial cell line stimulated by silica (SiO2). A549 cells were cultured and divided into four groups: Control, SiO2‑stimulated, AQP1 inhibitor and AQP4 inhibitor. The cells of the SiO2‑stimulated group were stimulated with SiO2 dispersed suspension (50 mg/ml). The cells of the inhibitor group were pretreated with mercury (II) chloride (HgCl2; a specific channel inhibitor of AQP1) and 2‑(nicotinamide)‑1,3,4‑thiadiazole (TGN‑020; a specific channel inhibitor of AQP4) and stimulated with SiO2. The mRNA expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 were detected by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 were detected by western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Compared with the control group, the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 mRNA and protein in SiO2‑stimulated groups increased and subsequently decreased (AQP1 peaked at 2 h and AQP4 at 1h; both P<0.001 compared with control group). In the inhibitor group, expression levels were increased compared with controls; however, they were significantly decreased compared with the SiO2‑stimulated group at 2 h (AQP1; P<0.001) and 1 h (AQP4; P<0.001). The expression of AQP1 and AQP4 increased when exposed to SiO2, and this was inhibited by HgCl2 and TGN‑020, suggesting that AQP1 and AQP4 may contribute to A549 cell damage induced by SiO2. AQP1 and AQP4 may thus be involved in the initiation and development of silicosis.

  9. Enhanced expression levels of aquaporin-1 and aquaporin-4 in A549 cells exposed to silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaohui; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Wei; Liu, Shupeng; Peng, Zihe; Sun, Yue; Zhao, Jinyuan; Jiang, Qiujie; Liu, Heliang

    2016-09-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins in the cell membranes of mammals, have been reported to be important in maintaining the water balance of the respiratory system. However, little is known regarding the role of AQP in occupational pulmonary diseases such as silicosis. The present study investigated the expression of AQP1 and AQP4 in the human A549 alveolar epithelial cell line stimulated by silica (SiO2). A549 cells were cultured and divided into four groups: Control, SiO2‑stimulated, AQP1 inhibitor and AQP4 inhibitor. The cells of the SiO2‑stimulated group were stimulated with SiO2 dispersed suspension (50 mg/ml). The cells of the inhibitor group were pretreated with mercury (II) chloride (HgCl2; a specific channel inhibitor of AQP1) and 2‑(nicotinamide)‑1,3,4‑thiadiazole (TGN‑020; a specific channel inhibitor of AQP4) and stimulated with SiO2. The mRNA expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 were detected by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 were detected by western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Compared with the control group, the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 mRNA and protein in SiO2‑stimulated groups increased and subsequently decreased (AQP1 peaked at 2 h and AQP4 at 1h; both P<0.001 compared with control group). In the inhibitor group, expression levels were increased compared with controls; however, they were significantly decreased compared with the SiO2‑stimulated group at 2 h (AQP1; P<0.001) and 1 h (AQP4; P<0.001). The expression of AQP1 and AQP4 increased when exposed to SiO2, and this was inhibited by HgCl2 and TGN‑020, suggesting that AQP1 and AQP4 may contribute to A549 cell damage induced by SiO2. AQP1 and AQP4 may thus be involved in the initiation and development of silicosis. PMID:27431275

  10. Effects of nitrogen on the apoptosis of and changes in gene expression in human lymphoma U937 cells exposed to argon-based cold atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Yunoki, Tatsuya; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) is known as a source of biologically active agents, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). In the present study, we examined the effects of nitrogen (N2) on the apoptosis of and changes in gene expression in human lymphoma U937 cells exposed to argon (Ar)-CAP. Enormous amounts of hydroxyl (·OH) radicals in aqueous solution were produced using Ar‑CAP generated using a 20 kHz low frequency at 18 kV with a flow rate of 2 l/min. The increase in the levels of ·OH radicals was significantly attenuated by the addition of N2 to Ar gas. On the other hand, the level of total nitrate/nitrite in the supernatant was significantly elevated in the Ar + N2-CAP‑exposed U937 cells. When the cells were exposed to Ar‑CAP, a significant increase in apoptosis was observed, whereas apoptosis was markedly decreased in the cells exposed to Ar + N2-CAP. Microarray and pathway analyses revealed that a newly identified gene network containing a number of heat shock proteins (HSPs), anti-apoptotic genes, was mainly associated with the biological function of the prevention of apoptosis. Quantitative PCR revealed that the expression levels of HSPs were significantly elevated in the cells exposed to Ar + N2-CAP than those exposed to Ar‑CAP. These results indicate that N2 gas in Ar‑CAP modifies the ratio of ROS to RNS, and suppresses the apoptosis induced by Ar‑CAP. The modulation of gaseous conditions in CAP may thus prove to be useful for future clinical applications, such as for switching from a sterilizing mode to cytocidal effect for cancer cells.

  11. Effects of nitrogen on the apoptosis of and changes in gene expression in human lymphoma U937 cells exposed to argon-based cold atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Yunoki, Tatsuya; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) is known as a source of biologically active agents, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). In the present study, we examined the effects of nitrogen (N2) on the apoptosis of and changes in gene expression in human lymphoma U937 cells exposed to argon (Ar)-CAP. Enormous amounts of hydroxyl (·OH) radicals in aqueous solution were produced using Ar‑CAP generated using a 20 kHz low frequency at 18 kV with a flow rate of 2 l/min. The increase in the levels of ·OH radicals was significantly attenuated by the addition of N2 to Ar gas. On the other hand, the level of total nitrate/nitrite in the supernatant was significantly elevated in the Ar + N2-CAP‑exposed U937 cells. When the cells were exposed to Ar‑CAP, a significant increase in apoptosis was observed, whereas apoptosis was markedly decreased in the cells exposed to Ar + N2-CAP. Microarray and pathway analyses revealed that a newly identified gene network containing a number of heat shock proteins (HSPs), anti-apoptotic genes, was mainly associated with the biological function of the prevention of apoptosis. Quantitative PCR revealed that the expression levels of HSPs were significantly elevated in the cells exposed to Ar + N2-CAP than those exposed to Ar‑CAP. These results indicate that N2 gas in Ar‑CAP modifies the ratio of ROS to RNS, and suppresses the apoptosis induced by Ar‑CAP. The modulation of gaseous conditions in CAP may thus prove to be useful for future clinical applications, such as for switching from a sterilizing mode to cytocidal effect for cancer cells. PMID:27121589

  12. Chronic arsenic exposure increases TGFalpha concentration in bladder urothelial cells of Mexican populations environmentally exposed to inorganic arsenic☆

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Germolec, Dori R.; Borja-Aburto, Víctor H.; Contreras-Ruiz, José; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Del Razo, Luz M.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a well-established carcinogen and human exposure has been associated with a variety of cancers including those of skin, lung, and bladder. High expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α) has associated with local relapses in early stages of urinary bladder cancer. iAs exposures are at least in part determined by the rate of formation and composition of iAs metabolites (MAsIII, MAsV, DMAsIII, DMAsV). This study examines the relationship between TGF-α concentration in exfoliated bladder urothelial cells (BUC) separated from urine and urinary arsenic species in 72 resident women (18-51 years old) from areas exposed to different concentrations of iAs in drinking water (2-378 ppb) in central Mexico. Urinary arsenic species, including trivalent methylated metabolites were measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method. The concentration of TGF-α in BUC was measured using an ELISA assay. Results show a statistically significant positive correlation between TGF-α concentration in BUC and each of the six arsenic species present in urine. The multivariate linear regression analyses show that the increment of TGF-α levels in BUC was importantly associated with the presence of arsenic species after adjusting by age, and presence of urinary infection. People from areas with high arsenic exposure had a significantly higher TGF-α concentration in BUC than people from areas of low arsenic exposure (128.8 vs. 64.4 pg/mg protein; p<0.05). Notably, exfoliated cells isolated from individuals with skin lesions contained significantly greater amount of TGF-α than cells from individuals without skin lesions: 157.7 vs. 64.9 pg/mg protein (p=0.003). These results suggest that TGF-α in exfoliated BUC may serve as a susceptibility marker of adverse health effects on epithelial tissue in arsenic-endemic areas. PMID:17267001

  13. Truly Incomplete and Complex Chromosomal Exchanges in Human Fibroblast Cells Exposed In Situ to Energetic Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG 1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Incomplete and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allow identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, which is a likely indication of the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track.

  14. Biomarker analysis of liver cells exposed to surfactant-wrapped and oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).

    PubMed

    Henderson, W Matthew; Bouchard, Dermont; Chang, Xiaojun; Al-Abed, Souhail R; Teng, Quincy

    2016-09-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential in industrial, consumer, and mechanical applications, based partly on their unique structural, optical and electronic properties. CNTs are commonly oxidized or treated with surfactants to facilitate aqueous solution processing, and these CNT surface modifications also increase possible human and ecological exposures to nanoparticle-contaminated waters. To determine the exposure outcomes of oxidized and surfactant-wrapped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on biochemical processes, metabolomics-based profiling of human liver cells (C3A) was utilized. Cells were exposed to 0, 10, or 100ng/mL of MWCNTs for 24 and 48h; MWCNT particle size distribution, charge, and aggregation were monitored concurrently during exposures. Following MWCNT exposure, cellular metabolites were extracted, lyophilized, and buffered for (1)H NMR analysis. Acquired spectra were subjected to both multivariate and univariate analysis to determine the consequences of nanotube exposure on the metabolite profile of C3A cells. Resulting scores plots illustrated temporal and dose-dependent metabolite responses to all MWCNTs tested. Loadings plots coupled with t-test filtered spectra identified metabolites of interest. XPS analysis revealed the presence of hydroxyl and carboxyl functionalities on both MWCNTs surfaces. Metal content analysis by ICP-AES indicated that the total mass concentration of the potentially toxic impurities in the exposure experiments were extremely low (i.e. [Ni]≤2×10(-10)g/mL). Preliminary data suggested that MWCNT exposure causes perturbations in biochemical processes involved in cellular oxidation as well as fluxes in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid synthesis. Dose-response trajectories were apparent and spectral peaks related to both dose and MWCNT dispersion methodologies were determined. Correlations of the significant changes in metabolites will help to identify potential biomarkers associated with carbonaceous

  15. Biomarker analysis of liver cells exposed to surfactant-wrapped and oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).

    PubMed

    Henderson, W Matthew; Bouchard, Dermont; Chang, Xiaojun; Al-Abed, Souhail R; Teng, Quincy

    2016-09-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential in industrial, consumer, and mechanical applications, based partly on their unique structural, optical and electronic properties. CNTs are commonly oxidized or treated with surfactants to facilitate aqueous solution processing, and these CNT surface modifications also increase possible human and ecological exposures to nanoparticle-contaminated waters. To determine the exposure outcomes of oxidized and surfactant-wrapped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on biochemical processes, metabolomics-based profiling of human liver cells (C3A) was utilized. Cells were exposed to 0, 10, or 100ng/mL of MWCNTs for 24 and 48h; MWCNT particle size distribution, charge, and aggregation were monitored concurrently during exposures. Following MWCNT exposure, cellular metabolites were extracted, lyophilized, and buffered for (1)H NMR analysis. Acquired spectra were subjected to both multivariate and univariate analysis to determine the consequences of nanotube exposure on the metabolite profile of C3A cells. Resulting scores plots illustrated temporal and dose-dependent metabolite responses to all MWCNTs tested. Loadings plots coupled with t-test filtered spectra identified metabolites of interest. XPS analysis revealed the presence of hydroxyl and carboxyl functionalities on both MWCNTs surfaces. Metal content analysis by ICP-AES indicated that the total mass concentration of the potentially toxic impurities in the exposure experiments were extremely low (i.e. [Ni]≤2×10(-10)g/mL). Preliminary data suggested that MWCNT exposure causes perturbations in biochemical processes involved in cellular oxidation as well as fluxes in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid synthesis. Dose-response trajectories were apparent and spectral peaks related to both dose and MWCNT dispersion methodologies were determined. Correlations of the significant changes in metabolites will help to identify potential biomarkers associated with carbonaceous

  16. Radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines and human normal liver cell lines exposed in vitro to carbon ions and argon ions at the HIRFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xigang; Li, Wenjian; Wang, Zhuanzi; Wei, Wei; Guo, Chuanling; Lu, Dong; Yang, Jianshe

    2009-05-01

    Human hepatoma (SMMC-7721) and normal liver (L02) cells were irradiated with γ-rays, 12C 6+ and 36Ar 18+ ion beams at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). By using the Calyculin-A induced premature chromosome condensation technique, chromatid-type breaks and isochromatid-type breaks were scored separately. Tumor cells irradiated with heavy ions produced a majority of isochromatid break, while chromatid breaks were dominant when cells were exposed to γ-rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for irradiation-induced chromatid breaks were 3.6 for L02 and 3.5 for SMMC-7721 cell lines at the LET peak of 96 keVμm -112C 6+ ions, and 2.9 for both of the two cell lines of 512 keVμm -136Ar 18+ ions. It suggested that the RBE of isochromatid-type breaks was pretty high when high-LET radiations were induced. Thus we concluded that the high production of isochromatid-type breaks, induced by the densely ionizing track structure, could be regarded as a signature of high-LET radiation exposure.

  17. Chicken embryo fibroblasts exposed to weak, time-varying magnetic fields share cell proliferation, adenosine deaminase activity, and membrane characteristics of transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parola, A.H.; Porat, N.; Kiesow, L.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) exposed to a sinusoidally varying magnetic field (SVMF) (100 Hz, 700 microT, for 24 h) showed a remarkable rise of segmental rotational relaxation rate of adenosine deaminase (ADA, EC 3.5.4.4) as determined by multifrequency phase fluorometry. Pyrene-labeled, small subunit ADA was applied to cultured (normal) CEF, which have available and abundant ADA complexing protein (ADCP) on their plasma membranes. Sine-wave-modulated fluorometry of the pyrene yielded a profile of phase angle vs. modulation frequency. In SVMF-treated cells and in Rous-sarcoma-virus (RSV) transformed cells the differential phase values at low modulation frequencies of the excitation are remarkably reduced. This effect is magnetic rather than thermal, because the temperature was carefully controlled and monitored; nevertheless to further check this matter we studied CEF, infected by the RSV-Ts68 temperature-sensitive mutant (36 degrees C transformed, 41 degrees C revertant). When grown at 36 degrees C in the SVMF, cells did not show the slightest trend towards reversion, as would be expected had there been local heating. Concomitant with the increased segmental rotational relaxation rate of ADA, there was a decrease in fluorescence lifetime and a slight, yet significant, increase in membrane lipid microfluidity. These biophysical observations prompted us to examine the effect of SVMF on cell proliferation and ADA activity (a malignancy marker): higher rates of cell proliferation and reduced specific activity of ADA were observed.

  18. Assessment of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Hazards in Brain and Bone Marrow Cells of Newborn Rats Exposed to Extremely Low-Frequency Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Rageh, Monira M.; EL-Gebaly, Reem H.; El-Bialy, Nihal S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the association between whole body exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) and genotoxic , cytotoxic hazards in brain and bone marrow cells of newborn rats. Newborn rats (10 days after delivery) were exposed continuously to 50 Hz, 0.5 mT for 30 days. The control group was treated as the exposed one with the sole difference that the rats were not exposed to magnetic field. Comet assay was used to quantify the level of DNA damage in isolated brain cells. Also bone marrow cells were flushed out to assess micronucleus induction and mitotic index. Spectrophotometric methods were used to measure the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). The results showed a significant increase in the mean tail moment indicating DNA damage in exposed group (P < 0.01, 0.001, 0.0001). Moreover ELF-MF exposure induced a significant (P < 0.01, 0.001) four folds increase in the induction of micronucleus and about three folds increase in mitotic index (P < 0.0001). Additionally newborn rats exposed to ELF-MF showed significant higher levels of MDA and SOD (P < 0.05). Meanwhile ELF-MF failed to alter the activity of GSH. In conclusion, the present study suggests an association between DNA damage and ELF-MF exposure in newborn rats. PMID:23091355

  19. HMGB1 Is Involved in IFN-α Production and TRAIL Expression by HIV-1-Exposed Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: Impact of the Crosstalk with NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Formaglio, Pauline; Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Charbit, Bruno; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are innate sensors of viral infections and important mediators of antiviral innate immunity through their ability to produce large amounts of IFN-α. Moreover, Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and 9 (TLR9) ligands, such as HIV and CpG respectively, turn pDCs into TRAIL-expressing killer pDCs able to lyse HIV-infected CD4+ T cells. NK cells can regulate antiviral immunity by modulating pDC functions, and pDC production of IFN-α as well as cell–cell contact is required to promote NK cell functions. Impaired pDC-NK cell crosstalk was reported in the setting of HIV-1 infection, but the impact of HIV-1 on TRAIL expression and innate antiviral immunity during this crosstalk is unknown. Here, we report that low concentrations of CCR5-tropic HIV-1Ba-L promote the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-α, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-12, and CCR5-interacting chemokines (MIP-1α and MIP-1β) in NK-pDCs co-cultures. At high HIV-1BaL concentrations, the addition of NK cells did not promote the release of these mediators, suggesting that once efficiently triggered by the virus, pDCs could not integrate new activating signals delivered by NK cells. However, high HIV-1BaL concentrations were required to trigger IFN-α-mediated TRAIL expression at the surface of both pDCs and NK cells during their crosstalk. Interestingly, we identified the alarmin HMGB1, released at pDC-NK cell synapse, as an essential trigger for the secretion of IFN-α and IFN-related soluble mediators during the interplay of HIV-1 exposed pDCs with NK cells. Moreover, HMGB1 was found crucial for mTRAIL translocation to the plasma membrane of both pDCs and NK cells during their crosstalk following pDC exposure to HIV-1. Data from serum analyses of circulating HMGB1, HMGB1-specific antibodies, sTRAIL and IP-10 in a cohort of 67 HIV-1+ patients argue for the in vivo relevance of these observations. Altogether, these findings identify HMGB1 as a trigger for IFN

  20. Increased oxidative stress and toxicity in ADH and CYP2E1 overexpressing human hepatoma VL-17A cells exposed to high glucose.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Karthikeyan; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Kumar, S Mathan; Clemens, Dahn L; Dey, Aparajita

    2012-05-01

    High glucose mediated oxidative stress and cell death is a well documented phenomenon. Using VL-17A cells which are HepG2 cells over-expressing alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) and control HepG2 cells, the association of ADH and CYP2E1 with high glucose mediated oxidative stress and toxicity in liver cells was investigated. Cell viability was measured and apoptosis or necrosis was determined through caspase-3 activity, Annexin V-propidium iodide staining and detecting decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential. Reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation and the formation of advanced glycated-end products were assessed. The levels of several antioxidants which included glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase were altered in high glucose treated VL-17A cells. Greater toxicity was observed in VL-17A cells exposed to high glucose when compared to HepG2 cells. Oxidative stress parameters were greatly increased in high glucose exposed VL-17A cells and apoptotic cell death was observed. Inhibition of CYP2E1 or caspase 3 or addition of the antioxidant trolox led to significant decreases in high glucose mediated oxidative stress and toxicity. Thus, the over-expression of ADH and CYP2E1 in liver cells is associated with increased high glucose mediated oxidative stress and toxicity.

  1. Aerosol generation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Polk, William W; Sharma, Monita; Sayes, Christie M; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-04-23

    Aerosol generation and characterization are critical components in the assessment of the inhalation hazards of engineered nanomaterials (NMs). An extensive review was conducted on aerosol generation and exposure apparatus as part of an international expert workshop convened to discuss the design of an in vitro testing strategy to assess pulmonary toxicity following exposure to aerosolized particles. More specifically, this workshop focused on the design of an in vitro method to predict the development of pulmonary fibrosis in humans following exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Aerosol generators, for dry or liquid particle suspension aerosolization, and exposure chambers, including both commercially available systems and those developed by independent researchers, were evaluated. Additionally, characterization methods that can be used and the time points at which characterization can be conducted in order to interpret in vitro exposure results were assessed. Summarized below is the information presented and discussed regarding the relevance of various aerosol generation and characterization techniques specific to aerosolized MWCNTs exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The generation of MWCNT aerosols relevant to human exposures and their characterization throughout exposure in an ALI system is critical for extrapolation of in vitro results to toxicological outcomes in humans.

  2. Thymosin α1 Interacts with Exposed Phosphatidylserine in Membrane Models and in Cells and Uses Serum Albumin as a Carrier.

    PubMed

    Mandaliti, Walter; Nepravishta, Ridvan; Sinibaldi Vallebona, Paola; Pica, Francesca; Garaci, Enrico; Paci, Maurizio

    2016-03-15

    Thymosin α1 is a peptidic hormone with pleiotropic activity and is used in the therapy of several diseases. It is unstructured in water solution and interacts with negative regions of vesicles by assuming two tracts of helical conformation with a structural break between them. This study reports on Thymosin α1's interaction with mixed phospholipids phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine, the negative component of the membranes, by ¹H and natural abundance ¹⁵N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The results indicate that interaction occurs when the membrane is negatively charged by exposing phosphatidylserine. Moreover, the direct interaction of Thymosin α1 with K562 cells with an overexposure of phosphatidylserine as a consequence of resveratrol-induced apoptosis was conducted. Thymosin α1's interaction with human serum albumin was also investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Steady-state saturation transfer, transfer nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy methodologies all reveal that the C-terminal region of Thymosin α1 is involved in the interaction with serum albumin. These results may shed more light on Thymosin α1's mechanism of action by its insertion in negative regions of membranes due to the exposure of phosphatidylserine. Once Thymosin α1's N-terminus has been inserted into the membrane, the rest may interact with nearby proteins and/or receptors acting as effectors and causing a biological signaling cascade, thus exerting thymosin α1's pleiotropy. PMID:26909491

  3. Dynamics of Protein Phosphatase Gene Expression in Corbicula fluminea Exposed to Microcystin-LR and to Toxic Microcystis aeruginosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martins, José Carlos; Machado, João; Martins, António; Azevedo, Joana; OlivaTeles, Luís; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the in vivo effects of microcystins on gene expression of several phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPP) in the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea with two different exposure scenarios. Clams were exposed for 96 h to 5 μg L−1 of dissolved microcystin-LR and the relative changes of gene expression of three different types of PPP (PPP1, 2 and 4) were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed a significant induction of PPP2 gene expression in the visceral mass. In contrast, the cyanotoxin did not cause any significant changes on PPP1 and PPP4 gene expression. Based on these results, we studied alterations in transcriptional patterns in parallel with enzymatic activity of C. fluminea for PPP2, induced by a Microcystis aeruginosa toxic strain (1 × 105 cells cm−3) during 96 h. The relative changes of gene expression and enzyme activity in visceral mass were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and colorimetric assays respectively. The clams exhibited a significant reduction of PPP2 activity with a concomitant enhancement of gene expression. Considering all the results we can conclude that the exposure to an ecologically relevant concentration of pure or intracellular microcystins (-LR) promoted an in vivo effect on PPP2 gene expression in C. fluminea. PMID:22272126

  4. Use of the comet assay to measure DNA damage in cells exposed to photosensitizers and gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouget, J.-P.; Ravanat, J.-L.; Douki, T.; Richard, M.-J.; Cadet, J.

    1999-01-01

    We used the comet assay associated with DNA-glycosylases to estimate DNA damage in cells exposed to gamma irradiation or photosensitized either with methylene blue or orange acridine. A calibration performed using irradiation allowed the measurement of the steady-state level and the yield of 8-oxodGuo as well as strand breaks and alkali-labile sites. Nous avons utilisé la méthode des comètes associée à des ADN-glycosylases, pour estimer les dommages de l'ADN dans des cellules après l'exposition à un rayonnement gamma ou après photosensibilisation par le bleu de méthylène ou l'acridine orange. Une calibration de la méthode des comètes a permis de mesurer le niveau basal et les taux de formation de 8-oxodGuo ainsi que le nombre de cassures de brins et de sites alcali labiles.

  5. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  6. Frequency response of a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell exposed to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.; Craft, D.C.; Stalker, K.T.; Taylor, E.W.; Kelley, M.A.; Sanchez, A.D.; Chapman, S.P.; Craig, D.M.; Kinsley, E.

    1994-12-31

    Radiation testing of photonic components is not new, however component level testing to date has not completely addressed quantities which are important to system behavior. One characteristic that is of particular importance for optical processing systems is the frequency response. In this paper, the authors present the results of the analysis of data from an experiment designed to provide a preliminary understanding of the effects of radiation on the frequency response of acousto-optic devices. The goal is to present possible physical mechanisms responsible for the radiation effects and to discuss the effects on signal processing functionality. The experiment discussed in this paper was designed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and performed by SNL and Phillips Laboratory (PL) personnel at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR). In the experiment, a TeO{sub 2} slow shear-wave acousto-optic cell was exposed to radiation from the WSMR linear accelerator. The TeO{sub 2} cell was placed in an experimental configuration which allowed swept frequency diffracted power measurements to be taken during radiation exposure and recovery. A series of exposures was performed. Each exposure consisted of between 1 to 800, 1 {mu}sec radiation pulses (yielding exposures of 2.25 kRad(Si) to 913 kRad(Si)), followed by recovery time. At low total and cumulative doses, the bandshape of the frequency response (i.e. diffracted power vs. frequency) remained almost identical during and after radiation. At the higher exposures, however, the amplitude and width of the frequency response changed as the radiation continued, but returned to the original shape slowly after the radiation stopped and recovery proceeded. It is interesting to note that the location of the Bragg degeneracy does not change significantly with radiation. In this paper, the authors discuss these effects, and they discuss the effect on the signal processing functionality.

  7. Speciation of Arsenic in Exfoliated Urinary Bladder Epithelial Cells from Individuals Exposed to Arsenic in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Zavala, Araceli; Valenzuela, Olga L.; Matous̆ek, Tomás̆; Drobná, Zuzana; Dĕdina, Jir̆í; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Thomas, David J.; Del Razo, Luz M.; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Background The concentration of arsenic in urine has been used as a marker of exposure to inorganic As (iAs). Relative proportions of urinary metabolites of iAs have been identified as potential biomarkers of susceptibility to iAs toxicity. However, the adverse effects of iAs exposure are ultimately determined by the concentrations of iAs metabolites in target tissues. Objective In this study we examined the feasibility of analyzing As species in cells that originate in the urinary bladder, a target organ for As-induced cancer in humans. Methods Exfoliated bladder epithelial cells (BECs) were collected from urine of 21 residents of Zimapan, Mexico, who were exposed to iAs in drinking water. We determined concentrations of iAs, methyl-As (MAs), and dimethyl-As (DMAs) in urine using conventional hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-CT-AAS). We used an optimized HG-CT-AAS technique with detection limits of 12–17 pg As for analysis of As species in BECs. Results All urine samples and 20 of 21 BEC samples contained detectable concentrations of iAs, MAs, and DMAs. Sums of concentrations of these As species in BECs ranged from 0.18 to 11.4 ng As/mg protein and in urine from 4.8 to 1,947 ng As/mL. We found no correlations between the concentrations or ratios of As species in BECs and in urine. Conclusion These results suggest that urinary levels of iAs metabolites do not necessarily reflect levels of these metabolites in the bladder epithelium. Thus, analysis of As species in BECs may provide a more effective tool for risk assessment of bladder cancer and other urothelial diseases associated with exposures to iAs. PMID:19079716

  8. DNA damage in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of Steatoda grossa (Theridiidae) spiders exposed to food contaminated with cadmium.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Monika; Wilczek, Grażyna; Wilczek, Piotr; Skowronek, Magdalena; Mędrzak, Monika

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of Cd on haemocytes and midgut gland cells of web-building spiders, Steatoda grossa (Theridiidae), exposed to the metal under laboratory conditions. Analyzes were conducted on adult females and males, fed for four weeks with cadmium-contaminated Drosophila hydei flies, grown on a medium suplemented with 0.25 mM CdCl2. The comet assay, providing a quantitative measure of DNA strand breaks, was used to evaluate the DNA damage caused by the metal. Cadmium content was measured in whole spider bodies by the AAS method. Metal body burden was significantly lower in females (0.25 µgg(-1) dry weight) than in males (3.03 µgg(-1) dry weight), suggesting that females may have more effective mechanisms controlling the uptake of metal, via the digestive tract, or its elimination from the body. Irrespectively of sex, spiders fed prey contaminated with cadmium showed significantly higher values of comet parameters: tail DNA (TDNA), tail length (TL) and olive tail moment (OTM), in comparison with the control. In midgut gland cells, the level of DNA damage was higher for males than females, while in haemocytes the genotoxic effect of cadmium was greater in females. The obtained results indicate that in spiders cadmium displays strong genotoxic effects and may cause DNA damage even at low concentrations, however the severity of damage seems to be sex- and internal organ-dependent. The comet assay can be considered a sensitive tool for measuring the deleterious effect of cadmium on DNA integrity in spiders.

  9. Melatonin promotes distal dendritic ramifications in layer II/III cortical pyramidal cells of rats exposed to toluene vapors.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Rodrigo; Bustamante, Carlos

    2010-10-01

    We have previously shown that toluene inhalation produces significant impairments in the basilar dendritic outgrowth of pyramidal cortical cells. This neurotoxic effect was markedly inhibited by melatonin administration at a dose of 5mg kg(-1). The present study was designed to determine whether toluene and melatonin equally affect all basilar dendritic segments or if a differential response exists between the segments. Twenty-eight male mice were weaned at postnatal day 21 (P21) and randomly assigned to either the control (C; n=10,) or toluene (T; n=18) group. Between P22-P32, male rats were placed into a glass chamber and exposed to either toluene vapors (5-000-6000 ppm) or clean air for 10 min a day. When toluene exposure ended (P32), animals were further assigned to the following experimental groups: (a) control/saline (C/S; n=10), (b) toluene/saline (T/S; n=10), or (c) toluene/melatonin 5mg kg(-1) (T/M; n=8). Melatonin or vehicle solutions were administered daily between P32 and P38. Forty-eight hours after the final toluene exposure, the animals were sacrificed, and the pyramidal cortical cells were stained using the Golgi-Cox-Sholl procedure. The number of basilar dendritic branches/order was counted using the centrifugal ordering method. The results indicate that (i) toluene inhalation significantly impairs both proximal and distal basilar dendritic ramifications (in the parietal and frontal/occipital cortices, respectively) and (ii) melatonin both protects neurons from toluene neurotoxicity in all cortical areas studied and increases the complexity of the dendritic tree above control values.

  10. Identification of Cell Surface-Exposed Proteins Involved in the Fimbria-Mediated Adherence of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Nataro, James P.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Fimbria-mediated adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key step in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) pathogenesis. To date, four fimbriae have been described for EAEC; aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II) is the most important adherence factor for EAEC prototype strain 042. Previously, we described results showing that extracellular matrix (ECM) components might be involved in the recognition of AAF/II fimbriae by intestinal cells. In this study, we sought to identify novel potential receptors on intestinal epithelial cells recognized by the AAF/II fimbriae. Purified AafA-dsc protein, the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae, was incubated with a monolayer of T84 cells, cross-linked to the surface-exposed T84 cell proteins, and immunoprecipitated by using anti-AafA antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of cellular proteins bound to AafA-dsc protein identified laminin (previously recognized as a potential receptor for AAF/II) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Involvement of the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae (AafA protein) in the binding to recombinant CK8 was confirmed by adherence assays with purified AAF/II fimbriae, AafA-dsc protein, and strain 042. Moreover, HEp-2 cells transfected with CK8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) showed reduced 042 adherence compared with cells transfected with scrambled siRNA as a control. Adherence of 042 to HEp-2 cells preincubated with antibodies against ECM proteins or CK8 was substantially reduced. Altogether, our results supported the idea of a role of CK8 as a potential receptor for EAEC. PMID:24516112

  11. Identification of cell surface-exposed proteins involved in the fimbria-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-04-01

    Fimbria-mediated adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key step in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) pathogenesis. To date, four fimbriae have been described for EAEC; aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II) is the most important adherence factor for EAEC prototype strain 042. Previously, we described results showing that extracellular matrix (ECM) components might be involved in the recognition of AAF/II fimbriae by intestinal cells. In this study, we sought to identify novel potential receptors on intestinal epithelial cells recognized by the AAF/II fimbriae. Purified AafA-dsc protein, the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae, was incubated with a monolayer of T84 cells, cross-linked to the surface-exposed T84 cell proteins, and immunoprecipitated by using anti-AafA antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of cellular proteins bound to AafA-dsc protein identified laminin (previously recognized as a potential receptor for AAF/II) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Involvement of the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae (AafA protein) in the binding to recombinant CK8 was confirmed by adherence assays with purified AAF/II fimbriae, AafA-dsc protein, and strain 042. Moreover, HEp-2 cells transfected with CK8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) showed reduced 042 adherence compared with cells transfected with scrambled siRNA as a control. Adherence of 042 to HEp-2 cells preincubated with antibodies against ECM proteins or CK8 was substantially reduced. Altogether, our results supported the idea of a role of CK8 as a potential receptor for EAEC.

  12. Comparative DNA microarray analysis of human monocyte derived dendritic cells and MUTZ-3 cells exposed to the moderate skin sensitizer cinnamaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Python, Francois; Goebel, Carsten; Aeby, Pierre

    2009-09-15

    The number of studies involved in the development of in vitro skin sensitization tests has increased since the adoption of the EU 7th amendment to the cosmetics directive proposing to ban animal testing for cosmetic ingredients by 2013. Several studies have recently demonstrated that sensitizers induce a relevant up-regulation of activation markers such as CD86, CD54, IL-8 or IL-1{beta} in human myeloid cell lines (e.g., U937, MUTZ-3, THP-1) or in human peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (PBMDCs). The present study aimed at the identification of new dendritic cell activation markers in order to further improve the in vitro evaluation of the sensitizing potential of chemicals. We have compared the gene expression profiles of PBMDCs and the human cell line MUTZ-3 after a 24-h exposure to the moderate sensitizer cinnamaldehyde. A list of 80 genes modulated in both cell types was obtained and a set of candidate marker genes was selected for further analysis. Cells were exposed to selected sensitizers and non-sensitizers for 24 h and gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results indicated that PIR, TRIM16 and two Nrf2-regulated genes, CES1 and NQO1, are modulated by most sensitizers. Up-regulation of these genes could also be observed in our recently published DC-activation test with U937 cells. Due to their role in DC activation, these new genes may help to further refine the in vitro approaches for the screening of the sensitizing properties of a chemical.

  13. Identification of cell surface-exposed proteins involved in the fimbria-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-04-01

    Fimbria-mediated adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key step in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) pathogenesis. To date, four fimbriae have been described for EAEC; aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II) is the most important adherence factor for EAEC prototype strain 042. Previously, we described results showing that extracellular matrix (ECM) components might be involved in the recognition of AAF/II fimbriae by intestinal cells. In this study, we sought to identify novel potential receptors on intestinal epithelial cells recognized by the AAF/II fimbriae. Purified AafA-dsc protein, the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae, was incubated with a monolayer of T84 cells, cross-linked to the surface-exposed T84 cell proteins, and immunoprecipitated by using anti-AafA antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of cellular proteins bound to AafA-dsc protein identified laminin (previously recognized as a potential receptor for AAF/II) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Involvement of the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae (AafA protein) in the binding to recombinant CK8 was confirmed by adherence assays with purified AAF/II fimbriae, AafA-dsc protein, and strain 042. Moreover, HEp-2 cells transfected with CK8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) showed reduced 042 adherence compared with cells transfected with scrambled siRNA as a control. Adherence of 042 to HEp-2 cells preincubated with antibodies against ECM proteins or CK8 was substantially reduced. Altogether, our results supported the idea of a role of CK8 as a potential receptor for EAEC. PMID:24516112

  14. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro. PMID:24734552

  15. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro.

  16. Micronuclei as biomarkers of carcinogen exposure in populations exposed to arsenic through drinking water in West Bengal, India: a comparative study in three cell types.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anamika; Ghosh, Pritha; Das, Jayanta K; Banerjee, Apurba; Ray, Kunal; Giri, Ashok K

    2004-05-01

    Contamination of groundwater by arsenic, a paradoxical human carcinogen, has become a cause of global public health concern. In West Bengal, India, the groundwater in 9 of 18 districts is heavily contaminated with arsenic. Various adverse health effects including cancer have been reported from these districts and are associated with prolonged arsenic exposure. A cross-sectional biomarker study was conducted to evaluate and compare the frequencies of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes, oral mucosa cells, and urothelial cells from the inhabitants of North 24 Parganas, one of the arsenic-affected districts. The three cell types were collected from 163 residents exposed to high levels of arsenic in drinking water (214.7213 +/- 9.0273 microg/l) and from 154 unexposed subjects residing in the unaffected East Midnapur district with very little or no exposure to arsenic through drinking water (9.2017 +/- 0.3157 microg/l). Our analysis revealed that micronuclei frequencies in the exposed group were significantly elevated to 5.33-fold over unexposed levels for lymphocytes, 4.63-fold for oral mucosa cells, and 4.71-fold for urothelial cells (increases in micronuclei frequencies significant at P < 0.01). The results indicate that chronic ingestion of arsenic in drinking water by the exposed subjects is linked to the enhanced incidence of micronuclei in all the three cell types, slightly higher level of micronuclei being observed in lymphocytes compared with oral mucosa and urothelial cells.

  17. The effects of catechin isolated from green tea GMB-4 on NADPH and nitric oxide levels in endothelial cells exposed to high glucose

    PubMed Central

    Peristiowati, Yuly; Indasah, Indasah; Ratnawati, Retty

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate whether a catechin isolated from GMB-4 green tea is able to increase the reducing equivalent system and nitric oxide (NO) level in endothelial cells exposed to high glucose (HG) level. Materials and Methods: Endothelial cells were obtained from human umbilical vascular tissues. At confluent, human endothelial cells were divided into five groups, which included control (untreated), endothelial cells exposed to HG (30 mM), endothelial cells exposed to HG in the presence of green tea catechin (HG + C) at the following three doses: 0.03; 0.3; and 3 mg/ml. Analysis of NADP+, NADPH, and NO levels were performed colorimetrically. Results: This decrease in NADPH was significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated by both the 0.3 and 3 mg/ml treatments of catechin. HG level significantly decreased NO compared with untreated cells. This increase in NO was significantly attenuated by the 0.3 mg/ml dose of the catechin. Conclusion: In conclusion, catechin isolated from GMB-4 green tea prohibits the decrease in NADPH and NO in endothelial cells induced by HG. Therefore this may provide a natural therapy for attenuating the endothelial dysfunction found in diabetes mellitus. PMID:26401396

  18. Overexpression of DJ-1 reduces oxidative stress and attenuates hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in NRK-52E cells exposed to high glucose

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zi-Ying; Sun, Qian; Xia, Zhong-Yuan; Meng, Qing-Tao; Lei, Shao-Qing; Zhao, Bo; Tang, Ling-Hua; Xue, Rui; Chen, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with diabetes are more vulnerable to renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, which is implicated in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. We previously reported that the hyperglycemia-induced inhibition of DJ-1, a novel oncogene that exhibits potent antioxidant activity, is implicated in the severity of myocardial I/R injury. In the present study, we aimed to explore the role of DJ-1 in hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury in renal cells exposed to high glucose (HG). For this purpose, NRK-52E cells were exposed to HG (30 mM) for 48 h and then exposed to hypoxia for 4 h and reoxygenation for 2 h, which significantly decreased cell viability and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, accompanied by a decrease in DJ-1 protein expression. The overexpression of DJ-1 by transfection with a DJ-1 overexpression plasmid exerted protective effects against HG-induced H/R injury, as evidenced by increased CCK-8 levels and SOD activity, the decreased release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the decreased MDA content, and increased nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Similar effects were observed following treatment with the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine. These results suggest that the overexpression of DJ-1 reduces oxidative stress and attenuates H/R injury in NRK-52E cells exposed to HG. PMID:27430285

  19. Metabolomic effects in HepG2 cells exposed to four TiO2 amd two CeO2 naomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract It is difficult to evaluate nanomaterials potential toxicity and to make science-based societal choices. To better assess potential hepatotoxicity issues, human liver HepG2 cells were exposed to four Ti02 and two Ce02 nanomaterials at 30 ug m1-1 for t...

  20. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid: Role of PPARalpha and T- and B-cell targeting

    EPA Science Inventory

    T-cell-dependent antibody responses (TDAR) are suppressed in female C57BL/6N mice exposed to ≥3.75 mg/kg of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) for 15 days. To determine if suppression of humoral immunity by PFOA is peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARa)-dependent and...

  1. MATRIX METALLOPROTEINS (MMP)-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR) IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZINC (ZN)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-Mediated Phosphorylation of The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in Human Airway Epithelial Cells (HAEC) Exposed to Zinc (Zn)
    Weidong Wu, James M. Samet, Robert Silbajoris, Lisa A. Dailey, Lee M. Graves, and Philip A. Bromberg
    Center fo...

  2. Prolactin gene expression and gill chloride cell activity in fugu Takifugu rubripes exposed to a hypoosmotic environment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Mi; Kaneko, Toyoji; Katoh, Fumi; Aida, Katsumi

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate a possible involvement of prolactin (PRL) in low-salinity tolerance of a marine pufferfish Takifugu rubripes, or fugu, gene-expression profiles of PRL in the pituitary and PRL receptor (PRLR) in the osmoregulatory organs were investigated in fish exposed to 25%-dilute seawater (SW). Following transfer from full-strength (100%) SW to 25% SW, plasma osmolality and Na(+) and Cl(-) levels were slightly decreased on day 1, which were restored on days 3 and 7. Expression levels of PRL mRNA in the pituitary was significantly increased in response to 25% SW transfer, which was in sharp contrast with a remarkable decrease in growth hormone (GH) mRNA levels. These profiles suggest that PRL and GH are involved in hyper- and hypoosmoregulation, respectively, as is the case with euryhaline teleosts. Expression levels of PRLR mRNA in the gill and intestine were not significantly different from the initial levels, whereas, PRLR mRNA expression in the kidney was significantly higher on day 7 than the initial levels. Although transfer to 25% SW did not affect the average size of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive chloride cells in the gills, both size and density of apical openings of chloride cells became significantly smaller after transfer to 25% SW. These findings suggest that the possible hypoosmotic action of PRL is mediated by PRLR expressed in the osmoregulatory organs, and that low-salinity tolerance of fugu may involve reduction of an ion-secreting function of gill chloride cells. To further evaluate long-term effects of the low-salinity environment on growth and osmoregulation, fugu were raised in 25% and 100% SW for a prolonged period of 8 weeks. They grew similarly in 25% and 100% SW, and there was no significant difference in body weight and standard length at any weekly sampling point. The plasma osmolality was maintained at about 345mOsm/kg.H(2)O in both media, whereas the gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity was significantly lower in 25% SW than 100% SW. Gene

  3. Chronic arsenic exposure increases TGFalpha concentration in bladder urothelial cells of Mexican populations environmentally exposed to inorganic arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Germolec, Dori R.; Borja-Aburto, Victor H.; Contreras-Ruiz, Jose; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Razo, Luz M. del

    2007-08-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a well-established carcinogen and human exposure has been associated with a variety of cancers including those of skin, lung, and bladder. High expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-{alpha}) has associated with local relapses in early stages of urinary bladder cancer. iAs exposures are at least in part determined by the rate of formation and composition of iAs metabolites (MAs{sup III}, MAs{sup V}, DMAs{sup III}, DMAs{sup V}). This study examines the relationship between TGF-{alpha} concentration in exfoliated bladder urothelial cells (BUC) separated from urine and urinary arsenic species in 72 resident women (18-51 years old) from areas exposed to different concentrations of iAs in drinking water (2-378 ppb) in central Mexico. Urinary arsenic species, including trivalent methylated metabolites were measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method. The concentration of TGF-{alpha} in BUC was measured using an ELISA assay. Results show a statistically significant positive correlation between TGF-{alpha} concentration in BUC and each of the six arsenic species present in urine. The multivariate linear regression analyses show that the increment of TGF-{alpha} levels in BUC was importantly associated with the presence of arsenic species after adjusting by age, and presence of urinary infection. People from areas with high arsenic exposure had a significantly higher TGF-{alpha} concentration in BUC than people from areas of low arsenic exposure (128.8 vs. 64.4 pg/mg protein; p < 0.05). Notably, exfoliated cells isolated from individuals with skin lesions contained significantly greater amount of TGF-{alpha} than cells from individuals without skin lesions: 157.7 vs. 64.9 pg/mg protein (p = 0.003). These results suggest that TGF-{alpha} in exfoliated BUC may serve as a susceptibility marker of adverse health effects on epithelial tissue in arsenic-endemic areas.

  4. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Orona, N.S.; Tasat, D.R.

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup −} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup −} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of Placenta-Specific 8 Contributes to Altered Function of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Exposed to Intrauterine Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Blue, Emily K; Sheehan, BreAnn M; Nuss, Zia V; Boyle, Frances A; Hocutt, Caleb M; Gohn, Cassandra R; Varberg, Kaela M; McClintick, Jeanette N; Haneline, Laura S

    2015-07-01

    Intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is linked to development of hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes in children. Our previous studies determined that endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from neonates exposed to GDM exhibit impaired function. The current goals were to identify aberrantly expressed genes that contribute to impaired function of GDM-exposed ECFCs and to evaluate for evidence of altered epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Genome-wide mRNA expression analysis was conducted on ECFCs from control and GDM pregnancies. Candidate genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Bisulfite sequencing evaluated DNA methylation of placenta-specific 8 (PLAC8). Proliferation and senescence assays of ECFCs transfected with siRNA to knockdown PLAC8 were performed to determine functional impact. Thirty-eight genes were differentially expressed between control and GDM-exposed ECFCs. PLAC8 was highly expressed in GDM-exposed ECFCs, and PLAC8 expression correlated with maternal hyperglycemia. Methylation status of 17 CpG sites in PLAC8 negatively correlated with mRNA expression. Knockdown of PLAC8 in GDM-exposed ECFCs improved proliferation and senescence defects. This study provides strong evidence in neonatal endothelial progenitor cells that GDM exposure in utero leads to altered gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting the possibility of altered epigenetic regulation. PMID:25720387

  6. Nicotine overrides DNA damage-induced G1/S restriction in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Zhu, Tongbo; Guo, Jinjin; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chen, Chang Yan

    2011-01-01

    As an addictive substance, nicotine has been suggested to facilitate pro-survival activities (such as anchorage-independent growth or angiogenesis) and the establishment of drug resistance to anticancer therapy. Tobacco smoking consists of a variety of carcinogens [such as benzopyrene (BP) and nitrosamine derivatives] that are able to cause DNA double strand breaks. However, the effect of nicotine on DNA damage-induced checkpoint response induced by genotoxins remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the events occurred during G(1) arrest induced by γ-radiation or BP in nicotine-treated murine or human lung epithelial cells. DNA synthesis was rapidly inhibited after exposure to γ-radiation or BP treatment, accompanied with the activation of DNA damage checkpoint. When these cells were co-treated with nicotine, the growth restriction was compromised, manifested by upregulation of cyclin D and A, and attenuation of Chk2 phosphorylation. Knockdown of cyclin D or Chk2 by the siRNAs blocked nicotine-mediated effect on DNA damage checkpoint activation. However, nicotine treatment appeared to play no role in nocodazole-induced mitotic checkpoint activation. Overall, our study presented a novel observation, in which nicotine is able to override DNA damage checkpoint activated by tobacco-related carcinogen BP or γ-irradiation. The results not only indicates the potentially important role of nicotine in facilitating the establishment of genetic instability to promote lung tumorigenesis, but also warrants a dismal prognosis for cancer patients who are smokers, heavily exposed second-hand smokers or nicotine users. PMID:21559516

  7. Break Point Distribution on Chromosome 3 of Human Epithelial Cells exposed to Gamma Rays, Neutrons and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the reported studies of break point distribution on the damaged chromosomes from radiation exposure were carried out with the G-banding technique or determined based on the relative length of the broken chromosomal fragments. However, these techniques lack the accuracy in comparison with the later developed multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique that is generally used for analysis of intrachromosomal aberrations such as inversions. Using mBAND, we studied chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells exposed in vitro to both low or high dose rate gamma rays in Houston, low dose rate secondary neutrons at Los Alamos National Laboratory and high dose rate 600 MeV/u Fe ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed after neutron or Fe ion exposure, and the majority of inversions in gamma-irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations. In addition, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges. We further compared the distribution of break point on chromosome 3 for the three radiation types. The break points were found to be randomly distributed on chromosome 3 after neutrons or Fe ions exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering break points was observed for gamma-rays. The break point distribution may serve as a potential fingerprint of high-LET radiation exposure.

  8. Functional investigations on human mesenchymal stem cells exposed to magnetic fields and labeled with clinically approved iron nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background For clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), labeling and tracking is crucial to evaluate cell distribution and homing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been successfully established detecting MSCs labeled with superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (SPIO). Despite initial reports that labeling of MSCs with SPIO is safe without affecting the MSC's biology, recent studies report on influences of SPIO-labeling on metabolism and function of MSCs. Exposition of cells and tissues to high magnetic fields is the functional principle of MRI. In this study we established innovative labeling protocols for human MSCs using clinically established SPIO in combination with magnetic fields and investigated on functional effects (migration assays, quantification of colony forming units, analyses of gene and protein expression and analyses on the proliferation capacity, the viability and the differentiation potential) of magnetic fields on unlabeled and labeled human MSCs. To evaluate the imaging properties, quantification of the total iron load per cell (TIL), electron microscopy, and MRI at 3.0 T were performed. Results Human MSCs labeled with SPIO permanently exposed to magnetic fields arranged and grew according to the magnetic flux lines. Exposure of MSCs to magnetic fields after labeling with SPIO significantly enhanced the TIL compared to SPIO labeled MSCs without exposure to magnetic fields resulting in optimized imaging properties (detection limit: 1,000 MSCs). Concerning the TIL and the imaging properties, immediate exposition to magnetic fields after labeling was superior to exposition after 24 h. On functional level, exposition to magnetic fields inhibited the ability of colony formation of labeled MSCs and led to an enhanced expression of lipoprotein lipase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ in labeled MSCs under adipogenic differentiation, and to a reduced expression of alkaline phosphatase in unlabeled MSCs under

  9. Increased level of apoptosis in rat brains and SH-SY5Y cells exposed to excessive fluoride--a mechanism connected with activating JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jie; Guan, Zhi-Zhong; Gao, Qin; Pei, Jin-Jing

    2011-07-28

    In order to reveal the mechanism of the brain injury induced by chronic fluorosis, the levels of apoptosis and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) in brains of rats and SH-SY5Y cells exposed to different concentrations of sodium fluoride (NaF) were detected. The dental fluorosis and fluoride contents in blood, urine and bones of rats were measured to evaluate the exhibition of fluorosis. The apoptotic death rate was measured by flow cytometry and the expression of JNK at protein level by Western blotting. The results showed that as compared with controls, the apoptotic death rate was obviously increased in brains of the rats exposed to high-fluoride (50ppm) for 6 months with a concentration dependent manner, but no significant change for 3 months. In SH-SY5Y cells treated with high concentration (50ppm) of fluoride, the increased apoptotic death rate was obviously observed as compared to controls. In addition, the expressions of phospho-JNK at protein level were raised by 20.5% and 107.6%, respectively, in brains of the rats exposed to low-fluoride (5ppm) and high-fluoride for 6 months; while no significant changes were found between the rats exposed to fluoride and the controls for 3 months. The protein level of phospho-JNK was also increased in SH-SY5Y cells exposed to high-fluoride. There were no changes of total-JNK both in the rats and in the SH-SY5Y cells exposed to excessive fluoride as compared to controls. When SH-SY5Y cells were singly treated with SP600125, an inhibitor of phospho-JNK, the decreased expression of phospho-JNK, but no apoptosis, was detected. Interestingly, after JNK phosphorylation in the cultured cells was inhibited by SP600125, the treatment with high-fluoride did not induce the increase of apoptosis. In addition, there was a positive correlation between the expression of phospho-JNK and the apoptotic death rate in rat brains or SH-SY5Y cells treated with high-fluoride. The results indicated that exposure to excessive fluoride resulted in

  10. Alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed at the air-liquid interface to diesel exhaust: First study in TNO's powertrain test center.

    PubMed

    Kooter, Ingeborg M; Alblas, Marcel J; Jedynska, Aleksandra D; Steenhof, Maaike; Houtzager, Marc M G; van Ras, Martijn

    2013-12-01

    Air-liquid interface (ALI) exposures enable in vitro testing of mixtures of gases and particles such as diesel exhaust (DE). The main objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of exposing human lung epithelial cells at the ALI to complete DE generated by a heavy-duty truck in the state-of-the-art TNO powertrain test center. A549 cells were exposed at the air-liquid interface to DE generated by a heavy-duty Euro III truck for 1.5h. The truck was tested at a speed of ∼70kmh(-1) to simulate free-flowing traffic on a motorway. Twenty-four hours after exposure, cells were analyzed for markers of oxidative stress (GSH and HO-1), cytotoxicity (LDH and Alamar Blue assay) and inflammation (IL-8). DE exposure resulted in an increased oxidative stress response (significantly increased HO-1 levels and significantly reduced GSH/GSSH ratio), and a decreased cell viability (significantly decreased Alamar Blue levels and slightly increased LDH levels). However, the pro-inflammatory response seemed to decrease (decrease in IL-8). The results presented here demonstrate that we are able to successfully expose A549 cells at ALI to complete DE generated by a heavy-duty truck in TNO's powertrain test center and show oxidative stress and cytotoxicity responses due to DE exposure.

  11. Alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed at the air-liquid interface to diesel exhaust: First study in TNO's powertrain test center.

    PubMed

    Kooter, Ingeborg M; Alblas, Marcel J; Jedynska, Aleksandra D; Steenhof, Maaike; Houtzager, Marc M G; van Ras, Martijn

    2013-12-01

    Air-liquid interface (ALI) exposures enable in vitro testing of mixtures of gases and particles such as diesel exhaust (DE). The main objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of exposing human lung epithelial cells at the ALI to complete DE generated by a heavy-duty truck in the state-of-the-art TNO powertrain test center. A549 cells were exposed at the air-liquid interface to DE generated by a heavy-duty Euro III truck for 1.5h. The truck was tested at a speed of ∼70kmh(-1) to simulate free-flowing traffic on a motorway. Twenty-four hours after exposure, cells were analyzed for markers of oxidative stress (GSH and HO-1), cytotoxicity (LDH and Alamar Blue assay) and inflammation (IL-8). DE exposure resulted in an increased oxidative stress response (significantly increased HO-1 levels and significantly reduced GSH/GSSH ratio), and a decreased cell viability (significantly decreased Alamar Blue levels and slightly increased LDH levels). However, the pro-inflammatory response seemed to decrease (decrease in IL-8). The results presented here demonstrate that we are able to successfully expose A549 cells at ALI to complete DE generated by a heavy-duty truck in TNO's powertrain test center and show oxidative stress and cytotoxicity responses due to DE exposure. PMID:24161370

  12. Association between oxidative DNA damage and the expression of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 in lung epithelial cells of neonatal rats exposed to hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    JIN, LINLIN; YANG, HAIPING; FU, JIANHUA; XUE, XINDONG; YAO, LI; QIAO, LIN

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress-induced lung injury is involved in the occurrence and developmental process of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The present study assessed whether oxidative DNA damage occurs in the early stages of hyperoxia-induced BPD in neonatal rats and evaluated the expression and localization of the DNA repair gene, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), upon exposure to hyperoxia. Neonatal rats and primary cultured neonatal rat alveolar epithelial type II (AECII) cells were exposed to hyperoxia (90% O2) or normoxia (21% O2) and the expression levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the lung tissues and AECII cells were determined using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DNA strand breaks in the AECII cells were detected using a comet assay. The expression and localization of the OGG1 protein in the lung tissues and AECII cells were determined by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and western blotting. The mRNA expression levels of OGG1 in the lung tissues and AECII cells were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The expression of 8-OHdG was elevated in the hyperoxia-exposed neonatal rat lung tissue and the AECII cells compared with the normoxic controls. The occurrence of DNA strand breaks in the AECII cells increased with increasing duration of hyperoxia exposure. The protein expression of OGG1 was significantly increased in the hyperoxia-exposed lung tissues and AECII cells, with OGG1 preferentially localized to the cytoplasm. No concomitant increase in the mRNA expression of OGG1 was detected. These results revealed that oxidative DNA damage occurred in lung epithelial cells during early-stage BPD, as confirmed by in vitro and in vivo hyperoxia exposure experiments, and the increased expression of OGG1 was associated with this process. PMID:25672835

  13. Toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in lung epithelial cells exposed at the air-liquid interface compared with in vivo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xuefang; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.; Thorne, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of spark-generated copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) was evaluated in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) and lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cells) using an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure system. Dose-response results were compared to in vivo inhalation and instillation studies of CuONP. Cells were exposed to particle-free clean air (controls) or spark-generated CuONPs. The number median diameter, geometric standard deviation and total number concentration of CuONPs were 9.2 nm, 1.48 and 2.27×107 particles/cm3, respectively. Outcome measures included cell viability, cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and proinflammatory chemokine production. Exposure to clean air (2 or 4 hr) did not induce toxicity in HBEC or A549 cells. Compared with controls, CuONP exposures significantly reduced cell viability, increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. A549 cells were significantly more susceptible to CuONP effects than HBEC. Antioxidant treatment reduced CuONP-induced cytotoxicity. When dose was expressed per area of exposed epithelium there was good agreement of toxicity measures with murine in vivo studies. This demonstrates that in vitro ALI studies can provide meaningful data on nanotoxicity of metal oxides. PMID:25575782

  14. Comparative analysis of cell killing and autosomal mutation in mouse kidney epithelium exposed to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions in vitro or in situ.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Kwoh, Ely; Connolly, Lanelle; Dan, Cristian; Lasarev, Michael; Turker, Mitchell S

    2009-11-01

    Astronauts receive exposures to high-energy heavy ions from galactic cosmic radiation. Although high-energy heavy ions are mutagenic and carcinogenic, their mutagenic potency in epithelial cells, where most human cancers develop, is poorly understood. Mutations are a critical component of human cancer, and mutations involving autosomal loci predominate. This study addresses the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions in mouse kidney epithelium. Mutant fractions were measured for an endogenous autosomal locus (Aprt) that detects all types of mutagenic events contributing to human cancer. Results for kidneys irradiated in situ are compared with results for kidney cells from the same strain exposed in vitro. The results demonstrate dose-dependent cell killing in vitro and for cells explanted 3-4 months postirradiation in situ, but in situ exposures were less likely to result in cell death than in vitro exposures. Prolonged incubation in situ (8-9 months) further attenuated cell killing at lower doses. Iron ions were mutagenic to cells in vitro and for irradiated kidneys. No sparing was seen for mutant frequency with a long incubation period in situ. In addition, the degree of mutation induction (relative increase over background) was similar for cells exposed in vitro or in situ. We speculate that the latent effects of iron-ion exposure contribute to the maintenance of an elevated mutation burden in an epithelial tissue. PMID:19883222

  15. Assessing the in vitro toxicity of the lunar dust environment using respiratory cells exposed to Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2) fine dust particles.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jacqueline A; Verhoff, Ashley M; Morgan, Julie E; Fischer, David G

    2009-12-01

    Prior chemical and physical analysis of lunar soil suggests a composition of dust particles that may contribute to the development of acute and chronic respiratory disorders. In this study, fine Al(2)O(3) (0.7 μm) and fine SiO(2) (mean 1.6 μm) were used to assess the cellular uptake and cellular toxicity of lunar dust particle analogs. Respiratory cells, murine alveolar macrophages (RAW 264.7) and human type II epithelial (A549), were cultured as the in vitro model system. The phagocytic activity of both cell types using ultrafine (0.1 μm) and fine (0.5 μm) fluorescent polystyrene beads was determined. Following a 6-h exposure, RAW 264.7 cells had extended pseudopods with beads localized in the cytoplasmic region of cells. After 24 h, the macrophage cells were rounded and clumped and lacked pseudopods, which suggest impairment of phagocytosis. A549 cells did not contain beads, and after 24 h, the majority of the beads appeared to primarily coat the surface of the cells. Next, we investigated the cellular response to fine SiO(2) and Al(2)O(3) (up to 5 mg/ml). RAW 264.7 cells exposed to 1.0 mg/ml of fine SiO(2) for 6 h demonstrated pseudopods, cellular damage, apoptosis, and necrosis. A549 cells showed slight toxicity when exposed to fine SiO(2) for the same time and dose. A549 cells had particles clustered on the surface of the cells. Only a higher dose (5.0 mg/ml) of fine SiO(2) resulted in a significant cytotoxicity to A549 cells. Most importantly, both cell types showed minimal cytotoxicity following exposure to fine Al(2)O(3). Overall, this study suggests differential cellular toxicity associated with exposure to fine mineral dust particles.

  16. Adaptive and Bystander Responses in Human and Rodent Cell Cultures Exposed to Low Level Ionizing Radiation: The Impact of Linear Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    de Toledo, Sonia M.; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2006-01-01

    To understand the potential impact on risk from exposure to low-level ionizing radiation, we have investigated the modulation of gene expression, induction of DNA damage and of neoplastic transformation in human or rodent cells derived from cultures exposed in vitro to low dose γ-rays (a low linear energy transfer radiation) or very low fluences of α-particles (a high linear energy transfer radiation). Pre-exposure of cells to a low γ-ray dose protected cells from the DNA damaging and killing effects induced by a subsequent acute challenge exposure to γ-rays. Furthermore, a low dose chronic exposure to γ-rays decreased the frequency of micronucleus formation and neoplastic transformation to a level below the spontaneous rate in human and rodent cells respectively. In contrast, when cell cultures were exposed to low fluences of α-particles, wherein a small fraction of cells were irradiated, stressful effects were transmitted from the irradiated to adjoining nonirradiated bystander cells. The mechanisms underlying these effects and their relative contribution to the overall risk to ionizing radiation is discussed. PMID:18648584

  17. RelA-Mediated BECN1 Expression Is Required for Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Autophagy in Oral Cancer Cells Exposed to Low-Power Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Shan; Chen, Chien-Hsun; Wu, Sam; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Kuo, Soong-Yu; Fu, Earl; Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung

    2016-01-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) is a non-invasive and safe method for cancer treatment that alters a variety of physiological processes in the cells. Autophagy can play either a cytoprotective role or a detrimental role in cancer cells exposed to stress. The detailed mechanisms of autophagy and its role on cytotoxicity in oral cancer cells exposed to LPLI remain unclear. In this study, we showed that LPLI at 810 nm with energy density 60 J/cm2 increased the number of microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1LC3) puncta and increased autophagic flux in oral cancer cells. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was induced, which increased RelA transcriptional activity and beclin 1 (BECN1) expression in oral cancer cells irradiated with LPLI. Furthermore, ROS scavenger or knockdown of RelA diminished LPLI-induced BECN1 expression and MAP1LC3-II conversion. In addition, pharmacological and genetic ablation of autophagy significantly enhanced the effects of LPLI-induced apoptosis in oral cancer cells. These results suggest that autophagy may be a resistant mechanism for LPLI-induced apoptosis in oral cancer cells. PMID:27632526

  18. RelA-Mediated BECN1 Expression Is Required for Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Autophagy in Oral Cancer Cells Exposed to Low-Power Laser Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chih-Wen; Chang, Hong-Tai; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Chen, Chien-Hsun; Wu, Sam; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Kuo, Soong-Yu; Fu, Earl; Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung

    2016-01-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) is a non-invasive and safe method for cancer treatment that alters a variety of physiological processes in the cells. Autophagy can play either a cytoprotective role or a detrimental role in cancer cells exposed to stress. The detailed mechanisms of autophagy and its role on cytotoxicity in oral cancer cells exposed to LPLI remain unclear. In this study, we showed that LPLI at 810 nm with energy density 60 J/cm2 increased the number of microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1LC3) puncta and increased autophagic flux in oral cancer cells. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was induced, which increased RelA transcriptional activity and beclin 1 (BECN1) expression in oral cancer cells irradiated with LPLI. Furthermore, ROS scavenger or knockdown of RelA diminished LPLI-induced BECN1 expression and MAP1LC3-II conversion. In addition, pharmacological and genetic ablation of autophagy significantly enhanced the effects of LPLI-induced apoptosis in oral cancer cells. These results suggest that autophagy may be a resistant mechanism for LPLI-induced apoptosis in oral cancer cells. PMID:27632526

  19. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  20. Genotoxic Evaluation of Mexican Welders Occupationally Exposed to Welding-Fumes Using the Micronucleus Test on Exfoliated Oral Mucosa Cells: A Cross-Sectional, Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Ettinger, Ana Cecilia; López-Tavera, Juan Carlos; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Torres-Bugarín, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 800,000 people worldwide are occupationally exposed to welding-fumes. Previous studies show that the exposure to such fumes is associated with damage to genetic material and increased cancer risk. In this study, we evaluate the genotoxic effect of welding-fumes using the Micronucleus Test on oral mucosa cells of Mexican welders. Material and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, matched case-control study of n = 66 (33 exposed welders, and 33 healthy controls). Buccal mucosa smears were collected and stained with acridine orange, observed under 100x optical amplification with a fluorescence lamp, and a single-blinded observer counted the number of micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities per 2,000 observed cells. We compared the frequencies of micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities, and fitted generalised linear models to investigate the interactions between nuclear abnormalities and the exposure to welding-fumes, while controlling for smoking and age. Results Binucleated cells and condensed-chromatin cells showed statistically significant differences between cases and controls. The frequency of micronuclei and the rest of nuclear abnormalities (lobed-nuclei, pyknosis, karyolysis, and karyorrhexis) did not differ significantly between the groups. After adjusting for smoking, the regression results showed that the occurrence of binucleated cells could be predicted by the exposure to welding-fumes plus the presence of tobacco consumption; for the condensed-chromatin cells, our model showed that the exposure to welding-fumes is the only reliable predictor. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Mexican welders who are occupationally exposed to welding-fumes have increased counts of binucleated and condensed-chromatin cells. Nevertheless, the frequencies of micronuclei and the rest of nuclear abnormalities did not differ between cases and controls. Further studies should shed more light on this subject. PMID:26244938

  1. Different Mechanisms of Cell Death in Radiosensitive and Radioresistant P53 Mutated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines Exposed to Carbon Ions and X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Maalouf, Mira; Alphonse, Gersende; Colliaux, Anthony; Beuve, Michael Ph.D.; Trajkovic-Bodennec, Selena; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia B.Sc.; Testard, Isabelle; Chapet, Olivier; Bajard, Marcel; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Fournier, Claudia; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: We initiated studies on the mechanisms of cell death in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HNSCC) since recent clinical trials have shown that local treatment of HNSCC by carbon hadrontherapy is less efficient than it is in other radioresistant cancers. Methods and Materials: Two p53-mutated HNSCC cell lines displaying opposite radiosensitivity were used. Different types of cell death were determined after exposure to carbon ions (33.6 and 184 keV/{mu}m) or X-rays. Results: Exposure to radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET) induced clonogenic cell death for SCC61 (radiosensitive) and SQ20B (radioresistant) cells, the latter systematically showing less sensitivity. Activation of an early p53-independent apoptotic process occurred in SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation, which increased with time, dose and LET. In contrast, SQ20B cells underwent G2/M arrest associated with Chk1 activation and Cdc2 phosphorylation. This inhibition was transient after X-rays, compared with a more prolonged and LET-dependent accumulation after carbon irradiation. After release, a LET-dependent increase of polyploid and multinucleated cells, both typical signs of mitotic catastrophe, was identified. However, a subpopulation of SQ20B cells was able to escape mitotic catastrophe and continue to proliferate. Conclusions: High LET irradiation induced distinct types of cell death in HNSCC cell lines and showed an increased effectiveness compared with X-rays. However, the reproliferation of SQ20B may explain the potential locoregional recurrence observed among some HNSCC patients treated by hadrontherapy. An adjuvant treatment forcing the tumor cells to enter apoptosis may therefore be necessary to improve the outcome of radiotherapy.

  2. Metabolomic effects in HepG2 cells exposed to CeO2, SiO2 and CuO nanomaterials.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better assess potential hepatotoxicity of nanomaterials, human liver HepG2 cells were exposed for three days to 5 different CeO2 (either 30 or 100 ug/ml), 3 SiO2 based (30 ug/ml) or 1 CuO (3 ug/ml) nanomaterials with dry primary particle sizes ranging from 15 to 213 nm. Metab...

  3. The Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry protein ROP 2 is inserted into the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, surrounding the intracellular parasite, and is exposed to the host cell cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The origin of the vacuole membrane surrounding the intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is not known. Although unique secretory organelles, the rhoptries, discharge during invasion of the host cell and may contribute to the formation of this parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), no direct evidence for this hypothesis exists. Using a novel approach we have determined that parasite-encoded proteins are present in the PVM, exposed to the host cell cytoplasm. In infected cells incubated with streptolysin-O or low concentrations of digitonin, the host cell plasma membrane was selectively permeabilized without significantly affecting the integrity of the PVM. Antisera prepared against whole parasites or a parasite fraction enriched in rhoptries and dense granules reacted with the PVM in these permeabilized cells, indicating that parasite-encoded antigens were exposed on the cytoplasmic side of the PVM. Parasite antigens responsible for this staining of the PVM were identified by fractionating total parasite proteins by SDS-PAGE and velocity sedimentation, and then affinity purifying "fraction-specific" antibodies from the crude antisera. Proteins responsible for the PVM- staining, identified with fraction-specific antibodies, cofractionated with known rhoptry proteins. The gene encoding one of the rhoptry proteins, ROP 2, was cloned and sequenced, predicting and integral membrane protein. Antibodies specific for ROP 2 reacted with the intact PVM. These results provide the first direct evidence that rhoptry contents participate in the formation of the PVM of T. gondii and suggest a possible role of ROP 2 in parasite-host cell interactions. PMID:7962077

  4. Adaptive response in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells exposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields: Gamma-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and repair.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yongxin; He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether radiofrequency field (RF) preexposure induced adaptive responses (AR) in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and the mechanisms underlying the observed findings. Cells were preexposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields (RF) at 120 μW/cm(2) power intensity for 4 h/d for 5 d. Some cells were subjected to 1.5 Gy γ-radiation (GR) 4 h following the last RF exposure. The intensity of strand breaks in the DNA was assessed immediately at 4 h. Subsequently, some BMSC were examined at 30, 60, 90, or 120 min utilizing the alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX foci technique. Data showed no significant differences in number and intensity of strand breaks in DNA between RF-exposed and control cells. A significant increase in number and intensity of DNA strand breaks was noted in cells exposed to GR exposure alone. RF followed by GR exposure significantly decreased number of strand breaks and resulted in faster kinetics of repair of DNA strand breaks compared to GR alone. Thus, data suggest that RF preexposure protected cells from damage induced by GR. Evidence indicates that in RF-mediated AR more rapid repair kinetics occurs under conditions of GR-induced damage, which may be attributed to diminished DNA strand breakage.

  5. Adaptive response in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells exposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields: Gamma-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and repair.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yongxin; He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether radiofrequency field (RF) preexposure induced adaptive responses (AR) in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and the mechanisms underlying the observed findings. Cells were preexposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields (RF) at 120 μW/cm(2) power intensity for 4 h/d for 5 d. Some cells were subjected to 1.5 Gy γ-radiation (GR) 4 h following the last RF exposure. The intensity of strand breaks in the DNA was assessed immediately at 4 h. Subsequently, some BMSC were examined at 30, 60, 90, or 120 min utilizing the alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX foci technique. Data showed no significant differences in number and intensity of strand breaks in DNA between RF-exposed and control cells. A significant increase in number and intensity of DNA strand breaks was noted in cells exposed to GR exposure alone. RF followed by GR exposure significantly decreased number of strand breaks and resulted in faster kinetics of repair of DNA strand breaks compared to GR alone. Thus, data suggest that RF preexposure protected cells from damage induced by GR. Evidence indicates that in RF-mediated AR more rapid repair kinetics occurs under conditions of GR-induced damage, which may be attributed to diminished DNA strand breakage. PMID:27267824

  6. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 2; Detection of DNA damage and adaptive response activity of human cells exposed to space radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Su, Xiaoming; Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Shimazu, Toru; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Nagamatsu, Aiko; Omori, Katsunori; Ishioka, Noriaki

    To identify DNA damage induced by space radiations such as the high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, phospho-H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation was analyzed in human cells frozen in an International Space Station (ISS) freezer for 133 days. After recovering the frozen sample to the earth, the cells were cultured for 30 min, and then fixed. Here, we show a track of γH2AX positive foci in them by immuno-cytochemical methods. It is suggested that space radiations, especially high LET particles, induced DSBs as a track. From the formation of the tracks in nuclei, exposure dose rate was calculated to be 0.7 mSv per day as relatively high-energy space radiations of Fe-ions (500 MeV/u, 200 keV/µm). From the physical dosimetry with CR-39 and TLD, dose rate was 0.5 mSv per day. These values were similar between biological and physical dosimetries. In addition, the aim of this study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the radio-adaptive response. After the frozen samples were returned to earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h, and then exposed to challenging X-irradiation doses of 1.2 Gy or 2 Gy. Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, chromosome aberrations and mutation frequencies were scored. In the cells exposed to a space environment, all of radio-adaptive responses such as the induction of radio-resistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis, chromosome aberrations and mutant frequencies investigated here were found in wtp53 cells, but not in the mp53 cells. These results confirmed that the cells exposed to a space environment were likely to the exposed cells to radiation by the specific low dose range (window; 20-100 mSv) which can lead to an adaptive response on ground-base experiments, and that the cells indicated the biological effects from the space-radiation exposure with such low doses in space.

  7. Reciprocal Translocation in Somatic and Germ Cells of Mice Chronically Exposed by Inhalation to Ethylene Oxide: Implication for Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groups of male B6C3F1 mice were exposed by inhalation to 0, 25, 50, 100 or 200 ppm EO for up to 48 weeks (6 hours/day, 5 days/week). Animals were sacrificed at 6, 12, 24, and 48 weeks after the startt of the exposure for analyses of reciprocal translocations in peripheral blood ...

  8. PARTICLE NUMBER AND SURFACE CHARGE PREDICT THE BIOLOGICAL ACTIVATION OF HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) produces a uniform degree of mortality in exposed populations, in spite of its diverse sources. This suggests a common mechanism of action to explain its initial toxicity. The present study relates certain physicochemical characteristics (i.e.,...

  9. *Assessing differential transcriptional regulation of IL-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells exposed to diesel exhaust particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles (DEP) induces inflammatory signaling characterized by MAP kinase-mediated activation of NFkB and AP-l in vitro and in bronchial biopsies obtained from human subjects exposed to DEP. NFkB and AP-l activation results in the upregulat...

  10. DIFFERENTIAL MODULATION OF CANCER-RELATED MOLECULAR NETWORKS IN HUMAN AND RAT URINARY BLADDER CELLS EXPOSED TO TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As) is classified as a known human carcinogen with primary targets of urinary bladder (UB), skin and lung. The most prevalent source of As exposure in humans is drinking water contaminated with inorganic As (iAs), and millions of people worldwide are exposed to drinking ...

  11. Differences in T cell distribution and CCR5 expression in HIV-positive and HIV-exposed seronegative persons who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Kallas, Eveli; Huik, Kristi; Türk, Silver; Pauskar, Merit; Jõgeda, Ene-Ly; Šunina, Marina; Karki, Tõnis; Des Jarlais, Don; Uusküla, Anneli; Avi, Radko; Lutsar, Irja

    2016-06-01

    Some individuals remain uninfected despite repeated exposure to HIV. This protection against HIV has been partly associated with altered T cell subset distributions and CCR5 expression levels. However, the majority of studies have been conducted in sexually exposed subjects. We aimed to assess whether HIV infection and intravenous drug use were associated with differences in CCR5 expression, immune activation on the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and T cell distribution among Caucasian persons who inject drugs (PWIDs). Analyses of the data from 41 HIV-positive PWIDs, 47 HIV-exposed seronegative PWIDs (ESNs) and 47 age- and gender-matched HIV-negative non-drug users are presented. Of all of the study subjects, 111 (82 %) were male, and the median age was 29 years. T cell phenotyping was performed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with multicolour flow cytometry using anti-CD3, CD4, CD8, CD45RA, CD45RO, HLA-DR and CCR5 antibodies. The ESNs exhibited greater levels of immune activation and higher percentages of CD4+ CD45RA+RO+ and CD8+ CD45RA+RO+ cells compared to the controls but not the HIV-positive people. The CCR5 expression on the CD4+ T cell subsets in the ESNs was lower than that in the controls but similar to that the HIV positives. The percentages of CCR5+ T cells were similar in all study groups and in most of the studied cell populations. Intravenous drug use was similarly associated with differences in T cell subset distributions and CCR5 expression among both the HIV-positive and HIV-negative PWIDs compared with the controls.

  12. Haptoglobin and CCR2 receptor expression in ovarian cancer cells that were exposed to ascitic fluid: Exploring a new role of haptoglobin in the tumoral microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Garibay-Cerdenares, OL; Hernández-Ramírez, VI; Osorio-Trujillo, JC; Gallardo-Rincón, D; Talamás-Rohana, P

    2015-01-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an acute-phase protein that is produced by the liver to capture the iron that is present in the blood circulation, thus avoiding its accumulation in the blood. Moreover, Hp has been detected in a wide variety of tissues, in which it performs various functions. In addition, this protein is considered a potential biomarker in many diseases, such as cancer, including ovarian carcinoma; however, its participation in the cancerous processes has not yet been determined. The objective of this work was to demonstrate the expression of Hp and its receptor CCR2 in the ovarian cancer cells and its possible involvement in the process of cell migration through changes in the rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton using western blot and wound-healing assays and confirming by confocal microscopy. Ovarian cancer cells express both Hp and its receptor CCR2 but only after exposure to ascitic fluid, inducing moderated cell migration. However, when the cells are exposed to exogenous Hp, the expression of CCR2 is induced together with drastic changes in the actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. At the same time, Hp induced cell migration in a much more efficient manner than did ascitic fluid. These effects were blocked when the CCR2 synthetic antagonist RS102895 was used to pretreat the cells. These results suggest that Hp-induced changes in the cell morphology, actin cytoskeleton structure, and migration ability of tumor cells, is possibly “preparing” these cells for the potential induction of the metastatic phenotype. PMID:26211665

  13. Tissue- and cell-specific expression of metallothionein genes in cadmium- and copper-exposed mussels analyzed by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Zorita, I.; Bilbao, E.; Schad, A.; Cancio, I.; Soto, M.; Cajaraville, M.P. . E-mail: mirenp.cajaraville@ehu.es

    2007-04-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are metal-inducible proteins that can be used as biomarkers of metal exposure. In mussels two families of MT isoforms (MT10 and MT20) have been characterized. In this study, mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) were exposed to 200 ppb Cd and 40 ppb Cu for 2 and 9 days to characterize the tissue and isoform specificity of metal-induced MT expression. Non-radioactive in situ hybridization demonstrated that both MT isoforms were mainly transcribed in digestive tubule epithelial cells, especially in basophilic cells. Weaker MT expression was detected in non-ciliated duct cells, stomach and gill epithelial cells, haemocytes, adipogranular cells, spermatic follicles and oocytes. RT-PCR resulted in cloning of a novel M. galloprovincialis isoform homologous to recently cloned Mytilus edulis intron-less MT10B isoform. In gills, Cd only affected MT10 gene expression after 2 days of exposure while increases in MT protein levels occurred at day 9. In the digestive gland, a marked increase of both isoforms, but especially of MT20, was accompanied by increased levels of MT proteins and basophilic cell volume density (Vv{sub BAS}) after 2 and 9 days and of intralysosomal metal accumulation in digestive cells after 9 days. Conversely, although metal was accumulated in digestive cells lysosomes and the Vv{sub BAS} increased in Cu-exposed mussels, Cu exposure did not produce an increase of MT gene expression or MT protein levels. These data suggest that MTs are expressed in a tissue-, cell- and isoform-specific way in response to different metals.

  14. Roles of MAPK Pathway Activation During Cytokine Induction in BEAS-2B Cells Exposed to Fine World Trade Center (WTC) Dust

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Prophete, Colette; Soukup, Joleen M.; Chen, Lung-chi; Costa, Max; Ghio, Andrew; Qu, Qingshan; Chen, Haobin

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) collapse on September 11, 2001 released copious amounts of particulate matter into the atmosphere of New York City. Follow-up studies on persons exposed to the dusts have revealed a severely increased rate for asthma and other respiratory illnesses. There have only been a few studies that have sought to discern the possible mechanisms underlying these untoward pathologies. In one study, an increased cytokine release was detected in cells exposed to WTC fine dusts (PM2.5 fraction or WTC2.5). However, the mechanism(s) for these increases has yet to be fully defined. Because activation of the MAPK signaling pathways is known to cause cytokine induction, the current study was undertaken to analyze the possible involvement of these pathways in any increased cytokine formation by lung epithelial cells (as BEAS-2B cells) exposed to WTC2.5. Our results showed that exposure to WTC2.5 for 5 hr increased IL-6 mRNA expression in BEAS-2B cells, as well as its protein levels in the culture media, in a dose-dependent manner. Besides IL-6, Cytokine Multiplex analyses revealed that formation of IL-8 and -10 was also elevated by the exposure. Both ERK and p38, but not JNK, signaling pathways were found to be activated in cells exposed to WTC2.5. Inactivation of ERK signaling pathways by PD98059 effectively blocked IL-6, -8, and -10 induction by WTC2.5; the p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 significantly decreased induction of IL-8 and -10. Together, our data demonstrated activation of MAPK signaling pathway(s) likely played an important role in the WTC2.5-induced formation of several inflammatory (and, subsequently, anti-inflammatory) cytokines. The results are important in that they help to define one mechanism via which the WTC dusts may have acted to cause the documented increases in asthma and other inflammation-associated respiratory dysfunctions in the individuals exposed to the dusts released from the WTC collapse. PMID:20731619

  15. Roles of MAPK pathway activation during cytokine induction in BEAS-2B cells exposed to fine World Trade Center (WTC) dust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang; Prophete, Colette; Soukup, Joleen M; Chen, Lung-Chi; Costa, Max; Ghio, Andrew; Qu, Qingshan; Cohen, Mitchell D; Chen, Haobin

    2010-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) collapse on September 11, 2001 released copious amounts of particulate matter (PM) into the atmosphere of New York City. Follow-up studies on persons exposed to the dusts have revealed a severely increased rate for asthma and other respiratory illnesses. There have only been a few studies that have sought to discern the possible mechanisms underlying these untoward pathologies. In one study, an increased cytokine release was detected in cells exposed to WTC fine dusts (PM₂.₅ fraction or WTC₂.₅). However, the mechanism(s) for these increases has yet to be fully defined. Because activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is known to cause cytokine induction, the current study was undertaken to analyze the possible involvement of these pathways in any increased cytokine formation by lung epithelial cells (as BEAS-2B cells) exposed to WTC₂.₅. Our results showed that exposure to WTC₂.₅ for 5 hr increased interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA expression in BEAS-2B cells, as well as its protein levels in the culture media, in a dose-dependent manner. Besides IL-6, cytokine multiplex analyses revealed that formation of IL-8 and -10 was also elevated by the exposure. Both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, but not c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, signaling pathways were found to be activated in cells exposed to WTC₂.₅. Inactivation of ERK signaling pathways by PD98059 effectively blocked IL-6, -8, and -10 induction by WTC₂.₅; the p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 significantly decreased induction of IL-8 and -10. Together, our data demonstrated activation of MAPK signaling pathway(s) likely played an important role in the WTC₂.₅-induced formation of several inflammatory (and, subsequently, anti-inflammatory) cytokines. The results are important in that they help to define one mechanism via which the WTC dusts may have acted to cause the documented increases in asthma and other

  16. Genetic damage in human cells exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: a meta-analysis of the data from 88 publications (1990-2011).

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Prihoda, Thomas J

    2012-12-12

    Based on the 'limited' evidence suggesting an association between exposure to radiofrequency fields (RF) emitted from mobile phones and two types of brain cancer, glioma and acoustic neuroma, the International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified RF as 'possibly carcinogenic to humans' in group 2B. In view of this classification and the positive correlation between increased genetic damage and carcinogenesis, a meta-analysis was conducted to determine whether a significant increase in genetic damage in human cells exposed to RF provides a potential mechanism for its carcinogenic potential. The extent of genetic damage in human cells, assessed from various end-points, viz., single-/double-strand breaks in the DNA, incidence of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges, reported in a total of 88 peer-reviewed scientific publications during 1990-2011 was considered in the meta-analysis. Among the several variables in the experimental protocols used, the influence of five specific variables related to RF exposure characteristics was investigated: (i) frequency, (ii) specific absorption rate, (iii) exposure as continuous wave, pulsed wave and occupationally exposed/mobile phone users, (iv) duration of exposure, and (v) different cell types. The data indicated the following. (1) The magnitude of difference between RF-exposed and sham-/un-exposed controls was small with some exceptions. (2) In certain RF exposure conditions there was a statistically significant increase in genotoxicity assessed from some end-points: the effect was observed in studies with small sample size and was largely influenced by publication bias. Studies conducted within the generally recommended RF exposure guidelines showed a smaller effect. (3) The multiple regression analyses and heterogeneity goodness of fit data indicated that factors other than the above five variables as well as the quality of publications have contributed to the overall results. (4) More

  17. Dynamic equilibrium of endogenous selenium nanoparticles in selenite-exposed cancer cells: a deep insight into the interaction between endogenous SeNPs and proteins.

    PubMed

    Bao, Peng; Chen, Song-Can; Xiao, Ke-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Elemental selenium (Se) was recently found to exist as endogenous nanoparticles (i.e., SeNPs) in selenite-exposed cancer cells. By sequestrating critical intracellular proteins, SeNPs appear capable of giving rise to multiple cytotoxicity mechanisms including inhibition of glycolysis, glycolysis-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction, microtubule depolymerization and inhibition of autophagy. In this work, we reveal a dynamic equilibrium of endogenous SeNP assembly and disassembly in selenite-exposed H157 cells. Endogenous SeNPs are observed both in the cytoplasm and in organelles. There is an increase in endogenous SeNPs between 24 h and 36 h, and a decrease between 36 h and 72 h according to transmission electron microscopy results and UV-Vis measurements. These observations imply that elemental Se in SeNPs could be oxidized back into selenite by scavenging superoxide radicals and ultimately re-reduced into selenide; then the assembly and disassembly of SeNPs proceed simultaneously with the sequestration and release of SeNP high-affinity proteins. There is also a possibility that the reduction of elemental Se to selenide pathway may lie in selenite-exposed cancer cells, which results in the assembly and disassembly of endogenous SeNPs. Genome-wide expression analysis results show that endogenous SeNPs significantly altered the expression of 504 genes, compared to the control. The endogenous SeNPs induced mitochondrial impairment and decreasing of the annexin A2 level can lead to inhibition of cancer cell invasion and migration. This dynamic flux of endogenous SeNPs amplifies their cytotoxic potential in cancer cells, thus provide a starting point to design more efficient intracellular self-assembling systems for overcoming multidrug resistance. PMID:26456389

  18. Characteristics and mechanisms of the bystander response in monolayer cell cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John B.; Azzam, Edouard I.; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Nagasawa, Hatsumi

    2005-02-01

    When confluent cultures of mammalian cells are irradiated with very low fluences of alpha particles whereby only occasional cells receive any radiation exposure, genetic changes are observed in the non-irradiated ("bystander") cells. Upregulation of the p53 damage-response pathway as well as activation of proteins in the MAPK family occurred in bystander cells; p53 was phosphorylated on the serine 15 residue suggesting that the upregulation of p53 was a consequence of DNA damage. Damage signals were transmitted to bystander cells through gap junctions, as confirmed by the use of genetically manipulated cells including connexin43 knockouts. Expression of connexin43 was markedly enhanced by irradiation. A moderate bystander effect was observed for specific gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations. This effect was markedly enhanced in cells defective in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway. Finally, an upregulation of oxidative metabolism occurred in bystander cells; the increased levels of reactive oxygen species appeared to be derived from flavine-containing oxidase enzymes. We hypothesize that genetic effects observed in non-irradiated bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative base damage; >90% of mutations in bystander cells were point mutations. When bystander cells cannot repair DNA double strand breaks, they become much more sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations, the latter consisting primarily of deletion mutants. While we propose that the genetic effects occurring in bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative stress, the nature of the signal that initiates this process remains to be determined.

  19. Quantification of DNA adducts formed in liver, lungs, and isolated lung cells of rats and mice exposed to (14)C-styrene by nose-only inhalation.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, P J; de Kloe, K P; Wong, B A; Sumner, S C; Watson, W P; van Sittert, N J

    2000-10-01

    Bronchiolo-alveolar tumors were observed in mice exposed chronically to 160 ppm styrene, whereas no tumors were seen in rats up to concentrations of 1000 ppm. Clara cells, which are predominant in the bronchiolo-alveolar region in mouse lungs but less numerous in rat and human lung, contain various cytochrome P450s, which may oxidize styrene to the rodent carcinogen styrene-7,8-oxide (SO) and other reactive metabolites. Reactive metabolites may form specific DNA adducts and induce the tumors observed in mice. To determine DNA adducts in specific tissues and cell types, rats and mice were exposed to 160 ppm [ring-U-(14)C]styrene by nose-only inhalation for 6 h in a recirculating exposure system. Liver and lungs were isolated 0 and 42 h after exposure. Fractions enriched in Type II cells and Clara cells were isolated from rat and mouse lung, respectively. DNA adduct profiles differed quantitatively and qualitatively in liver, total lung, and enriched lung cell fractions. At 0 and 42 h after exposure, the two isomeric N:7-guanine adducts of SO (measured together, HPEG) were present in liver at 3.0 +/- 0.2 and 1.9 +/- 0.3 (rat) and 1.2 +/- 0.2 and 3.2 +/- 0.5 (mouse) per 10(8) bases. Several other, unidentified adducts were present at two to three times higher concentrations in mouse, but not in rat liver. In both rat and mouse lung, HPEG was the major adduct at approximately 1 per 10(8) bases at 0 h, and these levels halved at 42 h. In both rat Type II and non-Type II cells, HPEG was the major adduct and was about three times higher in Type II cells than in total lung. For mice, DNA adduct levels in Clara cells and non-Clara cells were similar to total lung. The hepatic covalent binding index (CBI) at 0 and 42 h was 0.19 +/- 0.06 and 0.14 +/- 0.03 (rat) and 0. 25 +/- 0.11 and 0.44 +/- 0.23 (mouse), respectively. The pulmonary CBIs, based on tissues combined for 0 and 42 h, were 0.17 +/- 0.04 (rat) and 0.24 +/- 0.04 (mouse). Compared with CBIs for other genotoxicants

  20. Tailored Synthesis of Porous TiO₂ Nanocubes and Nanoparallelepipeds with Exposed {111} Facets and Mesoscopic Void Space: A Superior Candidate for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Amoli, Vipin; Bhat, Shekha; Maurya, Abhayankar; Banerjee, Biplab; Bhaumik, Asim; Sinha, Anil Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Anatase TiO2 nanocubes and nanoparallelepipeds, with highly reactive {111} facets exposed, were developed for the first time through a modified one pot hydrothermal method, through the hydrolysis of tetrabutyltitanate in the presence of oleylamine as the morphology-controlling capping-agent and using ammonia/hydrofluoric acid for stabilizing the {111} faceted surfaces. These nanocubes/nanoparallelepipeds were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high angle annular dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM). Accordingly, a possible growth mechanism for the nanostructures is elucidated. The morphology, surface area and the pore size distribution of the TiO2 nanostructures can be tuned simply by altering the HF and ammonia dosage in the precursor solution. More importantly, optimization of the reaction system leads to the assembly of highly crystalline, high surface area, {111} faceted anatase TiO2 nanocubes/nanoparallelepipeds to form uniform mesoscopic void space. We report the development of a novel double layered photoanode for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) made of highly crystalline, self-assembled faceted TiO2 nanocrystals as upper layer and commercial titania nanoparticles paste as under layer. The bilayered DSSC made from TiO2 nanostructures with exposed {111} facets as upper layer shows a much higher power conversion efficiency (9.60%), than DSSCs fabricated with commercial (P25) titania powder (4.67%) or with anatase TiO2 nanostructures having exposed {101} facets (7.59%) as the upper layer. The improved performance in bilayered DSSC made from TiO2 nanostructures with exposed {111} facets as the upper layer is attributed to high dye adsorption and fast electron transport dynamics owing to the unique structural features of the {111} facets in TiO2. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements conducted on the cells supported these conclusions

  1. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  2. Pharmacological doses of melatonin induce alterations in mitochondrial mass and potential, bcl-2 levels and K+ currents in UVB-exposed U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Canonico, Barbara; Luchetti, Francesca; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Arcangeletti, Marcella; Betti, Michele; Cesarini, Erica; Lattanzi, Davide; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Palma, Fulvio; Cuppini, Riccardo; Papa, Stefano

    2013-03-01

    Apoptosis is observed in 'actively' dying cells after the exposure to cell stressors such as ultraviolet light irradiation. Since melatonin has been proposed to act under stressful conditions as cell protection factor, in this study we examined the potential of this molecule when used at pharmacological concentrations to control mitochondrial damage and apoptotic signalling of UVB irradiated U937 human leukaemic cells. Moreover, the effect of melatonin treatment on electrophysiological properties and membrane K(+) currents of irradiated U937 cells was investigated as functional aspects relevant to the anti-apoptotic role of melatonin. The general effect is associated with the restoration of mass, number and membrane potential of mitochondria, with a lower caspase activation and bcl-2 upregulation. In the presence of the caspase inhibitor ZVAD-Fmk, melatonin seems to drive UVB stressed cells to follow the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway, interfering just at the mitochondrial level. Moreover, treatment with melatonin, as well as ZVAD-Fmk, prevented the K(+) current reduction observed late following the UVB insult application, by sparing cells from death; this result also indicates that the decrease of K(+) leakage currents could represent a functional feature of apoptotic process in UV-exposed U937 cells.

  3. CaNa2EDTA chelation attenuates cell damage in workers exposed to lead--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Čabarkapa, A; Borozan, S; Živković, L; Stojanović, S; Milanović-Čabarkapa, M; Bajić, V; Spremo-Potparević, B

    2015-12-01

    Lead induced oxidative cellular damage and long-term persistence of associated adverse effects increases risk of late-onset diseases. CaNa2EDTA chelation is known to remove contaminating metals and to reduce free radical production. The objective was to investigate the impact of chelation therapy on modulation of lead induced cellular damage, restoration of altered enzyme activities and lipid homeostasis in peripheral blood of workers exposed to lead, by comparing the selected biomarkers obtained prior and after five-day CaNa2EDTA chelation intervention. The group of smelting factory workers diagnosed with lead intoxication and current lead exposure 5.8 ± 1.2 years were administered five-day CaNa2EDTA chelation. Elevated baseline activity of antioxidant enzymes Cu, Zn-SOD and CAT as well as depleted thiols and increased protein degradation products-carbonyl groups and nitrites, pointing to Pb induced oxidative damage, were restored toward normal values following the treatment. Lead showed inhibitor potency on both RBC AChE and BChE in exposed workers, and chelation re-established the activity of BChE, while RBC AChE remained unaffected. Also, genotoxic effect of lead detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes was significantly decreased after therapy, exhibiting 18.9% DNA damage reduction. Administration of chelation reversed the depressed activity of serum PON 1 and significantly decreased lipid peroxidation detected by the post-chelation reduction of MDA levels. Lactate dehydrogenase LDH1-5 isoenzymes levels showed evident but no significant trend of restoring toward normal control values following chelation. CaNa2EDTA chelation ameliorates the alterations linked with Pb mediated oxidative stress, indicating possible benefits in reducing health risks associated with increased oxidative damage in lead exposed populations.

  4. Chlamydia psittaci IncA is phosphorylated by the host cell and is exposed on the cytoplasmic face of the developing inclusion.

    PubMed

    Rockey, D D; Grosenbach, D; Hruby, D E; Peacock, M G; Heinzen, R A; Hackstadt, T

    1997-04-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that replicate within a non-acidified vacuole called an inclusion. Chlamydia psittaci (strain GPIC) produces a 39 kDa protein (IncA) that is localized to the inclusion membrane. While IncA is present as a single 39 kDa species in purified reticulate bodies, two additional higher M(r) forms are found in C. psittaci-infected cells. This finding suggested that IncA may be post-translationally modified in the host cell. Here we present evidence that IncA is a serine/threonine phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated by host cell enzymes. This conclusion is supported by the following experimental findings: (i) treatment of infected cells with inhibitors of host cell phosphatases or kinases altered the electrophoretic migration pattern of IncA; (ii) treatment with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase eliminated the multiple-banding pattern of IncA, leaving only the protein band with the lowest relative molecular weight; and (iii) radioimmunoprecipitation of lysates of [32P]-orthophosphate-labelled infected HeLa cells with anti-IncA antisera demonstrated that the two highest M(r) IncA bands were phosphorylated. A vaccinia-virus recombinant expressing incA was used to determine if HeLa cells can phosphorylate IncA in the absence of a chlamydial background. IncA in lysates of these cells migrated identically to that seen in C. psittaci-infected cells, indicating the host cell was responsible for the phosphorylation of the protein. Microinjection of fluorescently labelled anti-IncA antibodies into C. psittaci-infected HeLa cells resulted in immunostaining of the outer face of the inclusion membrane. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IncA is phosphorylated by the host cell, and regions of IncA are exposed at the cytoplasmic face of the inclusion.

  5. Analysis of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in HIV-exposed seronegative persons and HIV-infected persons with different disease progressions.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Liu, Yongjian; Bao, Zuoyi; Chen, Lili; Wang, Zheng; Li, Tianyi; Li, Hanping; Zhuang, Daomin; Liu, Siyang; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Jingyun

    2011-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of T cells that play an important role in the regulation of T-cell function. In a previous study, CD25 was used as a marker of Tregs; however, FoxP3 was recently discovered to be a valuable phenotype of Tregs. In this study, we compared the frequency of Tregs in HIV-1-infected long-term nonprogressors (LTNP), AIDS patients (AP), HIV-exposed seronegative (ES) persons, and healthy controls (HC), by using CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ as a marker of Tregs. The results showed that the frequency of Tregs in AP was significantly higher than in the LTNP, ES, and HC, which suggests that Tregs may play a role in disease progression. Another unique finding in this study is that we found a decrease of Tregs in ES.

  6. Impaired Subset Progression and Polyfunctionality of T Cells in Mice Exposed to Methamphetamine during Chronic LCMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Uma; Hill, Beth L.; Cenna, Jonathan M.; Gofman, Larisa; Fernandes, Nicole C.; Haldar, Bijayesh; Potula, Raghava

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely used psychostimulant that severely impacts the host’s innate and adaptive immune systems and has profound immunological implications. T cells play a critical role in orchestrating immune responses. We have shown recently how chronic exposure to METH affects T cell activation using a murine model of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection. Using the TriCOM (trinary state combinations) feature of GemStone™ to study the polyfunctionality of T cells, we have analyzed how METH affected the cytokine production pattern over the course of chronic LCMV infection. Furthermore, we have studied in detail the effects of METH on splenic T cell functions, such as cytokine production and degranulation, and how they regulate each other. We used the Probability State Modeling (PSM) program to visualize the differentiation of effector/memory T cell subsets during LCMV infection and analyze the effects of METH on T cell subset progression. We recently demonstrated that METH increased PD-1 expression on T cells during viral infection. In this study, we further analyzed the impact of PD-1 expression on T cell functional markers as well as its expression in the effector/memory subsets. Overall, our study indicates that analyzing polyfunctionality of T cells can provide additional insight into T cell effector functions. Analysis of T cell heterogeneity is important to highlight changes in the evolution of memory/effector functions during chronic viral infections. Our study also highlights the impact of METH on PD-1 expression and its consequences on T cell responses. PMID:27760221

  7. Anaerobic glycolysis and specific gravity of the red blood cells of rats exposed to pure oxygen at 600 torr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabine, J. C.; Leon, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Rats were exposed to 100% oxygen at 600 torr for up to 8 days. Highly significant increases in RBC anaerobic glycolysis occurred during the first 4 days of exposure and then subsided. Two significant peaks were found, one on days 1 and 2 and one on day 4. The first peak is attributed to reticulocytosis, which was maximal after 90 minutes and had disappeared by day 3. A second mechanism must account for the peak on day 4. An interpretation of the second peak is provided by existing evidence that selective removal of older RBCs occurs during the first few days of exposure to hypobaric oxygen, with maximum effect on day 4. Results in splenectomized, sham-operated and intact animals were indistinguishable from each other. A significant decrease in RBC specific gravity was found in exposed animals with spleens intact, but not in splenectomized animals. Theoretical aspects of age-related parameters as an aid to continuous detection and evaluation of changes in RBC populations are discussed.

  8. ROS and NF-{kappa}B are involved in upregulation of IL-8 in A549 cells exposed to multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Shefang Wu Yihui; Hou Zhenqing; Zhang Qiqing

    2009-02-06

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have potential applications in biosensors, tissue engineering, and biomedical devices because of their unique physico-chemical, electronic and mechanical properties. However, there is limited literature data available concerning the biological properties and toxicity of CNTs. This study aimed to assess the toxicity exhibited by multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) and to elucidate possible molecular mechanisms underlying the biological effects of MWCNTs in A549 cells. Exposing A549 cells to MWCNTs led to cell death, changes in cell size and complexity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene expression and nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B activation. Treatment of A549 cells with antioxidants prior to adding MWCNTs decreased ROS production and abrogated expression of IL-8 mRNA. Pretreatment of A549 cells with NF-{kappa}B inhibitors suppressed MWCNTs-induced IL-8 mRNA expression. These results indicate that MWCNTs are able to induce expression of IL-8 in A549 cells, at least in part, mediated by oxidative stress and NF-{kappa}B activation.

  9. Diminished survival of human cytotrophoblast cells exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation injury and associated reduction of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Richard E.; Kilburn, Brian A.; Petkova, Anelia; Romero, Roberto; Armant, Randall D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The anti-apoptotic action of HBEGF and its regulation by O2 constitutes a key factor for trophoblast survival. The hypothesis that cytotrophoblast survival is compromised by exposure to hypoxia–reoxygenation (H/R) injury, which may contribute to preeclampsia and some missed abortions, prompted us to investigate HBEGF regulation and its role as a survival factor during H/R in cytotrophoblast cells Study Design A transformed human first trimester cytotrophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo was exposed to H/R (2% O2 followed by 20% O2) and assessed for HBEGF expression and cell death. Results Cellular HBEGF declined significantly within 30 minutes of reoxygenation after culture at 2% O2. H/R significantly reduced proliferation and increased cell death when compared to trophoblast cells cultured continuously at 2% or 20% O2. Restoration of cell survival also was achieved by adding recombinant HBEGF during reoxygenation. HBEGF inhibited apoptosis through its binding to either HER1 or HER4, its cognate receptors. Conclusion These results provide evidence that cytotrophoblast exposure to H/R induces apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation. HBEGF accumulation is diminished under these conditions, while restoration of HBEGF signaling improves trophoblast survival. PMID:18395045

  10. DNA strand breakage in normal and solar ultraviolet-sensitive ICR 2A frog cell lines exposed to solar ultraviolet wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenstein, B.S. )

    1989-01-01

    ICR 2A frog cells and two solar ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive cell lines, DRP 36 and DRP 153, were irradiated with 150 kJ/m{sup 2} of the UV radiation produced by a fluorescent sun lamp, the radiation from which was passed through a sheet of 48A Mylar to eliminate wavelengths shorter than approximately 315 nm. The irradiated cultures were also exposed to photoreactivating light (PRL), resulting in the removal of most of the pyrimidine dimers induced by the sun lamp UV irradiation, and then incubated 0-4 hr. At the end of the incubations, the cells were subjected to the alkaline elution assay. In these elutions, the cell lysates were either treated with proteinase K (proK) to eliminate any DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) that may be present in the cells, or left untreated with proK. For the ICR 2A cells, the level of apparent DNA single-strand breaks (ssb) detected in elutions using proK increased with the incubation time after irradiation and remained high. However, when the DNA was eluted without proK pretreatment, the number of ssb fell rapidly. In contrast, the levels of ssb decreased in the DRP 36 and DRP 153 cells regardless of the use of proK in the elutions. Hence, this differential response in ssb induction may be indicative of a system involved with recovery following irradiation with solar UV wavelengths.

  11. Immune cells and cardiovascular health in premenopausal women of rural India chronically exposed to biomass smoke during daily household cooking.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anindita; Bhattacharya, Purba; Lahiri, Twisha; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2012-11-01

    Changes in cells of the immune system are important indicators of systemic response of the body to air pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunological changes in rural women who have been cooking exclusively with biomass for the past 5 years or more and compare the findings with women cooking exclusively with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the associations between indices of indoor air pollution (IAP) and a set of immune assays. Biomass users illustrated marked suppression in the total number of T-helper (CD4+) cells and B (CD19+) cells while appreciable rise was documented in the number of CD8+ T-cytotoxic cells and CD16+CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells. A consistent finding among biomass users was rise in regulatory T (Treg) cells. Among biomass users, peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations, Treg cells, and the number of typical monocytes (CD16-CD64+ cells), antigen presenting types (CD16+CD64- cells) and plasmacytoid cells (CD16-CD64- cells) were found to be significantly altered in those who daily cooked with dung in comparison to wood and crop residue users (p<0.05). Biomass users who cooked in kitchens adjacent to their living areas had significant changes in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations, typical monocytes (CD16-CD64+) with high phagocytic activity and antigen presenting monocytes (CD16+CD64-) against women who cooked in separate kitchens (p<0.01). This study has shown that women who cooked exclusively with biomass fuel had alterations in immune defense compared with their neighbors who cooked with LPG. PMID:23010103

  12. Immune cells and cardiovascular health in premenopausal women of rural India chronically exposed to biomass smoke during daily household cooking.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anindita; Bhattacharya, Purba; Lahiri, Twisha; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2012-11-01

    Changes in cells of the immune system are important indicators of systemic response of the body to air pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunological changes in rural women who have been cooking exclusively with biomass for the past 5 years or more and compare the findings with women cooking exclusively with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the associations between indices of indoor air pollution (IAP) and a set of immune assays. Biomass users illustrated marked suppression in the total number of T-helper (CD4+) cells and B (CD19+) cells while appreciable rise was documented in the number of CD8+ T-cytotoxic cells and CD16+CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells. A consistent finding among biomass users was rise in regulatory T (Treg) cells. Among biomass users, peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations, Treg cells, and the number of typical monocytes (CD16-CD64+ cells), antigen presenting types (CD16+CD64- cells) and plasmacytoid cells (CD16-CD64- cells) were found to be significantly altered in those who daily cooked with dung in comparison to wood and crop residue users (p<0.05). Biomass users who cooked in kitchens adjacent to their living areas had significant changes in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations, typical monocytes (CD16-CD64+) with high phagocytic activity and antigen presenting monocytes (CD16+CD64-) against women who cooked in separate kitchens (p<0.01). This study has shown that women who cooked exclusively with biomass fuel had alterations in immune defense compared with their neighbors who cooked with LPG.

  13. Cytotoxicity, apoptosis, DNA damage and methylation in mammary and kidney epithelial cell lines exposed to ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Giromini, Carlotta; Rebucci, Raffaella; Fusi, Eleonora; Rossi, Luciana; Saccone, Francesca; Baldi, Antonella

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the in vitro damage induced by ochratoxin A (OTA) in BME-UV1 and MDCK epithelial cells. Both cells lines were treated with OTA (0 up to 10 μg/mL), and cell viability (MTT assay), membrane stability (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay) and apoptotic cell rate (Tunel assay) were investigated. Further, the effect of the incubation with OTA has been evaluated at DNA level by the determination of DNA integrity, by the quantification of DNA adduct formation (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)) and by the assessment of the global DNA methylation status (5-methyl-cytosine (5-mC)). The obtained results showed that after 24 h of OTA treatment, BME-UV1 cell viability was reduced in a dose-dependent way. OTA significantly (P < 0.05) increased LDH release in BME-UV1 cells at all concentrations tested. OTA (1.25 μg/mL) induced 35 % LDH release in MDCK cells (P < 0.05). A significant (P < 0.05) change in percentages of apoptotic BME-UV1 (10 ± 0.86) and MDCK (25 ± 0.88) cells was calculated when the cells were co-incubated with OTA. The level of 8-OHdG adduct formation was significantly (P < 0.05) increased in BME-UV1 cells treated with 1.25 μg/mL of OTA. The results of the present study suggest that a different mechanism of action may occur in these cell lines. Graphical abstract Study results overview. PMID:27154019

  14. Transcriptomes analysis of Aeromonas molluscorum Av27 cells exposed to tributyltin (TBT): Unravelling the effects from the molecular level to the organism

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Andreia; Rodrigues, Raquel; Pinheiro, Miguel; Mendo, Sónia

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas molluscorum Av27 cells were exposed to 0, 5 and 50 μM of TBT and the respective transcriptomes were obtained by pyrosequencing. Gene Ontology revealed that exposure to 5 μM TBT results in a higher number of repressed genes in contrast with 50 μM of TBT, where the number of over-expressed genes is greater. At both TBT concentrations, higher variations in gene expression were found in the functional categories associated with enzymatic activities, transport/binding and oxidation-reduction. A number of proteins are affected by TBT, such as the acriflavin resistance protein, several transcription-related proteins, several Hsps, ABC transporters, CorA and ZntB and other outer membrane efflux proteins, all of these involved in cellular metabolic processes, important to maintain overall cell viability. Using the STRING tool, several proteins with unknown function were related with others involved in degradation processes, such as the pyoverdine chromophore biosynthetic protein, that has been described as playing a role in the Sn–C cleavage of organotins. This approach has allowed a better understanding of the molecular effects of exposure of bacterial cells to TBT. Furthermore it contributes to the knowledge of the functional genomic aspects of bacteria exposed to this pollutant. Furthermore, the transcriptomic data gathered, and now publically available, constitute a valuable resource for comparative genome analysis. PMID:26171931

  15. Transcriptomes analysis of Aeromonas molluscorum Av27 cells exposed to tributyltin (TBT): Unravelling the effects from the molecular level to the organism.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andreia; Rodrigues, Raquel; Pinheiro, Miguel; Mendo, Sónia

    2015-08-01

    Aeromonas molluscorum Av27 cells were exposed to 0, 5 and 50 μM of TBT and the respective transcriptomes were obtained by pyrosequencing. Gene Ontology revealed that exposure to 5 μM TBT results in a higher number of repressed genes in contrast with 50 μM of TBT, where the number of over-expressed genes is greater. At both TBT concentrations, higher variations in gene expression were found in the functional categories associated with enzymatic activities, transport/binding and oxidation-reduction. A number of proteins are affected by TBT, such as the acriflavin resistance protein, several transcription-related proteins, several Hsps, ABC transporters, CorA and ZntB and other outer membrane efflux proteins, all of these involved in cellular metabolic processes, important to maintain overall cell viability. Using the STRING tool, several proteins with unknown function were related with others involved in degradation processes, such as the pyoverdine chromophore biosynthetic protein, that has been described as playing a role in the Sn-C cleavage of organotins. This approach has allowed a better understanding of the molecular effects of exposure of bacterial cells to TBT. Furthermore it contributes to the knowledge of the functional genomic aspects of bacteria exposed to this pollutant. Furthermore, the transcriptomic data gathered, and now publically available, constitute a valuable resource for comparative genome analysis. PMID:26171931

  16. Age-, gender-, and species-dependent mutagenicity in T cells of mice and rats exposed by inhalation to 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Meng, Quanxin; Walker, Dale M; McDonald, Jake D; Henderson, Rogene F; Carter, Meghan M; Cook, Dennis L; McCash, Consuelo L; Torres, Salina M; Bauer, Michael J; Seilkop, Steven K; Upton, Patricia B; Georgieva, Nadia I; Boysen, Gunnar; Swenberg, James A; Walker, Vernon E

    2007-03-20

    Experiments were performed: (i) to investigate potential age- and gender-dependent differences in mutagenic responses in T cells following exposures of B6C3F1 mice and F344 rats by inhalation for 2 weeks to 0 or 1250 ppm butadiene (BD), and (ii) to determine if exposures for 2 weeks to 62.5 ppm BD produce a mutagenic effect in female rats. To evaluate the effect of age on mutagenic response, mutant manifestation curves for splenic T cells of female mice exposed at 8-9 weeks of age were defined by measuring Hprt mutant frequencies (MFs) at multiple time points after BD exposure using a T cell cloning assay and comparing the resulting mutagenic potency estimate (calculated as the difference of areas under the mutant manifestation curves of treated versus control animals) to that reported for female mice exposed to BD in the same fashion beginning at 4-5 weeks of age. The shapes of the mutant T cell manifestation curves for spleens were different [e.g., the maximum BD-induced MFs in older mice (8.0+/-1.0 [S.D.]x10(-6)) and younger mice (17.8+/-6.1 x 10(-6)) were observed at 8 and 5 weeks post-exposure, respectively], but the mutagenic burden was the same for both age groups. To assess the effect of gender on mutagenic response, female and male rodents were exposed to BD at 4-5 weeks of age and Hprt MFs were measured when maximum MFs are expected to occur post-exposure. The resulting data demonstrated that the pattern for mutagenic susceptibility from high-level BD exposure is female mice>male mice>female rats>male rats. Exposures of female rats to 62.5 ppm BD caused a minor but significant mutagenic response compared with controls (n=16/group; P=0.03). These results help explain part of the differing outcomes/interpretations of data in earlier Hprt mutation studies in BD-exposed rodents. PMID:16945358

  17. Featured Article: Temporal responses of human endothelial and smooth muscle cells exposed to uniaxial cyclic tensile strain

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Alexandra M; Biela, Sarah A; Chen, Hao; Spatz, Joachim P

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of vascular cells depends on stimulating mechanical forces caused by pulsatile flow. Thus, mechano-transduction processes and responses of primary human endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have been studied to reveal cell-type specific differences which may contribute to vascular tissue integrity. Here, we investigate the dynamic reorientation response of ECs and SMCs cultured on elastic membranes over a range of stretch frequencies from 0.01 to 1 Hz. ECs and SMCs show different cell shape adaptation responses (reorientation) dependent on the frequency. ECs reveal a specific threshold frequency (0.01 Hz) below which no responses is detectable while the threshold frequency for SMCs could not be determined and is speculated to be above 1 Hz. Interestingly, the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions system, as well as changes in the focal adhesion area, can be observed for both cell types and is dependent on the frequency. RhoA and Rac1 activities are increased for ECs but not for SMCs upon application of a uniaxial cyclic tensile strain. Analysis of membrane protrusions revealed that the spatial protrusion activity of ECs and SMCs is independent of the application of a uniaxial cyclic tensile strain of 1 Hz while the total number of protrusions is increased for ECs only. Our study indicates differences in the reorientation response and the reaction times of the two cell types in dependence of the stretching frequency, with matching data for actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion realignment, RhoA/Rac1 activities, and membrane protrusion activity. These are promising results which may allow cell-type specific activation of vascular cells by frequency-selective mechanical stretching. This specific activation of different vascular cell types might be helpful in improving strategies in regenerative medicine. PMID:25687334

  18. The function of TLR4 in interferon gamma or interleukin-13 exposed and lipopolysaccharide stimulated gingival epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Beklen, A; Sarp, A S; Uckan, D; Tsaous Memet, G

    2014-10-01

    Gingival epithelial cells are part of the first line of host defense against infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) serve important immune and nonimmune functions. We investigated how interferon gamma (INF-γ) and interleukin 13 (IL-13) are involved in the TLR4 ligand-induced regulation of interleukin-8 (IL-8) effects on gingival epithelial cells. We used immunohistochemistry to localize TLR4 in ten healthy and ten periodontitis tissue specimens. Gingival epithelial cells then were primed with Th1 cytokine (INF-γ) or Th2 cytokine (IL-13) before stimulation with Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect the level of IL-8 secretion in cell culture supernatants. Although both healthy and periodontitis gingival tissue samples expressed TLR4, the periodontitis samples showed more intense expression on gingival epithelial cells. Gingival epithelial cell cultures were primed with either INF-γ or IL-13 before stimulation with TLR4 ligand. Supernatants from co-stimulated epithelial cells exhibited IL-8 production in opposite directions, i.e., as one stimulates the release, the other reduces the release. INF-γ significantly increased TLR4 function, whereas IL-13 significantly decreased TLR4 function, i.e., production of IL-8. Pathogen associated molecular pattern-LPS, shared by many different periodonto-pathogenic bacteria, activates the gingival epithelial cells in a TLR-dependent manner. Diminished or increased TLR function in gingival epithelial cells under the influence of different Th cell types may protect or be harmful due to the altered TLR signaling.

  19. Identification of surface-exposed B-cell epitopes recognized by Haemophilus influenzae type b P1-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Panezutti, H; James, O; Hansen, E J; Choi, Y; Harkness, R E; Klein, M H; Chong, P

    1993-05-01

    A panel of P1 synthetic peptides was synthesized to map the surface-exposed epitopes of Haemophilus influenzae type b outer membrane protein P1 recognized by three murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs 7C8, 3E12, and 6B1). By using peptide-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, MAbs 6B1, 7C8, and 3E12 were shown to recognize distinct epitopes localized within residues 60 to 88, 165 to 193, and 400 to 437 of mature P1, respectively. Since MAb 7C8 was shown previously to be protective against certain H. influenzae type b subtypes in the infant rat model of bacteremia, its cognate epitope was further characterized by using truncated peptide analogs. Fine mapping of the 7C8 epitope by competitive inhibition studies revealed that it was localized within residues 184 and 193.

  20. Studies of micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in red blood cells of Colossoma macropomum exposed to methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Carlos Alberto Machado; da Cunha, Lorena Araújo; da Silva Pinheiro, Raul Henrique; de Oliveira Bahia, Marcelo; Burbano, Rommel Mario Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of micronuclei (MN) and morphological nuclear abnormalities (NA) in erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), treated with 2 mg.L−1 methylmercury (MeHg), were analyzed. Two groups (nine specimens in each) were exposed to MeHg for different periods (group A - 24 h; group B - 120 h). A third group served as negative control (group C, untreated; n = 9). Although, when compared to the control group there were no significant differences in MN frequency in the treated groups, for NA, the differences between the frequencies of group B (treated for 120 h) and the control group were extremely significant (p < 0.02), thus demonstrating the potentially adverse effects of MeHg on C. macropomum erythrocytes after prolonged exposure. PMID:22215976

  1. Artemisinin conferred ERK mediated neuroprotection to PC12 cells and cortical neurons exposed to sodium nitroprusside-induced oxidative insult.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenhua; Chong, Cheong-Meng; Wang, Haitao; Zhou, Xuanhe; Zhang, Lang; Wang, Rikang; Meng, Qian; Lazarovici, Philip; Fang, Jiankang

    2016-08-01

    The production of nitric oxide (NO) is one of the primary mediators of ischemic damage, glutamate neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration and therefore inhibition of NO-induced neurotoxicity may be considered a therapeutic target for reducing neuronal cell death (neuroprotection). In this study, artemisinin, a well-known anti-malaria drug was found to suppress sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a nitric oxide donor)-induced cell death in the PC12 cells and brain primary cortical neuronal cultures. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with artemisinin significantly suppressed SNP-induced cell death by decreasing the extent of oxidation, preventing the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, restoring abnormal changes in nuclear morphology and reducing lactate dehydrogenase release and inhibiting caspase 3/7 activities. Western blotting analysis revealed that artemisinin was able to activate extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK) pathway. Furthermore, the ERK inhibitor PD98059 blocked the neuroprotective effect of artemisinin whereas the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 had no effect. Cumulatively these findings support the notion that artemisinin confers neuroprotection from SNP-induce neuronal cell death insult, a phenomenon coincidentally related to activation of ERK phosphorylation. This SNP-induced oxidative insult in PC12 cell culture model may be useful to investigate molecular mechanisms of NO-induced neurotoxicity and drug-induced neuroprotection, and to generate novel therapeutic concepts for ischemic disease treatment. PMID:27242266

  2. Measurement of plasma-generated RONS in the cancer cells exposed by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Baek, Eun Jeong; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, Tae Hun

    2015-09-01

    The plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) could result in cellular responses including DNA damages and apoptotic cell death. These chemical species, O, O2-,OH, NO, and NO2-,exhibit strong oxidative stress and/or trigger signaling pathways in biological cells. Each plasma-generated chemical species having biological implication should be identified and quantitatively measured. For quantitative measurement of RONS, this study is divided into three stages; plasma diagnostics, plasma-liquid interactions, plasma-liquid-cell interactions. First, the optical characteristics of the discharges were obtained by optical emission spectroscopy to identify various excited plasma species. And the characteristics of voltage-current waveforms, gas temperature, and plume length with varying control parameters were measured. Next, atmospheric pressure plasma jet was applied on the liquid. The estimated OH radical densities were obtained by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy at the liquid surface. And NO2-is detected by Griess test and compared between the pure liquid and the cell-containing liquid. Finally, bio-assays were performed on plasma treated human lung cancer cells (A549). Intracellular ROS production was measured using DCF-DA. Among these RONS, productions of NO and OH within cells were measured by DAF-2DA and APF, respectively. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of RONS in the plasmas, liquids, and cells.

  3. Activation of salt-inducible kinase 2 promotes the viability of peritoneal mesothelial cells exposed to stress of peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H-H; Lin, C-Y; Su, S-H; Chuang, C-T; Chang, Y-L; Lee, T-Y; Lee, S-C; Chang, C-J

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining mesothelial cell viability is critical to long-term successful peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment. To clarify the viability mechanism of peritoneal mesothelial cells under PD solutions exposure, we examined the mechanisms of cellular response to this stress conditions. Here we report that the proteasome activity is inhibited when treated with PD solutions. Proteasome inhibition-mediated activation of salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2), an endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein, is important for mesothelial cell viability. SIK2 is mobilized to promote autophagy and protect the cells from apoptosis under PD solution or MG132 treatment. Immunofluorescence staining showed that SIK2 is colocalized with LC3B in the autophagosomes of mesothelial cells treated with PD solution or derived from patients undergoing PD treatment. SIK2 activation is likely via a two-step mechanism, upstream kinases relieving the autoinhibitory conformation of SIK2 molecule followed by autophosphorylation of Thr175 and activation of kinase activity. These results suggest that activation of SIK2 is required for the cell viability when proteasome activity is inhibited by PD solutions. Maintaining or boosting the activity of SIK2 may promote peritoneal mesothelial cell viability and evolve as a potential therapeutic target for maintaining or restoring peritoneal membrane integrity in PD therapy. PMID:27441650

  4. Gene expression profiling of immune-competent human cells exposed to engineered zinc oxide or titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tuomela, Soile; Autio, Reija; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Arslan, Osman; Kunzmann, Andrea; Andersson-Willman, Britta; Wick, Peter; Mathur, Sanjay; Scheynius, Annika; Krug, Harald F; Fadeel, Bengt; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive in vitro assessment of two commercial metal oxide nanoparticles, TiO2 and ZnO, was performed using human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM), monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC), and Jurkat T cell leukemia-derived cell line. TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be non-toxic whereas ZnO nanoparticles caused dose-dependent cell death. Subsequently, global gene expression profiling was performed to identify transcriptional response underlying the cytotoxicity caused by ZnO nanoparticles. Analysis was done with doses 1 µg/ml and 10 µg/ml after 6 and 24 h of exposure. Interestingly, 2703 genes were significantly differentially expressed in HMDM upon exposure to 10 µg/ml ZnO nanoparticles, while in MDDCs only 12 genes were affected. In Jurkat cells, 980 genes were differentially expressed. It is noteworthy that only the gene expression of metallothioneins was upregulated in all the three cell types and a notable proportion of the genes were regulated in a cell type-specific manner. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the top biological processes disturbed in HMDM and Jurkat cells were regulating cell death and growth. In addition, genes controlling immune system development were affected. Using a panel of modified ZnO nanoparticles, we obtained an additional support that the cellular response to ZnO nanoparticles is largely dependent on particle dissolution and show that the ligand used to modify ZnO nanoparticles modulates Zn(2+) leaching. Overall, the study provides an extensive resource of transcriptional markers for mediating ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity for further mechanistic studies, and demonstrates the value of assessing nanoparticle responses through a combined transcriptomics and bioinformatics approach.

  5. Kinetics of B cell responses to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in Ghanaian women naturally exposed to malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Ampomah, Paulina; Stevenson, Liz; Ofori, Michael F; Barfod, Lea; Hviid, Lars

    2014-06-01

    Naturally acquired protective immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria takes years to develop. It relies mainly on Abs, particularly IgG specific for Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) proteins on the infected erythrocyte surface. It is only partially understood why acquisition of clinical protection takes years to develop, but it probably involves a range of immune-evasive parasite features, not least of which are PfEMP1 polymorphism and clonal variation. Parasite-induced subversion of immunological memory and expansion of "atypical" memory B cells may also contribute. In this first, to our knowledge, longitudinal study of its kind, we measured B cell subset composition, as well as PfEMP1-specific Ab levels and memory B cell frequencies, in Ghanaian women followed from early pregnancy up to 1 y after delivery. Cell phenotypes and Ag-specific B cell function were assessed three times during and after pregnancy. Levels of IgG specific for pregnancy-restricted, VAR2CSA-type PfEMP1 increased markedly during pregnancy and declined after delivery, whereas IgG levels specific for two PfEMP1 proteins not restricted to pregnancy did not. Changes in VAR2CSA-specific memory B cell frequencies showed typical primary memory induction among primigravidae and recall expansion among multigravidae, followed by contraction postpartum in all. No systematic changes in the frequencies of memory B cells specific for the two other PfEMP1 proteins were identified. The B cell subset analysis confirmed earlier reports of high atypical memory B cell frequencies among residents of P. falciparum-endemic areas, and indicated an additional effect of pregnancy. Our study provides new knowledge regarding immunity to P. falciparum malaria and underpins efforts to develop PfEMP1-based vaccines against this disease.

  6. Spatio-temporal patterns of photosystem II activity and plasma-membrane proton flows in Chara corallina cells exposed to overall and local illumination.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander; Vredenberg, Wim

    2003-11-01

    Pulse-amplitude modulated microfluorometry and an extracellular pH microprobe were used to examine light-induced spatial heterogeneity of photosynthetic and H(+)-transporting activities in cells of Chara corallina Klein ex Willd. Subcellular domains featuring different PSII photochemical activities were found to conform to alternate alkaline and acid zones produced near the cell surface, with peaks of PSII activity correlating with the position of acid zones. Buffers eliminated pH variations near the cell surface but did not destroy the variations in PSII photochemical yield (deltaF/Fm'). When a dark-adapted cell was exposed to actinic light, the PSII effective yield decreased within 5-15 min in the alkaline regions but rose after the initial decline in the acid regions. The light-induced decrease in deltaF/Fm' in the alkaline regions occurred prior to or synchronously with the steep rise in local pH. The kinetics of deltaF/Fm', Fm', and F observed in alkaline regions under overall illumination of Chara cells were replaced by those typical of acid regions, when the illumination area size was restricted to 1.5-2 mm. The data show that photoinduced patterns in photosynthetic activity are not predetermined by the particular structural organization of alkaline and acid cell regions but are subject to dynamic changes.

  7. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) shift the age composition of circulating red blood cells towards a younger cohort when exposed to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Johanne M; Klein, Georgia; Walsh, Patrick J; Currie, Suzanne

    2012-07-01

    Freshwater fish, such as the rainbow trout, are commonly exposed to temperature fluctuations in their aquatic environment. Exposure to increased temperatures places fish under respiratory stress and increases the likelihood of protein misfolding and degradation that could eventually lead to cell death. Previously, we showed that genes associated with the cellular stress response, apoptosis and hematopoiesis are upregulated in the red blood cells (RBCs) of rainbow trout post-thermal stress, leading to the hypothesis that a tightly regulated interaction between cell repair and cell death is occurring after heat stress. To test this hypothesis, we tracked changes in age class composition and markers of apoptosis in circulating RBCs within individual trout during exposure to and recovery from acute thermal stress. RBCs did not show any indication of apoptosis or necrosis following acute heat stress; however, we observed significant increases in numbers of early, juvenile and dividing RBCs. We also observed a shift in the composition of the circulating RBCs towards a younger cohort following heat shock through release of stored cells from the spleen and an increase in the maturation rate of early RBCs. These results suggest that the genes activated by increased temperature provided sufficient protection against thermal stress in the RBC, subsequently preventing the triggering of the cell death cascade.

  8. Studying the protein expression in human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) with protein microarray

    SciTech Connect

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Wei, Zheng; Yezhen, Lu; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jiliang, He

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Protein microarray shows the differential expression of 27 proteins induced by RFR. ► RPA32 related to DNA repair is down-regulated in Western blot. ► p73 related to cell genome stability and apoptosis is up-regulated in Western blot. -- Abstract: In the present study, the protein microarray was used to investigate the protein expression in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells intermittently exposed to 1.8-GHz GSM radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.0 W/kg for 24 h. The differential expression of 27 proteins was found, which were related to DNA damage repair, apoptosis, oncogenesis, cell cycle and proliferation (ratio >1.5-fold, P < 0.05). The results validated with Western blot assay indicated that the expression of RPA32 was significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05) while the expression of p73 was significantly up-regulated in RFR exposure group (P < 0.05). Because of the crucial roles of those proteins in DNA repair and cell apoptosis, the results of present investigation may explain the biological effects of RFR on DNA damage/repair and cell apoptosis.

  9. ACTIVATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING PATHWAY IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO UTAH VALLEY PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) in the Utah Valley (UV) has previously been associated with a variety of adverse health effects. To investigate intracellular signaling mechanisms for pulmonary responses to UV PM inhalation, human primary airway epithelial cells (NHBE)...

  10. Examination by EPR spectroscopy of free radicals in melanins isolated from A-375 cells exposed on valproic acid and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Chodurek, Ewa; Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Dzierzewicz, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Drug binding by melanin biopolymers influence the effectiveness of the chemotherapy, radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy. Free radicals of melanins take part in formation of their complex with drugs. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of the two compounds: valproic acid (VPA) and cisplatin (CPT) on free radicals properties of melanin isolated from A-375 melanoma cells. Free radicals were examined by an X-band (9.3 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR spectra were measured for the model synthetic eumelanin - DOPA-melanin, the melanin isolated from the control A-375 cells and these cells treated by VPA, CPT and both VPA and CPT. For all the examined samples broad EPR lines (deltaBpp: 0.48-0.68 mT) with g-factors of 2.0045-2.0060 characteristic for o-semiquinone free radicals were observed. Free radicals concentrations (N) in the tested samples, g-factors, amplitudes (A), integral intensities (I) and linewidths (deltaBpp) of the EPR spectra, were analyzed. The EPR lines were homogeneously broadened. Continuous microwave saturation of the EPR spectra indicated that slow spin-lattice relaxation processes existed in all the tested melanin samples. The relatively slowest spin-lattice relaxation processes characterized melanin isolated from A-375 cells treated with both VPA and CPT. The changes of the EPR spectra with increasing microwave power in the range of 2.2-70 mW were evaluated. Free radicals concentrations in the melanin from A-375 cells were higher than in the synthetic DOPA-melanin. The strong increase of free radicals concentration in the melanin from A-375 cells was observed after their treating by VPA. CPT also caused the increase of free radicals concentrations in the examined natural melanin. The free radicals concentration in melanin isolated from A-375 cells treated with both VPA and CPT was slightly higher than those in melanin from the control cells.

  11. Broadly targeted human cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells dominate the memory compartments of exposed subjects.

    PubMed

    Sylwester, Andrew W; Mitchell, Bridget L; Edgar, John B; Taormina, Cara; Pelte, Christian; Ruchti, Franziska; Sleath, Paul R; Grabstein, Kenneth H; Hosken, Nancy A; Kern, Florian; Nelson, Jay A; Picker, Louis J

    2005-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of immunocompetent hosts are characterized by a dynamic, life-long interaction in which host immune responses, particularly of T cells, restrain viral replication and prevent disease but do not eliminate the virus or preclude transmission. Because HCMV is among the largest and most complex of known viruses, the T cell resources committed to maintaining this balance have never been characterized completely. Here, using cytokine flow cytometry and 13,687 overlapping 15mer peptides comprising 213 HCMV open reading frames (ORFs), we found that 151 HCMV ORFs were immunogenic for CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cells, and that ORF immunogenicity was influenced only modestly by ORF expression kinetics and function. We further documented that total HCMV-specific T cell responses in seropositive subjects were enormous, comprising on average approximately 10% of both the CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory compartments in blood, whereas cross-reactive recognition of HCMV proteins in seronegative individuals was limited to CD8(+) T cells and was rare. These data provide the first glimpse of the total human T cell response to a complex infectious agent and will provide insight into the rules governing immunodominance and cross-reactivity in complex viral infections of humans. PMID:16147978

  12. Broadly targeted human cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells dominate the memory compartments of exposed subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sylwester, Andrew W.; Mitchell, Bridget L.; Edgar, John B.; Taormina, Cara; Pelte, Christian; Ruchti, Franziska; Sleath, Paul R.; Grabstein, Kenneth H.; Hosken, Nancy A.; Kern, Florian; Nelson, Jay A.; Picker, Louis J.

    2005-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of immunocompetent hosts are characterized by a dynamic, life-long interaction in which host immune responses, particularly of T cells, restrain viral replication and prevent disease but do not eliminate the virus or preclude transmission. Because HCMV is among the largest and most complex of known viruses, the T cell resources committed to maintaining this balance have never been characterized completely. Here, using cytokine flow cytometry and 13,687 overlapping 15mer peptides comprising 213 HCMV open reading frames (ORFs), we found that 151 HCMV ORFs were immunogenic for CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells, and that ORF immunogenicity was influenced only modestly by ORF expression kinetics and function. We further documented that total HCMV-specific T cell responses in seropositive subjects were enormous, comprising on average ∼10% of both the CD4+ and CD8+ memory compartments in blood, whereas cross-reactive recognition of HCMV proteins in seronegative individuals was limited to CD8+ T cells and was rare. These data provide the first glimpse of the total human T cell response to a complex infectious agent and will provide insight into the rules governing immunodominance and cross-reactivity in complex viral infections of humans. PMID:16147978

  13. Exposing human retinal pigmented epithelial cells to red light in vitro elicits an adaptive response to a subsequent 2-μm laser challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, K. J.; Estlack, L. E.; Wigle, J. C.

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate cellular mechanisms of protection against laser-induced thermal killing utilizing an in vitro retina model. When exposed to a 1-sec pulse of 2-μm laser radiation 24 hr after illuminating hTERT-RPE cells with red light (preconditioning), the cells are more resistant to thermal challenge than unilluminated controls (adaptive response). Results of efforts to understand the physiology of this effect led us to two genes: Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor C (VEGF-C) and Micro RNA 146a (miR-146a). Transfecting wild type (WT) cells with siRNA for VEGF-C and miR-146a mRNA resulted in knockdown strains (VEGF-C(KD) and miR- 146a(-)) with 10% and 30% (respectively) of the constitutive levels expressed in the WT cells. To induce gene expression, WT or KD cells were preconditioned with 1.44 to 5.40 J/cm2, using irradiances between 0.40 and 1.60 mW/cm2 of either 671-nm (diode) or 637-nm (laser) radiation. Probit analysis was used to calculate threshold damage irradiance, expressed as ED50, between 10 and 100 W/cm2 for the 2-μm laser pulse. In the WT cells there is a significant increase in ED50 (p 0.05) with the maximum response occurring at 2.88 J/cm2 in the preconditioned cells. Neither KD cell strain showed a significant increase in the ED50, although some data suggest the response may just be decreased in the knockdown cells instead of absent. So far the response does not appear to be dependent upon either wavelength (637 vs. 671 nm) or coherence (laser vs. LED), but there is an irradiance dependence.

  14. Pharmacologic Inhibition of Nedd8 Activation Enzyme Exposes CD4-Induced Epitopes within Env on Cells Expressing HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Tokarev, Andrey; Stoneham, Charlotte; Lewinski, Mary K.; Mukim, Amey; Deshmukh, Savitha; Vollbrecht, Thomas; Spina, Celsa A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Vpu decreases the exposure of epitopes within the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) on the surface of infected cells by downregulating both BST2 and CD4. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting Vpu activity would increase the exposure of these epitopes and sensitize infected cells to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), we treated cells with the Nedd8 activation enzyme (NAE) inhibitor MLN4924, which inhibits the cullin1-based ubiquitin ligase complex coopted by Vpu to degrade cellular targets. Treatment of HeLa cells with MLN4924 or expression of a dominant negative mutant of cullin1 inhibited the Vpu-mediated downregulation of CD4 but not the downregulation of BST2. NAE inhibition also increased the surface exposure of CD4-induced epitopes within Env on HEK293 cells containing an inducible HIV genome, on infected CEM T cells, and on infected primary T cells. In contrast, the Vpu-mediated downregulation of BST2 was substantially inhibited by MLN4924 only when T cells were treated with alpha interferon (IFN-α) to induce high levels of BST2 expression. As reported previously, the absence of vpu or nef and even more so the combined absence of these two genes sensitized infected cells to ADCC. However, NAE inhibition affected ADCC minimally. Paradoxically, even in infected, IFN-treated cells in which NAE inhibition substantially rescued the surface level of BST2, the surface level of Env detected with an antibody recognizing a CD4-independent epitope (2G12) was minimally increased. Mutation of the C-terminal Vpu residue W76, which supports the ability of Vpu to stimulate virion release by displacing BST2 from assembly sites on the plasma membrane by a cullin1-independent mechanism, increased the exposure of Env detected by 2G12 on infected T cells. Thus, inhibiting the displacement function of Vpu together with its ability to degrade CD4 and BST2 may be required to sensitize infected cells to ADCC. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic viruses encode gene

  15. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  16. Window contamination on Expose-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demets, R.; Bertrand, M.; Bolkhovitinov, A.; Bryson, K.; Colas, C.; Cottin, H.; Dettmann, J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Elsaesser, A.; Jaramillo, E.; Lebert, M.; van Papendrecht, G.; Pereira, C.; Rohr, T.; Saiagh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Expose is a multi-user instrument for astrobiological and astrochemical experiments in space. Installed at the outer surface of the International Space Station, it enables investigators to study the impact of the open space environment on biological and biochemical test samples. Two Expose missions have been completed so far, designated as Expose-E (Rabbow et al. 2012) and Expose-R (Rabbow et al. this issue). One of the space-unique environmental factors offered by Expose is full-spectrum, ultraviolet (UV)-rich electromagnetic radiation from the Sun. This paper describes and analyses how on Expose-R, access of the test samples to Solar radiation degraded during space exposure in an unpredicted way. Several windows in front of the Sun-exposed test samples acquired a brown shade, resulting in a reduced transparency in visible light, UV and vacuum UV (VUV). Post-flight investigations revealed the discolouration to be caused by a homogenous film of cross-linked organic polymers at the inside of the windows. The chemical signature varied per sample carrier. No such films were found on windows from sealed, pressurized compartments, or on windows that had been kept out of the Sun. This suggests that volatile compounds originating from the interior of the Expose facility were cross-linked and photo-fixed by Solar irradiation at the rear side of the windows. The origin of the volatiles was not fully identified; most probably there was a variety of sources involved including the biological test samples, adhesives, plastics and printed circuit boards. The outer surface of the windows (pointing into space) was chemically impacted as well, with a probable effect on the transparency in VUV. The reported analysis of the window contamination on Expose-R is expected to help the interpretation of the scientific results and offers possibilities to mitigate this problem on future missions - in particular Expose-R2, the direct successor of Expose-R.

  17. Biomonitoring with Micronuclei Test in Buccal Cells of Female Farmers and Children Exposed to Pesticides of Maneadero Agricultural Valley, Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Yslas, Idalia Jazmin; Arellano-García, María Evarista; García-Zarate, Marco Antonio; Ruíz-Ruíz, Balam; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Torres-Bugarín, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Feminization of the agricultural labor is common in Mexico; these women and their families are vulnerable to several health risks including genotoxicity. Previous papers have presented contradictory information with respect to indirect exposure to pesticides and DNA damage. We aimed to evaluate the genotoxic effect in buccal mucosa from female farmers and children, working in the agricultural valley of Maneadero, Baja California. Frequencies of micronucleated cells (MNc) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) in 2000 cells were obtained from the buccal mucosa of the study population (n = 144), divided in four groups: (1) farmers (n = 37), (2) unexposed (n = 35), (3) farmers' children (n = 34), and (4) unexposed children (n = 38). We compared frequencies of MNc and NA and fitted generalized linear models to investigate the interaction between these variables and exposition to pesticides. Differences were found between farmers and unexposed women in MNc (p < 0.0001), CC (p = 0.3376), and PN (p < 0.0001). With respect to exposed children, we found higher significant frequencies in MNc (p < 0.0001), LN (p < 0.0001), CC (p < 0.0001), and PN (p < 0.004) when compared to unexposed children. Therefore working as a farmer is a risk for genotoxic damage; more importantly indirectly exposed children were found to have genotoxic damage, which is of concern, since it could aid in future disturbances of their health.

  18. Biomonitoring with Micronuclei Test in Buccal Cells of Female Farmers and Children Exposed to Pesticides of Maneadero Agricultural Valley, Baja California, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Yslas, Idalia Jazmin; Arellano-García, María Evarista; García-Zarate, Marco Antonio; Ruíz-Ruíz, Balam; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Torres-Bugarín, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Feminization of the agricultural labor is common in Mexico; these women and their families are vulnerable to several health risks including genotoxicity. Previous papers have presented contradictory information with respect to indirect exposure to pesticides and DNA damage. We aimed to evaluate the genotoxic effect in buccal mucosa from female farmers and children, working in the agricultural valley of Maneadero, Baja California. Frequencies of micronucleated cells (MNc) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) in 2000 cells were obtained from the buccal mucosa of the study population (n = 144), divided in four groups: (1) farmers (n = 37), (2) unexposed (n = 35), (3) farmers' children (n = 34), and (4) unexposed children (n = 38). We compared frequencies of MNc and NA and fitted generalized linear models to investigate the interaction between these variables and exposition to pesticides. Differences were found between