Science.gov

Sample records for bereaved family members

  1. Impact of Service Member Death on Military Families: A National Study of Bereavement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Service Member Death on Military Families: A National Study of Bereavement Dr. Stephen Cozza Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of...Military Medicine Rockville, MD 20652 scozza@usuhs.mil The present study will examine various factors that influence the military family bereavement ...recruitment of study participants. military bereavement ; grief; coping; resilience; physical health; psychological health 7 INTRODUCTION: Since 9/11

  2. 77 FR 27542 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey) Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey) Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10- 21081(NR). OMB Control Number... VA Form 10-21081(NR) will be use to survey family members of deceased veterans on their...

  3. 77 FR 12109 - Proposed Information Collection (Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment.... Title: Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10- 21081(NR). OMB Control Number: 2900-0701... 10-21081(NR) will be used to survey family members of deceased veterans on their satisfaction...

  4. Changes experienced by and the future values of bereaved family members determined using narratives from bereavement life review therapy.

    PubMed

    Ando, Michiyo; Sakaguchi, Yukihiro; Shiihara, Yasufumi; Izuhara, Kumi

    2015-02-01

    The goals of this study were to investigate the changes experienced by bereaved family members in Japan and to determine what activities they would value in the future based on narratives from a bereavement life review, which is a type of psychotherapy used to treat depression and promote spiritual well-being. The participants were 20 bereaved Japanese family members who underwent two sessions of bereavement life review over a period of two weeks. Using qualitative analysis, we identified four areas of changes ("learning from the deceased's death and self-growth," "healing process," "relating with others," "relating with society," and "performing new family roles") and five categories of valued activities ("continuing grief work," "living with a philosophy," "attaining life roles," "keeping good human relationships," and "enjoying life"). "Learning from the deceased's death and self-growth" and "relating with others" are common in Japan and Western countries, whereas "relating with society," "healing process," and "performing new family roles" are more characteristic of Japan. The strength of bonding with the deceased may influence the values of bereaved family members. We concluded that bereavement life review therapy can contribute positively to their grief work.

  5. Posttraumatic Symptoms in Japanese Bereaved Family Members with Special Regard to Suicide and Homicide Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Kohske; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Nishi, Yuko; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members using a questionnaire. Participants were bereaved as a result of suicide and homicide (n = 51 and 49, respectively), with natural death (n = 56) as a control; and their relationships to the deceased were parent-child (n = 79), conjugal (n =…

  6. Posttraumatic Symptoms in Japanese Bereaved Family Members with Special Regard to Suicide and Homicide Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Kohske; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Nishi, Yuko; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members using a questionnaire. Participants were bereaved as a result of suicide and homicide (n = 51 and 49, respectively), with natural death (n = 56) as a control; and their relationships to the deceased were parent-child (n = 79), conjugal (n =…

  7. Utilization of Hospice Bereavement Support by At-Risk Family Members.

    PubMed

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Thomas, Julie; Bruce, Martha L

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 10% of the bereaved are at risk of bereavement-related mental health disorders. Hospices' bereavement services could potentially address needs of many at risk, but little is known about their service use. We analyzed data from 6160 bereaved family members of hospice patients. Risk of mental health problems was identified by hospice providers postloss. Of those characterized as "at-risk," 52% used services compared to 18% of the "low risk." Factors associated with service use among at-risk were female gender and younger age of death. Those who lost a child used services less than other bereaved. Although hospices appear to be skilled at identifying and providing bereavement services to the at-risk, services do not reach almost half. Results suggest the need to improve care access, especially among men and those losing a child.

  8. A pilot study of adaptation of the transtheoretical model to narratives of bereaved family members in the bereavement life review.

    PubMed

    Ando, Michiyo; Tsuda, Akira; Morita, Tatsuya; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Sanjo, Makiko; Shima, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the possibility of adaptation of the transtheoretical model (TTM) to narratives from the Bereavement Life Review. Narratives from 19 bereaved family members were recorded, transcribed into sentences, and allocated into stages based on the TTM criteria. Those who lived in fantasy were allocated to the precontemplation stage and who recognized the patient's death but could not adjust to the death were allocated to the contemplation stage. Those who understood the need for changes and had new plans were allocated to the preparation stage, and those who were coping were allocated to the action stage, and those who had confidence to remember the loved one who died were allocated to the maintenance stage. These results provide deeper understanding of a bereaved family member and suggest that a different intervention method may be useful in each stage.

  9. Suicidal ideation and distress in family members bereaved by suicide in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sara; Campos, Rui C; Tavares, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    The present study assessed the impact of suicide and distress on suicidal ideation in a sample of 93 Portuguese family members bereaved by suicide. A control community sample of 102 adults also participated. After controlling for educational level, those bereaved by the suicide of a family member were found to have higher levels of suicidal ideation. Forty-two percent of family members had Suicide Ideation Questionnaire scores at or above the cutoff point. General distress, depression, anxiety, and hostility related to suicidal ideation, whereas time since suicide also interacted with general distress and depression in predicting suicidal ideation.

  10. Japanese Bereaved Family Members' Perspectives of Palliative Care Units and Palliative Care: J-HOPE Study Results.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Shoji, Ayaka; Chiba, Yurika; Miyazaki, Tamana; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The study purpose was to understand the perspectives of bereaved family members regarding palliative care unit (PCU) and palliative care and to compare perceptions of PCU before admission and after bereavement. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted, and the perceptions of 454 and 424 bereaved family members were obtained regarding PCU and palliative care, respectively. Family members were significantly more likely to have positive perceptions after bereavement (ranging from 73% to 80%) compared to before admission (ranging from 62% to 71%). Bereaved family members who were satisfied with medical care in the PCU had a positive perception of the PCU and palliative care after bereavement. Respondents younger than 65 years of age were significantly more likely to have negative perceptions of PCU and palliative care.

  11. Good death inventory: a measure for evaluating good death from the bereaved family member's perspective.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Hirai, Kei; Shima, Yasuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a measure for evaluating good death from the bereaved family member's perspective, and to examine the validity and reliability of the assessment. A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire was administered to bereaved family members of cancer patients who had died in a regional cancer center from September 2004 to February 2006. We measured the Good Death Inventory (GDI), Care Evaluation Scale, and an overall care satisfaction scale. A retest was conducted one month after sending the questionnaire. Of the 344 questionnaires sent to bereaved family members, 189 responses were analyzed (57%). A factor analysis of the responses to the GDI identified 10 core domains: "environmental comfort," "life completion," "dying in a favorite place," "maintaining hope and pleasure," "independence," "physical and psychological comfort," "good relationship with medical staff," "not being a burden to others," "good relationship with family," and "being respected as an individual." Eight optional domains also were identified: "religious and spiritual comfort," "receiving enough treatment," "control over the future," "feeling that one's life is worth living," "unawareness of death," "pride and beauty," "natural death," and "preparation for death." The GDI had sufficient concurrent validity with the Care Evaluation Scale and overall care satisfaction, sufficient internal consistency (alpha=0.74-0.95), and acceptable test-retest reliability (ICC=0.38-0.72). Finally, we developed a short version of the GDI. The GDI is a valid scale to measure end-of-life care comprehensive outcomes from the bereaved family member's perspective in Japan.

  12. What bereavement follow-up does family members request in Japanese palliative care units? A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Muta, Rieko; Sanjo, Makiko; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Wakabayashi, Rieko; Ando, Etsuko; Morita, Tatsuya; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    There is no standardized method by which bereavement care is offered by hospice/palliative care units (PCUs) in Japan. To evaluate bereavement services provided by hospice/PCUs and clarify demands for bereavement care. Qualitative design based on semistructured interviews and content analysis. Forty-four bereaved family members of patients with cancer who died in 9 PCUs in 4 regions. Memorial services were positively evaluated for the following variables: reunion and interaction with staff; the service's relaxed atmosphere; staff attentiveness; suitable location; suitable timing; program content; and interaction with other bereaved families. Memorial cards were positively evaluated regarding the level of concern shown by the staff and the personalized card. Respondents indicated their desire for a care system, a bereaved family care program, and information services. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Changes in Perceptions of Opioids Before and After Admission to Palliative Care Units in Japan: Results of a Nationwide Bereaved Family Member Survey.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Miyazaki, Tamana; Shoji, Ayaka; Chiba, Yurika; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify perspectives of bereaved family members regarding opioids and compare perceptions before admission and after bereavement. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey for bereaved family members in 100 inpatient palliative care units was administered. Participants were 297 bereaved family members of patients who used opioids. Many bereaved family members had misconceptions of opioids before admission. There was improvement after bereavement, but understanding remained low. Respondents less than 65 years old showed significantly greater decreases in misconceptions regarding opioids compared to older generations, after bereavement. Bereaved family members who were misinformed about opioids by physicians were significantly more likely to have misconceptions about opioids. Educational interventions for physicians are needed to ensure that they offer correct information to the general population.

  14. Posttraumatic symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members with special regard to suicide and homicide cases.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kohske; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Nishi, Yuko; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    The authors investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members using a questionnaire. Participants were bereaved as a result of suicide and homicide (n = 51 and 49, respectively), with natural death (n = 56) as a control; and their relationships to the deceased were parent-child (n = 79), conjugal (n = 42), and others (n = 35). With regard to the 3 main PTSD-related criteria, (a) re-experiencing symptoms were not dependent on the manner of death or the relationship to the deceased; (b) avoidance behaviors were more highly related to homicide than natural death for relatives other than parent-child and conjugal relationships; and (c) hyperarousal and maladaptation symptoms were more serious for conjugal loss. These findings suggest that avoidance behaviors in homicidal cases are more closely associated with a distant family relationship, whereas conjugal loss is traumatic, irrespective of the manner of death, often causing hyperarousal and maladaptation symptoms.

  15. Factors contributing to evaluation of a good death from the bereaved family member's perspective.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Hirai, Kei; Shima, Yasuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2008-06-01

    Although it is important to achieve a good death in Japan, there have been no studies to explore factors associated with a good death. The aim of this study was to explore factors contributing to a good death from the bereaved family members' perspectives, including patient and family demographics and medical variables. A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire survey for bereaved family members of cancer patients who had died in a regional cancer center and a medical chart review were conducted. We measured the results from the Good Death Inventory and family demographics. In addition, we extracted patient demographics, medical variables, and medical interventions in the last 48 h before death from a medical chart review. Of the 344 questionnaires sent to bereaved family members, 165 responses were analyzed (48%). We found, first, that death in the palliative care unit was more likely to be described as a good death compared with death on a general ward. Some significant characteristics were 'environmental comfort,' 'physical and psychological comfort,' 'being respected as an individual,' and 'natural death.' Second, we found that a patient's and family member's age and other demographic factors significantly correlated with an evaluation of a good death. In addition, life prolongation treatment and aggressive treatment such as chemotherapy in the last 2 weeks of life were barriers to attainment of a good death. Moreover, appropriate opioid medication contributed to a good death. Withholding aggressive treatment and life-prolonging treatment for dying patients and appropriate opioid use may be associated with achievement of a good death in Japan.

  16. EvaIuating the "good death" concept from Iranian bereaved family members' perspective.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Sedigheh; Hosseini, Habibollah; Esmaili, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Improving end-of-life care demands that first you define what constitutes a good death for different cultures. This study was conducted to evaluate a good death concept from the Iranian bereaved family members' perspective. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was designed using a Good Death Inventory (GDI) questionnaire to evaluate 150 bereaved family members. Data were analyzed by SPSS. Based on the results, the highest scores belonged to the domains "being respected as an individual," "natural death," "religious and spiritual comfort," and "control over the future." The domain perceived by family members as less important was "unawareness of death." Providing a good death requires professional caregivers to be sensitive and pay attention to the preferences of each unique person's perceptions. In order to implement holistic care, caregivers must be aware of patients' spiritual needs. Establishing a specific unit in a hospital and individually treating each patient as a valued family member could be the best way to improve the quality of end-of-life care that is missing in Iran.

  17. Still Searching: A Meta-Synthesis of a Good Death from the Bereaved Family Member Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tenzek, Kelly E; Depner, Rachel

    2017-04-25

    The concept of a good death continues to receive attention in end-of-life (EOL) scholarship. We sought to continue this line of inquiry related to a good death by conducting a meta-synthesis of published qualitative research studies that examined a good death from the bereaved family member's perspective. Results of the meta-synthesis included 14 articles with 368 participants. Based on analysis, we present a conceptual model called The Opportunity Model for Presence during the EOL Process. The model is framed in socio-cultural factors, and major themes include EOL process engagement with categories of healthcare participants, communication and practical issues. The second theme, (dis)continuity of care, includes categories of place of care, knowledge of family member dying and moment of death. Both of these themes lead to perceptions of either a good or bad death, which influences the bereavement process. We argue the main contribution of the model is the ability to identify moments throughout the interaction where family members can be present to the EOL process. Recommendations for healthcare participants, including patients, family members and clinical care providers are offered to improve the quality of experience throughout the EOL process and limitations of the study are discussed.

  18. Still Searching: A Meta-Synthesis of a Good Death from the Bereaved Family Member Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tenzek, Kelly E.; Depner, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The concept of a good death continues to receive attention in end-of-life (EOL) scholarship. We sought to continue this line of inquiry related to a good death by conducting a meta-synthesis of published qualitative research studies that examined a good death from the bereaved family member’s perspective. Results of the meta-synthesis included 14 articles with 368 participants. Based on analysis, we present a conceptual model called The Opportunity Model for Presence during the EOL Process. The model is framed in socio-cultural factors, and major themes include EOL process engagement with categories of healthcare participants, communication and practical issues. The second theme, (dis)continuity of care, includes categories of place of care, knowledge of family member dying and moment of death. Both of these themes lead to perceptions of either a good or bad death, which influences the bereavement process. We argue the main contribution of the model is the ability to identify moments throughout the interaction where family members can be present to the EOL process. Recommendations for healthcare participants, including patients, family members and clinical care providers are offered to improve the quality of experience throughout the EOL process and limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:28441339

  19. [The development of an instrument for the "evaluation of hospices from the bereaved family members perspective"].

    PubMed

    Lohe, Mandy; Zimmermann, Manja; Luderer, Christiane; Sadowski, Katharina

    2011-06-01

    Inpatient hospice settings as facilities of health services are obliged to the quality assurance and internal quality development in Germany. The meaning of the patient's satisfaction as one of the indirect indicators for the judgement of nursing and care quality is indisputable by now. However, a subjective evaluation of the hospices by guests is practically and ethically problematic. An alternative approach is to investigate the views of bereaved relatives and close friends after the guest's death. The present article describes the development of an inventory for the evaluation of inpatient hospice settings from the bereaved relatives' point of view in order to examine the satisfaction of family members with the end-of-life care their loved ones received. With help of the inventory the question should be answered how family members judge the end-of-life care which was given to them and their late family members by the hospice. The construction of the questions results from the basis of existing concepts to the assessment of the end-of-life care and an analysis of all identified instruments to the evaluation of inpatient hospice settings from the perspective of bereaved relatives. The development of the questionnaire enclosed the formation of an item pool, the item choice, the critical discussion of the questions in the body of experts as well as a standardised and cognitive pretest beside a comprehensive literature research. A five-dimension questionnaire was developed that integrates physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and organisational aspects of the care at the end of life. The instrument encompasses 53 items, predominantly closed questions.

  20. Verbal communication of families with cancer patients at end of life: A questionnaire survey with bereaved family members.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Kazuhiro; Shiozaki, Mariko; Hirai, Kei; Morita, Tatsuya; Tatara, Ryuhei; Ichihara, Kaori; Sato, Shinichi; Simizu, Megumi; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyasita, Mitsunori

    2017-06-21

    To clarify the verbal communication of feelings between families and patients in Japanese palliative care units from the perspective of bereaved family members by examining (1) proportions of families' and patients' verbalization of six feelings (gratitude, love, seeking forgiveness, giving forgiveness, wishes after death, and continuing bonds), (2) recognition of receiving these feelings through verbalization from the family's perspective, and (3) the specific attitudes of family members that influence their verbalizations. In 2010, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with 968 bereaved families of cancer patients in palliative care units across Japan. Five hundred thirty-seven responses were analyzed. (1) "Gratitude" was verbalized most often (families: 47%; patients: 61%), and "expressing forgiveness" least often (families: 16%; patients: 11%). (2) Even if the words were not used, 81.2% to 88.2% of families answered that they had received the patient's feelings, and 71.8% to 85.4% of families felt the patient had received their feelings. (3) Multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that the strongest attitudes determining verbalizing were "not wanting to say farewell without conveying feelings," "a daily basis of expressing," and "heart-to-heart communication" (ishin-denshin). For both families and patients, verbalizing feelings was difficult. Our results showed that families' and patients' verbalizing and receiving of feelings must be aligned to understand their communication at the end of life in Japan. Future research is needed to verify how attitude helps promote or inhibit verbalization. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Bereaved Family Members of Cancer Patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jho, Hyun Jung; Choi, Jin Young; Kwak, Kiu Sang; Chang, Yoon Jung; Ahn, Eun Mi; Park, Eun Jung; Paek, Soo Jin; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bereaved family members of cancer patient are at risk of having psychological problems such as anxiety and depression. However, prevalence and associated factors of anxiety and depressive symptoms among this population have not been explored in Korea. We conducted a nation-wide cross-sectional questionnaire survey of 3522 bereaved family members of cancer patients who died at 44 hospice palliative care unit (HPCU) in Korea in 2012. The questionnaire comprised the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Good Death Inventory (GDI). Deceased patient's age, sex, primary site of cancer, duration of stay at HPCU, awareness of terminal status, bereaved family member's age, sex, and relation to the deceased were collected from Korean Terminal Cancer Patients Information System. 1121 returned questionnaires were analyzed (response rate, 31.8%). Using a cut-off value of 8 for HADS subscale, the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms was 48.0% and 57.6%, respectively. Mean scores for HADS-A and HADS-D were 7.88 ± 4.87 and 8.91 ± 4.82, respectively. Among the bereaved, older age, being a spouse to the deceased, family members of younger patient, and negative score for a few GDI items were significantly associated with an increased risk of having anxiety or depressive symptoms in the multivariate logistic analysis. In conclusion, we noted the high prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among the bereaved of cancer patients and identified associated factors for these psychological morbidities. Systematic efforts are needed to improve the mental health of the bereaved family members of cancer patients. PMID:27258497

  2. Evaluation of end-of-life cancer care from the perspective of bereaved family members: the Japanese experience.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Hirai, Kei

    2008-08-10

    Surveying bereaved family members could enhance the quality of end-of-life cancer care in inpatient palliative care units (PCUs). We systematically reviewed nationwide postbereavement studies of PCUs in Japan and attempts to develop measures for evaluating end-of-life care from the perspective of bereaved family members. The Care Evaluation Scale (CES) for evaluating the structures and processes of care, and the Good Death Inventory (GDI) for evaluating the outcomes of care were considered suitable methods. We applied a shortened version of the CES to three nationwide surveys from 2002 to 2007. We developed the CES as an instrument to measure the structures and processes of care and the GDI as an outcomes measure for end-of-life cancer care from the perspective of bereaved family members. We conducted three nationwide surveys in 1997, 2001, and 2007 (n = 850, 853, and 5,301, respectively). Although six of the 10 areas of the CES showed significant improvements between the two time points investigated, we identified considerable potential for further progress. Feedback from surveys of bereaved family members might help to improve the quality of end-of-life cancer care in inpatient PCUs. However, the effectiveness of feedback procedures remains to be confirmed. Furthermore, there is a need to extend the ongoing evaluation process to home care hospices and general hospitals, including cancer centers, identify the limitations of end-of-life care in all settings, and develop strategies to overcome them.

  3. Talking about death with terminally-ill cancer patients: What contributes to the regret of bereaved family members?

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanori; Yoshida, Saran; Shiozaki, Mariko; Baba, Mika; Morita, Tatsuya; Aoyama, Maho; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-08-07

    Talking about death is an important issue for terminally-ill cancer patients and their families. Little is known about how often and which bereaved families regret not having talked about death with their deceased loved one. To explore the prevalence of a regret of not having talked about death with a deceased loved one among bereaved family members of adult cancer patients, and to systematically explore factors contributing to their regret. We conducted a nationwide survey of 999 bereaved families of cancer patients admitted to 133 inpatient hospices in Japan and surveyed families' regret on talking about death. Exploratory analyses identified the underlying structures of process, option, and outcome subscales of factors contributing to regret. Among 678 bereaved families (response rate, 68%), 224 (33%) regretted not having talked about death sufficiently, while 40 (5.9%) conversely regretted having talked about death. Three process factors ( "prognostic disclosure to patient" (beta=0.082, p=0.039), "upsetting of patient and family" (beta=0.127, p=0.001), and "family's sense of uncertainty about when to act based on terminal awareness" (beta=0.141, p=0.000)) and an outcome factor ("having achieved a good death" (beta=-0.152, p=0.000)) contributed to the regret of talking insufficiently. A third of bereaved families of adult cancer patients regretted not having talked about death sufficiently. Clinicians may minimize this regret by facilitating a shared understanding of the disease and prognosis, advising families explicitly when to talk based on terminal awareness, providing continuous emotional support, and validating their decision on talking about death. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Care strategy for death rattle in terminally ill cancer patients and their family members: recommendations from a cross-sectional nationwide survey of bereaved family members' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoichi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    Bereaved family members witnessing a patient's death rattle often experience distress. However, the benefits of specific care measures aimed at decreasing death rattle-associated family distress have not yet been evaluated. To clarify death rattle-related emotional distress levels among family members and their perceptions of the need for death rattle care improvement and explore the factors influencing both these issues. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of bereaved family members of cancer patients was conducted in 95 palliative care units in June 2007. Six hundred sixty-three questionnaires were mailed out, and 390 (61%) responses were analyzed. Among these, 181 (46%) respondents experienced death rattle. Of these, 66% reported high distress levels and 53% perceived a strong need for improved death rattle care. Factors influencing high distress levels were the gender (female) of family members, unawareness about death rattle being a natural phenomenon, and their fear and distressing interpretations of death rattle. Factors influencing perceptions of a strong need for improved care were the gender (male) of family members, severity of death rattle, death rattle-associated discomfort to patients, family members' experiences of inadequate nursing care (e.g., repositioning) and insufficient consultation about suctioning, and their perception of uncomfortable smells. To decrease family-perceived distress, medical staff should alleviate patient symptoms and suffering with a comprehensive care strategy, try to decrease uncomfortable smells, and communicate with family members to address distressing interpretations and fears. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Quality indicators of end-of-life cancer care from the bereaved family members' perspective in Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Sato, Kazuki; Shima, Yasuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2009-06-01

    Although several studies about quality indicators (QIs) in end-of-life (EOL) cancer care have been conducted, the bereaved family members' perspective of QIs has not been investigated in Japan. The primary aim of this study was to rate QIs for EOL cancer care from the bereaved family members' perspective in Japan. A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire was administered to bereaved family members of cancer patients who had died in an inpatient palliative care unit. We mailed questionnaires to potential respondents in March 2007. Of 160 questionnaires sent, 109 responses were analyzed (effective response rate, 76%). Eighty-eight percent of participants rated the medical examination by the palliative care team or specialist positively, 80% rated the availability of emergency room (ER) services or after-hour examinations positively, and 77% agreed that medical orders to alleviate pain or suffering were documented in the chart. Only 15% of the respondents agreed that it was preferable to die at home. Additionally, 59% and 46% of participants agreed that the occurrence of a fall or pressure ulcer and death by an adverse event from surgery or chemotherapy were poor QIs, respectively. Moreover, only 17% and 14% rated the short interval from chemotherapy to dying and frequent visits to the ER or after-hour examination as poor QIs, respectively. In Japan, it would be appropriate to extract QIs from medical charts. However, many items suggested as QIs in a previous study were found to be different from the opinions expressed by bereaved family members in this study.

  6. End-of-Life Decision Making and Communication of Bereaved Family Members of African Americans with Serious Illness

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Susan E.; Meghani, Salimah H.; Perkins, Susan M.; Rawl, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The study objective was to examine factors that influence African American (AA) family members' end-of-life care decision outcomes for a relative who recently died from serious illness. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study design was used. Binary logistic and linear regressions were used to identify factors associated with decision regret and decisional conflict. Forty-nine bereaved AA family members of AA decedents with serious illness who died two to six months prior to enrollment were recruited from the palliative care program in a safety net hospital and a metropolitan church in the Midwest. Measurements used were the Decisional Conflict, Decision Regret, Beliefs and Values, and Quality of Communication scales. Results: Family members who reported higher quality of communication with health care providers had lower decisional conflict. Family members of decedents who received comfort-focused care (CFC) had significantly less decision regret than family members of those who received life-prolonging treatment (LPT). Family members who reported stronger beliefs and values had higher quality of communication with providers and lower decisional conflict. Conclusions: This research adds to a small body of literature on correlates of end-of-life decision outcomes among AAs. Although AAs' preference for aggressive end-of-life care is well-documented, we found that receipt of CFC was associated with less decision regret. To reduce decisional conflict and decision regret at the end of life, future studies should identify strategies to improve family member–provider communication, while considering relevant family member and decedent characteristics. PMID:26840853

  7. A Comparative Study of Family Bereavement Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopmeyer, Estelle; Werk, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Examined five bereavement support groups, three of which focused on widows, family survivors of suicide, and family survivors of death of family member by cancer. Members of three groups tended to report strong satisfaction with group experience. Reasons for joining group and most valuable aspects of group experience varied as function of group…

  8. Growing in times of grief: attachment modulates bereaved adults' posttraumatic growth after losing a family member to cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Fu, Zhongfang; He, Li; Schoebi, Dominik; Wang, Jianping

    2015-11-30

    This study explored whether attachment moderated the relationship between grief and posttraumatic growth. A total of 240 Chinese adults who have lost a family member to cancer reported on their grief (Prolonged Grief Questionnaire-13; PG-13), posttraumatic growth (Posttraumatic Growth Inventory; PTGI) and attachment (Experiences in Close Relationships; ECR). The results suggested that bereaved individuals who scored high on attachment anxiety showed a substantial and positive relationship between grief and posttraumatic growth, while their less anxiously attached counterparts showed no such association. Attachment avoidance was not significantly related to the association between grief and posttraumatic growth. Findings indicated that individuals high in attachment anxiety have the potential to benefit and gain from the process of adapting to the loss. The implications of the results for relevant research and grief counseling were discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Service of Remembrance: a comprehensive cancer center's response to bereaved family members.

    PubMed

    Knight, Louise; Cooper, Rhonda S; Hypki, Cinder

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive cancer centers that offer an array of clinical trials and treatment options often experience significant patient mortality rates. Bereavement resources may not be routinely incorporated into the service delivery model in these specialty hospitals. In response, an interdisciplinary team at one cancer center proposed, planned, and implemented an annual Service of Remembrance. The incorporation of music, poetry, and visual arts was important in designing a program that would provide a meaningful, spiritual experience. A community artist who designed an interactive memorial art piece played a pivotal role. This article outlines the process of institutional culture change and describes future challenges in the implementation of this type of bereavement service.

  10. Universality of bereavement life review for spirituality and depression in bereaved families.

    PubMed

    Ando, Michiyo; Sakaguchi, Yukihiro; Shiihara, Yasufumi; Izuhara, Kumi

    2014-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the Bereavement Life Review on depression and spiritual well-being of bereaved families in a setting that does not specialize in palliative care. The participants were 20 bereaved family members who underwent the Bereavement Life Review over 2 sessions in 2 weeks. Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition scores significantly decreased from 14.4 ± 9.2 to 11.6 ± 7.4 (t = 2.15, P = .045) and Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual scores increased from 24.3 ± 10.1 to 25.9 ± 11 (t = -1.0, P = .341) from pre- to postintervention. These results show that the Bereavement Life Review can decrease depression and improve spiritual well-being of bereaved families after the death of a family member in a setting without specialized palliative care. The results also suggest the universality of this therapy.

  11. Bereaved family members' perspectives on suffering among older rural cancer patients in palliative home nursing care: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Devik, S A; Hellzen, O; Enmarker, I

    2016-11-17

    Little is known about experiences with receiving home nursing care when old, living in a rural area, and suffering from end-stage cancer. The aim of this study was thus to investigate bereaved family members' perceptions of suffering by their older relatives when receiving palliative home nursing care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 family members, in Norway during autumn 2015, and directed content analysis guided by Katie Eriksson's theoretical framework on human suffering was performed upon the data. The two main categories identified reflected expressions of both suffering and well-being. Expressions of suffering were related to illness, to care and to life and supported the theory. Expressions of well-being were related to other people (e.g. familiar people and nurses), to home and to activity. The results indicate a need to review and possibly expand the perspective of what should motivate care. Nursing and palliative care that become purely disease and symptom-focused may end up with giving up and divert the attention to social and cultural factors that may contribute to well-being when cure is not the goal.

  12. Eating‐related distress and need for nutritional support of families of advanced cancer patients: a nationwide survey of bereaved family members

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Isseki; Morita, Tatsuya; Okajima, Yoshiro; Hama, Takashi; Aoyama, Maho; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background A number of advanced cancer patients are suffering from physical and psychosocial burdens because of cancer cachexia, and these burdens also greatly impact on their family members and relationships between patients and family members. It is necessary to consider the psychosocial impact of cancer cachexia on family members of advanced cancer patients. Methods A cross‐sectional anonymous nationwide survey was conducted involving 925 bereaved family members of cancer patients who had been admitted to 133 inpatient hospices throughout Japan. Results A total of 702 bereaved family members returned the questionnaires (response rate, 75.9%). Concerning eating‐related distress, ‘I served what the patient wanted without consideration of calories and nutritional composition’ was highest (75.1%), and ‘I tried making many kinds of meals for the patient’ and ‘I was concerned about planning meals for the patient every day’ followed (63.0% and 59.4%, respectively). The top 5 of the 19 items were categorized as ‘fighting back’. Need for nutritional support was high (72.2%), and need for explanations about the reasons for anorexia and weight loss of patients was moderate (41.4%). Explanatory factor analysis of eating‐related distress identified the following four domains: (factor 1) feeling that family members forced the patient to eat to avoid death, (factor 2) feeling that family members made great efforts to help the patient eat, (factor 3) feeling that eating was a cause of conflicts between the patient and family members, and (factor 4) feeling that correct information was insufficient. Results of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that spouse, fair/poor mental status, factors 1, and 4 were identified as independent determinants of major depression {odds ratio [OR] 3.27 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.24–8.60], P = 0.02; OR 4.50 [95% CI 2.46–8.25], P < 0.001; OR 2.51 [95% CI 1.16–5.45], P = 0.02; OR 2.33 [95

  13. Effects of End-of-Life Discussions on the Mental Health of Bereaved Family Members and Quality of Patient Death and Care.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Maeda, Isseki; Hatano, Yutaka; Mori, Masanori; Shima, Yasuo; Tsuneto, Satoru; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Morita, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Aoyama, Maho; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-07-01

    End-of-life discussions are crucial for providing appropriate care to patients with advanced cancer at the end of their lives. The objective of this study was to explore associations between end-of-life discussions and bereaved families' depression and complicated grief and the quality of patient death and end-of-life care. A nationwide questionnaire survey of bereaved family members was conducted between May and July 2014. A total of 13,711 bereaved family members of cancer patients who were cared for by specialist palliative care services at 75 institutions throughout Japan and died before January 2014 participated. We evaluated the prevalence of depression (defined as the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 ≥ 10) and complicated grief (defined as the Brief Grief Questionnaire ≥ 8) in bereaved family members. Moreover, we evaluated the quality of death and end-of-life care with the Good Death Inventory and the Care Evaluation Scale, respectively. A total of 9123 questionnaires were returned (response rate 67%), and 80.6% of the respondents reported that they had end-of-life discussions. After propensity score-weighted adjustment, the results showed that bereaved family members who had end-of-life discussions had a lower frequently of depression (17.3% vs. 21.6%; P < 0.001) and complicated grief (13.7% vs. 15.9%; P = 0.03). End-of-life discussions were associated with better quality of death (the Good Death Inventory score, 47.2 ± 8.5 vs. 46.1 ± 9.4; P < 0.001) and end-of-life care (the Care Evaluation Scale score, 84.1 ± 11.4 vs. 78.9 ± 14.3; P < 0.001). End-of-life discussions may contribute to reducing depression and complicated grief in bereaved family members and enable patients to experience quality end-of-life care and a good death. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Qualified nurses' perceptions of the needs of suddenly bereaved family members in the accident and emergency department.

    PubMed

    Tye, C

    1993-06-01

    This study aimed to identify qualified nurses' perceptions of the helpfulness of selected nursing actions, derived from the literature, in meeting the needs of suddenly bereaved family members in the accident and emergency (A&E) department. The effect of age, length of professional experience and death education received on the respondents' perceptions was examined. The nurse subjects' feelings of preparation for this stressful role were also identified. A self-administered, structured questionnaire using a five-point, Likert-type rating scale and two open-ended questions was developed. A non-randomized, convenience sample of 52 qualified nurses working in three A&E departments in the Greater London Area was used. Analysis of the sample's responses to the 35 nursing actions included revealed that certain activities were ranked lower in terms of their perceived helpfulness, compared to the survivors' perceptions in other studies. All three variables considered had a statistically significant correlation with the perceptions of the sample as measured by the instrument (P < 0.05, using Mann-Whitney U-test). Only 42% of the sample had received any form of death education and 56% felt unprepared for this specialist role.

  15. The Japan HOspice and Palliative Care Evaluation Study (J-HOPE Study): views about legalization of death with dignity and euthanasia among the bereaved whose family member died at palliative care units.

    PubMed

    Okishiro, Nao; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Tsuneto, Satoru; Sato, Kazuki; Shima, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    There has been a debate in appropriateness of legalization of death with dignity and euthanasia in Japan. To clarify views about these issues, we conducted a large nationwide study of the bereaved whose family member died at palliative care units. The percentages of 429 bereaved family members (response rate 65%) who affirmed legal authorization were 52 for death with dignity and 45 for euthanasia and who affirmed assignment at the discretion of the physician involved were 37 for death with dignity and 38 for euthanasia. In conclusion, views about legalization of death with dignity and euthanasia among the bereaved are inconsistent. No consensus is reached as to legislation of these issues.

  16. Bereavement needs of adults, children, and families after cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmee; Lucette, Aurelie; Loscalzo, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Many families and close friends are experiencing bereavement due to cancer. A review of recent studies of bereavement outcomes, mainly elevated psychological distress, suggests that bereaved family members, compared with nonbereaved, have poorer quality of life. They display high levels of complicated grief, anxiety, and depression and use bereavement services, but also report finding meaning in the loss, during the first 6 months after death. Similar demographic (e.g., female sex and younger age) and psychological (e.g., premorbid mental health conditions and lack of preparedness for the death) predictors are related to the bereavement outcomes across different familial groups. However, the severity of psychological distress and bereavement needs expressed vary by familial groups. Unrelieved pain and anxiety of the patient before the death and family members being unprepared for the impending death appear to be related to several postdeath psychological and physical morbidities of the surviving family members. Although the number of articles addressing bereavement-related issues associated with cancer has been growing in recent years, more rigorous studies that use longitudinal prospective designs, which bridge cancer survivorship with bereavement research, are needed.

  17. Family members of deceased palliative care patients receiving bereavement anniversary cards: a survey on the recipient's reactions and opinions.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Swantje; Mai, Sandra Stephanie; Gerlach, Christina; Windschmitt, Ulrike; Feldmann, Karl-Heinz; Weber, Martin

    2017-04-19

    Bereavement support is part of palliative care. Sending out bereavement anniversary cards is one intervention of follow-up support for the bereaved. This study evaluated the suitability of bereavement anniversary cards as an appropriate method in bereavement care. A questionnaire was sent to each card recipient since the starting point of this practice (October 2014-June 2015). Data was analyzed descriptively. 24 of 68 deliverable questionnaires were returned (response rate 35%). 22 out of 24 recipients felt pleased receiving the card. No participant felt annoyed on receiving the bereavement anniversary card; every participant agreed to at least one positive reaction (i.e. pleased, grateful or consoled). The participants' reactions and opinions about receiving the anniversary card were decidedly positive and indicate the continuation of this practice. Those few less pleased reactions may be related to timing and the first anniversary of the patients' death and therefore an expression of grief rather than a dissatisfaction with bereavement anniversary cards, as such.

  18. Bereavement Services for Families and Peers of Deceased Residents of Psychiatric Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauri, David P.; Grimes, Dana R.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that there often is no formally established bereavement service designed to assist surviving family members, patients, or staff members when patient dies while receiving care in acute care setting. Presents exemplar bereavement service using data from few existing or proposed efforts to formalize bereavement services in acute care settings…

  19. Value of religious care for relief of psycho-existential suffering in Japanese terminally ill cancer patients: the perspective of bereaved family members.

    PubMed

    Ando, Michiyo; Kawamura, Ryo; Morita, Tatsuya; Hirai, Kei; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Okamoto, Takuya; Shima, Yasuo

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to clarify the experience of bereaved family members of cancer patients regarding the usefulness of religious care (perceived usefulness). The value of this care to palliate psycho-existential suffering in future patients was also examined (predicted usefulness). A questionnaire was sent to 592 bereaved family members of cancer patients who were admitted to certified palliative care units in Japan. Responses were obtained from 378 families, indicating whether the patient received religious care, the perceived usefulness of the care, and its predicted usefulness for palliation of psycho-existential suffering. About 25% (N=83) indicated that the patient had received religious care, whereas 75% (N=255) had not received it. Families of patients who had received religious care evaluated pastoral care workers (86%), religious services (82%), and religious music (80%) as 'very useful' or 'useful'. Families predicted usefulness of religious care for future patients: attending a religious service (very useful or useful, 56%; not useful or harmful, 44%), a religious atmosphere (48%, 52%), meeting with a pastoral care worker (50%, 50%), and religious care by physicians (26%, 74%), and nurses (27%, 73%). Families with a religion were significantly more likely to rate religious care as useful for future patients. Families of patients who received religious care generally evaluated this care to be very useful or useful. For future patients, some families felt that religious care would be useful, but some did not. In Japan, religious care is more likely to provide benefits to patients who have a religion. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Piloting a Therapeutic Residential for Children, Young People and Families Bereaved through Suicide in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braiden, Hannah Jane; McCann, Monica; Barry, Helen; Lindsay, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Families bereaved by suicide can experience an extremely intense and complicated grieving process. This can be associated with a range of difficulties and can put bereaved family members at risk of a range of problems. In recognition of this, Barnardo's Child Bereavement Service piloted a two-day residential programme (integrating separate…

  1. Got volunteers? Association of hospice use of volunteers with bereaved family members' overall rating of the quality of end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Block, Eve M; Casarett, David J; Spence, Carol; Gozalo, Pedro; Connor, Stephen R; Teno, Joan M

    2010-03-01

    Volunteers are a key component of hospice, and they are required by Medicare conditions of participation in the United States. Yet, little is known about the impact of volunteers in hospice. The goal of this study was to characterize whether bereaved family members in hospice programs with increased use of volunteer hours per patient day report higher overall satisfaction with hospice services. A secondary analysis of the 2006 Family Evaluation of Hospice Care data repository with hospice organization data regarding the number of volunteer hours in direct patient care and the total number of patient days served. A multivariate model examined the association of institutional rate of bereaved family members stating end-of-life care was excellent with that of hospices' rate of volunteer hours per patient day, controlling for other organizational characteristics. Three hundred five hospice programs (67% freestanding and 20.7% for profit) submitted 57,353 surveys in 2006 (54.2% female decedents and 47.4% with cancer). Hospice programs reported on average 0.71 hours per patient week (25th percentile: 0.245 hours per patient week; 75th percentile: 0.91 volunteer hours per patient week; and 99 th percentile: 3.3 hours per patient week). Those hospice programs in the highest quartile of volunteer usage had higher overall satisfaction compared with those in the lowest-quartile usage of volunteers (75.8% reported excellent overall quality of care compared with 67.8% reporting excellent in the lowest quartile. After adjustment for hospice program characteristics, hospice programs in the highest quartile had highest overall rating of the quality of care (coefficient=0.06, 95% confidence interval=0.04, 0.09). In this cross-sectional study, hospice programs with higher use of volunteers per patient day were associated with bereaved family member reports that the hospice program quality of care was excellent. (c) 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc

  2. Understanding family member suicide narratives by investigating family history.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Dorothy; Maple, Myfanwy; Minichiello, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The complex family environments in which a suicide death had previously occurred were explored in a qualitative study of narratives of suicide-bereaved participants. The participants searched for reasons why the suicide occurred in their family. Family patterning stories and the context of the environment in which the suicide death occurred provided an additional depth of meaning into the relational aspects of the family. Fractured families emerged as an important theme. Shared in the narratives were stories of conditions within the family that may have contributed to vulnerability towards persistent negative feelings about their lives, their family, and their future. The study also identifies the strengths of family culture that led to resilience in the suicide bereaved. These stories highlight the importance of support for those bereaved by the suicide of a close family member and the issues that places people in vulnerable situations that perhaps may explain the increased risk of suicide for those bereaved family members.

  3. Issues in Counseling Bereaved Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Nina A.

    1985-01-01

    Assesses the impact of a loss experience within the family unit. Discusses how the loss affects the nuclear family and how socio-cultural and psychodynamic factors impact family grief. Issues in family counseling are then highlighted with suggestions for the grief counselor. (ML)

  4. The Shared Experience Help the Bereavement to Flow: A Family Support Group Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Henoch, Ingela; Berg, Christina; Benkel, Inger

    2016-12-01

    When a family member dies, a bereavement period is taking place for all family members. The death of a parent during childhood is a highly stressful event. This study evaluates families' experiences of family support groups when a parent has died. Families were participate in groups for children, teenagers, young adults, and parents in seven sessions. The same topic which was discussed in all groups. The support groups were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The participants were satisfied with the groups and experienced that the shared experience facilitated bereavement to proceed. The results indicate that families' experiences is being more open about feelings in their own family. A support group can be one possibility to help the whole family in the bereavement.

  5. Bereavement support for family caregivers: The gap between guidelines and practice in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Samar M; Rumbold, Bruce; Howting, Denise; Bolleter, Amanda; Breen, Lauren J

    2017-01-01

    Standards for bereavement care propose that support should be matched to risk and need. However, studies in many countries demonstrate that palliative care services continue to adopt a generic approach in offering support to bereaved families. To identify patterns of bereavement support in palliative care services based upon the experience of bereaved people from a population based survey and in relation to clinical practice guidelines. An anonymous postal survey collected information from clients of six funeral providers in four Australian states (2014-15), 6 to 24 months after the death of their family member or friend, with 1,139 responding. Responses from 506 bereaved relatives of people who had terminal illnesses were analysed. Of these, 298 had used palliative care services and 208 had not. More people with cancer (64%) had received palliative care in comparison to other illnesses such as heart disease, dementia and organ failure (4-10%). The support for family caregivers before and after their relative's death was not considered optimal. Only 39.4% of the bereaved reported being specifically asked about their emotional/ psychological distress pre-bereavement, and just half of the bereaved perceived they had enough support from palliative care services. Half of the bereaved had a follow up contact from the service at 3-6 weeks, and a quarter had a follow-up at 6 months. Their qualitative feedback underlined the limited helpfulness of the blanket approach to bereavement support, which was often described as "not personal" or "generic", or "just standard practice". Timeliness and consistency of relationship is crucial to building rapport and trust in the service's ability to help at post-bereavement as well as a focus on the specific rather than the generic needs of the bereaved. In light of these limitations, palliative care services might do better investing their efforts principally in assessing and supporting family caregivers during the pre-bereavement

  6. Grief reaction model of families who experienced acute bereavement in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, Junko; Yamase, Hiroaki; Yamase, Yoshie

    2012-06-01

    The present study clarified the structure of factors that affect grief reactions of families who experienced acute bereavement in critical care settings in Japan. Sixty-four families who experienced acute bereavement answered a questionnaire. The questionnaire included the Miyabayashi Grief Measurement, recognition of bereavement, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and the Tri-Axial Coping Scale. We analyzed the causal structure regarding the relationship of stress recognition, coping, and grief reactions using structural equation modeling. The greatest influence on grief reactions of bereaved families was stress recognition. Factors that influenced stress recognition were subjective degree of sadness, acceptance of bereavement, regret for bereavement, and recognition of a peaceful death. These results show that the quality of end-of-life care in critical care settings is an important factor that affects bereaved families' stress recognition and grief reactions. Nurses and medical staff must provide end-of-life care to help family members accept the death of their loved one and reduce regrets as much as possible.

  7. Bereavement and Coping of South Asian Families Post 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Arpana G.; Yeh, Christine J.; Madan-Bahel, Anvita; Nath, Shivani

    2007-01-01

    Eleven first-generation South Asian family members who lost a relative in the World Trade Center attacks on September 11, 2001, were interviewed about their loss and their coping strategies. Data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research (CQR) methodology. Participant responses clearly delineated bereavement reactions and coping within a…

  8. Bereavement and Coping of South Asian Families Post 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Arpana G.; Yeh, Christine J.; Madan-Bahel, Anvita; Nath, Shivani

    2007-01-01

    Eleven first-generation South Asian family members who lost a relative in the World Trade Center attacks on September 11, 2001, were interviewed about their loss and their coping strategies. Data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research (CQR) methodology. Participant responses clearly delineated bereavement reactions and coping within a…

  9. Effects of euthanasia on the bereaved family and friends: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Swarte, Nikkie B; van der Lee, Marije L; van der Bom, Johanna G; van den Bout, Jan; Heintz, A Peter M

    2003-01-01

    Objective To assess how euthanasia in terminally ill cancer patients affects the grief response of bereaved family and friends. Design Cross sectional study. Setting Tertiary referral centre for oncology patients in Utrecht, the Netherlands. Participants 189 bereaved family members and close friends of terminally ill cancer patients who died by euthanasia and 316 bereaved family members and close friends of comparable cancer patients who died a natural death between 1992 and 1999. Main outcome measures Symptoms of traumatic grief assessed by the inventory of traumatic grief, current feelings of grief assessed by the Texas revised inventory of grief, and post-traumatic stress reactions assessed by the impact of event scale. Results The bereaved family and friends of cancer patients who died by euthanasia had less traumatic grief symptoms (adjusted difference -5.29 (95% confidence interval -8.44 to -2.15)), less current feeling of grief (adjusted difference 2.93 (0.85 to 5.01)); and less post-traumatic stress reactions (adjusted difference -2.79 (-5.33 to -0.25)) than the family and friends of patients who died of natural causes. These differences were independent of other risk factors. Conclusions The bereaved family and friends of cancer patients who died by euthanasia coped better with respect to grief symptoms and post-traumatic stress reactions than the bereaved of comparable cancer patients who died a natural death. These results should not be interpreted as a plea for euthanasia, but as a plea for the same level of care and openness in all patients who are terminally ill. PMID:12881258

  10. Effects of euthanasia on the bereaved family and friends: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Swarte, Nikkie B; van der Lee, Marije L; van der Bom, Johanna G; van den Bout, Jan; Heintz, A Peter M

    2003-07-26

    To assess how euthanasia in terminally ill cancer patients affects the grief response of bereaved family and friends. Cross sectional study. Tertiary referral centre for oncology patients in Utrecht, the Netherlands. 189 bereaved family members and close friends of terminally ill cancer patients who died by euthanasia and 316 bereaved family members and close friends of comparable cancer patients who died a natural death between 1992 and 1999. Symptoms of traumatic grief assessed by the inventory of traumatic grief, current feelings of grief assessed by the Texas revised inventory of grief, and post-traumatic stress reactions assessed by the impact of event scale. The bereaved family and friends of cancer patients who died by euthanasia had less traumatic grief symptoms (adjusted difference -5.29 (95% confidence interval -8.44 to -2.15)), less current feeling of grief (adjusted difference 2.93 (0.85 to 5.01)); and less post-traumatic stress reactions (adjusted difference -2.79 (-5.33 to -0.25)) than the family and friends of patients who died of natural causes. These differences were independent of other risk factors. The bereaved family and friends of cancer patients who died by euthanasia coped better with respect to grief symptoms and post-traumatic stress reactions than the bereaved of comparable cancer patients who died a natural death. These results should not be interpreted as a plea for euthanasia, but as a plea for the same level of care and openness in all patients who are terminally ill.

  11. Dealing with death: an audit of family bereavement programs in Australian intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Valks, Katrina; Mitchell, Marion Lucy; Inglis-Simons, Chris; Limpus, Anthony

    2005-11-01

    Patient death in Intensive Care Units (ICU) can be sudden and unexpected, leading to emotionally charged situations and life changing circumstances for family members. Supporting families during and after this critical period is particularly challenging for ICU nurses who often feel dissatisfied with the way they deal with the situation. Bereavement programs in various areas of nursing have been reported to be beneficial in promoting normal grief patterns. There is, however, a lack of research in the area of evaluation of bereavement programs in adult ICUs. This paper presents the results of an Australia-wide audit on current practices in the area of bereavement programs within adult ICUs. Surveys were sent to 117 adult Australian ICUs; 99 surveys were returned completed (84.6% response rate). It was identified that most surveyed units offer minimal components of bereavement programs, such as viewing of the deceased and communicating with family members. Less than one third (n=26) provide additional follow-up services in the form of telephone calls and sympathy cards or referral to additional services. Ten units employ some form of program evaluation. Verbal feedback from staff and families is the primary assessment method. Over half of responding ICUs indicated they are considering or interested in providing a bereavement program in their unit. This study highlights the need for research-based data to support the introduction or deletion of strategies for bereavement programs using family-centred outcome measures. ICU nurses are interested in this area of clinical practice and require considerable support. It is recommended that this support can come via postgraduate and on-going education, hospital policies and procedures.

  12. Long-Term Effects of the Family Bereavement Program on Multiple Indicators of Grief in Parentally Bereaved Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Irwin N.; Ma, Yue; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Ayers, Tim S.; Wolchik, Sharlene; Kennedy, Cara; Millsap, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This article reports on results from a randomized experimental trial of the effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) on multiple measures of grief experienced by parentally bereaved children and adolescents over a 6-year period. Method: Participants were 244 youths (ages 8-16, mean age = 11.4 years) from 156 families that had…

  13. Bereavement

    MedlinePlus

    Bereavement is the period of grief and mourning after a death. When you grieve, it's part of the normal process of reacting to a loss. You may experience grief as a mental, physical, social or emotional reaction. ...

  14. The Development of a Hospital-Wide Bereavement Program: Ensuring Bereavement Care for All Families of Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Morris, Sue E; Dole, Olivia R; Joselow, Marsha; Duncan, Janet; Renaud, Kristen; Branowicki, Patricia

    Although grief is a normal response to loss, the death of a child is believed to be one of the most difficult losses a person can endure, and bereaved parents are considered to be an "at-risk" group. Even though most deaths of children in the United States occur in hospitals, bereavement care provided by hospitals is highly variable, and little attention has been directed to how hospitals can best support grieving parents. In this article, we describe the development of a hospital-wide bereavement program at Boston Children's Hospital, where we conceptualize bereavement care as a preventive model of care. We identify the primary constructs of the program as education, guidance, and support and outline a template for use by other hospitals. We recommend that all pediatric hospitals implement basic, coordinated bereavement programs as the standard of care to ensure that all families receive bereavement care after the death of a patient.

  15. Caring for bereaved family caregivers: analyzing the context of care.

    PubMed

    Holtslander, Lorraine F

    2008-06-01

    Deaths from cancer will continue to rise with an increasing and aging population. Family caregivers of patients with cancer will face loss, grief, and bereavement as a result. As mandated by cancer and palliative care clinical practice guidelines, support for family caregivers continues through the processes of grief and bereavement to facilitate a positive transition through loss. To provide evidence-based nursing with this population, an analysis of their context of care was undertaken. Key health policies, characteristics of the healthcare delivery system, and the results of research with bereaved palliative caregivers are described. A model of effectiveness, efficiency, and equity is used to examine the situation of bereaved caregivers and to suggest research questions to fill the gaps in what is known about their needs and experience. Bereaved caregivers are at high risk for many distressing symptoms, including depression and sleeplessness, related to a range of complex variables, such as age, gender, social support, resources, and their experiences during caregiving. Current systems of support have not been adequate to meet the needs of this population and very little is known about the caregivers' quality of life, well-being, and health outcomes or how best to provide compassionate and effective nursing care.

  16. Dignity therapy: family member perspectives.

    PubMed

    McClement, Susan; Chochinov, Harvey Max; Hack, Thomas; Hassard, Thomas; Kristjanson, Linda Joan; Harlos, Mike

    2007-10-01

    Dignity Therapy is a novel therapeutic intervention designed to address psychosocial and existential distress among the terminally ill. This brief, individualized approach to end-of-life care invites patients to discuss issues that are most important to them and to articulate things they would most want remembered as death draws near. These discussions and recollections are recorded, transcribed, and edited into a generativity document, which are usually given to family or loved ones. While the marked benefits of Dignity Therapy on patients' psychosocial and existential distress have been reported elsewhere, this paper presents data on bereft family members' perspectives regarding the impact of dignity therapy on patients and themselves. Sixty family members of deceased terminally ill patients who previously took part in Dignity Therapy completed a questionnaire to elicit feedback about the impact of Dignity Therapy on both the dying patient and themselves. Ninety-five percent of participants reported that Dignity Therapy helped the patient; 78% reported that it heightened the patient's sense of dignity; 72% reported that it heightened the patient's sense of purpose; 65% reported that it helped the patient prepare for death; 65% reported that it was as important as any other aspect of the patient's care; and 43% reported that Dignity Therapy reduced the patient's suffering. Regarding family members, 78% reported that the generativity document helped them during their time of grief; 77% reported that the document would continue to be a source of comfort for their families and themselves; and 95% reported they would recommend Dignity Therapy to other patients of family members confronting a terminal illness. Family members endorse Dignity Therapy as a therapeutic intervention that moderates their bereavement experiences and lessens suffering and distress in terminally ill relatives.

  17. Training Faculty Members and Resident Assistants to Respond to Bereaved Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Taub, Deborah J.

    2008-01-01

    Scholarship about campus responses to death-related events emphasizes the need for members of the campus community to be open to discussing grief-related issues. Faculty members and resident assistants (RAs) are ideally situated to observe and respond to bereaved students. Faculty--tenure-track, adjunct, and teaching assistants--have regular…

  18. Training Faculty Members and Resident Assistants to Respond to Bereaved Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Taub, Deborah J.

    2008-01-01

    Scholarship about campus responses to death-related events emphasizes the need for members of the campus community to be open to discussing grief-related issues. Faculty members and resident assistants (RAs) are ideally situated to observe and respond to bereaved students. Faculty--tenure-track, adjunct, and teaching assistants--have regular…

  19. Exploring the experiences of bereaved families involved in assisted suicide in Southern Switzerland: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Gamondi, Claudia; Pott, Murielle; Forbes, Karen; Payne, Sheila

    2015-06-01

    In Switzerland, helping with assisted suicide under certain conditions is not prosecuted. With approximately 300 cases annually, this leaves behind a large group of bereaved people where its consequences are mostly unknown. The study aimed to explore family involvement in decision making prior to assisted suicide, and to examine their ways of coping during the bereavement period. A qualitative interview study used the principles of Grounded Theory analysis. Eleven relatives of eight patients, who died in Southern Switzerland after assisted suicide, participated in semistructured interviews. The large majority of family members faced moral dilemmas during the decision-making phase. Their respect for patient's autonomy was a key justification to resolve dilemmas. Two types of involvement were identified: categorised as 'passive' when the decision making was located with the patient, and 'active' when assisted suicide was proposed by the family member and/or the relative was involved in some way. The relatives reported feelings of isolation during and after assisted suicide. Family members reported fear of social stigma and did not openly disclose assisted suicide as the cause of death. None of those interviewed received formal psychological support. Bereaved families express moral dilemmas, feelings of isolation and secrecy in the management of assisted suicide in Southern Switzerland. These features seem underestimated and not sufficiently recognised by the healthcare professionals. Management of assisted suicide requests should include consideration of family members' needs, in addition to those of the patient. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. A scale to measure satisfaction of bereaved family receiving inpatient palliative care.

    PubMed

    Morita, T; Chihara, S; Kashiwagi, T

    2002-03-01

    Although satisfaction is an important outcome of medical care, there are no validated tools to quantify family satisfaction with hospital-based palliative care. In this nationwide postal survey, an instrument to measure informal carer satisfaction with an inpatient palliative care service was validated. A 60-item questionnaire was mailed to 1344 bereaved people who had lost their family members at 50 palliative care units in Japan, and 850 responses were analysed (response rate = 64%). The reliability, construct validity, and convergent validity of the scale were examined after the responses were randomly divided into two groups: a training set used in the development phase (n = 500) and a testing set used in the validation phase (n = 350). The number of scale items was reduced from 50 to 34 through psychometric techniques in the development phase. In the testing sample, the overall Cronbach's coefficient alpha for the final 34-item scale was 0.98. A factor analysis revealed that the scale consisted of seven subcategories: Nursing Care, Facility, Information, Availability, Family Care, Cost, and Symptom Palliation. The total score of the scale was significantly correlated with the degree of global satisfaction of the bereaved (Spearman's rho = 0.78). In conclusion, this 34-item scale, the Satisfaction Scale for Family Members Receiving Inpatient Palliative Care (Sat-Fam-IPC), has acceptable psychometric properties and would be a useful tool to measure carer satisfaction with an inpatient palliative care service.

  1. Multiple social contexts in qualitative bereavement research

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Miriam S.; Moss, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Little research focuses on the ways that bereaved family members react to and make meaning of their experience of the death of an elderly father and husband. In a qualitative, ethnographic study of 34 bereaved families we examined how family members respond to two inter-related social contexts: 1. Social-cultural values and attitudes such as attitudes toward grieving for old persons, and 2. The inter-personal dyadic relationship between interviewer and interviewee. An underlying theme of uncertainty pervades the study participants’ views of what is normal and expected in their own process of bereavement. Implications for future bereavement research are suggested. PMID:22939542

  2. Multiple social contexts in qualitative bereavement research.

    PubMed

    Moss, Miriam S; Moss, Sidney Z

    2012-12-01

    Little research focuses on the ways that bereaved family members react to and make meaning of their experience of the death of an elderly father and husband. In a qualitative, ethnographic study of 34 bereaved families we examined how family members respond to two inter-related social contexts: 1. social-cultural values and attitudes such as attitudes toward grieving for old persons, and 2. the inter-personal dyadic relationship between interviewer and interviewee. An underlying theme of uncertainty pervades the study participants' views of what is normal and expected in their own process of bereavement. Implications for future bereavement research are suggested. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Family grief therapy: a preliminary account of a new model to promote healthy family functioning during palliative care and bereavement.

    PubMed

    Kissane, D W; Bloch, S; McKenzie, M; McDowall, A C; Nitzan, R

    1998-01-01

    The family is usually the primary provider of care for the terminally ill patient with cancer or other serious progressive illness. The way in which such a family functions is a major determinant of psychological well-being for its members. Through screening with the Family Relationships Index (FRI) (Moos and Moos, 1981), dysfunctional families and those at risk can be identified, and then helped to achieve better family functioning, thus improving psychosocial outcome of their grief. In this paper, we describe the techniques and themes involved in the application of our empirically developed model of family grief therapy, designed as a preventive intervention for use in the setting of palliative care and bereavement.

  4. Support Groups: A Psychological or Social Device for Suicide Bereavement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietila, Minna

    2002-01-01

    Examines the psychological studies of bereavement support groups as well as exploring the ways in which people talk about their participation in such groups after their family member's suicide. This paper draws on a study of 16 interviews with bereaved parents and (adult) children, half of whom had attended a bereavement support group after their…

  5. Which research questions are important for the bereaved families of palliative care cancer patients? A nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Akihiro; Morita, Tatsuya; Kishino, Megumi; Aoyama, Maho; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-09-18

    Bereaved family members are present from diagnosis to the end of life and can look back and evaluate the experience; additionally, the family itself is also an important subject in the care of the patient. Therefore, while it is essential to determine the priority research issues from the viewpoint of the patients and health care workers, it is also crucial to know the important research themes from the viewpoint of the bereaved family members. The purpose of this study was to identify research priorities for palliative care in Japan, based on the viewpoint of bereaved family members. We conducted a cross-sectional, self-report questionnaire survey. Content analysis was performed on free-text answers for research priorities. This study was carried out as part of the third Japan HOspice and Palliative Care Evaluation (J-HOPE3) study. We extracted 1,658 codes from the transcripts and organized them into 120 subcategories on the basis of similarity. Subcategories were then organized into 8 categories as follows: , , , , , , , and . The findings of this study can be used as a research agenda for palliative care, which should take first priority in the future, and could be carried out using limited resources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Evaluation of care for leukemia and lymphoma patients during their last hospitalization from the perspective of the bereaved family.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Yuki; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Kawa, Masako; Motokura, Toru; Sano, Fumiaki; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Oshimi, Kazuo; Kazuma, Keiko

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate care for leukemia and lymphoma patients during their last hospitalization from the perspective of the bereaved family. Questionnaires were sent to the bereaved family members of adult leukemia and lymphoma patients. We used the Care Evaluation Scale (CES) and asked the bereaved family members about care satisfaction and "good death" factors during the patient's last week of life or last admission period. We distributed 177 questionnaires and were able to analyze 103 (58.2%) responses. Compared with the results of a previous study of palliative care units in Japan, the CES scores were significantly lower in 9 out of 10 domains. Assessment of the "good death" components revealed that only 33% of respondents agreed that the patient had been relieved as far as possible of pain and physical distress during the last week of life. Only 21.4% of respondents agreed that the patient had been relieved as far as possible of psychological distress, and 57% of caregivers were not satisfied with the level of care. During the last hospitalizations of leukemia or lymphoma patients, their care was insufficient and a good death was not often achieved. Improvement of end-of-life care for leukemia and lymphoma patients is needed.

  7. Strengthening Effective Parenting Practices over the Long Term: Effects of a Preventive Intervention for Parentally Bereaved Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Melissa J.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Ayers, Tim S.; Luecken, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the effect of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a preventive intervention for bereaved families, on effective parenting (e.g., caregiver warmth, consistent discipline) 6 years after program completion. Families (n = 101; 69% female caregivers; 77% Caucasian, 11% Hispanic) with children between ages 8 and 16 who had…

  8. Strengthening Effective Parenting Practices over the Long Term: Effects of a Preventive Intervention for Parentally Bereaved Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Melissa J.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Ayers, Tim S.; Luecken, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the effect of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a preventive intervention for bereaved families, on effective parenting (e.g., caregiver warmth, consistent discipline) 6 years after program completion. Families (n = 101; 69% female caregivers; 77% Caucasian, 11% Hispanic) with children between ages 8 and 16 who had…

  9. Effectiveness of "Primary Bereavement Care" for Widows: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Jesus A.; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 15 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary…

  10. Effectiveness of "Primary Bereavement Care" for Widows: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Jesus A.; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 15 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary…

  11. Long-term Effects of the Family Bereavement Program on Multiple Indicators of Grief in Parentally Bereaved Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Irwin N.; Ma, Yue; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Ayers, Tim S.; Wolchik, Sharlene; Kennedy, Cara L.; Millsap, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This paper reports on results from a randomized experimental trial of the effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) on multiple measures of grief experienced by parentally-bereaved children and adolescents over a six year period of time. Method Participants were 244 youth (ages 8–16, mean age = 11.4 years) from 156 families that had experienced the death of a parent. The sample consisted of 53% boys; ethnicity was 67% non-Hispanic white and 33% ethnic minority. Families were randomly assigned to the FBP (N=135) or a literature control condition (N=109). Two grief measures, the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief (TRIG) and the Intrusive Grief Thoughts Scale (IGTS) were administered at four times over six years, pre-test, post-test, eleven-month and six-year follow-ups. A third measure, an adaptation of the Inventory of Traumatic Grief (ITG) was administered only at the six-year follow-up. Results The FBP showed a greater reduction as compared to controls in their level of problematic grief (IGTS) at post-test and six-year follow-up and in the percent at clinical levels of problematic grief at the post-test. The FBP also reduced scores on a dimension of the ITG, Social Detachment/Insecurity, at six-year follow-up for three subgroups; those who experienced lower levels of grief at program entry, older youth, and boys. Conclusion These are the first findings from a randomized trial with long-term follow-up of the effects of a program to reduce problematic levels of grief of parentally-bereaved youth. PMID:20350025

  12. Moving family-centered care forward: Bereaved fathers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Davies, Betty; Baird, Jennifer; Gudmundsdottir, Maria

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the key behaviors of "excellent" pediatric healthcare providers - a term used by fathers of children with complex, life-threatening illness to describe providers who consistently and effectively engage in family-centered care for children and their families. Using interview data from a multi-site grounded theory study of 60 fathers with a deceased child, five behaviors were identified: getting to know the family as individuals, talking about non-healthcare related topics, connecting in a human-human relationship, including parents as team members, and applying specialized knowledge to help the family. These behaviors are consistent with the goals of family-centered care, but they are inconsistently practiced, resulting in less-than-optimal care for children and their families during periods of crisis and vulnerability. A renewed focus on relationship building and interactions with families is needed, as well as a re-evaluation of the training of pediatric healthcare providers.

  13. Factors Affecting Communication Patterns between Oncology Staff and Family Members of Deceased Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Tal; Gordon, Noa; Perry, Shlomit; Rizel, Shulamith; Stemmer, Salomon M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Perceptions of the role of oncology medical staff in supporting bereaved families have evolved with the transition to interdisciplinary cancer care. We investigated the interactions between oncology professionals and bereaved families. Methods This cross-sectional study involved all oncology medical staff at the Davidoff Center. Participants were given a questionnaire relating to bereavement follow-up. Responses were measured using a 5-point Likert scale. Results Of 155 staff members, 107 filled questionnaires with <20% missing data and were included in the analysis (α = 0.799; corrected, α = 0.821). Respondents included physicians (35%), nurses (46%), social workers (7%), psychologists (4%), or unspecified (8%); 85% were Jewish, and 60% had ≥10 years of oncology experience. Most respondents thought that contacting bereaved families was important (73%), and that it provided closure for staff (79%); 41% indicated that they contacted >50% of the families of their deceased patients. Contacting bereaved families was considered the responsibility of the physicians (90%), nurses (84%), or social workers (89%). The main barriers to contacting bereaved families were emotional overload (68%) and lack of time (63%); 60% indicated a need for additional communication tools for bereavement follow-up. In a multivariate analysis, profession (physician vs. nurse), primary workplace (outpatient setting vs. other), and self-defined religion were significant variables with respect to the perceived importance of contacting bereaved families and to actually contacting them. Other factors (e.g., age, gender) were non-significant. Conclusions Perspectives regarding bereavement actions differ significantly across medical professions, work settings, and self-defined religions. Additional guidance and education regarding bereavement actions is warranted. PMID:27683075

  14. Increased beta power in the bereaved families of the Sewol ferry disaster: A paradoxical compensatory phenomenon? A two-channel electroencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kuk-In; Shim, Miseon; Lee, Sang Min; Huh, Hyu Jung; Huh, Seung; Joo, Ji-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2017-06-20

    The Sewol ferry capsizing accident on South Korea's southern coast resulted in the death of 304 people, and serious bereavement problems for their families. Electroencephalography (EEG) beta frequency is associated with psychiatric symptoms, such as insomnia. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between frontal beta power, psychological symptoms, and insomnia in the bereaved families. Eighty-four family members of the Sewol ferry victims (32 men and 52 women) were recruited and their EEG was compared with that of 25 (13 men and 12 women) healthy controls. A two-channel EEG device was used to measure cortical activity in the frontal lobe. Symptom severity of insomnia, post-traumatic stress disorder, complicated grief, and anxiety were evaluated. The bereaved families showed a higher frontal beta power than healthy controls. Subgroup analysis showed that frontal beta power was lower in the individuals with severe insomnia than in those with normal sleep. There was a significant inverse correlation between frontal beta power and insomnia symptom in the bereaved families. This study suggests that increased beta power, reflecting the psychopathology in the bereaved families of the Sewol ferry disaster, may be a compensatory mechanism that follows complex trauma. Frontal beta power could be a potential marker indicating the severity of sleep disturbances. Our results suggest that sleep disturbance is an important symptom in family members of the Sewol ferry disaster's victims, which may be screened by EEG beta power. © 2017 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2017 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  15. Those Who Are Left behind: An Estimate of the Number of Family Members of Suicide Victims in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Joe; Choi, Yun Jeong; Mori, Kohta; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Sugano, Saki

    2009-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature of suicide studies by presenting procedures and its estimates of the number of family members who lose their loved ones to suicide. Using Japanese aggregate level data, three main findings emerge: first, there are approximately five bereaved family members per suicide; second, in 2006, there were about…

  16. Those Who Are Left behind: An Estimate of the Number of Family Members of Suicide Victims in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Joe; Choi, Yun Jeong; Mori, Kohta; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Sugano, Saki

    2009-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature of suicide studies by presenting procedures and its estimates of the number of family members who lose their loved ones to suicide. Using Japanese aggregate level data, three main findings emerge: first, there are approximately five bereaved family members per suicide; second, in 2006, there were about…

  17. Communication Among Melanoma Family Members.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Deborah J; Albrecht, Terrance; Hay, Jennifer; Eggly, Susan; Harris-Wei, Julie; Meischke, Hendrika; Burke, Wylie

    2017-03-01

    Interventions to improve communication among family members may facilitate information flow about familial risk and preventive health behaviors. This is a secondary analysis of the effects of an interactive website intervention aimed at increasing communication frequency and agreement about health risk among melanoma families. Participants were family units, consisting of one family member with melanoma identified from a previous research study (the Case) and an additional first degree relative and a parent of a child 0-17. Family triads were randomized to receive access to the website intervention or to serve as control families. Family communication frequency and agreement about melanoma prevention behaviors and beliefs were measured at baseline and again at 1 year post randomization. Intervention participants of all three types significantly increased the frequency of communication to their first degree relatives (Parents, siblings, children; range = 14-18 percentage points; all p < .05). At baseline, approximately two-thirds of all three family members talked with at least some member of the family about cancer risk. Agreement between Cases and First Degree Relatives and between Cases and Parents increased from pre to post intervention in the intervention participants compared to the control participants (p < .05). These findings provide support for interventions to improve family communication about cancer risk.

  18. Moving family-centered care forward: Bereaved fathers’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Betty; Baird, Jennifer; Gudmundsdottir, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the key behaviors of “excellent” pediatric healthcare providers – a term used by fathers of children with complex, life-threatening illness to describe providers who consistently and effectively engage in family-centered care for children and their families. Using interview data from a multi-site grounded theory study of 60 fathers with a deceased child, five behaviors were identified: getting to know the family as individuals, talking about non-healthcare related topics, connecting in a human-human relationship, including parents as team members, and applying specialized knowledge to help the family. These behaviors are consistent with the goals of family-centered care, but they are inconsistently practiced, resulting in less-than-optimal care for children and their families during periods of crisis and vulnerability. A renewed focus on relationship building and interactions with families is needed, as well as a re-evaluation of the training of pediatric healthcare providers. PMID:24244105

  19. Bereaved Elderly Mothers: Changes in Health, Functional Activities, Family Cohesion, and Psychological Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesher, Emerson L.; Bergey, Karen J.

    1988-01-01

    Examined changes in health, functional activities, family cohesion, and psychological well-being among 18 bereaved elderly mothers following the death of an adult child. Results showed changes in all areas, but especially striking was the high level of psychological distress. Recommends increased research and clinical attention. (Author/ABL)

  20. [Individual neonatal end-of-life care and family-centred bereavement support].

    PubMed

    Garten, L; von der Hude, K; Rösner, B; Klapp, C; Bührer, C

    2013-06-01

    Neonatal end-of-life care and family-centred bereavement support in perinatal medicine are a multiprofessional challenge directed to the dying newborn and the parents as well as to the care-givers. Clinical experience shows that many aspects of individual neonatal end-of-life care and family-centred bereavement support are not well known to the health-care providers. This is especially true for a standardised quality management and the components of bereavement support offered to parents. An interdisciplinary concept for an individual neonatal end-of-life care and famlily-centred bereavement support has been developed at the Center of Perinatal Medicine at the Charité, Berlin. The concept aims for two main aspects: (1) meeting the individual medical, psychological, emotional and spiritual needs of the dying newborn, the parents and family, and (2) facilitating standardised and process-orientated preparation, evaluation and reflexion of every case of end-of-life care. In this article some recommendations for implementing a basic care concept for families and their dying newborns are presented.

  1. A survey of the experiences of families with bereavement support services following a perinatal loss.

    PubMed

    Inati, Violet; Matic, Mara; Phillips, Christine; Maconachie, Nathalie; Vanderhook, Fiona; Kent, Alison L

    2017-06-28

    Although there are many studies that explore complicated grief, no studies have examined the impact of bereavement support services on the progression to complicated grief. The aims of our study were to describe the types of bereavement services utilised by families who have experienced a perinatal loss, and explore the impact of these services on the families' bereavement journey. Women who experienced a perinatal loss were sent a survey consisting of the modified Perinatal Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) questionnaire, items addressing use of bereavement services, and the Inventory of Complicated Grief. Respondents also provided free-text comments. Forty-seven women were included in the study (34% response rate); 75% had a perinatal PTSD score which indicated the need for support from mental health services and 75% accessed services. Forty-three percent met the criteria for complicated grief. Women whose PTSD scores were in the highest quartile were most likely to access services; 45% of surveyed women used SIDS and Kids of the Australian Capital Territory (SKACT) accessing counselling (90%), support groups (50%), playgroups (15%) and the helpline (10%). Fifty-seven percent of women surveyed accessed non-SKACT services and predominantly used psychologists (66%) and general practitioners (30%). Requests were made for grief training of hospital staff, and for referral to bereavement services to be offered after hospital discharge. Following a perinatal loss, a high proportion of women had high PTSD scores and complicated grief despite utilising local bereavement services. Our findings support the continuation of current support services with modifications that may potentially improve recovery following a perinatal loss. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  2. Bereavement in the elderly: the role of primary care.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Syahnaz Mohd; Eng, Tan Chai; Tohit, Noorlaili; Wahab, Suzaily

    2013-09-01

    Bereavement in the elderly is a concern to primary care physicians (PCPs) as it can lead to psychological illness such as depression. Most people are able to come to terms with their grief without any intervention, but some people are not. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of bereavement-related depressive illness in elderly people. PCPs need to optimise support and available resources prior to, and throughout, the bereavement period in order to reduce the family members' burden and suffering.

  3. New members of Datura family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosaev, A.; Plávalová, E.

    2017-06-01

    Asteroid families are groups of minor planets which have a common origin in catastrophic disruptions. Young asteroid families are very interesting because they represent the product of their parent body's fragmentation before orbital and physical evolutionary processes could have changed them. A group of minor asteroids associated with the largest body (1270) Datura is of particular interest because it has enough known members and resides in the inner part of the main asteroid belt and is easier to observe than families (with similar physical characteristics on their surfaces) at further distances. Up to now, 7 members of this family are known. Here we discuss three new members of the Datura Family: (338309) 2002 VR17, 2002 RH291 and 2014 OE206. To prove that these recently-discovered members belong to the Datura family, we conducted numerical orbit integrations with all gravitational perturbation over the last 800 kyrs. In the results, we have found that (338309) 2002 VR17 and 2002 RH291 are very close to the mean orbit of this family throughout the calculation. In the case of 2014 OE206, it has a strongly chaotic orbit.

  4. Recommendations for palliative and bereavement care in the NICU: a family-centered integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Kenner, C; Press, J; Ryan, D

    2015-12-01

    Technological advances have increased our ability to detect a life-threatening, life-limiting or lethal problem early in pregnancy, leaving parents months to anticipate a death or a prematurely born infant. Babies can also be born with unanticipated problems that could lead to death. In either scenario, perinatal palliative care should be offered as a strategy for family support. Since the preponderance of professional training focuses on saving lives, many health professionals are uncomfortable with palliative care. This article's purpose is to define best practices for the provision of family-centered perinatal and neonatal palliative care and provision of support to bereaved families experiencing anticipated and unanticipated life-limiting conditions or death of their infant. An overview of core concepts and values is presented, followed by intervention strategies to promote an integrated family-centered approach to palliative and bereavement care. The concluding section presents evidence-based recommendations.

  5. Recommendations for palliative and bereavement care in the NICU: a family-centered integrative approach

    PubMed Central

    Kenner, C; Press, J; Ryan, D

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances have increased our ability to detect a life-threatening, life-limiting or lethal problem early in pregnancy, leaving parents months to anticipate a death or a prematurely born infant. Babies can also be born with unanticipated problems that could lead to death. In either scenario, perinatal palliative care should be offered as a strategy for family support. Since the preponderance of professional training focuses on saving lives, many health professionals are uncomfortable with palliative care. This article's purpose is to define best practices for the provision of family-centered perinatal and neonatal palliative care and provision of support to bereaved families experiencing anticipated and unanticipated life-limiting conditions or death of their infant. An overview of core concepts and values is presented, followed by intervention strategies to promote an integrated family-centered approach to palliative and bereavement care. The concluding section presents evidence-based recommendations. PMID:26597801

  6. Effectiveness of "primary bereavement care" for widows: a cluster randomized controlled trial involving family physicians.

    PubMed

    García, Jesús A; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-04-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 75 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary bereavement care training, saw 44 widows for 7 ordinary appointments, with the same schedule. Outcome measures were collected at 4, 10, 16, and 24 months after the loss. A linear mixed model was used. No significant differences were found in favor of the intervention group on grief and indeed control group widows experienced more improvement in somatisation, general health, and general emotional outcomes.

  7. Preparing family caregivers for death and bereavement. Insights from caregivers of terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Randy S; Schulz, Richard; Copeland, Valire C; Arnold, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Many family caregivers are unprepared for the death of their loved one and may suffer from worse mental health as a result. We therefore sought to determine the factors that family caregivers believe are important to preparing for death and bereavement. Focus groups and ethnographic interviews were conducted with 33 family caregivers (bereaved or current) of terminally ill patients. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using the constant comparative method. Life experiences such as the duration of caregiving/illness, advance care planning, previous experiences with caregiving or death, and medical sophistication all impacted preparedness, or the degree to which a caregiver is ready for the death and bereavement. Regardless of life experiences, however, all caregivers reported medical, practical, psychosocial, and religious/spiritual uncertainty. Because uncertainty was multidimensional, caregivers often needed more than prognostic information in order to prepare. Communication was the primary mechanism used to manage uncertainty. Good communication included clear, reliable information, combined with relationship-centered care from health care providers. Finally, preparedness had cognitive, affective, and behavioral dimensions. To prepare, some caregivers needed information tailored to their uncertainty (cognitive), others needed to "mentally" or "emotionally" prepare (affective), and still others had important tasks to complete (behavioral). In order to better prepare family caregivers for the death of a loved one, health care providers must develop a trusting relationship with caregivers, provide them with reliable information tailored to their uncertainty, and allow time for caregivers to process the information and complete important tasks.

  8. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  9. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a significant...

  10. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a significant...

  11. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a significant...

  12. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a significant...

  13. Adding Value to Palliative Care Services: The Development of an Institutional Bereavement Program.

    PubMed

    Morris, Sue E; Block, Susan D

    2015-11-01

    Although bereavement programs are a common element of palliative medicine and hospice programs, few health care institutions currently offer universal bereavement services to all their patients. The elevated risk of serious physical and mental health problems among the bereaved is a strong argument for the development of universal institution-based bereavement programs as an element of quality care for family members of all patients who die. We describe the development of the bereavement program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) where we conceptualized bereavement services as a preventive model of care. We identified education, guidance and support as the primary constructs of the program. The essential components include a formal acknowledgement of the death of the patient by the cancer center, information about grief and what to expect, individual visits to assess coping, and staff support and education. One hundred and forty bereaved families completed a survey about the bereavement program. The findings indicated that the formal letter of condolence and the bereavement guide had a positive impact on the grieving of the respondents. Contact from the patient's oncologist and nurse was especially well received. Bereavement programs can both help bereaved individuals adapt to their loss, and positively impact hospitals by enhancing the reputation of the hospital within the community and providing an avenue for identifying opportunities for improvement in care processes. We recommend that all hospitals implement basic bereavement programs for families of all deceased patients as the standard of care.

  14. Bereaved Siblings' Advice to Health Care Professionals Working With Children With Cancer and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Malin; Bylund-Grenklo, Tove; Jalmsell, Li; Wallin, Alexandra Eilegård; Kreicbergs, Ulrika

    2016-07-01

    Siblings of children with cancer experience psychosocial distress during the illness and after bereavement, but often stand outside the spotlight of attention and care. This study explored bereaved siblings' advice to health care professionals (HCPs) working with children with cancer and their families. In a nationwide Swedish survey of bereaved siblings, 174/240 (73%) participated. Of these, 108 answered an open-ended question about what advice they would give to HCPs working with children with cancer and their families. In this study, responses to this single question were analyzed using content analysis. The most common advice, suggested by 56% of siblings, related to their own support. One third suggested giving better medical information to siblings. Some siblings wanted to be more practically involved in their brother's/sister's care and suggested that HCPs should give parents guidance on how to involve siblings. Other common advice related to psychosocial aspects, such as the siblings' wish for HCPs to mediate hope, yet also realism, and the importance of asking the ill child about what care they wanted. Information, communication, and involvement should be emphasized by HCPs to support siblings' psychosocial needs in both the health care setting and within the family. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  15. Providing support to family members.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, Ruth; Dowd, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Providing recognition and simple information can be powerful and reassure a family member who is anxious and worried about an ill relative. While "answers" concerning the procedure are often not available, providing information that is available--the locations of the rest rooms and coffee shop; approximately how long the procedure will take; where to wait; and the process involved in the radiological procedure, reading and getting the results--can give some feeling of control, and thus reduce feelings of powerlessness. Most importantly, family members who are recognized and included with the patient in the treatment process will be reassured of the competency of the staff and gain hopefulness about the outcome of the diagnostic and treatment experience. And providing hope in the healthcare setting is a radiology professional's most important job.

  16. Factors related to nurse comfort when caring for families experiencing perinatal loss: evidence for bereavement program enhancement.

    PubMed

    Rondinelli, June; Long, Kathleen; Seelinger, Connie; Crawford, Cecelia L; Valdez, Regina

    2015-01-01

    As nurses provide holistic support, their own comfort in caring for parents and families experiencing perinatal loss must be considered. Study results showed that, although education is essential, experience independently predicted comfort in delivering perinatal bereavement care. Evidence from this study promotes the discussion of how nurse educators can structure professional development programs to best transfer the experience and confidence of perinatal nurses who are already comfortable with bereavement care to nurses who are not.

  17. Dementia Caregiver Grief and Bereavement: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Elizabeth H; Paun, Olimpia

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease and related dementias make up the fifth leading cause of death for individuals of 65 years of age and older in the United States. Seventy percent of these individuals will die in long-term care settings. The aim of this integrative review was to examine and synthesize the evidence on grief and bereavement in Alzheimer's disease and related dementias caregivers. This review identified five critical gaps in the existing evidence: (a) a lack of ethnic and gender diversity among caregivers studied, (b) limited use of valid instruments to study dementia caregiver grief and bereavement, (c) no substantive research examining dementia caregiver grief and bereavement for caregivers whose family members die in long-term care, (d) a lack of evidence examining the effect of hospice services on dementia caregiver grief and bereavement, and (e) a lack of grief and bereavement interventions for dementia caregivers whose family members die in long-term care.

  18. Cortisol levels six-years after participation in the Family Bereavement Program.

    PubMed

    Luecken, Linda J; Hagan, Melissa J; Sandler, Irwin N; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Ayers, Tim S; Wolchik, Sharlene A

    2010-06-01

    Recent studies have found short-term adrenocortical benefits of early interventions for at-risk children. The current study evaluated the effects of the Family Bereavement Program on cortisol levels six years after the program. Parentally bereaved children were randomly assigned to the 12-week preventive intervention (n=78) or a self-study control (n=61) condition. Six years later (mean age 17.5), salivary cortisol levels were measured before and after a conflict discussion task conducted in late afternoon/early evening. The intervention group had significantly higher cortisol levels across the task compared to the control group, and lower cortisol was associated with higher externalizing symptoms. The group effect did not differ by age at the time of death, and the group difference remained significant after adjustment for pre-intervention mental health and current mental health symptoms. Results suggest that a family-focused intervention for parentally bereaved youth may have prevented the development of attenuated cortisol secretion suggestive of dysregulation and associated with externalizing problems.

  19. Terminal care: evaluation of effects on surviving family of care before and after bereavement.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J.; Parkes, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    To evaluate the effects on the family of a comprehensive programme of terminal cancer care, 20 close relatives of patients who had died in a Palliative Care Unit (PCU) were compared with a matched group of 20 relatives of patients who had died of cancer in other wards of the same teaching hospital. Interviewed by telephone 1 year and 2 weeks after bereavement, relatives of PCU patients report significantly fewer psychological symptoms and less lasting grief and anger than relatives of patients who had died elsewhere. Factors thought to have contributed to good outcomes were successful relief of pain, awareness by relatives of the coming death of the patient and support given to relatives after bereavement. Two case examples illustrate these findings. PMID:6844191

  20. Economics and Family Bereavement Following a Fatal Farm Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Paul C.; Karis, Terri A.

    1993-01-01

    Interviews with 21 families who had lost the farm operator or a young person in a fatal farm accident revealed that, in every family, economic difficulties (operating the farm, providing for the family, and managing resources of time, energy, and capital) were entangled in the grief process. Implications for rural counselors and mental health…

  1. Importance of end-of-life support to minimize caregiver's regret during bereavement of the elderly for better subsequent adaptation to bereavement.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Akiko; Numata, Kumiko; Mikami, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the quality of end-of-life home medical care affected caregiver's psychological recovery from bereavement. We analyzed survey responses from an anonymous self-administered questionnaire from 147 bereaved family members (caregivers). Questionnaire content included information on the quality of end-of-life home medical care, feelings during bereavement and present feelings. Results showed that caregiver regret during bereavement was significantly associated with present feelings about loss regardless of the length of time after death of a loved one. Aspects of end-of-life support that were statistically significant at minimizing regret during bereavement were: (1) fulfilled home medical care service system, (2) peaceful death of the patient, and (3) providing direct care by the caregiver. These findings suggest that end-of-life support to minimize caregiver regret during bereavement was crucial for better subsequent adaptation to bereavement.

  2. [Bereavement Care in Cancer].

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideki; Ishida, Mayumi; Tanahashi, Iori

    2015-01-01

    Bereavement may become the most severe stressor in the lives of bereaved families, and it has a variety of influences on their psychological and physical aspects. Physical effects include worsening of physical conditions and an increase in the mortality, and psychological ones include increases in the suicide rate and morbidity of depression. Bereavement also has a social influence, such as causing changes in relationships. Therefore, it is necessary to provide bereaved families requiring support with appropriate intervention. Since bereaved families experience various types of distress, assessment of grief-related problems alone is inadequate. It is essential to assess the psychological, physical, social, and other aspects of bereaved families. Intervention can be expressed using the concept of postvention. There are various types of intervention : from care provided by non-specialists to psychiatric treatment provided by mental care specialists. Although bereavement is the strongest risk factor for depression, depressive symptoms following bereavement are often overlooked. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to such depression. Support is provided by not only health care professionals but also the general public in society, and it is essential to obtain knowledge of bereavement care in society. It should be noted that support not based on established knowledge may have an adverse effect on bereaved families (unhelpful support).

  3. Family Members Responding to a Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Dean W.

    1986-01-01

    A literature review regarding family adjustment to a visually impaired family member considered the stages of denial, withdrawal, acceptance, depression, reaffirmation, coping, mobilization, and self-acceptance. (CB)

  4. Who needs bereavement support? A population based survey of bereavement risk and support need.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Samar M; Breen, Lauren J; Howting, Denise A; Rumbold, Bruce; McNamara, Beverley; Hegney, Desley

    2015-01-01

    This study identifies and describes the profiles of bereavement risk and support needs of a community sample in Australia and tests the fit of the data with the three-tiered public health model for bereavement support. Family members who were bereaved 6-24 months prior to the survey and who were clients of four funeral providers participated (May-July 2013). A postal survey was used to collect information about bereaved people's experience of caring and perceived satisfaction with any bereavement support provided. The questionnaire included a validated risk assessment screening measure for Prolonged Grief Disorder (PG-13). A total of 678 bereaved people responded. The model predicted that 60% of the sample would be low risk, 30% moderate risk, and 10% high risk. Actual figures were very close at 58.4%, 35.2% and 6.4% respectively. The analysis of the demographic characteristics, experience and impact of caring and bereavement, and satisfaction with support received from a variety of sources revealed differential experiences and needs that align with the expectation of low, moderate, and high bereavement support need, as articulated in the public health model. This is the first empirical test of the public health model of bereavement support. As there is a lack of clear evidence to guide development and allocation of bereavement support programs, the findings have the potential to inform the ability of services, community organizations and informal networks to prioritize care according to each level of bereavement need. This is essential to achieve cost-effective and equitable resource allocation.

  5. The Effects of the Family Bereavement Program to Reduce Suicide Ideation and/or Attempts of Parentally Bereaved Children Six and Fifteen Years Later.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Irwin; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Wolchik, Sharlene; Ayers, Tim S

    2016-04-01

    Findings concerning the long-term effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) to reduce suicide ideation and/or attempts of parentally bereaved children and adolescents are presented. Parental death is a significant risk factor for suicide among offspring (Guldin et al., 2015). This study is a long-term follow-up of 244 children and adolescents who had participated in a randomized trial of the FBP, examining the intervention effects on suicide ideation and/or attempts as assessed through multiple sources. Results indicate a significant effect of the FBP to reduce suicide ideation and/or attempts at the 6- and 15-year follow-up evaluation. The findings support the potential benefits of further research on "upstream" suicide prevention.

  6. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  7. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to, such...

  8. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to, such...

  9. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to, such...

  10. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to, such...

  11. Long-term Effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) on Spousally-Bereaved Parents: Grief, Mental Health, Alcohol Problems, and Coping Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Irwin; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Cham, Heining; Wolchik, Sharlene; Ayers, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objective Reports on the finding from a six-year follow-up of a randomized trial of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) on outcomes for spousally-bereaved parents. Method Spousally-bereaved parents (N=131) participated in the trial in which they were randomly assigned to receive the FBP (N = 72) or literature control (LC, N = 59). Parents were assessed at four time points, pre-test, post-test, 11-months, and six-year follow-up. Parents reported on mental health problems, grief and parenting at all four time periods. At the six-year follow-up parents reported on additional measures of persistent complex bereavement disorder, alcohol abuse problems, and coping efficacy. Results Bereaved parents in the FBP as compared to those in the LC had lower levels of symptoms of depression, general psychiatric distress, prolonged grief, alcohol problems, and higher coping efficacy at the six-year follow-up. Multiple characteristics of the parent (e.g., gender, age, baseline mental health problems) and of the spousal death (e.g., cause of death) were tested as moderators of program effects on each outcome. Latent-growth modeling found that the effects of the FBP on depression, psychiatric distress and grief occurred immediately following program participation and were maintained over six-years. Mediation analysis found that improvement in positive parenting partially mediated program effects to reduce depression and psychiatric distress, but had an indirect effect to higher levels of grief at the six years follow-up. Mediation analysis also found that improved parenting at the six year follow-up was partially mediated by program effects to reduce depression and that program effects to increase coping efficacy at the six-year follow-up was partially mediated through reduced depression and grief and improved parenting. Conclusions FBP reduced mental health problems, prolonged grief and alcohol abuse and increased coping efficacy of spousally-bereaved parents six years later

  12. Long-term effects of the Family Bereavement Program on spousally bereaved parents: Grief, mental health problems, alcohol problems, and coping efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Irwin; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Cham, Heining; Wolchik, Sharlene; Ayers, Tim

    2016-08-01

    This study reports on the findings from a 6-year follow-up of a randomized trial of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) on the outcomes for spousally bereaved parents. Spousally bereaved parents (N = 131) participated in the trial in which they were randomly assigned to receive the FBP (N = 72) or literature control (N = 59). Parents were assessed at four time points: pretest, posttest, and 11-month and 6-year follow-up. They reported on mental health problems, grief, and parenting at all four time periods. At the 6-year follow-up, parents reported on additional measures of persistent complex bereavement disorder, alcohol abuse problems, and coping efficacy. Bereaved parents in the FBP as compared to those in the literature control had lower levels of symptoms of depression, general psychiatric distress, prolonged grief, and alcohol problems, and higher coping efficacy (for mothers) at the 6-year follow-up. Multiple characteristics of the parent (e.g., gender, age, and baseline mental health problems) and of the spousal death (e.g., cause of death) were tested as moderators of program effects on each outcome, but only 3 of 45 tests of moderation were significant. Latent growth modeling found that the effects of the FBP on depression, psychiatric distress, and grief occurred immediately following program participation and were maintained over 6 years. Mediation analysis found that improvement in positive parenting partially mediated program effects to reduce depression and psychiatric distress, but had an indirect effect to higher levels of grief at the 6-year follow-up. Mediation analysis also found that improved parenting at the 6-year follow-up was partially mediated by program effects to reduce depression and that program effects to increase coping efficacy at the 6-year follow-up was partially mediated through reduced depression and grief and improved parenting. FBP reduced mental health problems, prolonged grief, and alcohol abuse, and increased coping

  13. Soft tissue massage: early intervention for relatives whose family members died in palliative cancer care.

    PubMed

    Cronfalk, Berit S; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Strang, Peter

    2010-04-01

    This paper explores how bereaved relatives experienced soft tissue massage during the first four months after the death of a family member who was in palliative cancer care. Death of a close family member or friend is recognised as being an emotional and existential turning point in life. Previous studies emphasise need for various support strategies to assist relatives while they are grieving. Qualitative design. Eighteen bereaved relatives (11 women and seven men) received soft tissue massage (25 minutes, hand or foot) once a week for eight weeks. In-depth interviews were conducted after the end of the eight-week periods. Interviews were analysed using a qualitative descriptive content analysis method. Soft tissue massage proved to be helpful and to generate feelings of consolation in the first four months of grieving. The main findings were organised into four categories: (1) a helping hand at the right time, (2) something to rely on, (3) moments of rest and (4) moments of retaining energy. The categories were then conceptualised into this theme: feelings of consolation and help in learning to restructure everyday life. Soft tissue massage was experienced as a commendable source of consolation support during the grieving process. An assumption is that massage facilitates a transition toward rebuilding identity, but more studies in this area are needed. Soft tissue massage appears to be a worthy, early, grieving-process support option for bereaved family members whose relatives are in palliative care.

  14. Why people accept opioids: role of general attitudes toward drugs, experience as a bereaved family, information from medical professionals, and personal beliefs regarding a good death.

    PubMed

    Shinjo, Takuya; Morita, Tatsuya; Hirai, Kei; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Shimizu, Megumi; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Many surveys have evaluated patient-related barriers to pain management. To explore associations between a preference for opioids and general attitudes toward drugs, the experience and information received as a bereaved family, and beliefs regarding a good death. A cross-sectional survey, performed in 2010, of bereaved families of patients with cancer in palliative care units across Japan. Questionnaires were sent to 997 families. A total of 66% of families responded. Of these, 224 responses were excluded because the family declined to participate in the study (n = 38), the patient was not receiving any opioid analgesics, and there were missing data (n = 164), or data were missing for the primary end points (n = 22). Thus, 432 responses were finally analyzed (43%). In total, 26%, 41%, and 31% of family members stated that they strongly want to receive, want to receive, or slightly want to receive opioids if needed in the future, respectively. Determinants associated with a preference for receiving opioid treatment were the following: a general appreciation of the drugs (P = 0.005), witnessing an improvement in the patient's quality of life as a result of pain relief (P = 0.003), information provided by medical professionals that the opioid could be discontinued if side effects developed (P = 0.042), and the belief that a good death was one that was free from pain and physical distress (P < 0.001). More than 90% of bereaved families whose relatives were treated with opioid analgesics reported a preference to receive opioid analgesics for the treatment of cancer pain, if necessary, in the future. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Measuring the quality of structure and process in end-of-life care from the bereaved family perspective.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Hirai, Kei; Sakaguchi, Yukihiro; Maeyama, Etsuko; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2004-06-01

    Measurement of the structure/process of care is the first step in improving end-of-life care. The primary aim of this study was to psychometrically validate an instrument for directly measuring the bereaved family's perception of the necessity for improvement in structural/procedural aspects of palliative care. Different sets of questionnaires were sent to 800 and 425 families who lost family members at one of 70 certified palliative care units in Japan in the development and validation phases, respectively, and 281 families of the latter group in the follow-up phase. The participants were requested to fill out a newly-developed Care Evaluation Scale (CES), along with outcome measures (the perceived experience and satisfaction levels) and potential covariates (the degree of expectation, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the Social Desirability Scale). We obtained 485, 310, and 202 responses in the development, validation, and follow-up phases (response rates: 64%, 75%, and 72%, respectively). The 28-item CES had an overall Cronbach's coefficient alpha of 0.98; the intra-class correlation coefficient in the test-retest examination was 0.57. A confirmatory factor analysis revealed 10 subscales: physical care (by physicians, by nurses), psycho-existential care, help with decision-making (for patients, for family), environment, family burden, cost, availability, and coordination/consistency. The CES subscales were only moderately correlated with the perceived-experience and satisfaction levels of corresponding areas (r=0.36-0.52 and 0.39-0.60, respectively). The CES score was not significantly associated with the degree of expectation, the changes of depression, or the Social Desirability Scale. The CES is a useful tool to measure the bereaved family's perception of the necessity for improvement in structural/procedural aspects of palliative care. The advantages of the CES are: 1) it specifically evaluates the structure and process of care, 2

  16. Understanding the concept of a "good death" among bereaved family caregivers of cancer patients in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geok Ling; Woo, Ivan Mun Hong; Goh, Cynthia

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the concept of a good death from the perspectives of both the dying person and the family caregiver, as perceived by bereaved family caregivers of advanced cancer patients. The data were gathered from five focus group discussions and one face-to-face qualitative interview conducted over 8 months among 18 bereaved family caregivers recruited from a local hospice. The transcripts of the focus groups and the interview were entered into NVivo Version 8 and were analyzed using the thematic approach. A good death may be understood as having the biopsychosocial and spiritual aspects of life handled well at the end of life. Five major themes were identified. These were preparation for death, family and social relationships, moments at or near death, comfort and physical care, and spiritual well-being. Differences were also noted in what is important at the end of life between the patients and caregivers. Having a quick death with little suffering was perceived to be good by the patient, but the family caregiver wanted to be able to say a final goodbye to the patient. Patients tend to prefer not to die in their children's presence but the children wished to be present for the final moment. In addition, family caregivers reported it was important for them to be able to give the patients permission to die, to feel recognized for the efforts made, and to have had a fulfilling caregiving experience. Whereas there are global attributes of a good death, our findings suggest that patients and family caregivers may define a good death differently. Therefore, there is a need to respect, address, and reconcile the differences, so that all parties may have a good experience at the end of a person's life.

  17. Decision Making Regarding the Place of End-of-Life Cancer Care: The Burden on Bereaved Families and Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Sena; Arao, Harue; Masutani, Eiko; Aoki, Miwa; Kishino, Megumi; Morita, Tatsuya; Shima, Yasuo; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Aoyama, Maho; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-05-01

    Decision making regarding the place of end-of-life (EOL) care is an important issue for patients with terminal cancer and their families. It often requires surrogate decision making, which can be a burden on families. To explore the burden on the family of patients dying from cancer related to the decisions they made about the place of EOL care and investigate the factors affecting this burden. This was a cross-sectional mail survey using a self-administered questionnaire. Participants were 700 bereaved family members of patients with cancer from 133 palliative care units in Japan. The questionnaire covered decisional burdens, depression, grief, and the decision-making process. Participants experienced emotional pressure as the highest burden. Participants with a high decisional burden reported significantly higher scores for depression and grief (both P < 0.001). Multiple regression analyses revealed that higher burden was associated with selecting a place of EOL care that differed from that desired by participants (P < 0.001) and patients (P = 0.034), decision making without knowing the patient's wishes and values (P < 0.001) and without participants sharing their wishes and values with the patient's doctors and/or nurses (P = 0.022), and making the decision because of a due date for discharge from a former facility or hospital (P = 0.005). Decision making regarding the place of EOL care was recalled as burdensome for family decision makers. An early decision-making process that incorporates sharing patients' and family members' values that are relevant to the desired place of EOL care is important. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Importance of explanation before and after forensic autopsy to the bereaved family: lessons from a questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takako; Nobutomo, Koichi; Fujimiya, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2010-02-01

    To investigate how bereaved families felt about the explanation received before and after forensic autopsies, the authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of the bereaved families whose next of kin underwent a forensic autopsy at the two Departments of Forensic Medicine and a few bereaved families of crime victims. Of 403 questionnaires sent, 126 families responded. Among 81.5% of the respondents who received an explanation from policemen before the autopsy, 78.8% felt that the quality of the explanation was poor or improper. In Japan, the law has restricted disclosure of information from a forensic autopsy. Despite legal restrictions, 82% wanted to hear from the person who conducted the autopsy. However, police explained the results of autopsy to 65.2% of respondents. Among the families whose frustration and anger increased after autopsy, 86.4% had not been satisfied with the explanation before the autopsy. Additionally, 57.7% had not been informed on the autopsy findings at the time of the questionnaire when more than 2 years had passed after the autopsy. These results reminded us of the importance of an explanation before and shortly after a forensic autopsy for a better understanding and acceptance by bereaved families.

  19. [A nurse's experience applying grief counseling to a bereaved family].

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Wen-Ling

    2010-04-01

    This case report describes a nurse's experience applying William Worden's Grief Counseling on a young woman whose mother had passed away after a brief period in a coma. The report describes how the nurse facilitated this case and assisted the woman though the grief process, during which the woman completed the four tasks of mourning. Seven behavioral process records were analyzed base on Worden's grief responses. Emotional reactions included shock, denial, guilt and fear. Insomnia was the sole physical reaction indicated. Cognitive reactions included disbelief with regard to the death and preoccupation with her mother. Social withdrawal, avoidance of mentioning her mother, calling out, sighing and crying comprised the main behavioral reactions. The author applied the concepts and principles of grief counseling by accompanying and supporting this case though the grief process, and helping the patient complete the four tasks of mourning, which are: (1) to experience the pain of grief, (2) to accept the reality of the death, (3) to adjust to life after the death, and (4) to move on with life. It is hoped that this case report will help nursing staffs be more sensitive and receptive to family grieving and be better equipped to provide proper grief care.

  20. A decision model for community nurses providing bereavement care.

    PubMed

    Brownhill, Suzanne; Chang, Esther; Bidewell, John; Johnson, Amanda

    2013-03-01

    Community (district) nurses play a significant role in assisting and supporting bereaved informal carers (family members and friends) of recently decease clients of palliative care. Bereavement care demands a wide range of competencies including clinical decision-making. To date, little has been known about the decision-making role of community nurses in Australia. The aim of this study was to conduct in-depth examination of an existing data set generated from semi-structured interviews of 10 community nurses providing follow-up bereavement care home visits within an area health service of a metropolitan region of Sydney, Australia. A grounded theory approach to data analysis generated a model, which highlights an interaction between 'the relationship','the circumstances' (surrounding the bereavement),'the psychosocial variant', 'the mix of nurses', 'the workload', and 'the support' available for the bereaved and for community nurses, and elements of 'the visit' (central to bereavement care). The role of community nurses in bereavement care is complex, particularly where decision-making is discretionary and contingent on multiple variables that effect the course of the family's grief. The decision model has the potential to inform community nurses in their support of informal carers, to promote reflective practice and professional accountability, ensuring continuing competence in bereavement care.

  1. The Family Bereavement Program: description of a theory-based prevention program for parentally-bereaved children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Tim S; Wolchik, Sharlene A; Sandler, Irwin N; Twohey, Joan L; Weyer, Janelle Lutzke; Padgett-Jones, Sarah; Weiss, Lillie; Cole, Eloise; Kriege, Gary

    This article describes a preventive intervention to promote resilience of parentally bereaved youth. This intervention includes separate but concurrent programs for youth and caregivers that were developed to change empirically-supported risk and protective factors. We first discuss the risk that parental death confers to youth mental health and social adaptation outcomes. Next, we discuss the theoretical framework underlying this program. After describing the content and structure of the program, we describe the results of an experimental field trial and discuss directions for future work.

  2. The Family Bereavement Program: Description of a theory-based prevention program for parentally-bereaved children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Tim S.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Twohey, Joan L.; Weyer, Janelle Lutzke; Padgett-Jones, Sarah; Weiss, Lillie; Cole, Eloise; Kriege, Gary

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a preventive intervention to promote resilience of parentally bereaved youth. This intervention includes separate but concurrent programs for youth and caregivers that were developed to change empirically-supported risk and protective factors. We first discuss the risk that parental death confers to youth mental health and social adaptation outcomes. Next, we discuss the theoretical framework underlying this program. After describing the content and structure of the program, we describe the results of an experimental field trial and discuss directions for future work. PMID:24968618

  3. Assumptive Worldviews and Problematic Reactions to Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currier, Joseph M.; Holland, Jason M.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Forty-two individuals who had lost an immediate family member in the prior 2 years and 42 nonbereaved matched controls completed the World Assumptions Scale (Janoff-Bulman, 1989) and the Symptom Checklist-10-Revised (Rosen et al., 2000). Results showed that bereaved individuals were significantly more distressed than nonbereaved matched controls,…

  4. Family Member Involvement in Hastened Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starks, Helene; Back, Anthony L.; Pearlman, Robert A.; Koenig, Barbara A.; Hsu, Clarissa; Gordon, Judith R.; Bharucha, Ashok J.

    2007-01-01

    When patients pursue a hastened death, how is the labor of family caregiving affected? The authors examined this question in a qualitative study of 35 families. Four cases reveal the main themes: "taking care" included mutual protection between patients and family members; "midwifing the death" without professional support left families unprepared…

  5. Exploring Nonresponse Bias in the Department of Veterans Affairs' Bereaved Family Survey.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dawn; Kuzla, Natalie; Thorpe, Joshua; Scott, Laura; Ersek, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Patients' and families' evaluations of health care, including palliative care, are widely used as performance measures. Survey scores may be affected by nonresponse bias, resulting in inaccurate performance evaluation. Our aim was to examine nonresponse bias for the mailed version of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Bereaved Family Survey Performance Measure (BFS-PM) and evaluate the effect of nonresponse bias on facilities' BFS-PM scores. A cross-sectional analysis of a national sample was conducted. The sample consisted of 20,540 veterans who died in one of 146 VA Medical Centers (VAMCs) between October 2012 and September 2013. Next of kin (NOK) were asked to complete and return the survey. The BFS-PM is defined as the proportion of NOK who rated overall care for the veteran during the last month of life as "excellent." After creating a model to predict the likelihood of response based on patient and clinical characteristics, we applied inverse probability weights to examine their effect on facilities' scores. We also evaluated facility performance before and after weighting for nonresponse vis-à-vis varying benchmarks. We received 8912 surveys (45% response rate). The mean change in facility BFS-PM scores after weighting was -2%, (range: -10% to+11%). The scores of 31% of facilities changed more than±2%. The number of facilities meeting hypothetical benchmarks of 60%, 70%, and 80% also changed as a result of weighting for nonresponse. Our results underscore the importance of appropriately addressing nonresponse in the use of quality-of-care metrics based on Bereaved Family Survey (BFS) data.

  6. Conducting a multi family member interview study.

    PubMed

    Reczek, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    Family researchers have long recognized the utility of incorporating interview data from multiple family members. Yet, relatively few contemporary scholars utilize such an approach due to methodological underdevelopment. This article contributes to family scholarship by providing a roadmap for developing and executing in-depth interview studies that include more than one family member. Specifically, it outlines the epistemological frames that most commonly underlie this approach, illustrates thematic research questions that it best addresses, and critically reviews the best methodological practices of conducting research with this approach. The three most common approaches are addressed in depth: separate interviews with each family member, dyadic or group interviews with multiple family members, and a combined approach that uses separate and dyadic or group interviews. This article speaks to family scholars who are at the beginning stages of their research project but are unsure of the best qualitative approach to answer a given research question. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  7. Methods of Assessment for Affected Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Velleman, Richard; Copello, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The article begins by making the point that a good assessment of the needs and circumstances of family members is important if previous neglect of affected family members is to be reversed. The methods we have used in research studies are then described. They include a lengthy semi-structured interview covering seven topic areas and standard…

  8. Bereavement in the elderly: the role of primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement in the elderly is a concern to primary care physicians (PCPs) as it can lead to psychological illness such as depression. Most people are able to come to terms with their grief without any intervention, but some people are not. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of bereavement-related depressive illness in elderly people. PCPs need to optimise support and available resources prior to, and throughout, the bereavement period in order to reduce the family members' burden and suffering. PMID:24427183

  9. The Psychological Effects of a Stillbirth on Surviving Family Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFrain, John; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Interview and written testimony from over 300 mothers and fathers who had experienced a stillbirth suggest themes common to these bereaved families: shock, blame, guilt and hardship; desperate need to remember; utility of autopsies and funerals; irrational and terrifying thoughts; need for support systems; issues surrounding surviving siblings and…

  10. Interviewing when family members are present.

    PubMed

    Lang, Forrest; Marvel, Kim; Sanders, David; Waxman, Dael; Beine, Kathleen L; Pfaffly, Carol; McCord, Elizabeth

    2002-04-01

    The presence of family members at an office visit creates unique opportunities and challenges for the physician while interviewing the patient. The physician must address issues of confidentiality, privacy, and agency. Special skills are required to respectfully and efficiently involve family members, while keeping the patient at the center of the visit. A core set of interviewing skills exists for office visit interviews with family members present. These skills include building rapport with each participant by identifying their individual issues and perspectives, and encouraging participation by listening to and addressing the concerns of all persons. Physicians should also avoid triangulation, maintain confidentiality, and verify agreement with the plan. It may be necessary to use more advanced family interviewing skills, including providing direction despite problematic communications; managing conflict; negotiating common ground; and referring members to family therapy.

  11. Family management after the sudden death of a family member.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Debra L

    2012-02-01

    Although more is known about how individuals within families make decisions and manage more discrete issues when a family member is dying, less is known about how families as a unit manage after the sudden death of a family member. The article discusses an investigation that was conducted to better understand how families respond to the life-threatening illness or injury and eventual death of a family member. The purpose of the study was to define Family Management Styles (FMSs) and determine distinctive characteristics of each FMS used by families after the death of a family member who had life-sustaining therapy withdrawn as a result of an unexpected, life-threatening illness or injury. Interviews are conducted with 8 families (22 family members) 1 to 2 years after the death of their family members. A modified typology of FMSs based on a directed analysis that was then inductively modified includes: progressing, accommodating, maintaining, struggling, and floundering. Understanding FMSs and how FMSs may change over time, reflecting the changing focus of family work, will further aid in the development of family-focused interventions as well as develop FMSs within the context of end of life.

  12. Caregiver responsiveness to the family bereavement program: what predicts responsiveness? What does responsiveness predict?

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Erin N; Sandler, Irwin N; Millsap, Roger E; Wolchik, Sharlene A; Berkel, Cady; Ayers, Timothy S

    2013-12-01

    The study developed a multidimensional measure to assess participant responsiveness to a preventive intervention and applied this measure to study how participant baseline characteristics predict responsiveness and how responsiveness predicts program outcomes. The study was conducted with caregivers who participated in the parenting-focused component of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a prevention program for families that have experienced parental death. The sample consisted of 89 caregivers assigned to the intervention condition in the efficacy trial of the FBP. Positive parenting, caregiver depression, and child externalizing problems at baseline were found to predict caregivers' use of program skills outside the group, and more child internalizing problems predicted more positive perceptions of the group environment. Higher levels of skill use during the program predicted increased positive parenting at the 11-month follow-up, whereas positive perceptions of the group environment predicted decreased caregiver depressive symptoms at follow-up. Caregiver skill use mediated the relation between baseline positive parenting and improvements in positive parenting at 11-month follow-up, and skill use and perceived group environment mediated changes in caregiver depression from baseline to 11-month follow-up.

  13. Caregiver Responsiveness to the Family Bereavement Program: What predicts responsiveness? What does responsiveness predict?

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfelder, Erin N.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Millsap, Roger E.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Berkel, Cady; Ayers, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    The study developed a multi-dimensional measure to assess participant responsiveness to a preventive intervention, and applied this measure to study how participant baseline characteristics predict responsiveness and how responsiveness predicts program outcomes. The study was conducted with caregivers who participated in the parenting-focused component of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a prevention program for families that have experienced parental death. The sample consisted of 89 caregivers assigned to the intervention condition in the efficacy trial of the FBP. Positive parenting, caregiver depression, and child externalizing problems at baseline were found to predict caregivers’ use of program skills outside the group, and more child internalizing problems predicted more positive perceptions of the group environment. Higher levels of skill use during the program predicted increased positive parenting at the 11-month follow-up, whereas positive perceptions of the group environment predicted decreased caregiver depressive symptoms at follow-up. Caregiver skill use mediated the relation between baseline positive parenting and improvements in positive parenting at 11-month follow-up, and skill use and perceived group environment mediated changes in caregiver depression from baseline to 11-month follow-up. PMID:23404661

  14. 42 CFR 435.119 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Qualified family members. 435.119 Section 435.119... Family Members § 435.119 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 435.116 of...

  15. 42 CFR 435.119 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Qualified family members. 435.119 Section 435.119... Family Members § 435.119 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 435.116 of this...

  16. Critical care family needs: nurse-family member confederate pairs.

    PubMed

    Forrester, D A; Murphy, P A; Price, D M; Monaghan, J F

    1990-11-01

    In this study we explored the relationship between critical care family members' perceived needs and the assessment of these needs by a confederate sample of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses. Family needs were measured by using Molter's revised Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Data consisted of 92 confederate pairs of Critical Care Family Needs Inventory responses obtained from 92 family members of adult patients hospitalized in a variety of ICUs and 49 ICU nurses providing direct care for these patients. Paired t tests (two tailed) were calculated to detect significant differences between confederate pairs of family members' perceptions and ICU nurses' assessments of the importance of the needs studied. Family members' perceptions and ICU nurses' assessments of the most and least important critical care family needs were identified. Significant (p less than 0.001 to p less than 0.05) differences were detected between confederate pairs of family members' perceptions and ICU nurses' assessments of the importance of 15 (50%) of the critical care family needs studied. Therefore, it appears that these nurses were only moderately accurate in their assessments of critical care family needs. Implications for nursing practice, education, and research were identified and discussed.

  17. Which carers of family members at the end of life need more support from health services and why?

    PubMed

    McNamara, Beverley; Rosenwax, Lorna

    2010-04-01

    With end of life care a national priority in many countries, and the main place of care the family home, informal family carers are now considered the frontline of primary care. Yet we are insufficiently informed about the needs of carers, both during the time of caring and during bereavement. This study identifies which carers believed they did not get enough support from health services when caring for a terminally ill family member, what factors influenced perceptions of support, and whether inadequate support influenced the carer's health following the death of a family member. Unlike previous survey designs that explore end-of-life concerns, we were able to triangulate interview data from semi-structured telephone interviews (August 2005-June 2006) with a relatively large group of 1071 carers in Western Australia, with administrative records from death registrations, hospital morbidity and community care records from the 1071 deceased family members. The addition of administrative data allowed us to quantify hospital and community care service use. Data analysis consisted of summary statistics and logistic regressions for two groups of carers during the first few months of bereavement: those whose health got a bit/lot worse, and those who were not coping on most/all days. We found that carers were more likely to have poor health if they perceived they did not get enough support from health services and if the deceased family member did not die in the carer's preferred place of death. Additionally, carers were more likely to be not coping if they were aged 60 years or less, female, had lost a spouse/partner and the deceased family member did not die in the carer's preferred place. By identifying which carers are more vulnerable than others, carer education and practical support can be targeted to specific groups. Ideally resources for bereavement support should be extended into the months following the relative's death.

  18. Family's difficulty scale in end-of-life home care: a new measure of the family's difficulties in caring for patients with cancer at the end of life at home from bereaved family's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoko; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Sato, Kazuki; Ozawa, Taketoshi

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a tool to measure the family's difficulties in caring for cancer patients at the end of life at home: Family's Difficulty Scale in end-of-life home care (FDS). The draft of the FDS was derived from a pilot interview survey and literature reviews. The questionnaires were sent to 395 bereaved family caregivers whose family members were patients with terminal cancer receiving home service. We obtained 306 responses (response rate, 81%). Factor analysis resulted in 29 items and 8 factors: Burden of Care, Concerns about Home Care Doctor, Balance of Work and Care, Patient's Pain and Condition, Concerns about Visiting Nurse, Concerns about Home Care Service, Relationship between Family Caregivers and their Families, and Funeral Preparations. The cumulative rate of contribution was 71.8%. Cronbach coefficient α for the FDS was 0.73-0.75; the intraclass correlation coefficient in the test-retest examination was 0.75-0.85. Evidence for construct validity was confirmed by convergent and divergent validity. Concurrent validity was confirmed by significant correlations between identified factors and concurrent measures. The validity and reliability of this new instrument were confirmed. This scale should help home care providers to assess and focus on family difficulties and provide individualized care for the family who cares for a patient with terminal cancer at home.

  19. The Effect of a Videotape about Death on Bereaved Children in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Janet B.; Weinstein, Sanford A.

    1980-01-01

    Children who had lost a family member were tested to determine the effect of a videotape about reactions to death. Those who viewed the tape were more able to discuss death in family therapy sessions than those who did not view the tape. (JAC)

  20. Intensive care bereavement practices across New Zealand and Australian intensive care units: a qualitative content analysis.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen; Mitchell, Marion; James, Stephen; Wetzig, Krista

    2017-10-01

    End-of-life and bereavement care is an important consideration in intensive care. This study describes the type of bereavement care provided in intensive care units across Australia and New Zealand. Inductive qualitative content analysis was conducted on free-text responses to a web-based survey exploring unit-based bereavement practice distributed to nurse managers in 229 intensive care units in New Zealand and Australia. A total of 153 (67%) surveys were returned with 68 respondents making free-text responses. Respondents were mainly Australian (n = 54, 85·3%), from the public sector (n = 51, 75%) and holding Nurse Unit Managers/Charge Nurse roles (n = 39, 52·9%). From the 124 free-text responses, a total of 187 individual codes were identified focussing on bereavement care practices (n = 145, 77·5%), educational provision to support staff (n = 15, 8%) and organisational challenges (n = 27, 14·4%). Bereavement care practices described use of memory boxes, cultural specificity, annual memorial services and use of community support services. Educational provision identified local in-service programmes, and national bereavement courses for specialist bereavement nurse coordinators. Organisational challenges focussed on lack of funding, especially for provision of bereavement follow-up. This is the first Australasian-wide survey, and one of the few international studies, describing bereavement practices within intensive care, an important aspect of nursing practice. However, with funding for new bereavement services and education for staff lacking, there are continued challenges in developing bereavement care. Given knowledge about the impact of these areas of care on bereaved family members, this requires review. Nurses remain committed to supporting bereaved families during and following death in intensive care. With limited resource to support bereavement care, intensive care nurses undertake a range of bereavement care practices at time of death

  1. Reconstructing meaning through occupation after the death of a family member: accommodation, assimilation, and continuing bonds.

    PubMed

    Hoppes, Steve; Segal, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Reactions to death have been studied extensively from psychological, behavioral, and physiological perspectives. Occupational adaptation to loss has received scant attention. Qualitative research was undertaken to identify and describe occupational responses in bereavement. The constant comparative approach was used to analyze and interpret the occupational responses. Adaptive strategies of occupational accommodation and assimilation were used after the death of a family member. Desire to sustain bonds with the deceased motivated specific occupational engagements. These occupational responses served to reconstruct meaning after the death of a family member. These findings contribute to understanding adaptation after death by adding an occupational perspective to previous theories. Occupational therapists' abilities to support clients after loss can be enhanced through appreciation of occupational accommodation and assimilation and the role of continuing occupational bonds after the death of a loved one.

  2. Longitudinal mediators of a randomized prevention program effect on cortisol for youth from parentally-bereaved families

    PubMed Central

    Luecken, Linda J.; Hagan, Melissa J.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Ayers, Tim S.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We recently reported that a randomized controlled trial of a family-focused intervention for parentally-bereaved youth predicted higher cortisol output 6 years later relative to a control group of bereaved youth (Luecken et al., 2010). The current study evaluated longitudinal mediators of the preventive intervention effect on cortisol 6 years later. Method Parentally bereaved children (N=139; mean age 11.4, SD = 2.4; age range = 8-16 years; 54% male; 61% Caucasian, 17% Hispanic, 7% African American, 15% other ethnicities) were randomly assigned to the 12-week preventive intervention (n=78) or a self-study control (n=61) condition. Six years later (mean age 17.5, SD 2.4), cortisol was sampled as youth participated in a parent-child conflict interaction task. Using 4 waves of data across the 6 years, longitudinal mediators of the program impact on cortisol were evaluated. Results Program-induced increases in positive parenting, decreases in child exposure to negative life events, and lower externalizing symptoms significantly mediated the intervention effect on cortisol 6 years later. Conclusions An intervention targeting improved parenting and reduced child exposure to additional life stressors following the death of a parent may have long-term neuroendocrine effects. PMID:23529870

  3. Impact of the condolence letter on the experience of bereaved families after a death in intensive care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kentish-Barnes, Nancy; Chevret, Sylvie; Azoulay, Elie

    2016-02-20

    As intensive care mortality is high, end of life is a subject of major concern for intensivists. In this context, relatives are particularly vulnerable and prone to post-ICU syndrome, in the form of high levels of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress, and complicated grief. Grieving families suffer from a feeling of abandonment and evoke the need to get back in touch with the team to ask questions and remove doubts, but very few actually do. Aiding families during the grieving process is an important aspect of palliative care. A condolence letter represents an opportunity to recognize the pain of the family member and the strong tie that linked the family member to the ICU team, and to offer additional information if necessary. The goal of the study is to measure the impact of the condolence letter on the experience of bereaved families after a death in the ICU. Our hypothesis is that a post-death follow-up in the form of a condolence letter sent by the ICU physician who was in charge of the patient may help to reduce the risks of presenting symptoms of anxiety/depression, post-traumatic stress, and complicated grief. This is a randomized, controlled, multicenter study. Research will compare two groups of bereaved family members: one group that does not receive a condolence letter (control) and one group that receives a condolence letter 15 days after the death (intervention). Each of the 22 participating centers will include 12 relatives. Participating relatives will be followed up by phone with a call at 1 month and one at 6 months to complete questionnaires, permitting evaluation of post-ICU burden. The main outcome is anxiety and depression measured at 1 month. Other outcomes include evaluation of quality of dying and death, post-traumatic stress, and complicated grief. This study will allow us to assess if sending a condolence letter can reduce the risks of presenting symptoms of anxiety and depression, complicated grief, and symptoms of post

  4. Fort Lewis Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebdon, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Located in the shadow of Mt. Rainier, Fort Lewis is the home of the highest per capita exceptional family member population in the Army. Ideally located on the Northwest coast of Washington State, Fort Lewis is home to the Strykers and First Brigade. Combined with its close proximity to McChord Air Force Base, the installation is ideally suited to…

  5. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  6. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  7. Fort Lewis Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebdon, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Located in the shadow of Mt. Rainier, Fort Lewis is the home of the highest per capita exceptional family member population in the Army. Ideally located on the Northwest coast of Washington State, Fort Lewis is home to the Strykers and First Brigade. Combined with its close proximity to McChord Air Force Base, the installation is ideally suited to…

  8. Depression: Supporting a Family Member or Friend

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a family member or friend dealing with depression get treatment and find resources. By Mayo Clinic Staff Helping ... depression.asp. Accessed July 9, 2015. FYI: Understanding depression and effective treatment. American Psychological Association. http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/ ...

  9. Grief elaboration in families with handicapped member.

    PubMed

    Calandra, C; Finocchiaro, G; Raciti, L; Alberti, A

    1992-01-01

    Families with handicapped member seem to follow the same five stages (rejection and isolation, anger, dealing with the problem, depression, acceptance) of Kubler-Ross grief elaboration theory while dealing with the narcissistic wound of a handicapped child. Some of these families show a block in one of the stages. The effort of psychotherapy is to remove the block and let them reach the last stage. In this paper families under systemic psychotherapeutic treatment are analyzed, who had in common the birth of a child with low or modest invalidating signs and psychotic or autistic features. The families structure did not show the characteristics of a psychotic family. Nevertheless either one or both parents ignored the evidence of their child disease and they built a "disease-incongrous" wait around the child, trying to push away the painful reality. The authors explain the importance of this approach for the improvement of the autistic traits.

  10. Family Distancing Following a Fatal Farm Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Paul C.; Karis, Terri A.

    1994-01-01

    Interviewed 21 farm families following fatal accident. Identified factors involved in bereaved family members becoming more distant from one another: blaming and fear of blame; economic crisis when farm operator is killed; family differences over expression of feelings; preoccupation and emotional flatness of bereavement; and role of kinship…

  11. Comfort and consolation: a nursing perspective on parental bereavement.

    PubMed

    Yoder, L

    1994-01-01

    The death of a child is the most potentially devastating event that a family can ever experience (Lundin, 1984). The death of a child also has a significant impact on the lives of health care professionals who must provide care both for the child and for the grieving family members. Nurses can assume a critical role in supporting bereaved families by becoming cognizant of parental grief responses and by developing an awareness of the needs of families in planning appropriate interventions.

  12. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under §...

  13. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 436...

  14. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 436...

  15. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 436...

  16. An Exploration of Lesbian Maternal Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacciatore, Joanne; Raffo, Zulma

    2011-01-01

    Research on parental bereavement has focused historically on single or partnered cross-gendered (heterosexual) bereaved parents. No previous studies have examined the unique experiences of same-gendered bereaved parents. This multiple-case study focused on child death in same-gendered-parent families. The goal of this study was to yield…

  17. An Exploration of Lesbian Maternal Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacciatore, Joanne; Raffo, Zulma

    2011-01-01

    Research on parental bereavement has focused historically on single or partnered cross-gendered (heterosexual) bereaved parents. No previous studies have examined the unique experiences of same-gendered bereaved parents. This multiple-case study focused on child death in same-gendered-parent families. The goal of this study was to yield…

  18. The dying child and surviving family members.

    PubMed

    Shrier, D K

    1980-12-01

    This overview of death and dying focuses on the dying child and surviving family members. Children's concepts of death at different developmental stages are reviewed. These range from an inability to distinguish death from other forms of separation prior to age 3, through partial concepts of death until, by age 10 to 15 years, children are able to conceptualize death as universal, inevitable and final. The importance of adults assisting in the child's growing comprehension of death is stressed. The stages of grief and mourning, as outlined by Kubler-Ross, are reviewed from the perspective of the child and family: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Recognition is given to the variations in coping styles among different family members. The special circumstances related to the death of an infant and the impact of the death of a child on the surviving siblings are discussed. Specific helpful interventions to assist families in coping with mourning are described. The death of a child remains one of the most painful and difficult events for a family and its physician to accept.

  19. Employment Opportunities for Family Members in Germany.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-24

    community wives clubs in Germany. The tables in Appendix 2 provide statistical information on the world - wide distribution of DOD active duty military...fewer local nationals would create a skills imbalance that would be unacceptable? 4. Could we cope with the political repercussions from the unions...Could we cope with the political repercussions from the unions/ works councils if we decided to employ more family members and fewer LN’s? Should we

  20. Conflict rationalisation: how family members cope with a diagnosis of brain stem death.

    PubMed

    Long, Tracy; Sque, Magi; Addington-Hall, Julia

    2008-07-01

    Brain death, whether it be brain stem death in the UK, or whole-brain death in the USA, is a prerequisite for heart-beating organ donation. Understanding how brain death is perceived by family members approached about organ donation, its significance to them, and if it is accepted by them, are, therefore, important issues to explore as biomedicine expands the range of end of life technologies that blur the demarcation between life and death. To explore the concept of brain stem death and its meaning to family members the following research questions were posed: (i) what does the diagnosis of death based on brain stem testing mean to bereaved family members who have been approached and asked to consider a donation from a deceased relative, and (ii) how do family members understand the concept of brain stem death? To address these research questions, a secondary analysis of 28 interviews sorted from two primary datasets was carried out. The primary datasets contained longitudinal and cross-sectional interviews carried out in the UK with family members who had been approached about organ donation and agreed to donate their relatives' organs. Data analysis was guided by constructionist grounded theory method and resulted in the theory of Paradoxical Death. In this process, family members and health professionals engage in a series of practical and psychological activities aimed at rationalising real or potential emotional and cognitive conflict resulting from a brain-based diagnosis of death, whilst faced with the physical image of a functioning body. Rationalising emotional and cognitive conflict is how family members and health professionals appeared to process this paradoxical death, a death that is contrary to conventional opinion.

  1. A Death in the Family: Parental Bereavement in the First Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Judith A.

    If the nature of mourning depends on the relationship between the bereaved and the deceased, then parental mourning following a child's death may be different from mourning following the death of an adult. Parents' (N=145) descriptions of their experiences in the first year after a child's death from cancer or a blood disorder were examined to…

  2. A Death in the Family: Parental Bereavement in the First Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Judith A.

    If the nature of mourning depends on the relationship between the bereaved and the deceased, then parental mourning following a child's death may be different from mourning following the death of an adult. Parents' (N=145) descriptions of their experiences in the first year after a child's death from cancer or a blood disorder were examined to…

  3. Health Professionals and the Bereaved.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterweis, Marian; Townsend, Jessica

    Based on the premise that health care providers and institutions have a professional obligation to help bereaved families, this booklet focuses on the role of health care professionals in lessening distress, helping prevent pathological outcomes, and assisting the bereaved toward a satisfactory outcome. The information provided in this guide is…

  4. Sudden Death and Bereavement Outcomes: The Impact of Resources on Grief Symptomatology and Detachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    Examined grief, family detachment, and impact of resources following sudden bereavement among family members of victims of suicide and accidental deaths. Most grief-stricken survivors were more detached from family. Self-esteem emerged as strongest predictor of grief and played role in mediating influences of religious participation and exercise…

  5. Bereaved parents' perception of the grandparents' reactions to perinatal loss and the pregnancy that follows.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Joann; Warland, Jane; Parker, Lynnda

    2011-08-01

    This article presents bereaved parents' perceptions of their parents' (the grandparents) reactions at the time of loss and in the pregnancy that follows. Data originated from two phenomenological studies conducted to understand bereaved parents' experiences during their loss and subsequent pregnancy. However, this article reports a secondary thematic analysis focused on bereaved parents perceptions of the grandparents' support (or lack of) at the time of loss and during the pregnancy following loss. Our findings illustrate some families found the means to share their grief at the time of loss in a constructive manner, while in others the intergenerational relationship was strained. Most important to parents was intergenerational acknowledgment of the ongoing relationship to the deceased child as an important, though absent family member, especially during the pregnancy that followed. Those supporting bereaved families can play an important role in helping intergenerational communication around perinatal loss and the subsequent pregnancy. © The Author(s) 2011

  6. 20 CFR 653.104 - Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contractors, and crew members. 653.104 Section 653.104 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Farmworkers (MSFWs) § 653.104 Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members. (a... for services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors and crew members. Except as provided...

  7. Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-2-0113 TITLE: Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide PRINCIPAL...2013 - 30 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...to gain new knowledge about the experiences of family members of service members who are experiencing symptoms of PTSD or severe depression . The

  8. Long-term outcomes of war-related death of family members in Kosovar civilian war survivors.

    PubMed

    Morina, Nexhmedin; Reschke, Konrad; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to war-related experiences can comprise a broad variety of experiences and the very nature of certain war-related events has generally been neglected. To examine the long-term outcomes of war-related death of family members, the authors investigated the prevalence rates of major depressive episode (MDE), anxiety disorders, and quality of life among civilian war survivors with or without war-related death of first-degree family members 9 years after the war in Kosovo. Compared to participants without war-related death of family members, those who had experienced such loss had signficantly higher prevalence rates of MDE, posttraumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder, and reported a lower quality of life 9 years after the war. These results indicate that bereaved civilian survivors of war experience significant mental health problems many years after the war.

  9. 5 CFR 890.302 - Coverage of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage of family members. 890.302... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.302 Coverage of family members. (a)(1) An enrollment for self and family includes all family members who are eligible to...

  10. Research: Bereavement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, C. M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews last 10 years of research, counseling, and treatment in area of bereavement. Notes that community support can help some individuals coping with grief, but that others require different interventions. Sees need for research into sequence of events that lead to adverse physical, mental, or social consequences in bereavement, and about types…

  11. School Bereavement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Elaine

    2000-01-01

    At a New York City school, a parent's death is a community tragedy. Caring for a bereaved student requires a generous investment of time and heart: participation in bereavement rituals; acceptance of wide-ranging emotions; increased individual attention; reliable, consistent routines; physical warmth and comforting; and gentle, honest dialogue.…

  12. Peer Support Services for Bereaved Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bartone, Paul T; Bartone, Jocelyn V; Violanti, John M; Gileno, Zaneta M

    2017-01-01

    This systematic literature review assesses the evidence regarding benefits of peer support services for bereaved survivors of sudden or unexpected death. Reports were included that addressed peer support services for adults who experienced death of a family member, close friend, or coworker. Of the 32 studies meeting all inclusion criteria, most showed evidence that peer support was helpful to bereaved survivors, reducing grief symptoms and increasing well-being and personal growth. Studies also showed benefits to providers of peer support, including increased personal growth and positive meaning in life. Several studies addressed the growing trend of Internet-based peer support programs, finding that these are beneficial in part due to their easy accessibility. Peer support appears to be especially valuable for survivors of suicide loss, a result that may be related to stigma and lack of support from family and friends experienced by many suicide survivors. The reviewed studies provide consistent evidence that peer support is beneficial to bereaved survivors.

  13. Bereavement services development in a rural setting.

    PubMed

    Wilker, H I; Lowell, B

    1996-01-01

    Functioning as a hospital-based hospice program of a large medical center, bereavement services are not limited to hospice families in one location. Bereavement services are offered to those who died within the medical center and to the residents of the three county area the hospice serves. This paper identifies ways to offer bereavement follow-up to hospice and non-hospice families. This will include discussion of mixing together survivors of different types of death in a support group atmosphere. Due to the smaller population of a rural setting, the need to be creative to offer bereavement services to the community is imperative. This paper will discuss how our Bereavement Services have expanded in response to the needs of the communities in the three county area we serve. We will discuss survey results, meeting and support group data used to generate supporting information to allow our services to grow. Learning objectives for this article consist of readers being able to identify ways to develop and expand bereavement services; incorporating various types of death in a support group setting; and ways to better serve non-hospice families in need of bereavement follow-up. Topics include a description of Bereavement Services; Pre-Death Bereavement Intervention; Open and Closed Support groups; Routine Bereavement Follow-up of Hospice families; Quarterly Nursing Home Staff Support groups; Widow/Widower Brunch Social; opportunities to educate the community about Death/Dying; and data collection for Bereavement Needs.

  14. Evaluation of the Relationship between Major Depressive Disorder and Bereavement Symptoms in Elderly Patients Who Present Either to Psychiatry or Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    TAYMUR, İbrahim; ÖZDEL, Kadir; AYPAK, Cenk; DUYAN, Veli; TÜREDİ, Özlem; GÜNGÖR, Buket Belkız; SELVİ, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to determine the level of bereavement and depression symptoms among elderly patients who experience the loss of a significant other and the relationship between depressive symptoms and bereavement symptoms. Methods The study sample consisted of elderly adults who lost a significant other at least 6 months prior to the submission time. Participants were recruited from patients who presented to either the psychiatry or family medicine outpatient unit of a Training and Research Hospital. Cognitive functions were assessed using Standardized Mini Mental Examinations for Educated and Uneducated People (SMME/SMME-U). Participants were excluded from the study if their SMME or SMME-U scores were lower than 23 points. To assess the severity of depressive and bereavement symptoms, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and Core Bereavement Items (CBI) scales were used, respectively. Results Overall, 33 out of 67 individuals (49.2%) who presented to the psychiatry unit and 7 out of the 43 individuals (16.3%) who presented to the family medicine unit were diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). CBI scale score means were higher in the MDD groups than in the non-depressive groups (p=0.012 and p=0.001, respectively). CBI scores were significantly correlated to acute (p=0.047) and chronic stress (p=0.007) in the psychiatry group and to chronic stress in the family medicine group (p=0.001). Conclusion Probing loss experiences and reactions to them can be important to understand depression, to evaluate its symptoms, and to help manage the relevant symptoms. Considering the significant contributions of bereavement to depressive symptom severity in elders, interventions specific to bereavement symptoms should not be ignored. PMID:28360781

  15. Evaluation of the Relationship between Major Depressive Disorder and Bereavement Symptoms in Elderly Patients Who Present Either to Psychiatry or Family Medicine.

    PubMed

    Taymur, İbrahim; Özdel, Kadir; Aypak, Cenk; Duyan, Veli; Türedi, Özlem; Güngör, Buket Belkız; Selvi, Yavuz

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to determine the level of bereavement and depression symptoms among elderly patients who experience the loss of a significant other and the relationship between depressive symptoms and bereavement symptoms. The study sample consisted of elderly adults who lost a significant other at least 6 months prior to the submission time. Participants were recruited from patients who presented to either the psychiatry or family medicine outpatient unit of a Training and Research Hospital. Cognitive functions were assessed using Standardized Mini Mental Examinations for Educated and Uneducated People (SMME/SMME-U). Participants were excluded from the study if their SMME or SMME-U scores were lower than 23 points. To assess the severity of depressive and bereavement symptoms, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and Core Bereavement Items (CBI) scales were used, respectively. Overall, 33 out of 67 individuals (49.2%) who presented to the psychiatry unit and 7 out of the 43 individuals (16.3%) who presented to the family medicine unit were diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). CBI scale score means were higher in the MDD groups than in the non-depressive groups (p=0.012 and p=0.001, respectively). CBI scores were significantly correlated to acute (p=0.047) and chronic stress (p=0.007) in the psychiatry group and to chronic stress in the family medicine group (p=0.001). Probing loss experiences and reactions to them can be important to understand depression, to evaluate its symptoms, and to help manage the relevant symptoms. Considering the significant contributions of bereavement to depressive symptom severity in elders, interventions specific to bereavement symptoms should not be ignored.

  16. 32 CFR 884.10 - Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Returning members, employees, and family members... THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.10 Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas. The Air Force expects...

  17. 32 CFR 884.10 - Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Returning members, employees, and family members... THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.10 Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas. The Air Force expects...

  18. An Unusually Shaped Haumea Family Member

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda, P.; McNeill, A.

    2013-09-01

    2013 EL61 Haumea is a 2000 km-scale, fast-spinning Kuiper belt object covered in water ice, but with a bulk density near 2.5 g cm-3 implying a rocky interior (Rabinowitz et al. 2006; Trujillo et al. 2007). Approximately a dozen Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) have been identified as possibly related to Haumea as they share similar orbital properties and unusually fresh, icy surfaces similar to the mantle covering Haumea (Carry et al. 2012). These KBOs are usually referred to as the Haumea family. The formation of the family is the subject of intense speculation (Brown et al. 2007, Schlichting & Sari 2009, Leinhardt et al. 2010). Sparse photometry of one of the family members, 2003 SQ317, revealed an interesting high photometric variability (Snodgrass et al. 2009). We followed up on those observation and used the NTT in La Silla to obtain dense, time-resolved photometry of SQ317 over two semesters. Analysis of the lightcurve (Fig. 1) indicates a spin period P = 7.2 hr and a photometric range m = 0.9 mag. We will present implications of this lightcurve to the object's shape and bulk density.

  19. 42 CFR 31.9 - Dependent members of families; treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dependent members of families; treatment. 31.9... Public Health Service § 31.9 Dependent members of families; treatment. To the extent and under the... the dependent members of families of the following persons: (a) Coast Guard. Commissioned...

  20. 42 CFR 31.9 - Dependent members of families; treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dependent members of families; treatment. 31.9... Public Health Service § 31.9 Dependent members of families; treatment. To the extent and under the... the dependent members of families of the following persons: (a) Coast Guard. Commissioned officers...

  1. 42 CFR 31.9 - Dependent members of families; treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dependent members of families; treatment. 31.9... Public Health Service § 31.9 Dependent members of families; treatment. To the extent and under the... the dependent members of families of the following persons: (a) Coast Guard. Commissioned officers...

  2. 42 CFR 31.9 - Dependent members of families; treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dependent members of families; treatment. 31.9... Public Health Service § 31.9 Dependent members of families; treatment. To the extent and under the... the dependent members of families of the following persons: (a) Coast Guard. Commissioned officers...

  3. Coupled transport of p24 family members.

    PubMed

    Emery, G; Rojo, M; Gruenberg, J

    2000-07-01

    Recent studies show that small trans-membrane proteins of approximately 22-24 kDa (the p24 family), which are grouped into 4 sub-families by sequence homology (p23, p24, p25 and p26), are involved in the early secretory pathway. In this study, we have investigated the mutual requirements of ectopically expressed members of the p24 family for targeting to their proper cellular destination. We find that coexpression of p23 and p24 is both necessary and sufficient for each protein to be transported to the cis-Golgi network/Golgi complex. Proteins from other subfamilies did not substitute for either p23 or p24, even after multiple coexpression. However, trafficking of the p23/p24 couple was facilitated by coexpression of proteins from other sub-families. In addition, we find that the sequence resembling an endoplasmic reticulum retrieval signal present in the cytoplasmic domain of p23 (but not p24) is dispensable. In contrast, the conserved coiled-coil region in the lumenal domain is absolutely required in both p23 and p24 for proper targeting of the p23/p24 couple. These data demonstrate that p23 and p24 must interact with each other to reach their destination, but that this strict requirement is combined with a mutual dependence amongst p24 proteins. We speculate that p24 proteins can form different oligomeric complexes, which contribute to confer specialized sorting/trafficking properties to membranes of the early secretory pathway, perhaps serving as membrane organizers.

  4. Family Members' Reports of the Technology Use of Family Members with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, S. B.; Wehmeyer, M. L.; Davies, D. K.; Stock, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A nationwide survey of family members of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities ranging in age from birth through adulthood was conducted to replicate a similar effort by Wehmeyer and update the knowledge base concerning technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Method: Survey responses…

  5. Family Members' Reports of the Technology Use of Family Members with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, S. B.; Wehmeyer, M. L.; Davies, D. K.; Stock, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A nationwide survey of family members of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities ranging in age from birth through adulthood was conducted to replicate a similar effort by Wehmeyer and update the knowledge base concerning technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Method: Survey responses…

  6. Death of family members as an overlooked source of racial disadvantage in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Julie Skalamera; Crosnoe, Robert; Liu, Hui; Pudrovska, Tetyana; Donnelly, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Long-standing racial differences in US life expectancy suggest that black Americans would be exposed to significantly more family member deaths than white Americans from childhood through adulthood, which, given the health risks posed by grief and bereavement, would add to the disadvantages that they face. We analyze nationally representative US data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (n = 7,617) and the Health and Retirement Study (n = 34,757) to estimate racial differences in exposure to the death of family members at different ages, beginning in childhood. Results indicate that blacks are significantly more likely than whites to have experienced the death of a mother, a father, and a sibling from childhood through midlife. From young adulthood through later life, blacks are also more likely than whites to have experienced the death of a child and of a spouse. These results reveal an underappreciated layer of racial inequality in the United States, one that could contribute to the intergenerational transmission of health disadvantage. By calling attention to this heightened vulnerability of black Americans, our findings underscore the need to address the potential impact of more frequent and earlier exposure to family member deaths in the process of cumulative disadvantage. PMID:28115712

  7. Family members' influence on family meal vegetable choices.

    PubMed

    Wenrich, Tionni R; Brown, J Lynne; Miller-Day, Michelle; Kelley, Kevin J; Lengerich, Eugene J

    2010-01-01

    Characterize the process of family vegetable selection (especially cruciferous, deep orange, and dark green leafy vegetables); demonstrate the usefulness of Exchange Theory (how family norms and experiences interact with rewards and costs) for interpreting the data. Eight focus groups, 2 with each segment (men/women vegetable likers/dislikers based on a screening form). Participants completed a vegetable intake form. Rural Appalachian Pennsylvania. Sixty-one low-income, married/cohabiting men (n = 28) and women (n = 33). Thematic analysis within Exchange Theory framework for qualitative data. Descriptive analysis, t tests and chi-square tests for quantitative data. Exchange Theory proved useful for understanding that regardless of sex or vegetable liker/disliker status, meal preparers see more costs than rewards to serving vegetables. Experience plus expectations of food preparer role and of deference to family member preferences supported a family norm of serving only vegetables acceptable to everyone. Emphasized vegetables are largely ignored because of unfamiliarity; family norms prevented experimentation and learning through exposure. Interventions to increase vegetable consumption of this audience could (1) alter family norms about vegetables served, (2) change perceptions of experiences, (3) reduce social and personal costs of serving vegetables, and (4) increase tangible and social rewards of serving vegetables. Copyright 2010 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictors of grief in bereaved family caregivers of person's with Alzheimer's disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Romero, Melissa M; Ott, Carol H; Kelber, Sheryl T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to identify factors in 66 spouses and adult child caregivers of person's with Alzheimer's disease prior to the death that predicted higher levels of grief in bereavement. A hierarchical regression model was tested. Predeath grief, dysfunctional coping, depression, social support, and decreased positive states of mind explained 54.7% of the variance in postdeath grief. Factors that contributed significantly to postdeath grief included predeath grief and depression. Results from this study indicate that risk factors for postdeath grief can be predicted prior to the death.

  9. Comparative integromics on Angiopoietin family members.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-06-01

    Angiopoietin-1 (ANGPT1), Angiopoietin-4 (ANGPT4), VEGF, FGF2, FGF4, HGF, Ephrin, IL8 and CXCL12 (SFD1) are pro-angiogenic factors (angiogenic activators), while Angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT2), Angiostatin, Endostatin, Tumstatin, Canstatin, THBS1, THBS2, TNFSF15 (VEGI) and Vasohibin (VASH1) are anti-angiogenic factors (angiogenic inhibitors). ANGPT1 and ANGPT2 are ligands for TIE family receptor tyrosine kinases, TIE1 and TIE2 (TEK). Angiopoietin family consists of ANGPT1, ANGPT2, ANGPT4, ANGPTL1 (ANGPT3), ANGPTL2, ANGPTL3 (ANGPT5), ANGPTL4, ANGPTL5, ANGPTL6 and ANGPTL7. TCF/LEF binding sites within the promoter region of human Angiopoietin family members were searched for by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (Humint). Because four TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the human ANGPTL7 promoter, comparative genomics analyses on ANGPTL7 orthologs were further performed. ANGPTL7 gene at human chromosome 1p36.22 was located within intron 28 of FRAP1 gene encoding mTOR protein. Chimpanzee ANGPTL7 gene, consisting of five exons, was located within NW_101546.1 genome sequence. Chimpanzee ANGPTL7 showed 99.4% and 86.1% total-amino-acid identity with human ANGPTL7 and mouse Angptl7, respectively. Human ANGPTL7 mRNA was expressed in neural tissues, keratoconus cornea, trabecular meshwork, melanotic melanoma and uterus endometrial cancer, while mouse Angptl7 mRNA was expressed in four-cell embryo, synovial fibroblasts, thymus, uterus and testis. Four TCF/LEF-binding sites within human ANGPTL7 promoter were conserved in chimpanzee ANGPTL7 promoter; however, only an unrelated TCF/LEF-binding site occurred in mouse and rat Angptl7 promoters. Human ANGPTL7, characterized as potent target gene of WNT/ beta-catenin signaling pathway, is a pharmacogenomics target in the fields of oncology and regenerative medicine.

  10. Spiritual Needs of Families With Bereavement and Loss of an Infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Narges; Hasanpour, Marzieh; Heidarzadeh, Mohamad; Alamolhoda, Aliakbar; Waldman, Elisha

    2016-07-01

    The hospital is a place full of distress and questions about the meaning of life. The death of a child can cause a spiritual struggle and crisis. Therefore, it is necessary for health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to assess the spiritual needs of families that have lost a child. The purpose of this study was to explore the spiritual needs of families in Iran at the end of their baby's life and through bereavement in the NICU. This study was an exploratory qualitative study performed using purposeful sampling and semi-structured interviews with 24 participants. Inclusion criteria for families, nurses, and physicians included having experienced at least one newborn death in the last six months in the NICU. The research environment was the NICU in Isfahan, one of the largest cities in Iran. Data analysis revealed three main themes: spiritual belief in a supernatural power, the need for comfort of the soul, and human dignity for the newborn. The results of this study created a new vision in addressing spiritual needs of Iranian families who experience the death of a newborn. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. Terminal care and bereavement.

    PubMed

    Coyle, N; Schachter, S; Carver, A C

    2001-11-01

    Care of patients at the end of life requires a high level of clinical vigilance, compassion and skill. The involvement of the patient's primary neurologist in end-of-life care and into bereavement can be an invaluable comfort to the patient and family. An understanding of the techniques for assessing and anticipating patient and family needs and knowledge of the resources available is essential if the neurologist is to provide guidance in their care.

  12. Perceived Family Resources Based on Number of Members with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Melinda; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how the number of family members with ADHD affects other family members' perceived resources. Method: A total of 40 adolescents diagnosed with ADHD and their mothers, fathers, and adolescent siblings living in the household participated. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze family-level data from a total…

  13. Perceived Family Resources Based on Number of Members with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Melinda; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how the number of family members with ADHD affects other family members' perceived resources. Method: A total of 40 adolescents diagnosed with ADHD and their mothers, fathers, and adolescent siblings living in the household participated. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze family-level data from a total…

  14. Comparative integromics on VEGF family members.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-06-01

    VEGF, Hedgehog, FGF, Notch, and WNT signaling pathways network together for vascular remodeling during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and carcinogenesis. VEGFA (VEGF), VEGFB, VEGFC, VEGFD (FIGF) and PGF (PlGF) are VEGF family ligands for receptor tyrosine kinases, including VEGFR1 (FLT1), VEGFR2 (KDR) and VEGFR3 (FLT4). Bevacizumab (Avastin), Sunitinib (Sutent) and Sorafenib (Nexavar) are anti-cancer drugs targeted to VEGF signaling pathway. TCF/LEF binding sites within the promoter region of human VEGF family members were searched for by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (Humint). Because four TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human VEGFD gene within AC095351.5 genome sequence, comparative genomics analyses on VEGFD orthologs were further performed. ASB9-ASB11-VEGFD locus at human chromosome Xp22.2 and ASB5-VEGFC locus at human chromosome 4q34 were paralogous regions within the human genome. Human VEGFD mRNA was expressed in lung, small intestine, uterus, breast, neural tissues, and neuroblastoma. Mouse Vegfd mRNA was expressed in kidney, pregnant oviduct, and neural tissues. Chimpanzee VEGFD promoter, cow Vegfd promoter, mouse Vegfd promoter and rat Vegfd promoter were identified within NW_121675.1, AC161065.2, AL732475.6 and AC130036.3 genome sequences, respectively. Three out of four TCF/LEF-binding sites within human VEGFD promoter were conserved in chimpanzee VEGFD promoter, and one in cow Vegfd promoter. TCF/LEF-binding site, not conserved in human VEGFD promoter, occurred in cow, mouse and rat Vegfd promoters. At least five out of six bHLH-binding sites within human VEGFD proximal promoter region were conserved in chimpanzee VEGFD proximal promoter region, while only one in cow Vegfd proximal promoter region. Together these facts indicate that relatively significant promoter evolution occurred among mammalian VEGFD orthologs. Human VEGFD was characterized as a potent target gene of WNT

  15. Family members' experiences of the intensive care unit waiting room.

    PubMed

    Kutash, Mary; Northrop, Linda

    2007-11-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore family members' perspectives and experiences of waiting rooms in adult intensive care units. Waiting to visit family members who are hospitalized in intensive care units can be very stressful. Although flexible and or open visiting is practised in many hospitals, family members may spend a great deal of time in the waiting room. A qualitative design using semi-structured interviews was used and the data were collected in 2004. A convenience sample of six visitors was recruited from waiting rooms of three different adult intensive care units. Data collection and analysis were concurrent. Six categories emerged from the data that included structural and subjective aspects of waiting: 'close proximity' referred to the importance of a close physical distance to their family member; 'caring staff' captured the comfort family members felt when staff showed caring behaviours towards relative; 'need for a comfortable environment' represented the impact of the design of the waiting room on family members well-being; 'emotional support' referred to the waiting room as a place where comfort was found by sharing with others; 'rollercoaster of emotions' captured the range of emotions experienced by family members; 'information' referred to the importance of receiving information about their relative. Future research should focus on the impact of the interior design of waiting rooms on the comfort and welfare of family members and on identifying needs of family members across different cultures.

  16. Family meals and body weight. Analysis of multiple family members in family units.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jeffrey C; Sobal, Jeffery

    2011-10-01

    Prior research suggests that frequent family meals are associated with lower body mass index (BMI) among children and adolescents. The primary focus of this study was examining associations of reported frequency of family meals with reported BMI for multiple members of family units that included adults and adolescents. A secondary focus was examining settings for family meals and body weight (home and away from home). A cross-sectional survey recruited 327 individuals in 103 family units visiting one U.S. University. Results revealed that for individuals, frequency of family meals at home was inversely related with BMI, while frequency of family meals away from home was directly related with BMI. Family role analyses showed that frequency of family meals eaten by fathers and sons at home was inversely related to BMI, while for only fathers the frequency of family meals away from home was directly related to BMI. Full family unit analyses summed family member characteristics and found associations between family meal frequency and family BMI at home were inverse, but they were direct away from home. Multilevel regression models indicated that family level characteristics accounted for a substantial portion of the variability in body weight measures both at home and away from home. These findings reveal that meal settings, family roles, and full family units help to understand family meals and body weight. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of the Family Bereavement Program on academic outcomes, educational expectations and job aspirations 6 years later: the mediating role of parenting and youth mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Erin N; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Wolchik, Sharlene; Sandler, Irwin N

    2015-02-01

    Experiencing the death of a parent during childhood is associated with a variety of difficulties, including lower academic achievement, that have implications for functioning in childhood and adulthood. This study examines effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a preventive intervention for parentally-bereaved youth and their caregivers, on grade point averages (GPA), educational expectations and job aspirations of youths 6 years after the intervention. A total of 244 bereaved youths ages 8-16 and their caregivers were randomized to either the FBP or a comparison group that received books about bereavement. Assessments occurred at pretest, post-test, and 11-month and 6-year follow-ups. Direct program effects on educational outcomes and job aspirations 6 years later were non-significant, although the program improved educational expectations for children with fewer behavior problems at program entry, and GPA for younger children. Mediational pathways for program effects on educational outcomes were also tested. Program-induced improvements in effective parenting at 11-month follow-up were associated with higher GPAs at 6-year follow-up for youth who were younger or for whom more time had passed since the loss. Program-induced improvements in parenting and teacher-rated youth mental health problems at the 6-year follow-up mediated program effects on youths' educational expectations for those with fewer behavior problems at program entry. The implications of these findings for understanding processes related to academic and educational outcomes following the death of a parent and for prevention efforts to help bereaved and other high-risk children succeed in school are discussed.

  18. Effects of the Family Bereavement Program on Academic Outcomes, Educational Expectations and Job Aspirations 6 Years Later: The Mediating Role of Parenting and Youth Mental Health Problems

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfelder, Erin N.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Wolchik, Sharlene; Sandler, Irwin N.

    2014-01-01

    Experiencing the death of a parent during childhood is associated with a variety of difficulties, including lower academic achievement, that have implications for functioning in childhood and adulthood. This study examines effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a preventive intervention for parentally-bereaved youth and their caregivers, on grade point averages (GPA), educational expectations and job aspirations of youths 6 years after the intervention. A total of 244 bereaved youths ages 8-16 and their caregivers were randomized to either the FBP or a comparison group that received books about bereavement. Assessments occurred at pretest, post-test, and 11-month and 6-year follow-ups. Direct program effects on educational outcomes and job aspirations 6 years later were non-significant, although the program improved educational expectations for children with fewer behavior problems at program entry, and GPA for younger children. Mediational pathways for program effects on educational outcomes were also tested. Program-induced improvements in effective parenting at 11-month follow-up were associated with higher GPAs at 6-year follow-up for youth who were younger or for whom more time had passed since the loss. Program-induced improvements in parenting and teacher-rated youth mental health problems at the 6-year follow-up mediated program effects on youths’ educational expectations for those with fewer behavior problems at program entry. The implications of these findings for understanding processes related to academic and educational outcomes following the death of a parent and for prevention efforts to help bereaved and other high-risk children succeed in school are discussed. PMID:25052624

  19. Family Members' Experience With Hospice in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Gage, L Ashley; Washington, Karla; Oliver, Debra Parker; Kruse, Robin; Lewis, Alexandra; Demiris, George

    2016-05-01

    Research has documented numerous benefits and challenges associated with receipt of hospice care in nursing homes; however, study of this partnership from the perspective of residents' family members has been limited. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to explore family members' experience with hospice services received in the nursing home setting. Researchers conducted a secondary data analysis of 175 family member interviews using a thematic analytic approach. Findings highlighted the critical role of communication in supporting residents and their family members. Care coordination, support and oversight, and role confusion also impacted family members' experience of hospice care in the nursing home. Efforts directed at enhancing communication and more clearly articulating the roles of members of the health care team are indicated.

  20. Bereavement Rituals in the Muscogee Creek Tribe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Andrea C.; Balk, David E.

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative, collective case study explores bereavement rituals in the Muscogee Creek tribe. Data from interviews with 27 participants, all adult members of the tribe, revealed consensus on participation in certain bereavement rituals. Common rituals included (a) conducting a wake service the night before burial; (b) never leaving the body alone…

  1. Bereavement Rituals in the Muscogee Creek Tribe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Andrea C.; Balk, David E.

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative, collective case study explores bereavement rituals in the Muscogee Creek tribe. Data from interviews with 27 participants, all adult members of the tribe, revealed consensus on participation in certain bereavement rituals. Common rituals included (a) conducting a wake service the night before burial; (b) never leaving the body alone…

  2. Using the Support Group to Respond to the Isolation of Bereavement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedeschi, Richard G.; Calhoun, Lawrence G.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses perceptions of the bereaved that make support groups necessary and the process by which such groups work. Notes that bereavement support groups first produce sense of community with other bereaved persons, then allow group members to begin to concern themselves again with issues other than bereavement. (Author/NB)

  3. GATA family members as inducers for cellular reprogramming to pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Jian; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Minjie; Yao, Anzhi; Shao, Sida; Du, Fengxia; Yang, Caiyun; Chen, Wenhan; Wu, Chen; Yang, Weifeng; Sun, Yingli; Deng, Hongkui

    2015-01-01

    Members of the GATA protein family play important roles in lineage specification and transdifferentiation. Previous reports show that some members of the GATA protein family can also induce pluripotency in somatic cells by substituting for Oct4, a key pluripotency-associated factor. However, the mechanism linking lineage-specifying cues and the activation of pluripotency remains elusive. Here, we report that all GATA family members can substitute for Oct4 to induce pluripotency. We found that all members of the GATA family could inhibit the overrepresented ectodermal-lineage genes, which is consistent with previous reports indicating that a balance of different lineage-specifying forces is important for the restoration of pluripotency. A conserved zinc-finger DNA-binding domain in the C-terminus is critical for the GATA family to induce pluripotency. Using RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, we determined that the pluripotency-related gene Sall4 is a direct target of GATA family members during reprogramming and serves as a bridge linking the lineage-specifying GATA family to the pluripotency circuit. Thus, the GATA family is the first protein family of which all members can function as inducers of the reprogramming process and can substitute for Oct4. Our results suggest that the role of GATA family in reprogramming has been underestimated and that the GATA family may serve as an important mediator of cell fate conversion. PMID:25591928

  4. The After-Death Call to Family Members: Academic Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoboPrabhu, Sheila; Molinari, Victor; Pate, Jennifer; Lomax, James

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss clinical and teaching aspects of a telephone call by the treating clinician to family members after a patient dies. Methods: A MEDLINE search was conducted for references to an after-death call made by the treating clinician to family members. A review of this literature is summarized. Results: A clinical application…

  5. Family members' satisfaction with critical care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Christina; Tisell, Anna; Engström, Asa; Andershed, Birgitta

    2011-01-01

    the aim of this pilot study was to describe family members' satisfaction with the care provided in a Swedish intensive care unit (ICU) based on the following needs: assurance, information, proximity, support, and comfort, which are all included in the Critical Care Family Satisfaction Survey (CCFSS). knowledge concerning satisfaction with care among family members with a critically ill relative in an ICU is important if the family is to be met professionally. the study design was descriptive and retrospective, with a consecutive selection of family members of critically ill people cared for in an ICU. In total 35 family members participated. quantitative analyses based on 20 questions, and a qualitative analysis, based on two open questions was used. The median, average value and percent were computed for every question. The open questions were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. the family members had a high level of satisfaction regarding all groups of needs. They were especially satisfied with flexible visiting hours and the high quality of treatment that the ill person received. The shortcomings that emerged were that family members wanted the physician to be more available for regular talks, the room for relatives was felt to be uncomfortable; and it was felt there were deficiencies in the preparations before the patient's transferral to a ward. the results highlight the family members' need for regular information and the need to improve the environment in the waiting rooms for family members. The ICU staff's competence and their way of encountering the ill person and their family seem to be important for family members' satisfaction with the care.

  6. Health Behaviors in Family Members of Patients Completing Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mazanec, Susan R.; Flocke, Susan A.; Daly, Barbara J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe the impact of the cancer experience on the health behaviors of survivors’ family members and to determine factors associated with family members’ intentions for health behavior change. Design Descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational study. Setting A National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in the Midwestern United States. Sample 39 family members and 50 patients with diagnoses of breast, colon, head and neck, lung, or prostate cancer who were completing definitive cancer treatment. Methods Patients and family members were approached in the clinic at 3 weeks or less before the completion of their course of treatment. Family members completed surveys and a structured interview in-person or via telephone. Main Research Variables Intention, perceived benefit, and confidence for eating a healthy diet, physical activity, and smoking cessation; emotional distress; and family cohesiveness, conflict, and expressiveness. Findings Family members had, on average, high ratings for intention, perceived benefit, and confidence related to behaviors of eating a healthy diet and doing 30 minutes of daily moderate physical activity. They also had high ratings for the extent to which the cancer experience raised their awareness of their own cancer risk and made them think about having screening tests; ratings were lower for making changes in their health behaviors. Distress scores of family members were high at the completion of cancer treatment. Greater intention for physical activity and nutrition was associated with greater perceived benefit and confidence. Higher scores for family expressiveness was associated with intention for nutrition. Greater intention for smoking cessation was associated only with confidence. Conclusions Family members expressed strong intentions to engage in health-promoting behaviors related to physical activity and nutrition at the transition to post-treatment survivorship. Implications for

  7. 77 FR 18143 - Members of a Family for Purpose of Filing a CBP Family Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Members of a Family for Purpose of Filing a CBP Family Declaration AGENCIES: U.S. Customs and Border... eligible to file a single customs declaration for members of a family traveling together upon arrival in... family residing in one household'' to allow more U.S. returning residents to file a family...

  8. Parental Bereavement and the Loss of a Child with Intellectual Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Deirdre E.; Hastings, Richard P.; Vaughan, Frances L.; Huws, Jaci C.

    2008-01-01

    Inequalities in health care and other risk factors mean that children with intellectual disabilities are more likely to predecease their parents. Research on the effects on family members when a child with intellectual disability dies is sparse. In the present review, the authors describe 5 studies of bereavement in intellectual disability and…

  9. Parental Bereavement and the Loss of a Child with Intellectual Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Deirdre E.; Hastings, Richard P.; Vaughan, Frances L.; Huws, Jaci C.

    2008-01-01

    Inequalities in health care and other risk factors mean that children with intellectual disabilities are more likely to predecease their parents. Research on the effects on family members when a child with intellectual disability dies is sparse. In the present review, the authors describe 5 studies of bereavement in intellectual disability and…

  10. Use of a Bereavement Support Group To Help Adolescents Cope with Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Nancy T.; Pack, David L.

    This paper describes the use of a bereavement support group within the high school to provide an effective intervention for students who have experienced the loss of a significant family member or close friend. The first section examines the impact of parental loss on adolescents, noting that the loss of a parent might involve significant changes…

  11. Letting Go of Grief: Bereavement Groups for Children in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samide, Laura L.; Stockton, Rex

    2002-01-01

    The loss of a family member is a traumatic experience for any child, affecting every aspect of life. In this article, we describe many of the needs of the child experiencing a loss, focusing on parental bereavement. A rationale for using support groups with grieving children is presented. Furthermore, we provide a review of best practices from the…

  12. Association Between Bereaved Families' Sense of Security and Their Experience of Death in Cancer Patients: Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Ayumi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Akizuki, Nobuya; Akiyama, Miki; Shirahige, Yutaka; Sato, Kazuki; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Eguchi, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    The sense of security scale was developed to indicate care quality within the community. Bereaved families have perspective to evaluate the quality of the care system. The aim was to examine associations between end-of-life care and sense of security regarding regional cancer care among bereaved families. A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted with families of cancer patients who died in regional areas of Japan. A total of 1046 family caregivers of patients responded to surveys (effective response rate of 65%). In multiple regression analyses, the families' higher age (P < 0.001), home death (P = 0.039), better health status of the family at patients' end of life (P = 0.016), lower caregiving burden (P < 0.001), and elements of perceived good patient death, including being free from physical distress (P < 0.001), trusting the physician (P < 0.001), living in calm circumstances (P = 0.042), and feeling that one's life was fulfilling (P = 0.035), were associated with a higher sense of security. Quality of death and lower burden on family caregivers were associated with families' sense of security. This suggests strategies for improving care quality for each patient to improve the sense of security. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Funeral Directors and Bereaved Children: Beliefs and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    As one component of an ongoing project to develop resources for bereaved children and families, funeral directors were surveyed about their experiences and practices with bereaved children. About one-third of respondents reported that they provided services specifically for bereaved children. Of these, some were proactive (reaching out to provide…

  14. Assessing needs of family members of inpatients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Bužgová, R; Špatenková, N; Fukasová-Hajnová, E; Feltl, D

    2016-07-01

    To provide high-quality and effective cancer care, problems and unmet needs of family members during their relatives' hospitalisation have to be identified as well. The aims were to determine how needs of family members of patients with terminal cancer are met and to analyse factors that influence them. The needs were assessed with the Family Inventory of Needs. Each item (n = 20) represents one need of family members, for which the importance and satisfaction are rated. The study comprised 270 family members of hospitalised advanced cancer patients staying in the University Hospital Ostrava who were receiving palliative care. The family members preferred sufficient basic information and patient comfort. The unmet needs were support of hope (73%) and provision of information (65%). The unmet needs were more frequently identified by women, individuals with lower education, younger persons, unemployed, patients' children and family members of patients with generally unfavourable health status (P < 0.05). There was a correlation between lower quality of life and higher numbers of unmet needs. Targeted interventions aimed at meeting important needs of the family members may improve their quality of life.

  15. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  16. Members of FOX family could be drug targets of cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhua; Li, Wan; Zhao, Ying; Kang, De; Fu, Weiqi; Zheng, Xiangjin; Pang, Xiaocong; Du, Guanhua

    2017-08-19

    FOX families play important roles in biological processes, including metabolism, development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion and longevity. Here we are focusing on roles of FOX members in cancers, FOX members and drug resistance, FOX members and stem cells. Finally, FOX members as drug targets of cancer treatment were discussed. Future perspectives of FOXC1 research were described in the end. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Implementation of an informational card to reduce family members' anxiety.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Mary; Cheng, Dunlei; Vish, Nancy; Dejong, Sandra; Adams, Jenny

    2011-09-01

    For surgical patients' family members, the wait during surgery can cause anxiety that can be exacerbated if staff members provide inadequate or inconsistent information about the patient's status. Educational interventions and other staff-intensive measures to help reduce family members' anxiety can be time consuming for staff members and impractical in a high-volume facility. To improve communication with patients' families, nurses at a heart and vascular hospital in Dallas, Texas, designed and distributed a card containing estimated procedure times, helpful telephone numbers, and other information. A survey of family members indicated that receiving the card reduced anxiety in a significant proportion of the respondents. Copyright © 2011 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lineage Affect Similarity and Health of Older Family Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troll, Lillian E.

    Interviews with same-sex adult members of three-generation family lines can dramatize similarities and differences by age and generation in ways of thinking and feeling. An analysis of interviews with 157 families examined the health of the grandparent, the happiness of each of the three generational representatives, and family salience. Twelve…

  19. The strengths of families in supporting mentally-ill family members.

    PubMed

    Mokgothu, Masego C; Du Plessis, Emmerentia; Koen, Magdalena P

    2015-04-10

    Although families caring for a mentally-ill family member may experience challenges, some of these families may display strengths that help them to overcome difficulties and grow even stronger in caring for their family member. In cases where these families are unable to cope, the mentally-ill family member tends to relapse. This indicated the need to explore the strengths of families that cope with caring for mentally-ill family members. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the strengths of families in supporting mentally-ill family members in Potchefstroom in the North-West Province. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was employed, with purposive sampling and unstructured individual interviews with nine participants. Tesch's eight steps of thematic content analysis were used. Twelve themes emerged from the data. This involved strengths such as obtaining treatment, utilising external resources, faith, social support, supervision, calming techniques, keeping the mentally-ill family member busy, protecting the mentally-ill family member from negative outside influences, creative communication, praise and acceptance. Families utilise external strengths as well as internal strengths in supporting their mentally-ill family member. Recommendations for nursing practice, nursing education and for further research could be formulated. Psychiatric nurses should acknowledge families' strengths and, together with families, build on these strengths, as well as empower families further through psycho-education and support.

  20. Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-2-0113 TITLE: Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Keith D... RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) September 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND...SUBTITLE Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0113 5c. PROGRAM

  1. Posttraumatic stress disorder in women with war missing family members.

    PubMed

    Baraković, Devla; Avdibegović, Esmina; Sinanović, Osman

    2014-12-01

    Research in crisis areas indicate that survivors' responses to the forced disappearance of family members are similar to reactions to other traumatic events. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in women with war missing family members in Bosnia and Herzegovina 18 years after the war in this region (1992-1995). The study included 160 women aged 47.1±14.0 from three regions of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was carried out in the period from April 2010 to May 2011. Of the 160 participants, 120 women had a war missing family member and 40 women had no war missing family members. The Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA) were used for data collection. Basic socio-demographic data and data concerning the missing family members were also collected. Women with war missing family members experienced significantly more traumatic war experiences (18.43±5.27 vs 6.57±4.34, p<0.001). There was a significant difference between the two groups in the total PTSD score (2.48±0.59 vs 1.79±0.53, p<0.001), as well as in the intensity of depression (26.63±13.05 vs 10.32±6.58, p<0.001) and anxiety (21.0±10.69 vs 11.27±7.93, p<0.001). Anxiety and traumatic war experiences were significant predictors of PTSD in the group with war missing family members. Women with war missing family members showed significantly more severe PTSD symptoms. Based on the results of this study, it was determined that the forced disappearance of a family member is an ambiguous situation that can be characterized as a traumatic experience.

  2. Coping with stigma by association and family burden among family members of people with mental illness.

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, Remko L M; Stutterheim, Sarah E; Pryor, John B; Kok, Gerjo; Bos, Arjan E R

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we explored stigma by association, family burden, and their impact on the family members of people with mental illness. We also studied the ways in which family members coped with these phenomena. We conducted semistructured interviews with 23 immediate family members of people with mental illness. Participants reported various experiences of stigma by association and family burden. Social exclusion, being blamed, not being taken seriously, time-consuming caregiving activities, and exhaustion appeared to be the predominant forms of stigma by association and family burden experienced by the participants. The participants used problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies, separately or simultaneously, to cope with the negative impact of stigma by association and family burden. The results suggest that family members should have access to services to address these problems. Social, instrumental, and emotional support should be given to family members by community members and mental health professionals.

  3. Perceived needs of critical care family members: a phenomenological discourse.

    PubMed

    Fry, Shirley; Warren, Nancy A

    2007-01-01

    A phenomenological study with Heideggerian hermeneutic contextual analysis was used to illuminate the perceived needs of family members who were in the critical care waiting room. Family members freely expressed their perceptions of perceived needs, and thick descriptions supported 4 explicit needs expressed by all participants. These needs were seeking information, trusting the professionals, being a part of the care, and maintaining a positive outlook. The dialogues of the participants were presented to develop awareness and stimulate conversation regarding the needs of family members in the critical care waiting room who are an integral part of the healing process of patients in the critical care unit.

  4. 78 FR 76529 - Members of a Family for Purpose of Filing CBP Family Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... Members of a Family for Purpose of Filing CBP Family Declaration AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... definitions of family members residing in one household. As a result of this expansion, more U.S. returning resident and non-resident visitor families will be eligible to file a single customs declaration,...

  5. Characterization of Argonaute family members in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gen-Hong; Jiang, Liang; Zhu, Li; Cheng, Ting-Cai; Niu, Wei-Huan; Yan, Ya-Fei; Xia, Qing-You

    2013-02-01

    The Argonaute protein family is a highly conserved group of proteins, which have been implicated in RNA silencing in both plants and animals. Here, four members of the Argonaute family were systemically identified based on the genome sequence of Bombyx mori. Based on their sequence similarity, BmAgo1 and BmAgo2 belong to the Ago subfamily, while BmAgo3 and BmPiwi are in the Piwi subfamily. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that silkworm Argonaute family members are conserved in insects. Conserved amino acid residues involved in recognition of the 5' end of the small RNA guide strand and of the conserved (aspartate, aspartate and histidine [DDH]) motif present in their PIWI domains suggest that these four Argonaute family members may have conserved slicer activities. The results of microarray expression analysis show that there is a low expression level for B. mori Argonaute family members in different tissues and different developmental stages, except for BmPiwi. All four B. mori Argonaute family members are upregulated upon infection with B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus. The complete coding sequence of BmPiwi, the homolog of Drosophila piwi, was cloned and its expression occurred mainly in the area where spermatogonia and spermatocytes appear. Our results provide an overview of the B. mori Argonaute family members and suggest that they may have multiple roles. In addition, this is also the first report, to our knowledge, of the response of RNA silencing machinery to DNA virus infection in insects.

  6. The potential therapeutic value for bereaved relatives participating in research: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Germain, Alison; Mayland, Catriona R; Jack, Barbara A

    2016-10-01

    Conducting research with the bereaved presents an immediate ethical challenge, as they are undoubtedly a vulnerable group, associated with high levels of distress and susceptible to both physical and mental health issues. A comprehensive understanding of the potential therapeutic benefits for bereaved relatives participating in palliative care research is limited, and therefore the ethics of engaging this group remain questionable. This paper describes a secondary analysis of qualitative data collected in the Care of the Dying Evaluation (CODE) project, examining the experiences of patients who died at home. It explores the motivations and potential benefits for bereaved relatives participating in research with reference to the recently developed concepts in bereavement theory. Cognitive interviews were conducted with 15 bereaved relatives and secondary analysis using a content analysis framework was employed to classify the data. The results center around six recurring concepts identified as adaptive in current bereavement theory: an opportunity to share the narrative accounts of the final hours of their relative's life; a search for sense and meaning in loss; an ongoing bond/attachment with the deceased; altruistic motivations; oscillation between loss and restorative orientations; and a sense of resilience. Overall, the participants found that taking part in the research was valuable and that it could be described as offering therapeutic benefits. The need for bereaved relatives to take part in research studies should be encouraged, as they provide an accurate proxy for the patient's experience of end-of-life care while also providing a valuable account of their own perspective as family member and carer. In addition, we highlight the need for ethics committees to be aware of the potential benefits for bereaved relatives participating in research of this kind.

  7. Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    INTRODUCTION This project focuses on marriages/ romantic relationships and family relationships of service members with significant risk for...2003), and relationship difficulties have been cited as the most common trigger of suicides in service members over the past several years (Keuhn...phases. Phase 1 employs focus groups to (a) better understand the needs of romantic partners and (b) begin to identify needs of other types of family

  8. Combining regional expertise to form a bereavement support alliance.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Judy B; Kobler, Kathie; Roose, Rosmarie E; Meyer, Charlotte; Schmitz, Nancy; Kavanaugh, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Providing compassionate bereavement care for families experiencing perinatal loss is a standard of care in most healthcare organizations. In this article, we describe the development of The Alliance of Perinatal Bereavement Support Facilitators, begun over 25 years ago in Chicago by staff who identified the need to reach out to colleagues at other area institutions for advice and support in this work. This collaboration created a regional support network that has resulted in a long-lasting, active, sustainable organization of excellence focused on enhancing practice, education, and perinatal bereavement care. Alliance activities center around four main areas: education, networking/support, policy, and recognizing outstanding service to families. By continuing to draw upon the collective talent, wisdom, and expertise of its members, The Alliance still serves grieving families and provides mentoring for future interdisciplinary team members engaged in this work. The path taken to build this organization can be used by professionals in other specialties who are looking to create their own alliance infrastructure based on mutual benefit and interest.

  9. Ten Warning Signs Your Older Family Member May Need Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat 10 Warning Signs Your Older Family Member May Need ... the Eldercare Locator has compiled this list of 10 warning signs. Any one of the following behaviors ...

  10. 32 CFR 884.10 - Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas. 884.10 Section 884.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL...

  11. 32 CFR 884.10 - Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Returning members, employees, and family members from overseas. 884.10 Section 884.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL...

  12. Resilience in family members of persons with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Bekhet, Abir K; Suresky, M Jane

    2010-12-01

    This integrative review summarizes current research on resilience in adult family members who have a relative with a diagnosed mental disorder that is considered serious. Within the context of resilience theory, studies identifying risk/vulnerability and positive/protective factors in family members are summarized, and studies examining seven indicators of resilience, including acceptance, hardiness, hope, mastery, self-efficacy, sense of coherence, and resourcefulness, are described. Implications for clinical practice and recommendations for future research are presented.

  13. Opportunities for quality improvement in bereavement care at a children's hospital: assessment of interdisciplinary staff perspectives.

    PubMed

    Contro, Nancy; Sourkes, Barbara M

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the current state of bereavement care at a university-based children's hospital from the perspective of the interdisciplinary staff. In all, 60 staff members from multiple disciplines participated in in-depth interviews. In at least two-thirds of the interviews, issues related to the bereavement experience of both staff and families emerged and were consistently identified. Themes included: disparities in bereavement care based on relationship factors; logistics of time and space; geographical distances; the different cultures and languages of families; continuity in family follow-up; needs of siblings and other family members; staff communication, cooperation, and care coordination; staff suffering; and education, mentoring, and support for staff. This evidence-based needs assessment furnishes an empirical basis for the design and implementation of bereavement services for both families and staff. It can serve as a template for evaluation at other children's hospitals and thus contribute to the sound and creative development of the field of pediatric palliative care.

  14. Spectra of small Koronis family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.; Moskovitz, N.

    2014-07-01

    The space-weathering process and its implications for the relationships between S- and Q-type asteroids and ordinary chondrite meteorites are long-standing problems in asteroid science. Although the visible and near-infrared spectra of S- and Q-type objects qualitatively show the same absorption features and quantitatively show evidence of the same minerals, the S types display increased spectral slopes and muted absorption features compared to the Q types. This spectral mismatch is consistent with the effects of the space weathering process. Binzel et al. provided the missing link between Q- and S-type bodies in near-Earth space by showing a reddening of spectral slope in objects from 0.1 to 5 km that corresponded to the transition from Q- to S-type spectra. This result implied that size, and therefore age, is related to the relationship between Q- and S-type. The existence of Q-type objects in the main belt was not confirmed until Mothe-Diniz and Nesvorny (2008) found them in young S-type clusters. To investigate the trend from Q to S in the main belt, we examined space weathering within the old main-belt Koronis family using a spectrophotometric survey (Rivkin et al. 2011, Thomas et al. 2011). Rivkin et al. (2011) identified several potential Q-type objects within the Koronis family. Our Q-type candidates were identified using broad-band spectrophotometry and could not be taxonomically classified on that basis alone. We obtained follow-up visible and near-infrared spectral observations of our potential Q-type objects, (26970) Elias, (45610) 2000 DJ_{48}, and (37411) 2001 XF_{152}, using Gemini and Magellan. We will present the results of these spectral follow-up observations. Observations of (26970) Elias demonstrate that the object is more consistent with the average Q-type spectrum than the average S-type spectrum.

  15. Underrepresented minorities among physics family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    In the class of 2013, a record number of students earned bachelor's degrees in physics: 7,363. This is more than double the number of students doing so only 14 years earlier. Over the same time period, the total number of bachelor's degrees awarded in all disciplines was up also, but only by about 40%. The graph shows the number of students earning a bachelor's degree in physics since 1955. Between 1955 and the early 1960s, the number of undergraduates earning degrees in physics grew rapidly. After a brief downward turn in the middle of the decade, the number peaked at 5,975 in 1969. Thirty years later, it reached a low of 3,646 students in 1999. Every fall, the Statistical Research Center at the American Institute of Physics reaches out to all of the departments that award at least a bachelor's degree in physics. The departments graciously provide data on enrollments in introductory courses and the number of students earning degrees at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral level. In January, we will look at under-represented minorities among physics faculty members. If you have any questions or comments, please contact Susan White at the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics (swhite@aip.org).

  16. The phytochrome family: dissection of functional roles and signalling pathways among family members.

    PubMed Central

    Quail, P H

    1998-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that individual members of the five-membered phytochrome family of photoreceptors in Arabidopsis have differential functional roles in controlling plant photomorphogenesis. Emerging genetic evidence suggests that this differential activity may involve initially separate signalling pathway branches specific to individual family members. PMID:9800202

  17. Registered Nurses working together with family members of older people.

    PubMed

    Weman, Karin; Fagerberg, Ingegerd

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the study was to reach a more profound understanding, through looking at nurses' working situation, of those factors that influence how nurses are able to work together with family members of older people living in nursing homes or similar facilities. Working with the care of older people as a Registered Nurse provides a varied job with many challenges. Nurses have to co-operate with family members of those in community health care. Co-operation is important and necessary for all involved. Nurses working in elder care in a geographically defined area received a questionnaire with three open-ended questions, on the difficulties and/or problems involved with working together with family members, and the positive or negative aspects of this co-operation. Analysis was carried out using the latent content analysis method. Three themes, problems within the system, interaction with families and caring in nursing work, are presented with categories and their subcategories. The nurses wanted their superior to be a nurse so that their working situation would be better understood. Appreciation from their superior and family members was also a very important part of their work as nurses in community health care. The frequent changes and the lack of time in the work of elder care often put nurses under considerable psychological pressure. For the most part family members are a resource for the elder, but sometimes they will avoid contact, which will make co-operating difficult. Registered Nurses and family members are dependent on each other in their care of the elder. Relevance to clinical practice. More attention should be paid to the working situation of Registered Nurses in community health care, and their ability to work together with family members of older people.

  18. Family members' unique perspectives of the family: examining their scope, size, and relations to individual adjustment.

    PubMed

    Jager, Justin; Bornstein, Marc H; Putnick, Diane L; Hendricks, Charlene

    2012-06-01

    Using the McMaster Family Assessment Device (Epstein, Baldwin, & Bishop, 1983) and incorporating the perspectives of adolescent, mother, and father, this study examined each family member's "unique perspective" or nonshared, idiosyncratic view of the family. We used a modified multitrait-multimethod confirmatory factor analysis that (a) isolated for each family member's 6 reports of family dysfunction the nonshared variance (a combination of variance idiosyncratic to the individual and measurement error) from variance shared by 1 or more family members and (b) extracted common variance across each family member's set of nonshared variances. The sample included 128 families from a U.S. East Coast metropolitan area. Each family member's unique perspective generalized across his or her different reports of family dysfunction and accounted for a sizable proportion of his or her own variance in reports of family dysfunction. In addition, after holding level of dysfunction constant across families and controlling for a family's shared variance (agreement regarding family dysfunction), each family member's unique perspective was associated with his or her own adjustment. Future applications and competing alternatives for what these "unique perspectives" reflect about the family are discussed.

  19. Family Members' Unique Perspectives of the Family: Examining their Scope, Size, and Relations to Individual Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Jager, Justin; Bornstein, Marc H.; Diane, L. Putnick; Hendricks, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    Using the Family Assessment Device (FAD; Epstein, Baldwin, & Bishop, 1983) and incorporating the perspectives of adolescent, mother, and father, this study examined each family member's “unique perspective” or non-shared, idiosyncratic view of the family. To do so we used a modified multitrait-multimethod confirmatory factor analysis that (1) isolated for each family member's six reports of family dysfunction the non-shared variance (a combination of variance idiosyncratic to the individual and measurement error) from variance shared by one or more family members and (2) extracted common variance across each family member's set of non-shared variances. The sample included 128 families from a U.S. East Coast metropolitan area. Each family member's unique perspective generalized across his or her different reports of family dysfunction and accounted for a sizable proportion of his or her own variance in reports of family dysfunction. Additionally, after holding level of dysfunction constant across families and controlling for a family's shared variance (agreement regarding family dysfunction), each family member's unique perspective was associated with his or her own adjustment. Future applications and competing alternatives for what these “unique perspectives” reflect about the family are discussed. PMID:22545933

  20. Family Members' Influence on Family Meal Vegetable Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenrich, Tionni R.; Brown, J. Lynne; Miller-Day, Michelle; Kelley, Kevin J.; Lengerich, Eugene J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Characterize the process of family vegetable selection (especially cruciferous, deep orange, and dark green leafy vegetables); demonstrate the usefulness of Exchange Theory (how family norms and experiences interact with rewards and costs) for interpreting the data. Design: Eight focus groups, 2 with each segment (men/women vegetable…

  1. Early Life Bereavement and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hong; Olsen, Jørn; Yuan, Wei; Cnattingus, Sven; Vestergaard, Mogens; Obel, Carsten; Gissler, Mika; Li, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to examine whether early life bereavement, as indicator of severe stress, was associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life. Based on population registers, we established a cohort of all children born in Denmark (N = 1 686 416) and Sweden (N = 2 563 659) from 1973 to 1997. Children were categorized as exposed if they lost a first-degree relative during the first 18 years of life. Outcome is the first diagnosis of schizophrenia as either inpatient or outpatient. Log-linear Poisson regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs). A total of 188,850 children (4.6%) experienced death of a first-degree relative from birth to 18 years of age. Compared with unexposed children, those exposed had overall a 39% higher risk of schizophrenia (= 1.39, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 1.32–1.47). The IRR was particularly high if the family member committed suicide (aIRR = 2.11, 95% CI: 1.90–2.34) or died due to an injury or accident (aIRR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.27–1.63). The IRR of schizophrenia decreased with increasing child's age at bereavement (P < 0.0001). Children who experienced >1 death during the first 18 years of life (aIRR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.46–2.19) had a higher risk than those with a single death (aIRR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.30–1.45). The study suggested that exposure to death of a first-degree relative before 18 years was associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia in later life. The complex mechanisms behind these associations remain to be elucidated. PMID:26817875

  2. Country variations in family members' informal pressure to drink less.

    PubMed

    Holmila, Marja; Raitasalo, Kirsimarja; Knibbe, Ronald; Selin, Klara

    2009-04-01

    The paper examines how family members in 18 countries attempt to influence each other to drink less. Data come from the GENACIS (Gender, Alcohol and Culture: an International Study) dataset. Countries included were Argentina, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, India, Japan, Nigeria, Norway, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Uganda, UK and Uruguay (overall sample 44,115). In each country, the percentage of people who had experienced family member pressure to drink less were compared to country abstinence rate, mean drinking volume per drinker and other societal-level factors. While countries differed greatly on proportion of drinkers having experienced family members' pressure to drink less, in all countries drinking women reported less pressure than drinking men in their own society. In all studied countries, informal pressure was exerted most often by the spouse or sexual partner. However, other family members were also involved. Informal pressure was found to be highly correlated with the country's socioeconomic conditions. Informal pressure to drink less by family members is on one hand an expression of social and family problems, caused by heavy drinking, especially in the economically less developed countries, suggesting alcohol-related deprivation. On the other hand, similar gender differences were seen in all the societies, men reporting receiving more informal pressure than women. Thus, informal pressure to drink less tended to reflect the gender conflict caused by heavy use of alcohol by men.

  3. Country variations in family members' informal pressure to drink less

    PubMed Central

    Holmila, Marja; Raitasalo, Kirsimarja; Knibbe, Ronald; Selin, Klara

    2009-01-01

    The paper examines how family members in 18 countries attempt to influence each other to drink less. Data come from the GENACIS (Gender, Alcohol and Culture: an International Study) dataset. Countries included were Argentina, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, India, Japan, Nigeria, Norway, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Uganda, UK and Uruguay (overall sample 44,115). In each country, the percentage of people who had experienced family member pressure to drink less were compared to country abstinence rate, mean drinking volume per drinker and other societal-level factors. While countries differed greatly on proportion of drinkers having experienced family members' pressure to drink less, in all countries drinking women reported less pressure than drinking men in their own society. In all studied countries, informal pressure was exerted most often by the spouse or sexual partner. However, other family members were also involved. Informal pressure was found to be highly correlated with the country's socioeconomic conditions. Informal pressure to drink less by family members is on one hand an expression of social and family problems, caused by heavy drinking, especially in the economically less developed countries, suggesting alcohol-related deprivation. On the other hand, similar gender differences were seen in all the societies, men reporting receiving more informal pressure than women. Thus, informal pressure to drink less tended to reflect the gender conflict caused by heavy use of alcohol by men. PMID:20084178

  4. Intergenerational Family Support Following Infant Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Diana L.; Walker, Alexis J.; Richards, Leslie N.

    2008-01-01

    The death of a child is a traumatic, nonnormative family life event. Although parental bereavement has received substantial attention, little research has focused on extended family members affected by a child's death, and still less on how multiple family members perceive and respond to one another following the loss. Guided by a life course…

  5. Intergenerational Family Support Following Infant Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Diana L.; Walker, Alexis J.; Richards, Leslie N.

    2008-01-01

    The death of a child is a traumatic, nonnormative family life event. Although parental bereavement has received substantial attention, little research has focused on extended family members affected by a child's death, and still less on how multiple family members perceive and respond to one another following the loss. Guided by a life course…

  6. Psychotherapy and supervision with a bereaved Moslem family: an intervention that almost failed.

    PubMed

    Rubin, S S; Nassar, H Z

    1993-11-01

    Families responding to loss are units that function and are embedded in particular cultural frameworks. The adequate clinician learns to work with different individuals and problems over time, and in this process he or she learns about the importance of a range of variables including sex roles, age, socioeconomic circumstance, and the like. In parallel fashion, the developing clinician also learns to work with different cultural and religious contexts as they affect and frame the client's experiences.

  7. Systematic Early Intervention for Bereaved: Study Protocol of a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial With Families Who Suddenly Lose a Partner and a Parent

    PubMed Central

    Dyregrov, Kari; Hauken, May Aa; Senneseth, Mette; Dyregrov, Atle

    2016-01-01

    Background Grief has been associated with several long-term negative outcomes for both surviving parents and bereaved children, especially when it is preceded by unnatural and violent deaths. Nevertheless, it has been an underestimated public health problem with few, if any, empirically documented early preventive intervention programs. The best time to start them is also a major question that requires further evidence. Objective The overall aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of a future larger trial, informing sample size calculation, recruitment/randomization procedures, retention rates, data collection forms, and outcomes. This study will also explore: (1) the early effects of Systematic Early Intervention for Bereaved (SEIB) compared with the early effects of care as usual, and (2) the effects of the immediate SEIB version compared with the effects of the delayed SEIB version. Methods In a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a delayed intervention design, suddenly bereaved families will be assigned to: the immediate-SEIB intervention group, or the delayed-SEIB intervention group. Participants will fill in a set of self-report measures at baseline, and after 3, 6, and 9 months follow-up. Quantitative data on traumatic stress symptoms, complicated grief, psychological wellbeing, daily functioning, social support, parental capacity, parenting practices, and family functioning will be collected to inform power calculations and explore SEIB’s preliminary effects. Data on the flow of participants throughout the trial will be analyzed in order to estimate recruitment and retention rates. Two brief questionnaires were developed to assess recruitment procedures, randomization, and data collection materials. Results Recruitment for this project started in August 2015, and follow-up data collection will be completed in June 2017. Conclusions This study prepares the ground work for the design and implementation of a main trial and may add preliminary

  8. Shame feeling in the Intensive Care Unit patient's family members.

    PubMed

    Koulouras, Vasilios; Konstanti, Zoe; Lepida, Dimitra; Papathanakos, Georgios; Gouva, Mary

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the levels of internal and external shame among family members of critically ill patients. This prospective study was conducted in 2012/2013 on family members of Intensive Care Unit patients using the Others As Shamer Scale and the Experiential Shame Scale questionnaires. Greek university hospital. Two hundred and twenty-three family members mean-aged (41.5±11.9) were studied, corresponding to 147 ICU patients. Out of these 223, 81 (36.3%) were men and 142 (63.7%) were women, while 79 (35.4%) lived with the patient. Family members who lived with the patient experienced higher internal and external shame compared to those who did not live with the patient (p=0.046 and p=0.028 respectively). Elementary and Junior High School graduates scored significantly higher than the other grades graduates in total Others As Shamer Scale, inferiority and emptiness scale (p<0.001). Intensive Care Unit patients' family members are prone to shame feelings, especially when being of low educational level. Health professionals have to take into consideration the possible implications for the patients and their care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Postanesthesia care unit visitation decreases family member anxiety.

    PubMed

    Carter, Amy J; Deselms, JoAnn; Ruyle, Shelley; Morrissey-Lucas, Marcella; Kollar, Suzie; Cannon, Shelly; Schick, Lois

    2012-02-01

    Despite advocacy by professional nursing organizations, no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have evaluated the response of family members to a visit with an adult patient during a postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay. Therefore, the purpose of this RCT was to evaluate the impact of a brief PACU visitation on the anxiety of family members. The study was conducted in a phase I PACU of a large community-based hospital. Subjects were designated adult family members or significant others of an adult PACU patient who had undergone general anesthesia. A pretest-posttest RCT design was used. The dependent variable was the change in anxiety scores of the visitor after seeing his or her family member in the PACU. Student t test (unpaired, two tailed) was used to determine if changes in anxiety scores (posttest score-pretest score) were different for the PACU visit and no visit groups. A total of 45 participants were studied over a 3-month period, with N=24 randomly assigned to a PACU visit and N=21 assigned to usual care (no PACU visit). Participants in the PACU visit group had a statistically significant (P=.0001) decrease in anxiety after the visitation period (-4.11±6.4); participants in the usual care group (no PACU visit) had an increase in anxiety (+4.47±6.6). The results from this study support the value and importance of PACU visitation for family members.

  10. TRICARE; Reserve and Guard family member benefits. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2008-08-12

    This final rule implements sections 704 and 705 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005. These provisions apply to eligible family members who become eligible for TRICARE as a result of their Reserve Component (RC) sponsor (including those with delayed effective date orders up to 90 days) being called or ordered to active duty for more than 30 days in support of a federal/contingency operation and choose to participate in TRICARE Standard or Extra, rather than enroll in TRICARE Prime. The first provision gives the Secretary the authority to waive the annual TRICARE Standard (or Extra) deductible, which is set by law (10 U.S.C. 1079(b)) at $150 per individual and $300 per family ($50/$100 for families of members in pay grades E-4 and below). The second provision gives the Secretary the authority to increase TRICARE payments up to 115 percent of the TRICARE maximum allowable charge, less the applicable patient cost share if not previously waived under the first provision, for covered inpatient and outpatient health services received from a provider that does not participate (accept assignment) with TRICARE. These provisions help ensure timely access to health care and maintain clinically appropriate continuity of health care to family members of Reservists and Guardsmen activated in support of a federal/contingency operation; limit the out-of-pocket health care expenses for those family members; and remove potential barriers to health care access by Guard and Reserve families.

  11. Innovations in bereavement education.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patricia Moyle

    2011-08-01

    Advanced practice nursing students provide care for clients and families in numerous settings where they will encounter end-of-life issues. Thus, graduate nursing education should include information on current trends in thanatology, such as the debate over the proposed complicated grief criteria and the paradigmatic shift toward evidence-based grief theory. In this article, an innovative approach to teaching bereavement content to graduate nursing students during a 3-hour class is presented. The assignments were developed specifically for adult learners with clinical experience. Students' responses to the learning activities and recommendations for modifications of the teaching methods are presented. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Bereavement, postdisaster trauma, and behavioral changes in tsunami survivors.

    PubMed

    Suar, Damodar; Das, Sitanshu Sekhar; Alat, Priya

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether the death of family members intensifies the survivors' posttraumatic stress and behavioral changes. Data were collected by interviewing 416 adult survivors from nine habitations of the Nagapattinam district in the state of Tamil Nadu in India 14 months after the 2004 tsunami. Compared to those nonbereaved, bereaved survivors reported more posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, negative affect, deteriorated mental health, adverse physical health symptoms, alcohol consumption, family conflicts, and fear. When a tsunami trauma includes death of a loved one, psychological, physical, and behavioral ramifications are especially severe.

  13. New Insights in the Immunobiology of IL-1 Family Members

    PubMed Central

    van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2013-01-01

    The interleukin-1 (IL 1) family of ligands is associated with acute and chronic inflammation, and plays an essential role in the non-specific innate response to infection. The biological properties of IL 1 family ligands are typically pro-inflammatory. The IL 1 family has 11 family members and can be categorized into subfamilies according to the length of their precursor and the length of the propiece for each precursor (Figure 1). The IL 1 subfamily consists of IL 1α, IL 1β, and IL 33, with the longest propieces of the IL 1 family. IL 18 and IL 37 belong to the IL 18 subfamily and contain smaller propieces than IL 1 and IL-33. Since IL 37 binds to the IL 18Rα chain it is part of the IL 18 subfamily, however it remains to be elucidated how the propiece of IL 37 is removed. IL 36α, β, and γ as well as IL 36 Ra belong to the IL 36 subfamily. In addition, IL 38 likely belongs to this family since it has the ability to bind to the IL 36R. The IL 36 subfamily has the shortest propiece. The one member of the IL 1 family that cannot be categorized in these subfamilies is IL 1 receptor antagonist (IL 1Ra), which has a signal peptide and is readily secreted. In the present review we will describe the biological functions of the IL-1F members and new insights in their biology. PMID:23847614

  14. Being Socialised into Language Shift: The Impact of Extended Family Members on Family Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Christmas, Cassie

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a family language policy (FLP) in the context of an extended bilingual Gaelic-English family on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. It demonstrates how certain family members (namely, the children's mother and paternal grandmother) negotiate and reify a strongly Gaelic-centred FLP. It then discusses how other extended family members…

  15. Characterization of ricin toxin family members from Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Leshin, Jonathan; Danielsen, Mark; Credle, Joel J; Weeks, Andrea; O'Connell, Kevin P; Dretchen, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Ricin inhibits translation by removal of a specific adenine from 28S RNA. The Ricinus communis genome encodes seven full-length ricin family members. All encoded proteins have the ability of hydrolyzing adenine in 28S rRNA. As expected, these proteins also inhibited an in vitro transcription/translation system. These data show that the ricin gene family contains at least seven members that have the ability to inhibit translation and that may contribute to the toxicity of R. communis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Service Members' Experiences in Staying Connected With Family While Deployed.

    PubMed

    Durham, Susan W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the communication issues experienced by service members staying connected with families while deployed. Qualitative design guided data collection using interviews with 20 key informants who had been deployed in Iraq or Afghanistan. Inductive content analysis and NVivo software enabled data analysis. From the data, 5 main themes emerged: Creating Normalcy Through Connecting With Others; Understanding the Spoken and Unspoken; Connecting and Disconnecting; Changing Sense of Self; and Sustaining a Common Bond. A collective understanding of common communication challenges emerged that had an impact on service member/family relationships, mission focus, and safety.

  17. The challenges of reintegration for service members and their families.

    PubMed

    Danish, Steven J; Antonides, Bradley J

    2013-10-01

    The ongoing wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have posed a number of reintegration challenges to service members. Much of the research focuses on those service members experiencing psychological problems and being treated at the VA. In this article, we contend that much of the distress service members experience occurs following deployment and is a consequence of the difficulties encountered during their efforts to successfully reintegrate into their families and communities. We propose a new conceptual framework for intervening in this reintegration distress that is psycho-educational in nature as well as a new delivery model for providing such services. An example of this new intervention framework is presented.

  18. 'But I do believe you've got to accept that that's what life's about': older adults living in New Zealand talk about their experiences of loss and bereavement support.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, Gary; Gott, Merryn; Waterworth, Susan; McLean, Christine; Kerse, Ngaire

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores older people's views, experiences and sources of bereavement support following the death of a spouse, family member or other significant individual. Telephone interviews were conducted with 28 bereaved older adults recruited from the Brief Risk Identification Geriatric Health Tool trial participants in three geographically diverse District Health Boards in New Zealand. Analysis adhered to the principles of grounded theory and followed the National Centre for Social Research 'Framework' approach. Findings indicate that family and friends play a fundamental role supporting older bereaved adults, both emotionally and practically. Existing community-based organisations were identified as an important source of support following bereavement. Despite the emotional, financial and practical challenges associated with bereavement, the majority of participants questioned the role of, need for and value of formal bereavement support services. Instead, study participants cited a combination of being older and previous life experiences as factors that had enabled them to cope with these largely 'expected' events. Moreover, they demonstrated considerable resilience in managing the emotional and practical changes associated with loss and bereavement. This study poses a challenge to the argument that the growing secularisation of society has led to an increase in the use of professional bereavement services over more 'traditional' forms of support, such as family, friends and community and religious organisations. The paper highlights the value of adopting a public health-based approach as a way of optimising bereavement support via the use of existing community organisations previously known to older people. This is particularly important in those countries where the provision of bereavement support is limited due to resource constraints.

  19. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ELIGIBILITY IN GUAM, PUERTO RICO, AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Mandatory...

  20. Allergy to olive pollen: a study of four family members.

    PubMed

    Kalogeromitros, D; Armenaka, M; Toumbis-Ioannou, E; Koumandaki, E; Papasteriades, C; Lombardero, M; Katsarou, A

    2001-01-01

    We describe four family members with respiratory and dermatological manifestations of olive pollen allergy. The purpose of this study was 1) to investigate whether these patients' sera react to the same or different olive allergens, and 2) to identify common HLA class II antigens.

  1. Family Members' Perceptions of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Device Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Rita L.; Parette, Howard P., Jr.; Stoner, Julia B.; Angell, Maureen E.; Carroll, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Although advancements in technology have expanded the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices for children with disabilities, the use of AAC devices in school and home settings is often inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine family members' perceptions regarding the use of AAC devices. Factors that…

  2. Bereavement Is Associated with an Increased Risk of HPV Infection and Cervical Cancer: An Epidemiological Study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lu, Donghao; Sundström, Karin; Sparén, Pär; Fall, Katja; Sjölander, Arvid; Dillner, Joakim; Helm, Nathalie Ylitalo; Adami, Hans-Olov; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Fang, Fang

    2016-02-01

    Grief over the loss of a family member may cause physical and mental illness, but an association between bereavement and cancer risk has not been established. Based on the Swedish National Cervical Screening Register (1969-2011) including 14,011,269 smears from 2,466,107 women, we conducted two nested case-control studies to examine the associations of bereavement (i.e., loss of a family member due to death) with abnormal cytology (390,310 first abnormal and 1,951,319 normal smears) and in situ/invasive cervical cancer (75,128 case and 375,640 control women), both individually matched on year of birth and screening adherence. Among 1,696 of the control women, we further investigated bereavement in association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, both HPV16 and other HPV types. Bereavement was consistently associated with a 4% to 9% increased risk for first abnormal cytology, in situ and invasive cervical cancer (all P < 0.02). The associations became stronger when multiple losses, loss of child, sibling or spouse, and loss due to unnatural cause were analyzed separately (P for trend or difference < 0.0001), and for women with high screening adherence (P for difference < 0.05). Among 1,696 women who had not developed cervical cancer, we further investigated the link between bereavement and HPV infection. Bereavement was associated with a 62% increased risk of HPV16 infection, high viral load, and recurrent infection, and was also more strongly associated with HPV infections designated as high-risk compared with low-risk determinants of cervical carcinogenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that bereavement is associated with an increased risk of developing cervical cancer. Further, they suggest that this association may be attributed to stress-induced oncogenic HPV infections.

  3. [Psychoeducation of patients and their family members during episode psychosis].

    PubMed

    Hodé, Y

    2013-09-01

    The concept of psychoeducation is close to the concept of therapeutic education and refers to a kind of education intervention targeting people with a mental health condition. In the framework of psychosis, psychoeducation can be offered to patients, family members or both. The efficacy of patient psychoeducation on treatment adherence or social functioning is well-established but only if the family benefits of a joint psychoeducational intervention. Family psychoeducation, even without patient psychoeducation has proven efficacy in reducing relapse rate. This reduction is of the same order of magnitude as that obtained with an antipsychotic medication. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  4. Compassion or stigma? How adults bereaved by alcohol or drugs experience services.

    PubMed

    Walter, Tony; Ford, Allison; Templeton, Lorna; Valentine, Christine; Velleman, Richard

    2015-09-28

    How to promote compassionate care within public services is a concern in several countries; specifically, some British healthcare scandals highlight poor care for service users who may readily be stigmatised as 'other'. The article therefore aims to understand better the relationship between stigma and compassion. As people bereaved by a drug- or alcohol-related death often experience stigma, the article draws on findings from a major British study, conducted during 2012-2015 by the authors, of people bereaved in this way, in order to see how service provision can be improved. One hundred and six bereaved family members were interviewed in depth about their experiences of loss and support. Thematic analysis developed theoretical understandings of participants' lived experiences. This article analyses our data on how bereaved people experienced stigma and kindness from practitioners of all kinds. We found that stigma can be mitigated by small acts of kindness from those encountered after the death. Stigma entails stereotyping, othering and disgust, each of which has emotional and cognitive aspects; kindness entails identification and fellow feeling; professionalism has classically entailed emotional detachment, but interviewees found cold professionalism as disturbing as explicit disgust. Drawing on theories concerning the end of life, bereavement and emotional labour, the article analyses the relationship between stigma, kindness and professionalism, and identifies some strategies to counter stigmatisation and foster compassion. © 2015 The Authors. Health and Social Care in the Community Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Bereavement and Companion Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Avery D.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a bereavement counseling program at a humane society and reports findings that confirm parallels between human and animal bonding and bereavements. The act of consenting to euthanasia was particularly disturbing. Most of the bereaved owners reported depths of feeling that were unique and in most cases beyond those experienced in other…

  6. Bereavement and Companion Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Avery D.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a bereavement counseling program at a humane society and reports findings that confirm parallels between human and animal bonding and bereavements. The act of consenting to euthanasia was particularly disturbing. Most of the bereaved owners reported depths of feeling that were unique and in most cases beyond those experienced in other…

  7. Family Decision Making: Benefits to Persons with Developmental Disabilities and Their Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely-Barnes, Susan; Graff, J. Carolyn; Marcenko, Maureen; Weber, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Family involvement in planning and choosing services has become a key intervention concept in developmental disability services. This study (N = 547) modeled patterns of family decision making and assessed benefits to persons with developmental disabilities (DDs) and their family members. A latent profile analysis identified 4 classes that were…

  8. Family Decision Making: Benefits to Persons with Developmental Disabilities and Their Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely-Barnes, Susan; Graff, J. Carolyn; Marcenko, Maureen; Weber, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Family involvement in planning and choosing services has become a key intervention concept in developmental disability services. This study (N = 547) modeled patterns of family decision making and assessed benefits to persons with developmental disabilities (DDs) and their family members. A latent profile analysis identified 4 classes that were…

  9. Interacting with patients' family members during the office visit.

    PubMed

    Omole, Folashade S; Sow, Charles M; Fresh, Edith; Babalola, Dolapo; Strothers, Harry

    2011-10-01

    The physician-patient relationship is part of the patient's larger social system and is influenced by the patient's family. A patient's family member can be a valuable source of health information and can collaborate in making an accurate diagnosis and planning a treatment strategy during the office visit. However, it is important for the physician to keep an appropriate balance when addressing concerns to maintain the alliance formed among physician, patient, and family member. The patient-centered medical home, a patient care concept that helps address this dynamic, often involves a robust partnership among the physician, the patient, and the patient's family. During the office visit, this partnership may be influenced by the ethnicity, cultural values, beliefs about illness, and religion of the patient and his or her family. Physicians should recognize abnormal family dynamics during the office visit and attempt to stay neutral by avoiding triangulation. The only time neutrality should be disrupted is if the physician suspects abuse or neglect. It is important that the patient has time to communicate privately with the physician at some point during the visit.

  10. Family Presence During Trauma Resuscitation: Family Members' Attitudes, Behaviors, and Experiences.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Karen; Fritzeen, Jennifer; Guzzetta, Cathie E; Clark, Angela P; Lloyd, Christina; Scott, Shari H; Aldridge, Michael D; Kreling, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    The paradigm is shifting from separating family members from their children during resuscitation to one of patient- and family-centered care. However, widespread acceptance is still lacking. To measure attitudes, behaviors, and experiences of family members of pediatric patients during the resuscitation phase of trauma care, including family members who were present and those who were not. An observational mixed-methods study using structured interviews and focus groups was conducted at 3 level 1 pediatric trauma centers. Family members of children who met trauma team activation criteria (N = 126; 99 present, 27 not present) were interviewed; 25 also participated in focus groups. Mean attitude scores indicated a positive attitude about being present during the resuscitation phase of trauma care (3.65; SD, 0.37) or wanting to be present (3.2; SD, 0.60). Families present reported providing emotional support (94%) for their child and health care information (92%) to the medical team. Being present allowed them to advocate for their child, understand their child's condition, and provide comfort. Families in both groups felt strongly that the choice was their right but was contingent upon their bedside behavior. Study findings demonstrated compelling family benefits for presence during pediatric trauma care. This study is one of the first to report on family members who were not present. The practice of family presence should be made a priority at pediatric trauma centers. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  11. The serendipitous origin of chordate secretin peptide family members.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, João C R; Vieira, Florbela A; Gomes, Ana S; Power, Deborah M

    2010-05-06

    The secretin family is a pleotropic group of brain-gut peptides with affinity for class 2 G-protein coupled receptors (secretin family GPCRs) proposed to have emerged early in the metazoan radiation via gene or genome duplications. In human, 10 members exist and sequence and functional homologues and ligand-receptor pairs have been characterised in representatives of most vertebrate classes. Secretin-like family GPCR homologues have also been isolated in non-vertebrate genomes however their corresponding ligands have not been convincingly identified and their evolution remains enigmatic. In silico sequence comparisons failed to retrieve a non-vertebrate (porifera, cnidaria, protostome and early deuterostome) secretin family homologue. In contrast, secretin family members were identified in lamprey, several teleosts and tetrapods and comparative studies revealed that sequence and structure is in general maintained. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis revealed that PACAP, VIP and GCG are the most highly conserved members and two major peptide subfamilies exist; i) PACAP-like which includes PACAP, PRP, VIP, PH, GHRH, SCT and ii) GCG-like which includes GCG, GLP1, GLP2 and GIP. Conserved regions flanking secretin family members were established by comparative analysis of the Takifugu, Xenopus, chicken and human genomes and gene homologues were identified in nematode, Drosophila and Ciona genomes but no gene linkage occurred. However, in Drosophila and nematode genes which flank vertebrate secretin family members were identified in the same chromosome. Receptors of the secretin-like family GPCRs are present in protostomes but no sequence homologues of the vertebrate cognate ligands have been identified. It has not been possible to determine when the ligands evolved but it seems likely that it was after the protostome-deuterostome divergence from an exon that was part of an existing gene or gene fragment by rounds of gene/genome duplication. The duplicate exon

  12. The serendipitous origin of chordate secretin peptide family members

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The secretin family is a pleotropic group of brain-gut peptides with affinity for class 2 G-protein coupled receptors (secretin family GPCRs) proposed to have emerged early in the metazoan radiation via gene or genome duplications. In human, 10 members exist and sequence and functional homologues and ligand-receptor pairs have been characterised in representatives of most vertebrate classes. Secretin-like family GPCR homologues have also been isolated in non-vertebrate genomes however their corresponding ligands have not been convincingly identified and their evolution remains enigmatic. Results In silico sequence comparisons failed to retrieve a non-vertebrate (porifera, cnidaria, protostome and early deuterostome) secretin family homologue. In contrast, secretin family members were identified in lamprey, several teleosts and tetrapods and comparative studies revealed that sequence and structure is in general maintained. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis revealed that PACAP, VIP and GCG are the most highly conserved members and two major peptide subfamilies exist; i) PACAP-like which includes PACAP, PRP, VIP, PH, GHRH, SCT and ii) GCG-like which includes GCG, GLP1, GLP2 and GIP. Conserved regions flanking secretin family members were established by comparative analysis of the Takifugu, Xenopus, chicken and human genomes and gene homologues were identified in nematode, Drosophila and Ciona genomes but no gene linkage occurred. However, in Drosophila and nematode genes which flank vertebrate secretin family members were identified in the same chromosome. Conclusions Receptors of the secretin-like family GPCRs are present in protostomes but no sequence homologues of the vertebrate cognate ligands have been identified. It has not been possible to determine when the ligands evolved but it seems likely that it was after the protostome-deuterostome divergence from an exon that was part of an existing gene or gene fragment by rounds of gene

  13. The novel interleukin-1 cytokine family members in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Madelaine; Frey, Silke; Hueber, Axel J

    2017-03-01

    This review provides an update on the new interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine family members in inflammatory diseases with focus on recent findings concerning the family members IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 and their different expression patterns. The IL-1 cytokines are known to be involved in many different inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The latest IL-1 family members, IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 have been shown to be differently regulated during course of disease. Studies of patients suffering from inflammatory diseases revealed that those cytokines are upregulated in the serum as well as in inflamed tissue. Both, epithelial cells and infiltrating peripheral mononuclear blood cells serve as source of the cytokines IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 triggering different outcomes. These results could be confirmed in different mouse models and in-vitro and ex-vivo studies. IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 are involved in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory diseases psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, systemic lupus erythematosus as well as Crohn's disease. Thereby IL-36 acts proinflammatory triggering further inflammatory mediators. In contrast, IL-37 and IL-38 are upregulated to counteract. Understanding the imbalance of the IL-1 family is crucial for future therapeutics.

  14. How illness affects family members: a qualitative interview survey

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Eve; Saada, Adrianna; Prosser, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Spillover effects of illness on family members can be substantial. The purpose of this study was to identify the domains of family members’ health and well-being that are affected when a relative has a chronic health condition. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted in February, 2012 with 49 individuals whose relatives had any of five chronic health conditions (arthritis, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease/dementia, cerebral palsy, and depression), purposively sampled to include different relationships with the ill relative (parent, child, spouse). Subjects were queried on whether and how having an ill relative affected their health and well-being; they were also asked about their caregiving responsibilities and the relative’s health. Interview data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Family members in our sample reported experiencing psychological and non-health effects from having an ill relative, and secondarily somatic effects. Effects on emotional health were most commonly reported as psychological spillover; non-health effects frequently included changes in daily activities and provision of caregiving. Spouses of patients reported the broadest range of spillover domains affected and adolescents of ill parents the fewest. Family members reported experiencing effects that were perceived as both positive and negative. Conclusions Spillover of illness onto family members encompasses a wide range of domains of health and well-being, extending beyond those included in many existing health-related quality of life measures. Outcomes measurement efforts should be expanded to adequately capture these health and well-being outcomes for analysis, to ensure that the benefits of interventions are accurately estimated and conclusions are valid. PMID:24142495

  15. [Proxy consent and responsibility: professional autonomy and adamant family members].

    PubMed

    Touwen, D P; Cools, H J M; Engberts, D P

    2010-02-01

    Research into the role of family members in the decision making process concerning medical treatment of incompetent patients in nursing home care, shows that the involvement of a proxy decision maker implies a greater responsibility of the physician. It is the duty of the proxy decision-maker (mostly a family member) to look after the incompetent patient's interests. But it is the physician's duty to decide whether the proxy decision maker indeed fulfills this task. Even so, the physician has the professional responsibility to decide on the medical course of action. Involvement of others (relations and other health care professionals) is of great importance to the answer to the question 'What is good for this patient?' but does not absolve the physician from the obligation to decide professionally what is the right thing to do.

  16. 'You needed to rehab … families as well': family members' own goals for aphasia rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Howe, Tami; Davidson, Bronwyn; Worrall, Linda; Hersh, Deborah; Ferguson, Alison; Sherratt, Sue; Gilbert, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    Aphasia affects family members in addition to the individuals with the communication disorder. In order to develop appropriate services for the relatives of people with aphasia post-stroke, their rehabilitation goals need to be identified. The aim of the current investigation was to identify the rehabilitation goals that family members of individuals with aphasia have for themselves. Forty-eight family members of adults with aphasia post-stroke participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews to identify the rehabilitation goals they had for themselves. All the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Analysis revealed seven categories of goals that the family members had for themselves: to be included in rehabilitation, to be provided with hope and positivity, to be able to communicate and maintain their relationship with the person with aphasia, to be given information, to be given support, to look after their own well-being, and to be able to cope with new responsibilities. A few participants reported that, at certain times during the rehabilitation process, they did not have any goals for themselves. This study highlights that family members of individuals with aphasia have a number of aphasia-related rehabilitation goals for themselves. In order to provide a family-centred approach to rehabilitation, health professionals, including speech-language pathologists, need systematically to identify and address family members' goals in light of the categories revealed in this investigation. © 2012 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  17. Genochondromatosis type I: A clinicoradiological study of four family members.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Atul; D'souza, Maria M; Reddy, Kanakeya Bachha; Kanojia, Rajesh Kumar; Kumar, Ajay

    2015-11-01

    Genochondromatosis is an extremely rare autosomal dominant disorder, which manifests during childhood and tends to regress in adult life. The bony lesions are symmetrically distributed with characteristic localization at the metaphysis of proximal humerus and distal femur. Two types have been described based on the involvement of clavicle. Usually asymptomatic, sometimes patients may present with pathological fractures. In this communication, we describe four members of a family with Genochondromatosis type I, with some additional clinical and radiological findings not reported previously.

  18. Congenital Hypofibrinogenemia in Five Members of a Family

    PubMed Central

    Hasselback, R.; Marion, Rita B.; Thomas, J. W.

    1963-01-01

    The bleeding tendency in five members of one family with fibrinogen levels ranging from 58 mg. % to 158 mg. % was mild and chiefly related to dental extractions. Abruptio placentae in one patient produced severe bleeding. Reports of menstrual bleeding patterns in patients with defects of hemostatic mechanisms suggest that normal platelets, vascular function and extrinsic and possibly intrinsic coagulation systems, except for fibrinogen, control menstrual blood loss. An autosomal dominant gene with variable penetrance may determine fibrinogen levels. PMID:13960907

  19. Family members' experiences of the quality of geriatric care.

    PubMed

    Isola, Arja; Backman, Kaisa; Voutilainen, Päivi; Rautsiala, Tarja

    2003-12-01

    The quality of institutional geriatric care is a topical issue in Finland. The study to be described here is part of a Finnish project on the quality assessment and development of long-term geriatric care provided by the City of Helsinki. The health care division of the City of Helsinki authorized an outside survey of long-term geriatric care in the hospitals providing such care in 1998. Based on the results, recommendations concerning the development of geriatric care were issued. In the years 1999-2000, a further education programme was arranged for ward nurses, chief nurses and heads of profit centres concerning leadership in long-term geriatric nursing. A re-survey was conducted in 2001, using the same criteria of quality assessment. The purpose of this paper is to report on the quality of institutional geriatric nursing as evaluated by family members in 2001 and to compare the responses to those obtained in 1998. The results are presented as frequency and percentage distributions, means and medians and cross-tabulations. The responding family members were generally content with the care of their elderly relatives: 92% said they were very satisfied or satisfied with the care, and the average of the marks given for geriatric care was 8.3 (range 4-10). Family members were more content now than in 1998, when the corresponding figures were 86% and 7.3 (range 4-10). Nevertheless, the results still highlight certain aspects that should be improved and developed.

  20. A family-based diabetes intervention for Hispanic adults and their family members.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Wallace, Debra C; McCoy, Thomas P; Amirehsani, Karen A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, 1-group longitudinal study is to examine the effects of a family-based intervention program on diabetes self-management behaviors, A1C, other biomarkers, psychosocial factors, and health-related quality of life in Hispanics with diabetes. Adult patients with diabetes (n = 36) and family members (n = 37) were recruited from a community clinic in rural central North Carolina. Patients and family members attended an 8-week culturally tailored diabetes educational program taught in Spanish. Data were collected pre- and post-intervention for both patients and family members, with an additional data collection for patients 1 month post-intervention. Most patients and family members were female, and almost all were immigrants. A1C decreased by 4.9% on average among patients from pre-intervention to 1 month post-intervention. Patients showed significant improvements in systolic blood pressure, diabetes self-efficacy, diabetes knowledge, and physical and mental components of health-related quality of life. Higher levels of intake of healthy foods and performance of blood glucose tests and foot inspections were reported. Family members significantly lowered body mass index and improved diabetes knowledge from pre-intervention to immediately post-intervention. No significant changes in levels of physical activity were found among patients with diabetes or family members. Findings suggest that including family members in educational interventions may provide emotional and psychological support to patients with diabetes, help to develop healthy family behaviors, and promote diabetes self-management.

  1. Organ Donation Campaigns: Perspective of Dialysis Patient's Family Members.

    PubMed

    Tumin, Makmor; Raja Ariffin, Raja Noriza; Mohd Satar, NurulHuda; Ng, Kok-Peng; Lim, Soo-Kun; Chong, Chin-Sieng

    2014-07-01

    Solving the dilemma of the organ shortage in Malaysia requires educating Malaysians about organ donation and transplantation. This paper aims at exploring the average Malaysian households ' preferred channels of campaigns and the preferred campaigners in a family setting, targeting at the dialysis family members. We analyzed the responses of 350 respondents regarding organ donation campaigns. The respondents are 2 family members of 175 dialysis patients from 3 different institutions. The information on respondents' willingness to donate and preferred method and channel of organ donation campaign were collected through questionnaire. Malaysian families have a good tendency to welcome campaigns in both the public and private (their homes) spheres. We also found that campaigns facilitated by the electronic media (Television and Radio) and executed by experienced doctors are expected to optimize the outcomes of organ donation, in general. Chi-square tests show that there are no significant differences in welcoming campaigns among ethnics. However, ethnics preferences over the campaign methods and campaigners are significantly different (P <0.05). Ethnic differences imply that necessary modifications on the campaign channels and campaigners should also be taken under consideration. By identifying the preferred channel and campaigners, this study hopes to shed some light on the ways to overcome the problem of organ shortage in Malaysia.

  2. Organ Donation Campaigns: Perspective of Dialysis Patient's Family Members

    PubMed Central

    TUMIN, Makmor; RAJA ARIFFIN, Raja Noriza; MOHD SATAR, NurulHuda; NG, Kok-Peng; LIM, Soo-Kun; CHONG, Chin-Sieng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Solving the dilemma of the organ shortage in Malaysia requires educating Malaysians about organ donation and transplantation. This paper aims at exploring the average Malaysian households ’ preferred channels of campaigns and the preferred campaigners in a family setting, targeting at the dialysis family members. Methods We analyzed the responses of 350 respondents regarding organ donation campaigns. The respondents are 2 family members of 175 dialysis patients from 3 different institutions. The information on respondents’ willingness to donate and preferred method and channel of organ donation campaign were collected through questionnaire. Results Malaysian families have a good tendency to welcome campaigns in both the public and private (their homes) spheres. We also found that campaigns facilitated by the electronic media (Television and Radio) and executed by experienced doctors are expected to optimize the outcomes of organ donation, in general. Chi-square tests show that there are no significant differences in welcoming campaigns among ethnics. However, ethnics preferences over the campaign methods and campaigners are significantly different (P <0.05). Conclusion Ethnic differences imply that necessary modifications on the campaign channels and campaigners should also be taken under consideration. By identifying the preferred channel and campaigners, this study hopes to shed some light on the ways to overcome the problem of organ shortage in Malaysia. PMID:25909060

  3. [Health promotion in families with paramyloidosis: the role of elders with younger family members].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla Roma; Mendes, Álvaro; Sousa, Liliana

    2017-06-12

    Citizens are now partners in the formal health promotion system. In the management of hereditary diseases, the role of family members is a vital source of support. Elders play a crucial role due to their long relationship with the disease and with patients in the family. However, this role has still been insufficiently explored, particularly in genetic disorders like paramyloidosis. This exploratory qualitative study analyzes the role of elders in families with paramyloidosis, in health promotion for younger members. The critical incidents technique was applied using a semi-structured interview. The study involved 18 participants who reported 76 critical incidents. The interviews were taped and submitted to content analysis. The principal results suggest the following roles for elders with younger family members: act as role models (in behaviors), encourage, inform, and support. The older generations can be mobilized by health professionals as partners to support younger generations in families with paramyloidosis.

  4. [Music in human terminality: the family members' conceptions].

    PubMed

    Sales, Catarina Aparecida; da Silva, Vladimir Araujo; Pilger, Calíope; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2011-03-01

    This qualitative study was performed using the multiple case study method and Heidegger's existential phenomenology for data analysis. The objective was to understand how family members perceive the influence of musical experiences on the physical and mental health of a relative living with a terminal illness. Participants were seven individuals belonging to two families. Data collection was performed through interviews and observation from May to June 2009. Results showed that using music while providing care to beings living with cancer can provide well-being to patients as well as their caregivers. Considering the deficit of leisure and the monotony of the home environment, using music contemplates the philosophical and humanitarian precepts of palliative care, thus being characterized as a complementary resource to nursing care, as besides being a communication resource, it improves the interpersonal relationship between patients and their families.

  5. Stromal-dependent tumor promotion by MIF family members

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors are composed of a heterogeneous population of cells that interact with each other and with soluble and insoluble factors that, when combined, strongly influence the relative proliferation, differentiation, motility, matrix remodeling, metabolism and microvessel density of malignant lesions. One family of soluble factors that is becoming increasingly associated with pro-tumoral phenotypes within tumor microenvironments is that of the migration inhibitory factor family which includes its namesake, MIF, and its only known family member, D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT). This review seeks to highlight our current understanding of the relative contributions of a variety of immune and non-immune tumor stromal cell populations and, within those contexts, will summarize the literature associated with MIF and/or D-DT. PMID:25277536

  6. Bereavement interventions for adults with intellectual disabilities: what works?

    PubMed

    Clute, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Examination of the theory base for bereavement and loss is currently just beginning for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). Yet, as life spans increase for individuals with ID, these adults experience more and more loss and bereavement events. Practitioners, especially grief counselors, are finding it increasingly critical for them to understand best practice principles for working with bereaved adults with ID in their daily work. Practitioners also are asked to guide families and care providers regarding grief and death education. This article provides counselors and other professionals with a review of existing bereavement intervention research for adults with ID. Practice recommendations are made on three levels: informal support; formal intervention; and community education.

  7. Bereavement education for childcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Braund, J; Rose, J

    2001-01-01

    Bereavement is a stressor that affects not only the child but also the whole family. Children need time and support to come to terms with their grief. Current evidence suggests that professionals feel ill equipped to deal with these issues. Inter-professional, multi-agency collaboration and support can provide effective, integrated and supportive services. A 12-day modular course was developed within the Exeter Community Trust and accredited by the University of Plymouth.

  8. Family Members as Third Parties in Dyadic Family Conflict: Strategies, Alliances, and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuchinich, Samuel; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes conflicts of 52 families observed during dinner. Findings suggest that family members frequently joined dyadic conflicts, they were equally likely to attempt to end or continue conflicts, they formed alliances half of the time, and their intervention strategies were related to the patterning and outcome of the conflicts. (RJC)

  9. The Lost Boys of Sudan: Ambiguous Loss, Search for Family, and Reestablishing Relationships with Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luster, Tom; Qin, Desiree B.; Bates, Laura; Johnson, Deborah J.; Rana, Meenal

    2008-01-01

    The "Lost Boys of Sudan" were separated from their families by civil war and subsequently lived in 3 other countries--Ethiopia, Kenya, and the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 refugees who located surviving family members in Sudan after an average separation of 13.7 years. The interviews probed their experiences…

  10. The Lost Boys of Sudan: Ambiguous Loss, Search for Family, and Reestablishing Relationships with Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luster, Tom; Qin, Desiree B.; Bates, Laura; Johnson, Deborah J.; Rana, Meenal

    2008-01-01

    The "Lost Boys of Sudan" were separated from their families by civil war and subsequently lived in 3 other countries--Ethiopia, Kenya, and the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 refugees who located surviving family members in Sudan after an average separation of 13.7 years. The interviews probed their experiences…

  11. Bereavement: A Universal Process of Growth through Readjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Camille; And Others

    Difficult as it may be to accept, loss and grieving are natural components of living. Traditionally, the bereaved have relied upon the help of clergy, family, and the medical profession. The behavioral and social sciences virtually ignored loss, grief and bereavement as subjects until as recently as 15 or 20 years ago. However, counselors are…

  12. Preventive Opportunities in Childhood Bereavement. (Death of a Parent Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert

    This lecture to clergymen presents a discussion of childhood bereavement and possible long-term psychological effects. A correlation between the loss of a parent and later-life mental illness is suggested, as well as the need to look closely at children's unique ways of grieving. The clergyman's role in helping bereaved families is emphasized.…

  13. Asteroid (90) Antiope: Another icy member of the Themis family?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, Kelsey D.; Emery, Joshua P.; Campins, Humberto; Kelley, Michael S. P.

    2015-07-01

    Many members of the Themis family show evidence of hydration in the form of oxidized iron in phyllosilicates (Florczak, M. et al. [1999]. Astron. Astrophys. Suppl. Ser. 134, 463-471), and OH-bearing minerals (Takir, D., Emery, J.P. [2012]. Icarus 219, 641-654). The largest member, (24) Themis, has H2O ice covering its surface (Campins, H. et al. [2010]. Nature 464, 1320-1321; Rivkin, A.S., Emery, J.P. [2010]. Nature 464, 1322-1323). We have investigated the second largest Themis-family asteroid, (90) Antiope, which Castillo-Rogez and Schmidt (Castillo-Rogez, J.C., Schmidt, B.E. [2010]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, L10202) predict to have a composition that includes water ice and organics. We obtained 2-4-μm spectroscopy of (90) Antiope in 2006 and 2008, and we find an absorption in the 3-μm region clearly present in our 2008 spectrum and likely in our 2006 spectrum. Both spectra have rounded, bowl-shaped absorptions consistent with those ascribed to water ice as in the spectrum of Asteroid (24) Themis. We also present and compare Spitzer 8-12-μm mid-infrared spectra of (24) Themis and (90) Antiope. We find that (90) Antiope is lacking a "fairy castle" dusty surface, which is in contrast to (24) Themis, other Themis family members (Licandro, J. et al. [2012]. Astron. Astrophys. 537, A73), and Jupiter Trojans (e.g. Emery, J.P., Cruikshank, D.P., Van Cleve, J. [2006]. Icarus 182, 496-512). We conclude that the surface structure of (90) Antiope is most similar to Cybele Asteroid (121) Hermione (Hargrove, K.D. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 453-455).

  14. Experiences of Family Members of Dying Patients Receiving Palliative Sedation.

    PubMed

    Tursunov, Olga; Cherny, Nathan I; Ganz, Freda DeKeyser

    2016-11-01

    To describe the experience of family members of patients receiving palliative sedation at the initiation of treatment and after the patient has died and to compare these experiences over time.
. Descriptive comparative study.
. Oncology ward at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel.
. A convenience sample of 34 family members of dying patients receiving palliative sedation. 
. A modified version of a questionnaire describing experiences of family members with palliative sedation was administered during palliative sedation and one to four months after the patient died. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the results of the questionnaire, and appropriate statistical analyses were conducted for comparisons over time.
. Experiences of family members and time.
. Most relatives were satisfied with the sedation and staff support. Palliative sedation was experienced as an ethical way to relieve suffering. However, one-third felt that it shortened the patient's life. An explanation of the treatment was given less than half of the time and was usually given on the same day treatment was started. This explanation was given by physicians and nurses. Many felt that they were not ready for changes in the patient's condition and wanted increased opportunities to discuss the treatment with oncology care providers. No statistically significant differences in experiences were found over time. 
. Relatives' experiences of palliative sedation were generally positive and stable over time. Important experiences included timing of the initiation of sedation, timing and quality of explanations, and communication.
. Nurses should attempt to initiate discussions of the possible role of sedation in the event of refractory symptoms and follow through with continued discussions. The management of refractory symptoms at the end of life, the role of sedation, and communication skills associated with decision making related to palliative sedation should be a

  15. Recurrent cutaneous abscesses in two Italian family members

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Carmen; Richetta, Antonio G.; Bitonti, Andrea; Curatolo, Pietro; Ferretti, Gianfranco; Mattozzi, Carlo; Luca, Melis; Silvestri, Emidio; Calvieri, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Environmental mycobacteria are the causative factors of an increasing number of infections worldwide. Cutaneous infections as a result of such mycobacteria are often misdiagnosed, and their treatment is difficult since they can show in vivo and in vitro multidrug resistance. Absence of pathognomonic clinical signs and variable histological findings often delay diagnosis. We report a case of localized recurrent soft tissue swelling by Mycobacterium marinum in 2 members of the same family. The cases are being reported for their uncommon clinical presentation and the associated etiological agent. Patients recovered completely following therapy with rifampicin 600 mg plus isoniazide 300 mg daily for 45 days. PMID:24470891

  16. Community nurses' perceptions of providing bereavement care.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, Sarah; Harrison, Kath; Johnson, Amanda; Chang, Esther

    2013-06-01

    This study explored the perceptions of bereavement support offered to clients and their carers and family by community nurses (CNs) in three community health centres located in a single area health service. In the context of an ageing population, it is pertinent to review CNs' perceptions in providing bereavement services. Early assessment and intervention is likely to prevent complicated grief occurring in the community. The bereavement support provided by CNs, considered here within a person-centred framework, enables identification of complicated grief. Semistructured interviews were held with 10 CNs and were transcribed verbatim. Transcriptions were analysed for major themes, and responses were grouped in relation to the study aims and themes emerging from the interviews. The themes discussed in this paper are as follows: the carer as a focus of palliative care; bereavement support as an outlet for carers; and the ending of the relationship between carers and CNs that is facilitated through bereavement support. The study provides evidence that supports the adoption of a model of bereavement support delivered by CNs as a means of reducing the likelihood of complicated grief occurring in the community. Further, the visits provide an important opportunity for nurses and carers to satisfactorily complete their relationship.

  17. Neuroglobin and cytoglobin: two new members of globin family

    PubMed Central

    Tosqui, Priscilla; Colombo, Marcio Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The globin family has long been defined by myoglobin and hemoglobin, proteins with the functions of oxygen storage and transportation, respectively. Recently, two new members of this family were discovered: neuroglobin present in neurons and retinal cells and cytoglobin found in various types of tissue. The increased expression of these proteins in hypoxic conditions first suggested a role in oxygen supply. However structural and functional differences, such as the hexacoordinated heme, a high autoxidation rate and different concentrations between different cellular types, have dismissed this hypothesis. The protective role of these globins has already been established. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated increased survival of neurons under stress in the presence of neuroglobin and increased resistance to neurodegenerative diseases. However the mechanism remains unknown. Functions, including detoxification of nitric oxide, free radical scavenging and as an antioxidant and signaling of apoptosis, have also been suggested for neuroglobin and an antifibrotic function for cytoglobin. PMID:23049323

  18. Caregiving by Teens for Family Members With Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Janet K.; Ayres, Lioness; Specht, Janet; Sparbel, Kathleen; Klimek, Mary Lou

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe caregiving by teens for family members with Huntington disease (HD). Thirty-two teens in HD families in the United States and Canada participated in focus groups from 2002 to 2005 in a study to identify concerns and strategies to manage concerns. An unexpected finding was 24 (77%) described caregiving activities. Descriptive analysis of caregiving statements identified themes of Tasks and Responsibilities, Subjective Burden, Caregiving in Context of Personal Risk for HD, and Decisional Responsibility. Teens took an active part in nearly all aspects of care with the exception of contacting health care providers and attending doctors’ appointments. Some described emotional distress, and many provided care knowing they had the potential to develop HD. Teens recognized the need for decisions but lacked the authority to make these decisions. Findings may be relevant for other teens who strive to meet caregiver and student roles and developmental tasks. PMID:19465560

  19. A comprehensive approach to bereavement.

    PubMed

    Steen, K F

    1998-03-01

    Bereavement is associated with significant mental and physical health consequences, and risk factors for illness associated with bereavement have been demonstrated. Although bereavement cannot be eliminated as a health risk, primary care providers can screen for it, facilitate the normal grief process, and mitigate risks for bereavement complications and health deterioration. Considering the time constraints in today's fast-paced health care environment, this article offers a clear and comprehensive framework for primary care of grieving people. The framework presented here includes (1) empirically shown risk factors for health deterioration in bereavement; (2) an assessment and screening patient history format suitable for primary bereavement care; (3) primary care guidelines for differential diagnosis of bereavement; and (4) principles of primary care for the bereaved. This article also addresses primary care for bereaved children, parents, and other specific bereaved populations, and discusses pharmacotherapy and multicultural considerations in bereavement.

  20. The relations of family members' unique and shared perspectives of family dysfunction to dyad adjustment.

    PubMed

    Jager, Justin; Yuen, Cynthia X; Bornstein, Marc H; Putnick, Diane L; Hendricks, Charlene

    2014-06-01

    Among a community sample of families (N = 128), this study examined how family members' shared and unique perspectives of family dysfunction relate to dyad members' shared views of dyad adjustment within adolescent-mother, adolescent-father, and mother-father dyads. Independent of a family's family perspective (shared perspective of family dysfunction), the adolescent's unique perspective was associated with lower security and higher conflict with both mother and father; the father's unique perspective was associated with lower security and higher conflict with the adolescent, as well as lower marital quality with mother; and the mother unique perspective was associated with lower marital quality with the father. Moreover, for adolescent-parent dyads, compared with the parent unique perspective, the adolescent unique perspective was more strongly associated with dyad adjustment. These findings indicate that both shared and unique views of the family system-the adolescent's unique view in particular-independently relate to the health of family subsystems. They also suggest that research, as well as therapeutic interventions, that focus on just the shared view of the family may miss important elements of family dysfunction.

  1. Characterization of lamprey IL-17 family members and their receptors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qifeng; Das, Sabyasachi; Hirano, Masayuki; Holland, Stephen J.; McCurley, Nathanael; Guo, Peng; Rosenberg, Charles S.; Boehm, Thomas; Cooper, Max D.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-17 is an ancient cytokine implicated in a variety of immune defense reactions. We have indentified five members of the sea lamprey IL-17 family (IL-17D.1, IL-17D.2, IL-17E, IL-17B and IL-17C) and six IL-17 receptor genes (IL-17RA.1, IL-17RA.2, IL-17RA.3, IL-17RF, IL-17RE/RC and IL-17RD), determined their relationship with mammalian orthologues, and examined their expression patterns and potential interactions in order to explore their roles in innate and adaptive immunity. The most highly expressed IL-17 family member is IL-17D.1 (mammalian IL-17D like), which was found to be preferentially expressed by epithelial cells of skin, intestine and gills and by the two types of lamprey T-like cells. IL-17D.1 binding to recombinant IL-17RA.1 and to the surface of IL-17RA.1-expressing B-like cells and monocytes of lamprey larvae was demonstrated, and treatment of lamprey blood cells with recombinant IL-17D.1 protein enhanced transcription of genes expressed by the B-like cells. These findings suggest a potential role for IL-17 in coordinating the interactions between T-like cells and other cells of the adaptive and innate immune systems in jawless vertebrates. PMID:26491201

  2. Differential expression of Notch family members in astrocytomas and medulloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Yu, Shizhu; Jiang, Rongcai; Kang, Chunsheng; Wang, Guangxiu; Jiang, Hao; Pu, Peiyu

    2009-12-01

    Notch signaling pathway plays an integral role in determining cell fates in development. Growing evidence demonstrates that Notch signaling pathway has versatile effects in tumorigenesis depending on the tumor type, grade and stage. Notch signaling pathway is deregulated in some brain tumors. To examine the differential expression of Notch family members (Notch1, 2, 3, 4) in human astrocytomas and medulloblastomas, and to evaluate their roles in the development of both tumor types. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis were used to detect Notch1, 2, 3, 4 expression in tissue microarray and freshly resected tissue samples of normal brain, astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. Notch family members were not expressed or barely detectable in normal brain tissues. Notch1, 3, 4 were highly expressed but Notch2 was not expressed in astrocytomas. The percentage of immunopositive tumor cells and level of Notch1 expression was increased with tumor grade. In addition, overexpression of Notch2 was detected in medulloblastomas in contrast to low or no expression of Notch1, 3, 4. Differential expression of Notch1, 2, 3, 4 is detected in astrocytomas and medulloblastomas, that may be related to their different roles playing in the development of brain tumors.

  3. A family operation: plastic surgeons who perform aesthetic surgery on spouses or other family members.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Sara A; Slavin, Sumner A; Goldwyn, Robert M

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether plastic surgeons would perform elective cosmetic surgery on spouses or other family members and how many have done so, the type of procedures, the circumstances under which the surgery took place, and the results. Participants were 465 members of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, representing 30.7 percent of the overall sample pool of 1513 members recruited through anonymous, voluntary participation in an online survey. Approximately half (51.8 percent) were 51 to 65 years old, most were men (91.2 percent), and most were from large urban areas; respondents had been in practice for 1 to 40 years. The plastic surgeons who returned the survey were comfortable performing elective cosmetic procedures on family members, the majority having already done so. Eighty-eight percent reported they would operate on a spouse or other family member, and 83.9 percent reported they already had. The main motivation (67 percent) was their belief that they were the best surgeon for the procedure. The most commonly listed operations were rhinoplasty, abdominoplasty, eyelidplasty, face lift, breast augmentation, and liposuction. Patients included spouses, children, parents, cousins, and in-laws, ranging from teenaged males to women in their 70s. The overwhelming majority (94.2 percent) reported no complications, and 99.5 percent believed the patients were satisfied with their outcome. Survey participants are comfortable with the idea of performing elective cosmetic procedures on family members. Regardless of the invasiveness of the procedure or their relationship with the patient, respondents reported no complications and a high level of patient satisfaction anomalous for any patient-surgeon sample, suggesting that surgeons who operate on family members hold confident opinions of their surgical skills and results.

  4. Appraisal of the cancer experience by family members and survivors in long-term survivorship.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Karen F; Rose, Julia H; Deimling, Gary T

    2006-09-01

    This study assessed the appraisal of the stressfulness of the cancer experience and its correlates for family members and older survivors living in the long-term survivorship phase of the disease. On average, family members appraised the cancer experience as more stressful than their surviving relatives. Beliefs about the effect of the diagnosis and treatment on family members were important correlates for both family members and survivors in the appraisal process. Cancer characteristics were not related to appraisal for survivors, but stage at diagnosis was associated with a more stressful appraisal for family members. Demographic characteristics were unrelated to appraisal for family members, but being African-American was linked to a less stressful appraisal for survivors. These findings highlight the stressful impact of the cancer experience on family members and can help guide health care interventions which include family members from African-American and White ethnicities.

  5. Al-Anon family groups: newcomers and members.

    PubMed

    Timko, Christine; Cronkite, Ruth; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Laudet, Alexandre; Roth, Jeffrey; Moos, Rudolf H

    2013-11-01

    Empirical knowledge is lacking about Al-Anon Family Groups (Al-Anon), the most widely used form of help by people concerned about another's drinking, partly because conducting research on 12-step groups is challenging. Our purpose was to describe a new method of obtaining survey data from 12-step group attendees and to examine influences on initial Al-Anon attendance and attendees' recent life contexts and functioning. Al-Anon's World Service Office sent a mailing to a random sample of groups, which subsequently yielded surveys from newcomers (n = 359) and stable members (n = 264). Reasons for groups' nonparticipation included having infrequent newcomers and the study being seen as either contrary to the 12 Traditions or too uncomfortable for newcomers. Main concerns prompting initial Al-Anon attendance were problems with overall quality of life and with the Al-Anon trigger (a significant drinking individual), and being stressed and angry. Goals for Al-Anon attendance were related to the following concerns: better quality of life, fewer trigger-related problems, and less stress. Members reported better functioning in some of these domains (quality of life, relationship with the trigger) but did not differ from newcomers on physical and psychological health. Newcomers were more likely to have recently drunk alcohol and to have obtained treatment for their own substance misuse problems. This method of collecting data from 12-step group attendees yielded valid data and also was seen by many in Al-Anon as consistent with the Traditions. Both newcomers and members had aimed to improve their overall quality of life and well-being through Al-Anon, and, indeed, members were more satisfied with their quality of life than were newcomers.

  6. Al-Anon Family Groups: Newcomers and Members

    PubMed Central

    Timko, Christine; Cronkite, Ruth; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Laudet, Alexandre; Roth, Jeffrey; Moos, Rudolf H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Empirical knowledge is lacking about Al-Anon Family Groups (Al-Anon), the most widely used form of help by people concerned about another’s drinking, partly because conducting research on 12-step groups is challenging. Our purpose was to describe a new method of obtaining survey data from 12-step group attendees and to examine influences on initial Al-Anon attendance and attendees’ recent life contexts and functioning. Method: Al-Anon’s World Service Office sent a mailing to a random sample of groups, which subsequently yielded surveys from newcomers (n = 359) and stable members (n = 264). Results: Reasons for groups’ nonparticipation included having infrequent newcomers and the study being seen as either contrary to the 12 Traditions or too uncomfortable for newcomers. Main concerns prompting initial Al-Anon attendance were problems with overall quality of life and with the Al-Anon trigger (a significant drinking individual), and being stressed and angry. Goals for Al-Anon attendance were related to the following concerns: better quality of life, fewer trigger-related problems, and less stress. Members reported better functioning in some of these domains (quality of life, relationship with the trigger) but did not differ from newcomers on physical and psychological health. Newcomers were more likely to have recently drunk alcohol and to have obtained treatment for their own substance misuse problems. Conclusions: This method of collecting data from 12-step group attendees yielded valid data and also was seen by many in Al-Anon as consistent with the Traditions. Both newcomers and members had aimed to improve their overall quality of life and well-being through Al-Anon, and, indeed, members were more satisfied with their quality of life than were newcomers. PMID:24172125

  7. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families. © 2014 AWHONN.

  8. Adaptation to Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Yulia Chentsova; Zisook, Sidney

    2005-01-01

    Much of the literature on the effects of conjugal bereavement has focused on the detrimental effects of losing a spouse. Although it is very important to be aware of the emotional, physical, and social problems often associated with bereavement, these difficulties are not universal accompaniments of grief. Accumulating evidence suggests that…

  9. Adaptation to Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Yulia Chentsova; Zisook, Sidney

    2005-01-01

    Much of the literature on the effects of conjugal bereavement has focused on the detrimental effects of losing a spouse. Although it is very important to be aware of the emotional, physical, and social problems often associated with bereavement, these difficulties are not universal accompaniments of grief. Accumulating evidence suggests that…

  10. Bereavement in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, James P.

    1994-01-01

    Factors that place older adults at risk for problems associated with the bereavement process are identified and discussed. Provides guidelines for distinguishing between normal bereavement depression and clinical depression, discusses the impact of different types of loss, describes three types of intervention, and explores countertransference.…

  11. Skin surveillance intentions among family members of patients with melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with melanoma are at increased disease risk. However, many first-degree relatives do not receive a periodic total cutaneous examination from a health care provider or engage in regular skin self-examination. The goal of this study was to identify correlates of total cutaneous examination and skin self-examination intentions among first-degree relatives of melanoma patients, thus providing insight on factors that should be targeted in future intervention research. Methods The participants were 545 first-degree relatives of melanoma patients at increased disease risk due to their risk factor profile and lack of skin surveillance behaviors. Participants completed a telephone survey regarding their total cutaneous examination and skin self-examination intentions and potential correlates, including demographics, medical factors, psychological factors, knowledge, and social influence factors. Results Intentions to receive a total cutaneous examination were higher among first-degree relatives with more education, those perceiving higher benefits and lower barriers to an examination, and those reporting greater physician and family support. Intentions to receive a skin self-examination were higher among those with higher benefits and lower barriers to self-examination, and higher family support. Conclusions Interventions to promote skin surveillance behaviors among first-degree relatives of melanoma patients should highlight the benefits of early detection of melanoma, address barriers to receipt of total cutaneous examination and engagement in skin self-examination, and promote support from physicians and family members. PMID:22082038

  12. Are we getting it right? Parents' perceptions of hospice child bereavement support services.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S; Croy, P; King, M; Barnes, J

    2007-07-01

    To determine parents' experiences and perceptions of a support service for families with bereaved children, provided by a UK charity for cancer patients in seven hospices in the UK. Individual interviews with 25 purposively selected parents. Parents used the service for: advice and reassurance; support for their children while they grieved; and advice on ameliorating behavioural difficulties at home and school. Non-service users did not think formalised support was necessary or had other sufficient support. Nevertheless, important to parents in both groups was that the service existed so their children's needs were being or could be addressed. Children and their parents benefited from talking to a non-family member, and being involved in social events that reduced feelings of isolation. The hospice child bereavement service was offered as an integral part of palliative cancer care support. Future research could explore collaborative work between counsellors and other professionals.

  13. Health outcomes of bereavement.

    PubMed

    Stroebe, Margaret; Schut, Henk; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    2007-12-08

    In this Review, we look at the relation between bereavement and physical and mental health. Although grief is not a disease and most people adjust without professional psychological intervention, bereavement is associated with excess risk of mortality, particularly in the early weeks and months after loss. It is related to decrements in physical health, indicated by presence of symptoms and illnesses, and use of medical services. Furthermore, bereaved individuals report diverse psychological reactions. For a few people, mental disorders or complications in the grieving process ensue. We summarise research on risk factors that increase vulnerability of some bereaved individuals. Diverse factors (circumstances of death, intrapersonal and interpersonal variables, ways of coping) are likely to co-determine excesses in ill-health. We also assess the effectiveness of psychological intervention programmes. Intervention should be targeted at high-risk people and those with complicated grief or bereavement-related depression and stress disorders.

  14. End-of-Life and Bereavement Care in Pediatric Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Markita L; Jenkins, Tammara L; Tamburro, Robert F

    2017-10-01

    Most childhood deaths in the United States occur in hospitals. Pediatric intensive care clinicians must anticipate and effectively treat dying children's pain and suffering and support the psychosocial and spiritual needs of families. These actions may help family members adjust to their loss, particularly bereaved parents who often experience reduced mental and physical health. Candid and compassionate communication is paramount to successful end-of-life (EOL) care as is creating an environment that fosters meaningful family interaction. EOL care in the pediatric intensive care unit is associated with challenging ethical issues, of which clinicians must maintain a sound and working understanding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 5 CFR 734.405 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... and Positions § 734.405 Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family member of either a candidate for partisan political office, or...

  16. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... transfer to a nursing home. The employee need not be the only individual or family member available to care... certification provision that an employee is “needed to care for” a family member or covered servicemember... serious health condition, the family member is unable to care for his or her own basic medical,...

  17. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... transfer to a nursing home. The employee need not be the only individual or family member available to care... certification provision that an employee is “needed to care for” a family member or covered servicemember... serious health condition, the family member is unable to care for his or her own basic medical,...

  18. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... transfer to a nursing home. The employee need not be the only individual or family member available to care... certification provision that an employee is needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember... serious health condition, the family member is unable to care for his or her own basic medical,...

  19. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... transfer to a nursing home. The employee need not be the only individual or family member available to care... certification provision that an employee is needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember... serious health condition, the family member is unable to care for his or her own basic medical,...

  20. 75 FR 5870 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for the HCTC Medicare Family Member Registration Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for the HCTC Medicare Family Member... Medicare Family Member Registration Form. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before April 5...: HCTC Medicare Family Member Registration Form. OMB Number: 1545-2162. Form Number: 14117....

  1. 75 FR 5873 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for the HCTC Family Member Eligibility Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for the HCTC Family Member Eligibility Form..., HCTC Family Member Eligibility Form. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before April 5...: HCTC Family Member Eligibility Form. OMB Number: 1545-2163. Form Number: 14116. Abstract: This...

  2. 5 CFR 734.405 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... and Positions § 734.405 Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family member of either a candidate for partisan political office, or a...

  3. The burden of living with and caring for a suicidal family member.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Columba; McGowan, Iain; O'Neill, Siobhan; Kernohan, George

    2014-10-01

    The family has a primary role in caring for family members who are suicidal and in the prevention of future suicide. However, the impact that suicidal behaviour has on these family members is poorly understood. To explore the lived experiences of participants who cared for suicidal family members. Eighteen participants were interviewed using a short topic guide. Responses were digitally recorded and transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. One overarching theme: "Hard work for the whole family" and four sub-themes: (i) Family burden, (ii) competing pressures, (iii) secrecy and shame and (iv) helplessness and guilt. Caring for a suicidal family member may be euphemistically summarised as "hard work" that impacts heavily on the day-to-day tasks of other family members. Participants spent much time worrying and ruminating about the risk of suicide in their family member. Mental health care professionals ought to acknowledge and address the impact that suicidal behaviour has on family carers.

  4. Religion and spirituality in online suicide bereavement: an analysis of online memorials.

    PubMed

    Krysinska, Karolina; Andriessen, Karl; Corveleyn, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Religion and spirituality can be valuable resources in coping with bereavement. There is a paucity of studies focusing specifically on their role in suicide bereavement, although there are indications that religion/spirituality can be helpful for suicide survivors. The study explores the role of religion and/or spirituality in suicide bereavement by analyzing this theme in online memorials dedicated to suicide victims. We randomly selected 250 memorials in two online cemeteries: Faces of Suicide and Gone too Soon. Interpretative and deductive thematic analysis was used to identify themes in the collected material, including the theme of religion/spirituality. References to religion/spirituality were found in 14% of memorials. These memorials were written by family members, friends, and (ex-)partners of the deceased and were dedicated mostly to young adult males. Religion/spirituality was mentioned in the context of God's will, peace wish, continuation of the spirit, afterlife, reunion, gratitude, description of the deceased, and grief reactions of suicide survivors. Some suicide survivors spontaneously mention the role of religious/spiritual beliefs in coping with their loss. Future studies could explore which subgroups of the bereaved are likely to turn to these resources, and whether they can contribute to the well-being of the suicide survivors.

  5. Muscarinic toxicity among family members after consumption of mushrooms.

    PubMed

    George, Peter; Hegde, Narasimha

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are commercially cultivated over the world and safe for human consumption, except in those with known allergies. Among the thousands of mushroom species identified, few are considered to be edible. Mushroom hunting has emerged as an adventure and recreational activity in recent decades. Wild forms of mushrooms are often poisonous and visually mimic the edible ones, thus leading to mistaken harvesting, consumption, and toxicities. In literature, various systemic toxic syndromes associated with mushroom poisoning have been described. We report four members of a family with muscarinic manifestations after accidental consumption of poisonous mushrooms. The Clitocybe species of mushrooms they consumed resulted in their muscarinic toxicity. Patients with muscarinic mushroom toxicity have early onset of symptoms and they respond well to atropine and symptomatic supportive care.

  6. Muscarinic Toxicity Among Family Members After Consumption of Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    George, Peter; Hegde, Narasimha

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are commercially cultivated over the world and safe for human consumption, except in those with known allergies. Among the thousands of mushroom species identified, few are considered to be edible. Mushroom hunting has emerged as an adventure and recreational activity in recent decades. Wild forms of mushrooms are often poisonous and visually mimic the edible ones, thus leading to mistaken harvesting, consumption, and toxicities. In literature, various systemic toxic syndromes associated with mushroom poisoning have been described. We report four members of a family with muscarinic manifestations after accidental consumption of poisonous mushrooms. The Clitocybe species of mushrooms they consumed resulted in their muscarinic toxicity. Patients with muscarinic mushroom toxicity have early onset of symptoms and they respond well to atropine and symptomatic supportive care. PMID:23833447

  7. A New Member of the Graphene Family: Graphene Acid.

    PubMed

    Jankovský, Ondřej; Nováček, Michal; Luxa, Jan; Sedmidubský, David; Fila, Vlastimil; Pumera, Martin; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2016-11-21

    A new member of the family of graphene derivatives, namely, graphene acid with a composition close to C1 (COOH)1 , was prepared by oxidation of graphene oxide. The synthetic procedure is based on repeated oxidation of graphite with potassium permanganate in an acidic environment. The oxidation process was studied in detail after each step. The multiple oxidations led to oxidative removal of other oxygen functional groups formed in the first oxidation step. Detailed chemical analysis showed only a minor amount of other oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl and the dominant presence of carboxyl groups in a concentration of about 30 wt %. Further oxidation led to complete decomposition of graphene acid. The obtained material exhibits unique sorption capacity towards metal ions and carbon dioxide. The highly hydrophilic nature of graphene acid allowed the assembly of ultrathin free-standing membranes with high transparency.

  8. Nursing interventions for family members waiting during cardiac procedures.

    PubMed

    Trecartin, Kelly; Carroll, Diane L

    2011-08-01

    Anxiety is shared by patients and family members (FMs) and can increase throughout the FMs waiting during invasive cardiac procedures (ICP). The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of an informational report (IR) and a postprocedure visit (PPV), on the anxiety of waiting FMs. There were 151 FMs assigned to 3 groups; Group 1 (50 FMs: standard of care [SOC]), Group 2 (50 FMs: SOC + IR), and Group 3 (51 FMs: SOC + IR + PPV). Pre/ postvariables measured were: blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), skin temperature (ST), and anxiety. When comparing the BP, HR, ST, and anxiety there were no differences between groups with either SOC or IR. There was a significant reduction in anxiety, from baseline to the PPV in Group 3 (F = 10.1; p < .000). A PPV had an impact on FMs and a PPV should be incorporated as a nursing intervention during ICP.

  9. Informational support to family members of intensive care unit patients: the perspectives of families and nurses.

    PubMed

    Gaeeni, Mina; Farahani, Mansoureh A; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Mohammadi, Nooredin

    2014-09-25

    The receiving information about the patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is classified among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. Meeting the informational needs of families is a major goal for intensive care workers. Delivering honest, intelligible and effective information raises specific challenges in the stressful setting of the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this qualitative study was to explain perspectives of families of Intensive Care Unit patients and nurses about informational support. Using a conventional content analysis approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants to explore their perspectives of providing informational support to families of ICU patients. A purposeful sampling method was used to recruit nineteen family members of thirteen patients hospitalized in the ICU and twelve nurses from three teaching hospitals. In general, 31 persons participated in this study. Data collection continued to achieve data saturation. A conventional content analysis of the data produced three categories and seven sub-categories. The three main categories were as followed, a) providing information, b) handling information and c) using information. Providing information had three sub-categories consisting of "receiving admission news", "receiving truthful and complete information" and receiving general information. Handling information had two sub-categories consisting "keeping information" and "gradual revelation". Lastly, using information has two sub-categories consisting of "support of patient" and "support of family members". The results of this study revealed perspectives of families of Intensive Care Unit patients and nurses about informational support. It also determines the nurses' need to know more about the influence of their supportive role on family's ICU patients informing. In addition, the results of present study can be used as a basis for further studies and for offering

  10. Correlated Outcomes of a Pilot Intervention for People Injecting Drugs and Their Family Members in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Liang, Li-Jung; Lin, Chunqing; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2013-01-01

    Background The interrelationship between the well-being of injecting drug users (IDUs) and their family environment has been widely documented. However, few intervention programs have addressed the needs of both IDUs and their family members. Methods This study describes a randomized intervention pilot targeting 83 IDUs and 83 of their family members from four communes in Phú Thọ province, Vietnam. The IDUs and family members in the intervention condition received multiple group sessions, with the intent to improve psychological well-being and family relationships. The intervention outcomes (depressive symptoms and family relations) were evaluated at baseline, 3-month and 6-month follow-up assessments. Results Depressive symptoms and family relations reported by IDUs were found to be correlated to those reported by their family members. Overall, significant intervention effects on depressive symptoms and family relations were observed for both IDUs and family members. A similar improvement pattern in family relations emerged for both the IDU and family member samples, although the intervention effect of reducing depressive symptoms was more sustainable for family members at the 6-month assessment when compared to the IDU sample. Conclusion The intervention pilot addressed challenges faced by IDUs and their family members and revealed correlated outcomes for the two groups. Findings suggest a vital need to include family members in future drug prevention and harm reduction intervention efforts. PMID:24305572

  11. "You Needed to Rehab...Families as Well": Family Members' Own Goals for Aphasia Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Tami; Davidson, Bronwyn; Worrall, Linda; Hersh, Deborah; Ferguson, Alison; Sherratt, Sue; Gilbert, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aphasia affects family members in addition to the individuals with the communication disorder. In order to develop appropriate services for the relatives of people with aphasia post-stroke, their rehabilitation goals need to be identified. Aim: The aim of the current investigation was to identify the rehabilitation goals that family…

  12. "You Needed to Rehab...Families as Well": Family Members' Own Goals for Aphasia Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Tami; Davidson, Bronwyn; Worrall, Linda; Hersh, Deborah; Ferguson, Alison; Sherratt, Sue; Gilbert, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aphasia affects family members in addition to the individuals with the communication disorder. In order to develop appropriate services for the relatives of people with aphasia post-stroke, their rehabilitation goals need to be identified. Aim: The aim of the current investigation was to identify the rehabilitation goals that family…

  13. [Presence of family members while performing invasive procedures. A prospective study].

    PubMed

    Martínez Moreno, C; Cordero Castro, C; Palacios Cuesta, A; Blázquez Gamero, D; Marín Ferrer, M M

    2012-07-01

    Family members of child patients have traditionally not been allowed to be present during invasive procedures. To evaluate the level of satisfaction of family members, healthcare professionals, and the patients themselves, when family members are present during invasive procedures carried out in the pediatric emergency department. A prospective observational study was carried out, which included a questionnaire containing demographic information, the details of the procedure, and the level of satisfaction of the patient, their family members, and the healthcare professionals present. Data was obtained from 75 procedures. In 5 of these, family members chose not to be present during the procedure. The most frequent procedures were lumbar punctures (44%), laceration repairs (22,7%) and venopunctures (17,3%). All (100%) the children who were asked wanted their family members to be present. 90% of family members and 57% of healthcare professionals were of the opinion that the presence of family members facilitated the procedure. Furthermore, 90% of family members and 76% of healthcare professionals thought that family presence was beneficial to the patient. 95% of family members and 71% of healthcare professionals thought that the option to be present during invasive procedures should be given to family members. 73% of healthcare professionals were satisfied with the presence of family members. On a scale of one to ten, overall satisfaction of family members was 9.5. In our experience, family presence during invasive procedures is possible, and we have found this to be beneficial to the child. We also found that both family members and healthcare professionals were accepting and also satisfied with this new practice policy. Copyright © 2010 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. 5 CFR 734.307 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... candidate for partisan political office may appear in a family photograph which is printed in a campaign... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family...

  15. 5 CFR 734.307 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family... candidate for partisan political office may appear in a family photograph which is printed in a...

  16. Follow-Up Study to Family Members' Reactions to the Initial Special Education Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingalls, Lawrence; Hammond, Helen; Paez, Carlos; Rodriguez, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Family involvement is a central component of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Family members are to be integrated in all aspects of the special education process. At the onset, of family involvement, it is imperative for educators to be aware of possible reactions family members may experience in this initial stage. This…

  17. Follow-Up Study to Family Members' Reactions to the Initial Special Education Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingalls, Lawrence; Hammond, Helen; Paez, Carlos; Rodriguez, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Family involvement is a central component of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Family members are to be integrated in all aspects of the special education process. At the onset, of family involvement, it is imperative for educators to be aware of possible reactions family members may experience in this initial stage. This…

  18. 5 CFR 734.307 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family... candidate for partisan political office may appear in a family photograph which is printed in a campaign...

  19. Physiological role of SLC12 family members in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Bazúa-Valenti, Silvana; Castañeda-Bueno, María; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-07-01

    The solute carrier family 12, as numbered according to Human Genome Organisation (HUGO) nomenclature, encodes the electroneutral cation-coupled chloride cotransporters that are expressed in many cells and tissues; they play key roles in important physiological events, such as cell volume regulation, modulation of the intracellular chloride concentration, and transepithelial ion transport. Most of these family members are expressed in specific regions of the nephron. The Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC2, which is located in the thick ascending limb, and the Na-Cl cotransporter, which is located in the distal convoluted tubule, play important roles in salt reabsorption and serve as the receptors for loop and thiazide diuretics, respectively (Thiazide diuretics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in the world.). The activity of these transporters correlates with blood pressure levels; thus, their regulation has been a subject of intense research for more than a decade. The K-Cl cotransporters KCC1, KCC3, and KCC4 are expressed in several nephron segments, and their role in renal physiology is less understood but nevertheless important. Evidence suggests that they are involved in modulating proximal tubule glucose reabsorption, thick ascending limb salt reabsorption and collecting duct proton secretion. In this work, we present an overview of the physiological roles of these transporters in the kidney, with particular emphasis on the knowledge gained in the past few years. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Association between aggressive care and bereaved families' evaluation of end-of-life care for veterans with non-small cell lung cancer who died in Veterans Affairs facilities.

    PubMed

    Ersek, Mary; Miller, Susan C; Wagner, Todd H; Thorpe, Joshua M; Smith, Dawn; Levy, Cari R; Gidwani, Risha; Faricy-Anderson, Katherine; Lorenz, Karl A; Kinosian, Bruce; Mor, Vincent

    2017-08-15

    To the authors' knowledge, little is known regarding the relationship between patients' and families' satisfaction with aggressive end-of-life care. Herein, the authors examined the associations between episodes of aggressive care (ie, chemotherapy, mechanical ventilation, acute hospitalizations, and intensive care unit admissions) within the last 30 days of life and families' evaluations of end-of-life care among patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 847 patients with NSCLC (34% of whom were aged <65 years) who died in a nursing home or intensive care, acute care, or hospice/palliative care (HPC) unit at 1 of 128 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers between 2010 and 2012 were examined. Data sources included Veterans Affairs administrative and clinical data, Medicare claims, and the Bereaved Family Survey. The response rate for the Bereaved Family Survey was 62%. Greater than 72% of veterans with advanced lung cancer who died in an inpatient setting had at least 1 episode of aggressive care and 31% received chemotherapy within the last 30 days of life. For all units except for HPC, when patients experienced at least 1 episode of aggressive care, bereaved families rated care lower compared with when patients did not receive any aggressive care. For patients dying in an HPC unit, the associations between overall ratings of care and ≥2 inpatient admissions or any episode of aggressive care were not found to be statistically significant. Rates of aggressive care were not associated with age, and family ratings of care were similar for younger and older patients. Aggressive care within the last month of life is common among patients with NSCLC and is associated with lower family evaluations of end-of-life care. Specialized care provided within an HPC unit may mitigate the negative effects of aggressive care on these outcomes. Cancer 2017;123:3186-94. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  1. Faustoviruses: Comparative Genomics of New Megavirales Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Benamar, Samia; Reteno, Dorine G. I.; Bandaly, Victor; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    An emerging interest for the giant virus discovery process, genome sequencing and analysis has allowed an expansion of the number of known Megavirales members. Using the protist Vermamoeba sp. as cell support, a new giant virus named Faustovirus has been isolated. In this study, we describe the genome sequences of nine Faustoviruses and build a genomic comparison in order to have a comprehensive overview of genomic composition and diversity among this new virus family. The average sequence length of these viruses is 467,592.44 bp (ranging from 455,803 to 491,024 bp), making them the fourth largest Megavirales genome after Mimiviruses, Pandoraviruses, and Pithovirus sibericum. Faustovirus genomes displayed an average G+C content of 37.14 % (ranging from 36.22 to 39.59%) which is close to the G+C content range of the Asfarviridae genomes (38%). The proportion of best matches and the phylogenetic analysis suggest a shared origin with Asfarviridae without belonging to the same family. The core-gene-based phylogeny of Faustoviruses study has identified four lineages. These results were confirmed by the analysis of amino acids and COGs category distribution. The diversity of the gene composition of these lineages is mainly explained by gene deletion or acquisition and some exceptions for gene duplications. The high proportion of best matches from Bacteria and Phycodnaviridae on the pan-genome and unique genes may be explained by an interaction occurring after the separation of the lineages. The Faustovirus core-genome appears to consolidate the surrounding of 207 genes whereas the pan-genome is described as an open pan-genome, its enrichment via the discovery of new Faustoviruses is required to better seize all the genomic diversity of this family. PMID:26903952

  2. Phenotypic features of Chinese family members with primary angle closure.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yun Shu; Damji, Karim F; Chen, Zai Hong; Arora, Sourabh; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2013-06-01

    To describe ocular phenotypic features in Chinese families with primary angle closure (PAC). Prospective cohort study. 428 individuals of 103 eligible families. Probands identified in clinic and their relatives were examined. Measurements included intraocular pressure, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, axial length, and gonioscopic features related to the anterior chamber angle. Electroretinogram (ERG) testing for dark and light adaptation on both eyes of each individual examined was also obtained. There were 144 PAC affected patients (33.7%), 60 suspects (14%), and 224 unaffected individuals (52.3%). There were more than 2 affected members in 51 families (49.5%). Compared with unaffected individuals, affected individuals were more likely to be female, have shallower peripheral and central anterior chamber depths, narrower angles, thicker lenses, and shorter axial lengths (p<0.001). Affected patients and suspects had similar axial lengths (p>0.05). Compared with unaffected individuals, affected and suspect individuals showed ERG adaptation abnormalities (p<0.05). Of 45 unaffected individuals with mean axial length ≤ 22.00 mm (10.51%), 20 individuals (4.67%) showed ERG adaptation abnormalities similar to affected patients and suspects (p> 0.05). Patients with PAC were significantly more likely to be female, have shorter axial length, and have thicker lenses compared with unaffected individuals. PAC suspects showed similar axial lengths to affected individuals. ERG abnormalities mainly occurred in affected patients and suspects, but also occurred in unaffected individuals with short axial length. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Does Mode of Survey Administration Matter? Using Measurement Invariance to Validate the Mail and Telephone Versions of the Bereaved Family Survey.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Joshua M; Smith, Dawn; Kuzla, Natalie; Scott, Laura; Ersek, Mary

    2016-03-01

    The Veterans Health Administration evaluates outcomes of end-of-life (EOL) care using the Bereaved Family Survey (BFS). Originally, the BFS was administered as a telephone survey but was transitioned to a mail survey beginning October 2012. The transition necessitated an evaluation of the tool's validity using this new mode of administration. The objective of this study was to validate the mail version and to test for measurement invariance (MI) across the two administration modes. Telephone and mail versions of the BFS were validated separately between October 2009 and September 2013. MI was evaluated using a series of confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). Construct validity was evaluated by calculating Cronbach alpha coefficients and examining differences between BFS factor scores for groups with and without quality care indicators (e.g., receipt of a palliative care consult). Our sample consisted of 35,682 decedent BFS scores (27,109 telephone surveys; 8573 mail surveys). BFS item scores were slightly skewed, with a predominance of higher scores for both the telephone and mail version. The average missing rate for each BFS item was minimal, just 2% for each version. The CFA models demonstrated dimensional, configural, metric, and factor mean invariance across administration modes. BFS factor scores were consistently higher when a patient received EOL quality care indicators regardless of mode of administration. These findings demonstrate the MI and robust psychometric properties for the BFS across administration modes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. An assessment of hospice bereavement programs for Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Arriaza, Pablo; Martin, Shadi S; Csikai, Ellen L

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in the United States, numbering over 42 million and comprising 15% of the total population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 ). Hispanics are a heterogeneous group that experience disparities in accessing health care, including at the end of life. Specific gaps can be identified in the care of bereaved Hispanic individuals and families. This exploratory study examined bereavement services available and perceived needs for Hispanics in Florida. Hospice bereavement coordinators indicated that limited services were available specifically for Spanish-speakers and that language and cultural barriers were challenges when communicating, offering, and delivering bereavement services to Hispanics. Implications for social workers include the need to increase access to and evaluate the effectiveness of bereavement services for Hispanics.

  5. Family health information sharing among older adults: reaching more family members.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Sato; Schafer, Ellen J

    2015-01-01

    Although family health history (FHH) information has tremendous potential in the prevention of common complex diseases such as heart disease and cancer, lack of knowledge about one's own FHH among the public hinders its utility. Older individuals often desire to contribute to the well-being of younger generations and also play critical roles in disseminating this information. This study evaluated psychosocial factors associated with the extent of FHH communication within families. Older adults (N = 110) were interviewed at three senior centers in an urban community. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis showed that respondents who received FHH from a parent reported 41 % more family members with whom they shared FHH (b = 0.34, p < 0.001) controlling for the family network size. Furthermore, one unit increase in the number of family members with whom respondents exchange reciprocal emotional support (b = 0.04, p < 0.01), perceived familiarity with own FHH (b = 0.14, p = 0.01), and self-efficacy to share FHH (b = 0.18, p = 0.02) were associated with 4, 15, and 20 % increases in the number of family members with whom respondents shared FHH, respectively. Future efforts may inform older adults about their important role in modeling FHH communication behavior to encourage information sharing in future generations while providing information about how to collect and disseminate FHH to increase their familiarity and ability to share FHH within the family.

  6. Evidence for healing interventions with perinatal bereavement.

    PubMed

    Capitulo, Kathleen Leask

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of perinatal grief and evidence-based healing interventions for it. The loss of a pregnancy or death of an infant causes profound grief, yet society has long minimized or ignored this grief, which is among the most painful of bereavement experiences. Throughout the last century, research on grief and the special needs of bereaved parents has changed the context of professional intervention from protective to supportive. The central focus of bereavement interventions is to assist families in healing by helping them make meaning of their losses. The use of symbols, spirituality, and rituals has been shown to help bring meaning. Research has shown that memories are key to healing, and that gender, age, and relationships bring different grief expressions and experiences. While children's understanding of loss and grief differs with developmental age, they should also be given the opportunity to participate in grief rituals and practices. Professionals who care for bereaved parents have a unique opportunity to offer support by validating their grief, facilitating rituals, providing mementos, and letting the bereaved tell their stories. While no intervention can bring back their beloved children, appropriate intervention can promote healing.

  7. An exploration of lesbian maternal bereavement.

    PubMed

    Cacciatore, Joanne; Raffo, Zulma

    2011-04-01

    Research on parental bereavement has focused historically on single or partnered cross-gendered (heterosexual) bereaved parents. No previous studies have examined the unique experiences of same-gendered bereaved parents. This multiple-case study focused on child death in same-gendered-parent families. The goal of this study was to yield information that will expand the existing body of knowledge regarding parental bereavement and add to the scant literature on lesbian parenthood and the challenges that lesbians may face as a marginalized group. The study used in-depth interviews with six self-identified lesbian mothers who had experienced the death of a child at various ages and from various causes. Results suggest that lesbian bereaved mothers experience a type of double-disenfranchisement after their losses and that social support is often insufficient to meet their psychological needs. Because previous research has not been published on this specific population, the findings may be worthwhile for the lesbian and gay parenting community, community advocacy groups, and the clinicians who serve them.

  8. Bereavement referrals to a psychiatric service: an audit.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Williams, M

    1995-03-01

    The majority of people who are bereaved will work through their grief with support from family and friends. Over 30%, however, may require professional support, and studies have shown that most people contact their General Practitioner and primary health-care team for counselling/support. Effective support and counselling can also be given by voluntary agencies. It was decided to audit the referrals made to a bereavement service for bereavement counselling to ascertain the level of support given prior to the referral and whether information had been given to the bereaved regarding the services available to them in the voluntary sector. Twelve referrals were received in the allotted time period, 10 of which were made within the first year of bereavement. Only one referral had been offered counselling by the primary health-care team and one other had been informed of voluntary bereavement support/counselling agencies. Two referrals had abnormal grief reactions requiring psychiatric intervention. Conclusions include raising the awareness of general practitioners and primary health-care teams of the normal grieving process, and increasing the provision of support for the bereaved. It is also suggested that the bereaved are made more aware of the services that voluntary agencies can provide.

  9. Syncope in genotype-negative long QT syndrome family members.

    PubMed

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Ruwald, Martin H; Goldenberg, Ilan; Wieling, Wouter; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Wilde, Arthur A M; van Dijk, Nynke; Moss, Arthur J

    2014-10-15

    Unaffected long-QT syndrome family members (FMs) frequently experience syncope. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that syncope events in FMs are benign events and to compare clinical characteristics, triggers eliciting the syncope events, and long-term outcomes between FMs and those with LQT1 or LQT2 mutations from the international Long QT Syndrome Registry. A total of 679 FMs, 864 LQT1 patients, and 782 LQT2 patients were included. Seventy-eight FMs (11%) experienced cardiovascular events. Almost all cardiovascular events were nonfatal syncope; only 1 FM, with an additional mitral valve prolapse, experienced aborted cardiac arrest during exercise. The mean age at first syncope in FMs was 17 years, and female FMs experienced syncope more frequently than male FMs (14% vs 9%, p = 0.027). Syncope was more frequently triggered by exercise in LQT1 patients (43% in LQT1 patients vs 5% in FMs, p <0.001), while syncope triggered by a variety of other triggers was more frequent in FMs (54% in FMs vs 22% in LQT1 patients and 30% in LQT2 patients, p <0.001 for both). None of the FMs experienced aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death after the first syncopal episode. In conclusion, syncope is frequently present in FMs, and these syncopal events occurred more frequently in female than in male FMs, with an increased incidence in midadolescence. Triggers eliciting the syncopal events were different between FMs and patients with long-QT syndrome mutations. Hence, the type of trigger is useful in distinguishing between high- and low-risk syncope. These data indicate that FMs from families with LQTS have a benign form of syncope, most likely related to vasovagal syncope and not ventricular tachyarrhythmic syncope.

  10. Discovery of a Satellite to Asteroid Family Member (702) Alauda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, Jean-Luc; Rojo, P.

    2007-10-01

    Rojo and Margot [1] reported the discovery of a satellite to (702) Alauda from adaptive-optics imaging with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) 8-m Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Cerro Paranal, Chile. (702) Alauda (a = 3.2 AU, e = 0.02, i = 21 deg) has been identified as the largest member of a dynamical family [2,3], suggesting a possible origin of the satellite in the family formation event. The diameter of (702) Alauda is given in the IRAS Minor Planet Survey (IMPS) as 194.73 +/- 3.2 km [4]. If the primary and secondary have similar albedoes, the diameter of the satellite is about 5.5 km. This is based on the measured flux ratio between primary and secondary of 1250, possibly the largest ever observed for solar system binaries with adaptive optics. This is the first satellite discovered to a large minor planet of type B in the SMASSII taxonomy, which is defined by a linear featureless spectrum with bluish to neutral slope [5]. B-types are carbonaceous asteroids that are not well characterized. The mass and density estimates of B-type (2) Pallas vary by 50% [6,7]. Our ongoing determination of the satellite orbit will provide mass and density estimates for (702) Alauda. [1] Rojo and Margot, CBET 1016, 2007. [2] Foglia and Masi 2004, Minor Planet Bull. 41, 100. [3] Gil-Hutton 2006, Icarus 183, 93. [4] Tedesco 2002, AJ 123, 1056. [5] Bus and Binzel 2002, Icarus 158, 146. [6] Hilton 2002, Asteroids III, 103. [7] Britt et al. 2002, Asteroids III, 485.

  11. Professional bereavement photographs: one aspect of a perinatal bereavement program.

    PubMed

    Primeau, M R; Recht, C K

    1994-01-01

    Although professionals can do little to cushion the emotional trauma for parents and family when an infant dies, many institutions have implemented bereavement programs to offer counseling, support, and assistance. Included in such programs are photographs of the deceased infant. The value of such photographs has been documented in the literature. Some institutions provide parents with instantly developed photos of the deceased infant. Unfortunately, instant prints may blue and often fade with time. To improve services to bereaved families at a hospital in Massachusetts, a program was implemented to use the skills of the hospital's professional biomedical photographers and the nursing team. The perinatal clinical nurse specialist or her designee takes a 35-mm black-and-white photograph of the infant. The biomedical photographers process the negatives and use hand coloring techniques and matting to produce professional-quality photographs. The response by parents and families to the improved photographs has been positive. As the number of photographs taken has increased, the staff have continued to improve the service.

  12. Reconstructing meaning in bereavement.

    PubMed

    Neimeyer, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Bereavement, in the form of the loss of a significant attachment figure to death, disrupts the self-narratives of survivors, and typically launches them into an unsought quest for meaning in the loss as well as in their changed lives. A growing body of research on diverse groups – bereaved parents, young people, elders – suffering loss through both natural and violent death, documents the link between inability to find meaning in the experience and the intensity of complicated grief they suffer. This article reviews this literature, arguing that processes of sense-making and benefit-finding play a crucial role in bereavement adaptation for many of the bereaved, and accordingly that interventions that facilitate processes of meaning reconstruction can support effective psychotherapy for those struggling with intense and prolonged grief.

  13. Bereavement: An anthropological approach.

    PubMed

    Souza, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    The literature on bereavement has been dominated by psychology. Social science has expanded that perspective by illustrating the ways in which the bereaved maintain continuing bonds with the deceased. In this article I build upon the social science literature from an anthropological perspective. I focus upon how the bereaved must learn to live in the social environment without the deceased in what I call a "new normal." The connections to their social environment have been altered as a link in those connections has been broken. The bereavement process requires repairing that rupture and developing a new way in which to adopt a new sense of self. This article mainly focuses on issues involved with the loss of a spouse.

  14. 76 FR 76037 - Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA Exceptions to Disregarded Entities; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BJ07 Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA... for certain family members), 3127 (concerning members of religious faiths), and 3306(c)(5)...

  15. 76 FR 70057 - Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA Exceptions to Disregarded Entities; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BJ07 Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA...) (concerning individuals who work for certain family members), 3127 (concerning members of religious...

  16. Homicidal sharp force injuries inflicted by family members or relatives.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiromasa; Ikeda, Noriaki; Ito, Takako; Tsuji, Akiko; Kudo, Keiko

    2006-04-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 35 autopsy cases where death had resulted from homicidal sharp force injuries and compared cases where the injuries had been inflicted by family members or relatives (relative group) with cases where the injuries had been inflicted by an unrelated person (stranger group). We reviewed the age and sex of the victims, the number of stab wounds, the site of the stab wounds, the presence of defence wounds, the detection of alcohol and other drugs and the mental status of the victims and perpetrators. We found the following tendencies: (a) a female victim was more frequently killed by a relative than by a stranger; (b) the percentage of cases receiving a single stab wound and the percentage of cases receiving more than ten stab wounds were both unexpectedly higher in the relative group than in the stranger group, and (c) in the stranger group, when there were no defence wounds, the victim had usually consumed alcohol, whereas when there were neither defence wounds nor alcohol intake, the case usually fell into the relative group. These tendencies will contribute towards our forensic appraisement in autopsy cases resulting from sharp force injuries.

  17. Bi73-: the missing family member, finally isolated and characterized.

    PubMed

    Perla, Luis G; Oliver, Allen G; Sevov, Slavi C

    2015-02-02

    The synthesis and structure of Bi(7)(3-), the only missing member of the family of heptanuclear pnictogen cluster anions Pn(7)(3-) (Pn = pnictogen, a group 15 element excluding the unique nitrogen), is reported. The new species is synthesized by oxidation of a solution of K(5)Bi(4) by the solvent pyridine in the presence of (C(6)H(6))Cr(CO)(3). The existence of the species in solution is confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry, while its structure is elucidated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction in the compound [K(2,2,2-crypt)](3)Bi(7)·2py (monoclinic, P2(1)/n, a = 13.8739(13) Å, b = 24.878(2) Å, c = 26.401(2) Å, β = 96.353(4)°, V = 9056.5(14) Å(3), Z = 4, and R1/wR2 = 0.0636/0.1390 for the observed data and 0.0901/0.1541 for all data).

  18. STS-106 crew gathers to greet family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    While meeting with family on the day before launch, the STS-106 crew poses for a photo. Waving, left to right, are Mission Specialist Richard A. Mastracchio, Commander Terrence W. Wilcutt, Pilot Scott D. Altman, and Mission Specialists Edward T. Lu, Yuri I. Malenchenko, Boris V. Morukov and Daniel C. Burbank. Malenchenko and Morukov are with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. In the background (left) is Launch Pad 39B and Space Shuttle Atlantis, with the Rotating Service Structure still in place. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:45 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed '''Expedition One,''' is due to arrive at the Station in late fall. Landing is targeted for Sept. 19 at 4:59 a.m. EDT at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility.

  19. Bereaved Parents’ and Siblings’ Reports of Legacies Created by Children With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Terrah L.; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Davies, Betty; Barrera, Maru; Fairclough, Diane; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explored bereaved parents’ and siblings’ reports of legacies created by children with advanced cancer. Participants included 40 families of children who died from cancer, with 36 mothers, 27 fathers, and 40 siblings (ages 8–18 years). Individual interviews were completed at home approximately 10.68 months (SD = 3.48) after the child’s death. Content analysis of interviews indicated that many children living with cancer did specific things to be remembered, such as making crafts for others, willing away belongings, writing letters to loved ones, and giving special gifts. Some children, particularly those who were very ill or died unexpectedly, did not intentionally do or say anything to be remembered. Legacies included bereaved individuals remembering children’s qualities, concern for family, and beliefs about afterlife. Having advanced cancer appeared to motivate children to influence others’ lives and prepare for their own deaths. Children’s advice about how to live life inspired bereaved family members. Findings contribute to the current knowledge of legacy-making in children and offer implications for practice and future research. PMID:20032298

  20. Working with dreams in a bereavement therapy group.

    PubMed

    Moss, Eric

    2002-04-01

    There is ample theory and research about group therapy, dream work, and bereavement as separate subjects. However, there is little written specifically about utilizing dream work in bereavement therapy groups. Using the Foulksian group analytic model, dreams in one particular bereavement group (for parents of children killed in a terrorist action) were interpreted in such a way as to help members access deep unconscious feelings. This helped facilitate a fuller and more complete mourning process. The analytic, dream interpretive activity also helped overcome resistance in the group-as-a-whole and thereby facilitated movement through group development phases.

  1. Does race influence conflict between nursing home staff and family members of residents?

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Pillemer, Karl; Sechrist, Jori; Suitor, Jill

    2011-11-01

    This study examines the influence of race on perceived similarity and conflict between nursing home staff and family members of residents. Despite evidence that the caregiving experience varies by race for both family and professional caregivers, little is known about how race plays a role in staff conflict with residents' family members. We used a representative sample of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) to test relationships between race, treatment from family members, similarity to family members in expectations for care by CNAs, and conflicts with family members concerning aspects of resident care. Results of structural equation modeling indicated that race was not a predictor of staff perception of conflict with family members or of poor treatment from residents' families. However, Black nursing assistants were more likely to perceive that their own expectations of nursing care are dissimilar from those of residents' family members. Dissimilarity predicted reports of poor treatment from family members, and poor treatment was a positive predictor of perception of conflict. The personal long-term nature of nursing home care necessitates a high level of connectedness between family caregivers and nursing home staff. Results highlight the importance of establishing organizational pathways for communication of expectations between nursing staff and residents' families.

  2. Family Adjustment Following Disclosure of Homosexuality by a Member: Themes Discerned in Narrative Accounts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeler, Jeff; DiProva, Vicky

    1999-01-01

    Using a narrative approach, study explores how families respond to homosexual disclosure of a member over time and how families integrate the family member once their homosexuality has been accepted. Discusses the relationship between 12 themes found through these narratives and current models in the literature within the context of heterosexism.…

  3. Family Adjustment Following Disclosure of Homosexuality by a Member: Themes Discerned in Narrative Accounts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeler, Jeff; DiProva, Vicky

    1999-01-01

    Using a narrative approach, study explores how families respond to homosexual disclosure of a member over time and how families integrate the family member once their homosexuality has been accepted. Discusses the relationship between 12 themes found through these narratives and current models in the literature within the context of heterosexism.…

  4. Studying the Effect Dialogic Reading Has on Family Members' Verbal Interactions during Shared Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannon, Diana; Dauksas, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The effect dialogic reading training has on the verbal interactions of family members and their "at risk" preschool children was studied. There were significant differences at the time of the post-test between family members who received dialogic reading training and the group that participated in the preschool's traditional family time. Family…

  5. Military service absences and family members' mental health: A timeline followback assessment.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Aubrey J; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-08-01

    Although military service, and particularly absence due to deployment, has been linked to risk for depression and anxiety among some spouses and children of active duty service members, there is limited research to explain the heterogeneity in family members' reactions to military service stressors. The current investigation introduces the Timeline Followback Military Family Interview (TFMFI) as a clinically useful strategy to collect detailed time-linked information about the service member's absences. Two dimensions of parent absence--the extent to which absences coincide with important family events and cumulative time absent--were tested as potential risks to family members' mental health. Data from 70 mother-adolescent pairs revealed that the number of important family events missed by the service member was linked to elevated youth symptoms of depression, even when accounting for the number of deployments and cumulative duration of the service member's absence. However, youth who reported more frequent contact with the service member during absences were buffered from the effects of extensive absence. Mothers' symptoms were associated with the cumulative duration of the service members' time away, but not with family events missed by the service member. These results identify circumstances that increase the risk for mental health symptoms associated with military family life. The TFMFI provides an interview-based strategy for clinicians wishing to understand military family members' lived experience during periods of service-member absence. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Association Between Resilience and Family Member Psychologic Symptoms in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Sottile, Peter D; Lynch, Ylinne; Mealer, Meredith; Moss, Marc

    2016-08-01

    There are increased rates of depression, anxiety, and stress disorders in families of critically ill patients. Interventions directed at family members may help their ability to cope with this stress. Specifically, resilience is a teachable psychologic construct describing a person's ability to adapt to traumatic situations. Resilience can inherently assist individuals to diminish adverse psychologic outcomes. Consequently, we determined the relationship between resilience and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and acute stress in family members of critically ill patients. This is a cross-sectional study. Three medical ICUs were screened by study staff. Family members of ICU patients admitted for greater than 48 hours were approached for enrollment. The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale was used to stratify family members as resilient or nonresilient. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and Family Satisfaction in the ICU were collected prior to ICU discharge to measure symptoms of depression, anxiety, and acute stress, as well as satisfaction with care. One-hundred and seventy family members were enrolled. Seventy-eight family members were resilient. Resilient family members had fewer symptoms of anxiety (14.2% vs 43.6%; p < 0.001), depression (14.1% vs 44.9%; p < 0.001), and acute stress (12.7% vs 36.3%; p = 0.001). Resilient family members were more satisfied with care in the ICU (76.7 vs 70.8; p = 0.008). Resilience remained independently associated with these outcomes after adjusting for family member age and gender, as well as the patient's need for mechanical ventilation. When caring for the critically ill, resilient family members have fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety, and acute stress. Resilient families were generally better satisfied with the care delivered. These data suggest that interventions aimed at increasing resilience may improve a family member's experience in the ICU.

  7. Returning from the War Zone: A Guide for Families of Military Members

    MedlinePlus

    ... or remains Knowing someone seriously injured or killed Percentages are based on a sample of troops serving in Iraq in 2006. 60% 63% 86% 79% These statistics are presented to help family members know what their service member may have ...

  8. Managing bereavement in the classroom: a conspiracy of silence?

    PubMed

    Lowton, Karen; Higginson, Irene J

    2003-10-01

    The ways in which teachers in British schools manage bereaved children are underreported. This article reports the impact of students' bereavement and their subsequent management in primary and secondary school classrooms in Southeast London. Thirteen school staff working in inner-city schools took part in in-depth interviews that focused on the impact of bereaved children on the school and how teachers responded to these children.All respondents had previously had contact with a local child bereavement service that aims to provide support, advice, and consultancy to children, their parents, and teachers. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using ATLAS-ti. Three main themes were identified from analysis of interview data. Firstly, British society, culture, local communities, and the family were significant influences in these teachers' involvement with bereaved students. Secondly, school staff managed bereaved students through contact with other adults and using practical classroom measures such as "time out" cards and contact books. Lastly, teachers felt they had to be strong, even when they were distressed. Surprise was expressed at the mature reaction of secondary school students to deaths of others. The article recommends that future research needs to concentrate on finding the most effective way of supporting routinely bereaved children, their families, and teachers.

  9. When the unreal becomes real: family members' experiences of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Weslien, Marita; Nilstun, Tore; Lundqvist, Anita; Fridlund, Bengt

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide insight into family members' experiences related to cardiac arrest. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 family members approximately 5-34 months after the cardiac arrest of a relative. As the focus was on the family members' experiences seen from a holistic perspective, content analysis was chosen for the study. When the event occurred to the patient, family members realized the need for assistance and managed to initiate first actions. When the emergency medical service arrived, family members responded to stress and forgot their own needs. When the staff took over at the hospital, family members not only received sympathy but also encountered professional distancing. Because their experiences vary widely, the encounter has to be developed through a comforting, sympathetic and respectful dialogue in consideration for individuals' preferences.

  10. [Intervention and psychological care for the family caregivers of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that family members of a cancer patient show as much or even higher psychological distress as the cancer patients themselves. There are several reasons for psychological distress among family members. The family of the cancer patient is expected to provide patient care. There are shared responsibilities for decision-making, providing concrete care-giving, meeting the financial and social costs, maintaining stability and adapting to change. In addition, some family caregivers are involved in direct patient care. These responsibilities place both physical and emotional burdens on the family members. It has been shown that spouses demonstrate levels of emotional and functional disruption as great or greater than that of the patient and that these problems often worsen with time, independent of the patient's mood or health. Health problems of caregivers have a very important influence on their ability to meet these demands and it is reported that care-giving affects the physical health of spouse caregivers. Some caregivers may be physically weak or sick, and some may also demonstrate symptoms of cancer. Based on these findings, family members of the cancer patient are called "second-order patients". Therefore, various kinds of care programs are needed to provide support for family members and such interventions are aimed at psychiatric, physical, socio-economic problems. Bereavement is one of the most striking events in human experience. Although bereavement is not a disease, it is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity. Bereaved individuals show various physical and psychological symptoms and some of the bereaved individuals develop psychiatric disorders such as bereavement reaction, major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore, psychiatric interventions are needed for these bereaved individuals. In the bereavement care clinic, interventions are aimed at psychiatric, physical, socio-economical problems

  11. MIF family members cooperatively inhibit p53 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Stephanie E; Rendon, Beatriz E; Xin, Dan; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Mitchell, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is induced by genotoxic stress in both normal and transformed cells and serves to transcriptionally coordinate cell cycle checkpoint control and programmed cell death responses. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an autocrine and paracrine acting cytokine/growth factor that promotes lung adenocarcinoma cell motility, anchorage-independence and neo-angiogenic potential. Several recent studies indicate that the only known homolog of MIF, D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT - also referred to as MIF-2), has functionally redundant activities with MIF and cooperatively promotes MIF-dependent pro-tumorigenic phenotypes. We now report that MIF and D-DT synergistically inhibit steady state p53 phosphorylation, stabilization and transcriptional activity in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The combined loss of MIF and D-DT by siRNA leads to dramatically reduced cell cycle progression, anchorage independence, focus formation and increased programmed cell death when compared to individual loss of MIF or D-DT. Importantly, p53 mutant and p53 null lung adenocarcinoma cell lines were only nominally rescued from the cell growth effects of MIF/D-DT combined deficiency suggesting only a minor role for p53 in these transformed cell growth phenotypes. Finally, increased p53 activation was found to be independent of aberrantly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that occurs in response to MIF/D-DT-deficiency but is dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) that mediate aberrant AMPK activation in these cells. Combined, these findings suggest that both p53 wildtype and mutant human lung adenocarcinoma tumors rely on MIF family members for maximal cell growth and survival.

  12. Comparison of Families with and without a Suicide Prevention Plan Following a Suicidal Attempt by a Family Member.

    PubMed

    Cho, Heung-Don; Kim, Nam-Young; Gil, Hyo-wook; Jeong, Du-shin; Hong, Sae-yong

    2015-07-01

    The frequency and extent of the existence of a familial suicide prevention plan may differ across cultures. The aim of this work was, therefore, to determine how common it was for families to develop a suicide prevention plan and to compare the main measures used by families with and without such a plan, after an attempt to commit suicide was made by a member of a family living in a rural area of Korea. On the basis of the presence or absence of a familial suicide prevention plan, we compared 50 recruited families that were divided into 2 groups, with Group A (31 families) employing a familial suicide prevention plan after a suicide attempt by a family member, and Group B (19 families) not doing so. The strategy that was employed most frequently to prevent a reoccurrence among both populations was promoting communication among family members, followed by seeking psychological counseling and/or psychiatric treatment. Contrary to our expectation, the economic burden from medical treatment after a suicide attempt did not influence the establishment of a familial suicide prevention plan. It is a pressing social issue that 38% (19 of 50) of families in this study did not employ a familial suicide prevention plan, even after a family member had attempted suicide. Regional suicide prevention centers and/or health authorities should pay particular attention to these patients and their families.

  13. Resilience in families in which a member has been diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bishop, M; Greeff, A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to the extensive focus of the literature on the burden placed on families in which a member has been diagnosed with a mental illness such as schizophrenia, there is a need to identify factors that may help these families to be resilient and adapt to their crisis. The aim of this study was to identify family resilience qualities in families in which a member has been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The study comprised 42 families, represented by 33 parents and 9 siblings of the diagnosed family member. Families were recruited from three support groups within the Cape Metropolitan area, Western Cape, South Africa. Qualitative data were obtained through an open-ended question and quantitative data were collected with seven self-report questionnaires. The following family resilience qualities were identified: family income; finding support in their community; family togetherness; family communication style during crises; affirming and supportive communication patterns; family hardiness; commitment to the family; reframing crises as a challenge; and an internal locus of control within the family. The findings may be used by professionals and support group facilitators to enhance the resilience and functioning of families living with a member with schizophrenia. With approximately 1% of the world's population diagnosed with schizophrenia, it is clear that many families are affected when a member has been diagnosed. There is a need to identify factors that may help these families to be resilient. The aim of this study was to identify family resilience qualities in families in which a member has been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The following family resilience qualities were identified as resources that helped them to adapt to the many challenges put to them: family income, finding support in their community, the availability of hospitals, churches and professionals, family togetherness, family communication, family hardiness, commitment to the family, reframing crises

  14. Racial disparity in capital punishment and its impact on family members of capital defendants.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A review of the literature was conducted to explore the continuing racial disparity in capital punishment and its effects on family members of African American capital defendants. Statistical studies conducted on both the state and national level conclude that racial bias influences all stages of the death penalty process, with race of the victim being one of the most significant factors. This racial bias places an added burden on family members of African American capital defendants. While research has explored the impact of capital punishment on family members of capital defendants, the unique experiences of family members of African American defendants has not been addressed in the research literature.

  15. IL-17 family member cytokines: regulation, and function in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joseph M.; Angkasekwinai, Pornpimon; Dong, Chen

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the IL-17 family member cytokines have become prominent subjects of investigation. IL-17 (IL-17A) is the best-described member of this family where its production has been mainly attributed to a specialized T helper subset of the adaptive immune response termed Th17. However, recent research on this and other Th17 cytokines has revealed new sources and functions of IL-17 family members in the innate immune response. This review will highlight recent advances in the field of IL-17 family member cytokines and will predominately focus on the innate regulation and function of IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-25. PMID:21074482

  16. Participation of family members and quality of patient care - the perspective of adult surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Gröndahl, Weronica; Katajisto, Jouko; Nurminen, Matti; Suhonen, Riitta

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the participation of family members in the care of Finnish adult surgical patients and the connection of the participation with the quality of patient care as perceived by surgical patients. The family members of adult surgical patients are important. Earlier studies vary concerning the nature of participation, its meaning and the connection of participation with patient-centred quality of care. In this study, we aim to produce new knowledge about adult surgical patients whose family members have participated in their care. This was a cross-sectional descriptive survey study. The data were collected among adult surgical patients (N = 481) before being discharged home from hospital with two instruments: the Good Nursing Care scale and the Received Knowledge of Hospital Patients. Based on the results, most adult surgical patients report that family members participate in their care. Participation was connected with received knowledge and preconditions of care, which are components of the quality of patient care. In future, testing of different solutions for improving the participation of surgical patients' family members in patient care should be implemented. Furthermore, the preconditions of family members' participation in care and the concept of participation should be analysed to emphasise the active role of family members. The results emphasised the importance of family members for the patients in surgical care. Family members' participation is connected with the quality of patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Looking Through the Lens of Receptivity and Its Role in Bereavement Support: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Pippa; McGrath, Pam; Bulsara, Caroline

    2016-12-01

    Receptivity is a new concept within the area of scholarship on bereavement. There is a dearth of research that specifically focuses on individuals' receptivity in relation to bereavement support. This is particularly the case within the context of rural, regional, and remote locations. There is also a noticeable absence in the literature on bereavement support to Aboriginal families. Understanding receptivity in relation to bereavement in rural areas is important, particularly as bereavement support is an important area of service to the community by palliative care services. Receptivity to bereavement services has been identified as a critical factor in participation in bereavement support programs. This review provides a starting point by outlining the present literature on receptivity and bereavement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Screening of household family members of brucellosis cases and neighboring community members in Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Ismayilova, Rita; Mody, Rupal; Abdullayev, Rakif; Amirova, Kamala; Jabbarova, Latafat; Ustun, Narmin; Jahanov, Musa; Nasirova, Emilya; Powers, Marilyn; Rivard, Robert; Hepburn, Matthew; Bautista, Christian T

    2013-05-01

    Brucellosis is an endemic zoonotic disease in Azerbaijan. The first human brucellosis case reported in 1922 was in Pardabil village of a region currently named Shabran. Household members of brucellosis index cases are a population at risk for brucellosis infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of seropositivity of brucellosis among household and neighboring community members of brucellosis index cases in Azerbaijan. Twenty-one household members of 8 index brucellosis cases and 27 community neighbors were serologically tested for evidence of exposure by the serum agglutination test. Of these, the brucellosis seropositivity rate was 9.5% and 7.4%, respectively. Screening of household members of index cases and individuals who live in proximity to infected household members is a practical approach to increase the detection of brucellosis exposure.

  19. Sibling Bereavement and Continuing Bonds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packman, Wendy; Horsley, Heidi; Davies, Betty; Kramer, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Historically, from a Freudian and medical model perspective, emotional disengagement from the deceased was seen as essential to the successful adaptation of bereavement. A major shift in the bereavement literature has occurred and it is now generally accepted that despite the permanence of physical separation, the bereaved remains involved and…

  20. Sibling Bereavement and Continuing Bonds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packman, Wendy; Horsley, Heidi; Davies, Betty; Kramer, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Historically, from a Freudian and medical model perspective, emotional disengagement from the deceased was seen as essential to the successful adaptation of bereavement. A major shift in the bereavement literature has occurred and it is now generally accepted that despite the permanence of physical separation, the bereaved remains involved and…

  1. 41 CFR 302-3.511 - What must we consider when determining return travel for immediate family member(s) for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... when determining return travel for immediate family member(s) for compassionate reasons prior to... determining return travel for immediate family member(s) for compassionate reasons prior to completion of the service agreement? You must determine that the public interest requires the return of the immediate...

  2. [Structural equation model for caregiving experience of families providing care for family members with mental disorders].

    PubMed

    Oh, In Ohg; Kim, Sunah

    2015-02-01

    This study was done to develop and test a structural model for caregiving experience including caregiving satisfaction and caregiving strain in families providing care for family members with a mental disorder. The Stress-appraisal-coping model was used as the conceptual framework and the structural equation model to confirm the path that explains what and how variables affect caregiving experience in these families. In this hypothesis model, exogenous variables were optimism, severity of illness and uncertainty. The endogenous variables were self efficacy, social support, caregiving satisfaction and caregiving strain. Data were collected using structured questionnaires. Optimism and caregiving self-efficacy had significant direct and indirect effects on caregiving satisfaction. Optimism, severity of illness and uncertainty had significant direct and indirect effects on caregiving strain. The modified path model explained effects of optimism on caregiving self-efficacy with social support in the path structure as a mediator. Also, there were direct and indirect effects of optimism and uncertainty on caregiving satisfaction with social support and caregiving self-efficacy in the path structure as a mediators. Results suggest the need to improve caregiving self-efficacy of these families, establish support systems such as a mental health professional support programs for caregiving self-efficacy. Optimism, severity of illness and uncertainty perceived by families need to be considered in the development of support programs in order to increase their effectiveness.

  3. Needs of Patients' Family Members in an Intensive Care Unit With Continuous Visitation.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Mini; Horton, Cynthia; Rance-Ashley, Sharon; Field, Tera; Patterson, Robbie; Johnson, Claudette; Saunders, Holly; Shelton, Tracy; Miller, Jessica; Frobos, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Although many critical care experts and national organizations support open visitation in intensive care units (ICUs), most ICU visiting policies do not allow unrestricted presence of patients' family members. To describe how well the needs of family members were met in an adult neuroscience ICU with a continuous visitation policy and an adjoining private suite for patients' family members. An exploratory, descriptive study design was used to identify the effects of continuous family visitation in the neuroscience ICU on patients' family members and their needs and experiences during their time in the unit. A convenience sample of consenting family members completed a survey of family need items 72 hours after the patient was admitted to the unit. The most important needs identified by the 45 family members surveyed were items relating to information about the patient, visiting the patient, being given hope, talking with a doctor each day, and being assured that the best care is being given to the patient. Least important items were related to physical comforts for the family members. The vast majority of family members rated their needs as being met for all of the items in the survey and reported a high level of satisfaction with care. In a neuroscience ICU with an open visitation policy and a private suite for patients' family members, family members rated their needs as being met at a high level, unlike in prior studies in units with limitations on family visitation. The rank order of the importance of each need in the survey was similar to rankings in prior studies in a variety of critical care units. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  4. The experience of family members of ICU patients who require extensive monitoring: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claudia DiSabatino; Custard, Kristi

    2014-09-01

    A mixed methods study using family research with a phenomenological approach (n = 5 families) was conducted to explore family members' perceptions about the extensive monitoring technology used on their critically ill family member after cardiac surgery, as experienced when family members initially visited the patient in the cardiovascular intensive care unit. Five relevant themes emerged: overwhelmed by all of the machines; feelings of uncertainty; methods of coping; meaning of the numbers on the machines; and need for education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding of advance care planning by family members of persons undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Calvin, Amy O; Engebretson, Joan C; Sardual, S Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore hemodialysis patients' family members' understanding of end-of-life decision-making processes. The project aimed to address (a) family members' constructions of advance care planning (ACP), including their roles and responsibilities, and (b) family members' perceptions of health care providers' roles and responsibilities in ACP. Eighteen family members of persons undergoing hemodialysis were recruited primarily from outpatient dialysis facilities and interviewed individually. Confirmed transcript data were analyzed, coded, and compared, and categories were established. Interpretations were validated throughout the interviews and peer debriefing sessions were used at a later stage in the analysis. The overarching construct identified was one of Protection. Family members protect patients by (a) Sharing Burdens, (b) Normalizing Life, and (c) Personalizing Care. Recommendations for future research include the need to explore ACP of persons undergoing hemodialysis who do not have a family support system. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. The unmet support needs of family members caring for a suicidal person.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Columba; McGowan, Iain; Kernohan, George; O'Neill, Siobhan

    2016-06-01

    The prevention of suicide is a key aim for health care authorities and society in general and family members have a principal role in caring for suicidal people. However, the support needs of these essential family carers are relatively unknown. To explore the support needs of family members of suicidal people. Eighteen participants were interviewed using a short topic guide. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis and confirmed by discussion. Family members of suicidal people have unmet needs (this was the main theme). Four sub-themes emerged: having practical support, respite and advice; feeling acknowledged and included; having someone to turn-to; and consistency of support. Family members are perceived to have an important role in suicide prevention; however some carers experience a lack of support which impinges on their ability to undertake this role. Family members need be included in care and require support from healthcare staff.

  7. Everyday Living with Diabetes Described by Family Members of Adult People with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Paavilainen, Eija; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members' views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members' participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members' point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. PMID:24455251

  8. Counselling for Patients and Family Members: A Follow-Up Study in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Paavilainen, Eija; Salminen-Tuomaala, Mari; Leikkola, Päivi

    2012-01-01

    Although the research indicates that patients and family members are not fully satisfied with the counselling they receive, little is known about the quality of counselling in more detail. The purpose of the study was to describe patients' and their family members' experiences about counselling in emergency department, and follow how these experiences possibly change after the educational intervention for the whole nursing staff of the ED ward. The pre-test-post-test follow-up design was implemented including online continuing education for ED staff. The data were collected via questionnaires from patients and their family members in two phases and analyzed statistically. After online education of staff, experiences of patients and family members concerning counselling were better than before the education. Especially, family members' satisfaction had increased. However, our results also indicated that patients and family members desire more information for example, regarding medications. Care practices had developed towards family-centeredness, which patients and family members appreciate. Online education proved also in some degree its usefulness in educating ED staff, by offering the same education to a staff which works in shifts. Furthermore, family presence and participation practices should be developed by offering possibilities for families to stay with each other on ED ward. PMID:23008782

  9. A preliminary evaluation of trust and shared decision making among intensive care patients' family members.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Elizabeth G; Wolfe, Katherine

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to preliminarily evaluate ICU family members' trust and shared decision making using modified versions of the Wake Forest Trust Survey and the Shared Decision Making-9 Survey. Using a descriptive approach, the perceptions of family members of ICU patients (n=69) of trust and shared decision making were measured using the Wake Forest Trust Survey and the 9-item Shared Decision Making (SDM-9) Questionnaire. Both surveys were modified slightly to apply to family members of ICU patients and to include perceptions of nurses as well as physicians. Overall, family members reported high levels of trust and inclusion in decision making. Family members who lived with the patient had higher levels of trust than those who did not. Family members who reported strong agreement among other family about treatment decisions had higher levels of trust and higher SDM-9 scores than those who reported less family agreement. The modified surveys may be useful in evaluating family members' trust and shared decision making in ICU settings. Future studies should include development of a comprehensive patient-centered care framework that focuses on its central goal of maintaining provider-patient/family partnerships as an avenue toward effective shared decision making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Testicular Cancer and Genetics Knowledge Among Familial Testicular Cancer Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Beckjord, Ellen B.; Banda Ryan, Deliya R.; Carr, Ann G.; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Korde, Larissa; Greene, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose It was our aim to determine baseline levels of testicular cancer and genetics knowledge among members of families with Familial Testicular Cancer (FTC). Methods This is a sub-study of an ongoing National Cancer Institute (NCI) multidisciplinary, etiologically-focused, cross-sectional study of FTC. We evaluated 258 male and female participants including testicular cancer (TC) survivors, blood relatives and spouses to assess factors associated with a Genetic Knowledge Scale (GKS) and Testicular Cancer Knowledge Scale (TCKS). Results Knowledge levels were generally low, with genetic knowledge lower than TC knowledge (p<0.01). Men with a personal TC history scored highest on TC knowledge, while gender, age and education differentially influenced knowledge levels, particularly among unaffected relatives. Conclusions Prior to identifying FTC susceptibility genes, we recommend tailoring FTC genetic education to the different informational needs of TC survivors, their spouses and relatives, in preparation for the day when clinical susceptibility testing may be available. PMID:18481162

  11. A qualitative analysis of family member needs and concerns in the population of patients with burns.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R; Boyle, D; Teel, C; Wambach, K; Cramer, A

    1999-01-01

    The importance of family support to ameliorate the recovery of a patient with burns has been documented in the literature. However, there is a dearth of research that identifies family members' needs and concerns during the hospitalization of patients with burns. Study aims were as follows: (1) identify support needs and concerns of family members of adult and pediatric patients currently in a burn center and (2) explore the relationship between family needs and the patient's severity of injury. An observational design was used that incorporated semistructured interviews with family members 1 to 3 days after the burn. A convenience sample of family members of burn center patients (n = 97) was recruited over 9 months. Content analysis was used to establish themes from interview data. Interrater reliability on coding of thematic units from 15% of the interviews was 86%; discrepancies were corrected to 100%. The average family member was 42.3 years old, female, white, and at least a high school graduate. Family members' concerns included general patient concerns, physical concerns about the patient, satisfaction of personal needs, and psychologic concerns about the patient. Major sources of support were family and friends, burn center staff, and spirituality. Family members of pediatric patients identified pain and skin graft surgery as priority worries. Satisfaction of personal needs, financial support, and information needs were greater among family members of intensive care unit patients in comparison with step-down patients. These findings underscore the importance of communication and reassurance between the burn team and the family members. Alterations to the support provided to families can be made on the basis of study subjects' responses.

  12. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  13. Every Mark on the Page: Educating Family and Community Members about Young Children's Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusumano, Kate Foley

    2008-01-01

    Family and community members often look at children's writing from a deficit point of view--seeing only what's "wrong" with it, what needs "fixing." Teachers can take a proactive role as family and community member educators, communicating to them how writing develops in young children and how they can play a positive role in this development.…

  14. Effective doses to family members of patients treated with radioiodine-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdraveska Kocovska, M.; Vaskova, O.; Majstorov, V.; Kuzmanovska, S.; Pop Gjorceva, D.; Spasic Jokic, V.

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose to family members of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine-131, and also to compare the results with dose constraints proposed by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). For the estimation of the effective doses, sixty family members of sixty patients, treated with radioiodine-131, and thermoluminiscent dosimeters (Model TLD 100) were used. Thyroid cancer patients were hospitalized for three days, while hyperthyroid patients were treated on out-patient basis. The family members wore TLD in front of the torso for seven days. The radiation doses to family members of thyroid cancer patients were well below the recommended dose constraint of 1 mSv. The mean value of effective dose was 0.21 mSv (min 0.02 - max 0.51 mSv). Effective doses, higher than 1 mSv, were detected for 11 family members of hyperthyroid patients. The mean value of effective dose of family members of hyperthyroid patients was 0.87 mSv (min 0.12 - max 6.79). The estimated effective doses to family members of hyperthyroid patients were higher than the effective doses to family members of thyroid carcinoma patients. These findings may be considered when establishing new national guidelines concerning radiation protection and release of patients after a treatment with radioiodine therapy.

  15. The Effect of Home Caregiving Program for Family Members Providing Care for Chronically Ill Relative Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Hussein Jassim; Kamel, Andaleeb Abu

    2015-01-01

    Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Family members and friends haven't knowledge and skills to become caregivers as many studies found that, the need to involve in such program to enhance their ability to be…

  16. Experiences of Military Youth during a Family Member's Deployment: Changes, Challenges, and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knobloch, Leanne K.; Pusateri, Kimberly B.; Ebata, Aaron T.; McGlaughlin, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    The deployment of a family member can be very distressing for military children, but it also can supply opportunities for growth. This study addresses calls for research on the changes, challenges, and opportunities facing youth during a family member's tour of duty. It uses the relational turbulence model to frame research questions about how…

  17. Catapulting Shifts in Images, Understandings, and Actions for Family Members through Research-Based Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Sherry L.; Gillies, Jennifer; Mitchell, Gail J.; Jonas-Simpson, Christine; Whyte, Colleen; Carson, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This article examined how images, understandings, and actions change for family members of persons with dementia after the introduction of a research-based drama called I'm Still Here. Guided by interpretivist phenomenology, a set of seven pre- and post-performance focus groups were conducted with family members (n = 48) in four cities. Findings…

  18. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Are foster children eligible as family members? 894.306 Section 894.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL....306 Are foster children eligible as family members? Yes, foster children may be eligible for coverage...

  19. 5 CFR 6801.108 - Restrictions resulting from employment of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions resulting from employment of family members. 6801.108 Section 6801.108 Administrative Personnel BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM § 6801.108 Restrictions resulting from employment of family members. A supervisory...

  20. Dementia Management Strategies and Adjustment of Family Members of Older Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; Niederehe, George

    1994-01-01

    Examined how strategies to manage dementia problems in 152 older people were associated with adjustment of family members while providing assistance to relative. Identified three dementia management strategies (criticism, encouragement, and active management) that were associated with three indices of family members' emotional adjustment (burden,…

  1. Grief among Family Members of Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Givens, Jane L.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Kiely, Dan K.; Shaffer, Michele L.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To describe pre-loss and post-loss grief symptoms among family members of nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia, and to identify predictors of greater post-loss grief symptoms. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 22 NHs in the greater Boston area. Participants 123 family members of NH residents who died with advanced dementia. Measurements Pre-loss grief was measured at baseline, and post-loss grief was measured 2 and 7 months post-loss using the Prolonged Grief Disorder scale. Independent variables included resident and family member sociodemographic characteristics, resident comfort, acute illness, acute care prior to death, family member depression, and family member understanding of dementia and of resident’s prognosis. Results Levels of pre-loss and post-loss grief were relatively stable from baseline to 7 months post-loss. Feelings of separation and yearning were the most prominent grief symptoms. After multivariable adjustment, greater pre-loss grief and the family member having lived with the resident prior to NH admission were the only factors independently associated with greater post-loss grief 7 months after resident death. Conclusions The pattern of grieving for some family members of NH residents with advanced dementia is prolonged and begins before resident death. Identification of family members at risk for post-loss grief during the pre-loss period may help guide interventions aimed at lessening post-loss grief. PMID:21606897

  2. Caregiving for Dementia in Family Members: Caregiving Burden and Prospects for Effective Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Robert J.; And Others

    Caring for a family member with dementia is a major source of stress for the caregiver. To assess the impact of caring for an impaired family member and to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention programs, 34 caregivers of relatives with dementia completed an amended form of the Philadelphia Geriatric Center's Caregiver Survey and two…

  3. Strategies for Recruiting Family Members from Diverse Backgrounds for Roles in Policy and Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Kim

    1995-01-01

    Strategies are presented for recruiting family members from minority groups to be involved in the formation of policies and development of programs that affect their lives and those of their young children with disabilities. Organizational strategies, strategies to empower family members, logistical strategies, and process strategies are…

  4. Experiences of Military Youth during a Family Member's Deployment: Changes, Challenges, and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knobloch, Leanne K.; Pusateri, Kimberly B.; Ebata, Aaron T.; McGlaughlin, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    The deployment of a family member can be very distressing for military children, but it also can supply opportunities for growth. This study addresses calls for research on the changes, challenges, and opportunities facing youth during a family member's tour of duty. It uses the relational turbulence model to frame research questions about how…

  5. Catapulting Shifts in Images, Understandings, and Actions for Family Members through Research-Based Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Sherry L.; Gillies, Jennifer; Mitchell, Gail J.; Jonas-Simpson, Christine; Whyte, Colleen; Carson, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This article examined how images, understandings, and actions change for family members of persons with dementia after the introduction of a research-based drama called I'm Still Here. Guided by interpretivist phenomenology, a set of seven pre- and post-performance focus groups were conducted with family members (n = 48) in four cities. Findings…

  6. Longitudinal changes and predictors of prolonged grief for bereaved family caregivers over the first 2 years after the terminally ill cancer patient's death.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-I; Prigerson, Holly G; Li, Chung-Yi; Chou, Wen-Chi; Kuo, Su-Ching; Tang, Siew Tzuh

    2016-05-01

    A significant minority of bereaved caregivers experience prolonged grief. However, few longitudinal studies have examined prolonged grief, especially in an Asian context. We explored longitudinal changes and factors predicting prolonged grief in bereaved caregivers of terminally ill Taiwanese cancer patients. Observational, prospective, and longitudinal. Prolonged grief symptoms were measured with the PG-13 at 6, 13, 18, and 24 months postloss. A convenience sample of 493 caregivers (83.3% participation rate) of terminally ill cancer patients was recruited from a medical center in Taiwan. The prevalence of prolonged grief decreased significantly over time from the patient's death (7.73%, 1.80%, 2.49%, and 1.85% at 6, 13, 18, and 24 months postloss, respectively, p < 0.05 at all times in reference to 6 months postloss). Caregivers' likelihood of prolonged grief was significantly higher if they had severe preloss depressive symptoms, negatively perceived their relative's dying situation, and were poorly prepared for the patient's death. However, the likelihood of prolonged grief decreased significantly with greater perceived concurrent social support and subjective caregiving burden right before the patient's death. Prolonged grief in bereavement diminished over time and was predicted by modifiable factors before, during, and after bereavement. To facilitate bereavement adjustment and avoid prolonged grief, healthcare professionals should develop and provide at-risk caregivers with effective interventions starting when patients are still alive to improve their dying experience, to facilitate preparedness for the patient's forthcoming death, to alleviate caregivers' preloss depressive symptoms, and to enhance their perceived postloss social support. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Differential expression of Fas family members and Bcl-2 family members in benign versus malignant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) in North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Parvesh; Srinivasan, Radhika; Patel, Firuza D

    2012-09-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents the most challenging of gynecological malignancies. Defective apoptosis is a major causative factor in the development and progression of cancer. The two important pathways of apoptosis are extrinsic death receptor pathway (Fas family) and intrinsic mitochondrial pathway (Bcl-2 family). In this study, differential protein expression of the major Fas family members (Fas, FasL, and FAP-1) and Bcl-2 family members (Bax, Bcl-2, and Bcl-X(L)) in benign versus malignant surface epithelial ovarian tumors was evaluated at the protein level by immunohistochemistry. The expression of these molecules was compared in 30 benign versus 35 malignant surface epithelial ovarian tumors. The findings of the present study showed that there was no significant difference in the expression of the Fas family members in benign and malignant ovarian tumors. However, benign tumors showed higher levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein levels (p < 0.009), whereas malignant tumors showed higher levels of pro-apoptotic Bax (p < 0.001). In general, there was no significant difference in Bcl-X(L) protein levels. The observations made in the present study suggest that alterations in expression of the Fas family and the Bcl-2 family members occur and play a key role in the deregulated growth of epithelial ovarian cancer.

  8. Familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Evidence of lung inflammation in unaffected family members

    SciTech Connect

    Bitterman, P.B.; Rennard, S.I.; Keogh, B.A.; Wewers, M.D.; Adelberg, S.; Crystal, R.G.

    1986-05-22

    We evaluated 17 clinically unaffected members of three families with an autosomal dominant form of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis for evidence of alveolar inflammation. Each person in the study was examined by gallium-67 scanning for a general estimate of pulmonary inflammation, and by bronchoalveolar lavage for characterization of the types of recovered cells and their state of activation. Eight of the 17 subjects had evidence of alveolar inflammation on the lavage studies. Supporting data included increased numbers of neutrophils and activated macrophages that released one or more neutrophil chemoattractants, and growth factors for lung fibroblasts--findings similar to those observed in patients with overt idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Four of these eight also had a positive gallium scan; in all the other clinically unaffected subjects the scan was normal. During a follow-up of two to four years in seven of the eight subjects who had evidence of inflammation, no clinical evidence of pulmonary fibrosis has appeared. These results indicate that alveolar inflammation occurs in approximately half the clinically unaffected family members at risk of inheriting autosomal dominant idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Whether these persons with evidence of pulmonary inflammation but no fibrosis will proceed to have clinically evident pulmonary fibrosis is not yet known.

  9. Accommodating family life: mentoring future female faculty members.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-03-01

    The demands of family life are crucial factors in successfully retaining women in science. Retention efforts should focus on creating a family-friendly environment within the laboratory and the institute. Based on my own experiences, I suggest ways to attract top young scientists and support their development into leading researchers.

  10. The Replacement Child: Substitution of a Lost Family Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Roy T.; Green, Donald

    Patterns of successful and unsuccessful resolution of grief over death of a child were studied in 25 families who had lost children across an 11-year-span. The families varied considerably in age, income, education, and parental occupation. Data were gathered by means of an intensive, open-ended interview schedule. The research focused on two…

  11. Family adjustment following disclosure of homosexuality by a member: themes discerned in narrative accounts.

    PubMed

    Beeler, J; DiProva, V

    1999-10-01

    Disclosure of homosexuality by a family member frequently creates a crisis within the family. Previous research has focused primarily on families' response to this initial crisis and how they cope with and transform initial negative reactions. Little attention has been given to how families respond to disclosure over time and to how families integrate a gay or lesbian family member--and his or her relationships--once they have come to accept his or her homosexuality. Using a narrative approach and interviewing whole families, this project explores these questions. We present 12 themes we found consistently recurring in family members' narratives. We discuss the relationship between these themes and current models in the literature within the context of heterosexism and suggest that this approach may represent a first step in developing a model of successful adaptation subsequent to disclosure.

  12. Resilient Family Processes, Personal Reintegration, and Subjective Well-Being Outcomes for Military Personnel and Their Family Members.

    PubMed

    Clark, Malissa A; O'Neal, Catherine W; Conley, Kate M; Mancini, Jay A

    2017-06-15

    Deployment affects not just the service members, but also their family members back home. Accordingly, this study examined how resilient family processes during a deployment (i.e., frequency of communication and household management) were related to the personal reintegration of each family member (i.e., how well each family member begins to "feel like oneself again" after a deployment), as well as several indicators of subjective well-being. Drawing from the family attachment network model (Riggs & Riggs, 2011), the present study collected survey data from 273 service members, their partners, and their adolescent children. Resilient family processes during the deployment itself (i.e., frequency of communication, household management), postdeployment positive and negative personal reintegration, and several indicators of well-being were assessed. Frequency of communication was related to personal reintegration for service members, while household management was related to personal reintegration for nondeployed partners; both factors were related to personal reintegration for adolescents. Negative and positive personal reintegration related to a variety of subjective well-being outcomes for each individual family member. Interindividual (i.e., crossover) effects were also found, particularly between adolescents and nondeployed partners. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Is cardiopulmonary resuscitation training deleterious for family members of cardiac patients?

    PubMed Central

    Dracup, K; Moser, D K; Guzy, P M; Taylor, S E; Marsden, C

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the attitudes toward cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training and subsequent CPR use of 172 CPR-trained family members of cardiac patients. The majority (88.9%) reported positive attitudes. Only 14 (8.1%) reported feeling too responsible for their family member. One hundred and forty-one (81.9%) said that they would perform CPR if required to do so. Family members do not feel unduly burdened by learning CPR, and CPR training should be recommended to families of patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. PMID:8279597

  14. Genealogy of an ancient protein family: the Sirtuins, a family of disordered members

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sirtuins genes are widely distributed by evolution and have been found in eubacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. While prokaryotic and archeal species usually have one or two sirtuin homologs, in humans as well as in eukaryotes we found multiple versions and in mammals this family is comprised of seven different homologous proteins being all NAD-dependent de-acylases. 3D structures of human SIRT2, SIRT3, and SIRT5 revealed the overall conformation of the conserved core domain but they were unable to give a structural information about the presence of very flexible and dynamically disordered regions, the role of which is still structurally and functionally unclear. Recently, we modeled the 3D-structure of human SIRT1, the most studied member of this family, that unexpectedly emerged as a member of the intrinsically disordered proteins with its long disordered terminal arms. Despite clear similarities in catalytic cores between the human sirtuins little is known of the general structural characteristics of these proteins. The presence of disorder in human SIRT1 and the propensity of these proteins in promoting molecular interactions make it important to understand the underlying mechanisms of molecular recognition that reasonably should involve terminal segments. The mechanism of recognition, in turn, is a prerequisite for the understanding of any functional activity. Aim of this work is to understand what structural properties are shared among members of this family in humans as well as in other organisms. Results We have studied the distribution of the structural features of N- and C-terminal segments of sirtuins in all known organisms to draw their evolutionary histories by taking into account average length of terminal segments, amino acid composition, intrinsic disorder, presence of charged stretches, presence of putative phosphorylation sites, flexibility, and GC content of genes. Finally, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of the putative

  15. In-utero exposure to bereavement and offspring IQ: a Danish national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Virk, Jasveer; Obel, Carsten; Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    Intelligence is a life-long trait that has strong influences on lifestyle, adult morbidity and life expectancy. Hence, lower cognitive abilities are therefore of public health interest. Our primary aim was to examine if prenatal bereavement measured as exposure to death of a close family member is associated with the intelligence quotient (IQ) scores at 18-years of age of adult Danish males completing a military cognitive screening examination. We extracted records for the Danish military screening test and found kinship links with biological parents, siblings, and maternal grandparents using the Danish Civil Registration System (N = 167,900). The prenatal exposure period was defined as 12 months before conception until birth of the child. We categorized children as exposed in utero to severe stress (bereavement) during prenatal life if their mothers lost an elder child, husband, parent or sibling during the prenatal period; the remaining children were included in the unexposed cohort. Mean score estimates were adjusted for maternal and paternal age at birth, residence, income, maternal education, gestational age at birth and birth weight. When exposure was due to death of a father the offsprings' mean IQ scores were lower among men completing the military recruitment exam compared to their unexposed counterparts, adjusted difference of 6.5 standard IQ points (p-value = 0.01). We did not observe a clinically significant association between exposure to prenatal maternal bereavement caused by death of a sibling, maternal uncle/aunt or maternal grandparent even after stratifying deaths only due to traumatic events. We found maternal bereavement to be adversely associated with IQ in male offspring, which could be related to prenatal stress exposure though more likely is due to changes in family conditions after death of the father. This finding supports other literature on maternal adversity during fetal life and cognitive development in the offspring.

  16. Coping with colorectal cancer: a qualitative exploration with patients and their family members

    PubMed Central

    Asiedu, Gladys B; Eustace, Rosemary W; Eton, David T

    2014-01-01

    Background. Extensive family coping research has been conducted among breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma with lesser emphasis on the coping experiences of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and their family members. Objective. To examine ways in which patients and their family members cope with the diagnosis of CRC. Methods. A total of 73 participants (21 patients, 52 family members) from 23 families described their experiences during and after a CRC diagnosis, including their coping experiences with the diagnosis. Data from semi-structured interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. The data were analyzed utilizing content analysis with inductive coding methods. Results. Eight major themes were identified: positive reframing, holding on to a sense of normalcy, religion and spirituality, joining a group, creating awareness of CRC, lifestyle change, seeking information and alternative treatments. Maintaining an emotional sense of normalcy through positive thinking, engaging in activities to take one’s mind off the diagnosis and believing that there is a higher authority which has control over the diagnosis and life were vital for the patients and their family members. Patients and family members used similar coping strategies. Conclusion. Findings from this study have implications for understanding how families blend emotion-based and problem-focused coping strategies in the face of a CRC diagnosis. Further developing evidence-based interventions that target coping and well-being in cancer patients and extending them to family members is necessary and holds great promise for providers who care for patients with familial cancers. PMID:25080507

  17. An Online Survey of Family Members' Beliefs and Attitudes About Smoking and Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Dixon, Lisa B; Naslund, John A; Bienvenida, John Carlo M; McManus, Kinsey L; Bartels, Stephen J; Brunette, Mary F

    2017-01-01

    Family beliefs about smoking and cessation may influence whether individuals with mental illness who smoke use effective cessation treatment. We surveyed family members online regarding beliefs about smoking and cessation among people with mental illness. Method: Two hundred fifty-six family members of individuals with mental illness completed an online survey. Responses were summarized and t tests were used to compare responses based on the family member's smoking status. One-quarter of respondents agreed that people with mental illness must smoke to manage mental health symptoms, nearly half (48%) expressed uncertainty about the whether nicotine replacement therapy is harmful for this population, and 69% believed that family members do not have the skills to help an individual with mental illness quit smoking. Misconceptions about smoking and mental illness and uncertainty about the safety of cessation treatment may interfere with family support for quitting smoking among people with mental illness.

  18. The experiences of family members in the nursing home to hospital transfer decision.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Bernard, Brittany; Magnabosco, Lara; Nazir, Arif; Unroe, Kathleen T

    2016-11-15

    The objective of this study was to better understand the experiences of family members in the nursing home to hospital transfer decision making process. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 family members who had recently been involved in a nursing home to hospital transfer decision. Family members perceived themselves to play an advocacy role in their resident's care and interview themes clustered within three over-arching categories: Family perception of the nursing home's capacity to provide medical care: Resident and family choices; and issues at 'hand-off' and the hospital. Multiple sub-themes were also identified. Findings from this study contribute to knowledge surrounding the nursing home transfer decision by illuminating the experiences of family members in the transfer decision process.

  19. Bereavement Follow-up after the Death of a Child as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenthal, Wendy G.; Sweeney, Corinne R.; Roberts, Kailey E.; Corner, Geoffrey W.; Donovan, Leigh A.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Wiener, Lori

    2015-01-01

    After a child’s death to cancer, families commonly want continued connection with the healthcare team that cared for their child, yet bereavement follow-up is often sporadic. A comprehensive literature search found that many bereaved parents experience poor psychological outcomes during bereavement and that parents want follow-up and benefit from continued connection with their child’s health care providers. Evidence suggests that the standard of care should consist of at least one meaningful contact between the health care team and bereaved parents to identify those at risk for negative psychosocial sequelae and to provide resources for bereavement support. PMID:26700929

  20. Family member involvement in audiology appointments with older people with hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Katie; Meyer, Carly; Scarinci, Nerina; Grenness, Caitlin; Hickson, Louise

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate family members' involvement in audiology rehabilitation appointments. Audiology appointments were video-recorded and analysed using quantitative coding and conversation analysis (CA). The study sample included 13 audiologists, 17 older adults with hearing impairment, and 17 family members. Initial coding showed that family members participated in 12% of the total talk time during audiology appointments. The CA results demonstrated that family members were not typically invited to join the conversation. However, family members would self-select to speak by: (1) responding to questions from the audiologist which were directed at the client; (2) self-initiating expansions on clients' turns; and (3) self-initiating questions. When family members did participate in the interaction, audiologists typically responded by shifting the conversation back to the client. While family members currently have minimal participation in audiology appointments, they display a strong interest in being involved and sharing their experiences of the client's hearing impairment. The findings suggest support for implementing family-centred care principles in audiology practice.

  1. Embracing technology: patients', family members' and nurse specialists' experience of communicating using e-mail.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Amanda; Moore, Sally; Plant, Hilary

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the usefulness of e-mail as a means of communication between nurse specialists and patients with lung cancer and their families. The study involved two lung cancer nurse specialists and 16 patients and family members who used e-mail with them during the 6-month study period. Data were collected from three sources: (1) e-mail contact between the nurse specialists and patients/family members, (2) patient/family member questionnaire and (3) a focus group/reflective session with the nurse specialists. Quantitative data collected from the e-mails and the questionnaires were analysed descriptively and are presented as summary statistics. Text data from the questionnaires and e-mails were analysed using content analysis. Findings suggest that e-mail can be an effective and convenient means of communication between nurse specialists, and patients and family members. Patients and family members reported high levels of satisfaction with this method of communication. It was found to be quick and easy, and patients and family members were satisfied with both the response and the speed of response from the nurse specialists. Nurse specialists were also positive about e-mail use and found that the benefits of using e-mail with patients/family members outweighed any disadvantages. Further investigation is recommended involving other health care professionals and different patient groups to ensure the safe and appropriate use of e-mail within health care.

  2. Recovering from Opioid Overdose: Resources for Overdose Survivors & Family Members

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors and their families can be found at: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)  National Helpline ... treatment/ physician- program- data/ treatment- physician- locator  State Substance Abuse Agencies: https: / / findtreatment. samhsa. gov/ TreatmentLocator/ faces/ about. ...

  3. Pets: Your Plan Should Include All Family Members

    MedlinePlus

    ... time looking for them. Previous Seniors Pets and Disaster Safety Checklist Check out this printable checklist - perfect ... Red Cross Stories Governance Career Opportunities Military Families Disaster Relief What We Do Disaster Relief Health and ...

  4. Death at the Worksite: Helping Grieving Family Members

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the families and co-workers involved. Few responsibilities are more difficult for managers than that of ... ordered on our Publications and Products page. Review Corporate Policies Refresh your knowledge of corporate policies relating ...

  5. Stigmatization and Suicide Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigelman, William; Gorman, Bernard S.; Jordan, John R.

    2009-01-01

    With survey data collected primarily from peer support group participants, the authors compared stigmatization responses of 462 parents losing children to suicide with 54 other traumatic death survivors and 24 child natural death survivors. Parents who encountered harmful responses and strained relations with family members and non-kin reported…

  6. Stigmatization and Suicide Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigelman, William; Gorman, Bernard S.; Jordan, John R.

    2009-01-01

    With survey data collected primarily from peer support group participants, the authors compared stigmatization responses of 462 parents losing children to suicide with 54 other traumatic death survivors and 24 child natural death survivors. Parents who encountered harmful responses and strained relations with family members and non-kin reported…

  7. The psychosocial status of the family members of rheumatoid arthritis patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sang Wan; Ha, You Jung; Kang, Eun Ha; Lee, Yun Jong; Song, Yeong Wook

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the psychosocial aspect of the family members of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we conducted a population-based analysis to examine the psychosocial characteristics of family members of RA patients in comparison with the general population. From the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey dataset (KNHANES V) (2010-2012), we identified 363 RA patients and selected family members of these patients who were aged 20 years or older (n = 367). The control group was randomly sampled from members of families without RA patients and matched for sex and age (n = 1101). We compared the psychosocial characteristics of family members of RA patients with the control group. Additionally, serial conditional logistic regression models were performed to evaluate the factors that affect psychosocial status of the RA family members, after adjusting for covariates. No significant differences were found in socioeconomic status between the two groups. For psychological factors, stress (85.8 vs 74.7 %, p < 0.001) and depression (7.9 vs 3.3 %, p < 0.001) were more common in the family members of RA patients. The presence of a RA patient in the family showed a positive association with stress [odds ratio (OR) 2.07; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.48-2.88, p < 0.001] and depression (OR 2.59, CI 1.55-4.32, p < 0.001), after adjusting for socioeconomic status. Our data show that the family members of RA patients have an increased prevalence of stress and depression. Physicians who treat RA patients should also consider the needs and the burden of family members.

  8. Unfinished Business in Bereavement

    PubMed Central

    Klingspon, Kara L.; Holland, Jason M.; Neimeyer, Robert A.; Lichtenthal, Wendy G.

    2016-01-01

    Unfinished business (incomplete, unexpressed or unresolved relationship issues with the deceased) is frequently discussed as a risk factor for chronic and severe grief reactions. However, few empirical studies have examined this construct. The present study aimed to address this gap in the literature by examining the presence and severity of unfinished business as well as common themes of unfinished business reported in open-ended qualitative narratives among a sample of 224 bereaved individuals. In bivariate analyses, self-reported presence of unfinished business and the severity of distress due to unfinished business were both found to be associated with poorer bereavement outcomes. However, after controlling for potential confounds, distress related to unresolved issues with the deceased emerged as a more robust correlate of these outcomes. Qualitative responses were categorized, and the type of reported unfinished business was not significantly related to the degree of unfinished business distress or other bereavement outcomes. These findings provide preliminary justification for bereavement interventions that aim to ameliorate distress related to unresolved relational issues with the deceased. PMID:26057117

  9. Time travel: the lived experience of providing feeding assistance to a family member with dementia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Ruth Palan; Amella, Elaine J

    2011-04-01

    A major concern facing family members of people with advanced dementia is deciding how to provide food and water. Nurses play a significant role in supporting mealtimes, yet little is known about the meaning of mealtime for family caregivers of people with dementia. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the experience of providing feeding assistance to a family member with dementia from the perspective of community and nursing home family caregivers. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with 16 family caregivers of individuals with advanced dementia. Analysis revealed that the experience was likened to living in a time warp whereby family caregivers were propelled from pleasant memories of the past, to the stark reality of the present, to a foreboding and uncertain future. Findings can guide nurses to dialogue with family members and to ensure that the full spectrum of mealtime is preserved. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. [Family dynamics in face of Alzheimer's in one of its member].

    PubMed

    Vizzachi, Barbara Alana; Daspett, Celina; Cruz, Maria Goreti da Silva; Horta, Ana Lúcia de Moraes

    2015-12-01

    To understand the family dynamics when there is a member in the residence with Alzheimer's disease. A study of qualitative approach, using the creative sensitive method (CSM), and with participation of two families who had a member with Alzheimer's disease at home. Three categories emerged: Effects of Alzheimer's disease and the family dynamics; Development process of Alzheimer's disease and Coping strategies in face of the disease. It was possible to know the manifestations and consequences of Alzheimer's disease in the family, such as mutual help, the mobilization of resources to activate memories of the past, spirituality and faith. There was also understanding of the structure of family dynamics.

  11. Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    are experiencing symptoms of PTSD or severe depression . The study is multi-method, with an initial qualitative phase (Phase 1), and a follow-up...Unfortunately, spouses of service members or veterans with symptoms of PTSD or depression have significantly elevated levels of psychological and... depression experience significant distress, but there currently are almost no empirical data about relatives other than spouses or children. Based on

  12. 5 CFR 734.405 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... candidate for political party office, may appear in photographs of the candidate's family which might appear... political office may appear in a family photograph which is printed in a campaign flier, but she may not... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member...

  13. Family Members Affected by a Close Relative's Addiction: The Stress-Strain-Coping-Support Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Templeton, Lorna

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines the stress-strain-coping-support (SSCS) model which underpins the whole programme of work described in this supplement. The need for such a model is explained: previous models of substance misuse and the family have attributed dysfunction or deficiency to families or family members. In contrast, the SSCS model assumes that…

  14. Family Members Affected by a Close Relative's Addiction: The Stress-Strain-Coping-Support Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Templeton, Lorna

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines the stress-strain-coping-support (SSCS) model which underpins the whole programme of work described in this supplement. The need for such a model is explained: previous models of substance misuse and the family have attributed dysfunction or deficiency to families or family members. In contrast, the SSCS model assumes that…

  15. The Family As Role Model for Educating Its Members: Childhood through Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehner, Wilhelm

    The key element for survival in today's technological society is the family and the role it plays in the education of its members. Educational attainments are closely linked to family background; not only for children, but for adults as well. Children tend to gain levels of education similar to, if not higher than those of family heads, and…

  16. Quality of life in adult patients with epilepsy and their family members.

    PubMed

    Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Jaggi, Sabina; Bonomo, Armanda; Hediger, Hannele; Eggenschwiler, Priska; Krämer, Günther; Oberholzer, Erich

    2013-03-01

    Epilepsy is not only a neurological disorder but may also have negative psychosocial consequences on people with epilepsy (PWE) and their relatives. Epilepsy has a major impact on quality of life (QoL) in PWE and family members. However, less is known about the impact of family support and family functioning on quality of life for PWE and family members and their interaction. Therefore, the study aimed to investigate factors that influence QoL in hospitalized adult patients with epilepsy and their relatives. An explorative cross-sectional study has been conducted in a tertiary clinic in Switzerland. Hospitalized adult patients with epilepsy and their relatives were enrolled in the study. Subjective QoL as well as family support and family functioning were measured with patients and family members. Patients and their relatives assessed the patients' support need and their satisfaction with the care provided. In addition, patients were administered a disease-related HRQoL measure (QoLIED-36, Version 2). Backward stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis was used to explain variances in patients and relatives' subjective QoL. One hundred and four dyads of patient and family member participated. Subjective QoL in patients and family members differed significantly, as did satisfaction with care delivery. In both groups family support contributed significantly to QoL. In the models 40% of the variance in QoL in patients and relatives could be explained. While the quality of life of the family members was affected by the patients' knowledge about the disease and the reason for their current hospitalization, patient QoL scores had no influence on the QoL of family members. The patients' QoL, however, depended significantly on the QoL of the family members. Interventions should address both PWE and family members and focus on the self-care improvement of PWE and the well-being and coping of family members. A patient-centred approach needs to include both the PWE and

  17. Family members' informal roles in end-of-life decision making in adult intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Jill R; Schmitt, Madeline; Baggs, Judith Gedney; Norton, Sally A; Dombeck, Mary T; Sellers, Craig R

    2012-01-01

    To support the process of effective family decision making, it is important to recognize and understand informal roles that various family members may play in the end-of-life decision-making process. To describe some informal roles consistently enacted by family members involved in the process of end-of-life decision making in intensive care units. Ethnographic study. Data were collected via participant observation with field notes and semistructured interviews on 4 intensive care units in an academic health center in the mid-Atlantic United States from 2001 to 2004. The units studied were a medical, a surgical, a burn and trauma, and a cardiovascular intensive care unit. Health care clinicians, patients, and family members. Informal roles for family members consistently observed were primary caregiver, primary decision maker, family spokesperson, out-of-towner, patient's wishes expert, protector, vulnerable member, and health care expert. The identified informal roles were part of families' decision-making processes, and each role was part of a potentially complicated family dynamic for end-of-life decision making within the family system and between the family and health care domains. These informal roles reflect the diverse responses to demands for family decision making in what is usually a novel and stressful situation. Identification and description of these informal roles of family members can help clinicians recognize and understand the functions of these roles in families' decision making at the end of life and guide development of strategies to support and facilitate increased effectiveness of family discussions and decision-making processes.

  18. Grief, Bereavement, and Coping with Loss (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregiver Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview ... a resource to help caregivers of cancer patients. Bereavement and Grief Key Points Bereavement is the period ...

  19. Family Members, Transplantation Candidates, and Patients Who Underwent Liver Transplantation Had Insufficient Information About the Procedure.

    PubMed

    de Felício, H C C; da Silva, R C A M; da Costa, A M; Arroyo, P C; Duca, W J; da Silva, R F; Dos Santos, R; Miyazaki, E T; Domingos, N M; Miyazaki, M C O S

    2016-09-01

    Adherence to treatment is essential for a successful liver transplantation (LT) because LT requires information, abilities, and competencies of patients and family members. This study sought to identify whether the information received about the LT process was enough for either patients or family members who attended a liver transplant center in a school hospital. This was a transversal study using questionnaires to verify received information on LT. It included 50 patients on the waiting list for LT, 50 transplanted patients, and 50 family members. There was a prevalence of men (82%) among patients, age range from 19 to 67 years (average: 46.87 ± 10.99), and of women (74%) among family members, age range from 18 to 80 years (average: 43.5 ± 11.77). The majority of subjects (88%) had a low education level. The most frequent etiology of hepatic cirrhosis was viral hepatitis associated with alcohol. A significant number of the listed and transplanted patients as well as all family members reported insufficient information about the process of the transplantation. The kind of insufficient information varied according to the period of treatment. The best way to obtain information, as reported by patients and family members, was a combination of oral and written information. Our data show the need for improvement in the means of delivering information to patients and family members, and an explanatory manual was created from this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Work/Family Attitudes of Dual Military Member Couples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    MilitarW familW statistics in its annual almanac. The Air Force began its own research after the 1980 appointment of the Assistant for Air Force...leveling off of the numbers of dual military member couples since 1983 ( after 12 years of rapid increase) may have something to do with the increasing...stability and internal consistency. However, after its first 2 years of use, Dansby (1M) examined the stability of factor construction through a series

  1. Glycosidase profiles of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Kämpfer, P; Rauhoff, O; Dott, W

    1991-01-01

    A total of 712 strains representing 47 taxa of the family Enterobacteriaceae were tested for the ability to hydrolyze 14 4-methylumbelliferyl (4-MU)-linked substrates within 3 h of incubation. In addition to the well-known differentiation potential of the hydrolysis of 4-MU-beta-D-galactopyranoside, 4-MU-beta-D-glucuronide, and 4-MU-beta-D-xylopyranoside, the hydrolysis of some other fluorogenic substrates (e.g., 4-MU-beta-D-fucopyranoside, 4-MU-N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide, and 4-MU-alpha-D-galactopyranoside) can also be used for species differentiation within the family Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:1757564

  2. Patients' and family members' experiences of a psychoeducational family intervention after a first episode psychosis: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Liv; Frich, Jan C; Friis, Svein; Røssberg, Jan Ivar

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore patients' and family members' experiences of the different elements of a psychoeducational family intervention. A qualitative, explorative study was performed based on digitally recorded in-depth interviews with 12 patients and 14 family members. The interview data were transcribed in a slightly modified verbatim mode and analysed using systematic text condensation. Six themes that both patients and family members experienced as important in the family intervention were identified: alliance, support, anxiety and tension, knowledge and learning, time, and structure. A good relationship between the group leaders and participants was essential in preventing dropout. Meeting with other people in the same situation reduced feelings of shame and increased hope for the future. Hearing real life stories was experienced as being more important for gaining new knowledge about psychosis than lectures and workshops. However, many patients experienced anxiety and tension during the meetings. The group format could be demanding for patients immediately after a psychotic episode and for those still struggling with distressing psychotic symptoms. Group leaders need to recognise patients' levels of anxiety before, and during, the intervention, and consider the different needs of patients and family members in regards to when the intervention starts, the group format, and the patients' level of psychotic symptoms. The findings in the present study may help to tailor family work to better meet the needs of both patients and family members.

  3. A unified nomenclature of NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER family members in plants.

    PubMed

    Léran, Sophie; Varala, Kranthi; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Chiurazzi, Maurizio; Crawford, Nigel; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise; David, Laure; Dickstein, Rebecca; Fernandez, Emilio; Forde, Brian; Gassmann, Walter; Geiger, Dietmar; Gojon, Alain; Gong, Ji-Ming; Halkier, Barbara A; Harris, Jeanne M; Hedrich, Rainer; Limami, Anis M; Rentsch, Doris; Seo, Mitsunori; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Zhang, Mingyong; Coruzzi, Gloria; Lacombe, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Members of the plant NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER (NRT1/PTR) family display protein sequence homology with the SLC15/PepT/PTR/POT family of peptide transporters in animals. In comparison to their animal and bacterial counterparts, these plant proteins transport a wide variety of substrates: nitrate, peptides, amino acids, dicarboxylates, glucosinolates, IAA, and ABA. The phylogenetic relationship of the members of the NRT1/PTR family in 31 fully sequenced plant genomes allowed the identification of unambiguous clades, defining eight subfamilies. The phylogenetic tree was used to determine a unified nomenclature of this family named NPF, for NRT1/PTR FAMILY. We propose that the members should be named accordingly: NPFX.Y, where X denotes the subfamily and Y the individual member within the species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative Analysis of the Perception of Family Functioning by Heads of Families with and without Cancer Members During Illness.

    PubMed

    Sahebihagh, Mohamad Hasan; Amani, Leila; Salimi, Saleh; Feizi, Aram; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza; Atri, Shirin Barzanjeh

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a major health problem due to the aging population with increasing deaths. Family functioning is affected by cancer diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this study was to comparative analysis of the perception of family functioning by heads of families with and without cancer members during illness, focusing on changes or probable changes. This comparative study was conducted on two groups (families with a member of the cancer and controls without a family member with cancer). The families were of patients referred to the clinics and hospitals of Imam Khomeini, Taleghani and Omid of Urmia city, the number of samples being 148 for cases and 176for the control group. To collect the data, valid and reliable family functioning (FAD) was applied, a 60-item questionnaire with seven dimensions, with heads of families. To analyze the data SPSS- 23 Software was used for descriptive and analytical statistics. Significance level was defined p<0.05. Among the seven items : problem solving, communication, roles, emotional response, emotional involvement, behavior control and overall functioning, only differences for average scores of problem-solving were statistically significant. Contrary to common perception of severe damage for family functioning in families with cancer members, results of this study indicate that functioning in terms of family caregivers is more or less similar to that of the families with other diseases. Only in problem-solving item do these families experience more difficulty. According to the research findings, in nursing from families with cancer patient, it is recommended to focus more on the problem-solving item of the families.

  5. To tell or not to tell: HIV disclosure to family members in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Wu, Zunyou; Lord, Lynwood; Wu, Sheng

    2008-12-01

    Laws in China relating to HIV disclosure are inconsistent. After a patient has tested HIV-positive, service providers struggle to decide who should be informed first: patients, family members, or both. To understand service providers' attitudes and practices regarding the HIV notification process in China, 1101 service providers from a southwestern province of China were surveyed. Opinions were gathered from providers at five different levels of health care facilities (provincial, city, county, township and village). A mixed methods approach was used to analyze perceptions of informing family members of a patient's HIV status. Quantitative analysis was used to examine whether providers held a favorable attitude toward notifying family members first and qualitative analysis was used to explore the reasons and consequences of notifying family members first. Nearly half of service providers felt family members should be informed of a patient's HIV status first. Providers who were older, had contact with HIV patients, or had less medical education were more likely to agree with a family-first notification practice. Psychological pressure, concern about protecting family members, the need for family support, and consideration for local regulations were cited as the main reasons for this practice. There is an immediate need to re-examine HIV notification policies so that there are consistent guidelines and procedures for providers throughout China.

  6. [A study on the factors influencing the anxiety of family members in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Chifumi; Matsuoka, Midori; Taki, Kenji

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors which affect anxiety of family members in the emergency department (ED). 174 family members of patients participated in this study. The age of family members was a mean of 43.1 (range: 20 to 84) years and 59.8% of them were women. The informations were obtained from a questionnaire filled out by the family members when they were waiting during examination and treatment of the patients. In this study, we divided the factors that influence the anxiety of family members into 4 categories; demographic factors, the family's individual factors, factors associated illness, and environmental factors in the ED. Multiple regression analysis with SPSS was used to identify the variables contributing to the variance in anxiety. We used the State Anxiety Inventory (S-STAI) to measure anxiety. As a result, 8 variables involving in severity of illness, situation in the emergency room, disagreement between perceived severity of illness and actual severity of illness, having symptoms of trauma, neurological, heart, and respiratory problems, waiting time, family needs, naturally anxious personality and a first visit patient were identified as significant predictors of anxiety. These variables accounted for 46.9% of total variance. These results suggest that nurses need more interaction with family members to reduce their anxiety.

  7. 5 CFR 890.302 - Coverage of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certificate must— (1) State that the child is incapable of self-support because of a physical or mental... Section 890.302 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.302 Coverage of family...

  8. 5 CFR 890.302 - Coverage of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... certificate must— (1) State that the child is incapable of self-support because of a physical or mental... Section 890.302 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.302 Coverage of family...

  9. 5 CFR 890.302 - Coverage of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.302 Coverage of family... individuals are not covered under the other enrollment. (3) Dual enrollment—child. (i) When natural parents... both natural parents or of a natural parent and a step-parent, the children are entitled to receive...

  10. Pbx4, a new Pbx family member on mouse chromosome 8, is expressed during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, K; Mincheva, A; Korn, B; Lichter, P; Pöpperl, H

    2001-05-01

    Members of the Pbx family are involved in a diverse range of developmental processes including axial patterning and organogenesis. Pbx functions are in part mediated by the interaction of Pbx proteins with members of the Hox and Meis/Prep families. We have identified a fourth mammalian Pbx family member. Pbx4 in the mouse and PBX4 in humans are located on chromosome 8 and chromosome 19, respectively. Pbx4 expression is confined to the testis, especially to spermatocytes in the pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase.

  11. 78 FR 33699 - Visas: Classification of Immediate Family Members as G Nonimmigrants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ...This rule permits qualified immediate family members of A-1 or A-2 nonimmigrants to be independently classified as G-1, G-2, G-3, or G-4 nonimmigrants. It also clarifies that immediate family members of G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 nonimmigrants who have employment authorization may remain in G classification upon gaining employment that would otherwise allow them to change status to A classification. This rule is being promulgated to allow family members of employees of bilateral missions to work at international organizations in a visa status that reflects their position with the international organization.

  12. Staff-family relationships in residential aged care facilities: the views of residents' family members and care staff.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michael; Fetherstonhaugh, Deirdre; Tarzia, Laura; Chenco, Carol

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to examine staff and family members' perceptions of each other's roles and responsibilities in the Australian residential aged care setting. Data was collected by interview and focus group from 27 staff and 14 family members at five residential aged care facilities in the state of Victoria, Australia. Findings highlight "communication" as the core category supporting the formation of constructive staff-family relationships, as described by three main themes; "building trust," "involvement," and "keeping the family happy." Staff attitudes, mutual cooperation, meaningful engagement, and shared expectations lay the foundation for relationships. Findings suggest that further efforts to establish and sustain good relationships with families are required by facilities. Characteristics, roles, and expectations of staff and family that can both promote and hinder the formation of constructive staff-family relationships are discussed.

  13. A Qualitative Systematic Review of the Bereavement Process Following Suicide.

    PubMed

    Shields, Chris; Kavanagh, Michele; Russo, Kate

    2017-03-01

    Despite the fact that a large number of people are bereaved by suicide each year, the experiences of those bereaved by suicide are poorly understood. It has been suggested that a contributing factor in relation to this lack of understanding has been the use of quantitative methods, which may not be sensitive to the bereavement process and its thematic content. Therefore, the current article outlines a systematic review of 11 qualitative studies that address issues related to the bereavement process following suicide. The results indicate that those bereaved by suicide encounter a range of difficult feelings following suicide including blame, guilt, and emptiness and that these feelings are affected by participants' ability to make meaning of the event. The meaning-making process is a complex one that occurs within a difficult social context in which both those bereaved by suicide and members of the wider community struggle to interact with each other in a beneficial way. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. Stigma by association and family burden among family members of people with mental illness: the mediating role of coping.

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, Remko L M; Pryor, John B; Stutterheim, Sarah E; Kok, Gerjo; Bos, Arjan E R

    2016-09-01

    When someone has a mental illness, family members may share the experience of stigma. Past research has established that family members' experiences of stigma by association predict psychological distress and lower quality-of-life. The present study, conducted with 503 family members of people with mental illness examined the prevalence of 14 different coping strategies. Of greater importance, we examined the role of these coping strategies as mediators of the relationships between stigma by association and family burden, on the one hand, and outcomes, such as psychological distress and quality-of-life, on the other. The results showed that both perceived stigma by association and family burden are associated with greater psychological distress and lower quality-of-life, and that most coping strategies mediate these relationships. Adaptive coping strategies were related to reduced negative outcomes, while most maladaptive coping strategies were related to enhanced negative outcomes. Implications for intervention development are discussed.

  15. Caregiving experiences of family members of persons with dementia in south India.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Suzanne M; Varghese, Mathew; Hepburn, Kenneth; Lewis, Marsha; Paul, Isabel; Bhimani, Rozina

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on the first phase of an investigation aimed at adapting The Savvy Caregiver program, a successful family caregiving curriculum developed in the United States, for application in South India. Thirty family members caring for a person with dementia were interviewed regarding their experiences as caregivers (CGs). Qualitative interviews were conducted with the family member at a geriatric clinic, while other diagnostic procedures were being carried out with the person with dementia. Findings from the study revealed that although family members understood the term CG, none could identify a word for CG in his or her language. There was little understanding of dementia as an illness. Family CGs reported feeling distressed, overwhelmed, and frustrated with caregiving. Caregivers were interested in an educational program, but many had unrealistic expectations for what they wanted to learn. The findings provide directions for adapting The Savvy Caregiver curriculum for Indian family CGs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Same-Sex Partner Bereavement.

    PubMed

    Patlamazoglou, Lefteris; Simmonds, Janette G; Snell, Tristan L

    2017-01-01

    The experience of same-sex-attracted people who have lost a partner is neglected in the existing literature on bereavement. Previous research on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer and questioning (LGBTIQ) populations tends to focus on the loss of a partner to HIV-related causes, and there is scant research concerning non-HIV-related bereavement. The purpose of this article is to investigate the non-HIV-related bereavement experiences of same-sex partners and to address the potential complications of disenfranchised grief. Coping with the loss of a same-sex partner and the impact of bereavement on subsequent relationships are also discussed. Implications for counseling of bereaved same-sex-attracted individuals are drawn, and recommendations for future psychological research on the experience of bereavement are made.

  17. The economic cost of bereavement in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Audrey I; Macduff, Colin; Petrie, Dennis J; Tseng, Fu-Min; Schut, Henk; Skår, Silje; Corden, Anne; Birrell, John; Wang, Shaolin; Newsom, Cate; Wilson, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Aspects of the socioeconomic costs of bereavement in Scotland were estimated using 3 sets of data. Spousal bereavement was associated with increased mortality and longer hospital stays, with additional annual cost of around £20 million. Cost of bereavement coded consultations in primary care was estimated at around £2.0 million annually. In addition, bereaved people were significantly less likely to be employed in the year of and 2 years after bereavement than non-bereaved matched controls, but there were no significant differences in income between bereaved people and matched controls before and after bereavement.

  18. Forgotten family members: the importance of siblings in early psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Siann; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Wade, Darryl; McGorry, Patrick; Howie, Linsey

    2014-08-01

    This paper reviews the evidence on the significance of sibling inclusion in family interventions and support during early psychosis. This narrative review presents the current research related to the importance of family work during early psychosis, the needs and developmental significance of siblings during adolescence and early adulthood, the protective effects of sibling relationships, and the characteristics of early psychosis relevant to the sibling experience. It will also review the evidence of the sibling experience in chronic physical illness and disability, as well as long-term psychotic illness. Despite the evidence that working with families is important during early psychosis, siblings have been largely ignored. Siblings are an important reciprocal relationship of long duration. They play an important role in development during adolescence and early adulthood. These relationships may be an underutilized protective factor due to their inherent benefits and social support. Developmental theories imply that early psychosis could negatively impact the sibling relationship and their quality of life, effecting personality development and health outcomes. The evidence shows that adolescent physical illness or disability has a significantly negative impact on the sibling's quality of life and increases the risk for the onset of mental health issues. Long-term psychotic illness also results in negative experiences for siblings. Current evidence shows that siblings in early psychosis experience psychological distress and changes in functional performance. Further research using standard measures is required to understand the impact early psychosis has on the sibling relationship and their quality of life. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. The evolution of Euphrosyne family members into the near-Earth population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, Joseph; Carruba, Valerio; Mainzer, Amy

    2015-08-01

    We will present new results from numerical simulations investigating the long-term evolution of asteroids from the Euphrosyne family. The Euphrosyne family crosses the nu_6 resonance in the outer Main Belt, where it is located at relatively large inclinations. This has resulted in a draining of the largest family members and thus an unusually steep size frequency distribution. Our simulations allow us to identify which subset of the NEOs are most likely to be associated with this family.

  20. Psychiatric Worker and Family Members: Pathways Towards Co-Operation Networks within Psychiatric Assistance Services.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Silvia

    2014-03-04

    The family's role in patient care was greatly altered by Law 180. This law, introduced in Italy in 1978, led to a gradual phasing out of custodial treatment for psychiatric patients. This different mindset, which views the family as an alternative to institutionalization, leads to it being seen as an essential entity in the setting up of community service dynamics. We interviewed health professionals in order to understand obstacles of collaboration between family members and mental health care workers. The goal was to uncover actions that promote collaboration and help build alliances between families and psychiatric workers. Results showed that health professionals view the family as a therapeutic resource. Despite this view, family members were rarely included in patient treatment. The reasons is: the structures have a theoretical orientation of collaboration with the family but, for nurses not are organized a few meeting spaces with family members. Services should create moments, such as multi-family groups or groups of information, managed by nurses and not only by doctors. These occasions it might facilitate the knowledge between professionals and family members.

  1. Associative stigma in family members of psychotic patients in Flanders: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Catthoor, Kirsten; Schrijvers, Didier; Hutsebaut, Joost; Feenstra, Dineke; Persoons, Philippe; De Hert, Marc; Peuskens, Jozef; Sabbe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess presence and severity of associative stigma in family members of psychotic patients and factors for higher associative stigma. METHODS: Standardized semi-structured interview of 150 family members of psychotic patients receiving full time treatment. This study on associative stigma in family members of psychotic patients was part of a larger research program on the burden of the family, using “Interview for the Burden of the Family” and the chapters stigma, treatment and attribution from the “Family interview Schedule”. The respondents were relatives, one per patient, either partner or parent. The patients had been diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder. All contacts with patients and relatives were in Dutch. Relatives were deemed suitable to participate in this research if they saw the patient at least once a week. Recruitment took place in a standardized way: after obtaining the patient’s consent, the relatives were approached to participate. The results were analyzed using SPSS Version 18.0. RESULTS: The prevalence of associative stigma in this sample is 86%. Feelings of depression in the majority of family members are prominent. Twenty-one point three percent experienced guilt more or less frequent, while shame was less pronounced. Also, 18.6% of all respondents indicated that they tried to hide the illness of their family member for others regularly or more. Three six point seven percent really kept secret about it in certain circumstances and 29.3% made efforts to explain what the situation or psychiatric condition of their family member really is like. Factors with marked significance towards higher associative stigma are a worsened relationship between the patient and the family member, conduct problems to family members, the patients’ residence in a residential care setting, and hereditary attributional factors like genetic hereditability and character. The level of associative stigma has significantly been

  2. Implications of Parental Suicide and Violent Death for Promotion of Resilience of Parentally-Bereaved Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ana C.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Liu, Xianchen; Haine, Rachel A.

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the implications of suicide and violent deaths (including suicide, homicide, and accidents) for the development of interventions for parentally bereaved children. Analyses of data from the Family Bereavement Program find minimal differences in children's mental health problems, grief or risk and protective factors based on…

  3. Implications of Parental Suicide and Violent Death for Promotion of Resilience of Parentally-Bereaved Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ana C.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Liu, Xianchen; Haine, Rachel A.

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the implications of suicide and violent deaths (including suicide, homicide, and accidents) for the development of interventions for parentally bereaved children. Analyses of data from the Family Bereavement Program find minimal differences in children's mental health problems, grief or risk and protective factors based on…

  4. [The phenomenon of families who are involved in decision making about life support withdrawal in family members].

    PubMed

    Oberholster, M; Gmeiner, A; Poggenpoel, M

    1998-12-01

    The overall objective of this study was to explore and describe the phenomenon of families who are involved in deciding about withdrawal of life-support treatment of a family member. A phenomenon analysis was undertaken in two phases. During the first phase, secondary analysis of primary data was done on the family used in Burger's study (1996: 1-175) and was followed up by phenomenological interviews with families used as member checking from the same circumstances and according to the same criteria that Burger (1996: 1-185) used in her study. Data were analysed in collaboration with an independent coder. The family used as member checking in this study is also used as data control. A literature control was conducted as part of data control. The themes that were identified included were: physical and bodily experiences of families; defence mechanisms used by families to cope with grief; emotional experiences of families; need of knowledge/perceptions/outlook on life/internal conflict/feelings of guilt/ability to make decisions/respect of patient wishes/the effect of time and prior experiences; support needed by an given to families; spiritual and supernatural experiences/hope/acceptance/ability to 'let go' of the patient. In phase two, guidelines were described for psychiatric nurse specialists to mobilise resources for families to promote, maintain and restore their mental health as an integral part of health.

  5. Perceived Intrafamilial Connectedness and Autonomy in Families with and without an Anxious Family Member: A Multiple Informant Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Albuquerque, Jiske E. G.; Schneider, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Perceived intrafamilial "emotional connectedness" and "autonomy" were investigated within families with and without an anxious family member using a multiple informant approach. The sample consisted of 32 mothers with a current anxiety disorder and 56 controls, their partners, and their anxious and nonanxious teenage children. No differences were…

  6. Quality of relationship between veterans with traumatic brain injury and their family members.

    PubMed

    Winter, Laraine; Moriarty, Helene J

    2017-01-01

    The quality of the relationship between patients with many illnesses and their family members has been shown to affect the well-being of both. Yet, relationship quality has not been studied in traumatic brain injury (TBI), and giving and receiving aspects have not been distinguished. The present study of veterans with TBI examined associations between relationship quality and caregiver burden, satisfaction with caregiving, and veterans' competence in interpersonal functioning, rated by veterans and family members. In this cross-sectional study, 83 veterans and their family members were interviewed at home. Measures of quality of relationship, veterans' interpersonal competence and sociodemographics were collected for both, caregiver burden and satisfaction for family members only. As predicted, veteran-rated Qrel/Giving was associated with family-rated Qrel/Receiving, and veteran-rated Qrel/Receiving with family-rated Qrel/Giving. Lower caregiver burden and higher caregiving satisfaction were associated with higher Qrel/Receiving scores but not with Qrel/Giving scores. Veterans' interpersonal competence was associated with total Qrel as rated by either veterans or family members. Relationship quality should be included in family research in TBI, and giving and receiving aspects should be differentiated. Findings suggest that lower caregiver burden and greater satisfaction should be more achievable by increasing caregivers' sense of benefits received from the relationship.

  7. Motives for residential mobility in later life: post-move perspectives of elders and family members.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Julie F; Ekerdt, David J

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move within the past year, and with 14 extended family members. Reasons for moving (from perspectives of both elders who moved and their family members) were grouped into four themes and eleven issues that influenced the move decision. These themes parallel the ecological context of individual health and functioning, beliefs and attitudes, physical environment, and social pressures. Late-life mobility is a significant life transition that is the outcome of an ongoing appraisal and reappraisal of housing fit with individual functioning, needs, and aspirations. Family members are an integral part of these decision and residential mobility processes.

  8. Nurses' experiences of caring for their own family members.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jayne; Aubeeluck, Aimee

    There is a wealth of literature that addresses the needs of informal caregivers and the needs of health professionals caring for someone with a life-threatening illness. However, there is a paucity of research that deals with nurses who are caring for their own relative who has a life-threatening illness. This qualitative study explores the information needs, support systems available, and the impact that this experience has upon the nurse's quality of life. Individual semi-structured interviews were transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith and Osbourne, 2003). Four superordinate themes emerged from the data: quality of life, personal and professional boundaries, disempowerment and positive aspects to the role. These themes were then linked to validated models of caregiving (Caron and Bowers 2003; Sherwood et al, 2004) to further explore their impact upon the nurse in his/her role as family carer. This study has established that nurses providing care for their own relatives have specific needs with regard to their dual role as a health professional and family carer. In understanding these specific needs, it may be possible to provide a more effective and equal level of support for these individuals. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  9. Perceptions of family members of palliative medicine and hospice patients who experienced music therapy.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Lisa M; Lagman, Ruth; Bates, Debbie; Edsall, Melissa; Eden, Patricia; Janaitis, Jessica; Rybicki, Lisa

    2017-06-01

    Evidence shows that music therapy aids in symptom management and improves quality of life for palliative medicine and hospice patients. The majority of previous studies have addressed patient needs, while only a few addressed the needs of family members. The primary purpose of this study was to understand family members' perceptions of music therapy experienced by a relative in palliative medicine or hospice. Patient self-reported scales and music therapist assessment of change were also investigated. Patients scored their symptoms (pain, anxiety, depression, shortness of breath, and mood) before and after music therapy sessions. One family member present during the session assessed perceived effect on the patient's pain, anxiety, depression, shortness of breath, stress level, restlessness, comfort level, mood, and quality of life. The effect on family member's stress level, quality of life, and mood and helpfulness of the music therapy session for the patient and self were studied. Recommendations about future patient participation in music therapy and qualitative comments were also solicited. Fifty family member/patient dyads participated in the study. Family member perceptions were positive, with 82% of responders indicating improvement for self and patient in stress, mood, and quality of life; 80% rating the session as extremely helpful; and 100% of 49 recommending further music therapy sessions for the patient. Patients reported statistically significant improvement in pain, depression, distress, and mood scores. Family members of patients in palliative medicine and hospice settings reported an immediate positive impact of music therapy on the patient and on themselves. More research needs to be conducted to better understand the benefits of music therapy for family members.

  10. Family members' experiences of personal assistance given to a relative with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ahlström, Gerd; Wadensten, Barbro

    2011-11-01

    Personal assistance is a type of home care common to many countries even though entitlement and legislative framework may vary from country to country. At present, there exists no knowledge about the family members' experiences of such assistance; therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate family members' experiences of personal assistance given to a relative of working age with a functional disability. Twenty-five family members who had a relative with a severe neurological disease in Sweden were interviewed about the significance of personal assistance, and the qualitative interviews were subjected to qualitative latent content analysis. The overall findings verify the close connection between the family members' experiences and their perception of the quality of the caring relationship between the personal assistant and the person with disability. The main finding was an appreciation of the personal assistance on the part of the family members. However, in situations where the encounter between the assistant and the relative with disability was perceived negatively, the family members experienced great anxiety. The shortcomings were the inability to maintain a private life with assistance and the limitation of choice because of the shortage of personal assistants. Beyond these general findings, this study found that personal assistance was experienced by the family members in terms of dignity and empowering care. This theme was generated from seven subthemes: Insight into private life, Security through the close relation, Social life through freedom of movement, Influence over the organisation of assistance, Self-determination and understanding, Friendship and mutual respect and Adaption to the dependency on assistance. The findings indicate that responsible officials, work leaders and assistants need constantly to improve the implementation of the law. In such efforts, the experiences of family members described in this study are a source of knowledge.

  11. Patient and Family Member Factors Influencing Outcomes of Poststroke Inpatient Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yunhua; Tao, Qian; Zhou, Xiaoxuan; Chen, Shanjia; Huang, Jia; Jiang, Yingping; Wu, Yi; Chen, Lidian; Tao, Jing; Chan, Chetwyn C

    2017-02-01

    To investigate how family members' attitudes toward functional regain, and patients' knowledge and intention of independence influence poststroke rehabilitation. Cross-sectional study. Three rehabilitation inpatient settings. Younger (n=79) and older (n=84) poststroke patients, along with their family members (spouses, n=104; children, n=59). Not applicable. Custom-designed questionnaires were used to tap into the patients' knowledge about rehabilitation (Patient's Rehabilitation Questionnaire-Knowledge About Rehabilitation) and intention of independence (Patient's Rehabilitation Questionnaire-Intention of Independence), and family members' attitudes toward patients in performing basic activities of daily living (BADL) (Family Member Attitudes Questionnaire-BADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (Family Member Attitudes Questionnaire-instrumental activities of daily living). The rehabilitation outcomes included gains in motor, cognitive, and emotional functions, and self-care independence, measured with common clinical instruments. The Family Member Attitudes Questionnaire-BADL predicted cognitive outcome and the Patient's Rehabilitation Questionnaire-Intention of Independence predicted motor outcome for both groups. Differential age-related effects were revealed for the Patient's Rehabilitation Questionnaire-Intention of Independence in predicting emotional outcome only for the younger group, and self-care independence only for the older group. Patients' intention of independence positively affected motor recovery, while family members' positive attitudes promoted cognitive regain. The findings suggested plausible age-related differences in how patients' intentions affect emotion versus self-care independence outcomes. Future studies should explore strategies for promoting positive attitudes toward independence among patients and family members during poststroke rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by

  12. Pseudohyperkalaemia associated with hereditary spherocytosis in four members of a family.

    PubMed Central

    Alani, F. S.; Dyer, T.; Hindle, E.; Newsome, D. A.; Ormerod, L. P.; Mahoney, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Pseudohyperkalaemia was detected in four members of a family all of whom have hereditary spherocytosis with normal white blood cells and platelets counts. The degree of pseudohyperkalaemia was related to the time between sampling and cell separation, and inversely related to the temperature in which the sample was left to stand before cell separation. A fifth member of this family was free from both conditions. The association suggests linkage at a membrane level. PMID:7831176

  13. Bereavement support for children.

    PubMed

    Auman, Mary Jo

    2007-02-01

    The death of a parent is one of the most significant and stressful events children can encounter. Surviving children may experience psychiatric problems and social dysfunction during their childhood and possibly throughout their adult lives. Children surviving a sibling's death may develop behavioral problems, because no one can fill the emptiness that remains in their lives, especially if their relationship was close. It is vital to recognize the trauma experienced by children who have suffered the loss of a loved one. Adults need to know when a grieving child needs help. Literature supports the need for education and counseling for grieving children. School nurses can be instrumental in meeting these needs for school-age children by performing early, comprehensive assessments, educating school administration regarding the benefits of bereavement support, initiating appropriate referrals, and providing bereavement support.

  14. Grief among Surviving Family Members of Homicide Victims: A Causal Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprang, M. Virginia; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Proposed causal model to delineate predictors of self-reported grief among surviving family members of homicide victims. Evaluated model using data from survey of members of "Victims of Violence" support groups. Results generally supported model and indicated that correlates of grief differed across gender-specific subgroups in terms of their…

  15. Halo effect for bariatric surgery: collateral weight loss in patients' family members.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt A; Encarnacion, Betsy; Peraza, Joe; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Morton, John

    2011-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for morbid obesity, which is increasingly recognized as a familial disease. Healthy behavior transmission may be enhanced by family relationships. To determine changes in weight and healthy behavior in patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and their family members. Prospective, longitudinal, and multidimensional health assessment before and 1 year after index Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. An academic bariatric center of excellence, from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2009. Eighty-five participants (35 patients, 35 adult family members, and 15 children <18 years old). Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and associated dietary and lifestyle counseling. Weight and expected body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared). Secondary outcomes were waist circumference, quality of life (36-Item Short Form or Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), healthy behaviors, eating behaviors, and activity levels. Participants were grouped by relationship to patient for analysis with paired 2-sample t tests. Before the operation, 60% of adult family members and 73% of children of patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery were obese. At 12 months after the operation, significant weight loss was observed in obese adult family members (from 234 to 226 lb; P = .01). There was a trend for obese children to have a lower body mass index than expected for their growth curve (31.2 expected vs 29.6 observed; P = .07). Family members increased their daily activity levels (adults, from 8 to 17 metabolic equivalent task-hours, P = .005; and children, from 13 to 22, P = .04). Adult family members also had improved eating habits with less uncontrollable eating (from 35 to 28; P = .01), emotional eating (from 36 to 28; P = .04), and alcohol consumption (from 11 drinks per month to 1 drink per month; P = .009). Gastric bypass surgery may render an additional benefit of weight loss

  16. Characterisation of candidate members of (136108) Haumea's family. II. Follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carry, B.; Snodgrass, C.; Lacerda, P.; Hainaut, O.; Dumas, C.

    2012-08-01

    Context. From a dynamical analysis of the orbital elements of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs), Ragozzine & Brown (2007, AJ, 134, 2160) reported a list of candidate members of the first collisional family found among this population, associated with (136 108) Haumea (a.k.a. 2003 EL61). Aims: We aim to distinguish the true members of the Haumea collisional family from interlopers. We search for water ice on their surfaces, which is a common characteristic of the known family members. The properties of the confirmed family are used to constrain the formation mechanism of Haumea, its satellites, and its family. Methods: Optical and near-infrared photometry is used to identify water ice. We use in particular the CH4 filter of the Hawk-I instrument at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope as a short H-band (HS), the (J - HS) colour being a sensitive measure of the water ice absorption band at 1.6 μm. Results: Continuing our previous study headed by Snodgrass, we report colours for 8 candidate family members, including near-infrared colours for 5. We confirm one object as a genuine member of the collisional family (2003 UZ117), and reject 5 others. The lack of infrared data for the two remaining objects prevent any conclusion from being drawn. The total number of rejected members is therefore 17. The 11 confirmed members represent only a third of the 36 candidates. Conclusions: The origin of Haumea's family is likely to be related to an impact event. However, a scenario explaining all the peculiarities of Haumea itself and its family remains elusive. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla & Paranal, Chile - 81.C-0544 & 82.C-0306 & 84.C-0594.

  17. The Many Faces of Military Families: Unique Features of the Lives of Female Service Members.

    PubMed

    Southwell, Kenona H; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley M

    2016-01-01

    Female service members' family structures differ from the traditional male service member-female spouse composition of military families. Consequently, this mixed-methods study reviewed demographic data, empirical evidence, and presented findings from secondary analyses of the 2010 wave of the Military Family Life Project regarding structural differences in male and female service members' families and perceptions and experiences of military spouses. In addition, to gain an understanding of the influence of women's service on their family functioning, we conducted in-depth telephone interviews with 20 civilian husbands residing in 11 states around the United States. Empirical evidence suggests service women had higher rates or remarriage and divorce than service men. Women were also more likely than men to be part of nontraditional family forms. Civilian husbands of female service members, however, reported lower marital satisfaction, less support from the community, and less satisfaction with the military lifestyle than military wives. Husbands' accounts indicated that their families experienced both benefits and challenges from wives' service. Integration in the military community and separation presented major challenges for women's families. Implications of benefits and challenges of women's service for their families are discussed.

  18. A qualitative study on communication between nursing students and the family members of patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2017-09-12

    When caring for a family as a unit, it is as crucial to communicate with the family members of a patient as it is with the patient. However, there is a lack of research on the views of nursing students on communicating with the family members of patients, and little has been mentioned in the nursing curriculum on this topic. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students' experiences of communicating with the family members of patients. A qualitative descriptive study. A total of 42 nursing students (21 undergraduate year-two students and 21 were master's year-one students) from one school of nursing in Hong Kong participated in in-depth individual interviews. Content analysis was adopted. The trustworthiness of this study was ensured by enhancing its credibility, confirmability, and dependability. Two main themes were discerned. The first, "inspirations gained from nursing student-family communication", included the following sub-themes: (a) responding to enquiries clearly, (b) avoiding sensitive topics, (c) listening to the patient's family, and (d) sharing one's own experiences. The second, "emotions aroused from nursing student-family communication", had the following sub-themes: (a) happiness, (b) anger, (c) sadness, and (d) anxiety. More studies on the perspectives of nursing students on communicating with family members should be conducted, to strengthen the contents and learning outcomes of nursing student-family communication in the existing nursing curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pneumonia care and the nursing home: a qualitative descriptive study of resident and family member perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chan Carusone, Soo; Loeb, Mark; Lohfeld, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    Background Nursing home residents are frequently sent to hospital for diagnostic tests or to receive acute health care services. These transfers are both costly and for some, associated with increased risks. Although improved technology allows long-term care facilities to deliver more complex health care on site, if this is to become a trend then residents and family members must see the value of such care. This qualitative study examined resident and family member perspectives on in situ care for pneumonia. Methods A qualitative descriptive study design was used. Participants were residents and family members of residents treated for pneumonia drawn from a larger randomized controlled trial of a clinical pathway to manage nursing home-acquired pneumonia on-site. A total of 14 in-depth interviews were conducted. Interview data were analyzed using the editing style, described by Miller and Crabtree, to identify key themes. Results Both residents and family members preferred that pneumonia be treated in the nursing home, where possible. They both felt that caring and attention are key aspects of care which are more easily accessible in the nursing home setting. However, residents felt that staff or doctors should make the decision whether to hospitalize them, whereas family members wanted to be consulted or involved in the decision-making process. Conclusion These findings suggest that interventions to reduce hospitalization of nursing home residents with pneumonia are consistent with resident and family member preferences. PMID:16430782

  20. FGFR Family Members Protein Expression as Prognostic Markers in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koole, Koos; Clausen, Martijn J A M; van Es, Robert J J; van Kempen, Pauline M W; Melchers, Lieuwe J; Koole, Ron; Langendijk, Johannes A; van Diest, Paul J; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Schuuring, Ed; Willems, Stefan M

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor family member proteins (FGFR1-4) have been identified as promising novel therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in a wide spectrum of solid tumors. The present study investigates the expression and prognostic value of four FGFR family member proteins in a large multicenter oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) cohort. Protein expression of FGFR1-4 was determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays containing 951 formalin-fixed paraffin embedded OCSCC and OPSCC tissues from the University Medical Center Utrecht and University Medical Center Groningen. Protein expression was correlated to overall survival using Cox regression models, and bootstrapping was performed as internal validation. FGFR proteins were highly expressed in 39-64 % of OCSCC and 63-79 % of OPSCC. Seventy-three percent (299/412) of OCSCC and 85 % (305/357) of OPSCC highly co-expressed two or more FGFR family member proteins. FGFR1 protein was more frequently highly expressed in human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative OPSCC than HPV-positive OPSCC (82 vs. 65 %; p = 0.008). Furthermore, protein expression of FGFR family members was not related to overall survival in OCSCC or OPSCC (p > 0.05). FGFR family members are frequently highly expressed in OCSCC and OPSCC. These FGFR family member proteins are therefore potential targets for novel therapies that are urgently required to improve survival of OCSCC and OPSCC patients.

  1. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The STS-101 crew gather during a meeting with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. From left, Mission Specialist Susan J. Helms, Commander James D. Halsell Jr., Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber, Pilot Scott J. Horowitz and Mission Specialists Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev, Jeffery N. Williams and James S. Voss. In the background is the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the pad. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  2. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A light-hearted moment during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. From left, Commander James D. Halsell Jr., Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber and Pilot Scott J. Horowitz. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  3. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-101 Mission Specialist Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev, a Russian cosmonaut, and his wife Vera Sergeevna Usacheva during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  4. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-101 Commander James D. Halsell Jr. waves as he stands with his wife Kathy during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  5. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-101 Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber and her husband Jerome Elkind during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  6. IQGAP Family Members in Yeast, Dictyostelium, and Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Katie B.

    2012-01-01

    IQGAPs are a family of scaffolding proteins with multiple domains, named for the IQ motifs and GTPase activating protein (GAP) related domains. Despite their GAP homology, IQGAP proteins act as effectors for GTP-bound GTPases of the Ras superfamily and do not stimulate GTP hydrolysis. IQGAPs are found in eukaryotic cells from yeast to human, and localize to actin-containing structures such as lamellipodia, membrane ruffles, cell-cell adhesions, phagocytic cups, and the actomyosin ring formed during cytokinesis. Mammalian IQGAPs also act as scaffolds for signaling pathways. IQGAPs perform their myriad functions through association with a large number of proteins including filamentous actin (F-actin), GTPases, calcium-binding proteins, microtubule binding proteins, kinases, and receptors. The focus of this paper is on recent studies describing new binding partners, mechanisms of regulation, and biochemical and physiological functions of IQGAPs in yeast, amoeba, and mammalian cells. PMID:22505937

  7. Coping with colorectal cancer: a qualitative exploration with patients and their family members.

    PubMed

    Asiedu, Gladys B; Eustace, Rosemary W; Eton, David T; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen

    2014-10-01

    Extensive family coping research has been conducted among breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma with lesser emphasis on the coping experiences of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and their family members. To examine ways in which patients and their family members cope with the diagnosis of CRC. A total of 73 participants (21 patients, 52 family members) from 23 families described their experiences during and after a CRC diagnosis, including their coping experiences with the diagnosis. Data from semi-structured interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. The data were analyzed utilizing content analysis with inductive coding methods. Eight major themes were identified: positive reframing, holding on to a sense of normalcy, religion and spirituality, joining a group, creating awareness of CRC, lifestyle change, seeking information and alternative treatments. Maintaining an emotional sense of normalcy through positive thinking, engaging in activities to take one's mind off the diagnosis and believing that there is a higher authority which has control over the diagnosis and life were vital for the patients and their family members. Patients and family members used similar coping strategies. Findings from this study have implications for understanding how families blend emotion-based and problem-focused coping strategies in the face of a CRC diagnosis. Further developing evidence-based interventions that target coping and well-being in cancer patients and extending them to family members is necessary and holds great promise for providers who care for patients with familial cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Experience and needs of family members of patients treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Tramm, Ralph; Ilic, Dragan; Murphy, Kerry; Sheldrake, Jayne; Pellegrino, Vincent; Hodgson, Carol

    2017-06-01

    To explore the experiences of family members of patients treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Sudden onset of an unexpected and severe illness is associated with an increased stress experience of family members. Only one study to date has explored the experience of family members of patients who are at high risk of dying and treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A qualitative descriptive research design was used. A total of 10 family members of patients treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were recruited through a convenient sampling approach. Data were collected using open-ended semi-structured interviews. A six-step process was applied to analyse the data thematically. Four criteria were employed to evaluate methodological rigour. Family members of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients experienced psychological distress and strain during and after admission. Five main themes (Going Downhill, Intensive Care Unit Stress and Stressors, Carousel of Roles, Today and Advice) were identified. These themes were explored from the four roles of the Carousel of Roles theme (decision-maker, carer, manager and recorder) that participants experienced. Nurses and other staff involved in the care of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients must pay attention to individual needs of the family and activate all available support systems to help them cope with stress and strain. An information and recommendation guide for families and staff caring for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients was developed and needs to be applied cautiously to the individual clinical setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Adaptive coping strategies of affected family members of a relative with substance misuse: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    McCann, Terence V; Lubman, Dan I

    2017-08-03

    To explore the coping strategies used by affected family members of a relative with substance misuse. Families play an important role in supporting a relative with substance misuse. However, the experience often has an adverse effect on their general well-being, the extent of which depends largely on their coping strategies. An interpretative phenomenological analysis study. Data were collected between January - December 2015. Semistructured, audio-recorded qualitative interviews were conducted with 31 affected family members. Three main themes and related subthemes were abstracted from the data illustrating how participants coped with their relative's substance misuse: (1) Seeking timely access to evidence-based information; (2) Enhancing personal coping strategies and (3) Accessing informal and formal support. Greater investment is needed in support services for affected family members, particularly in regional and rural areas. A wide range of accessible evidence-based information and informal and formal support, including telephone and online support, is needed to assist them to cope in this crucial support-giving role. Affected family members need to adopt a flexible set of coping strategies while supporting a relative with substance misuse. Family and friends, alcohol and other drug services, mental health nurses and other clinicians have a critical role providing emotional, instrumental and educational support to affected family members to enhance their adaptive coping strategies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Characterization of Members of the Legionellaceae Family by Automated Ribotyping

    PubMed Central

    Cordevant, Christophe; Tang, Jane S.; Cleland, David; Lange, Marc

    2003-01-01

    In order to implement a new and reliable method for characterizing different species of Legionella, a genetic fingerprinting study with an automated ribotyping system (RiboPrinter) was completed with members of this genus which were deposited at the American Type Culture Collection. The RiboPrinter examined the different patterns of EcoRI digestion fragments from the rRNA operons of 110 strains, representing 48 of the 49 described Legionella species as well as 70 serogroups of those species. Distinctive and consistent patterns were obtained for the type strains of the 48 species investigated. Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subsp. pascullei each generated a specific pattern, whereas L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila produced six different fingerprint patterns. No correlation seemed to exist between the ribotypes obtained and the 15 serotypes of L. pneumophila. For the other species, those with two known serogroups presented two distinctive patterns with the RiboPrinter with the exception of L. hackeliae and L. quinlivanii, which yielded only one pattern. We also encountered ribotypes for strains which were not identified to the species level. The ribotypes generated for these strains with the RiboPrinter did not match those generated for known type strains, suggesting the putative description of new serogroups or species. Although the automated system did not have sufficient discriminatory ability to serve as an epidemiological tool in a clinical setting, it appeared to be a powerful tool for general genomic analysis of the Legionella isolates (e.g., determination of new species) and assessment of the interrelationship among Legionella strains through the RiboPrinter database connection. PMID:12517822

  11. Bereavement Photography for Children: Program Development and Healthcare Professionals’ Response

    PubMed Central

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Blehart, Kathleen; Hochberg, Todd; James, Kristin; Frader, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Reports of in-hospital bereavement photography focus largely on stillborns and neonates. Empiric data regarding the implementation of bereavement photography in pediatrics beyond the neonatal period and the impact of such programs on healthcare professionals (HCPs) is lacking. We describe the implementation of a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) bereavement photography program and use questionnaire data from HCPs to describe HCPs’ reflections on the program and to identify program barriers. From July, 2007 through April, 2010 families of 59 (36%) of the 164 patients who died in the PICU participated in our bereavement photography program. Forty questionnaires from 29 HCPs caring for 39 participating patients/families indicated that families seemed grateful for the service (n=34, 85%) and that the program helped HCPs feel better about their role (n=30, 70%). Many HCPs disagreed that the program consumed too much of his/her time (n=34, 85%) and that the photographer made his/her job difficult (n=37, 92.5%). Qualitative analysis of responses to open ended questions revealed four categories: the program’s general value; positive aspects of the program; negative aspects of the program; and suggestions for improvements. Implementing bereavement photography in the PICU is feasible though some barriers exist. HCPs may benefit from such programs. PMID:24520925

  12. Marfan syndrome in a large family: response of family members to a screening programme.

    PubMed

    Bridges, A B; Faed, M; Boxer, M; Gray, J R; Bundy, C; Murray, A

    1992-02-01

    Reaction to medical, social, and genetic implications of Marfan syndrome was evaluated by means of two questionnaires, the first after various tests before discussion of the diagnosis, the second after full discussion of the patient's diagnosis. Thirty-seven members of a family known to be at risk for Marfan syndrome attended for both questionnaires. All patients claimed to be satisfied with the way they were informed of the results of screening; 41% of patients were more worried about their health and 48% were more worried about the future after diagnosis. Apart from 50% of the smokers reducing or stopping their intake of cigarettes there were only very minor changes in lifestyle over the first month despite the increased level of expressed anxiety. If a definitive screening test was available, 96% of patients claimed they would have chosen it, 45% felt it would have an influence on their future plans, and 78% would choose to use a method of prenatal diagnosis for Marfan syndrome if it were available.

  13. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi poses for photographers near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  14. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele enjoys a reunion with his wife near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  15. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Pilot Dominic Gorie enjoys a reunion with his wife, Wendy, near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  16. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Commander Kevin Kregel enjoys a reunion with his wife, Jeanne, near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  17. Leiomodins: larger members of the tropomodulin (Tmod) gene family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.; Fritz-Six, K. L.; Almenar-Queralt, A.; Fowler, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    The 64-kDa autoantigen D1 or 1D, first identified as a potential autoantigen in Graves' disease, is similar to the tropomodulin (Tmod) family of actin filament pointed end-capping proteins. A novel gene with significant similarity to the 64-kDa human autoantigen D1 has been cloned from both humans and mice, and the genomic sequences of both genes have been identified. These genes form a subfamily closely related to the Tmods and are here named the Leiomodins (Lmods). Both Lmod genes display a conserved intron-exon structure, as do three Tmod genes, but the intron-exon structure of the Lmods and the Tmods is divergent. mRNA expression analysis indicates that the gene formerly known as the 64-kDa autoantigen D1 is most highly expressed in a variety of human tissues that contain smooth muscle, earning it the name smooth muscle Leiomodin (SM-Lmod; HGMW-approved symbol LMOD1). Transcripts encoding the novel Lmod gene are present exclusively in fetal and adult heart and adult skeletal muscle, and it is here named cardiac Leiomodin (C-Lmod; HGMW-approved symbol LMOD2). Human C-Lmod is located near the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy locus CMH6 on human chromosome 7q3, potentially implicating it in this disease. Our data demonstrate that the Lmods are evolutionarily related and display tissue-specific patterns of expression distinct from, but overlapping with, the expression of Tmod isoforms. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi poses for photographers near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  19. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Pilot Dominic Gorie enjoys a reunion with his wife, Wendy, near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  20. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele enjoys a reunion with his wife near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.