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Sample records for beta chain gene

  1. Gene encoding the human beta-hexosaminidase beta chain: extensive homology of intron placement in the alpha- and beta-chain genes.

    PubMed Central

    Proia, R L

    1988-01-01

    Lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.52) is composed of two structurally similar chains, alpha and beta, that are the products of different genes. Mutations in either gene causing beta-hexosaminidase deficiency result in the lysosomal storage disease GM2-gangliosidosis. To enable the investigation of the molecular lesions in this disorder and to study the evolutionary relationship between the alpha and beta chains, the beta-chain gene was isolated, and its organization was characterized. The beta-chain coding region is divided into 14 exons distributed over approximately 40 kilobases of DNA. Comparison with the alpha-chain gene revealed that 12 of the 13 introns interrupt the coding regions at homologous positions. This extensive sharing of intron placement demonstrates that the alpha and beta chains evolved by way of the duplication of a common ancestor. PMID:2964638

  2. Genomic organization of the mouse T-cell receptor beta-chain gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, E; Barth, R K; Hood, L

    1987-01-01

    We have combined three different methods, deletion mapping of T-cell lines, field-inversion gel electrophoresis, and the restriction mapping of a cosmid clone, to construct a physical map of the murine T-cell receptor beta-chain gene family. We have mapped 19 variable (V beta) gene segments and the two clusters of diversity (D beta) and joining (J beta) gene segments and constant (C beta) genes. These members of the beta-chain gene family span approximately equal to 450 kilobases of DNA, excluding one potential gap in the DNA fragment alignments. Images PMID:3035555

  3. In vivo analysis of the murine beta-myosin heavy chain gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Rindt, H; Gulick, J; Knotts, S; Neumann, J; Robbins, J

    1993-03-05

    The 5' upstream region of the murine beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene has been isolated and tested for its ability to drive gene expression in transgenic mice. Three classes of transgenic mice were generated. The constructs contained approximately 5000, 2500, and 600 base pairs of beta-MHC upstream sequence fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene and were termed beta 5, beta 2.5, and beta .6, respectively. Muscle-specific expression was observed with all three constructs. However, only the beta 5 lines directed high levels of muscle-specific transgene expression in both pre- and postbirth mice. Expression driven by the two shorter constructs was two to three orders of magnitude lower when the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase specific activities were compared. These data suggest that a distal-positive element directs high levels of gene expression in the ventricle and in slow skeletal muscles. Analyses of transgene expression during heart maturation revealed that some of the beta 5 lines were not able to respond in an appropriate manner to developmental transcriptional cues. Unlike the endogenous beta-MHC gene, which is down regulated in the ventricles around the time of birth, reporter gene expression in the majority of the lines generated was not shut off in the ventricles of the adult animals. These data indicate that high levels of muscle-specific beta-MHC gene expression are dependent upon the combinatorial interactions of a number of sequence elements that are distributed over a large region of the gene's upstream sequence.

  4. Gene correction in the evolution of the T cell receptor beta chain

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Mutational mechanisms operating at the T cell receptor beta chain locus have been examined by comparison of the CT beta 1 and CT beta 2 gene sequences from Mus pahari, believed to be the oldest living species in the genus Mus, with those of inbred mice. Results indicate that a gene correction event independent of that suggested to have occurred in inbred mice has homogenized the M. pahari CT beta exon 1 sequences, minimizing diversity in this region of the molecule. These observations suggest that correction events such as gene conversion may occur frequently, even in pauci-gene families with as few as two members, and therefore play a significant role in gene diversification or homogenization of small as well as large gene families. PMID:3783089

  5. Physical mapping of the human T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) {beta}-chain gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yashim, Y.; So, A.K.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic variation of the TCR loci and their contribution to autoimmune diseases is poorly defined, in direct contrast to the clear examples of disease association with the Class I and II alleles of the major histocompatibility complex. We have therefore started to determine the gene organization and polymorphism of the TCR {beta} locus. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to construct a physical map of the germline human TCR {beta}-chain gene complex. Variable gene (V{beta}) sequences for the 25 known V{beta} subfamilies were amplified by PCR and were used as probes to screen a YAC library. Five positive YACs were identified. YACs designated B3, E11 and H11 of sizes 820, 400 and 600 kbp, respectively, were analyzed for their V{beta} content by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). YAC B3 was found to contain all 25 V{beta} subfamilies, E11 for 14 and H11 for 7. B3 was also positive for the constant region genes. Restriction enzyme mapping of B3 located V{beta} and C{beta} gene regions to four Sfi I fragments of 280, 110, 90 and 125 kbp, and was in accordance with published data. The data thus showed that YAC B3 encoded a complete and unrearranged TCR {beta}-gene locus. The map was further resolved by locating restriction sites for Sal I and Bssll II on B3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes localized B3 to chromosome 7q35. However, two additional signals were obtained: one attributable to V{beta} orphon cluster on chromosome 9q21; the second to the long arm of chromosome 2. PCR amplification of a chromosome 2 somatic cell hybrid using primers for all 25 V{beta} gene families revealed the signal was not attributable to a second orphon cluster. It is suggested that B3 is a chimeric YAC with an intact TCR {beta} locus flanked by chromosome 2 sequences. The determination of the TCR genomic organization will help extend studies of the role T-cells play in autoimmune diseases.

  6. In vivo regulation of the mouse beta myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Knotts, S; Rindt, H; Neumann, J; Robbins, J

    1994-12-09

    The interactions of trans-acting factors with their respective cis-acting elements in the 5' upstream region of the beta myosin heavy chain gene (MyHC) regulate its tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression. The role of three conserved elements, an MCAT or TEF-1 binding site, a C-rich region, and a beta e3 region, in muscle-specific gene expression was analyzed in vivo. Each cis-acting site was ablated in the context of the beta MyHC promoter, fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, and used to generate transgenic mice. In contrast to results obtained in vitro, the data demonstrate that mutating any one of these cis-acting elements does not affect the level or tissue specificity of transgene expression. Sequences upstream of -600 can functionally substitute for any one of these regulatory cassettes and are important both for high levels of expression as well as for controlled muscle specificity. Mutation of any two of the cis-acting elements also does not affect transgene expression. However, simultaneous mutation of the three sites significantly reduces expression, indicating that these conserved sequences do play an important role and that combinatorial interactions underlie the beta MyHC's regulation.

  7. Characterization of horse (Equus caballus) T-cell receptor beta chain genes

    SciTech Connect

    Schrenzel, M.D.; Watson, J.L.; Ferrick, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    Genes encoding the horse (Equus caballus) T-cell receptor beta chain (TCRB) were cloned and characterized. Of 33 cDNA clones isolated from the mesenteric lymph node, 30 had functionally rearranged gene segments, and three contained germline sequences. Sixteen unique variable segments (TCRBV), 14 joining genes (TCRBJ), and two constant region genes (TCRBC) were identified. Horse TCRBV were grouped into nine families based on similarity to human sequences. TCRBV2 and TCRBV12 were the most commonly represented horse families. Analysis of predicted protein structure revealed the presence of conserved regions similar to those seen in TCRB of other species. A decanucleotide promoter sequence homologous to those found in humans and mice was located in the 5{prime} untranslated region of one horse gene. Germline sequences included the 5{prime} region of the TCRBD2 gene with flanking heptamer/nonamer recombination signals and portions of the TCRBJ2-C2 intro. Southern blot hybridizations demonstrated restriction fragment length polymorphisms at the TCRBC locus among different horse breeds.

  8. Haplotyping the human T-cell receptor. beta. -chain gene complex by use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Charmley, P.; Chao, A.; Gatti, R.A. ); Concannon, P. ); Hood, L. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have studied the genetic segregation of human T-cell receptor {beta}-chain (TCR{beta}) genes on chromosome 7q in 40 CEPH (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) families by using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). They constructed haplotypes from eight RFLPs by using variable- and constant-region cDNA probes, which detect polymorphisms that span more than 600 kilobases of the TCR{beta} gene complex. Analysis of allele distributions between TCR{beta} genes revealed significant linkage disequilibrium between only 6 of the 28 different pairs of RFLPs. This linkage disequilibrium strongly influences the most efficient order to proceed for typing of these RFLPs in order to achieve maximum genetic informativeness, which in this study revealed a 97.3% level of heterozygosity within the TCR{beta} gene complex. The results should provide new insight into recent reports of disease associations with the TCR{beta} gene complex and should assist in designing future experiments to detect or confirm the existence of disease-susceptibility loci in this region of the human genome.

  9. Segregation of cardiac and skeletal muscle-specific regulatory elements of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rindt, H; Knotts, S; Robbins, J

    1995-01-01

    The beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MyHC) gene is expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscles. To examine the regulatory sequences that are required for the gene's expression in the two compartments in vivo, we analyzed the expression pattern of a transgene consisting of the beta-MyHC gene 5' upstream region linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. By using 5600 bp of 5' upstream region, the transgene was expressed at high levels in the slow skeletal muscles. Decreased levels of thyroid hormone led to the up-regulation of the transgene in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, mimicking the behavior of the endogenous beta-MyHC gene. After deleting the distal 5000 bp, the level of reporter gene expression was strongly reduced. However, decreased levels of thyroid hormone led to an 80-fold skeletal muscle-specific increase in transgene expression, even upon the ablation of a conserved cis-regulatory element termed MCAT, which under normal (euthyroid) conditions abolishes muscle-specific expression. In contrast, cardiac-specific induction was not detected with the deletion construct. These observations indicate that the cardiac and skeletal muscle regulatory elements can be functionally segregated on the beta-MyHC gene promoter. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7878016

  10. Segregation of cardiac and skeletal muscle-specific regulatory elements of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Rindt, H; Knotts, S; Robbins, J

    1995-02-28

    The beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MyHC) gene is expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscles. To examine the regulatory sequences that are required for the gene's expression in the two compartments in vivo, we analyzed the expression pattern of a transgene consisting of the beta-MyHC gene 5' upstream region linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. By using 5600 bp of 5' upstream region, the transgene was expressed at high levels in the slow skeletal muscles. Decreased levels of thyroid hormone led to the up-regulation of the transgene in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, mimicking the behavior of the endogenous beta-MyHC gene. After deleting the distal 5000 bp, the level of reporter gene expression was strongly reduced. However, decreased levels of thyroid hormone led to an 80-fold skeletal muscle-specific increase in transgene expression, even upon the ablation of a conserved cis-regulatory element termed MCAT, which under normal (euthyroid) conditions abolishes muscle-specific expression. In contrast, cardiac-specific induction was not detected with the deletion construct. These observations indicate that the cardiac and skeletal muscle regulatory elements can be functionally segregated on the beta-MyHC gene promoter.

  11. Provocative pattern of rearrangements of the genes for the. gamma. and. beta. chains of the T-cell receptor in human leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Goorha, R.; Bunin, N.; Mirro, J. Jr.; Murphy, S.B.; Cross, A.H.; Behm, F.G.; Quertermous, T.; Seidman, J.; Kitchingman, G.R.

    1987-07-01

    To examine the distribution of rearrangements of the ..gamma..- and ..beta..-chain T-cell receptor (TCR) genes in T- and non-T acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs), and potentially to determine which genes rearrange first in ontogeny, the authors analyzed high molecular weight DNA from 102 patients with acute leukemia. Rearranged ..gamma..- and ..beta..-chain genes were found in all T-cell ALLs (22/22) examined. Overall, 27% (18/66) of B-lineage ALLs had ..beta..-chain gene rearrangements, and 41% (24/58) had ..gamma..-chain gene rearrangements, but the distribution of rearranged genes varied according to the stage of B-cell differentiation. The ..gamma..-chain genes were rearranged in 11% (1/9) of the B-lineage patients negative for the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (cALLA) and 50% (23/46) of cALLA/sup -/= ALL patients, while the ..beta..-chain genes were not rearranged in any of the 7 cALLA/sup -/ ALL patients examined but were rearranged in 32% (18/56) of the cALLA/sup +/ patients. Of the 44 cALLA/sup +/ patients in which a direct comparison of ..gamma..- and ..beta..-chain gene rearrangements could be made, 34% had both genes rearranged, 16% had only ..gamma..-chain gene rearrangements, and the remaining 50% had both genes in the germ-line configuration. ..beta..-Chain rearrangements have not been found in the absence of ..gamma..-chain rearrangements, thus supporting a proposed hierarchy of TCR gene rearrangements.

  12. Association study of schizophrenia and IL-2 receptor {beta} chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Nimgaonkar, V.L.; Yang, Z.W.; Zhang, X.R.; Brar, J.S.

    1995-10-09

    A case-control association study was conducted in Caucasian patients with schizophrenia (DSM-III-R, n = 42) and unaffected controls (n = 47) matched for ethnicity and area of residence. Serum interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) concentrations, as well as a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the IL-2RP chain gene, were examined in both groups. No significant differences in IL-2R concentrations or in the distribution of the polymorphism were noted. This study does not support an association between schizophrenia and the IL-2RP gene locus, contrary to the suggestive evidence from linkage analysis in multicase families. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Provocative pattern of rearrangements of the genes for the gamma and beta chains of the T-cell receptor in human leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Goorha, R; Bunin, N; Mirro, J; Murphy, S B; Cross, A H; Behm, F G; Quertermous, T; Seidman, J; Kitchingman, G R

    1987-01-01

    To examine the distribution of rearrangements of the gamma- and beta-chain T-cell receptor (TCR) genes in T- and non-T acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs), and potentially to determine which genes rearrange first in ontogeny, we analyzed high molecular weight DNA from 102 patients with acute leukemia. Rearranged gamma- and beta-chain genes were found in all T-cell ALLs (22/22) examined. Overall, 27% (18/66) of B-lineage ALLs had beta-chain gene rearrangements, and 41% (24/58) had gamma-chain gene rearrangements, but the distribution of rearranged genes varied according to the stage of B-cell differentiation. The gamma-chain genes were rearranged in 11% (1/9) of the B-lineage patients negative for the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (cALLA) and 50% (23/46) of cALLA+ ALL patients, while the beta-chain genes were not rearranged in any of the 7 cALLA- ALL patients examined but were rearranged in 32% (18/56) of the cALLA+ patients. Neither TCR gene was found to be rearranged in acute nonlymphoid leukemia patients (0/12) or in patients with B-cell (surface immunoglobulin-positive) leukemia (0/3). Of the 44 cALLA+ patients in which a direct comparison of gamma- and beta-chain gene rearrangements could be made, 34% had both genes rearranged, 16% had only gamma-chain gene rearrangements, and the remaining 50% had both genes in the germ-line configuration. beta-Chain rearrangements have not been found in the absence of gamma-chain rearrangements, thus supporting a proposed hierarchy of TCR gene rearrangements. A provocative finding was that only a small percentage (11%) of the patients with cALLA- B precursor cell ALLs had rearranged TCR genes, while 50% of the cALLA+ leukemia patients had at least gamma-chain rearrangement, raising a question as to whether indeed cALLA- cells are precursors to cALLA+ cells. Interestingly, 18% (2/11) of the cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg)-positive cALLA+ (pre-B) ALLs involved TCR gene rearrangements, compared to 60% (21/35) of

  14. Analysis of T cell antigen receptor (TCR) expression by human peripheral blood CD4-8- alpha/beta T cells demonstrates preferential use of several V beta genes and an invariant TCR alpha chain

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    CD4-CD8- (double negative [DN]) alpha/beta T cells are a largely uncharacterized subpopulation of unknown function. To investigate whether these cells are selected to recognize particular antigens or antigen-presenting molecules, DN alpha/beta T cells were purified from the peripheral blood of five normal donors and their T cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta chains were examined. Random cloning of TCR alpha chains by single-sided polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification identified an invariant rearrangement between V alpha 24 and J alpha Q, with no N region diversity, which was expressed preferentially by DN alpha/beta T cells from all donors. Random cloning also identified a precise V alpha 7.2-J alpha (IGRJa14) rearrangement, with two variable amino acids encoded in the V-J junction, which was enriched in the DN alpha/beta T cell preparations from some, but not all, donors. Analysis of TCR beta chains by quantitative PCR amplification demonstrated that the expression of four V beta gene families, V beta 2, 8, 11, and 13, was markedly increased in these DN alpha/beta T cell preparations. The expression of particular TCRs by DN alpha/beta T cells from multiple donors indicates that these cells, or at least a subpopulation of cells with this phenotype, recognize a limited spectrum of antigens and suggests that they may use nonpolymorphic antigen-presenting molecules. PMID:8391057

  15. Cloning of the {beta}3 chain gene (LAMB3) of human laminin 5, a candidate gene in junctional epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect

    Pulkkinen, L.; Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J.

    1995-01-01

    Laminin 5 consists of three polypeptides, {alpha}3, {beta}3, and {gamma}2, encoded by the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2, respectively. In this study, we have elucidated the exon-intron organization of the human LAMB3 gene. Characterization of five overlapping {lambda} phage DNA clones revealed that the gene was approximately 29 kb in size. Subsequent sequence data revealed that the gene consisted of 23 exons that varied from 64 to 379 bp in size, accounting for the full-length cDNA with an open reading frame of 3516 hp encoding 1172 amino acids. Comparison of the LAMB3 gene structure with the previously characterized LAMB1 gene revealed that LAMB3 was considerably more compact. Knowledge of the exon-intron organization of the LAMB3 gene will facilitate elucidation of mutations in patients with the junctional forms of epidermolysis bullosa, some of which have been associated with mutations in the laminin 5 genes. 33 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Microsatellite haplotyping and identification of a hot spot for mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Dausse, E; Komajda, M; Fetler, L; Dubourg, O; Dufour, C; Carrier, L; Wisnewsky, C; Bercovici, J; Hengstenberg, C; al-Mahdawi, S

    1993-12-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. The first identified disease gene, located on chromosome 14q11-q12, encodes the beta-myosin heavy chain. We have performed linkage analysis of two French FHC pedigrees, 720 and 730, with two microsatellite markers located in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYO I and MYO II) and with four highly informative markers, recently mapped to chromosome 14q11-q12. Significant linkage was found with MYO I and MYO II in pedigree 720, but results were not conclusive for pedigree 730. Haplotype analysis of the six markers allowed identification of affected individuals and of some unaffected subjects carrying the disease gene. Two novel missense mutations were identified in exon 13 by direct sequencing, 403Arg-->Leu and 403Arg-->Trp in families 720 and 730, respectively. The 403Arg-->Leu mutation was associated with incomplete penetrance, a high incidence of sudden deaths and severe cardiac events, whereas the consequences of the 403Arg-->Trp mutation appeared less severe. Haplotyping of polymorphic markers in close linkage to the beta-myosin heavy chain gene can, thus, provide rapid analysis of non informative pedigrees and rapid detection of carrier status. Our results also indicate that codon 403 of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene is a hot spot for mutations causing FHC.

  17. Interaction between T cell receptor beta chain and immunoglobulin heavy chain region genes in susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Field, L L; Stephure, D K; McArthur, R G

    1991-09-01

    Despite some reports of an association between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and a BglII RFLP in the T cell receptor beta chain (TCRB) constant region, results of several recent studies, including our own, have failed to support such an association. However, we here report evidence for an IDDM-TCRB relationship which is dependent on immunoglobulin heavy-chain-region genes. We analyzed 198 unrelated diabetics and 84 normal siblings (maximum one sibling per diabetic) typed for the BglII TCRB RFLP and Gm immunoglobulin allotypes Glm(1), Glm(2), G2m(23), and G3m(5), which identify the four common Gm haplotypes. The BglIII TCRB genotype frequencies were significantly different between diabetics positive and negative for G2m(23) (P = .017) and G3m(5) (P = .021) but were not different between normal siblings positive and negative for those allotypes (P = .94 and P = .77, respectively). Thus, there were significant interactions between TCRB, Gm, and IDDM for two of the four immunoglobulin allotypes examined. We have previously reported interactions between HLA, Gm (particularly G2m(23)), and IDDM and postulate that the TCRB-Gm-IDDM and HLA-Gm-IDDM interaction effects may be functionally related.

  18. Sequences 5' of the basement membrane laminin beta 1 chain gene (LAMB1) direct the expression of beta-galactosidase during development of the mouse testis and ovary.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Gudas, L J

    1997-12-01

    The murine LAMB1 gene encoding laminin beta 1 is expressed in the developing male and female gonads and mesonephros. To identify the cis-acting elements regulating the expression of LAMB1, murine transgenic lines were generated by fusing regions of the LAMB1 gene to the Eschericia coli lacZ gene. The p3.9LAM beta gal construct contained approximately 4 kb of 5' flanking sequence and directed beta-galactosidase expression in many different organs including the kidney, mammary gland, and the male and female genital systems, the focus of this report. In male embryos, between gestational ages E 14.5 and birth beta-galactosidase was transiently expressed in the prospermatogonia cells of the testis and in the differentiating epithelial cells in the ductus deferens, ductus epididymis, and seminal vesicles. In female embryos, beta-galactosidase was not detected in the ovary until about 1 week after birth; at this time, beta-galactosidase was expressed by oocytes of primary and secondary follicles. In contrast, transgenic mice carrying the first 0.7 kb of LAMB1 fused to the lacZ gene expressed beta-galactosidase only in the prospermatogonia cells of the testis. Thus, the cis-acting element(s) necessary for the expression of the LAMB1 gene in prospermatogonia cells are located in the first 0.7 kb of LAMB1 5' flanking sequence; element(s) required for expression of the LAMB1 gene in oocytes and epithelial cells of the mesonephric ducts, mesonephric tubules, the ductus deferens, ductus epididymis, and seminal vesicles are located with 4 kb 5' of the transcription initiation site.

  19. In vivo regulation of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene in soleus muscle of suspended and weight-bearing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giger, J. M.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    In the weight-bearing hindlimb soleus muscle of the rat, approximately 90% of muscle fibers express the beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC) isoform protein. Hindlimb suspension (HS) causes the MHC isoform population to shift from beta toward the fast MHC isoforms. Our aim was to establish a model to test the hypothesis that this shift in expression is transcriptionally regulated through specific cis elements of the beta-MHC promoter. With the use of a direct gene transfer approach, we determined the activity of different length beta-MHC promoter fragments, linked to a firefly luciferase reporter gene, in soleus muscle of control and HS rats. In weight-bearing rats, the relative luciferase activity of the longest beta-promoter fragment (-3500 bp) was threefold higher than the shorter promoter constructs, which suggests that an enhancer sequence is present in the upstream promoter region. After 1 wk of HS, the reporter activities of the -3500-, -914-, and -408-bp promoter constructs were significantly reduced ( approximately 40%), compared with the control muscles. However, using the -215-bp construct, no differences in promoter activity were observed between HS and control muscles, which indicates that the response to HS in the rodent appears to be regulated within the -408 and -215 bp of the promoter.

  20. Human beta-hexosaminidase alpha chain: coding sequence and homology with the beta chain.

    PubMed Central

    Myerowitz, R; Piekarz, R; Neufeld, E F; Shows, T B; Suzuki, K

    1985-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone, p beta H alpha-5, from an adult human liver library that contains the entire coding sequence of the alpha chain of beta-hexosaminidase. The cDNA insert of p beta H alpha-5 is 1944 base pairs long and contains a 168-base-pair 5' untranslated region, a 186-base-pair 3' untranslated region, and an open reading frame of 1587 base pairs corresponding to 529 amino acids (Mr, 60,697). The first 17-22 amino acids satisfy the requirements of a signal sequence. A striking sequence homology with a published partial amino acid sequence for the beta chain [O'Dowd, B. F., Quan, F., Willard, H. F., Lamhonwah, A. M., Korneluk, R. G., Lowden, J. A., Gravel, R. A. & Mahuran, D. J. (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 1184-1188] suggests that both chains may have evolved from a common ancestor. A shorter alpha-chain cDNA was found to hybridize to the long arm of chromosome 15, the known location for the alpha-chain gene. In addition, we isolated another alpha-chain cDNA clone, p beta H alpha-4, from a simian virus 40-transformed human fibroblast library that contained an extra 453-base-pair piece at its 3' end. A probe consisting of this additional sequence hybridized exclusively to a single mRNA species (2.6 kilobases) in mRNA preparations from cultured human fibroblasts. In contrast, p beta H alpha-5 hybridized to both a 2.1-kilobase major and a 2.6-kilobase minor mRNA species in these same mRNA preparations, indicating the presence of two distinct alpha-chain mRNA species differing at the 3' end. Fibroblasts from an Ashkenazi Jewish patient with classic Tay-Sachs disease were deficient in both species of mRNA, confirming their genetic relationship. Images PMID:2933746

  1. Identification of an immunodominant region on the I-A beta chain using site-directed mutagenesis and DNA-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    To identify which polymorphic residues determine the allospecific antibody binding sites on A beta polypeptides, mutant Ak beta genes were constructed encoding single or multiple amino acids of the d allele at 14 polymorphic positions in the beta 1 domain. Cell lines expressing these genes were analyzed by quantitative immunofluorescence using 16 mAbs reactive to Ak beta or Ad beta. Substitution of d allele residues at positions 63 and 65-67 in the Ak beta polypeptide resulted in the loss of binding of all Ak beta-reactive antibodies and the gain of binding of most Ad beta-reactive antibodies. Two Ad beta-reactive mAbs bound to the mutant Ak beta polypeptide containing d allele- characteristic residue at position 40. In contrast, substitution of the other polymorphic residues in the NH2-terminal and COOH-terminal regions of the beta 1 domain did not alter antibody binding. PMID:2450160

  2. Position independent expression and developmental regulation is directed by the beta myosin heavy chain gene's 5' upstream region in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Knotts, S; Rindt, H; Robbins, J

    1995-08-25

    Transgenic mice generated with constructs containing 5.6 kb of the beta myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene's 5' flanking region linked to the cat reporter gene express the transgene at high levels. In all 47 lines analyzed, tissue-specific accumulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was found at levels proportional to the number of integrated transgene copies. Deletion constructs containing only 0.6 kb of 5' upstream region showed position effects in transgenic mice and did not demonstrate copy number dependence although transgene expression remained muscle-specific. The 5.6 kb 5' upstream region conferred appropriate developmental control of the transgene to the cardiac compartment and directs copy number dependent and position independent expression. Lines generated with a construct in which three proximal cis-acting elements were mutated showed reduced levels of transgene expression, but all maintained their position independence and copy number dependence, suggesting the presence of distinct regulatory mechanisms.

  3. Position independent expression and developmental regulation is directed by the beta myosin heavy chain gene's 5' upstream region in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Knotts, S; Rindt, H; Robbins, J

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic mice generated with constructs containing 5.6 kb of the beta myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene's 5' flanking region linked to the cat reporter gene express the transgene at high levels. In all 47 lines analyzed, tissue-specific accumulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was found at levels proportional to the number of integrated transgene copies. Deletion constructs containing only 0.6 kb of 5' upstream region showed position effects in transgenic mice and did not demonstrate copy number dependence although transgene expression remained muscle-specific. The 5.6 kb 5' upstream region conferred appropriate developmental control of the transgene to the cardiac compartment and directs copy number dependent and position independent expression. Lines generated with a construct in which three proximal cis-acting elements were mutated showed reduced levels of transgene expression, but all maintained their position independence and copy number dependence, suggesting the presence of distinct regulatory mechanisms. Images PMID:7667107

  4. Conserved structure of amphibian T-cell antigen receptor beta chain.

    PubMed Central

    Fellah, J S; Kerfourn, F; Guillet, F; Charlemagne, J

    1993-01-01

    All jawed vertebrates possess well-differentiated thymuses and elicit T-cell-like cell-mediated responses; however, no surface T-cell receptor (TCR) molecules or TCR genes have been identified in ectothermic vertebrate species. Here we describe cDNA clones from an amphibian species, Ambystoma mexicanum (the Mexican axolotl), that have sequences highly homologous to the avian and mammalian TCR beta chains. The cloned amphibian beta chain variable region (V beta) shares most of the structural characteristics with the more evolved vertebrate V beta and presents approximately 56% amino acid identities with the murine V beta 14 and human V beta 18 families. The two different cloned axolotl beta chain joining regions (J beta) were found to have conserved all the invariant mammalian J beta residues, and in addition, the presence of a conserved glycine at the V beta-J beta junction suggests the existence of diversity elements. The extracellular domains of the two axolotl beta chain constant region isotypes C beta 1 and C beta 2 show an impressively high degree of identity, thus suggesting that a very efficient mechanism of gene correction has been in operation to preserve this structure at least from the early tetrapod evolution. The transmembrane axolotl C beta domains have been less well conserved when compared to the mammalian C beta but they do maintain the lysine residue that is thought to be involved in the charged interaction between the TCR alpha beta heterodimer and the CD3 complex. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8341702

  5. DNA segment containing C/sub. beta. 1/, a gene for the constant region of the. beta. chain of the T-cell antigen receptor, was inserted into chromosome 6 in cells from one patients with human T-cell leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Ino, T.; Kurosawa, Y.; Yoshida, M.C.; Hirano, M.

    1987-06-01

    DNA rearrangements that occurred in the vicinity of T-cell antigen receptor ..beta..-chain gene clusters residing on chromosome 7 were examined in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In one patient, it was observed that, for the T-cell receptor ..beta..-chain genes, a D/sub ..beta.. 1/-J/sub ..beta..2.3/ (where D is diversity and J is joining) junction was found on one chromosome, while the other chromosome kept the germ-line configuration. If this D/sub ..beta../-J/sub ..beta../ junction was formed by the customary deletion mechanism, the C/sub ..beta..1/ gene (where C is constant) located between the D/sub ..beta..1/ and J/sub BETA2.3/ loci should have disappeared from this chromosome. The C/sub ..beta..1/ gene indeed was absent from the rearranged chromosome 7, but it was found on chromosome 6 as an inserted segment. The implications of the observations are discussed.

  6. Search for genetic variants in the retinoid X receptor-gamma-gene by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone without mutations in thyroid hormone receptor beta gene.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Stefano; Menzaghi, Claudia; Bruno, Rocco; Sentinelli, Federica; Fallarino, Mara; Fioretti, Francesca; Filetti, Sebastiano; Balsamo, Armando; Di Mario, Umberto; Baroni, Marco G

    2004-05-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is an inherited disease characterized by reduced tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormone. Approximately 90% of subjects with RTH have mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRbeta) gene. Approximately 10% of subjects diagnosed as having RTH do not carry mutation in the TRbeta gene. A possible linkage was reported with the retinoid X receptor-gamma (RXR-gamma) gene in two families. The aim of this study is to search for mutation within the RXR-gamma gene in unrelated subjects with diagnosed RTH without mutations in the TRbeta gene. Four subjects with RTH were studied, and sequence variants in the RXR-gamma gene were searched by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). Analysis of all the 10 exons of the RXR-gamma gene, including intron-exon boundaries, promoter region and 3' untranslated region (UTR) reveled two variant bands in subjects II and III. Sequencing of these variants showed two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): 447C > T in exon 3 for patients II and IVS9 + 6A > G for patient III. Both SNPs were also present at high frequency in a group of normal subjects and in nonaffected relatives of subject III. In conclusion, in patients with RTH we have found two SNPs in the RXR-gamma gene; these SNPS are common in the general population, thus excluding a role for the RXR-gamma gene in these patients.

  7. A phorbol ester response element within the human T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, H M; Wotton, D; Gegonne, A; Ghysdael, J; Wang, S; Speck, N A; Owen, M J

    1992-01-01

    The activity of the T-cell receptor beta-chain gene enhancer is increased by activators of the protein kinase C pathway during T-cell activation. Analysis of mutant enhancer constructs identified two elements, beta E2 and beta E3, conferring phorbol ester inducibility. Multimerized beta E2 acted in isolation as a phorbol ester-responsive element. Both beta E2 and beta E3, which contain a consensus Ets-binding site, were shown to bind directly to the product of the c-ets-1 protooncogene. Both regions also bound a second factor, core-binding factor. Mutation of the beta E2 Ets site abolished the inducibility of the beta E2 multimer. beta E2 and beta E3 Ets site mutations also profoundly affected activity and inducibility of the enhancer. In contrast, enhancer activity but not its inducibility was affected by mutation of the beta E2 core-binding factor site. Cotransfection studies showed that Ets-1 specifically repressed activity of the multimerized beta E2 element and the complete T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer. These data show that the T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer responds to protein kinase C-mediated activation signals via a functional domain, composed of two elements, which contains binding sites for Ets transcription factors and which is negatively regulated by Ets-1. Images PMID:1409722

  8. Isolation of chicken major histocompatibility complex class II (B-L) beta chain sequences: comparison with mammalian beta chains and expression in lymphoid organs.

    PubMed Central

    Bourlet, Y; Béhar, G; Guillemot, F; Fréchin, N; Billault, A; Chaussé, A M; Zoorob, R; Auffray, C

    1988-01-01

    By cross-hybridization in low stringency conditions, using a probe derived from an HLA-DQ beta cDNA clone, we have isolated several chicken genomic DNA clones. These clones were mapped to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of the chick (B complex) by virtue of their ability to detect restriction enzyme length polymorphisms between congenic lines of chicken. Evidence was obtained for the presence of at least three B-L beta genes in the chicken genome. The B-L beta genes are transcribed specifically in tissues containing cells of the B lymphocyte and myeloid lineages and expressing the B-L antigens. Exons encoding the beta 1, beta 2 and transmembrane domains of a B-L beta chain have been identified with 63, 66 and 62% similarity with the HLA-DQ beta sequence. This first isolation of an MHC class II gene outside of the mammalian class provides insight into the evolution of MHC genes based on the comparison of avian and mammalian class II beta chain amino acid and nucleotide sequences. Images PMID:2841107

  9. Chicken T-cell receptor beta-chain diversity: an evolutionarily conserved D beta-encoded glycine turn within the hypervariable CDR3 domain.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, W T; Tjoelker, L W; Stella, G; Postema, C E; Thompson, C B

    1991-01-01

    Unlike mammals, chickens generate an immunoglobulin (Ig) repertoire by a developmentally regulated process of intrachromosomal gene conversion, which results in nucleotide substitutions throughout the variable regions of the Ig heavy- and light-chain genes. In contrast to chicken Ig genes, we show in this report that diversity of the rearranged chicken T-cell receptor (TCR) beta-chain gene is generated by junctional heterogeneity, as observed in rearranged mammalian TCR genes. This junctional diversity increases during chicken development as a result of an increasing base-pair addition at the V beta-D beta and D beta-J beta joints (where V, D, and J are the variable, diversity, and joining gene segments). Despite the junctional hypervariability, however, almost all functional V beta-D beta-J beta junctions appear to encode a glycine-containing beta-turn. Such a turn may serve to position the amino acid side chains of a hypervariable TCR beta-chain loop with respect to the antigen-binding groove of the major histocompatibility complex molecule. Consistent with this hypothesis, the germ-line D beta nucleotide sequences of chickens, mice, rabbits, and humans have been highly conserved and encode a glycine in all three reading frames. Images PMID:1652759

  10. Maple syrup urine disease. Complete primary structure of the E1 beta subunit of human branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex deduced from the nucleotide sequence and a gene analysis of patients with this disease.

    PubMed Central

    Nobukuni, Y; Mitsubuchi, H; Endo, F; Akaboshi, I; Asaka, J; Matsuda, I

    1990-01-01

    A defect in the E1 beta subunit of the branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex is one cause of maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). In an attempt to elucidate the molecular basis of MSUD, we isolated and characterized a 1.35 kbp cDNA clone encoding the entire precursor of the E1 beta subunit of BCKDH complex from a human placental cDNA library. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the isolated cDNA clone (lambda hBE1 beta-1) contained a 5'-untranslated sequence of four nucleotides, the translated sequence of 1,176 nucleotides and the 3'-untranslated sequence of 169 nucleotides. Comparison of the amino acid sequence predicted from the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA insert of the clone with the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified mature bovine BCKDH-E1 beta subunit showed that the cDNA insert encodes for a 342-amino acid subunit with a Mr = 37,585. The subunit is synthesized as the precursor with a leader sequence of 50 amino acids and is processed at the NH2 terminus. A search for protein homology revealed that the primary structure of human BCKDH-E1 beta was similar to the bovine BCKDH-E1 beta and to the E1 beta subunit of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, in all regions. The structures and functions of mammalian alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes are apparently highly conserved. Genomic DNA from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from normal and five MSUD patients, in whom E1 beta was not detected by immunoblot analysis, gave the same restriction maps on Southern blot analysis. The gene has at least 80 kbp. Images PMID:2365818

  11. MicroRNA-27a Regulates Beta Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression by Targeting Thyroid Hormone Receptor β1 in Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hitoo; Ono, Koh; Horie, Takahiro; Nagao, Kazuya; Kinoshita, Minako; Kuwabara, Yasuhide; Watanabe, Shin; Takaya, Tomohide; Tamaki, Yodo; Takanabe-Mori, Rieko; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding RNAs, are negative regulators of gene expression and play important roles in gene regulation in the heart. To examine the role of miRNAs in the expression of the two isoforms of the cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, α- and β-MHC, which regulate cardiac contractility, endogenous miRNAs were downregulated in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) using lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Dicer, an essential enzyme for miRNA biosynthesis, and MHC expression levels were examined. As a result, Dicer siRNA could downregulate endogenous miRNAs simultaneously and the β-MHC gene but not α-MHC, which implied that specific miRNAs could upregulate the β-MHC gene. Among 19 selected miRNAs, miR-27a was found to most strongly upregulate the β-MHC gene but not α-MHC. Moreover, β-MHC protein was downregulated by silencing of endogenous miR-27a. Through a bioinformatics screening using TargetScan, we identified thyroid hormone receptor β1 (TRβ1), which negatively regulates β-MHC transcription, as a target of miR-27a. Moreover, miR-27a was demonstrated to modulate β-MHC gene regulation via thyroid hormone signaling and to be upregulated during the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells or in hypertrophic hearts in association with β-MHC gene upregulation. These findings suggested that miR-27a regulates β-MHC gene expression by targeting TRβ1 in cardiomyocytes. PMID:21149577

  12. Energetic, Structural, and Antimicrobial Analyses of [beta]-Lactam Side Chain Recognition by [beta]-Lactamases

    SciTech Connect

    Caselli, E.; Powers, R.A.; Blaszczak, L.C.; Wu, C.Y.E.; Prati, F.; Shoichet, B.K.

    2010-03-05

    Penicillins and cephalosporins are among the most widely used and successful antibiotics. The emergence of resistance to these {beta}-lactams, most often through bacterial expression of {beta}-lactamases, threatens public health. To understand how {beta}-lactamases recognize their substrates, it would be helpful to know their binding energies. Unfortunately, these have been difficult to measure because {beta}-lactams form covalent adducts with {beta}-lactamases. This has complicated functional analyses and inhibitor design. To investigate the contribution to interaction energy of the key amide (R1) side chain of {beta}-lactam antibiotics, eight acylglycineboronic acids that bear the side chains of characteristic penicillins and cephalosporins, as well as four other analogs, were synthesized. These transition-state analogs form reversible adducts with serine {beta}-lactamases. Therefore, binding energies can be calculated directly from K{sub i} values. The K{sub i} values measured span four orders of magnitude against the Group I {beta}-lactamase AmpC and three orders of magnitude against the Group II {beta}-lactamase TEM-1. The acylglycineboronic acids have K{sub i} values as low as 20 nM against AmpC and as low as 390 nM against TEM-1. The inhibitors showed little activity against serine proteases, such as chymotrypsin. R1 side chains characteristic of {beta}-lactam inhibitors did not have better affinity for AmpC than did side chains characteristic of {beta}-lactam substrates. Two of the inhibitors reversed the resistance of pathogenic bacteria to {beta}-lactams in cell culture. Structures of two inhibitors in their complexes with AmpC were determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.90 {angstrom} and 1.75 {angstrom} resolution; these structures suggest interactions that are important to the affinity of the inhibitors. Acylglycineboronic acids allow us to begin to dissect interaction energies between {beta}-lactam side chains and {beta}-lactamases. Surprisingly

  13. Two new beta-chain variants: Hb Tripoli [beta26(B8)Glu-->Ala] and Hb Tizi-Ouzou [beta29(B11)Gly-->Ser].

    PubMed

    Lacan, Philippe; Becchi, Michel; Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Aubry, Martine; Ffrench, Martine; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2004-08-01

    Two new beta-globin chain variants: Hb Tripoli: codon 26, GAG-->GCG [beta26(B8)Glu-->Ala] and Hb Tizi-Ouzou: codon 29, GGC-->AGC [beta29(B11)Gly-->Ser] are described on the first exon of the beta-globin gene. The two variants are characterized by DNA sequencing and mass spectrometry (MS). Hematological abnormalities were found in the two carriers. The presence of microcytosis and hypochromia is explained by an additional homozygous 3.7 kb alpha(+) thalassemic deletion for the carrier of Hb Tizi-Ouzou. Hb Tizi-Ouzou showed a slight instability in vitro. The same hematological abnormalities associated with anemia are difficult to explain for Hb Tripoli's carrier in the absence of an alpha-globin genes abnormality and could suggest a possible abnormal splicing.

  14. Characterization of the beta2-microglobulin gene of the horse.

    PubMed

    Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Lear, Teri L; Johnson, Amanda K; Guérin, Gérard; Millon, Lee V; Carpenter, Susan L; Antczak, Douglas F

    2003-01-01

    A clone containing beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)-m), the light chain of the major histocompatibility complex class I cell surface molecule, was isolated from an equine bacterial artificial chromosome library. This clone was used as a template for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and unidirectional sequencing to elucidate the genomic sequence and intron/exon boundaries. We obtained 7,000 bases of sequence, extending from 1,100 nucleotides (nt) upstream of the coding region start through 1,698 nt downstream of the stop codon. The sequence contained regulatory elements in the region upstream of the coding sequence similar to those of the beta(2)-m gene of other species. The beta(2)-m gene was localized to horse chromosome ECA1q23-q25 by fluorescent in situ hybridization. This was confirmed by synteny mapping on a (horse x mouse) somatic cell hybrid panel. The sequence and intron/exon boundaries determined were used to design PCR primers to amplify and sequence the coding region of the beta(2)-m gene in other equids, including five breeds of domestic horse, one Przewalski's horse, five domestic donkeys and five zebras. A high degree of conservation was found among equids, illustrated by >98% (349/354) identity at the nucleotide level and 95% (113/118) at the amino acid level, because of non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions. The promoter detected in the region upstream of the coding sequence was subcloned and used in chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) assays to demonstrate the presence of a functional promoter. This study provides tools for the analysis of regulation of not only the horse beta(2)-m gene, but also for any genes dependent upon beta(2)-m for expression.

  15. The C-terminal region of laminin beta chains modulates the integrin binding affinities of laminins.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yukimasa; Ido, Hiroyuki; Sanzen, Noriko; Hayashi, Maria; Sato-Nishiuchi, Ryoko; Futaki, Sugiko; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2009-03-20

    Laminins are major cell-adhesive proteins in basement membranes that are capable of binding to integrins. Laminins consist of three chains (alpha, beta, and gamma), in which three laminin globular modules in the alpha chain and the Glu residue in the C-terminal tail of the gamma chain have been shown to be prerequisites for binding to integrins. However, it remains unknown whether any part of the beta chain is involved in laminin-integrin interactions. We compared the binding affinities of pairs of laminin isoforms containing the beta1 or beta2 chain toward a panel of laminin-binding integrins, and we found that beta2 chain-containing laminins (beta2-laminins) bound more avidly to alpha3beta1 and alpha7X2beta1 integrins than beta1 chain-containing laminins (beta1-laminins), whereas alpha6beta1, alpha6beta4, and alpha7X1beta1 integrins did not show any preference toward beta2-laminins. Because alpha3beta1 contains the "X2-type" variable region in the alpha3 subunit and alpha6beta1 and alpha6beta4 contain the "X1-type" region in the alpha6 subunit, we hypothesized that only integrins containing the X2-type region were capable of discriminating between beta1-laminins and beta2-laminins. In support of this possibility, a putative X2-type variant of alpha6beta1 was produced and found to bind preferentially to beta2-laminins. Production of a series of swap mutants between the beta1 and beta2 chains revealed that the C-terminal 20 amino acids in the coiled-coil domain were responsible for the enhanced integrin binding by beta2-laminins. Taken together, the results provide evidence that the C-terminal region of beta chains is involved in laminin recognition by integrins and modulates the binding affinities of laminins toward X2-type integrins.

  16. Developmental Modulation of a beta myosin heavy chain promoter-driven transgene.

    PubMed

    Knotts, S; Sánchez, A; Rindt, H; Robbins, J

    1996-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying heart and skeletal muscle-specific gene expression during development and in response to physioloic stimuli are largely unknown. Using a novel immunohistochemical procedure to detect chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), we have investigated, in vivo at high resolution, the ability of cis-acting DNA sequences within the 5' flanking region of the mouse beta myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene (beta-MyHC) to direct appropriate gene expression throughout development. A 5.6-kb fragment 5' to the beta-MyHC's transcriptional start site was linked to the reporter gene encoding CAT (cat) and used to generate transgenic mice. The anti-CAT in situ assay described in this report allowed us to define the ability of the promoter fragment to direct appropriate temporal, tissue- and muscle fiber type-specific gene expression throughout early development. In skeletal muscles, the transgene expression profile mimics the endogenous beta-myHC's at all developmental stages and is appropriately restricted to slow (type I) skeletal fibers in the adult. Surprisingly, transgene expression was detected in both the atria and ventricles during embryonic and fetal development, indicating that ventricular specification involves elements outside the 5.6-kb fragment. In contrast, in the adult, hypothyroid conditions led to transgene induction specifically in the ventricles, suggesting that distinct regulatory mechanisms control fetal versus adult beta-MyHC expression in the cardiac compartment.

  17. Localization of a site on bacterial superantigens that determines T cell receptor beta chain specificity

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A defining characteristic of superantigens is their ability to stimulate T cells based predominantly on the type of variable segment of the T cell receptor (TCR) beta chain (V beta). The V beta specificity of these toxins most likely results from direct contact between the toxin and the TCR, although the low affinity nature of this binding has prevented direct assessment of this interaction. To identify important functional sites on the toxin, we created chimeric enterotoxin genes between staphylococcal enterotoxins A and E (SEA and SEE) and tested the V beta specificity of the chimeric toxins. This approach allowed us to identify three amino acid residues in the extreme COOH terminus of these toxins that are largely responsible for their ability to stimulate either human V beta 5- or V beta 8-bearing T cells, or mouse V beta 3 or V beta 11. We also found that residues in the NH2 terminus were required for wild-type levels of V beta-specific T cell activation, suggesting that the NH2 and COOH ends of these superantigens may come together to form the full TCR V beta contact site. SEA and SEE also differ with respect to their class II binding characteristics. Using the same chimeric molecules, we demonstrate that the first third of the molecule controls the class II binding phenotype. These data lead us to propose that for SEA and SEE, and perhaps for all bacterial-derived superantigens, the COOH and NH2 termini together form the contact sites for the TCR and therefore largely determine the V beta specificity of the toxin, while the NH2 terminus alone binds major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. The predominant role of the COOH terminus of bacterial superantigens in determining V beta specificity resembles current models being proposed for virally encoded superantigens, suggesting that these molecules may demonstrate some structural relationship not seen at the amino acid level. PMID:7678849

  18. First molecular cloning and gene expression analysis of teleost CD42 (glycoprotein Ib beta chain) GPIb-IX-V subunit from rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-Min; Kim, Ju-Won; Kim, Do-Hyung; Park, Chan-Il

    2015-04-01

    CD42 is a platelet membrane glycoprotein Ib that plays a key role in haemostasis and thrombin-induced platelet activation. Here, we report the molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the CD42c gene from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus). Rock bream CD42 (RbCD42c) gene expression profiles were determined after infection with Streptococcus iniae, Edwardsiella tarda and red seabream iridovirus (RSIV). The full-length RbCD42c cDNA contained an open reading frame of 624 bp encoding 207 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequences of the leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-N terminal and LRR-C terminal were conserved between fish and mammals. RbCD42c was highly expressed in red blood cells, spleen, gill, liver and kidney of healthy rock bream. The RbCD42c gene was not significantly up- or downregulated after E. tarda exposure. However, RbCD42c gene expression was upregulated in kidney, spleen and gill after S. iniae infection. RbCD42c was upregulated in spleen, liver and gill, but downregulated in kidney 24 and 48 h after RSIV infection. These results suggest that RbCD42c has different expression patterns after infection with bacterial or viral pathogens. This gene may be directly involved in haemostasis.

  19. V(D)J recombination and allelic exclusion of a TCR {beta}-chain minilocus occurs in the absence of a functional promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, J.D.; Anderson, S.J.; Loh, D.Y.

    1995-08-01

    Transcriptional activation of rearranging Ag receptor gene segments has been hypothesized to regulate their accessibility to V(D)J recombination. We analyzed the role of a functional promoter in the rearrangement of the murine TCR {beta}-chain locus using two transgenic minilocus constructs. These miniloci each contain an unrearranged V{beta}8.3 gene. One has a wild-type V{beta}8.3 gene, but the other has a V{beta}8.3 gene with a promoter mutation that was previously shown to abrogate transcription in tissue culture. FACS analysis of thymus and lymph node cells from transgenic mouse lines showed that only the lines with the wild-type V{beta}8.3 gene promoter express an 8.3 TCR {beta}-chain. Consistent with the protein expression data, V{beta}8.3 gene transcripts were found only in the transgenic lines with the wild-type promoter. Using a quantitative PCR-based assay, it was shown that both types of transgenic lines recombine the V{beta}8.3 gene at similar levels. Rearrangement of the transgenes was normal with respect to thymic development and junctional reading frame. Interestingly, both types of miniloci also underwent allelic exclusion in that recombination was blocked by the expression of a rearranged TCR {beta}-chain transgene. We conclude that a functional V{beta} gene promoter is not necessary for proper V(D)J recombination to occur.

  20. Modeling of polypeptide chains as C alpha chains, C alpha chains with C beta, and C alpha chains with ellipsoidal lateral chains.

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, F; Esposito, G; Viglino, P; Cattarinussi, S

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the number of degrees of freedom necessary to describe a polypeptide chain we analyze the statistical behavior of polypeptide chains when represented as C alpha chains, C alpha chains with C beta atoms attached, and C alpha chains with rotational ellipsoids as models of side chains. A statistical analysis on a restricted data set of 75 unrelated protein structures is performed. The comparison of the database distributions with those obtained by model calculation on very short polypeptide stretches allows the dissection of local versus nonlocal features of the distributions. The database distribution of the bend angles of polypeptide chains of pseudo bonded C alpha atoms spans a restricted range of values and shows a bimodal structure. On the other hand, the torsion angles of the C alpha chain may assume almost all possible values. The distribution is bimodal, but with a much broader probability distribution than for bend angles. The C alpha - C beta vectors may be taken as representative of the orientation of the lateral chain, as the direction of the bond is close to the direction of the vector joining C alpha to the ad hoc defined center of the "steric mass" of the side chain. Interestingly, both the bend angle defined by C alpha i-C alpha i+1-C beta i+1 and the torsional angle offset of the pseudo-dihedral C alpha i-C alpha i+1-C alpha i+2-C beta i+2 with respect to C alpha i-C alpha i+1-C alpha i+2-C alpha i+3 span a limited range of values. The latter results show that it is possible to give a more realistic representation of polypeptide chains without introducing additional degrees of freedom, i.e., by just adding to the C alpha chain a C beta with given side-chain properties. However, a more realistic description of side chains may be attained by modeling side chains as rotational ellipsoids that have roughly the same orientation and steric hindrance. To this end, we define the steric mass of an atom as proportional to its van der

  1. Hemoglobinopathies among the Gond tribal groups of central India; interaction of alpha- and beta-thalassemia with beta chain variants.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R B; Tiwary, R S; Pande, P L; Kutlar, F; Oner, C; Oner, R; Huisman, T H

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the frequencies and types of alpha-thal, beta-thal, and Hb variants among nearly 200 inhabitants of villages in the Mandla and Jabalpur districts of Madhya Pradesh in Central India. Over 85% were tribals of the Gond group. alpha-Thal, as -alpha 3.7/and -alpha 4.2/, and the nondeletional Koya Dora mutation were present at the combined frequency of 0.54. There were indications for the presence of other nondeletional types of alpha-thal. alpha-Globin gene triplications were not observed. Four of the six beta-thal alleles observed were in the tribal groups; two (G----C at codon 30 and G----A at IVS-I-1) were found for the first time. The simultaneous presence of an alpha-thal (-alpha/alpha alpha or -alpha/-alpha) greatly improved the clinical and hematological condition of the patients with Hb S-beta(+)-thal (IVS-I-5; G----C). The lower frequency of alpha-thal among the beta-thal heterozygotes (f = 0.32) may indicate that some of the beta-thal alleles in the tribal populations originated from an outside source. Forty-one subjects had SS; all but one had beta S with haplotype #31, while one chromosome had haplotype #17. The presence of an alpha-thal-2 (f = 0.53) in the SS patients did not affect hematological data. The Hb F levels varied between 7.5% and 42.5% with high G gamma values. No difference in Hb F level between males and females was observed. Lower Hb F levels were present in 10 SS patients with an alpha-thal-2 homozygosity (average 16% versus 23.5% for eight SS patients with alpha alpha/alpha alpha) suggesting a decreased formation of alpha gamma dimers in severe alpha chain deficiency. Several younger SS patients (less than 10 years) also had high Hb F levels (32-42%). Variations in the sequence at -530 of the beta-globin gene; i.e. in the so-called silencer sequence, were present in all beta S chromosomes with haplotype #31, but were not considered important for understanding the variability in the Hb F level. gamma-Globin gene

  2. Arrested rearrangement of TCR V[beta] genes in thymocytes from children with x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, J.W.; Harville, T.O.; White, G.B.; Barrett, D.J. ); George, J.F. ); Goodenow, M.M. Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL )

    1994-07-01

    Human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) is an immunodeficiency disorder in which T cell development is arrested in the thymic cortex. B lymphocytes in children with X-linked SCID seem to differentiate normally. X-linked SCID is associated with a mutation in the gene that encodes the IL-2R [gamma]-chain. Because TCR-[beta] gene recombination is a pivotal initial event in T lymphocyte onteogeny within the thymus, the authors hypothesized that a failure to express normal IL-2R[gamma] could lead to impaired TCR-[beta] gene recombination in early thymic development. PCR was used to determine the status of TCR-[beta] gene-segment rearrangements in thymic DNA that had been obtained from children with X-linked SCID. The initial step in TCR-[beta] gene rearrangement, that of D[beta] to J[beta] recombination, was readily detected in all thymus samples from children with X-linked SCID; in contrast, V[beta] to DJ[beta] gene rearrangements were undetectable in the same samples. Both D[beta] to J[beta] and V[beta] to DJ[beta] TCR genes were rearranged in the thymic tissues obtained from immunologically normal children. The authors conclude that TCR[beta]-chain gene rearrangement is arrested in children with X-linked SCID. The results suggest a causative relationship between the failure of TCR [beta]-chain gene arrangements to proceed beyond DJ[beta] rearrangements and the production of a nonfunctional IL-2R [gamma]-chain. 45 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Tissue distribution of the laminin beta1 and beta2 chain during embryonic and fetal human development.

    PubMed

    Roediger, Matthias; Miosge, Nicolai; Gersdorff, Nikolaus

    2010-04-01

    Laminins are the major glycoproteins present in all basement membranes. Previously, we showed that perlecan is present during human development. Although an overview of mRNA-expression of the laminin beta1 and beta2 chains in various developing fetal organs is already available, a systematic localization of the laminin beta1 and beta2 chains on the protein level during embryonic and fetal human development is missing. Therefore, we studied the immunohistochemical expression and tissue distribution of the laminin beta1 and beta2 chains in various developing embryonic and fetal human organs between gestational weeks 8 and 12. The laminin beta1 chain was ubiquitously expressed in the basement membrane zones of the brain, ganglia, blood vessels, liver, kidney, skin, pancreas, intestine, heart and skeletal system. Furthermore, the laminin beta2 chain was present in the basement membrane zones of the brain, ganglia, skin, heart and skeletal system. The findings of this study support and expand upon the theory that these two laminin chains are important during human development.

  4. Analysis of betaS and betaA genes in a Mexican population with African roots.

    PubMed

    Magaña, María Teresa; Ongay, Zoyla; Tagle, Juan; Bentura, Gilberto; Cobián, José G; Perea, F Javier; Casas-Castañeda, Maricela; Sánchez-López, Yoaly J; Ibarra, Bertha

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the origin of the beta(A) and beta(S) genes in a Mexican population with African roots and a high frequency of hemoglobin S, we analyzed 467 individuals (288 unrelated) from different towns in the states of Guerrero and Oaxaca in the Costa Chica region. The frequency of the sickle-cell trait was 12.8%, which may represent a public health problem. The frequencies of the beta-haplotypes were determined from 350 nonrelated chromosomes (313 beta(A) and 37 beta(S)). We observed 15 different beta(A) haplotypes, the most common of which were haplotypes 1 (48.9%), 2 (13.4%), and 3 (13.4%). The calculation of pairwise distributions and Nei's genetic distance analysis using 32 worldwide populations showed that the beta(A) genes are more closely related to those of Mexican Mestizos and North Africans. Bantu and Benin haplotypes and haplotype 9 were related to the beta(S) genes, with frequencies of 78.8, 18.2, and 3.0%, respectively. Comparison of these haplotypes with 17 other populations revealed a high similitude with the population of the Central African Republic. These data suggest distinct origins for the beta(A) and beta(S) genes in Mexican individuals from the Costa Chica region.

  5. Total beta-globin gene deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, N.; Miyakawa, F.; Hunt, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    The distribution of {beta}-thalassemia [{beta}{sup Th}] mutations is unique to each ethnic group. Most mutations affect one or a few bases; large deletions have been rare. Among families screened in Hawaii, [{beta}{sup Th}] heterozygotes were diagnosed by microcytosis, absence of abnormal hemoglobins on isoelectric focusing, and raised Hb A{sub 2} by chromatography. Gene frequency for {beta}{sup Th} was 0.02 in Filipinos. In Filipinos, polymerase chain reaction [PCR] with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for {beta}{sup Th} mutations detected a mutation in only 6 of 42 {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes; an IVS2-666 C/T polymorphism showed non-heterozygosity in 37 and heterozygosity in only 5 of these {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes. One {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} major patient and his mother had no mutation detected by allele-specific oligomer hybridization; PCR failed to amplify any DNA from his {beta}-globin gene. After a total {beta}-globin gene deletion [{beta}{sup Del}] was found in a Filipino family in Ontario, specific PCR amplification for {beta}{sup Del} detected this in 43 of 53 {beta}{sup Th} Filipino samples tested; the above {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} patient was a ({beta}{sup Del}/{beta}{sup Del}) homozygote. The {beta}{sup Del} may account for over 60% of all {beta}{sup Th} alleles in Filipinos; this is the highest proportion of a deletion {beta}{sup Th} mutation reported from any population. Most but not all {beta}{sup Del} heterozygotes had high Hb F [5.13 {plus_minus} 3.94 mean {plus_minus} 1 s.d.] compared to the codon 41/42 four base deletion common in Chinese [2.30 {plus_minus} 0.86], or to {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes with normal {alpha}-globin genes [2.23 {plus_minus} 0.80].

  6. Expression of 3beta-HSD and P5betaR, genes respectively coding for Delta5-3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and progesterone 5beta-reductase, in leaves and cell cultures of Digitalis lanata EHRH.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Mona; de Padua, Rodrigo Maia; Herl, Vanessa; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Plants of the genus Digitalis produce 5 beta-cardenolides that are used in the therapy of cardiac insufficiency in humans. 3 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) and progesterone 5 beta-reductase (P5 betaR) are both supposed to be important enzymes in the biosynthesis of these natural products. Activity and gene expression were demonstrated for both enzymes in cardenolide-accumulating leaves of Digitalis lanata but also in cardenolide-free permanent cell suspension cultures initiated from D. lanata leaf tissue. Enzyme activities were determined and quantified by HPLC and GC-MS methods. Expression of the respective genes, namely AY585867.1 (P5betaR gene) and DQ466890.1 (3beta-HSD gene), was made evident by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. We demonstrate for the first time that the P5betaR gene, encoding an enzyme described as a key enzyme in cardenolide biosynthesis, is also expressed in cardenolide-free tissues of cardenolide-containing plants.

  7. Two monoclonal rat antibodies with specificity for the beta-chain variable region V beta 6 of the murine T-cell receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, J; Huber, B T; Cannon, N A; Schneider, R; Schilham, M W; Acha-Orbea, H; MacDonald, H R; Hengartner, H

    1988-01-01

    Two rat monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 44-22-1 and 46-6B5, which recognize an alloreactive cytotoxic clone, 3F9, have been further tested on a panel of T hybridomas and cytotoxic T-cell clones for binding and functional activities. The mAbs recognized only those cells sharing the expression of the T-cell receptor beta-chain variable region gene V beta 6 with 3F9. All V beta 6+ cells were activated by these mAbs under cross-linking conditions and their antigen-specific activation was blocked by soluble mAb. Furthermore, depletion of 46-6B5+ normal lymph node T cells eliminated all cells expressing the epitope recognized by 44-22-1 and V beta 6 mRNA. Images PMID:2459713

  8. Proliferation of thymocytes in relation to T-cell receptor beta-chain expression.

    PubMed

    Parkin, I G; Owen, J J; Jenkinson, E J

    1988-05-01

    During proliferation and differentiation of maturing thymocytes, T-cell receptor beta-chain products are first expressed in the cytoplasm. Only subsequently are they expressed on the cell surface, presumably as part of the alpha beta/CD3 receptor complex. This study uses double immunofluorescence labelling to identify these cytoplasmic and surface phases separately in relationship to cell-cycle parameters. The use of a mitotic arrest agent and tritiated thymidine autoradiography both show that cells with cytoplasmic beta-chains are in cell cycle, whereas cells with surface beta-chains are cycling slowly, if at all.

  9. Domains of the TCR beta-chain required for early thymocyte development

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The T cell receptor beta (TCR beta) chain controls the developmental transition from CD4-CD8- to CD4+8+thymocytes. We show that the extracellular constant region and the transmembrane region, but not the variable domain or cytoplasmic tail of the TCR beta chain are required for this differentiation step. TCR beta mutant chains lacking the cytoplasmic tail can be found at the cell surface both in functional TCR/CD3 complexes and in a GPI-anchored monomeric form indicating that the cytoplasmic tail of the TCR beta chain functions as an ER retention signal. The concordance between cell surface expression of the mutant chains as TCR/CD3 complexes and their capacity to mediate thymocyte differentiation supports the CD3 mediated feedback model in which preTCR/CD3 complexes control the developmental transition from CD4-CD8- to CD4+CD8+thymocytes. PMID:8920871

  10. Retroviral transfer of a human beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene linked to beta locus control region hypersensitive site 2 aimed at the gene therapy of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Takekoshi, K J; Oh, Y H; Westerman, K W; London, I M; Leboulch, P

    1995-01-01

    Human gamma-globin and delta-globin chains have been previously identified as strong inhibitors of the polymerization of hemoglobin S, in contrast to the beta-globin chain, which exerts only a moderate antisickling effect. However, gamma-globin and delta-globin are normally expressed at very low levels in adult erythroid cells, in contrast to beta-globin. We report the design of a beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene, beta/delta-sickle cell inhibitor 1 (beta/delta-SCI1) and its transduction by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. The beta/delta-SCI1-encoding gene retains the overall structure of the human beta-globin gene, while incorporating specific amino acid residues from the delta chain previously found responsible for its enhanced antisickling properties. To achieve high expression levels of beta/delta-SCI1 in adult erythrocytes, the hybrid gene was placed under the transcriptional control of the human beta-globin promoter and the DNase I hypersensitive site 2 of the human beta locus control region. High-titer retroviruses were generated, and stable proviral transmission was achieved in infected cells. The mRNA expression levels of the beta/delta-SCI1 gene in infected, dimethyl sulfoxide-induced murine erythroleukemia cells approached 85% of the endogenous murine beta maj-globin mRNA, on a per gene basis, evidence that high gene expression levels were achieved in adult erythroid cells. Further evaluation of this strategy in transgenic animal models of sickle cell disease should assess its efficacy for the gene therapy of human patients. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708766

  11. Aspartic acid at position 57 of the HLA-DQ beta chain protects against type I diabetes: a family study.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, P A; Dorman, J S; Todd, J A; McDevitt, H O; Trucco, M

    1988-01-01

    One hundred seventy-two members from 27 randomly selected multiple case Caucasian families of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) were studied at the DNA level to ascertain the reliability of codon 57 of the HLA-DQ beta-chain gene as a disease protection/susceptibility marker. The analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA encoding the first domain of the DQ beta chain and by dot blot analysis of the amplified material with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. One hundred twenty-three randomly selected healthy Caucasian donors were also tested. The results demonstrated that haplotypes carrying an aspartic acid in position 57 (Asp-57) of their DQ beta chain were significantly increased in frequency among nondiabetic haplotypes (23/38), while non-Asp-57 haplotypes were significantly increased in frequency among diabetic haplotypes (65/69). Ninety-six percent of the diabetic probands in our study were homozygous non-Asp/non-Asp as compared to 19.5% of healthy unrelated controls. This conferred a relative risk of 107 (chi 2 = 54.97; P = 0.00003) for non-Asp-57 homozygous individuals. Even though the inheritance and genetic features of IDDM are complex and are not necessarily fully explained by DQ beta chain polymorphism, this approach is much more sensitive than HLA serolog in assessing risk for IDDM. PMID:3186714

  12. Human globin gene analysis for a patient with beta-o/delta beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ottolenghi, S; Lanyon, W G; Williamson, R; Weatherall, D J; Clegg, J B; Pitcher, C S

    1975-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) was prepared with RNA-dependent DNA polymerase from human globin messenger RNA (mRNA). Annealing and translation experimenta with total mRNA from circulating cells from a patient with heterozygous beta/heterozygous beta-delta-o thalassemia (beta-o/delta beta-o-thalassemia) demonstrated no detectable mRNA for beta-globin. cDNA enriched in sequences homologous to beta-globin mRNA was prepared by hydroxylapatite fractionation of hybrids formed between beta-o/delta beta-o-thalassemic mRNA and cDNA made from mRNA from a patient with alpha-thalassemia (hemoglobin H disease). The rate of annealing of this beta-enriched cDNA to normal human nuclear DNA was that of a sequence present as only a single copy per haploid genome. The beta-enriched cDNA annealed to the beta-o-delta beta-o-thalassemia total DNA with approximately the same kinetics as to normal DNA, indicating that no total gene deletion of beta-globin genes from the diploid genome has occurred, although the accuracy of the technique could not exclude with certainty a partial deletion or a deletion of a beta-globin gene from only one of the haploid genomes. This demonstrates that at least one of the beta-o- or the delta beta-o-thalassemia haploid genomes in this case contains a substantially intact beta-globin gene. PMID:49057

  13. Human beta-globin gene expression in transgenic mice is enhanced by a distant DNase I hypersensitive site.

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, P T; Liu, D P; Liu, W; Chang, J C; Kan, Y W

    1989-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that erythroid-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) located far upstream of the human beta-globin gene are important in regulating beta-globin gene expression. We used the polymerase chain reaction technique to amplify and clone an 882-base-pair DNA fragment spanning one of these HS, designated HSII, which is located 54 kilobases upstream of the beta-globin gene. The cloned HSII fragment was linked to a human beta-globin gene in either the genomic (HSII-beta) or antigenomic (HSII-beta) orientation. These two constructs and a beta-globin gene alone (beta) were injected into fertilized mouse eggs, and expression was analyzed in liver and brain from day-16 transgenic fetuses. Five of 7 beta-transgenic fetuses expressed human beta-globin mRNA, but the level of expression per gene copy was low, ranging from 0.93 to 22.4% of mouse alpha-globin mRNA (average 9.9%). In contrast, 11 of 12 HSII-beta transgenic fetuses expressed beta-globin mRNA at levels per gene copy ranging from 31.3 to 336.6% of mouse alpha-globin mRNA (average 139.5%). Only three fetuses containing intact copies of the HSII-beta construct were produced. Two of three expressed human beta-globin mRNA at levels per gene copy of 179.2 and 387.1%. Expression of human beta-globin mRNA was tissue-specific in all three types of transgenic fetuses. These studies demonstrate that a small DNA fragment containing a single erythroid-specific HS can stimulate high-level human beta-globin gene expression in transgenic mice. Images PMID:2780563

  14. Crystal Structures of T Cell Receptor (Beta) Chains Related to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Li,H.; van Vranken, S.; Zhao, Y.; Li, Z.; Guo, Y.; Eisele, L.; Li, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structures of the V{beta}17+ {beta} chains of two human T cell receptors (TCRs), originally derived from the synovial fluid (SF4) and tissue (C5-1) of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), have been determined in native (SF4) and mutant (C5-1{sub F104{yields}Y/C187{yields}S}) forms, respectively. These TCR {beta} chains form homo-dimers in solution and in crystals. Structural comparison reveals that the main-chain conformations in the CDR regions of the C5-1 and SF4 V{beta}17 closely resemble those of a V{beta}17 JM22 in a bound form; however, the CDR3 region shows different conformations among these three V{beta}17 structures. At the side-chain level, conformational differences were observed at the CDR2 regions between our two ligand-free forms and the bound JM22 form. Other significant differences were observed at the V{beta} regions 8-12, 40-44, and 82-88 between C5-1/SF4 and JM22 V{beta}17, implying that there is considerable variability in the structures of very similar {beta} chains. Structural alignments also reveal a considerable variation in the V{beta}-C{beta} associations, and this may affect ligand recognition. The crystal structures also provide insights into the structure basis of T cell recognition of Mycoplasma arthritidis mitogen (MAM), a superantigen that may be implicated in the development of human RA. Structural comparisons of the V{beta} domains of known TCR structures indicate that there are significant similarities among V{beta} regions that are MAM-reactive, whereas there appear to be significant structural differences among those V{beta} regions that lack MAM-reactivity. It further reveals that CDR2 and framework region (FR) 3 are likely to account for the binding of TCR to MAM.

  15. The nucleotide sequence of the human beta-globin gene.

    PubMed

    Lawn, R M; Efstratiadis, A; O'Connell, C; Maniatis, T

    1980-10-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence of the human beta-globin gene. The purpose of this study is to obtain information necessary to study the evolutionary relationships between members of the human beta-like globin gene family and to provide the basis for comparing normal beta-globin genes with those obtained from the DNA of individuals with genetic defects in hemoglobin expression.

  16. Coexpression of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B chain and the PDGF. beta. receptor in isolated pancreatic islet cells stimulates DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.; Hallberg, A.; Welsh, N.; Arkhammar, P.; Nilsson, T.; Berggren, P.O. ); Claesson-Welsh, L.; Heldin, C.H. ); Betsholtz, C. ); Berggren, P.O. )

    1990-08-01

    Suspensions rich in pancreatic {beta} cells were transfected by means of electroporation or by using the liposome technique with DNA constructs coding for the {beta} chain of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and the PDGF {alpha} and {beta} receptors to induce a mitotic response in this slowly replicating cell type. Transfection with the B-chain construct induced synthesis of the PDGF B-chain homodimer (PDGF-BB) as assessed by the presence of {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF-BB competing activity in the conditioned medium of the transfected islet cells. Moreover, islet cells transfected with the PDGF {beta}-receptor construct exhibited increased immunofluorescence staining with a PDGF {beta}-receptor antibody. These cells also displayed increased {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF-BB binding compared with control transfected cells. The {beta} cells exhibited elevated levels of ({sup 3}H)inositol trisphosphate after transfection with the B-chain and {beta}-receptor constructs, indicating activation of phospholipase C. Islet cells transfected with the different receptor constructs exhibited different patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation upon ligand activation. The results demonstrate that pancreatic islet cells can be stimulated to increase DNA synthesis by transfection with the PDGF {beta}-receptor gene, whereas cotransfection with the {alpha}-receptor gene may attenuate the growth response.

  17. Isolation of monotreme T-cell receptor alpha and beta chains.

    PubMed

    Belov, Katherine; Miller, Robert D; Ilijeski, Aron; Hellman, Lars; Harrison, Gavan A

    2004-06-01

    Monotremes are an ancient mammalian lineage that last shared a common ancestor with the marsupial and eutherian (placental) mammals about 170 million years ago. Characterization of their immune genes is allowing us to gain insights into the evolutionary processes that lead to the 'mammalian' immune response. Here we describe the characterization of the first cDNA clones encoding T-cell receptors from a monotreme. Two TCR alpha-chain cDNAs ( TCRA) from the short-beaked echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus, containing complete variable, joining and constant regions were isolated. The echidna TCRA constant region shares approximately 37% amino acid identity with other mammalian TCRA constant region sequences. The two variable regions belong to the TCRAV group C, which also contains V genes from humans, mice, cattle and chickens. One echidna TCR beta-chain cDNA ( TCRB) containing the entire constant region was isolated and sequenced. It shares about 63% identity with other mammalian TCRB constant region sequences. The echidna TCRBV belongs to TCRBV group A, which also contains V genes from various eutherian species. Southern blot analysis indicates that, like in other mammalian species, there is only one TCRA constant region copy in the echidna genome, but at least two TCRB constant regions.

  18. The human thyrotropin beta-subunit gene differs in 5' structure from murine TSH-beta genes.

    PubMed

    Guidon, P T; Whitfield, G K; Porti, D; Kourides, I A

    1988-12-01

    The gene encoding the beta-subunit of human thyrotropin (hTSH-beta) was isolated, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene is 4.3 kb in length, consists of three exons and two introns, and is present as a single copy as determined by Southern blot analysis of total genomic DNA. The protein coding portion of the gene, which includes exons 2 and 3, was isolated from a human genomic phage library, while exon 1, which encodes only 5' untranslated mRNA sequence, was isolated from a plasmid library of size-selected genomic DNA fragments. Here we describe the isolation of the 5' untranslated exon of the hTSH-beta subunit and 5'-flanking region. The structure of the hTSH-beta gene is very similar to the previously characterized TSH-beta genes from mouse and rat. The genes from all three species have two distinct promoter regions, but while both promoters are utilized by the murine TSH-beta genes, the human TSH-beta gene apparently utilizes only the proximal promoter for transcription initiation. A striking difference in hTSH-beta gene structure compared to the murine genes is that exon 1 of the human gene is 36 nucleotides. An analysis of the mouse, rat, and human exon 1 and 5'-flanking region shows a high percentage of sequence homology, with the exception of a 9-nucleotide insertion 13 bases 3' from the proximal TATA box found in the human gene but not found in the other two species. We propose that this insertion results in the additional length of human exon 1 compared to the mouse and rat genes. By isolating the promoter region of the hTSH-beta gene, we can begin to identify specific sequences involved in the regulation of hTSH gene expression.

  19. Cloning and expression analysis of the murine lymphotoxin beta gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pokholok, D K; Maroulakou, I G; Kuprash, D V; Alimzhanov, M B; Kozlov, S V; Novobrantseva, T I; Turetskaya, R L; Green, J E; Nedospasov, S A

    1995-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and soluble lymphotoxin (LT) (also called LT-alpha or TNF-beta) are cytokines with similar biological activities that are encoded by related and closely linked genes. TNF-alpha, a mediator of the inflammatory response, exists in soluble and transmembrane forms. LT-alpha can be secreted or retained at the cell surface by binding to a 33-kDa transmembrane subunit, LT-beta. The recently cloned human LT-beta gene encodes another TNF family member and is linked to the TNF/LT locus within the major histocompatibility complex locus. The cell surface LT is a heterotrimer consisting of LT-alpha and LT-beta, whose physiological function is not yet clearly defined. We now report the sequence analysis of the genomic region and cDNA of murine LT-beta gene, which is closely associated with the TNF-alpha and LT-alpha genes within the murine major histocompatibility complex locus. Unlike the TNF-alpha, LT-alpha, and human LT-beta genes, which contain four exons, the murine LT-beta contains three exons and encodes a 244-amino acid polypeptide with a 66-amino acid insert that is absent from the human homologue. In situ hybridization demonstrates constitutive expression of LT-beta in lymphoid and hematopoietic tissues. LT-beta transcription is maximal in the thymic medulla and in splenic white pulp. LT-beta mRNA is also detected in the skin and in specific regions of the brain. The LT-beta promoter region contains putative Ets-binding sites, suggesting that the expression of LT-beta may be regulated in part by Ets transcription factors whose pattern of lymphoid expression overlaps that of LT-beta. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7846035

  20. Characterization of a beta-tubulin gene and a beta-tubulin gene products of Brugia pahangi.

    PubMed

    Guénette, S; Prichard, R K; Klein, R D; Matlashewski, G

    1991-02-01

    A genomic clone containing a beta-tubulin gene from the parasitic nematode Brugia pahangi was isolated. This gene was sequenced to determine its size, structural organization, and corresponding primary amino acid sequence. The coding sequence of the beta-tubulin gene spans 3.8 kb, is organized into 9 exons and expresses an mNRA of 1.8 kb which codes for a protein of 448 amino acids. The predicted beta-tubulin amino acid sequence is 89%, 94%, 90% and 88% identical to the chicken beta 2, and the Caenorhabditis elegans ben-1, tub-1 and mec-7 gene products, respectively. Southern hybridization analyses demonstrated that there is only one copy of this gene isotype but that other distinct beta-tubulin genes may exist in the Brugia pahangi genome. A nematode specific antipeptide rabbit antiserum raised against the predicted amino acid sequence of the extreme carboxy-terminal region of the B. pahangi beta-tubulin was used to identify beta-tubulin isoforms in adult nematodes and microfilariae. Isoforms detected by this nematode-specific antipeptide antiserum were identical in both adult worms and microfilariae and did not differ from the isoform patterns detected by a monoclonal antibody recognizing a conserved beta-tubulin epitope. This suggests that this carboxy-terminal peptide is highly represented in the beta-tubulin isoforms of B. pahangi.

  1. Evolutionary ecology of beta-lactam gene clusters in animals.

    PubMed

    Suring, Wouter; Meusemann, Karen; Blanke, Alexander; Mariën, Janine; Schol, Tim; Agamennone, Valeria; Faddeeva-Vakhrusheva, Anna; Berg, Matty P; Brouwer, Bram; van Straalen, Nico M; Roelofs, Dick

    2017-03-18

    Beta-lactam biosynthesis was thought to occur only in fungi and bacteria, but we recently reported the presence of isopenicillin N synthase in a soil-dwelling animal, Folsomia candida. However, it has remained unclear whether this gene is part of a larger beta-lactam biosynthesis pathway and how widespread the occurrence of penicillin biosynthesis is among animals. Here, we analyzed the distribution of beta-lactam biosynthesis genes throughout the animal kingdom and identified a beta-lactam gene cluster in the genome of F. candida (Collembola), consisting of isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS), δ-(L-α-aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS), and two cephamycin C genes (cmcI and cmcJ) on a genomic scaffold of 0.76 Mb. All genes are transcriptionally active and are inducible by stress (heat shock). A beta-lactam compound was detected in vivo using an ELISA beta-lactam assay. The gene cluster also contains an ABC transporter which is co-regulated with IPNS and ACVS after heat shock. Furthermore, we show that different combinations of beta-lactam biosynthesis genes are present in over 60% of springtail families but they are absent from genome- and transcript libraries of other animals including close relatives of springtails (Protura, Diplura, and insects). The presence of beta-lactam genes is strongly correlated with an eudaphic (soil-living) lifestyle. Beta-lactam genes IPNS and ACVS each form a phylogenetic clade in between bacteria and fungi, while cmcI and cmcJ genes cluster within bacteria. This suggests a single horizontal gene transfer event most probably from a bacterial host, followed by differential loss in more recently evolving species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Beta-thalassemia genes in French-Canadians: haplotype and mutation analysis of Portneuf chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, F; Kokotsis, G; DeBraekeleer, M; Morgan, K; Scriver, C R

    1990-01-01

    beta-Thalassemia minor occurs at approximately 1% frequency in French-Canadians--in families residing in Portneuf County (population approximately 40,000) of Quebec province. We found eight different RFLP haplotypes at the beta-globin gene cluster in 37 normal persons and in 12 beta-thalassemia heterozygotes from six families. beta-Thalassemia genes in these families associated with two haplotypes only: Mediterranean I and Mediterranean II. There were two different beta-thalassemia mutations segregating in the Portneuf population: an RNA processing mutation (beta(+)IVS-1,nt110) on haplotype I (five families) and a point mutation leading to chain termination (beta(0) nonsense codon 39) on haplotype II (one family). The distribution of 5' haplotypes on normal beta A Portneuf chromosomes compared with other European populations was most similar to that in British subjects (data for French subjects have not yet been reported). Genealogical reconstructions traced the ancestry of carrier couples to settlers emigrating from several different regions of France to New France in the 17th century. These findings indicate genetic diversity of a greater degree among French-Canadians than recognized heretofore. Images Figure 4 PMID:1967205

  3. Beta-thalassemia genes in French-Canadians: haplotype and mutation analysis of Portneuf chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, F; Kokotsis, G; DeBraekeleer, M; Morgan, K; Scriver, C R

    1990-01-01

    beta-Thalassemia minor occurs at approximately 1% frequency in French-Canadians--in families residing in Portneuf County (population approximately 40,000) of Quebec province. We found eight different RFLP haplotypes at the beta-globin gene cluster in 37 normal persons and in 12 beta-thalassemia heterozygotes from six families. beta-Thalassemia genes in these families associated with two haplotypes only: Mediterranean I and Mediterranean II. There were two different beta-thalassemia mutations segregating in the Portneuf population: an RNA processing mutation (beta(+)IVS-1,nt110) on haplotype I (five families) and a point mutation leading to chain termination (beta(0) nonsense codon 39) on haplotype II (one family). The distribution of 5' haplotypes on normal beta A Portneuf chromosomes compared with other European populations was most similar to that in British subjects (data for French subjects have not yet been reported). Genealogical reconstructions traced the ancestry of carrier couples to settlers emigrating from several different regions of France to New France in the 17th century. These findings indicate genetic diversity of a greater degree among French-Canadians than recognized heretofore.

  4. Analysis of cDNA coding MHC class II beta chain of the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Hatta, Yuki; Kanai, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Kyuwa, Shigeru; Hayasaka, Ikuo; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2002-04-01

    The chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes, Patr) is the closest zoological living relative of humans and shares approximately 98.6% genetic homology to human beings. Although major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a critical role in T cell-mediated immune responses in vertebrates, the information on Patr MHC remains at a relatively poor level. Therefore, we attempted to isolate Patr MHC class II genes and determine their nucleotide sequences. The cDNAs encoding Patr MHC class II DP, DQ and DR beta chains were isolated from the cDNA library of a chimpanzee B lymphocyte cell line Bch261. As a result of screening, the clone 6-3-1 as a representative of Patr DP clone, clone 30-1 as a Patr DQ clone, and clones 4-7-1 and 55-1 having different sequences as Patr DR clones were detected. The clone 6-3-1 consisted of 1,062 nucleotides including an open reading frame (ORF) of 777 bp. In the same way, clone 30-1 consisted of 1,172 nucleotides including ORF of 786 bp, clones 4-7-1 and 55-1 consisted of 1,163 nucleotides including ORF of 801 bp. Except for five nucleotide changes, clones 4-7-1 and 55-1 were the same sequence. By comparison with the nucleotide sequences already reported on chimpanzee MHC class II beta 1 genes, clones 6-3-1, 30-1, 4-7-1 and 55-1 were classified as PatrDPB1*16, PatrDQB1*0302, PatrDRB1*0201 and PatrDRB1*0204, respectively. This is the first report to describe complete cDNA sequences of Patr DP and DQ molecules. The nucleotide sequence data of Patr MHC class II genes obtained in this study will be useful for the genotyping of Patr MHC class II genes in individual chimpanzees.

  5. The alpha 4 integrin chain is a ligand for alpha 4 beta 7 and alpha 4 beta 1

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The heterodimeric alpha 4 integrins alpha 4 beta 7 lymphocyte Peyer's patch adhesion molecule ([LPAM]-1) and alpha 4 beta 1 (very late antigen-4) are cell surface adhesion molecules involved in lymphocyte trafficking and lymphocyte-cell and matrix interactions. Known cellular ligands include vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, which binds to alpha 4 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 7, and the mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule (MAdCAM)-1, which binds to alpha 4 beta 7. Here we show that the alpha 4 chain of these integrins can itself serve as a ligand. The alpha 4 chain, immunoaffinity purified and immobilized on glass slides, binds thymocytes and T lymphocytes. Binding exhibits divalent cation requirements and temperature sensitivity which are characteristic of integrin-mediated interactions, and is specifically inhibited by anti-alpha 4 integrin antibodies, which exert their effect at the cell surface. Cells expressing exclusively alpha 4 beta 7 (TK-1) or alpha 4 beta 1 (L1-2) both bound avidly, whereas alpha 4-negative cells did not. A soluble 34-kD alpha 4 chain fragment retained binding activity, and it inhibited lymphocyte adhesion to alpha 4 ligands. It has been shown that alpha 4 integrin binding to fibronectin involves an leucine-aspartic acid-valine (LDV) motif in the HepII/IIICS region of fibronectin (CS-1 peptide), and homologous sequences are important in binding to VCAM-1 and MAdCAM-1. Three conserved LDV motifs occur in the extracellular sequence of alpha 4. A synthetic LDV-containing alpha 4- derived oligopeptide supports alpha 4-integrin-dependent lymphocyte adhesion and blocks binding to the 34-kD alpha 4 chain fragment. Our results suggest that alpha 4 beta 7 and alpha 4 beta 1 integrins may be able to bind to the alpha 4 subunit on adjacent cells, providing a novel mechanism for alpha 4 integrin-mediated and activation-regulated lymphocyte interactions during immune responses. PMID:7629498

  6. Monoclonal anti-mouse laminin antibodies: AL-1 reacts with laminin alpha1 chain, AL-2 with laminin beta1 chain, and AL-4 with the coiled-coil domain of laminin beta1 chain.

    PubMed

    Schéele, Susanne; Sasaki, Takako; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Durbeej, Madeleine; Ekblom, Peter

    2006-07-01

    We analyzed the reactivity of three different commercially available rat monoclonal antibodies raised against mouse laminin-alpha1beta1gamma1 (laminin-111), AL-1, AL-2, and AL-4. Using ELISA assays, Western blot analysis and immunostainings we present refined epitope maps for these three laminin monoclonals. AL-1 reacted, as predicted with laminin alpha1 chain. AL-4 has also been marketed as an alpha1 chain specific probe, but we show here that AL-4 detects mouse laminin beta1 chain, in the distal part of the coiled-coil region. AL-2 was predicted to react with all three chains near the cross-region, but seems to primarily react with laminin beta1 chain.

  7. No evidence of the human chorionic gonadotropin-beta gene 5 betaV79M polymorphism in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Lopez, Pablo; Diaz-Cueto, Laura; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Lopez-Valle, Miguel Angel; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabian

    2008-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a placental hormone essential for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown a G to A transition in exon 3 of the hCGbeta gene 5, which changes the naturally occurring valine to methionine in codon 79. The frequency of this transition varies among different ethnic groups, being high in USA women, and less common, or absent, in various European populations. The purpose of the present study was to determine the frequency of the betaV79M allelic variant of the beta-subunit of hCG in a Mexican population, and to compare this frequency with those found in other ethnic groups. Placental DNA from 161 pregnant Mexican women was genotyped for the betaV79M by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragments length polymorphism analysis. No polymorphic betaV79M alleles were identified in the population studied. The allele and genotypic frequencies of betaV79M polymorphism in Mexican Mestizo women were significantly different from those reported for the US population, but not from five different European populations. In contrast to what has been found in women from the USA, it seems that the hCGbeta V79M polymorphism is absent or extremely rare in Mexican Mestizo women.

  8. Phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of the beta light chain of clathrin from rat liver coated vesicles.

    PubMed

    Loeb, J E; Cantournet, B; Vartanian, J P; Goris, J; Merlevede, W

    1989-06-01

    The phosphorylation in vitro, on serine residues by endogenous casein kinase 2, of the clathrin beta light chain (33 kDa) of rat liver coated vesicles requires the presence of poly(L-lysine) which acts through binding to the beta light chain. The phosphorylation of other proteins is also increased in the presence of poly(L-lysine) and casein kinase 2. In contrast, the phosphorylation of the upper band of the 50-kDa protein doublet from rat liver coated vesicles is inhibited. Rat liver coated vesicles display a protein phosphatase activity which preferentially dephosphorylates clathrin beta light chain. This activity is different from the protein phosphatase which dephosphorylates the 50-kDa protein. This enzyme seems to be unrelated to the ATP/Mg-dependent protein phosphatase, or the polycation-stimulated protein phosphatases, which dephosphorylate the 50-kDa protein and beta light chain very efficiently, but with a different specificity. After dissociation of coated vesicles the beta-light-chain phosphatase activity is recovered in the membrane fraction. This phosphatase activity is inhibited by 50 microM orthovanadate and 5 mM p-nitrophenyl phosphate but not by 10 mM EDTA.

  9. The IL-2 receptor alpha-chain alters the binding of IL-2 to the beta-chain.

    PubMed

    Arima, N; Kamio, M; Okuma, M; Ju, G; Uchiyama, T

    1991-11-15

    The binding of IL-2 to its high affinity receptor results in the formation of the ternary complex consisting of IL-2, alpha-chain (p55, Tac) and beta-chain (p75). We studied the role of alpha-chain in IL-2 binding to the high affinity receptor using IL-2 analog Lys20 which was made by the substitution of Lys for Asp20 of wild-type rIL-2. Lys20 bound to MT-1 cells solely expressing alpha-chain at low affinity, but did not bind to YT-2C2 cells which solely expressed beta-chain. However, direct binding of radiolabeled Lys20 to ED515-D cells, an HTLV-I-infected and IL-2-dependent T cell line, revealed both high affinity and low affinity binding although the Kd value of high affinity binding was 50 to 100 times higher than that of the high affinity binding of wild-type rIL-2. High affinity binding of Lys20 was completely blocked by 2R-B mAb recognizing IL-2R beta-chain. Anti-Tac mAb recognizing IL-2R alpha-chain abolished all of the specific Lys20 bindings. In contrast to the replacement of cell bound 2R-B mAb with wild-type rIL-2 at 37 degrees C, the addition of an excess of Lys20 did not cause the detachment of cell-bound radiolabeled or FITC-labeled 2R-B mAb. Consistent with the results of binding studies, Lys20 induced the proliferation of ED515-D cells, but not large granular lymphocyte leukemic cells. The growth of ED-515D cells was completely suppressed by either anti-Tac mAb or 2R-B mAb. These results strongly suggest that coexpression of the IL-2R alpha- and beta-chains alters the binding affinity of Lys20 and that the interaction between IL-2 and the alpha-chain is a key event in the formation of the IL-2/IL-2R ternary complex.

  10. Presence and diversity of the beta-lactamase gene in cat and dog staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Malik, Seidu; Christensen, Henrik; Peng, Haihong; Barton, Mary D

    2007-07-20

    Staphylococci are part of the normal microflora of humans and animals and some are potential pathogens that have become resistant to almost all known antibiotics. Despite the widespread reports of penicillin resistance in cat and dog staphylococci, the mechanism underlying penicillin resistance has not been examined. This study was aimed at investigating the molecular basis of resistance to penicillin in cat and dog staphylococcal isolates that showed phenotypic resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. An 861 bp fragment of the structural blaZ gene which codes for beta-lactamase production in staphylococci was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the products were sequenced. Sequenced fragments were analysed by protein signature typing and sequences were compared to published blaZ sequences of human and bovine staphylococcal strains held in a public database. Four known protein signature types (1, 3, 5 and 6) and one new type (12) were identified in this study. When sequences were compared with published blaZ sequences, gene phylogenetic analysis revealed three major groups. The four variants of beta-lactamases types (A, B, C and D) belonged to each major group except for types A and D which were both in group II. These findings confirm that the blaZ gene is responsible for beta-lactamase production leading to subsequent resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics in feline and canine staphylococci and that the gene shows similar diversity and relatedness as found with blaZ sequences obtained from human and bovine staphylococci.

  11. Structure of a Ruminococcus albus endo-1,4-beta-glucanase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ohmiya, K; Kajino, T; Kato, A; Shimizu, S

    1989-01-01

    A chromosomal DNA fragment encoding an endo-1,4-beta-glucanase I (Eg I) gene from Ruminococcus albus cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli with pUC18 was fully sequenced by the dideoxy-chain termination method. The sequence contained a consensus promoter sequence and a structural amino acid sequence. The initial 43 amino acids of the protein were deduced to be a signal sequence, since they are missing in the mature protein (Eg I). High homology was found when the amino acid sequence of the Eg I was compared with that of endoglucanase E from Clostridium thermocellum. Codon usage of the gene was not biased. These results suggested that the properties of the Eg I gene from R. albus was specified from the known beta-glucanase genes of the other organisms. Images PMID:2687251

  12. Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylation of kinesin heavy chain on beta-granules in pancreatic beta-cells. Implications for regulated beta-granule transport and insulin exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Donelan, Matthew J; Morfini, Gerardo; Julyan, Richard; Sommers, Scott; Hays, Lori; Kajio, Hiroshi; Briaud, Isabelle; Easom, Richard A; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Brady, Scott T; Rhodes, Christopher J

    2002-07-05

    The specific biochemical steps required for glucose-regulated insulin exocytosis from beta-cells are not well defined. Elevation of glucose leads to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+]i and biphasic release of insulin from both a readily releasable and a storage pool of beta-granules. The effect of elevated [Ca2+]i on phosphorylation of isolated beta-granule membrane proteins was evaluated, and the phosphorylation of four proteins was found to be altered by [Ca2+]i. One (a 18/20-kDa doublet) was a Ca2+-dependent increase in phosphorylation, and, surprisingly, three others (138, 42, and 36 kDa) were Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylations. The 138-kDa beta-granule phosphoprotein was found to be kinesin heavy chain (KHC). At low levels of [Ca2+]i KHC was phosphorylated by casein kinase 2, but KHC was rapidly dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2B beta (PP2Bbeta) as [Ca2+]i increased. Inhibitors of PP2B specifically reduced the second, microtubule-dependent, phase of insulin secretion, suggesting that dephosphorylation of KHC was required for transport of beta-granules from the storage pool to replenish the readily releasable pool of beta-granules. This is distinct from synaptic vesicle exocytosis, because neurotransmitter release from synaptosomes did not require a Ca2+-dependent KHC dephosphorylation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for regulating KHC function and beta-granule transport in beta-cells that is mediated by casein kinase 2 and PP2B. They also implicate a novel regulatory role for PP2B/calcineurin in the control of insulin secretion downstream of a rise in [Ca2+]i.

  13. Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylation of kinesin heavy chain on beta-granules in pancreatic beta-cells. Implications for regulated beta-granule transport and insulin exocytosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donelan, Matthew J.; Morfini, Gerardo; Julyan, Richard; Sommers, Scott; Hays, Lori; Kajio, Hiroshi; Briaud, Isabelle; Easom, Richard A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Brady, Scott T.; Rhodes, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    The specific biochemical steps required for glucose-regulated insulin exocytosis from beta-cells are not well defined. Elevation of glucose leads to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+]i and biphasic release of insulin from both a readily releasable and a storage pool of beta-granules. The effect of elevated [Ca2+]i on phosphorylation of isolated beta-granule membrane proteins was evaluated, and the phosphorylation of four proteins was found to be altered by [Ca2+]i. One (a 18/20-kDa doublet) was a Ca2+-dependent increase in phosphorylation, and, surprisingly, three others (138, 42, and 36 kDa) were Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylations. The 138-kDa beta-granule phosphoprotein was found to be kinesin heavy chain (KHC). At low levels of [Ca2+]i KHC was phosphorylated by casein kinase 2, but KHC was rapidly dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2B beta (PP2Bbeta) as [Ca2+]i increased. Inhibitors of PP2B specifically reduced the second, microtubule-dependent, phase of insulin secretion, suggesting that dephosphorylation of KHC was required for transport of beta-granules from the storage pool to replenish the readily releasable pool of beta-granules. This is distinct from synaptic vesicle exocytosis, because neurotransmitter release from synaptosomes did not require a Ca2+-dependent KHC dephosphorylation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for regulating KHC function and beta-granule transport in beta-cells that is mediated by casein kinase 2 and PP2B. They also implicate a novel regulatory role for PP2B/calcineurin in the control of insulin secretion downstream of a rise in [Ca2+]i.

  14. Distinct tyrosine residues within the interleukin-2 receptor beta chain drive signal transduction specificity, redundancy, and diversity.

    PubMed

    Gaffen, S L; Lai, S Y; Ha, M; Liu, X; Hennighausen, L; Greene, W C; Goldsmith, M A

    1996-08-30

    To explore the basis for interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling specificity, the roles of tyrosine-based sequences located within the cytoplasmic tails of the beta and gammac chains were examined in the murine helper T cell line HT-2. Activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, cellular proliferation, and the induction of various genes were monitored. All four of the cytoplasmic tyrosine residues as well as the distal portion of the gammac proved dispensable for the entire spectrum of IL-2R signaling responses studied. Conversely, select tyrosine residues within the beta chain were essential and differentially required for various signaling events. Specifically, activation of c-fos gene expression was found to occur exclusively through the most membrane proximal tyrosine, Tyr-338, whereas proliferation and the activation of STAT-5 were induced either through Tyr-338 or through the two C-terminal tyrosine residues, Tyr-392 and Tyr-510. These tyrosine residues mediated the induction of two different STAT-5 isoforms, which were found to form heterodimers upon receptor activation. In contrast to the tyrosine dependence of c-fos and STAT-5 induction, bcl-2 gene induction proceeded independently of all IL-2Rbeta tyrosine residues. Thus, the tyrosine-based modules present within the IL-2Rbeta cytoplasmic tail play a critical role in IL-2R signaling, mediating specificity, redundancy, and multifunctionality.

  15. Nucleotide sequence of SHV-2 beta-lactamase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Garbarg-Chenon, A.; Godard, V.; Labia, R.; Nicolas, J.C. )

    1990-07-01

    The nucleotide sequence of plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase SHV-2 from Salmonella typhimurium (SHV-2pHT1) was determined. The gene was very similar to chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase LEN-1 of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Compared with the sequence of the Escherichia coli SHV-2 enzyme (SHV-2E.coli) obtained by protein sequencing, the deduced amino acid sequence of SHV-2pHT1 differed by three amino acid substitutions.

  16. Expression of the human. beta. -globin gene following retroviral-mediated transfer into multipotential hematopoietic progenitors of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, S.; Bodine, D.M.; Perry, L.; Papayannopoulou, T.; Nienhuis, A.W. )

    1988-08-01

    Efficient transfer of the {beta}-globin gene into primitive hematopoietic progenitors was achieved with consistent and significant expression in the progeny of those cells. Retroviral vectors containing the intact genomic human {beta}-globin gene and the neomycin (G418)-resistance (neo{sup R}) gene were constructed. These gave titers of 10{sup 6} or more neo{sup R} colony-forming units/ml when packaged in {psi}2 cells. Mouse bone marrow cells were infected by coculture with producer cells and injected into lethally irradiated animals. Several parameters were varied to enhance infection frequency of colony-forming units, spleen (CFU-S); overall 41% of 116 foci studied contained an intact proviral genome. The human {beta}-globin gene was expressed in 31 of 35 CFU-S-derived spleen colonies that contained the intact vector genome at levels ranging from 1% to 5% of that of the mouse {beta}-globin genes. Infected bone marrow cells were also injected into genetically anemic W/W{sup v} recipients without prior irradiation. Human {beta}-globin chains were detected in circulating erythrocytes by immunofluorescent staining with a specific monoclonal antibody. All animals injected with donor cells that had been cultured in G418 (1 mg/ml) for 48 hr after retroviral infection had circulating erythrocytes containing human {beta}-globin chains between 3 and 8 weeks after transplantation.

  17. Gamma-chain heterogeneity in Greek (delta beta)zero-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, I; Seferiadis, K; Lolis, D; Tsolas, O; Bourantas, K L

    1995-02-01

    A molecular and biochemical population study of (delta beta)zero thalassemia in central Greece is described. The molecular study was focused on the type of the deletion and the status of G gamma-XmnI polymorphism, whereas the biochemical approach was centered on the G gamma/A gamma ratio as well as the frequency of the A gamma T chain in the fetal hemoglobin of 19 delta beta-thalassemia heterozygotes and 3 homozygotes. This study includes individuals from the mountainous district of Epirus (northwestern Greece) where the trait was found to be concentrated along the river Arachthos. The Sicilian (delta beta)zero thalassemia deletion was found in all subjects tested by direct PCR. The levels for the G gamma-chain presented values ranging from 29 to 83% of the total gamma-chain content. Thirteen heterozygotes had the adult G gamma/A gamma ratio (mean G gamma: 35% +/- 10) of whom 10 were XmnI-negative (- / -), 6 had the newborn ratio (mean G gamma: 70% +/- 9) and were XmnI-positive, while homozygotes had equal amounts of G gamma and A gamma. Five of the 19 heterozygotes were A gamma T-positive with low levels of this A gamma-chain variant, suggesting an in-trans to the delta beta-thalassemia determinant production.

  18. Inhibition of autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction by monoclonal antibodies specific for the beta chain of HLA-DR antigens.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, M; Ikeda, H; Ogasawara, K; Ishikawa, N; Okuyama, T; Fukasawa, Y; Kojima, H; Kunikane, H; Hawkin, S; Ohhashi, T

    1984-09-01

    Recent studies using rabbit antisera to the separated HLA-DR alpha and beta subunits have suggested that alpha chain-specific, but not beta chain-specific, antisera inhibit T cell proliferative responses in primary and secondary human autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR). In the present study, with the aid of sequential co-precipitation assays and Western blotting methods, a monoclonal rat alloantibody 1E4, specific for the beta chain of rat class II molecules carrying an Ia determinant Ba-2.7, was characterized to recognize a monomorphic determinant located on the beta chain of DR antigens. This antibody and a murine monoclonal antibody HU-4, also specific for the beta chain of DR antigens, strongly inhibited both primary and secondary AMLR through a mechanism distinct from an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity reaction. These results indicate that the inhibition of AMLR is not a unique feature of DR alpha-specific antibodies.

  19. Origin and spread of beta-globin gene mutations in India, Africa, and Mediterranea: analysis of the 5' flanking and intragenic sequences of beta S and beta C genes.

    PubMed

    Trabuchet, G; Elion, J; Baudot, G; Pagnier, J; Bouhass, R; Nigon, V M; Labie, D; Krishnamoorthy, R

    1991-06-01

    Nucleotide polymorphisms of both the 5' flanking and intragenic regions of the human beta-globin gene were investigated by directly sequencing genomic DNA after amplification by the polymerase chain reaction in 47 subjects homozygous for the beta S or the beta C mutation. The sickle-cell mutation was found in the context of five different haplotypes defined by eight nucleotide substitutions and various structures of a region of the simple repeated sequence (AT) chi Ty. All subjects from the same geographic origin bear an identical chromosomal structure, defining the Senegal-, Bantu-, Benin-, Cameroon-, and Indian-type chromosomes. These results strengthen our previous conclusions about the multiple occurrence of the sickle-cell mutation. The Benin-type chromosome was also found among Algerian and Sicilian sickle-cell patients, whereas the Indian-type chromosome was observed in two geographically distant tribes, illustrating the spread of these sickle-cell genes. We also found that the intragenic sequence polymorphisms (frameworks) are not always in linkage disequilibrium with the BamH I polymorphism downstream from the beta-globin gene, as had been previously observed. Finally, we present a tentative phylogenetic tree of the different alleles at this locus. Some polymorphisms of this sequence might be contemporary with our last common ancestor, the great apes, that is, about 4-6 millions years old.

  20. Immunomodulation by mucosal gene transfer using TGF-beta DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kuklin, N A; Daheshia, M; Chun, S; Rouse, B T

    1998-01-01

    This report evaluates the efficacy of DNA encoding TGF-beta administered mucosally to suppress immunity and modulate the immunoinflammatory response to herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. A single intranasal administration of an eukaryotic expression vector encoding TGF-beta1 led to expression in the lung and lymphoid tissue. T cell-mediated immune responses to HSV infection were suppressed with this effect persisting as measured by the delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction for at least 7 wk. Treated animals were more susceptible to systemic infection with HSV. Multiple prophylactic mucosal administrations of TGF-beta DNA also suppressed the severity of ocular lesions caused by HSV infection, although no effects on this immunoinflammatory response were evident after therapeutic treatment with TGF-beta DNA. Our results demonstrate that the direct mucosal gene transfer of immunomodulatory cytokines provides a convenient means of modulating immunity and influencing the expression of inflammatory disorders. PMID:9664086

  1. Assignment of an intron-containing human heat-shock protein gene (hsp90[beta], HSPCB) to chromosome 6 near TCTE1 (6p21) and two intronless pseudogenes to chromosomes 4 and 15 by polymerase chain reaction amplification from a panel of hybrid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, A.S.; Nierman, W.C.; Maglott, D.R. ); Vamvakopoulos, N.C. ); Zoghbi, H.Y. )

    1993-11-01

    We report here the successful application of designing primers from intronic sequences to map a structural hsp90[beta] gene to a unique human chromosome distinct from potential pseudogenes or rodent background. Also, by designing primers that bracket an intron and detecting products from intronless genes, we localized two hsp90[beta] pseudogenes to human chromosomes 4 and 15. PCR primers were designed from the published human hsp90[beta] DNA sequence from exon 11 (nucleotides 7066-7085, 7181-7198), intron A (1659-1678, 1722-1741), intron B (8109, 8170-8187), and exons 3 and 4 to amplify across intron C (3391-3412, 3731-3752).

  2. Profiling the T-cell receptor beta-chain repertoire by massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Freeman, J Douglas; Warren, René L; Webb, John R; Nelson, Brad H; Holt, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) genomic loci undergo somatic V(D)J recombination, plus the addition/subtraction of nontemplated bases at recombination junctions, in order to generate the repertoire of structurally diverse T cells necessary for antigen recognition. TCR beta subunits can be unambiguously identified by their hypervariable CDR3 (Complement Determining Region 3) sequence. This is the site of V(D)J recombination encoding the principal site of antigen contact. The complexity and dynamics of the T-cell repertoire remain unknown because the potential repertoire size has made conventional sequence analysis intractable. Here, we use 5'-RACE, Illumina sequencing, and a novel short read assembly strategy to sample CDR3(beta) diversity in human T lymphocytes from peripheral blood. Assembly of 40.5 million short reads identified 33,664 distinct TCR(beta) clonotypes and provides precise measurements of CDR3(beta) length diversity, usage of nontemplated bases, sequence convergence, and preferences for TRBV (T-cell receptor beta variable gene) and TRBJ (T-cell receptor beta joining gene) gene usage and pairing. CDR3 length between conserved residues of TRBV and TRBJ ranged from 21 to 81 nucleotides (nt). TRBV gene usage ranged from 0.01% for TRBV17 to 24.6% for TRBV20-1. TRBJ gene usage ranged from 1.6% for TRBJ2-6 to 17.2% for TRBJ2-1. We identified 1573 examples of convergence where the same amino acid translation was specified by distinct CDR3(beta) nucleotide sequences. Direct sequence-based immunoprofiling will likely prove to be a useful tool for understanding repertoire dynamics in response to immune challenge, without a priori knowledge of antigen.

  3. The linkage arrangement of four rabbit beta-like globin genes.

    PubMed

    Lacy, E; Hardison, R C; Quon, D; Maniatis, T

    1979-12-01

    Four different regions of rabbit beta-like globin gene sequences designated beta 1, beta 2, beta 3 and beta 4 were identified in a set of clones isolated from a bacteriophage lambda library of chromosomal DNA fragments (Maniatis et al., 1978). Restriction mapping and blot hybridization (Southern, 1975) studies indicate that a subset of these clones containing beta 1 and beta 2 hybridizes to an adult beta-globin cDNA clone (Maniatis et al., 1976) more efficiently than to a human gamma-globin cDNA clone (Wilson et al., 1978), while another subset containing beta 3 and beta 4 displays the converse hybridization specificity. beta 1 was identified as the adult beta-globin gene, while beta 2, beta 3 and beta 4 have not been identified with any known rabbit globin polypeptides. Cross-hybridization and transcriptional orientation experiments indicate that the set of beta-like gene clones contains overlapping restriction fragments encompassing 44 kb of rabbit chromosomal DNA. In addition, all four genes have the same transcriptional orientation and are arranged in the order 5'-beta 4-beta 3-beta 2-beta 1-3'.

  4. Molecular characterization of the gene for human interleukin-1[beta] converting enzyme (IL1BC)

    SciTech Connect

    Cerretti, D.P.; Hollingsworth, L.T.; Kozlosky, C.J.; Nelson, N. ); Valentine, M.B. ); Shapiro, D.N.; Morris, S.W. Univ. of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN )

    1994-04-01

    Interleukin-1[beta] (IL-1[beta]) mediates a wide range of immune and inflammatory responses. The active cytokine is generated by proteolytic cleavage of an inactive precursor by a protease called the IL-1[beta] converting enzyme (ICE). A cDNA encoding this protease was recently isolated. A human genomic clone containing the ICE gene (IL1BC) was isolated using the cDNA as a probe. The gene consists of 10 exons spanning at least 10.6 kb. 5[prime]-anchored polymerase chain reaction indicated a single transcription start site [approximately]33 bp upstream of the initiator Met codon. The 5[prime]-flanking region does not have an apparent TATA box but may contain an initiator (Inr) promotor element. However, transcriptional activity could not be detected with a fusion gene containing the 5[prime]-flanking region linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (CAT) when transfected into the human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. Using the genomic IL1BC clone, the authors have confirmed the localization of the gene to chromosome 11 band q22.2-q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Correction of human. beta. sup S -globin gene by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Shesely, E.G.; Hyungsuk Kim; Shehee, W.R.; Smithies, O. ); Papayannopoulou, T. ); Popovich, B.W. )

    1991-05-15

    As a step toward using gene targeting for gene therapy, the authors have corrected a human {beta}{sup S}-globin gene to the normal {beta}{sup A} allele by homologous recombination in the mouse-human hybrid cell line BSM. BSM is derived from a mouse erythroleukemia cell line and carries a single human chromosome 11 with the {beta}{sup S}-globin allele. A {beta}{sup A}-globin targeting construct containing a unique oligomer and a neomycin-resistance gene was electroporated into the BSM cells, which were then placed under G418 selection. Then 126 resulting pools containing a total {approx}29,000 G418-resistant clones were screened by PCR for the presence of a targeted recombinant: 3 positive pools were identified. A targeted clone was isolated by replating one of the positive pools into smaller pools and rescreening by PCR, followed by dilution cloning. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the isolated clone had been targeted as planned. The correction of the {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A} was confirmed both by allele-specific PCR and by allele-specific antibodies. Expression studies comparing the uninduced and induced RNA levels in unmodified BSM cells and in the targeted clone showed no significant alteration in the ability of the targeted clone to undergo induction, despite the potentially disrupting presence of a transcriptionally active neomycin gene 5{prime} to the human {beta}{sup A}-globin gene. Thus gene targeting can correct a {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A}, and the use of a selectable helper gene need not significantly interfere with the induction of the corrected gene.

  6. Detection of genes mediating beta-lactamase production in isolates of enterobacteria recovered from wild pets in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sabry A.; Shobrak, Mohammed Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the genetic basis and types of beta-lactamase encountered among enterobacterial isolates of wild pets from the animal exhibit. Materials and Methods: A total of 17 beta-lactamase-producing enterobacteria recovered from fecal samples of wild pet animals were analyzed for a selected beta-lactamase gene by polymerase chain reaction. Results: Molecular analysis identified one or more β-lactamase-encoding genes in 14 enterobacterial isolates as a single or gene combination. The most frequent extended-spectrum β-lactamases types were TEM and CTX-M, and the most common AmpC enzymes were CMY-2 and DHA types. Conclusions: The study is the first in Saudi Arabia, have established the presence of β-lactamase-encoding genes in the fecal isolates of wild pets. PMID:27047051

  7. Gene expression of type 2 17 beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in scalp hairs of hirsute women.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Isabel O; Lhullier, Cintia; Brum, Ilma S; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2003-09-01

    Androgens are the main hormonal regulators of human hair growth and they are related to clinical conditions such as hirsutism. The aim of this study was to analyze the gene expression of androgen receptor (AR) and type 2 17 beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17 beta-HSD) in keratinocytes of plucked scalp hairs from hirsute patients and normal subjects. We studied 58 women with hirsutism (31 with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), 27 with idiopathic hirsutism (IH)); 15 control women; and 10 control men. Hirsutism was assessed by a modified Ferriman-Gallwey method. Hormonal status was assessed between days 2 and 10 of the menstrual cycle or on any day when the patients were amenorrheic. AR and type 2 17 beta-HSD mRNA levels were estimated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AR expression was similar in all groups. Type 2 17 beta-HSD gene expression in untreated hirsute patients was lower (2.1+/-0.10) than in normal women (3.1+/-0.17), and similar to men (1.8+/-0.22). Comparing hirsute patients, type 2 17 beta-HSD expression was higher in treated PCOS (3.0+/-0.34 versus 2.2+/-0.13) and IH patients (2.5+/-0.19 versus 2.0+/-0.15); hirsutism score was lower (P=0.003, PCOS; P=0.003, IH); and SHBG levels were higher (P=0.001, PCOS; P=0.024, IH) in treated patients. The free androgen index was lower in treated women (P=0.024 for the IH group). In conclusion, the lower expression of type 2 17 beta-HSD mRNA in scalp hairs of untreated hirsute patients suggests androgen metabolism disturbances with predominance of more potent androgens, as occurs in men. The enzyme's higher gene expression in treated hirsute patients could be an indirect evidence of restored enzyme activity and intracellular androgen metabolism.

  8. The genomic structure of the gene encoding the human transforming growth factor {beta} type II receptor (TGF-{beta} RII)

    SciTech Connect

    Takenoshita, Seiichi; Hagiwara, Koichi; Nagashima, Makoto; Gemma, Akihiko

    1996-09-01

    The genomic structure of the human transforming growth factor-{beta} type II receptor gene (TGF-{beta} RII) was determined by two PCR-based methods, the {open_quotes}long distance sequencer{close_quotes} method and the {open_quotes}promoter finder{close_quotes} method. Genomic fragments containing exons and adjacent introns were amplified by PCR, and the nucleotide sequences were determined by direct sequencing and subcloning sequencing. The TGF-{beta} RII protein is encoded by 567 codons in 7 exons. This is the first report about the genomic structure of a gene that belongs to the serine/threonine kinase type II receptor subfamily. Knowledge of the genomic structure of the TGF-{beta} RII gene will facilitate investigation of the TGF-{beta} RII gene will facilitate investigation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in normal human cells and of the aberrations occurring during carcinogenesis. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. beta-adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms and beta-blocker treatment outcomes in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pacanowski, M A; Gong, Y; Cooper-Dehoff, R M; Schork, N J; Shriver, M D; Langaee, T Y; Pepine, C J; Johnson, J A

    2008-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB1 and ADRB2) variants influence cardiovascular risk and beta-blocker responses in hypertension and heart failure. We evaluated the relationship between ADRB1 and ADRB2 haplotypes, cardiovascular risk (death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and nonfatal stroke), and atenolol-based vs. verapamil sustained-release (SR)-based antihypertensive therapy in 5,895 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. After an average of 2.8 years, death rates were higher in patients carrying the ADRB1 Ser49-Arg389 haplotype (hazard ratio (HR) 3.66, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.68-7.99). This mortality risk was significant in patients randomly assigned to verapamil SR (HR 8.58, 95% CI 2.06-35.8) but not atenolol (HR 2.31, 95% CI 0.82-6.55), suggesting a protective role for the beta-blocker. ADRB2 haplotype associations were divergent within the treatment groups but did not remain significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. ADRB1 haplotype variation is associated with mortality risk, and beta-blockers may be preferred in subgroups of patients defined by ADRB1 or ADRB2 polymorphisms.

  10. Effect of polymorphic variants of GH, Pit-1, and beta-LG genes on milk production of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Heidari, M; Azari, M A; Hasani, S; Khanahmadi, A; Zerehdaran, S

    2012-04-01

    Effect of polymorphic variants of growth hormone (GH), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), and Pit-1 genes on milk yield was analyzed in a Holstein herd. Genotypes of the cows for these genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Allele frequencies were 0.884 and 0.116 for L and V variants of GH, 0.170 and 0.830 for A and B variants of Pit-1, and 0.529 and 0.471 for A and B variants of beta-LG, respectively. GLM procedure of SAS software was used to test the effects of these genes on milk yield. Results indicated significant effects of these genes on milk yield (P < 0.05). Cows with LL genotype of GH produced more milk than cows with LVgenotype (P < 0.05). Also, for Pit-1 gene, animals with AB genotype produced more milk than BB genotype (P < 0.05). In the case of beta-LG gene, milk yield of animals with AA genotype was more than BB genotype (P < 0.01). Therefore, it might be concluded that homozygote genotypes of GH (LL) and beta-LG (AA) were superior compared to heterozygote genotypes, whereas, the heterozygote genotype of Pit-1 gene (AB) was desirable.

  11. Characterization of the mouse lymphotoxin-beta gene.

    PubMed

    Lawton, P; Nelson, J; Tizard, R; Browning, J L

    1995-01-01

    Lymphotoxin-beta (LT-beta) is a member of the TNF family of ligands which when expressed with lymphotoxin-alpha (LT-alpha, i.e., the original LT or TNF-beta) forms a heteromeric complex with LT-alpha on the cell surface. The mouse gene structure was determined by both cDNA cloning and analysis of a genomic DNA fragment encompassing the TNF/LT locus in the H-2 region of chromosome 17. The mouse and human genomic structures were found to be similar in terms of location in the class III region of the MHC; however, the mouse gene lacks one intron found in most members of the family. Both the cDNA and the genomic sequences revealed an altered splice donor in the conventional intron 2 position, rendering it nonfunctional. The altered gene retains an open reading frame such that an additional 66 amino acids are inserted into the stalk region connecting the transmembrane domain with the receptor binding domain encoded by exon 4 in this type II membrane protein. Northern analysis showed that this gene is expressed predominantly in lymphoid organs. The outlining of the complete mouse TNF locus will further studies of the relationship between these genes and immune function.

  12. Transcriptional activation of cloned human beta-globin genes by viral immediate-early gene products.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Treisman, R; Maniatis, T

    1983-11-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transfected into Hela cells, no beta-globin RNA is detected unless the gene is linked to a viral transcription enhancer. In this paper we show that trans-acting adenovirus and herpesvirus (pseudorabies) transcriptional regulatory proteins can circumvent this enhancer requirement for detectable beta-globin transcription in transient expression assays. The viral gene products can be provided by constitutively expressed, integrated viral genes in established cell lines, by viral infection of permissive cells, or by transfection of cells with bacterial plasmids carrying the viral immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate the utility of transient expression assays for studying regulatory mechanisms involving trans-acting factors. Analysis of beta-globin promoter mutants indicates that between 75 and 128 bp of sequence 5' to the mRNA cap site is required for enhancer-dependent transcription in Hela cells. In contrast, beta-globin transcription in the presence of viral immediate-early gene products requires only 36 bp of 5'-flanking sequence, which includes the TATA box. Thus both cis and trans-acting viral factors activate beta-globin gene transcription in transient expression experiments, but the mechanisms by which they act appear to be fundamentally different.

  13. Effect of side-chain amide thionation on turnover of beta-lactam substrates by beta-lactamases. Further evidence on the question of side-chain hydrogen-bonding in catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, R F; Krishnaraj, R; Xu, H

    1992-01-01

    Two side-chain-thionated beta-lactams, a penicillin and a cephalosporin, have been prepared and found to be not significantly poorer as substrates of typical serine (classes A and C) beta-lactamases than are their oxo analogues. This result is interpreted to mean that any hydrogen-bonding site on these enzymes for the beta-lactam side-chain amide carbonyl group must be flexible and is more likely to be a passive rather than active or essential feature of the active site. Previously, data from crystal structures and site-directed mutagenesis had suggested that the side chain of Asn-132 of class-A beta-lactamases, a component of the conserved SDN loop, forms a hydrogen bond with the side-chain carbonyl of the beta-lactam substrate and may provide significant transition-state stabilization during catalysis. The thionocephalosporin was also equally as good as its oxo analogue as a substrate of the class-B beta-lactamase II of Bacillus cereus and not significantly less effective as an inhibitor of the Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase; a tight hydrogen-bond donor site for the beta-lactam side-chain amide is apparently not present in these enzymes either. PMID:1417747

  14. Effect of side-chain amide thionation on turnover of beta-lactam substrates by beta-lactamases. Further evidence on the question of side-chain hydrogen-bonding in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Pratt, R F; Krishnaraj, R; Xu, H

    1992-09-15

    Two side-chain-thionated beta-lactams, a penicillin and a cephalosporin, have been prepared and found to be not significantly poorer as substrates of typical serine (classes A and C) beta-lactamases than are their oxo analogues. This result is interpreted to mean that any hydrogen-bonding site on these enzymes for the beta-lactam side-chain amide carbonyl group must be flexible and is more likely to be a passive rather than active or essential feature of the active site. Previously, data from crystal structures and site-directed mutagenesis had suggested that the side chain of Asn-132 of class-A beta-lactamases, a component of the conserved SDN loop, forms a hydrogen bond with the side-chain carbonyl of the beta-lactam substrate and may provide significant transition-state stabilization during catalysis. The thionocephalosporin was also equally as good as its oxo analogue as a substrate of the class-B beta-lactamase II of Bacillus cereus and not significantly less effective as an inhibitor of the Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase; a tight hydrogen-bond donor site for the beta-lactam side-chain amide is apparently not present in these enzymes either.

  15. Flow cytometric analysis of expression of interleukin-2 receptor beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, S.; Oshimi, K.; Tsudo, M.; Miyasaka, M.; Teramura, M.; Masuda, M.; Motoji, T.; Mizoguchi, H. )

    1990-08-15

    We analyzed the expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells from 44 patients by flow cytometric analysis using the IL-2R beta chain-specific monoclonal antibody, designated Mik-beta 1. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the expression of the IL-2R beta chain on granular lymphocytes (GLs) from all eight patients with granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders (GLPDs), on adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells from all three patients with ATL, and on T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells from one of three patients with T-ALL. Although GLs from all the GLPD patients expressed the IL-2R beta chain alone and not the IL-2R alpha chain (Tac-antigen: p55), ATL and T-ALL cells expressing the beta chain coexpressed the alpha chain. In two of seven patients with common ALL (cALL) and in both patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the leukemic cells expressed the alpha chain alone. Neither the alpha chain nor the beta chain was expressed on leukemic cells from the remaining 28 patients, including all 18 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, five of seven patients with cALL, all three patients with multiple myeloma, and two of three patients with T-ALL. These results indicate that three different forms of IL-2R chain expression exist on leukemic cells: the alpha chain alone; the beta chain alone; and both the alpha and beta chains. To examine whether the results obtained by flow cytometric analysis actually reflect functional aspects of the expressed IL-2Rs, we studied the specific binding of 125I-labeled IL-2 (125I-IL-2) to leukemic cells in 18 of the 44 patients. In addition, we performed 125I-IL-2 crosslinking studies in seven patients. The results of IL-2R expression of both 125I-IL-2 binding assay and crosslinking studies were in agreement with those obtained by flow cytometric analysis.

  16. The role of EKLF in human beta-globin gene competition.

    PubMed

    Wijgerde, M; Gribnau, J; Trimborn, T; Nuez, B; Philipsen, S; Grosveld, F; Fraser, P

    1996-11-15

    We have investigated the role of erythroid Kruppel-like factor (EKLF) in expression of the human beta-globin genes in compound EKLF knockout/human beta-locus transgenic mice. EKLF affects only the adult mouse beta-globin genes in homozygous knockout mice; heterozygous mice are unaffected. Here we show that EKLF knockout mice express the human epsilon and gamma-globin genes normally in embryonic red cells. However, fetal liver erythropoiesis, which is marked by a period of gamma- and beta-gene competition in which the genes are alternately transcribed, exhibits an altered ratio of gamma- to beta-gene transcription. EKLF heterozygous fetal livers display a decrease in the number of transcriptionally active beta genes with a reciprocal increase in the number of transcriptionally active gamma genes. beta-Gene transcription is absent in homozygous knockout fetuses with coincident changes in chromatin structure at the beta promoter. There is a further increase in the number of transcriptionally active gamma genes and accompanying gamma gene promoter chromatin alterations. These results indicate that EKLF plays a major role in gamma- and beta-gene competition and suggest that EKLF is important in stabilizing the interaction between the Locus Control Region and the beta-globin gene. In addition, these findings provide further evidence that developmental modulation of globin gene expression within individual cells is accomplished by altering the frequency and/or duration of transcriptional periods of a gene rather than changing the rate of transcription.

  17. Allelic polymorphism in IL-1 beta and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) genes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bioque, G; Crusius, J B; Koutroubakis, I; Bouma, G; Kostense, P J; Meuwissen, S G; Peña, A S

    1995-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that allele 2 of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) gene is over-represented in ulcerative colitis (UC). Healthy individuals carrying allele 2 of this gene have increased production of IL-1Ra protein. Since the final outcome of the biological effects of IL-1 beta may depend on the relative proportion of these two cytokines, we have studied if a TaqI polymorphism in the IL-1 beta gene, which is relevant to IL-1 beta protein production, may be involved in the genetic susceptibility to UC and Crohn's disease (CD), in association with the established IL-1Ra gene polymorphism. Polymorphisms in the closely linked genes for IL-1 beta and IL-1Ra were typed in 100 unrelated Dutch patients with UC, 79 with CD, and 71 healthy controls. The polymorphic regions in exon 5 of the IL-1 beta gene and in intron 2 of the IL-1Ra gene, were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. The IL-1 beta allele frequencies in UC and CD patients did not differ from those in healthy controls. In order to study if the IL-1 beta gene polymorphism might participate synergistically with the IL-1Ra gene polymorphism in susceptibility to UC and CD, individuals were distributed into carriers and non-carriers of allele 2 of the genes encoding IL-1 beta and IL-1Ra, in each of the patient groups and controls. Results indicated a significant association of this pair of genes, estimated by the odds ratio (OR) after performing Fisher's exact test, in the UC group (P = 0.023, OR = 2.81), as well as in the CD group (P = 0.01, OR = 3.79). Thus, non-carriers of IL-1 beta allele 2 were more often present in the subgroup of patients carrying the IL-1Ra allele 2. By contrast, no association of these alleles was detected in the group of healthy controls (P = 1.00, OR = 0.92). These results suggest that the IL-1 beta/IL-1Ra allelic cluster may participate in defining the biological basis of predisposition to chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:7586694

  18. beta(S)-Globin gene cluster haplotypes in the West Bank of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Samarah, Fekri; Ayesh, Suhail; Athanasiou, Miranda; Christakis, John; Vavatsi, Norma

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder of the beta-globin chain. In Palestine it is accompanied by a low level of Hb F (mean 5.14%) and a severe clinical presentation. In this study, 59 Palestinian patients, homozygotes for Hb S were studied for their haplotype background. Eight polymorphic sites in the beta-globin gene cluster were examined. The Benin haplotype was predominant with a frequency of 88.1%, followed by a frequency of 5.1% for the Bantu haplotype. One chromosome was found to carry the Cameroon haplotype (0.85%). Three atypical haplotypes were also found (5.95%). Heterogeneity was observed in Hb F production, ranging between 1.5 and 17.0%, whereas the (G)gamma ratio was homogeneous among all haplotypes with a normal amount of about 41%. Our results are in agreement with previous reports of the Benin haplotype origin in the Mediterranean.

  19. The beta104-109 sequence is essential for the secretion of correctly folded single-chain beta alpha horse LH/CG and for its FSH activity.

    PubMed

    Galet, Colette; Guillou, Florian; Foulon-Gauze, Florence; Combarnous, Yves; Chopineau, Maryse

    2009-10-01

    The dual LH and FSH activity of the equine LH (eLH)/equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) in heterologous species makes eLH/CG a good model to study structure/function relationships of gonadotropins. In order to bypass the problem of intracellular association of the heterodimer, a recombinant single-chain beta alpha eLH/CG was used to identify sequences in the beta-subunit involved in the secretion and activities of the hormone. The C-terminal region of the beta-subunit was progressively truncated. All resulting truncated single-chains were secreted in the media as detected by an anti-beta peptide antibody in reducing conditions. However, using a conformation sensitive ELISA we show that the truncated single-chains were differently recognized: deletion of the last 40 amino acids of the beta-subunit (beta109alpha eLH/CG) resulted in a 90% decrease in the recognized correctly folded hormone compared with the full-length beta alpha eLH/CG single-chain and no properly folded hormone was detected in the secretion medium when the last 46 amino acids of the beta-subunit were deleted (beta103alpha eLH/CG). We thus focused on the six amino acids sequence 104-109, which belongs to the seat-belt region. Mutation of the 104-109 sequence in alanines in the full-length beta alpha eLH/CG (beta104-109Ala alpha) led to a 50% decrease in the production of properly folded hormone in COS-7 as well as in alphaT3 pituitary cells. Moreover, the FSH activity of this mutant was decreased by 70% whereas its LH activity remained intact. These data lead us to conclude that the 104-109 region of the beta eLH/CG subunit is essential for the secretion of a fully folded beta alpha eLH/CG and for its FSH activity but not for its LH activity.

  20. Peyer's patch-specific lymphocyte homing receptors consist of a VLA-4-like alpha chain associated with either of two integrin beta chains, one of which is novel.

    PubMed Central

    Holzmann, B; Weissman, I L

    1989-01-01

    Lymphocytes home to various lymphoid organs by adhering to and migrating through specialized high endothelial venules (HEV). The murine cell surface heterodimer LPAM-1 is involved in the homing of lymphocytes to mucosal sites (Peyer's patches). LPAM-1 has an alpha subunit (alpha 4m) analogous to the alpha chain of the human integrin molecule VLA-4. Here we show that the LPAM-1 beta subunit (beta p) is immunochemically and biochemically distinct from previously defined integrin beta subunits, suggesting that beta p represents a novel integrin beta subunit. Depending on the cellular source two alternative beta subunits, beta p and integrin beta 1, can be isolated in association with alpha 4m. Therefore, alpha 4m is the common subunit of the unique integrin LPAM-1 (alpha 4m beta p) and of the heterodimer LPAM-2 (alpha 4m beta 1), which is analogous to VLA-4. Antibody-blocking experiments suggest that, in addition to LPAM-1, LPAM-2 is also involved in the organ-specific adhesion of lymphocytes to Peyer's patch HEV. Images PMID:2670559

  1. Beta-oxidation in hepatocyte cultures from mice with peroxisomal gene knockouts.

    PubMed

    Dirkx, Ruud; Meyhi, Els; Asselberghs, Stanny; Reddy, Janardan; Baes, Myriam; Van Veldhoven, Paul P

    2007-06-08

    Beta-oxidation of carboxylates takes place both in mitochondria and peroxisomes and in each pathway parallel enzymes exist for each conversion step. In order to better define the substrate specificities of these enzymes and in particular the elusive role of peroxisomal MFP-1, hepatocyte cultures from mice with peroxisomal gene knockouts were used to assess the consequences on substrate degradation. Hepatocytes from mice with liver selective elimination of peroxisomes displayed severely impaired oxidation of 2-methylhexadecanoic acid, the bile acid intermediate trihydroxycholestanoic acid (THCA), and tetradecanedioic acid. In contrast, mitochondrial beta-oxidation rates of palmitate were doubled, despite the severely affected inner mitochondrial membrane. As expected, beta-oxidation of the branched chain compounds 2-methylhexadecanoic acid and THCA was reduced in hepatocytes from mice with inactivation of MFP-2. More surprisingly, dicarboxylic fatty acid oxidation was impaired in MFP-1 but not in MFP-2 knockout hepatocytes, indicating that MFP-1 might play more than an obsolete role in peroxisomal beta-oxidation.

  2. Light chain replacement: a new model for antibody gene rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    A functional B cell antigen receptor is thought to regulate antibody gene rearrangement either by stopping further rearrangement (exclusion) or by promoting additional rearrangement (editing). We have developed a new model to study the regulation of antibody gene rearrangement. In this model, we used gene targeting to replace the J kappa region with a functional V kappa-J kappa light chain gene. Two different strains of mice were created; one, V kappa 4R, has a V kappa 4-J kappa 4 rearrangement followed by a downstream J kappa 5 segment, while the other, V kappa 8R, has a V kappa 8-J kappa 5 light chain. Here, we analyze the influence of these functional light chains on light chain rearrangement. We show that some V kappa 4R and V kappa 8R B cells only have the V kappa R light chain rearrangement, whereas others undergo additional rearrangements. Additional rearrangement can occur not only at the other kappa allele or isotype (lambda), but also at the targeted locus in both V kappa 4R and V kappa 8R. Rearrangement to the downstream J kappa 5 segment is observed in V kappa 4R, as is deletion of the targeted locus in both V kappa 4R and V kappa 8R. The V kappa R models illustrate that a productively rearranged light chain can either terminate further rearrangement or allow further rearrangement. We attribute the latter to editing of autoantibodies and to corrections of dysfunctional receptors. PMID:7629511

  3. Salt, phosphate and the Bohr effect at the hemoglobin beta chain C terminus studied by hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    Louie, G; Englander, J J; Englander, S W

    1988-06-20

    Hydrogen exchange experiments using functional labeling and fragment separation methods were performed to study interactions at the C terminus of the hemoglobin beta subunit that contribute to the phosphate effect and the Bohr effect. The results show that the H-exchange behavior of several peptide NH at the beta chain C terminus is determined by a transient, concerted unfolding reaction involving five or more residues, from the C-terminal His146 beta through at least Ala142 beta, and that H-exchange rate can be used to measure the stabilization free energy of interactions, both individually and collectively, at this locus. In deoxy hemoglobin at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, the removal of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) or pyrophosphate (loss of a salt to His143 beta) speeds the exchange of the beta chain C-terminal peptide NH protons by 2.5-fold (at high salt), indicating a destabilization of the C-terminal segment by 0.5 kcal of free energy. Loss of the His146 beta 1 to Asp94 beta 1 salt link speeds all these protons by 6.3-fold, indicating a bond stabilization free energy of 1.0 kcal. When both these salt links are removed together, the effect is found to be strictly additive; all the protons exchange faster by 16-fold indicating a loss of 1.5 kcal in stabilization free energy. Added salt is slightly destabilizing when DPG is present but provides some increased stability, in the 0.2 kcal range, when DPG is absent. The total allosteric stabilization energy at each beta chain C terminus in deoxy hemoglobin under these conditions is measured to be 3.8 kcal (pH 7.4, 0 degrees C, with DPG). In oxy hemoglobin at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, stability at the beta chain C terminus is essentially independent of salt concentration, and the NES modification, which in deoxy hemoglobin blocks the His146 beta to Asp94 beta salt link, has no destabilizing effect, either at high or low salt. These results appear to show that the His146 beta salt link, which participates importantly in the

  4. Localization of a clathrin heavy chain gene to chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.; Buckler, A.; Trofatter, J.

    1994-09-01

    Random isolation of exons from human chromosome 22 using the exon amplification procedure has identified a number of sequences having similarity to previously cloned genes. One exon was found to be highly similar to clathrin heavy chain genes. Previously, a putative clathrin heavy chain gene has been mapped to chromosome 17, but comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of this gene to the other clathrin genes in public databases indicates that there is little or no similarity between the chromosome 17 gene and the others. The exon isolated from chromosome 22 shows significant similarity to the other clathrin genes but not the chromosome 17 sequence. This high level of peptide similarity extends even to the Drosophila melanogaster clathrin gene. Somatic cell hybrids containing different portions of chromosome 22 localize the gene above D22S193 placing it within the 22p12-q11 region, which is a particularly disease-rich region of the chromosome. A YAC and cosmid contig has been constructed surrounding the gene and isolation of a full-length cDNA is in progress. The localization of this gene is especially important given the role of clathrin with regards to receptor-mediated endocytosis and signal transduction.

  5. A chain reaction approach to modelling gene pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, James J.; Soong, Seng-jaw; Lamartiniere, Coral; Barnes, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Background Of great interest in cancer prevention is how nutrient components affect gene pathways associated with the physiological events of puberty. Nutrient-gene interactions may cause changes in breast or prostate cells and, therefore, may result in cancer risk later in life. Analysis of gene pathways can lead to insights about nutrient-gene interactions and the development of more effective prevention approaches to reduce cancer risk. To date, researchers have relied heavily upon experimental assays (such as microarray analysis, etc.) to identify genes and their associated pathways that are affected by nutrient and diets. However, the vast number of genes and combinations of gene pathways, coupled with the expense of the experimental analyses, has delayed the progress of gene-pathway research. The development of an analytical approach based on available test data could greatly benefit the evaluation of gene pathways, and thus advance the study of nutrient-gene interactions in cancer prevention. In the present study, we have proposed a chain reaction model to simulate gene pathways, in which the gene expression changes through the pathway are represented by the species undergoing a set of chemical reactions. We have also developed a numerical tool to solve for the species changes due to the chain reactions over time. Through this approach we can examine the impact of nutrient-containing diets on the gene pathway; moreover, transformation of genes over time with a nutrient treatment can be observed numerically, which is very difficult to achieve experimentally. We apply this approach to microarray analysis data from an experiment which involved the effects of three polyphenols (nutrient treatments), epigallo-catechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), genistein, and resveratrol, in a study of nutrient-gene interaction in the estrogen synthesis pathway during puberty. Results In this preliminary study, the estrogen synthesis pathway was simulated by a chain reaction model. By

  6. A chain reaction approach to modelling gene pathways.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gary C; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, James J; Soong, Seng-Jaw; Lamartiniere, Coral; Barnes, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Of great interest in cancer prevention is how nutrient components affect gene pathways associated with the physiological events of puberty. Nutrient-gene interactions may cause changes in breast or prostate cells and, therefore, may result in cancer risk later in life. Analysis of gene pathways can lead to insights about nutrient-gene interactions and the development of more effective prevention approaches to reduce cancer risk. To date, researchers have relied heavily upon experimental assays (such as microarray analysis, etc.) to identify genes and their associated pathways that are affected by nutrient and diets. However, the vast number of genes and combinations of gene pathways, coupled with the expense of the experimental analyses, has delayed the progress of gene-pathway research. The development of an analytical approach based on available test data could greatly benefit the evaluation of gene pathways, and thus advance the study of nutrient-gene interactions in cancer prevention. In the present study, we have proposed a chain reaction model to simulate gene pathways, in which the gene expression changes through the pathway are represented by the species undergoing a set of chemical reactions. We have also developed a numerical tool to solve for the species changes due to the chain reactions over time. Through this approach we can examine the impact of nutrient-containing diets on the gene pathway; moreover, transformation of genes over time with a nutrient treatment can be observed numerically, which is very difficult to achieve experimentally. We apply this approach to microarray analysis data from an experiment which involved the effects of three polyphenols (nutrient treatments), epigallo-catechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), genistein, and resveratrol, in a study of nutrient-gene interaction in the estrogen synthesis pathway during puberty. RESULTS: In this preliminary study, the estrogen synthesis pathway was simulated by a chain reaction model. By

  7. Lactogenic hormonal induction of long distance interactions between beta-casein gene regulatory elements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactogenic hormone regulation of beta-casein gene expression in mammary epithelial cells provides, an excellent model in which to study the mechanisms by which steroid and peptide hormone signaling control gene expression. Prolactin- and glucocorticoid-mediated induction of beta-casein gene express...

  8. Gene Prioritization by Compressive Data Fusion and Chaining

    PubMed Central

    Žitnik, Marinka; Nam, Edward A.; Dinh, Christopher; Kuspa, Adam; Shaulsky, Gad; Zupan, Blaž

    2015-01-01

    Data integration procedures combine heterogeneous data sets into predictive models, but they are limited to data explicitly related to the target object type, such as genes. Collage is a new data fusion approach to gene prioritization. It considers data sets of various association levels with the prediction task, utilizes collective matrix factorization to compress the data, and chaining to relate different object types contained in a data compendium. Collage prioritizes genes based on their similarity to several seed genes. We tested Collage by prioritizing bacterial response genes in Dictyostelium as a novel model system for prokaryote-eukaryote interactions. Using 4 seed genes and 14 data sets, only one of which was directly related to the bacterial response, Collage proposed 8 candidate genes that were readily validated as necessary for the response of Dictyostelium to Gram-negative bacteria. These findings establish Collage as a method for inferring biological knowledge from the integration of heterogeneous and coarsely related data sets. PMID:26465776

  9. DNP-specific/class I MHC-restricted suppressor molecules bear determinants of the T cell receptor alpha- and beta-chains. The V beta 8+ chain dictates restriction to either K or D.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, R L; Kubo, R T; Moorhead, J W

    1990-10-01

    To examine in greater detail the relationship between DNP-specific/class I MHC-restricted suppressor molecules (SSF) that inhibit contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene and the receptors on the T cells that produce them, we have generated two T cell hybridomas that can be induced to produce and secrete these molecules. In order to become activated to produce SSF, the Ts 15.15 and 15.31 cells required recognition of complexes of DNP/Dd on presenting cells. The suppressor molecules produced by each of the Ts hybrids had the same specificity, recognizing DNP/Dd on cells in the immune lymph node cell target population. The activation of the Ts hybrids was blocked when the cells were treated with the anti-V beta 8 antibody F23.1 before coculture with the DNP-presenting cells. Reduction of the 15.15 and 15.31 SSF followed by affinity chromatography on DNP-bovine-gamma-globulin-Sepharose beads indicated that these molecules are dimers and that one of the chains (Ag-binding(AgB] binds to cellfree DNP and one (non-Ag-binding (NAgB) chain) does not. The AgB chain was found to express an epitope bound by a mAb specific for a TCR alpha-chain-constant region determinant. Alternatively, the NAgB chain expressed an epitope bound by the anti-V beta 8 mAb F23.1. Active hybrid suppressor molecules were generated by combining the NAgB chain from a DNP-specific/H-2Kd-restricted SSF (produced by Ts hybridoma 3-10) with the AgB chain from Ts 15.31 and by combining the NAgB chain from Ts cell 15.15 with the 3-10 AgB chain. In each case, the class I MHC element (i.e., Kd or Dd) restricting the activity of these hybrid SSF correlated with the source of the V beta 8+, NAgB chain. Thus, these secreted immunoregulatory molecules have the Ag/MHC specificity of the T cells producing them and are structurally and serologically related to the TCR-alpha/beta. The results further suggest that for some hapten-specific/class I MHC-restricted TCR, the alpha-chain may have avidity for the

  10. Isolation and identification of a cDNA clone corresponding to an HLA-DR antigen beta chain.

    PubMed

    Wiman, K; Larhammar, D; Claesson, L; Gustafsson, K; Schenning, L; Bill, P; Böhme, J; Denaro, M; Dobberstein, B; Hammerling, U; Kvist, S; Servenius, B; Sundelin, J; Peterson, P A; Rask, L

    1982-03-01

    The HLA-D locus in the major histocompatibility complex controls the expression of the genetically polymorphic HLA-DR antigens. mRNA coding for the beta chains of these antigens was partially purified from the human lymphoblastoid cell line Raji. The mRNA was copied into double-stranded cDNA and cloned in Escherichia coli. One clone, pDR-beta-1, obtained by hybrid selection, carries a 1070-base-pair insert comprising all of the coding region except the signal sequence and a substantial portion of the untranslated region. To identify pDR-beta-1, highly purified HLA-DR antigen beta chains derived from Raji cells were subjected to NH2-terminal amino acid sequence determination. This sequence displayed extensive homology with that deduced from the nucleotide sequence at the 5' end of the pDR-beta-1 coding region. Taken together, the amino acid and nucleotide sequences strongly argue in favor of Raji cells containing at least two beta-chain loci.

  11. The amino acid sequence of Canada goose (Branta canadensis) and mute swan (Cygnus olor) hemoglobins. Two different species with identical beta-chains.

    PubMed

    Oberthür, W; Godovac-Zimmermann, J; Braunitzer, G; Wiesner, H

    1982-08-01

    The amino acid sequences of the alpha- and beta-chains from the major hemoglobin component (HbA) of Canada goose (Branta canadensis) and mute swan (Cygnus olor) are given. The alpha-chains are of the alpha A-type, since alpha D-type was expressed but only found in low concentrations. By homologous comparison, greylag goose hemoglobin (Anser anser) and Canada goose hemoglobin alpha-chains differ by two exchanges, and beta-chains by three exchanges. A valine substitution for threonine was found at position alpha 34 (B15). This exchange is a result of a two point mutation. Thus, there are three nucleotide mutations in alpha-chains, as in beta-chains. Substitutions in positions alpha 34 (B15) and beta 125 (H3) have modified intersubunit contacts (alpha 1 beta 1-contacts). A comparison of mute swan hemoglobin with greylag goose hemoglobin shows four exchanges in alpha-chains and three in beta-chains. Canada goose and mute swan have identical beta-chains, while alpha-chains differ in two amino acids. One of these exchanges is implicated in one of the alpha 1 beta 1-contact points (alpha 34) where isoleucine substitution for valine was found. Comparison of hemoglobins from different species in the same tribe (Anserini) shows a high homology between Canada goose and mute swan hemoglobins.

  12. Genomic evidence for independent origins of beta-like globin genes in monotremes and therian mammals.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Juan C; Hoffmann, Federico G; Storz, Jay F

    2008-02-05

    Phylogenetic reconstructions of the beta-globin gene family in vertebrates have revealed that developmentally regulated systems of hemoglobin synthesis have been reinvented multiple times in independent lineages. For example, the functional differentiation of embryonic and adult beta-like globin genes occurred independently in birds and mammals. In both taxa, the embryonic beta-globin gene is exclusively expressed in primitive erythroid cells derived from the yolk sac. However, the "epsilon-globin" gene in birds is not orthologous to the epsilon-globin gene in mammals, because they are independently derived from lineage-specific duplications of a proto beta-globin gene. Here, we report evidence that the early and late expressed beta-like globin genes in monotremes and therian mammals (marsupials and placental mammals) are the products of independent duplications of a proto beta-globin gene in each of these two lineages. Results of our analysis of genomic sequence data from a large number of vertebrate taxa, including sequence from the recently completed platypus genome, reveal that the epsilon- and beta-globin genes of therian mammals arose via duplication of a proto beta-globin gene after the therian/monotreme split. Our analysis of genomic sequence from the platypus also revealed the presence of a duplicate pair of beta-like globin genes that originated via duplication of a proto beta-globin gene in the monotreme lineage. This discovery provides evidence that, in different lineages of mammals, descendent copies of the same proto beta-globin gene may have been independently neofunctionalized to perform physiological tasks associated with oxygen uptake and storage during embryonic development.

  13. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin G (SEG) in Complex with a Mouse T-cell Receptor Beta Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, M.M.; Robinson, H.; Cho, S.; De Marzi, M. C.; Kerzic, M. C.; Mariuzza, R. A.; Malchiodi, E. L.

    2011-01-14

    Superantigens (SAgs) are bacterial or viral toxins that bind MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules and T-cell receptor (TCR) in a nonconventional manner, inducing T-cell activation that leads to inflammatory cytokine production, which may result in acute toxic shock. In addition, the emerging threat of purpura fulminans and community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emphasizes the importance of a better characterization of SAg binding to their natural ligands that may allow the development of reagents to neutralize their action. The three-dimensional structure of the complex between a mouse TCR {beta} chain (mV{beta}8.2) and staphylococcal enterotoxin G (SEG) at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution revealed a binding site that does not conserve the 'hot spots' present in mV{beta}8.2-SEC2, mV{beta}8.2-SEC3, mV{beta}8.2-SEB, and mV{beta}8.2-SPEA complexes. Analysis of the mV{beta}8.2-SEG interface allowed us to explain the higher affinity of this complex compared with the others, which may account for the early activation of T-cells bearing mV{beta}8.2 by SEG. This mode of interaction between SEG and mV{beta}8.2 could be an adaptive advantage to bestow on the pathogen a faster rate of colonization of the host.

  14. Biased Immunoglobulin Light Chain Gene Usage in the Shark.

    PubMed

    Iacoangeli, Anna; Lui, Anita; Naik, Ushma; Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin; Hsu, Ellen

    2015-10-15

    This study of a large family of κ L chain clusters in nurse shark completes the characterization of its classical Ig gene content (two H chain isotypes, μ and ω, and four L chain isotypes, κ, λ, σ, and σ-2). The shark κ clusters are minigenes consisting of a simple VL-JL-CL array, where V to J recombination occurs over an ~500-bp interval, and functional clusters are widely separated by at least 100 kb. Six out of ~39 κ clusters are prerearranged in the germline (germline joined). Unlike the complex gene organization and multistep assembly process of Ig in mammals, each shark Ig rearrangement, somatic or in the germline, appears to be an independent event localized to the minigene. This study examined the expression of functional, nonproductive, and sterile transcripts of the κ clusters compared with the other three L chain isotypes. κ cluster usage was investigated in young sharks, and a skewed pattern of split gene expression was observed, one similar in functional and nonproductive rearrangements. These results show that the individual activation of the spatially distant κ clusters is nonrandom. Although both split and germline-joined κ genes are expressed, the latter are prominent in young animals and wane with age. We speculate that, in the shark, the differential activation of the multiple isotypes can be advantageously used in receptor editing.

  15. Biased immunoglobulin light chain gene usage in the shark1

    PubMed Central

    Iacoangeli, Anna; Lui, Anita; Naik, Ushma; Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin; Hsu, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This study of a large family of kappa light (L) chain clusters in nurse shark completes the characterization of its classical immunoglobulin (Ig) gene content (two heavy chain classes, mu and omega, and four L chain isotopes, kappa, lambda, sigma, and sigma-2). The shark kappa clusters are minigenes consisting of a simple VL-JL-CL array, where V to J recombination occurs over a ~500 bp interval, and functional clusters are widely separated by at least 100 kb. Six out of ca. 39 kappa clusters are pre-rearranged in the germline (GL-joined). Unlike the complex gene organization and multistep assembly process of Ig in mammals, each shark Ig rearrangement, somatic or in the germline, appears to be an independent event localized to the minigene. This study examined the expression of functional, non-productive, and sterile transcripts of the kappa clusters compared to the other three L chain isotypes. Kappa cluster usage was investigated in young sharks, and a skewed pattern of split gene expression was observed, one similar in functional and non-productive rearrangements. These results show that the individual activation of the spatially distant kappa clusters is non-random. Although both split and GL-joined kappa genes are expressed, the latter are prominent in young animals and wane with age. We speculate that, in the shark, the differential activation of the multiple isotypes can be advantageously used in receptor editing. PMID:26342033

  16. Lack of neighborhood effects from a transcriptionally active phosphoglycerate kinase-neo cassette located between the murine beta-major and beta-minor globin genes.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, R M; Lu, Z H; Behl, R; Holt, J M; Ackers, G K; Ley, T J

    2001-07-01

    For the treatment of beta-globin gene defects, a homologous recombination-mediated gene correction approach would provide advantages over random integration-based gene therapy strategies. However, "neighborhood effects" from retained selectable marker genes in the targeted locus are among the key issues that must be taken into consideration for any attempt to use this strategy for gene correction. An Ala-to-Ile mutation was created in the beta6 position of the mouse beta-major globin gene (beta(6I)) as a step toward the development of a murine model system that could serve as a platform for therapeutic gene correction studies. The marked beta-major gene can be tracked at the level of DNA, RNA, and protein, allowing investigation of the impact of a retained phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK)-neo cassette located between the mutant beta-major and beta-minor globin genes on expression of these 2 neighboring genes. Although the PGK-neo cassette was expressed at high levels in adult erythroid cells, the abundance of the beta(6I) mRNA was indistinguishable from that of the wild-type counterpart in bone marrow cells. Similarly, the output from the beta-minor globin gene was also normal. Therefore, in this specific location, the retained, transcriptionally active PGK-neo cassette does not disrupt the regulated expression of the adult beta-globin genes. (Blood. 2001;98:65-73)

  17. [Perissodactyla: the primary structure of hemoglobins from the lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris): glutamic acid in position 2 of the beta chains].

    PubMed

    Mazur, G; Braunitzer, G

    1984-09-01

    The hemoglobins from a lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) were analysed and the complete primary structure is described. The globin chains were separated on CM cellulose column in 8M urea and the amino-acid sequences were determined in the liquid phase sequenator. The results show that globin consists of two alpha chains (alpha I and alpha II) and beta major and beta minor components. The alpha chains differ only at one position: alpha I contains aspartic acid and alpha II glycine. The beta chains are heterogeneous: aspartic and glutamic acid were found at position beta 21 and beta 73 of the beta major components and asparagine and serine at position beta 139. In the beta minor components four positions were found with more than one amino acid, namely beta 2, beta 4, beta 6 and beta 56. The sequences are compared with those of man, horse and rhinoceros. Four residues of horse methemoglobin, which are involved in the alpha 1 beta 1 contacts are substituted in tapir hemoglobins. In the alpha chains: alpha 107(G14)Ser----Val, alpha 111-(G18) Val----Leu, alpha 115(GH3) Asn----Asp or Gly; in the beta chains: beta 116(G18) Arg----Gln. The amino acid at beta 2 of the major components is glutamic acid while glutamine and histidine are found in the minor components. Although glutamic acid, a binding site for ATP, does not interact with 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, glutamine and histidine in the minor components are responsible for the slight effect of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate on tapir hemoglobin.

  18. Stimulatory effect of Crocus sativus (saffron) on beta2-adrenoceptors of guinea pig tracheal chains.

    PubMed

    Nemati, H; Boskabady, M H; Ahmadzadef Vostakolaei, H

    2008-12-01

    To study the mechanism(s) of the relaxant effects of Crocus sativus (Iridaceae), the stimulatory effect of aqueous-ethanolic extracts of this plant and one of its constituent, safranal was examined on beta-adrenoceptors in tracheal chains of guinea pigs. The beta(2)-adrenergic stimulatory was tested by performing the cumulative concentration-response curves of isoprenaline-induced relaxation of pre-contracted isolated guinea pig tracheal chains. The studied solutions were included two concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract from Crocus sativus (0.1 and 0.2g%), safranal (1.25 and 2.5 microg), 10nM propranolol, and saline. The study was done in two different conditions including: non-incubated (group 1, n=9) and incubated tissues with 1 microM chlorpheniramine (group 2, n=6). The results showed clear leftward shifts in isoprenaline curves obtained in the presence of only higher concentration of the extract in group 1 and its both concentrations in group 2 compared with that of saline. The EC(50) (the effective concentration of isoprenaline, causing 50% of maximum response) obtained in the presence of both concentrations of the extract (0.17+/-0.06 and 0.12+/-0.02) and safranal (0.22+/-0.05 and 0.22+/-0.05) in group 1 and only in the presence of two concentrations of the extract (1.16+/-0.31 and 0.68+/-0.21) in group 2 was significantly lower compared to saline (1.00+/-0.22 and 4.06+/-1.04 for groups 1 and 2, respectively) (p<0.05-0.001). The maximum responses obtained in the presence of both concentrations of the extract and safranal in group 1 were significantly lower than that of saline (p<0.005 for all cases). All values (CR-1=(EC(50) obtained in the presence of active substances/EC(50), obtained in the presence of saline)-1) obtained in the presence of higher concentrations of extract in group 1, its both concentrations and higher concentration of safranal in group 2 were negative and there were significant differences in this value between propranolol and

  19. Human T-cell receptor v{beta} gene polymorphism and multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S.; Charmley, P.; Birchfield, R.I.; Concannon, P.

    1995-04-01

    Population-based genetic associations have been reported between RFLPs detected with probes corresponding to the genes encoding the {beta} chain of the T-cell receptor for antigen (RCRB) and a variety of autoimmune disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis (MS), these studies have localized a putative disease-associated gene to a region of {approximately}110 kb in length, located within the TCRB locus. In the current study, all 14 known TCRBV (variable region) genes within the region of localization were mapped and identified. The nucleotide sequences of these genes were determined in a panel of six MS patients and six healthy controls, who were human-leukocyte antigen and TCRB-RFLP haplotype matched. Nine of the 14 TCRBV genes studied showed evidence of polymorphism. PCR-based assays for each of these polymorphic genes were developed, and allele and genotype frequencies were determined in a panel of DNA samples from 48 MS patients and 60 control individuals. No significant differences in allele, genotype, or phenotype frequencies were observed between the MS patients and controls for any of the 14 TCRBV-gene polymorphisms studied. In light of the extensive linkage disequilibrium across the region studied, the saturating numbers of polymorphisms examined, and the direct sequence analysis of all BV genes in the region, these results suggest that it is unlikely that germ-line polymorphism in the TCRBV locus makes a major contribution to MS susceptibility. The TCRBV coding region-specific markers generated in these studies, as well as the approach of testing for associations with specific functionally relevant polymorphic sites within individual BV genes, should be useful in the evaluation of the many reported disease associations involving the human TCRB region. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Intestinal lactase as an autologous beta-galactosidase reporter gene for in vivo gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Siamak; Eckley, Lorna; Sawyer, Greta J; Zhang, Xiaohong; Dong, Xuebin; Freund, Jean-Noel; Fabre, John W

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal lactase has potential as an autologous beta-galactosidase reporter gene for long-term gene expression studies in vivo, using chromogenic, luminescent, and fluorogenic substrates developed for Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. In normal rat tissues, reactivity with a chromogenic fucopyranoside (X-Fuc, the preferred substrate of lactase) was present only at the lumenal surface of small intestine epithelial cells. Full-length lactase (domains I-IV), mature lactase (domains III and IV), and a cytosolic form of mature lactase (domains III and IV, without the signal sequence or transmembrane region) were evaluated. Transfection of HuH-7 cells in vitro, and hydrodynamic gene delivery to the liver in vivo, resulted in excellent gene expression. The full-length and mature (homodimeric, membrane-bound) forms reacted strongly with X-Fuc but not with the corresponding galactopyranoside (X-Gal). However, the presumptively monomeric cytosolic lactase unexpectedly reacted equally well with both substrates. The fluorogenic substrate fluorescein-di-beta-D-galactopyranoside was cleaved by cytosolic lactase, but not by full-length or mature lactase. Full-length lactase, when expressed ectopically in hepatocytes in vivo, localized exclusively to the bile canalicular membrane. Intestinal lactase is highly homologous in mice, rats, and humans and has considerable potential for evaluating long-term gene expression in experimental animals and the clinic.

  1. [Nucleotide sequence of genes for alpha- and beta-subunits of luciferase from Photobacterium leiognathi].

    PubMed

    Illarionov, B A; Protopopova, M V; Karginov, V A; Mertvetsov, N P; Gitel'zon, I I

    1988-03-01

    Nucleotide sequence of the Photobacterium leiognathi DNA containing genes of alpha and beta subunits of luciferase has been determined. We also deduced amino acid sequence and molecular mass of luciferase and localized luciferase genes in the sequenced DNA fragment.

  2. Chromosome mapping of the human arrestin (SAG), {beta}-arrestin 2 (ARRB2), and {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase 2 (ADRBK2) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, G.; Sallese, M.; Stornaiuolo, A.

    1994-09-01

    Two types of proteins play a major role in determining homologous desensitization of G-coupled receptors: {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase ({beta}ARK), which phosphorylates the agonist-occupied receptor and its functional cofactor, {beta}-arrestin. Both {beta}ARK and {beta}-arrestin are members of multigene families. The family of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases includes rhodopsin kinase, {beta}ARK1, {beta}ARK2, IT11-A (GRK4), GRK5, and GRK6. The arrestin/{beta}-arrestin gene family includes arrestin (also known as S-antigen), {beta}-arrestin 1, and {beta}-arrestin 2. Here we report the chromosome mapping of the human genes for arrestin (SAG), {beta}arrestin 2 (ARRB2), and {beta}ARK2 (ADRBK2) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results confirmed the assignment of the gene coding for arrestin (SAG) to chromosome 2 and allowed us to refine its localization to band q37. The gene coding for {beta}-arrestin 2 (ARRB2) was mapped to chromosome 17p13 and that coding for {beta}ARK2 (ADRBK2) to chromosome 22q11. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Functional polymorphism of each of the two HLA-DR beta chain loci demonstrated with antigen-specific DR3- and DRw52-restricted T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    HLA-DR3- and HLA-DRw52-associated functional polymorphism was investigated with selected tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific T cell clones. We have shown earlier that HLA-DR antigens are encoded by two distinct loci, DR beta I and DR beta III. The alloantigenic determinant(s) defined by the serological HLA-DR3 specificity map to the former, while the supratypic HLA-DRw52 determinants map to DR beta III. Furthermore, we have recently recognized by DNA sequencing three alleles of HLA- DRw52 at locus DR beta III, referred to as 52 a, b, and c. Our objective was to correlate the pattern of T cell restriction with the gene products of individual DR beta chain loci and with the three newly described alleles of locus DR beta III. Among the selected T cell clones, 5 reacted exclusively when TT was presented by HLA-DR3+ APCs (TT-DR3-APC). In contrast, two T cell clones were stimulated by TT- DRw52-APC. More specifically, these two T cell clones (Clones 10 and 16) were stimulated by different subsets of TT-DRw52-APC. Clone 16 responded to some DR3 and TT-DRw6-APC, while clone 10 was stimulated by other TT-DR3 and TT-DRw6, and all TT-DR5-APC. This same pattern of DRw52 restriction was found in panel, as well as in family studies. Because this suggested a correlation with the pattern of DRw52 polymorphism observed earlier by DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide hybridization, the APC used in these experiments were typed for the 52 a, b, and c alleles of locus DR beta III by allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. This distribution overlapped exactly with the stimulation pattern defined by the T cell clones. Clone 16 responded to TT-52a-APC, clone 10 to TT-52b-APC, and both clones to a TT-52c-APC. The response of the T cell clones was inhibited differentially by mAbs to DR. Raising TT concentration, or increasing HLA-class II expression with INF-gamma both affected the magnitude of response of the TT- specific clones but did not modify their specificities. These results demonstrate that

  4. Molecular dynamics studies of side chain effect on the beta-1,3-D-glucan triple helix in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Okobira, Tadashi; Miyoshi, Kentaro; Uezu, Kazuya; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2008-03-01

    beta-1,3-D-glucans have been isolated from fungi as right-handed 6(1) triple helices. They are categorized by the side chains bound to the main triple helix through beta-(1-->6)-D-glycosyl linkage. Indeed, since a glucose-based side chain is water soluble, the presence and frequency of glucose-based side chains give rise to significant variation in the physical properties of the glucan family. Curdlan has no side chains and self-assembles to form an water-insoluble triple helical structure, while schizophyllan, which has a 1,6-D-glucose side chain on every third glucose unit along the main chain, is completely water soluble. A thermal fluctuation in the optical rotatory dispersion is observed for the side chain, indicating probable co-operative interaction between the side chains and water molecules. This paper documents molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution for three models of the beta-1,3-D-glucan series: curdlan (no side chain), schizophyllan (a beta-(1-->6)-D-glycosyl side-chain at every third position), and a hypothetical triple helix with a side chain at every sixth main-chain glucose unit. A decrease was observed in the helical pitch as the population of the side chain increased. Two types of hydrogen bonding via water molecules, the side chain/main chain and the side chain/side chain hydrogen bonding, play an important role in determination of the triple helix conformation. The formation of a one-dimensional cavity of diameter about 3.5 A was observed in the schizophyllan triple helix, while curdlan showed no such cavity. The side chain/side chain hydrogen bonding in schizophyllan and the hypothetical beta-1,3-D-glucan triple helix could cause the tilt of the main-chain glucose residues to the helix.

  5. Molecular analysis of the beta-globin gene cluster in the Niokholo Mandenka population reveals a recent origin of the beta(S) Senegal mutation.

    PubMed

    Currat, Mathias; Trabuchet, Guy; Rees, David; Perrin, Pascale; Harding, Rosalind M; Clegg, John B; Langaney, André; Excoffier, Laurent

    2002-01-01

    A large and ethnically well-defined Mandenka sample from eastern Senegal was analyzed for the polymorphism of the beta-globin gene cluster on chromosome 11. Five RFLP sites of the 5' region were investigated in 193 individuals revealing the presence of 10 different haplotypes. The frequency of the sickle-cell anemia causing mutation (beta(S)) in the Mandenka estimated from this sample is 11.7%. This mutation was found strictly associated with the single Senegal haplotype. Approximately 600 bp of the upstream region of the beta-globin gene were sequenced for a subset of 94 chromosomes, showing the presence of four transversions, five transitions, and a composite microsatellite polymorphism. The sequence of 22 beta(S) chromosomes was also identical to the previously defined Senegal haplotype, suggesting that this mutation is very recent. Monte Carlo simulations (allowing for a specific balancing selection model, a logistic growth of the population, and variable initial frequencies of the Senegal haplotype) were used to estimate the age of the beta(S) mutation. Resulting maximum-likelihood estimates are 45-70 generations (1,350-2,100 years) for very different demographic scenarios. Smallest confidence intervals (25-690 generations) are obtained under the hypothesis that the Mandenka population is large (N(e) >5,000) and stationary or that it has undergone a rapid demographic expansion to a current size of >5,000 reproducing individuals, which is quite likely in view of the great diversity found on beta(A) chromosomes.

  6. Gene expression assay in blood and various tissues using a single-tube real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method using an oligodeoxythymidine-immobilized polymerase chain reaction tube.

    PubMed

    Harikai, N; Saito, S; Tanaka, A; Kinoshita, K

    2009-06-01

    A single-tube real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method has been developed which makes it possible to conduct the entire procedure, from nucleic acid extraction to product detection, in a single PCR tube. In this study, we developed the method using an oligodeoxythymidine-immobilized PCR tube, which enables simple and rapid mRNA extraction and quantification of target genes in blood and other tissues. The beta-actin gene was analyzed from lysates of blood and various tissues using this method. The data showed a good correlation between the plotted threshold cycle values and log(10) of blood and tissue amounts without a reduction in PCR efficiency. Gene expression of interleukin-1beta in blood from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated rats and of beta(3)-adrenoceptors in adipose tissue from SHRSP.Z-Lepr (fa)/IzmDmcr (obese SHRSP) rats was also analyzed using the single-tube method, as well as a general real-time RT-PCR method, using RNA purified with a silica membrane column. In both methods, the copy number ratio of interleukin-1beta to beta-actin in LPS-stimulated rats was higher than in control rats, and the ratio of beta(3)-adrenoceptors to beta-actin in obese SHRSP rats was lower than in lean littermates. These results indicate that the single-tube method can provide results equivalent to those from general real-time RTPCR methods in gene expression analysis.

  7. Genotyping of Giardia duodenalis from humans and dogs from Mexico using a beta-giardin nested polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Lalle, Marco; Jimenez-Cardosa, Enedina; Cacciò, Simone M; Pozio, Edoardo

    2005-02-01

    Cysts of Giardia duodenalis were collected in Mexico from symptomatic children (n = 9) and from pet dogs (n = 5), and they were directly characterized by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the beta-giardin gene. Eight isolates of human origin established as in vitro cultures and 2 reference strains, representing assemblages A and B of G. duodenalis, were also analyzed. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism showed that all isolates belonged to assemblage A. Sequence analyses indicated that the large majority of isolates were of the A1 genotype; interestingly, 2 human isolates displayed the A3 genotype, which has been previously identified in human isolates from Italy. The presence of cysts of the A1 and A3 genotypes in isolates from pet dogs is consistent with their role as reservoirs for human infection, although further studies are needed to confirm the occurrence of zoonotic transmission. Remarkably, cysts of assemblage B have not been found in any of the Mexican isolates studied to date.

  8. The amino-acid sequence of alpha A- and beta-chains from the major hemoglobin component of American flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber ruber).

    PubMed

    Godovac-Zimmermann, J; Braunitzer, G

    1984-04-01

    The complete amino-acid sequence of alpha A- and beta-chains from the major hemoglobin component (HbA) of American Flamingo ( Phoenicopterus ruber ruber) is presented. The minor component (HbD) with alpha D-chains was detected in similar amounts (25%) as in chicken and pheasant hemoglobins. The comparison of American Flamingo and Greylag Goose (Anser anser) hemoglobins shows that alpha A-chains differ by 22 exchanges and beta-chains by only 4 exchanges. Two substitutions modify alpha 1 beta 1-contacts. Amino-acid replacements between American Flamingo and other bird hemoglobins are discussed.

  9. T cell receptor repertoire differences between African Americans and Caucasians associated with polymorphism of the TCRBV3S1 (V{beta}3.1) gene

    SciTech Connect

    De Inocencio, J.; Glass, D.N.; Hirsch, R.

    1995-05-01

    The generation of TCR diversity occurs primarily through rearrangement of germline DNA. Genetic polymorphism of the TCR chains appears to be a rarer mechanism for generating repertoire differences between races. Flow cytometric analysis of the TCR V{beta} repertoire in a population of healthy African Americans (n = 30) and Caucasians (n = 30) revealed a significant difference in the frequency of cells bearing V{beta}3.1, but not V{beta}2, V{beta}5.1, V{beta}5.2-5.3, V{beta}6.7, V{beta}8.1-8.2, V{beta}12.1, V{beta}13.3, or V{beta}19. African Americans had a significantly lower frequency of V{beta}3.1{sup +} cells, in both the CD4{sup +} (2.55 {+-} 0.36% vs 4.85 {+-} 0.43%, p = 0.0001) and the CD8{sup +} (3.03 {+-} 0.54% vs 5.32 {+-} 0.57%, p = 0.004) population than did Caucasians, and this difference was independent of the age of the individuals. Analysis of genomic DNA revealed that the observed differences in frequency of V{beta}3.1{sup +} cells correlated with a recently described polymorphism of the recombination signal sequence of the TCRBV3S1 gene. Allele 1, associated with a lower frequency of V{beta}3.1{sup +} cells, was more commonly present in African Americans (0.68 vs 0.43), whereas allele 2, associated with a higher frequency of V{beta}3.1{sup +} cells, was more commonly present in Caucasians (0.31 vs 0.56). This study demonstrates the potential for TCR repertoire differences, based on genetic polymorphism, between African Americans and Caucasians. 31 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Amyloid-beta aggregation: selective inhibition of aggregation in mixtures of amyloid with different chain lengths.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, S W; Ladror, U S; Wade, W S; Wang, G T; Barrett, L W; Matayoshi, E D; Huffaker, H J; Krafft, G A; Holzman, T F

    1994-01-01

    One of the clinical manifestations of Alzheimer's disease is the deposition of the 39-43 residue amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide in aggregated fibrils in senile plaques. Characterization of the aggregation behavior of A beta is one of the critical issues in understanding the role of A beta in the disease process. Using solution hydrodynamics, A beta was observed to form three types of species in phosphate-buffered saline: insoluble aggregates with sedimentation coefficients of approximately 50,000 S and molecular masses of approximately 10(9) Da, "soluble aggregates" with sedimentation coefficients of approximately 30 S and masses of approximately 10(6) Da, and monomer. When starting from monomer, the aggregation kinetics of A beta 1-40 (A beta 40) and A beta 1-42 (A beta 42), alone and in combination, reveal large differences in the tendency of these peptides to aggregate as a function of pH and other solution conditions. At pH 4.1 and 7.0-7.4, aggregation is significantly slower than at pH 5 and 6. Under all conditions, aggregation of the longer A beta 42 was more rapid than A beta 40. Oxidation of Met-35 to the sulfoxide in A beta 40 enhances the aggregation rate over that of the nonoxidized peptide. Aggregation was found to be dependent upon temperature and to be strongly dependent on peptide concentration and ionic strength, indicating that aggregation is driven by a hydrophobic effect. When A beta 40 and A beta 42 are mixed together, A beta 40 retards the aggregation of A beta 42 in a concentration-dependent manner. Shorter fragments have a decreasing ability to interfere with A beta 42 aggregation. Conversely, the rate of aggregation of A beta 40 can be significantly enhanced by seeding slow aggregating solutions with preformed aggregates of A beta 42. Taken together, the inhibition of A beta 42 aggregation by A beta 40, the seeding of A beta 40 aggregation by A beta 42 aggregates, and the chemical oxidation of A beta 40 suggest that the relative abundance and

  11. Ultrasound-mediated interferon {beta} gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-{beta} genes both in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon {beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-{beta} in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-{beta} genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-{beta} gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-{beta} gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  12. A human high affinity interleukin-5 receptor (IL5R) is composed of an IL5-specific alpha chain and a beta chain shared with the receptor for GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, J; Devos, R; Cornelis, S; Tuypens, T; Van der Heyden, J; Fiers, W; Plaetinck, G

    1991-09-20

    cDNA clones encoding two receptor proteins involved in the binding of human interleukin 5 (hIL5) have been isolated. A first class codes for an IL5-specific chain (hIL5R alpha). The major transcript of this receptor gene, as analyzed in both HL-60 eosinophilic cells and eosinophilic myelocytes grown from cord blood, encodes a secreted form of this receptor. This soluble hIL5R alpha has antagonistic properties. A second component of the hIL5R is found to be identical to the beta chain of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) high affinity receptor. The finding that IL5 and GM-CSF share a receptor subunit provides a molecular basis for the observation that these cytokines can partially interfere with each other's binding and have highly overlapping biological activities on eosinophils.

  13. Lambda light chain myeloma with co-migrating paraprotein at beta region on agarose gel electrophoresis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Siti Sarah, M; Nor Aini, U; Nurismah, M I; Hafiza, A; Khalidah, M; Mokhtar, A B; Das, S

    2014-01-01

    Paraproteinemia is one of the diagnostic features of multiple myeloma. A commonly used method is the detection of paraprotein by agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) followed by by immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) to confirm monoclonality. Due to their smaller size, immunoglobulin A (IgA) and light chain only paraproteins may appear at the beta or even alpha 2 protein fractions. Here, we discuss a case report of a 47-year-old man who presented with pathological fracture of third thoracic (T3) vertebra. Serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) was initially reported as no paraprotein detected. However, a bone biopsy was reported to show plasma cell proliferation with light chain restriction. A repeat sample for protein electrophoresis together with IFE revealed lambda light chain paraprotein co-migrating at the beta region. The beta band plus paraprotein was quantitated as 4.3 g/L (7.0%), which was within normal limits of the beta protein fraction. Hence, it has to be remembered that if the SPE is negative, it does not necessarily mean that the paraprotein is absent in cases which are highly suspicious.

  14. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain gene expression by activated blood monocytes precedes the expression of the PDGF A-chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Martinet, Y.; Jaffe, H.A.; Yamauchi, K.; Betsholtz, C.; Westermark, B.; Heldin, C.H.; Crystal, R.G.

    1987-05-01

    When activated, normal human blood monocytes are known to express the c-sis proto-oncogene coding for PDGF B-chain. Since normal human platelet PDGF molecules are dimers of A and B chains and platelets and monocytes are derived from the same marrow precursors, activated blood monocytes were simultaneously evaluated for their expression of PDGF A and B chain genes. Human blood monocytes were purified by adherence, cultured with or without activation by lipopolysaccharide and poly(A)+ RNA evaluated using Northern analysis and /sup 32/P-labeled A-chain and B-chain (human c-sis) probes. Unstimulated blood monocytes did not express either A-chain or B-chain genes. In contrast, activated monocytes expressed a 4.2 kb mRNA B-chain transcript at 4 hr, but the B-chain mRNA levels declined significantly over the next 18 hr. In comparison, activated monocytes expressed very little A-chain mRNA at 4 hr, but at 12 hr 1.9, 2.3, and 2.8 kb transcripts were observed and persisted through 24 hr. Thus, activation of blood monocytes is followed by PDGF B-chain gene expression preceding PDGF A-chain gene expression, suggesting a difference in the regulation of the expression of the genes for these two chains by these cells.

  15. Unusual association of beta 2-microglobulin with certain class I heavy chains of the murine major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed Central

    Bushkin, Y; Tung, J S; Pinter, A; Michaelson, J; Boyse, E A

    1986-01-01

    Class I products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) comprise a heavy chain of about 45 kDa noncovalently linked to a 12-kDa beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) light chain encoded on a different chromosome. We find that class I products of some mouse strains include an additional 62-kDa molecule which on the following evidence consists of a heavy chain linked covalently with beta 2m. Production of the 62-kDa protein invariably accorded with the occurrence of cysteine at position 121 of the heavy chain (Kb,Kbm1,Kbm3,Dd, and Ld). Substitution of arginine at position 121 invariably accorded with absence of the 62-kDa protein (Kbm6,Kbm7,Kbm9,Kd, and Db). On the basis of observed production versus nonproduction of the 62-kDa molecule, predictions are made regarding residue 121 in class I products for which this is not yet known; namely, Kk, Ks, and Dk, which produce the 62-kDa molecule, as compared with Kj, Qa-2, and TL, which do not. Reported differences in immunologic reactivity between Kb mutant strains with Arg-121 in place of Cys-121 imply that the occurrence of 62-kDa class I products in mice of Cys-121 genotype has functional consequences. Images PMID:3510435

  16. Cellular distribution and molecular heterogeneity of MAC393 antigen (clusterin, beta-chain) on the surface membrane of bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Howes, E A; Hurst, S; Laslop, A; Jones, R

    1998-07-01

    The distribution and size of a surface membrane antigen identified by a monoclonal antibody (MAC9393) have been examined in testicular and epididymal bovine sperm preparations. Western blots indicated a substantial decrease in molecular mass of the antigen during epididymal maturation from approximately 87 kDa in the testis to approximately 35 kDa in the cauda epididymidis. This was accompanied by a change in its cellular localization from the neck and whole head to the acrosomal region. N-terminal microsequencing identified MAC393 antigen as the beta-chain of clusterin. A polyclonal antiserum to the alpha-chain of clusterin recognized both testicular and epididymal forms and revealed that the heterodimer was present on the sperm tail as well as the acrosome. These findings are explained by the co-existence of dimeric and monomeric pools of clusterin on spermatozoa. The polyclonal antiserum recognizes both testicular and epididymal forms of the heterodimer and although the monoclonal antibody binds to the testicular heterodimer, it only recognizes the beta-chain monomer of epididymal clusterin. These findings support previous observations made on human spermatozoa that two forms of clusterin, the beta-chain monomer and the heterodimer, are present on the surface membrane and in seminal plasma.

  17. Regulatory myosin light-chain genes of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, C; Anderson, P

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned and analyzed the Caenorhabditis elegans regulatory myosin light-chain genes. C. elegans contains two such genes, which we have designated mlc-1 and mlc-2. The two genes are separated by 2.6 kilobases and are divergently transcribed. We determined the complete nucleotide sequences of both mlc-1 and mlc-2. A single, conservative amino acid substitution distinguishes the sequences of the two proteins. The C. elegans proteins are strongly homologous to regulatory myosin light chains of Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates and weakly homologous to a superfamily of eucaryotic calcium-binding proteins. Both mlc-1 and mlc-2 encode abundant mRNAs. We mapped the 5' termini of these transcripts by using primer extension sequencing of mRNA templates. mlc-1 mRNAs initiate within conserved hexanucleotides at two different positions, located at -28 and -38 relative to the start of translation. The 5' terminus of mlc-2 mRNA is not encoded in the 4.8-kilobase genomic region upstream of mlc-2. Rather, mlc-2 mRNA contains at its 5' end a short, untranslated leader sequence that is identical to the trans-spliced leader sequence of three C. elegans actin genes. Images PMID:3244358

  18. Analysis of HLA-DR glycoproteins by DNA-mediated gene transfer. Definition of DR2 beta gene products and antigen presentation to T cell clones from leprosy patients

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have used DNA-mediated gene transfer to express HLA class II molecules in mouse L cells for serological, biochemical, and functional analysis. cDNA clones encoding the DR2 beta a and DR2 beta b products of the DR2Dw2 haplotype were subcloned into a mouse Moloney leukemia virus-based expression vector (pJ4) and transfected separately into mouse L cells together with a HLA-DR alpha/pJ4 construct. These transfectants have allowed differential analysis of the two DR2 beta products in a manner normally prohibited by the concomitant expression seen in B cells. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE analysis of the transfectants defines the more acidic beta chain as the product of the DR2 beta a sequence, and the more basic chain as the product of the DR2 beta b sequence. The LDR2a transfectants present antigen efficiently to M.leprae-specific T cell clones and are capable of presenting synthetic peptide, 65-kD recombinant mycobacterial antigen and M.leprae. Of the DR2Dw2-restricted T cell clones we have tested, all use the DR2 beta a chain as their restriction element. Inhibition studies with mAbs demonstrate the dependence of presentation by the transfectant on class II and CD4, while mAbs against LFA-1, which substantially inhibit presentation by B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, do not inhibit transfectant presentation. PMID:3128633

  19. Detection of Clostridium septicum hemolysin gene by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, S; Hashizume, N; Kinoshita, T; Kaidoh, T; Tamura, Y

    1997-09-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the detection of the hemolysin (alpha toxin) gene of Clostridium septicum. The PCR primers were designed from the sequence of the hemolysin gene and synthesized. A DNA fragment of 270 bp was amplified from 10 strains of C. septicum, but was not from strains of C. chauvoei, C. perfringens, C. novyi, or C. haemolyticum. When the PCR product was digested with Sau3AI, two DNA fragments of the expected 148 bp and 122 bp were recognized. The lowest detectable threshold of PCR for the hemolysin gene was 3.8 x 10(3) cells/ml. The PCR technique may be useful for rapid detection or identification of C. septicum associated with malignant edema.

  20. Targeted disruption of the mouse beta1-adrenergic receptor gene: developmental and cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer, D K; Desai, K H; Jasper, J R; Stevens, M E; Regula, D P; Barsh, G S; Bernstein, D; Kobilka, B K

    1996-01-01

    At least three distinct beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) subtypes exist in mammals. These receptors modulate a wide variety of processes, from development and behavior, to cardiac function, metabolism, and smooth muscle tone. To understand the roles that individual beta-AR subtypes play in these processes, we have used the technique of gene targeting to create homozygous beta 1-AR null mutants (beta 1-AR -/-) in mice. The majority of beta 1-AR -/- mice die prenatally, and the penetrance of lethality shows strain dependence. Beta l-AR -/- mice that do survive to adulthood appear normal, but lack the chronotropic and inotropic responses seen in wild-type mice when beta-AR agonists such as isoproterenol are administered. Moreover, this lack of responsiveness is accompanied by markedly reduced stimulation of adenylate cyclase in cardiac membranes from beta 1-AR -/- mice. These findings occur despite persistent cardiac beta 2-AR expression, demonstrating the importance of beta 1-ARs for proper mouse development and cardiac function, while highlighting functional differences between beta-AR subtypes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8693001

  1. Inhibition of spermidine synthase gene expression by transforming growth factor-beta 1 in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Y; Kar, S; Wiest, L; Pegg, A E; Carr, B I

    1997-01-01

    We screened genes responsive to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta 1) protein in a human hepatoma cell line (Hep3B) using a PCR-mediated differential display technique, in order to investigate the mechanisms involved in TGF-beta-induced growth suppression. We found a gene that was down-regulated by TGF-beta 1 to be completely identical in an approx. 620 bp segment to the gene for the enzyme spermidine synthase, which mediates the conversion of putrescine into spermidine. Both spermidine synthase mRNA expression and its enzyme activity were decreased after TGF-beta 1 treatment of Hep3B cells. The inhibition of spermidine synthase gene expression by TGF-beta 1 protein was also observed in other hepatoma cell lines. The expression of genes for other biosynthetic enzymes in polyamine metabolism (ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase) was also inhibited to the same extent as for spermidine synthase, while the gene expression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, a catabolic enzyme, was relatively resistant to TGF-beta 1. Spermine levels in Hep3B cells were decreased by TGF-beta 1 treatment, although the levels of spermidine and putrescine were unchanged, probably due to compensation by remaining spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase activity. Exogenously added spermidine or spermine, but not putrescine, partially antagonized the growth-inhibitor effects of TGF-beta 1 on Hep3B cells. Our data suggest that down-regulation of gene expression of the enzymes involved in polyamine metabolism, including spermidine synthase, may be associated with the mechanism of TGF-beta-induced growth suppression. PMID:9020892

  2. Identification of the gene for fly non-muscle myosin heavy chain: Drosophila myosin heavy chains are encoded by a gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehart, D P; Lutz, M S; Chan, D; Ketchum, A S; Laymon, R A; Nguyen, B; Goldstein, L S

    1989-01-01

    In contrast to vertebrate species Drosophila has a single myosin heavy chain gene that apparently encodes all sarcomeric heavy chain polypeptides. Flies also contain a cytoplasmic myosin heavy chain polypeptide that by immunological and peptide mapping criteria is clearly different from the major thoracic muscle isoform. Here, we identify the gene that encodes this cytoplasmic isoform and demonstrate that it is distinct from the muscle myosin heavy chain gene. Thus, fly myosin heavy chains are the products of a gene family. Our data suggest that the contractile function required to power myosin based movement in non-muscle cells requires myosin diversity beyond that available in a single heavy chain gene. In addition, we show, that accumulation of cytoplasmic myosin transcripts is regulated in a developmental stage specific fashion, consistent with a key role for this protein in the movements of early embryogenesis. Images PMID:2498088

  3. Tumor-produced, active Interleukin-1 {beta} regulates gene expression in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, Jozsef; Fullar, Alexandra; Bitsche, Mario; Schartinger, Volker; Kovalszky, Ilona; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2011-09-10

    Recently we described a co-culture model of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts and SCC-25 lingual squamous carcinoma cells, which resulted in conversion of normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of SCC-25 cells. We have found a constitutive high interleukin-1{beta} (IL1-{beta}) expression in SCC-25 cells in normal and in co-cultured conditions. In our hypothesis a constitutive IL1-{beta} expression in SCC-25 regulates gene expression in fibroblasts during co-culture. Co-cultures were performed between PDL fibroblasts and SCC-25 cells with and without dexamethasone (DEX) treatment; IL1-{beta} processing was investigated in SCC-25 cells, tumor cells and PDL fibroblasts were treated with IL1-{beta}. IL1-{beta} signaling was investigated by western blot and immunocytochemistry. IL1-{beta}-regulated genes were analyzed by real-time qPCR. SCC-25 cells produced 16 kD active IL1-{beta}, its receptor was upregulated in PDL fibroblasts during co-culture, which induced phosphorylation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1), and nuclear translocalization of NF{kappa}B{alpha}. Several genes, including interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2) were induced in CAFs during co-culture. The most enhanced induction was found for IL-6 and COX-2. Treatment of PDL fibroblasts with IL1-{beta} reproduced a time- and dose-dependent upregulation of IL1-receptor, IL-6 and COX-2. A further proof was achieved by DEX inhibition for IL1-{beta}-stimulated IL-6 and COX-2 gene expression. Constitutive expression of IL1-{beta} in the tumor cells leads to IL1-{beta}-stimulated gene expression changes in tumor-associated fibroblasts, which are involved in tumor progression. -- Graphical abstract: SCC-25 cells produce active, processed IL1-{beta}. PDL fibroblasts possess receptor for IL1-{beta}, and its expression is increased 4.56-times in the

  4. The beta-globin gene in Sardinian delta beta 0-thalassemia carries a C----T nonsense mutation at codon 39.

    PubMed

    Guida, S; Giglioni, B; Comi, P; Ottolenghi, S; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G

    1984-04-01

    Sardinian delta beta 0-thalassemia is an inherited syndrome characterized by the inactivity of the beta-globin gene and the persistent activity of the fetal gamma-globin genes, particularly the A gamma-globin gene. Previous mapping studies with restriction enzymes failed to show any abnormality in the non-alpha globin gene cluster. We have now examined the possibility that this syndrome might result from a single rather than two different defects. Restriction enzyme polymorphisms linked to the delta beta 0-thalassemic non-alpha globin fragments were defined providing the basis for cloning the delta beta 0-thalassemic beta-globin gene from the DNA of a heterozygous patient. This gene appears to carry a C----T single mutation causing the appearance of a stop codon at amino acid position 39 of the beta-globin gene. This mutation was previously reported in beta 0-thalassemic patients, in linkage with different haplotypes. We conclude that Sardinian delta beta 0-thalassemia is the result of two separate mutations, the former one (unknown) responsible for persistent expression of gamma-globin genes, the latter for beta 0-thalassemia.

  5. Structure and expression of the mouse beta-hexosaminidase genes, Hexa and Hexb.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, S; Johnson, O N; Norflus, F; Boles, D J; Proia, R L

    1994-06-01

    Two genes, HEXA and HEXB, encode the alpha- and beta-subunits, respectively, of human beta-hexosaminidase. In the mouse, the corresponding genes are termed Hexa and Hexb. The subunits dimerize to yield three isozymes, beta-hexosaminidase A (alpha beta), B (beta beta), and S (alpha alpha), that have the capacity to degrade a variety of substrates containing beta-linked N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine residues. Mutations in the HEXA or HEXB gene resulting in a beta-hexosaminidase deficiency cause Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff disease, respectively. As a prelude to the creation of mouse models of these lysosomal storage diseases, we have characterized the molecular biology of the mouse beta-hexosaminidase system. Protein sequences derived from the cloned Hexa and Hexb cDNAs were 55% identical to each other and were also very similar to the cognate human sequences: 84% sequence identity with human HEXA and 75% with HEXB. The mouse hexosaminidase subunits, when expressed in HeLa cells from the cDNAs, displayed specificity toward synthetic substrates similar to the human subunits. The Hexa and Hexb genes were 25 and 22 kb in length, respectively. Each gene was divided into 14 exons, with the positions of introns precisely matching those of the corresponding human genes. The 5' flanking regions of the mouse genes demonstrated promoter activity as ascertained by their ability to drive chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression in transfected NIH 3T3 cells. The sequences of these regulatory regions were G+C-rich in the 200 bp upstream of the respective initiator ATGs. Several putative promoter elements were present, including Sp1, AP2, CAAT, and TATA motifs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. [Investigation of beta-lactamase genes and clonal relationship among the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing nosocomial Escherichia coli isolates].

    PubMed

    Görgeç, Sündüz; Kuzucu, Çiğdem; Otlu, Barış; Yetkin, Funda; Ersoy, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing microorganisms currently cause a major problem. Among theseCTX-M beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli has also disseminated worldwide as an important cause of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of the beta-lactamase genes, antibiotic susceptibilities and clonal relationships of ESBL-producing nosocomial E.coli isolates. A total of 76 ESBL-producing E.coli strains isolated from urine (n= 26), blood (n= 25) and wound (n= 25) specimens of hospitalized patients identified as nosocomial infection agents according to the CDC criteria between June 2010-June 2011 were included in the study. Antibiotic susceptibilities of the isolates were detected by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method according to CLSI recommendations. ESBL production was tested by double disc diffusion method, and cefotaxime/cefotaxime-clavulanic acid E-test strips (AB Biodisk, Sweden) were used for indeterminate results. Presence of TEM, SHV, CTX-M, OXA-2 group, 0XA-10 group, PER, VEB and GES beta-lactamase genes were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method was used for the detection of clonal relationships among the strains. Most of the ESBL-producing E.coli strains were isolated from samples of inpatients in intensive care (35%), internal medicine (16%) and general surgery (13%) units. All of the 76 strains were found susceptible to imipenem, meropenem and amikacin; however all were resistant to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone. The susceptibility rates of the isolates to cefoxitin, ertapenem, cefoperazone/sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, aztreonam and ceftazidime were 96%, 83%, 63%, 61%, 50%, 41%, 25%, 21%, 20% and 18%, respectively. Among E.coli isolates, the frequency of CTX-M, TEM, OXA-2 group, PER, SHV and OXA-10 group beta

  7. Beta-lactam antibiotic biosynthetic genes have been conserved in clusters in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Burnham, M K; Bull, J H; Hodgson, J E; Ward, J M; Browne, P; Brown, J; Barton, B; Earl, A J; Turner, G

    1990-01-01

    A cosmid clone containing closely linked beta-lactam antibiotic biosynthetic genes was isolated from a gene library of Flavobacterium sp. SC 12,154. The location within the cluster of the DNA thought to contain the gene for delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS), the first step in the beta-lactam antibiotic biosynthetic pathway, was identified by a novel method. This DNA facilitated the isolation, by cross-hybridization, of the corresponding DNA from Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064, Penicillium chrysogenum Oli13 and Aspergillus nidulans R153. Evidence was obtained which confirmed that the cross-hybridizing sequences contained the ACVS gene. In each case the ACVS gene was found to be closely linked to other beta-lactam biosynthetic genes and constituted part of a gene cluster. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2107074

  8. Digitalis purpurea P5 beta R2, encoding steroid 5 beta-reductase, is a novel defense-related gene involved in cardenolide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bermúdez, Pedro; García, Aurelio A Moya; Tuñón, Iñaki; Gavidia, Isabel

    2010-02-01

    The stereospecific 5 beta-reduction of progesterone is a required step for cardiac glycoside biosynthesis in foxglove plants. Recently, we have isolated the gene P5 beta R, and here we investigate the function and regulation of P5 beta R2, a new progesterone 5 beta-reductase gene from Digitalis purpurea. P5 beta R2 cDNA was isolated from a D. purpurea cDNA library and further characterized at the biochemical, structural and physiological levels. Like P5 beta R, P5 beta R2 catalyzes the 5 beta-reduction of the Delta(4) double bond of several steroids and is present in all plant organs. Under stress conditions or on treatment with chemical elicitors, P5 beta R expression does not vary, whereas P5 beta R2 is highly responsive. P5 beta R2 expression is regulated by ethylene and hydrogen peroxide. The correlation between P5 beta R2 expression and cardenolide formation demonstrates the key role of this gene in cardenolide biosynthesis, and therefore in the chemical defense of foxglove plants.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of mutant and wild-type human. beta. -actin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, J.; Gunning, P.; Porreca, P.; Ng, S.Y.; Lin, C.H.; Kedes, L.

    1984-10-01

    There are more than 20 ..beta..-actin-specific sequences in the human genome, many of which are pseudogenes. To facilitate the isolation of potentially functional ..beta..-actin genes, they used the new method of B. Seed for selecting genomic clones by homologous recombination. A derivative of the ..pi..VX miniplasmid, ..pi..AN7..beta..1, was constructed by insertion of the 600-base-pair 3' untranslated region of the ..beta..-actin mRNA expressed in human fibroblasts. Five clones containing ..beta..-actin sequences were selected from an amplified human fetal gene library by homologous recombination between library phage and the miniplasmid. One of these clones contained a complete ..beta..-actin gene with a coding sequence identical to that determined for the mRNA of human fibroblasts. A DNA fragment consisting of mostly intervening sequences from this gene was then use to identify 13 independent recombinant copies of the analogous gene from two specially constructed gene libraries, each containing one of the two types of mutant ..beta..-actin genes found in a line of neoplastic human fibroblasts. The amino acid and nucleotide sequences encoded by the unmutated gene predict that a guanine-to-adenine transition is responsible for the glycine-to-aspartic acid mutation at codon 244 and would also result in the loss of a HaeIII site. Detection of this HaeIII polymorphism among the fibroblast-derived closed verified the identity of the ..beta..-actin gene expressed in human fibroblasts.

  10. Diverse locations of amino acids in HLA-DR beta chains involved in polymorphic antibody binding epitopes on DR(alpha, beta 1*0101), DR(alpha, beta 1*1101), and DR(alpha,beta 3*0202) molecules.

    PubMed

    Fu, X T; Klohe, E; Alber, C; Yu, W Y; Ferrara, G B; Pistillo, M P; Ballas, M; Karr, R W

    1992-03-01

    In a previous study, we used transfectants expressing hybrid HLA-DR(beta 1*0403)/DR(beta 1*0701) chains to map sequences involved in polymorphic antibody binding epitopes on DR(alpha, beta 1*0403) or DR(alpha, beta 1*0701) molecules. Amino acids 1-40 of the beta 1 domain were found to make the major contributions to most of the antibody binding epitopes studied. To begin to localize sequences that contribute to polymorphic antibody epitopes on DR(alpha,beta 1*0101), DR(alpha,beta 1*1101) and DR(alpha,beta 3*0202) molecules, we used indirect immunofluorescence and flow cytometry to assess the binding of mAb to transfectants expressing hybrid DR(beta 1*0101)/DR(beta 1*1101) or DR(beta 1*1101)/DR(beta 3*0202) chains that divide the DR beta chain into three segments: amino acids 1-40, 41-97, and the beta 2 domain. The results indicate that amino acids 41-97 of the beta 1 domain on DR(beta 1*0101), DR(beta 1*1101), or DR(beta 3*0202) are critical in most of the epitopes, including those recognized by human antibodies MP4 and MP12, and mouse mAb GS88.2, I-LR1, 21r5, and 7.3.19.1, whereas amino acids 1-40 of DR(beta 1*1101) are critical in the epitope recognized by the MCS-7 mAb, and both segments 1-40 and 41-97 of DR(beta 1*1101) are important in the epitopes recognized by the I-LR2 and UL-52 mAbs. Based on these data and comparison of DR beta allelic protein sequences, the residues that may play critical roles in these antibody binding epitopes are predicted.

  11. On the road to gene therapy for beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Bank, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    Human globin gene therapy is a potential cure for sickle cell disease and beta-thalassemia (Cooley anemia). A clinical trial of this treatment is currently under way in Paris using lentiglobin vectors.

  12. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Transdisciplinary Research in Epigenetics and Cancer Journal Clubs and Transdisciplinary Science Meetings, biweekly and monthly 3. To gain expertise...Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Lamb CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Washington University...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genes in

  13. Induction of cytochrome P450IA1 gene expression in rat epidermis and human keratinocytes by. beta. -napthoflavone and benzanthracene

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, I.U.; Mukhtar, H.; Bickers, D.R.; Haqqi, T.M. )

    1991-03-15

    Cytochrome P450IA1 (P450IA1) plays a major role in the bioactivation of procarcinogens in various tissues including skin. However, factors controlling the expression of P450IA1 gene message in mammalian skin are unknown. In this study, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers was employed to study the expression of P450IA1 mRNA transcripts in rat epidermis and human keratinocytes (HK) treated with {beta}-napthoflavone ({beta}NF) and benzanthracene (BA). Total RNA was extracted from the epidermis of control and inducer-treated 4-day-old and adult Sprague Dawley rats, and from control and inducer-treated HL. cDNAs were synthesized using random primers and reverse transcriptase. PCR products were analyzed on agarose gel and quantitated by densitometry. Inducer treatment of rats and HK resulted in several-fold increases in aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity. The level of P450IA1 gene message increased 2-5-fold in treated animals as compared to controls; higher basal level and inducibility in adult than in 4-day-old rats. This induction occurred as early as 4 h after {beta}NF application, reached a maximum at 16 h and returned to basal levels by 36 h. Exposure to {beta}NF and BA resulted in 2-3-fold increase in gene message in HK. Northern blot analysis complemented PCR data. These results indicate that in mammalian skin P450IA1 gene expression is increased by the inducers of epidermal AHH activity.

  14. Chromosomal mapping, sequence and transcription analysis of the porcine fertilin beta gene (ADAM2).

    PubMed

    Day, A E; Quilter, C R; Sargent, C A; Mileham, A J

    2003-10-01

    Fertilin beta (ADAM2) forms a part of the heterodimeric surface protein fertilin, found on the plasma membrane of mammalian sperm, and has been implicated in the process of sperm-egg fusion. Analysis of cDNA products obtained from adult porcine testis mRNA has presented a sequence corresponding to 2620 bp of the ADAM2 gene. This sequence contained an open reading frame encoding a 735-amino acid protein and homologous to ADAM2 genes known in other mammalian species. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genomic DNA showed that the 2620 bp of cDNA sequence comprises at least 21 exons and spans approximately 76 kb of genomic DNA, with its size and structure being relatively conserved between mouse, human and pig. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to map ADAM2 to chromosome 15 of the pig, using a bacterial artificial chromosome clone from the PigE BAC library. This finding is consistent with comparative mapping experiments performed between pig and human chromosomes. Analysis of nine mRNA samples, by reverse transcriptase-PCR, from different porcine tissues has also suggested that expression of ADAM2 is limited to the testis, a finding that is consistent with other mammalian species.

  15. Somatic generation of hybrid antibody H chain genes in transgenic mice via interchromosomal gene conversion

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have constructed lines of mice with transgenes containing an antibody heavy (H) chain variable region (VHDJH) gene and various amounts of natural immunoglobulin (Ig) and plasmid flanking DNA. In these lines, recombination of the transgene and the endogenous Igh locus takes place in B cells, leading to the expression of functional H chains partially encoded by the transgenic VHDJH gene. Here, we demonstrate that the transgenic VHDJH gene, and various amounts of flanking sequence are recombined with Igh locus DNA via interchromosomal gene conversion. The structures of the resulting "hybrid" transgene-Igh H chain loci are consistent with the 3' end of the conversion occurring in regions of sequence identity, and the 5' end taking place between regions of little or no homology. This mode of antibody transgene recombination with the Igh locus is fundamentally different from the previously reported "trans H chain class switching" that results in reciprocal translocations. In contrast, this recombination resembles events previously observed in mammalian tissue culture cells between adjacent homologous chromosomal sequences, or transfected DNA and a homologous chromosomal target. Our data indicate that this recombination takes place at a low frequency, and that the frequency is influenced by both the length and extent of homology between the transgene and the Igh locus, but is not greatly affected by transgene copy number. This recombination pathway provides a novel approach for the subtle alteration of the clonal composition of the mouse B cell compartment in vivo using VH genes with defined structures and functions. PMID:8270869

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human beta-like globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, E F; Lawn, R M; Maniatis, T

    1980-04-01

    The genes encoding human embryonic (epsilon), fetal (G gamma, A gamma) and adult (delta, beta) beta-like globin polypeptides were isolated as a set of overlapping cloned DNA fragments from bacteriophage lambda libraries of high molecular weight (15-20 kb) chromosomal DNA. The 65 kb of DNA represented in these overlapping clones contains the genes for all five beta-like polypeptides, including the embryonic epsilon-globin gene, for which the chromosomal location was previously unknown. All five genes are transcribed from the same DNA strand and are arranged in the order 5'-epsilon-(13.3 kb)-G gamma-(3.5 kb)-A gamma-(13.9 kb)-delta-(5.4 kb)-beta-3'. Thus the genes are positioned on the chromosome in the order of their expression during development. In addition to the five known beta-like globin genes, we have detected two other beta-like globin sequences which do not correspond to known polypeptides. One of these sequences has been mapped to the A gamma-delta intergenic region while the other is located 6-9 kb 5' to the epsilon gene. Cross hybridization experiments between the intergenic sequences of the gene cluster have revealed a nonglobin repeat sequence (*) which is interspersed with the globin genes in the following manner: 5'-**epsilon-*G gamma-A gamma*-**delta-beta*-3'. Fine structure mapping of the region located 5' to the delta-globin gene revealed two repeats with a maximum size of 400 bp, which are separated by approximately 700 bp of DNA not repeated within the cluster. Preliminary experiments indicate that this repeat family is also repeated many times in the human genome.

  17. A recombinant single-chain human class II MHC molecule (HLA-DR1) as a covalently linked heterotrimer of alpha chain, beta chain, and antigenic peptide, with immunogenicity in vitro and reduced affinity for bacterial superantigens.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Bavari, S; Ulrich, R; Sadegh-Nasseri, S; Ferrone, S; McHugh, L; Mage, M

    1997-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules bind to numerous peptides and display these on the cell surface for T cell recognition. In a given immune response, receptors on T cells recognize antigenic peptides that are a minor population of MHC class II-bound peptides. To control which peptides are presented to T cells, it may be desirable to use recombinant MHC molecules with covalently bound antigenic peptides. To study T cell responses to such homogeneous peptide-MHC complexes, we engineered an HLA-DR1 cDNA coding for influenza hemagglutinin, influenza matrix, or HIV p24 gag peptides covalently attached via a peptide spacer to the N terminus of the DR1 beta chain. Co-transfection with DR alpha cDNA into mouse L cells resulted in surface expression of HLA-DR1 molecules that reacted with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for correctly folded HLA-DR epitopes. This suggested that the spacer and peptide did not alter expression or folding of the molecule. We then engineered an additional peptide spacer between the C terminus of a truncated beta chain (without transmembrane or cytoplasmic domains) and the N terminus of full-length DR alpha chain. Transfection of this cDNA into mouse L cells resulted in surface expression of the entire covalently linked heterotrimer of peptide, beta chain, and alpha chain with the expected molecular mass of approximately 66 kDa. These single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules reacted with mAb specific for correctly folded HLA-DR epitopes, and identified one mAb with [MHC + peptide] specificity. Affinity-purified soluble secreted single-chain molecules with truncated alpha chain moved in electrophoresis as compact class II MHC dimers. Cell surface two-chain or single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules with a covalent HA peptide stimulated HLA-DR1-restricted HA-specific T cells. They were immunogenic in vitro for peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The two-chain and single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules with covalent HA peptide had reduced binding

  18. Identification of a Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Porcine Beta-Defensin-1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Pruthviraj, D R; Usha, A P; Venkatachalapathy, R T

    2016-03-01

    Porcine beta-defensin-1 (PBD-1) gene plays an important role in the innate immunity of pigs. The peptide encoded by this gene is an antimicrobial peptide that has direct activity against a wide range of microbes. This peptide is involved in the co-creation of an antimicrobial barrier in the oral cavity of pigs. The objective of the present study was to detect polymorphisms, if any, in exon-1 and exon-2 regions of PBD-1 gene in Large White Yorkshire (LWY) and native Ankamali pigs of Kerala, India. Blood samples were collected from 100 pigs and genomic DNA was isolated using phenol chloroform method. The quantity of DNA was assessed in a spectrophotometer and quality by gel electrophoresis. Exon-1 and exon-2 regions of PBD-1 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the products were subjected to single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Subsequent silver staining of the polyacrylamide gels revealed three unique SSCP banding patterns in each of the two exons. The presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing of the PCR products. A novel SNP was found in the 5'-UTR region of exon-1 and a SNP was detected in the mature peptide coding region of exon-2. In exon-1, the pooled population frequencies of GG, GT, and TT genotypes were 0.67, 0.30, and 0.03, respectively. GG genotype was predominant in both the breeds whereas TT genotype was not detected in LWY breed. Similarly, in exon-2, the pooled population frequencies of AA, AG, and GG genotypes were 0.50, 0.27, and 0.23, respectively. AA genotype was predominant in LWY pigs whereas GG genotype was predominant in native pigs. These results suggest that there exists a considerable genetic variation at PBD-1 locus and further association studies may help in development of a PCR based genotyping test to select pigs with better immunity.

  19. The sizes of the CDR3 hypervariable regions of the murine T-cell receptor beta chains vary as a function of the recombined germ-line segments.

    PubMed Central

    Pannetier, C; Cochet, M; Darche, S; Casrouge, A; Zöller, M; Kourilsky, P

    1993-01-01

    A method using PCR amplification and primer extension with fluorescent oligonucleotides was developed to analyze T-cell repertoires. The sizes of the hypervariable CDR3-like regions of the murine T-cell antigen receptor beta chains were measured for all possible V beta-J beta combinations. This analysis shows that beta chains are distributed into at least 2000 groups, a value that provides a lower limit to their complexity. The CDR3 sizes appear to be dependent on the J beta and especially the V beta segment used and correlates with amino acid sequence motifs in the corresponding CDR1 region. This feature of T-cell receptors is discussed. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8483950

  20. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  1. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, D R; Martin-Morris, L; Luo, L Q; White, K

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human beta-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development. Images PMID:2494667

  2. The exon-intron organization of the human erythroid [beta]-spectrin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, K.M.; Forget, B.G. ); Scarpa, A.L.; Curtis, P.J. ); Winkelmann, J.C. )

    1993-10-01

    The human erythrocyte [beta]-spectrin gene DNA has been cloned from overlapping human genomic phage and cosmid recombinants. The entire erythroid [beta]-spectrin mRNA is encoded by 32 exons that range in size from 49 to 871 bases. The exon/intron junctions have been identified and the exons mapped. There is no correlation between intron positions and the repeat units of 106 amino acids within domain II of the [beta]-spectrin gene. The scatter of the introns over the 17 repeats argues against the 106-amino-acid unit representing a minigene that underwent repeated duplication resulting in the present [beta]-spectrin gene. In fact, the two largest exons, exon 14 (871 bp) and 16 (757 bp), extend over 4 and 3 repeat units of 106 amino acids, respectively, while repeat [beta]10 is encoded by 4 exons. No single position of an intron in the [beta]-spectrin gene is conserved between any of the 17 [beta]-spectrin and 22 [alpha]-spectrin repeat units. The nucleotide sequences of the exon/intron boundaries conform to the consensus splice site sequences except for exon 20, whose 5[prime] donor splice-site sequence begins with GC. The [beta]-spectrin isoform present in the human brain, the skeletal muscle, and the cardiac muscle is an alternatively spliced product of the erythroid [beta]-spectrin gene. This splice site is located within the coding sequences of exon 32 and its utilization in nonerythroid tissues leads to the use of 4 additional downstream exons with a size range of 44 to 530 bp. 55 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Comparative Studies of Vertebrate Beta Integrin Genes and Proteins: Ancient Genes in Vertebrate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Roger S.; Rout, Ujjwal K.

    2011-01-01

    Intregins are heterodimeric α- and β-subunit containing membrane receptor proteins which serve various cell adhesion roles in tissue repair, hemostasis, immune response, embryogenesis and metastasis. At least 18 α- (ITA or ITGA) and 8 β-integrin subunits (ITB or ITGB) are encoded on mammalian genomes. Comparative ITB amino acid sequences and protein structures and ITB gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Vertebrate ITB genes usually contained 13–16 coding exons and encoded protein subunits with ∼800 amino acids, whereas vertebrate ITB4 genes contained 36-39 coding exons and encoded larger proteins with ∼1800 amino acids. The ITB sequences exhibited several conserved domains including signal peptide, extracellular β-integrin, β-tail domain and integrin β-cytoplasmic domains. Sequence alignments of the integrin β-cytoplasmic domains revealed highly conserved regions possibly for performing essential functions and its maintenance during vertebrate evolution. With the exception of the human ITB8 sequence, the other ITB sequences shared a predicted 19 residue α-helix for this region. Potential sites for regulating human ITB gene expression were identified which included CpG islands, transcription factor binding sites and microRNA binding sites within the 3′-UTR of human ITB genes. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships of vertebrate beta-integrin genes which were consistent with four major groups: 1: ITB1, ITB2, ITB7; 2: ITB3, ITB5, ITB6; 3: ITB4; and 4: ITB8 and a common evolutionary origin from an ancestral gene, prior to the appearance of fish during vertebrate evolution. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that ITB4 is the most likely primordial form of the vertebrate β integrin subunit encoding genes, that is the only β subunit expressed as a constituent of the sole integrin receptor ‘α6β4’ in the hemidesmosomes of unicellular organisms. PMID:24970121

  4. Cloning and sequencing of the beta-glucosidase gene from Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 23769.

    PubMed

    Tajima, K; Nakajima, K; Yamashita, H; Shiba, T; Munekata, M; Takai, M

    2001-12-31

    The beta-glucosidase gene (bglxA) was cloned from the genomic DNA of Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 23769 and its nucleotide sequence (2200 bp) was determined. This bglxA gene was present downstream of the cellulose synthase operon and coded for a polypeptide of molecular mass 79 kDa. The overexpression of the beta-glucosidase in A. xylinum caused a tenfold increase in activity compared to the wild-type strain. In addition, the action pattern of the enzyme was identified as G3ase activity. The deduced amino acid sequence of the bglxA gene showed 72.3%, 49.6%, and 45.1% identity with the beta-glucosidases from A. xylinum subsp. sucrofermentans, Cellvibrio gilvus, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively. Based on amino acid sequence similarities, the beta-glucosidase (BglxA) was assigned to family 3 of the glycosyl hydrolases.

  5. Understanding the mechanisms of ATPase beta family genes for cellular thermotolerance in crossbred bulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Rajib; Sajjanar, Basavaraj; Singh, Umesh; Alex, Rani; Raja, T. V.; Alyethodi, Rafeeque R.; Kumar, Sushil; Sengar, Gyanendra; Sharma, Sheetal; Singh, Rani; Prakash, B.

    2015-12-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase is an integral membrane protein composed of a large catalytic subunit (alpha), a smaller glycoprotein subunit (beta), and gamma subunit. The beta subunit is essential for ion recognition as well as maintenance of the membrane integrity. Present study was aimed to analyze the expression pattern of ATPase beta subunit genes (ATPase B1, ATPase B2, and ATPase B3) among the crossbred bulls under different ambient temperatures (20-44 °C). The present study was also aimed to look into the relationship of HSP70 with the ATPase beta family genes. Our results demonstrated that among beta family genes, transcript abundance of ATPase B1 and ATPase B2 is significantly ( P < 0.05) higher during the thermal stress. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis revealed that the expression of ATPase Β1, ATPase B2, and ATPase B3 is highly correlated ( P < 0.01) with HSP70, representing that the change in the expression pattern of these genes is positive and synergistic. These may provide a foundation for understanding the mechanisms of ATPase beta family genes for cellular thermotolerance in cattle.

  6. Effects of side-chain orientation on the 13C chemical shifts of antiparallel beta-sheet model peptides.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Myriam E; Vila, Jorge A; Scheraga, Harold A

    2007-02-01

    The dependence of the (13)C chemical shift on side-chain orientation was investigated at the density functional level for a two-strand antiparallel beta-sheet model peptide represented by the amino acid sequence Ac-(Ala)(3)-X-(Ala)(12)-NH(2) where X represents any of the 17 naturally occurring amino acids, i.e., not including alanine, glycine and proline. The dihedral angles adopted for the backbone were taken from, and fixed at, observed experimental values of an antiparallel beta-sheet. We carried out a cluster analysis of the ensembles of conformations generated by considering the side-chain dihedral angles for each residue X as variables, and use them to compute the (13)C chemical shifts at the density functional theory level. It is shown that the adoption of the locally-dense basis set approach for the quantum chemical calculations enabled us to reduce the length of the chemical-shift calculations while maintaining good accuracy of the results. For the 17 naturally occurring amino acids in an antiparallel beta-sheet, there is (i) good agreement between computed and observed (13)C(alpha) and (13)C(beta) chemical shifts, with correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.99, respectively; (ii) significant variability of the computed (13)C(alpha) and (13)C(beta) chemical shifts as a function of chi(1) for all amino acid residues except Ser; and (iii) a smaller, although significant, dependence of the computed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts on chi(xi) (with xi > or = 2) compared to chi(1) for eleven out of seventeen residues. Our results suggest that predicted (13)C(alpha) and (13)C(beta) chemical shifts, based only on backbone (phi,psi) dihedral angles from high-resolution X-ray structure data or from NMR-derived models, may differ significantly from those observed in solution if the dihedral-angle preferences for the side chains are not taken into account.

  7. Growth inhibition of human pancreatic cancer cells by human interferon-beta gene combined with gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Endou, Masato; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nagata, Takuya; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Nakahara, Norimoto; Tsuno, Takaya; Osawa, Hirokatsu; Kuno, Tomohiko; Fujita, Mitsugu; Hatano, Manabu; Yoshida, Jun

    2005-02-01

    We examined the anti-tumor effect of cationic multilamellar liposome containing human IFN-beta (huIFN-beta) gene against cultured human pancreatic cancer cells. We also evaluated the combined effect of huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine. Furthermore, we examined the anti-tumor mechanisms of the therapy, with emphasis on the Ras-related signal pathway. Three human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPc-1, MIAPaCa-2, and PANC-1) were used in this study. The growth inhibition together with the therapy were evaluated by WST-1 assay; the production of huIFN-beta protein was measured by ELISA; the cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed using a FACScan flow cytometer; the protein levels of Son of sevenless (SOS-1) and Ras-GAP were measured by Western blotting; and the activation of Ras-GTP was evaluated by the immunoprecipitation method. As a result, we found that huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes demonstrated a strong anti-tumor effect against human pancreatic cancer cells. The treatment that combined huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine was more effective than each treatment alone. Although gemcitabine remarkably reduced the level of SOS-1, the above combined therapy reduced the level of SOS-1 even more significantly. Both huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and the com-bination of huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine increased the level of Ras-GAP, and decreased the activity of Ras-GTP. These results suggest that this combination therapy can induce strong anti-tumor activity against human pancreatic cancer cells through the regulation of the Ras-related signal pathway.

  8. Cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain defects in two families with non-compaction cardiomyopathy: linking non-compaction to hypertrophic, restrictive, and dilated cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Hoedemaekers, Yvonne M; Caliskan, Kadir; Majoor-Krakauer, Danielle; van de Laar, Ingrid; Michels, Michelle; Witsenburg, Maarten; ten Cate, Folkert J; Simoons, Maarten L; Dooijes, Dennis

    2007-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies are classified according to distinct morphological characteristics. They occur relatively frequent and are an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Isolated ventricular non-compaction or non-compaction cardiomyopathy (NCCM) is characterized by an excessively thickened endocardial layer with deep intertrabecular recesses, reminiscent of the myocardium during early embryogenesis. Aims Autosomal-dominant as well as X-linked inheritance for NCCM has been described and several loci have been associated with the disease. Nevertheless, a major genetic cause for familial NCCM remains to be identified. Methods and Results We describe, in two separate autosomal-dominant NCCM families, the identification of mutations in the sarcomeric cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7), known to be associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restricted cardiomyopathy (RCM), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Conclusion These results confirm the genetic heterogeneity of NCCM and suggest that the molecular classification of cardiomyopathies includes an MYH7-associated spectrum of NCCM with HCM, RCM, and DCM.

  9. The C-terminus of the {gamma}2 chain but not of the {beta}3 chain of laminin-332 is indirectly but indispensably necessary for integrin-mediated cell reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navdaev, Alexei; Heitmann, Vanessa; Santana Evangelista, Karla de; Moergelin, Matthias; Wegener, Joachim; Eble, Johannes A.

    2008-02-01

    Using a recombinant mini-laminin-332, we showed that truncation of the three C-terminal amino acids of the {gamma}2 chain, but not of the C-terminal amino acid of the {beta}3 chain, completely abolished {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin binding and its cellular functions, such as attachment and spreading. However, a synthetic peptide mimicking the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus did not interfere with {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin binding or cell adhesion and spreading on laminin-332 as measured by protein interaction assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Nor was the soluble peptide able to restore the loss of integrin-mediated cell adhesiveness to mini-laminin-332 after deletion of the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus. These findings spoke against the hypothesis that the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus of laminin-332 is a part of the {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin interaction site. In addition, structural studies with electron microscopy showed that truncation of the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus opened up the compact supradomain structure of LG1-3 domains. Thus, by inducing or stabilizing an integrin binding-competent conformation or array of the LG1-3 domains, the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus plays an indirect but essential role in laminin-332 recognition by {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin and, hence, its cellular functions.

  10. The human ATP synthase beta subunit gene: sequence analysis, chromosome assignment, and differential expression.

    PubMed

    Neckelmann, N; Warner, C K; Chung, A; Kudoh, J; Minoshima, S; Fukuyama, R; Maekawa, M; Shimizu, Y; Shimizu, N; Liu, J D

    1989-11-01

    In humans, the functional F0F1-ATP synthase beta subunit gene is located on chromosome 12 in the p13----qter region. Other partially homologous sequences have been detected on chromosomes 2 and 17. The bona fide beta subunit gene has 10 exons encoding a leader peptide of 49 amino acids and a mature protein of 480 amino acids. Thirteen Alu family DNA repeats are found upstream from the gene and in four introns. The gene has four "CCAAT" sequences upstream and in close proximity to the transcriptional initiation site. A 13-bp motif is found in the 5' nontranscribed region of both the beta subunit gene and an ADP/ATP translocator gene that is expressed in high levels in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Analysis of the beta subunit mRNA levels reveals marked differences among tissues. The highest levels are found in heart, lower levels in skeletal muscle, and the lowest levels in liver and kidney. These findings suggest that the tissue-specific levels of ATP synthase beta subunit mRNA may be generated through transcriptional control.

  11. Expression and nucleotide sequence of the Clostridium acetobutylicum beta-galactosidase gene cloned in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, K R; Rockman, E; Young, C A; Pearce, L; Maddox, I S; Scott, D B

    1991-01-01

    A gene library for Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIB 2951 was constructed in the broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR1, and cosmids containing the beta-galactosidase gene were isolated by direct selection for enzyme activity on X-Gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside) plates after conjugal transfer of the library to a lac deletion derivative of Escherichia coli. Analysis of various pSUP202 subclones of the lac cosmids on X-Gal plates localized the beta-galactosidase gene to a 5.1-kb EcoRI fragment. Expression of the Clostridium beta-galactosidase gene in E. coli was not subject to glucose repression. By using transposon Tn5 mutagenesis, two gene loci, cbgA (locus I) and cbgR (locus II), were identified as necessary for beta-galactosidase expression in E. coli. DNA sequence analysis of the entire 5.1-kb fragment identified open reading frames of 2,691 and 303 bp, corresponding to locus I and locus II, respectively, and in addition a third truncated open reading frame of 825 bp. The predicted gene product of locus I, CbgA (molecular size, 105 kDa), showed extensive amino acid sequence homology with E. coli LacZ, E. coli EbgA, and Klebsiella pneumoniae LacZ and was in agreement with the size of a polypeptide synthesized in maxicells containing the cloned 5.1-kb fragment. The predicted gene product of locus II, CbgR (molecular size, 11 kDa) shares no significant homology with any other sequence in the current DNA and protein sequence data bases, but Tn5 insertions in this gene prevent the synthesis of CbgA. Complementation experiments indicate that the gene product of cbgR is required in cis with cbgA for expression of beta-galactosidase in E. coli. Images PMID:1850729

  12. Reference genes for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction studies in soybean plants under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T J; Rodrigues, F A; Neumaier, N; Marcelino-Guimarães, F C; Farias, J R B; de Oliveira, M C N; Borém, A; de Oliveira, A C B; Emygdio, B M; Nepomuceno, A L

    2014-02-13

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a powerful tool used to measure gene expression. However, because of its high sensitivity, the method is strongly influenced by the quality and concentration of the template cDNA and by the amplification efficiency. Relative quantification is an effective strategy for correcting random and systematic errors by using the expression level of reference gene(s) to normalize the expression level of the genes of interest. To identify soybean reference genes for use in studies of flooding stress, we compared 5 candidate reference genes (CRGs) with the NormFinder and GeNorm programs to select the best internal control. The expression stability of the CRGs was evaluated in root tissues from soybean plants subjected to hypoxic conditions. Elongation factor 1-beta and actin-11 were identified as the most appropriate genes for RT-qPCR normalization by both the NormFinder and GeNorm analyses. The expression profiles of the genes for alcohol dehydrogenase 1, sucrose synthase 4, and ascorbate peroxidase 2 were analyzed by comparing different normalizing combinations (including no normalization) of the selected reference genes. Here, we have identified potential genes for use as references for RT-qPCR normalization in experiments with soybean roots growing in O2-depleted environments, such as flooding-stressed plants.

  13. Structure of the gene for human. beta. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor: expression and promoter characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Emorine, L.J.; Marullo, S.; Delavier-Klutchko, C.; Kaveri, S.V.; Durieu-Trautmann, O.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-10-01

    The genomic gene coding for the human ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (..beta../sub 2/AR) from A431 epidermoid cells has been isolated. Transfection of the gene into eukaryotic cells restores a fully active receptor/GTP-binding protein/adenylate cyclase complex with ..beta../sub 2/AR properties. Southern blot analyses with ..beta../sub 2/AR-specific probes show that a single ..beta../sub 2/AR gene is common to various human tissues and that its flanking sequences are highly conserved among humans and between man and rabbit, mouse, and hamster. Functional significance of these regions is supported by the presence of a promoter region (including mRNA cap sites, two TATA boxes, a CAAT box, and three G + C-rich regions that resemble binding sites for transcription factor Sp1) 200-300 base pairs 5' to the translation initiation codon. In the 3' flanking region, sequences homologous to glucocorticoid-response elements might be responsible for the increased expression of the ..beta../sub 2/AR gene observed after treatment of the transfected cells with hydrocortisone. In addition, 5' to the promoter region, an open reading frame encodes a 251-residue polypeptide that displays striking homologies with protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

  14. Translocation of peptides through microsomal membranes is a rapid process and promotes assembly of HLA-B27 heavy chain and beta 2- microglobulin translated in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have translated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I heavy chains and human beta 2-microglobulin in vitro in the presence of microsomal membranes and a peptide from the nucleoprotein of influenza A. This peptide stimulates assembly of HLA-B27 heavy chain and beta 2- microglobulin about fivefold. By modifying this peptide to contain biotin at its amino terminus, we could precipitate HLA-B27 heavy chains with immobilized streptavidin, thereby directly demonstrating class I heavy chain-peptide association under close to physiological conditions. The biotin-modified peptide stimulates assembly to the same extent as the unmodified peptide. Both peptides bind to the same site on the HLA-B27 molecule. Immediately after synthesis of the HLA-B27 heavy chain has been completed, it assembles with beta 2-microglobulin and peptide. These interactions occur in the lumen of the microsomes (endoplasmic reticulum), demonstrating that the peptide must cross the microsomal membrane in order to promote assembly. The transfer of peptide across the microsomal membrane is a rapid process, as peptide binding to heavy chain-beta 2-microglobulin complexes is observed in less than 1 min after addition of peptide. By using microsomes deficient of beta 2-microglobulin (from Daudi cells), we find a strict requirement of beta 2-microglobulin for detection of peptide interaction with the MHC class I heavy chain. Furthermore, we show that heavy chain interaction with beta 2-microglobulin is likely to precede peptide binding. Biotin-modified peptides are likely to become a valuable tool in studying MHC antigen interaction and assembly. PMID:1955465

  15. Genes and mechanisms involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Steiner, H; Capell, A; Leimer, U; Haass, C

    1999-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the invariable accumulation of senile plaques that are predominantly composed of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). Abeta is generated by proteolytic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (betaAPP) involving the combined action of beta- and gamma-secretase. Cleavage within the Abeta domain by alpha-secretase prevents Abeta generation. In some very rare cases of familial AD (FAD), mutations have been identified within the betaAPP gene. These mutations are located close to or at the cleavage sites of the secretases and pathologically effect betaAPP processing by increasing Abeta production, specifically its highly amyloidogenic 42 amino acid variant (Abeta42). Most of the mutations associated with FAD have been identified in the two presenilin (PS) genes, particularly the PS1 gene. Like the mutations identified within the betaAPP gene, mutations in PS1 and PS2 cause the increased generation of Abeta42. PS1 has been shown to be functionally involved in Notch signaling, a key process in cellular differentation, and in betaAPP processing. A gene knock out of PS1 in mice leads to an embryonic lethal phenotype similar to that of mice lacking Notch. In addition, absence of PS1 results in reduced gamma-secretase cleavage and leads to an accumulation of betaAPP C-terminal fragments and decreased amounts of Abeta. Recent work may suggest that PS1 could be the gamma-secretase itself, exhibiting the properties of a novel aspartyl protease. Mutagenesis of either of two highly conserved intramembraneous aspartate residues of PS1 leads to reduced Abeta production as observed in the PS1 knockout. A corresponding mutation in PS2 interfered with betaAPP processing and Notch signaling suggesting a functional redundancy of both presenilins. In this issue, some of the recent work on the molecular mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as novel diagnostic approaches and risk factors for AD will be discussed. In the first

  16. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia in sickle cell disease patients from Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Jones-Lecointe, Altheia; Smith, Erskine; Romana, Marc; Gilbert, Marie-Georges; Charles, Waveney P; Saint-Martin, Christian; Kéclard, Lisiane

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we have determined the frequency of beta(S) haplotypes in 163 sickle cell disease patients from Trinidad. The alpha(3.7) globin gene deletion status was also studied with an observed gene frequency of 0.17. Among the 283 beta(S) chromosomes analyzed, the Benin haplotype was the most prevalent (61.8%) followed by Bantu (17.3%), Senegal (8.5%), Cameroon (3.5%), and Arab-Indian (3.2%), while 5.7% of them were atypical. This beta(S) haplotypes distribution differed from those previously described in other Caribbean islands (Jamaica, Guadeloupe, and Cuba), in agreement with the known involvement of the major colonial powers (Spain, France, and Great Britain) in the slave trade in Trinidad and documented an Indian origin of the beta(S) gene.

  17. The regulated expression of beta-globin genes introduced into mouse erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, M V; Mellon, P; Charnay, P; Maniatis, T; Axel, R

    1983-02-01

    We have introduced a hybrid mouse-human beta-globin gene as well as the intact human beta-globin gene into murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells and have demonstrated that these genes are appropriately regulated during differentiation of the MEL cell in culture. The addition of chemical inducers to cotransformed cells results in a 5 to 50 fold increase in the level of mRNA transcribed from the exogenous globin gene. S1 nuclease and primer extension analyses demonstrate that these mRNAs initiate and terminate correctly. Nuclear transcription experiments indicate that induction of hybrid mRNA results at least in part from the increase in the rate of globin gene transcription. Furthermore, the induction appears to be specific for globin genes within an erythroid cell. These results permit the study of expression of the globin gene during erythroid differentiation and suggest that the specific induction of the globin gene is an inherent property of DNA sequences within or flanking the beta-globin genes. Moreover, the fact that the human and hybrid globin genes are both inducible in MEL cells suggests that these regulatory sequences are conserved between mouse and human cells.

  18. Cloning and characterization of the human beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2-GPI) gene promoter: roles of the atypical TATA box and hepatic nuclear factor-1alpha in regulating beta2-GPI promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Chiang, An-Na

    2004-01-01

    Beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2-GPI) is a plasma glycoprotein primarily synthesized in the liver. The interindividual variability of beta2-GPI expression in subjects with various metabolic syndromes and disease states suggests that it may have clinical importance. However, the regulation of beta2-GPI gene expression has not been clarified. To gain more insight into the control of beta2-GPI gene expression, we cloned the 4.1-kb 5'-flanking region and characterized the proximal promoter of the beta2- GPI gene in this study. Cis -acting elements required for beta2-GPI promoter activity were identified with transient transfection assays in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Huh7 and in non-hepatic HeLa cells. Serial deletion analyses of the beta2-GPI 5'-flanking sequence revealed that the region from -197 to +7 had strong promoter activity in hepatoma cells but not in HeLa cells. Truncation and site-directed mutagenesis of putative cis -elements within this region showing an atypical TATA box and a HNF-1 (hepatic nuclear factor-1) element were both essential for the beta2-GPI promoter activity. Subsequent gel mobility shift assays confirmed the interaction of HNF-1alpha with the HNF-1 site residing downstream of the TATA box. Co-transfection of beta2-GPI promoter-luciferase vector with HNF-1alpha expression vector in Huh7 and HNF-1-deficient HeLa cells demonstrated the transactivation effect of HNF-1alpha on beta2-GPI promoter activity. In addition, overexpression of HNF-1alpha enhanced the endogenous beta2-GPI expression. These results suggest that the atypical TATA box and HNF-1 cis-element are critical for beta2-GPI transcription and HNF-1alpha may play an important role in cell-specific regulation of beta2-GPI gene expression. PMID:14984368

  19. Laminins containing the beta2 chain modulate the precise organization of CNS synapses.

    PubMed

    Egles, Christophe; Claudepierre, Thomas; Manglapus, Mary K; Champliaud, Marie-France; Brunken, William J; Hunter, Dale D

    2007-03-01

    Synapses are formed and stabilized by concerted interactions of pre-, intra-, and post-synaptic components; however, the precise nature of the intrasynaptic components in the CNS remains obscure. Potential intrasynaptic components include extracellular matrix molecules such as laminins; here, we isolate beta2-containing laminins, including perhaps laminins 13 (alpha3beta2gamma3) and 14 (alpha4beta2gamma3), from CNS synaptosomes suggesting a role for these molecules in synaptic organization. Indeed, hippocampal synapses that form in vivo in the absence of these laminins are malformed at the ultrastructural level and this malformation is replicated in synapses formed in vitro, where laminins are provided largely by the post-synaptic neuron. This recapitulation of the in vivo function of laminins in vitro suggests that the malformations are a direct consequence of the removal of laminins from the synapse. Together, these results support a role for neuronal laminins in the structural integrity of central synapses.

  20. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in sickle cell patients from southwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Z; Karimi, M; Haghshenass, M; Merat, A

    2003-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia in Iran is accompanied by a high level of HbF and mild clinical presentation. Here we report haplotypes of the beta gene cluster found in 81 randomly selected sickle cell patients, including 47 sickle cell anemia (SS), 17 sickle cell trait (AS), and 17 sickle/thalassemia (S/thal) from southwest Iran. We found all five common typical haplotypes as well as five atypical haplotypes in our patients. Except for four patients with homozygous Benin haplotype, none of the other African typical haplotypes were found in a homozygous state. Arab-Indian was found to be the most prevalent haplotype in the study population. This haplotype accounted for 51.1% as the homozygous form in SS patients, where 69.1% of chromosomes in these patients had the Arab-Indian haplotype. Bantu A2 was the second most prevalent haplotype among all patients. The mean %HbF in SS patients was 27.83 and in the homozygous Arab-Indian haplotype it was still higher (30.40%), while in AS patients the %HbF was only 1.20. The high %Ggamma chain (71.81) in the Arab-Indian homozygous haplotype was concomitant with the presence of an Xmn I site in both chromosomes. The presence of the Arab-Indian haplotype as the predominant haplotype might be suggestive of a gene flow to/from Saudi Arabia or India. More haplotype investigations of a normal population can clarify the high incidence of Bantu A2 haplotype in our population.

  1. Genomic organization and characterization of a three-gene rat adult beta-globin haplotype.

    PubMed

    Au, D M; Wong, W M; Tam, J W; Cheng, L Y; Lam, V M

    1995-11-20

    The isolation and detailed characterization of a three-beta-globin gene (GloB) haplotype in the Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rat is described. An enriched library, lambda SDHelib, was screened with a human GloB probe, humbg44, and from which a beta minor gene, Rathbbz, was isolated, sequenced and characterized. A S-D rat GloB-specific probe, Ratbgze12, derived from the Rathbbz gene, was then used to screen a S-D rat genomic library, lambda SDglib. The clone T1510 was isolated and identified to include the entire Rathbbz gene and part of another GloB gene, Rathbby, which was 5' upstream from Rathbbz. Chromosomal walking upstream using the riboprobe, rnaT71, led to the isolation of an overlapping clone, Ta49, which was shown to include two full-length GloB genes; the most 5' was Rathbbx followed by Rathbby. Sequence data suggests that Rathbbx is a beta major gene, whereas Rathbby is a hybrid gene of Rathbbx and Rathbbz. Genomic hybridization confirmed this particular three-gene haplotype in the S-D rat. This haplotype, a1, may be the prototype of the GloB cluster in rat.

  2. Promoters for the human beta-hexosaminidase genes, HEXA and HEXB.

    PubMed

    Norflus, F; Yamanaka, S; Proia, R L

    1996-02-01

    Human lysosomal beta-hexosaminidases are encoded by two genes, HEXA and HEXB, specifying an alpha- and a beta-subunit, respectively. The subunits dimerize to form beta-hexosaminidase A (alpha beta), beta-hexosaminidase B (beta beta), and beta-hexosaminidase S (alpha alpha). This enzyme system has the capacity to degrade a variety of cellular substrates: oligosaccharides, glycosaminoglycans, and glycolipids containing beta-linked N-acetylglucosaminyl or N-galactosaminyl residues. Mutations in either the HEXA gene or HEXB gene lead to an accumulation of GM2 ganglioside in neurons, resulting in the severe neurodegenerative disorders termed the GM2 gangliosidoses. To identify the DNA elements responsible for hexosaminidase expression, we ligated the 5'-flanking sequences of both the human and mouse hexosaminidase genes to a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. The resulting plasmids were transfected into NIH-3T3 cells and CAT activity was determined as a measure of promoter strength. By 5' deletion analysis, it was found that essential sequences for HEXA expression resided within a 40-bp region between 100 bp and 60 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. This area contained two potential estrogen response element half-sites as well as potential binding sites for transcription factors NF-E1 and AP-2. Similarly, important HEXB promoter sequences were localized to a 60-bp region between 150 bp and 90 bp upstream of the ATG codon. By performing scanning mutagenesis on a 60-bp region within the 150-bp HEXB construct, we defined an essential promoter element of 12 bp that contained two potential AP-1 sites. The mouse Hexa and Hexb 5'-flanking sequences were found to contain regions similar in sequence, location, and activity to the essential promoter elements defined in the cognate human genes. No sequence similarity was found, however, between 5'-flanking regions of the HEXA and HEXB genes. These essential promoter elements represent potential sites for HEXA and

  3. A mutation of the beta-globin gene initiation codon, ATG-->AAG, found in a French Caucasian man.

    PubMed

    Lacan, Philippe; Aubry, Martine; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2005-01-01

    A new mutation of the beta-globin gene initiation codon, ATG-->AAG (Met-->Tyr), is reported in a man originating from the southeast of France. Typical hematological findings of beta-thalassemia (thal) trait were found. We emphasize the importance of characterizing uncommon beta-thal mutations for genetic counseling.

  4. Major histocompatibility complex gene product expression on pancreatic beta cells in acutely diabetic BB rats.

    PubMed Central

    Issa-Chergui, B.; Yale, J. F.; Vigeant, C.; Seemayer, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus was induced in young, diabetes-prone BB rats by the passive transfer of concanavalin A-activated T lymphocytes from the spleens of acutely diabetic BB rats. The pancreas of the recipients was examined 1-2 days after the onset of glycosuria by immunocytochemistry by means of monoclonal antibodies for determining whether 1) Class I and/or II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products were expressed on beta cells and 2) the mononuclear cell infiltrates were represented by T cells. Marked expression of Class I MHC gene products was evident on beta cells. In contrast, Class II MHC gene products were not identified on normal-appearing beta cells. Dendritic cells dispersed throughout the acinar and interstitial pancreas were markedly increased in number. The mononuclear cell infiltrate contained few cells (1-15%) recognized by a pan-T cell marker. Although it is possible that this passive transfer model might differ considerably from the spontaneously occurring diabetic state in the rat, this study suggests that 1) Class I, rather than Class II, MHC gene expression may be pivotal to beta-cell injury in diabetic rats, and 2) non-T cells may constitute an effector cell population central to beta-cell necrosis in Type I diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3276208

  5. Identification and molecular characterization of four new large deletions in the beta-globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fact that mutations in the human beta-globin gene cluster are essentially point mutations, a significant number of large deletions have also been described. We present here four new large deletions in the beta-globin gene cluster that have been identified on patients displaying an atypical hemoglobin phenotype (high HbF) at routine analysis. The first deletion, which spreads over 2.0 kb, removes the entire beta-globin gene, including its promoter, and is associated with a typical beta-thal minor phenotype. The three other deletions are larger (19.7 to 23.9 kb) and remove both the delta and beta-globin genes. Phenotypically, they look like an HPFH-deletion as they are associated with normal hematological parameters. The precise localization of their 5' and 3' breakpoints gives new insights about the differences between HPFH and (deltabeta)(0)-thalassemia at the molecular level. The importance of detection of these deletions in prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening of hemoglobinopathies is also discussed.

  6. Identification and characterization of a novel repressor of beta-interferon gene expression.

    PubMed

    Keller, A D; Maniatis, T

    1991-05-01

    We have identified and characterized a novel repressor of human beta-interferon (beta-IFN) gene expression. This protein, designated PRDI-BF1, binds specifically to the PRDI element of the beta-IFN gene promoter and is distinct from previously reported proteins that bind to this sequence. PRDI-BF1 is an 88-kD protein containing five zinc-finger motifs. Cotransfection experiments in cultured mammalian cells revealed that PRDI-BF1 is a potent repressor of PRDI-dependent transcription. PRDI-BF1 blocks virus induction of the intact beta-IFN gene promoter and of synthetic promoters containing multiple PRDI sites. PRDI-BF1 can also block the SV40 enhancer when PRDI sites are located between the enhancer and the promoter. This repression is highly dependent on the location of the PRDI sites, however, indicating that PRDI-BF1 cannot act at a distance. On the basis of the properties of PRDI-BF1 and the observation that PRDI-BF1 mRNA accumulation is virus inducible, we propose that PRDI-BF1 may act as a postinduction repressor of the beta-IFN gene by displacing positive regulatory proteins from the PRDI site of the promoter.

  7. Neofunctionalization of Chromoplast Specific Lycopene Beta Cyclase Gene (CYC-B) in Tomato Clade

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vijee; Pandey, Arun; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    The ancestor of tomato underwent whole genome triplication ca. 71 Myr ago followed by widespread gene loss. However, few of the triplicated genes are retained in modern day tomato including lycopene beta cyclase that mediates conversion of lycopene to β-carotene. The fruit specific β-carotene formation is mediated by a chromoplast-specific paralog of lycopene beta cyclase (CYC-B) gene. Presently limited information is available about how the variations in CYC-B gene contributed to its neofunctionalization. CYC-B gene in tomato clade contained several SNPs and In-Dels in the coding sequence (33 haplotypes) and promoter region (44 haplotypes). The CYC-B gene coding sequence in tomato appeared to undergo purifying selection. The transit peptide sequence of CYC-B protein was predicted to have a stronger plastid targeting signal than its chloroplast specific paralog indicating a possible neofunctionalization. In promoter of two Bog (Beta old gold) mutants, a NUPT (nuclear plastid) DNA fragment of 256 bp, likely derived from a S. chilense accession, was present. In transient expression assay, this promoter was more efficient than the “Beta type” promoter. CARGATCONSENSUS box sequences are required for the binding of the MADS-box regulatory protein RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN). The loss of CARGATCONSENSUS box sequence from CYC-B promoter in tomato may be related to attenuation of its efficiency to promote higher accumulation of β-carotene than lycopene during fruit ripening. PMID:27070417

  8. Critical contribution of beta chain residue 57 in peptide binding ability of both HLA-DR and -DQ molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Nepom, B S; Nepom, G T; Coleman, M; Kwok, W W

    1996-01-01

    Position 57 in the beta chain of HLA class II molecules maintains an Asp/non-Asp dimorphism that has been conserved through evolution and is implicated in susceptibility to some autoimmune diseases. The latter effect may be due to the influence of this residue on the ability of class II alleles to bind specific pathogenic peptides. We utilized highly homologous pairs of both DR and DQ alleles that varied at residue 57 to investigate the impact of this dimorphism on binding of model peptides. Using a direct binding assay of biotinylated peptides on whole cells expressing the desired alleles, we report several peptides that bind differentially to the allele pairs depending on the presence or absence of Asp at position 57. Peptides with negatively charged residues at anchor position 9 bind well to alleles not containing Asp at position 57 in the beta chain but cannot bind well to homologous Asp-positive alleles. By changing the peptides at the single residue predicted to interact with this position 57, we demonstrate a drastically altered or reversed pattern of binding. Ala analog peptides confirm these interactions and identify a limited set of interaction sites between the bound peptides and the class II molecules. Clarification of the impact of specific class II polymorphisms on generating unique allele-specific peptide binding "repertoires" will aid in our understanding of the development of specific immune responses and HLA-associated diseases. PMID:8692969

  9. Identification alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein precursor and tubulin beta chain as serology diagnosis biomarker of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a major worldwide cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality largely due to the insidious onset of the disease. The current clinical procedures utilized for disease diagnosis are invasive, unpleasant, and inconvenient. Hence, the need for simple blood tests that could be used for the early detection is crucial for its ultimate control and prevention. Methods The present work is a case–control study focused on proteomic analysis of serum of healthy volunteers and CRC patients by the ClinProt profiling technology based on mass spectrometry. This approach allowed to identifying a pattern of proteins/peptides able to differentiate the studied populations. Moreover, some of peptides differentially expressed in the serum of patients as compared to healthy volunteers were identified by LTQ Orbitrap XL. Results A Quick Classifier Algorithm was used to construct the peptidome patterns (m/z 1208, 1467, 1505, 1618, 1656 and 4215) for the identification of CRC from healthy volunteers with accuracy close to 100% (>CEA, P < 0.05). Peaks at m/z 1505 and 1618 were identified as alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein precursor and tubulin beta chain, respectively. Conclusions Alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein precursor and tubulin beta chain could be involved in the pathogenesis of CRC and perform as potential serology diagnosis biomarker. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4796578761089186. PMID:24618180

  10. Genes involved in long-chain alkene biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus.

    PubMed

    Beller, Harry R; Goh, Ee-Been; Keasling, Jay D

    2010-02-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are highly appealing targets for advanced cellulosic biofuels, as they are already predominant components of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuels. We have studied alkene biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698, a close relative of Sarcina lutea (now Kocuria rhizophila), which 4 decades ago was reported to biosynthesize iso- and anteiso-branched, long-chain alkenes. The underlying biochemistry and genetics of alkene biosynthesis were not elucidated in those studies. We show here that heterologous expression of a three-gene cluster from M. luteus (Mlut_13230-13250) in a fatty acid-overproducing Escherichia coli strain resulted in production of long-chain alkenes, predominantly 27:3 and 29:3 (no. carbon atoms: no. C=C bonds). Heterologous expression of Mlut_13230 (oleA) alone produced no long-chain alkenes but unsaturated aliphatic monoketones, predominantly 27:2, and in vitro studies with the purified Mlut_13230 protein and tetradecanoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) produced the same C(27) monoketone. Gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry confirmed the elemental composition of all detected long-chain alkenes and monoketones (putative intermediates of alkene biosynthesis). Negative controls demonstrated that the M. luteus genes were responsible for production of these metabolites. Studies with wild-type M. luteus showed that the transcript copy number of Mlut_13230-13250 and the concentrations of 29:1 alkene isomers (the dominant alkenes produced by this strain) generally corresponded with bacterial population over time. We propose a metabolic pathway for alkene biosynthesis starting with acyl-CoA (or-ACP [acyl carrier protein]) thioesters and involving decarboxylative Claisen condensation as a key step, which we believe is catalyzed by OleA. Such activity is consistent with our data and with the homology (including the conserved Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad) of Mlut_13230 (OleA) to FabH (beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III), which

  11. Sequence heterogeneity, multiplicity, and genomic organization of alpha- and beta-tubulin genes in sea urchins.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandraki, D; Ruderman, J V

    1981-01-01

    We analyzed the multiplicity, heterogeneity, and organization of the genes encoding the alpha and beta tubulins in the sea urchin Lytechinus pictus by using cloned complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) and genomic tubulin sequences. cDNA clones were constructed by using immature spermatogenic testis polyadenylic acid-containing ribonucleic acid as a template. alpha- and beta-tubulin clones were identified by hybrid selection and in vitro translation of the corresponding messenger ribonucleic acids, followed by immunoprecipitation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the translation products. The alpha cDNA clone contains a sequence that encodes the 48 C-terminal amino acids of alpha tubulin and 104 base pairs of the 3' nontranslated portion of the messenger ribonucleic acid. The beta cDNA insertion contains the coding sequence for the 100-C terminal amino acids of beta tubulin and 83 pairs of the 3' noncoding sequence. Hybrid selections performed at different criteria demonstrated the presence of several heterogeneous, closely related tubulin messenger ribonucleic acids, suggesting the existence of heterogeneous alpha- and beta-tubulin genes. Hybridization analyses indicated that there are at least 9 to 13 sequences for each of the two tubulin gene families per haploid genome. Hybridization of the cDNA probes to both total genomic DNA and cloned germline DNA fragments gave no evidence for close physical linkage of alpha-tubulin genes with beta-tubulin genes at the DNA level. In contrast, these experiments indicated that some genes within the same family are clustered. Images PMID:6287219

  12. Sequence heterogeneity, multiplicity, and genomic organization of. cap alpha. - and. beta. -tubulin genes in Sea Urchins

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandraki, D.; Ruderman, J.V.

    1981-12-01

    The authors analyzed the multiplicity, heterogeneity, and organization of the genes encoding the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. tubulins in the sea urchin Lytechinus pictus by using cloned complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) and genomic tubulin sequences. cDNA clones were constructed by using immature spermatogenic testis polyadenylic acid-containing ribonucleic acid as a template. ..cap alpha.. and ..beta..-tubulin clones were identified by hybrid selection and in vitro translation of the corresponding messenger ribonucleic acids, followed by immunoprecipitation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the translation products. The ..cap alpha.. cDNA clone contains a sequence that encodes the 48 C-terminal amino acids of ..cap alpha.. tubulin and 104 base pairs of the 3' nontranslated portion of the messenger ribonucleic acid. The ..beta.. cDNA insertion contains the coding sequence for the 100 C-terminal amino acids of ..beta.. tubulin and 83 base pairs of the 3' noncoding sequence. Hybrid selections performed at different criteria demonstrated the presence of several heterogeneous, closely related tubulin messenger ribonucleic acids, suggesting the existence of heterogeneous ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-tubulin genes. Hybridization analyses indicated that there are at least 9 to 13 sequences for each of the two tubulin gene families per haploid genome. Hybridization of the cDNA probes to both total genomic DNA and cloned germline DNA fragments gave no evidence for close physical linkage of ..cap alpha..-tubulin genes with ..beta..-tubulin genes at the DNA level. In contrast, these experiments indicated that some genes within the same family are clustered.

  13. Evolution and molecular characterization of a beta-globin gene from the Australian Echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus (Monotremata).

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Shroff, R; Cooper, S J; Hope, R

    1999-07-01

    Coinciding with a period in evolution when monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians diverged from a common ancestor, a proto-beta-globin gene duplicated, producing the progenitors of mammalian embryonic and adult beta-like globin genes. To determine whether monotremes contain orthologues of these genes and to further investigate the evolutionary relationships of monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians, we have determined the complete DNA sequence of an echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) beta-like globin gene. Conceptual translation of the gene and sequence comparisons with eutherian and marsupial beta-like globin genes and echidna adult beta-globin indicate that the gene is adult expressed. Phylogenetic analyses do not clearly resolve the branching pattern of mammalian beta-like globin gene lineages and it is therefore uncertain whether monotremes have orthologues of the embryonic beta-like globin genes of marsupials and eutherians. Four models are proposed that provide a framework for interpreting further studies on the evolution of beta-like globin genes in the context of the evolution of monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians.

  14. Stalk region of beta-chain enhances the coreceptor function of CD8.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny S; Wang, Xiaosong; Witte, Torsten; Nie, Linghu; Carvou, Nicolas; Kern, Petra; Chang, Hsiu-Ching

    2003-07-15

    CD8 glycoproteins are expressed as either alphaalpha homodimers or alphabeta heterodimers on the surface of T cells. CD8alphabeta is a more efficient coreceptor than the CD8alphaalpha for peptide Ag recognition by TCR. Each CD8 subunit is composed of four structural domains, namely, Ig-like domain, stalk region, transmembrane region, and cytoplasmic domain. In an attempt to understand why CD8alphabeta is a better coreceptor than CD8alphaalpha, we engineered, expressed, and functionally tested a chimeric CD8alpha protein whose stalk region is replaced with that of CD8beta. We found that the beta stalk region enhances the coreceptor function of chimeric CD8alphaalpha to a level similar to that of CD8alphabeta. Surprisingly, the beta stalk region also restored functional activity to an inactive CD8alpha variant, carrying an Ala mutation at Arg(8) (R8A), to a level similar to that of wild-type CD8alphabeta. Using the R8A variant of CD8alpha, a panel of anti-CD8alpha Abs, and three MHC class I (MHCI) variants differing in key residues known to be involved in CD8alpha interaction, we show that the introduction of the CD8beta stalk leads to a different topology of the CD8alpha-MHCI complex without altering the overall structure of the Ig-like domain of CD8alpha or causing the MHCI to employ different residues to interact with the CD8alpha Ig domain. Our results show that the stalk region of CD8beta is capable of fine-tuning the coreceptor function of CD8 proteins as a coreceptor, possibly due to its distinct protein structure, smaller physical size and the unique glycan adducts associated with this region.

  15. Effect of beta-globin gene cluster haplotype on the hematological and clinical features of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Rieder, R F; Safaya, S; Gillette, P; Fryd, S; Hsu, H; Adams, J G; Steinberg, M H

    1991-03-01

    In 113 black American adults with sickle cell anemia (HbSS), we examined nine polymorphic restriction sites, including the Xmnl site 5' to the G gamma gene, to see whether haplotype is related to the level of HbF and the proportion of G gamma chains or if it influences the hematological and clinical features of the disease. Seventy-five percent of the patients were homozygous or heterozygous for the Benin (no. 19) or Central African Republic (Bantu, no. 20) haplotypes; 13.3% were homozygous or heterozygous for the Senegal (no. 3) haplotype, while 11.5% had other genotypes. Of the subjects, 14.2% were either homozygous or heterozygous for the Xmnl restriction site 5' to the G gamma gene. We found no effect of haplotype on HbF levels. The level of G gamma chains was 60.5% +/- 17.0% in individuals heterozygous or homozygous for haplotype no. 3 and was 46.9% +/- 11.6% in individuals with other haplotypes. Subjects with the Xmnl site 5' to the G gamma gene had G gamma globin levels of 59.5% +/- 16.7% while those lacking that site had an average of 47.2% +/- 12.1%. There were no significant differences among these groups in hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume, mean cell volume, or clinical indicators of vaso-occlusive severity, including crises, hospitalizations per year, aseptic bone necrosis, acute chest syndrome, or leg ulcers. While the presence of haplotype 3 and the 5' G gamma Xmnl site were associated with increased G gamma chains, there was no effect on HbF level or other hematological and clinical features that might reflect disease severity. It is likely that determinants unrelated to haplotype, linked or unlinked to the beta-globin gene cluster, are the major effectors of differences in the levels of HbF in American patients with sickle cell anemia.

  16. Molecular variations linked to the grouping of beta- and alpha-globin genes in neonatal patients with sickle cell disease in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Marcos André C; Santos, Magnun N N; Araújo, Aderson S; Gomes, Yara M; Abath, Frederico G C; Bandeira, Flavia M G C

    2007-01-01

    Various factors have been described as phenotypic modulators of sickle cell disease, such as levels of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F), presence of alpha-thalassemia (thal), and haplotypes of the beta-globin genes. In order to characterize and determine the frequency of the betaS and betaC mutations and the prevalence of -alpha3.7-thal, 74 patients with sickle cell disease detected during neonatal screening in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, were studied. The haplotypes of the beta gene and -alpha3.7-thal were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and specific restriction endonucleases were used to establish the polymorphic sites of the haplotypes. The results showed the high frequency of the Central African Republic (CAR) or Bantu haplotype in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil. The low frequency of the Benin haplotype recorded in this study, in comparison with other states in northeast Brazil, suggests the diversity of origins of Afro-Brazilians in this region.

  17. Nitric oxide stimulates insulin gene transcription in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.C. . E-mail: s.c.campbell@ncl.ac.uk; Richardson, H.; Ferris, W.F.; Butler, C.S.; Macfarlane, W.M.

    2007-02-23

    Recent studies have identified a positive role for nitric oxide (NO) in the regulation of pancreatic {beta}-cell function. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of short-term exposure to NO on {beta}-cell gene expression and the activity of the transcription factor PDX-1. NO stimulated the activity of the insulin gene promoter in Min6 {beta}-cells and endogenous insulin mRNA levels in both Min6 and isolated islets of Langerhans. Addition of wortmannin prior to NO stimulation blocked the observed increases in insulin gene promoter activity. Although NO addition stimulated the phosphorylation of p38, inhibition by SB203580 did not block the effect of NO on the insulin gene promoter. NO addition also stimulated both the nuclear accumulation and the DNA binding activity of PDX-1. This study has shown that over 24 h, NO stimulates insulin gene expression, PI-3-kinase activity and the activity of the critical {beta}-cell transcription factor PDX-1.

  18. The genomic fingerprinting of the coding region of the beta-tubulin gene in Leishmania identification.

    PubMed

    Luis, L; Ramírez, A; Aguilar, C M; Eresh, S; Barker, D C; Mendoza-León, A

    1998-06-01

    We have demonstrated the polymorphism of the beta-tubulin gene region in Leishmania and its value in the identification of the parasite. In this work we have shown that the coding region of the gene has sufficient variation to accurately discriminate these parasites at the subgenus level. Nevertheless, intrasubgenus diversity, for particular restriction enzymes, was found in New World Leishmania belonging to the Leishmania subgenus. For instance, differences were found between mexicana and amazonensis strains. A unique pattern at the species level was found in particular species of both subgenera, e.g. L. (L.) major strain P and L. (L.) tropica belonging to the Leishmania subgenus, and L. (V.) panamensis strain LS94 from the Viannia subgenus. Particular endonucleases are diagnostic in Leishmania species discrimination as in the case of PvuII for the mexicana and amazonensis. This variation evidenced in the beta-tubulin gene region of Leishmania also occurred in other Kinetoplastida e.g. Trypanosoma cruzi, Leptomonas spp. and Crithidia spp. Moreover, these organisms showed a different genomic fingerprinting for the beta-tubulin gene among them and also Leishmania. Thus, the polymorphism of the coding region of the beta-tubulin gene can be used as a molecular marker for the identification of Leishmania.

  19. Development of real-time PCR method for the detection and the quantification of a new endogenous reference gene in sugar beet "Beta vulgaris L.": GMO application.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Maher; Alaya, Akram; Ali, Imen Ben Haj; Hafsa, Ahmed Ben; Nabi, Nesrine; Bérard, Aurélie; Romaniuk, Marcel; Skhiri, Fethia; Saïd, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE : Here, we describe a new developed quantitative real-time PCR method for the detection and quantification of a new specific endogenous reference gene used in GMO analysis. The key requirement of this study was the identification of a new reference gene used for the differentiation of the four genomic sections of the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) (Beta, Corrollinae, Nanae and Procumbentes) suitable for quantification of genetically modified sugar beet. A specific qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was designed to detect the sugar beet amplifying a region of the adenylate transporter (ant) gene only from the species of the genomic section I of the genus Beta (cultivated and wild relatives) and showing negative PCR results for 7 species of the 3 other sections, 8 related species and 20 non-sugar beet plants. The sensitivity of the assay was 15 haploid genome copies (HGC). A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) assay was also performed, having high linearity (R (2) > 0.994) over sugar beet standard concentrations ranging from 20,000 to 10 HGC of the sugar beet DNA per PCR. The QRT-PCR assay described in this study was specific and more sensitive for sugar beet quantification compared to the validated test previously reported in the European Reference Laboratory. This assay is suitable for GMO quantification in routine analysis from a wide variety of matrices.

  20. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor requirements for the induction of the endothelin-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Castañares, Cristina; Redondo-Horcajo, Mariano; Magan-Marchal, Noemi; Lamas, Santiago; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2006-06-01

    Expression of the endothelin (ET)-1 gene is subject to complex regulation by numerous factors, among which the cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is one of the most important. TGF-beta action is based on the activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad proteins activate transcription of the gene by cooperation with activator protein-1 (AP-1) at specific sites on the ET-1 promoter. Smad signaling pathway is initiated by binding of the cytokine to a heteromeric complex of type I and type II receptors. Signal is then propagated to the nucleus by specific members of the Smad family. Most cell types contain a type I receptor known as ALK5. However, endothelial cells are unique because they coexpress an additional type I receptor named ALK1. These forms do not constitute redundant receptors with the same function, but they actually activate different Smad-mediated expression programs that lead to specific endothelial phenotypes. TGF-beta/ALK5/Smad3 pathway is associated to a mature endothelium because it leads to inhibition of cell migration/proliferation. Conversely, TGF-beta/ALK1/Smad5 activates both processes and is more related to the angiogenic state. We have analyzed the TGF-beta receptor subtype requirements for the activation of the ET-1 gene. For that purpose, we have overexpressed type I receptor and Smad isoforms in endothelial cells and analyzed the effect on ET-1 expression. Our experiments indicate that TGF-beta induces ET-1 expression preferentially through the activation of the ALK5/Smad3 pathway and, therefore, the expression of the vaso-constrictor may be associated to a quiescent and mature endothelial phenotype.

  1. Cell and Gene Therapy for the Beta-Thalassemias: Advances and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Riviere, Isabelle; Boulad, Farid; Sadelain, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The beta-thalassemias are inherited anemias caused by mutations that severely reduce or abolish expression of the beta-globin gene. Like sickle cell disease, a related beta-globin gene disorder, they are ideal candidates for performing a genetic correction in patient hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The most advanced approach utilizes complex lentiviral vectors encoding the human β-globin gene, as first reported by May et al. in 2000. Considerable progress toward the clinical implementation of this approach has been made in the past five years, based on effective CD34+ cell mobilization and improved lentiviral vector manufacturing. Four trials have been initiated in the United States and Europe. Of 16 evaluable subjects, 6 have achieved transfusion independence. One of them developed a durable clonal expansion, which regressed after several years without transformation. Although globin lentiviral vectors have so far proven to be safe, this occurrence suggests that powerful insulators with robust enhancer-blocking activity will further enhance this approach. The combined discovery of Bcl11a-mediated γ-globin gene silencing and advances in gene editing are the foundations for another gene therapy approach, which aims to reactivate fetal hemoglobin (HbF) production. Its clinical translation will hinge on the safety and efficiency of gene targeting in true HSCs and the induction of sufficient levels of HbF to achieve transfusion independence. Altogether, the progress achieved over the past 15 years bodes well for finding a genetic cure for severe globin disorders in the next decade.

  2. A new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3{beta}-HSD gene causes salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Sakkal-Alkaddour, S.; Chang, Ying T.; Yang, Xiaojiang; Songya Pang

    1996-01-01

    We report a new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{Beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}-HSD) gene in a Pakistanian female child with the salt-wasting form of 3{Beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The etiology for her congenital adrenal hyperplasia was not defined. Although the family history suggested possible 3{beta}-HSd deficiency disorder, suppressed adrenal function caused by excess glucocorticoid therapy in this child at 7 yr of age did not allow hormonal diagnosis. To confirm 3{beta}-HSD deficiency, we sequenced the type II 3{beta}-HSD gene in the patient, her family, and the parents of her deceased paternal cousins. The type II 3{beta}-HSD gene region of a putative promotor, exons I, II, III, and IV, and exon-intron boundaries were amplified by PCR and sequenced in all subjects. The DNA sequence of the child revealed a single nucleotide deletion at codon 318 [ACA(Thr){r_arrow}AA] in exon IV in one allele, and two nucleotide deletions at codon 273 [AAA(Lys){r_arrow}A] in exon IV in the other allele. The remaining gene sequences were normal. The codon 318 mutation was found in one allele from the father, brother, and parents of the deceased paternal cousins. The codon 273 mutation was found in one allele of the mother and a sister. These findings confirmed inherited 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the child caused by the compound heterozygous type II 3{beta}-HSD gene mutation. Both codons at codons 279 and 367, respectively, are predicted to result in an altered and truncated type II 3{beta}-HSD protein, thereby causing salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the patient. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Conformation of methyl beta-lactoside bound to the ricin B-chain: Interpretation of transferred nuclear Overhauser effects facilitated by spin simulation and selective deuteration

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, V.L.; Thomson, D.S.; Prestegard, J.H. )

    1990-06-12

    Spin simulation and selective deuteration have been used to aid in the interpretation of 1D transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) NMR experiments on ricin B-chain/ligand systems. Application of these methods has revealed a change in the conformation of deuterated methyl beta-lactoside upon binding to the ricin B-chain which results in a slight change in glycosidic torsional angels which appear to dominate in the solution conformation. The combination of simulation and experiment also shows an important sensitivity of TRNOE magnitudes to dissociation rate constants and available spin-diffusion pathways for the ricin B-chain/ligand systems under study. The sensitivity to dissociation rates allows determination of rate constants for methyl beta-lactoside and methyl beta-galactoside of 50 and 300 s-1, respectively.

  4. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  5. Imputing Variants in HLA-DR Beta Genes Reveals That HLA-DRB1 Is Solely Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Nath, Swapan K.; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The genetic association of HLA-DRB1 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is well documented, but association with other HLA-DR beta genes (HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DRB5) has not been thoroughly studied, despite their similar functions and chromosomal positions. We examined variants in all functional HLA-DR beta genes in RA and SLE patients and controls, down to the amino-acid level, to better understand disease association with the HLA-DR locus. To this end, we improved an existing HLA reference panel to impute variants in all protein-coding HLA-DR beta genes. Using the reference panel, HLA variants were inferred from high-density SNP data of 9,271 RA-control subjects and 5,342 SLE-control subjects. Disease association tests were performed by logistic regression and log-likelihood ratio tests. After imputation using the newly constructed HLA reference panel and statistical analysis, we observed that HLA-DRB1 variants better accounted for the association between MHC and susceptibility to RA and SLE than did the other three HLA-DRB variants. Moreover, there were no secondary effects in HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4, or HLA-DRB5 in RA or SLE. Of all the HLA-DR beta chain paralogs, those encoded by HLA-DRB1 solely or dominantly influence susceptibility to RA and SLE. PMID:26919467

  6. Prevalence of TEM, SHV, and CTX-M Beta-Lactamase genes in the urinary isolates of a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Trupti; Pandey, M.; Varma, M.; Bhatambare, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) are the major cause of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics such as penicillins, cephalosporins, and monobactams. They are derived from the narrow-spectrum beta-lactamases (TEM-1, TEM-2, or SHV-1) by mutations that alter the amino acid configuration around the enzyme active site. Aim: To determine the prevalence of ESBL (blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV) genes among the members of Enterobacteriaceae. Methodology: The present prospective study was carried out from January 2015 to June 2015 in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine of a Teaching Tertiary Care Hospital. A total of 526 urine samples were studied. Seventy-eight isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for detection of ESBL genes. Results: In our study, ESBL genes were detected among 18 (45%) phenotypically confirmed ESBL producers and 20 (52.5%) phenotypically confirmed non-ESBL producers. The gene that predominated was blaTEM (48.7%), followed by blaCTX-M (7.6%) and blaSHV (5.1%). Conclusion: Definitive identification of ESBL genes is only possible by molecular detection methods. Phenotypic tests need to be evaluated periodically as their performance may change with the introduction of new enzymes. PMID:28182026

  7. Nonblack patients with sickle cell disease have African. beta. sup s gene cluster haplotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Z.R.; Powars, D.R.; Williams, W.D. ); Kinney, T.R. ); Schroeder, W.A. )

    1989-05-26

    Of 18 nonblack patients with sickle cell disease, 14 had sickle cell anemia, 2 had hemoglobin SC disease, and 2 had hemoglobin S-{beta}{sup o}-thalassemia. The {beta}{sup s} gene cluster haplotypes that were determined in 7 patients were of African origin and were identified as Central African Republic, Central African Republic minor II, Benin, and Senegal. The haplotype Central African Republic minor II was present on the {beta}{sup o}-thalassemia chromosome in 2 patients. None of 10 patients whose {alpha}-gene status was determined had {alpha}-thalassemia-2. These data strongly support the concept that the {beta}{sup s} gene on chromosome 11 of these individuals is of African origin and that the {alpha}-gene locus on chromosome 16 is of white or native American origin. The clinical severity of the disease in these nonblack patients is appropriate to their haplotype without {alpha}-thalassemia-2 and is comparable with that of black patients. All persons with congenital hemolytic anemia should be examined for the presence of sickle cell disease regardless of physical appearance or ethnic background.

  8. Characterization and expression of the beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase gene family of Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymes belonging to the Beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) family cleave chitin oligosaccharides produced by the action of chitinases on chitin into the constituent N-acetylglucosamine monomer. Four genes encoding putative NAGs in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, namely TcNAG1, TcFDL, Tc...

  9. Using the NCBI Genome Databases to Compare the Genes for Human & Chimpanzee Beta Hemoglobin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The beta hemoglobin protein is identical in humans and chimpanzees. In this tutorial, students see that even though the proteins are identical, the genes that code for them are not. There are many more differences in the introns than in the exons, which indicates that coding regions of DNA are more highly conserved than non-coding regions.

  10. Direct cellobiose production from cellulose using sextuple beta-glucosidase gene deletion Neurospora crassa mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct cellobiose production from cellulose by a genetically modified fungus—Neurospora crassa, was explored in this study. A library of N. crassa sextuple beta-glucosidase (bgl) gene deletion strains was constructed. Various concentrations of cellobiose were detected in the culture broth of the N. ...

  11. Lampreys have a single gene cluster for the fast skeletal myosin heavy chain gene family.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Ono, Yosuke; Hirano, Shigeki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs) and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod), a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs) are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost) contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans). We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5'-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny.

  12. Chromosome 3p loss of heterozygosity and mutation analysis of the FHIT and beta-cat genes in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    González, M V; Pello, M F; Ablanedo, P; Suárez, C; Alvarez, V; Coto, E

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To study the loss of heterozygosity at the short arm of chromosome 3 in primary tumours from patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck; to determine whether the FHIT gene, mapped to 3p14.2 and the CTNNB1 (beta-cat) gene, mapped to 3p21, are deleted or mutated in these tumours. METHODS: DNA was extracted from fresh tumours. Loss of heterozygosity was assessed by microsatellite analysis of the following markers: D3S1283 and D3S1286 (3p24), D3S966 (3p21), and D3S1300 (3P14.2). Homozygous deletion was determined by radioactive multiplex polymerase chain reaction of exons 5 and 6 of the FHIT gene. The presence of mutations in FHIT exon 5 and beta-cat exon 3 was studied by single strand conformation polymorphism. RESULTS: 50% of informative cases (25/50) showed loss of heterozygosity for at least one of the 3p markers. 3p21 was the region with the highest rate of allelic deletion (63%). No point mutation was found in FHIT exon 5 or beta-cat exon 3. No case showed homozygous deletion for the FHIT (exons 5 and 6) or the beta-cat exon 3. CONCLUSIONS: The short arm of chromosome 3 is often deleted in the head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. In the remaining alleles of the FHIT or beta-cat genes, no evidence was found for point mutations or deletions, documented in other common carcinomas. Inactivation could occur by different mechanisms such as methylation, or other genes (not studied here) could be target of allelic losses in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Images PMID:9797729

  13. Contribution of peroxisomal beta-oxidation system to the chain-shortening of N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)azelaamic acid in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Mori, K; Yamada, J; Suga, T

    1990-06-15

    Hepaptic peroxisomal and mitochondrial beta-oxidation of N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)azelaamic acid (C9), which is a possible metabolic intermediate of Melinamide, a potent hypocholesterolemic drug, were investigated. Isolated hepatocytes generated H2O2 when incubated with C9, indicating that C9 served as the substrate for peroxisomal beta-oxidation. Also with isolated peroxisomes a significant activity of peroxisomal beta-oxidation for C9-CoA measured by following cyanide-insensitive NAD reduction was observed, when the chain-shortened products such as C7 and C5 were detected from the incubation mixture of C9-CoA, and so NADH, acetyl-CoA and C2 units split off from C9-CoA were produced in stoichiometric amounts. In contrast, the mitochondrial beta-oxidation for C9 measured by following ketone body production and antimycin A-sensitive O2 consumption was not detectable, indicating that C9 is not metabolized by mitochondrial beta-oxidation. Comparative study of beta-oxidation capacities in peroxisomes and mitochondria indicate that the beta-oxidation of C9 occurs exclusively in peroxisomes. Also, the formation activity of C2 units liberated from C9 in intact hepatocytes reflects the peroxisomal beta-oxidation activity of liver homogenates with a highly close correlation. Therefore, it is concluded that C9 can be an excellent substrate for estimating peroxisomal beta-oxidation activity in intact cells.

  14. Isolation and functional characterization of a lycopene beta-cyclase gene that controls fruit colour of papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    PubMed

    Devitt, Luke C; Fanning, Kent; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Holton, Timothy A

    2010-01-01

    The colour of papaya fruit flesh is determined largely by the presence of carotenoid pigments. Red-fleshed papaya fruit contain lycopene, whilst this pigment is absent from yellow-fleshed fruit. The conversion of lycopene (red) to beta-carotene (yellow) is catalysed by lycopene beta-cyclase. This present study describes the cloning and functional characterization of two different genes encoding lycopene beta-cyclases (lcy-beta1 and lcy-beta2) from red (Tainung) and yellow (Hybrid 1B) papaya cultivars. A mutation in the lcy-beta2 gene, which inactivates enzyme activity, controls lycopene production in fruit and is responsible for the difference in carotenoid production between red and yellow-fleshed papaya fruit. The expression level of both lcy-beta1 and lcy-beta2 genes is similar and low in leaves, but lcy-beta2 expression increases markedly in ripe fruit. Isolation of the lcy-beta2 gene from papaya, that is preferentially expressed in fruit and is correlated with fruit colour, will facilitate marker-assisted breeding for fruit colour in papaya and should create possibilities for metabolic engineering of carotenoid production in papaya fruit to alter both colour and nutritional properties.

  15. Stimulator of IFN gene is critical for induction of IFN-beta during Chlamydia muridarum infection.

    PubMed

    Prantner, Daniel; Darville, Toni; Nagarajan, Uma M

    2010-03-01

    Type I IFN signaling has recently been shown to be detrimental to the host during infection with Chlamydia muridarum in both mouse lung and female genital tract. However, the pattern recognition receptor and the signaling pathways involved in chlamydial-induced IFN-beta are unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated no role for TLR4 and a partial role for MyD88 in chlamydial-induced IFN-beta. In this study, we demonstrate that mouse macrophages lacking TLR3, TRIF, TLR7, or TLR9 individually or both TLR4 and MyD88, still induce IFN-beta equivalent to wild type controls, leading to the hypothesis that TLR-independent cytosolic pathogen receptor pathways are crucial for this response. Silencing nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 in HeLa cells partially decreased chlamydial-induced IFN-beta. Independently, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of the stimulator of IFN gene (STING) protein in HeLa cells and mouse oviduct epithelial cells significantly decreased IFN-beta mRNA expression, suggesting a critical role for STING in chlamydial-induced IFN-beta induction. Conversely, silencing of mitochondria-associated antiviral signaling proteins and the Rig-I-like receptors, RIG-I, and melanoma differentiation associated protein 5, had no effect. In addition, induction of IFN-beta depended on the downstream transcription IFN regulatory factor 3, and on activation of NF-kappaB and MAPK p38. Finally, STING, an endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein, was found to localize in close proximity to the chlamydial inclusion membrane during infection. These results indicate that C. muridarum induces IFN-beta via stimulation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 pathway, and TLR- and Rig-I-like receptor-independent pathways that require STING, culminating in activation of IFN regulatory factor 3, NF-kappaB, and p38 MAPK.

  16. An Electrophoretically Silent Polymorphism for the Beta Chains of Rabbit Hemoglobin and Associated Polyribosome Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Garrick, Michael D.; Bricker, J.; Garrick, Laura M.

    1974-01-01

    The β chain of rabbit (Oryctolagus caniculus) hemoglobin has previously been reported to contain a single residue of isoleucine at β112. We have detected other rabbits with either zero isoleucyl residues or half a residue per β chain. This character is polymorphic and inherited as a simple mendelian autosomal codominant.—Normally the modal number of ribosomes per polyribosome is 4 to 6 in reticulocyte lysates; but incubation of rabbit reticulocytes prior to lysis with L-o-methylthreonine (OMT), an isostere of isoleucine, leads to a bimodal distribution in lysates with 2–3 and 8–12 ribosomes as modes. This alteration has been attributed to ribosomal traffic jams caused by starvation for ile-tRNA at mRNA codons corresponding to the locations of isoleucyl residues at positions α10, α17, α55 and β112. We have confirmed this interpretation by incubating OMT with reticulocytes from rabbits with integral, half integral and nil values for isoleucyl residues per β chain to show that formation of the larger clusters of polyribosomes requires that β112 = ile. PMID:4818267

  17. Increased Stability and DNA Site Discrimination of Single Chain Variants of the Dimeric beta-Barrel DNA Binding Domain of the Human Papillomavirus E2 Transcriptional Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dellarole,M.; Sanchez, I.; Freire, E.; de Prat-Gay, G.

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infects millions of people worldwide and is a causal agent of cervical cancer in women. The HPV E2 protein controls the expression of all viral genes through binding of its dimeric C-terminal domain (E2C) to its target DNA site. We engineered monomeric versions of the HPV16 E2C, in order to probe the link of the dimeric {beta}-barrel fold to stability, dimerization, and DNA binding. Two single-chain variants, with 6 and 12 residue linkers (scE2C-6 and scE2C-12), were purified and characterized. Spectroscopy and crystallography show that the native structure is unperturbed in scE2C-12. The single chain variants are stabilized with respect to E2C, with effective concentrations of 0.6 to 6 mM. The early folding events of the E2C dimer and scE2C-12 are very similar and include formation of a compact species in the submillisecond time scale and a non-native monomeric intermediate with a half-life of 25 ms. However, monomerization changes the unfolding mechanism of the linked species from two-state to three-state, with a high-energy intermediate. Binding to the specific target site is up to 5-fold tighter in the single chain variants. Nonspecific DNA binding is up to 7-fold weaker in the single chain variants, leading to an overall 10-fold increased site discrimination capacity, the largest described so far for linked DNA binding domains. Titration calorimetric binding analysis, however, shows almost identical behavior for dimer and single-chain species, suggesting very subtle changes behind the increased specificity. Global analysis of the mechanisms probed suggests that the dynamics of the E2C domain, rather than the structure, are responsible for the differential properties. Thus, the plastic and dimeric nature of the domain did not evolve for a maximum affinity, specificity, and stability of the quaternary structure, likely because of regulatory reasons and for roles other than DNA binding played by partly folded dimeric or monomeric conformers.

  18. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes and HbF levels are not the only modulators of sickle cell disease in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Inati, A; Taher, A; Bou Alawi, W; Koussa, S; Kaspar, H; Shbaklo, H; Zalloua, P A

    2003-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder of the beta-globin chain. Despite the fact that all subjects with SCD have the same single base pair mutation, the severity of the clinical and hematological manifestations is extremely variable. This study examined for the first time in Lebanon the correlation between the clinical manifestation of SCD and the beta-globin gene haplotypes. The haplotypes of 50 patients diagnosed with SCD were determined using polymerase chain reaction amplification of fragments containing nine polymorphic restriction sites around and within the epsilon-Ggamma-Agamma-psibeta-delta-beta-globin gene complex. Most reported haplotypes were found in our population with the Benin haplotype as the most prevalent one. When the patients were divided according to their HbF levels into three groups (Group A: HbF < 5%, Group B: HbF between 5 and 15%, and Group C: HbF > 15%), surprisingly, the highest levels of HbF were associated with the most severe clinical cases. Our findings suggest that fetal hemoglobin levels are important but not the only parameters that affect the severity of the disease. In addition, the high levels of HbF in patients with CAR haplotypes did not seem to ameliorate the severity of symptoms, suggesting that genetic factors other than haplotypes are the major determinants of increased HbF levels in Lebanon.

  19. Regulated expression of a complete human beta-globin gene encoded by a transmissible retrovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Cone, R D; Weber-Benarous, A; Baorto, D; Mulligan, R C

    1987-01-01

    We introduced a human beta-globin gene into murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells by infection with recombinant retroviruses containing the complete genomic globin sequence. The beta-globin gene was correctly regulated during differentiation, steady-state mRNA levels being induced 5- to 30-fold after treatment of the cells with the chemical inducer dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies using vectors which yield integrated proviruses lacking transcriptional enhancer sequences indicated that neither retroviral transcription nor the retroviral enhancer sequences themselves had any obvious effect on expression of the globin gene. Viral RNA expression also appeared inducible, being considerably depressed in uninduced MEL cells but approaching normal wild-type levels after dimethyl sulfoxide treatment. We provide data which suggest that the control point for both repression and subsequent activation of virus expression in MEL cells lies in the viral enhancer element. Images PMID:3029570

  20. Specific transcription and RNA splicing defects in five cloned beta-thalassaemia genes.

    PubMed

    Treisman, R; Orkin, S H; Maniatis, T

    1983-04-14

    Transcriptional analysis of five different cloned beta-thalassaemia genes introduced into cultured mammalian cells revealed specific defects in transcription and RNA splicing. A single base change 87 base pairs to the 5' side of the mRNA cap site significantly lowers the level of transcription and therefore appears to represent a promoter mutation. Three genes contain different single base changes in the first intervening sequence (IVS) 5' splice site. One mutation, at IVS1 position 1, inactivates the splice site completely; the other two, at IVS1 positions 5 and 6, reduce its activity. Each mutation activates the same three cryptic splice sites. The fifth gene contains a single base change within IVS2 at position 745, which results in the formation of abnormal beta-globin RNA that contains an extra exon.

  1. Promoter region of the human platelet-derived growth factor A-chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Takimoto, Yasuo; Wang, Zhao Yi; Kobler, K.; Deuel, T.F. )

    1991-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) A- and B-chain genes are widely expressed in mammalian tissues and their homodimeric gene products appear to regulate the autocrine growth of both normal and transformed cells. In this study, we analyzed the 5{prime} flanking sequences of the human PDGF A-chain gene to seek elements important to regulating its transcription. The promoter reigon was exceptionally G + C-rich and contained a TATA box but no CAAT box. The transcription start site was identified 845 base pairs 5{prime} to the translation initiation site by S1 nuclease mapping and by primer extension. Both in vitro transcription and transient expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene linked to the PDGF A-chain 5{prime} flanking sequences established that the putative promoter region was active, and RNase H mapping established that the three characteristic mRNAs used the same transcription start site, which was used in normal endothelial cells and in two human tumor cell lines that express high levels of A-chain transcripts. The results extablished an exceptionally G + C-rich promoter region and a single transcription start site active for each of the three mRNAs of the PDGF A-chain gene. DNA sites of potential importance in mediating the activation of the PDGF A-chain gene in normal cells and in transformed cell lines expressing high levels of PDGF A-chain were identified.

  2. Promoter region of the human platelet-derived growth factor A-chain gene.

    PubMed Central

    Takimoto, Y; Wang, Z Y; Kobler, K; Deuel, T F

    1991-01-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) A- and B-chain genes are widely expressed in mammalian tissues and their homodimeric gene products appear to regulate the autocrine growth of both normal and transformed cells. In this study, we analyzed the 5' flanking sequences of the human PDGF A-chain gene to seek elements important to regulating its transcription. The promoter region was exceptionally G + C-rich and contained a "TATA box" but no "CAAT box." The transcription start site was identified 845 base pairs 5' to the translation initiation site by S1 nuclease mapping and by primer extension. Both in vitro transcription and transient expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene linked to the PDGF A-chain 5' flanking sequences established that the putative promoter region was active, and RNase H mapping established that the three characteristic mRNAs (1.9, 2.3, and 2.8 kilobases) used the same transcription start site, which was used in normal endothelial cells and in two human tumor cell lines that express high levels of A-chain transcripts. The results established an exceptionally G + C-rich promoter region and a single transcription start site active for each of the three mRNAs of the PDGF A-chain gene. DNA sites of potential importance in mediating the activation of the PDGF A-chain gene in normal cells and in transformed cell lines expressing high levels of PDGF A chain were identified. Images PMID:1848007

  3. Rapid evolution of Beta-keratin genes contribute to phenotypic differences that distinguish turtles and birds from other reptiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang I; Kong, Lesheng; Ponting, Chris P; Haerty, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Sequencing of vertebrate genomes permits changes in distinct protein families, including gene gains and losses, to be ascribed to lineage-specific phenotypes. A prominent example of this is the large-scale duplication of beta-keratin genes in the ancestors of birds, which was crucial to the subsequent evolution of their beaks, claws, and feathers. Evidence suggests that the shell of Pseudomys nelsoni contains at least 16 beta-keratins proteins, but it is unknown whether this is a complete set and whether their corresponding genes are orthologous to avian beak, claw, or feather beta-keratin genes. To address these issues and to better understand the evolution of the turtle shell at a molecular level, we surveyed the diversity of beta-keratin genes from the genome assemblies of three turtles, Chrysemys picta, Pelodiscus sinensis, and Chelonia mydas, which together represent over 160 Myr of chelonian evolution. For these three turtles, we found 200 beta-keratins, which indicate that, as for birds, a large expansion of beta-keratin genes in turtles occurred concomitantly with the evolution of a unique phenotype, namely, their plastron and carapace. Phylogenetic reconstruction of beta-keratin gene evolution suggests that separate waves of gene duplication within a single genomic location gave rise to scales, claws, and feathers in birds, and independently the scutes of the shell in turtles.

  4. Transfer of nonselectable genes into mouse teratocarcinoma cells and transcription of the transferred human. beta. -globin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.F.; Mintz, B.

    1982-02-01

    Teratocarcinoma (TCC) stem cells can function as vehicles for the introduction of specific recombinant genes into mice. Because most genes do not code for a selectable marker, the authors investigated the transformation efficiency of vectors with a linked selectable gene. In one series, TCC cells first selected for thymidine kinase deficiency were treated with DNA from the plasmid vector PtkH..beta..1 containing the human genomic ..beta..-globin gene and the thymidine kinase gene of herpes simplex virus. A high transformation frequency was obtained after selection in hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium. Hybridization tests revealed that the majority of transformants had intact copies of the human gene among three to six total copies per cell. These were associated with cellular DNA sequences as judged from the presence of additional new restriction fragments and from stability of the sequences in tumors produced by injecting the cells subcutaneously. Total polyadenylate-containing RNA from cell cultures of two out of four transformants examined showed hybridization to the human gene probe: one RNA species resembled mature human ..beta..-globin mRNA transcripts; the others were of larger size. In differentiating tumors, various tissues, including hematopoietic cells of TCC provenance could be found. In a second model set of experiments, wild-type TCC cells were used to test a dominant-selection scheme with pSV-gpt vectors. Numerous transformants were isolated, and their transfected DNA was apparently stably integrated. Thus, any gene of choice can be transferred into TCC stem cells even without mutagenesis of the cells, and selected cell clones can be characterized. Cells of interest may then be introduced into early embryos to produce new mouse strains with predetermined genetic changes.

  5. Inter-MAR association contributes to transcriptionally active looping events in human beta-globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Di, Li-Jun; Lv, Xiang; Zheng, Wei; Xue, Zheng; Guo, Zhi-Chen; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chi-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are important in chromatin organization and gene regulation. Although it is known that there are a number of MAR elements in the beta-globin gene cluster, it is unclear that how these MAR elements are involved in regulating beta-globin genes expression. Here, we report the identification of a new MAR element at the LCR (locus control region) of human beta-globin gene cluster and the detection of the inter-MAR association within the beta-globin gene cluster. Also, we demonstrate that SATB1, a protein factor that has been implicated in the formation of network like higher order chromatin structures at some gene loci, takes part in beta-globin specific inter-MAR association through binding the specific MARs. Knocking down of SATB1 obviously reduces the binding of SATB1 to the MARs and diminishes the frequency of the inter-MAR association. As a result, the ACH establishment and the alpha-like globin genes and beta-like globin genes expressions are affected either. In summary, our results suggest that SATB1 is a regulatory factor of hemoglobin genes, especially the early differentiation genes at least through affecting the higher order chromatin structure.

  6. Further characterization of the thrombasthenia-related idiotype OG. Antiidiotype defines a novel epitope(s) shared by fibrinogen B beta chain, vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor and required for binding to beta 3

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A patient (OG) with Glanzmann thrombasthenia became refractory to platelet transfusion after the production of an immunoglobulin G (IgG) isoantibody (Ab1) specific for the integrin subunit beta 3. To determine the frequency at which the OG idiotype is found in the general population and in immune-mediated disease states, we developed a rabbit polyclonal antibody (Ab2) specific for affinity-purified OG anti-beta 3 Fab. The binding of Ab2 to Ab1 is inhibited by purified alpha IIb beta 3. Ab2 als binds to IgG specific for alpha IIb beta 3 obtained from one nonrelated Glanzmann thrombasthenia patient ES who has developed isoantibodies of similar specificity. On the other hand, Ab2 does not recognize alpha IIb beta 3-specific antibodies produced by two Glanzmann thrombasthenia patients, AF and LUC, who have developed isoantibodies with specificities distinct from that of the OG isoantibody. Moreover, Ab2 does not recognize alpha IIb beta 3-specific antibodies developed by three representative patients with (autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura or six representative patients with alloimmune thrombocytopenias, nor does it bind to IgG from any of 13 nonimmunized individuals. We have found that Ab2 also binds to selected protein ligands of alpha IIb beta 3 namely, fibrinogen, vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor, but not to other protein ligands or control proteins, such a fibronectin, type I collagen, and albumin. The epitope(s) recognized by Ab2 on each adhesive protein are either very similar or identical since each protein can inhibit the binding of Ab2 to any of the other proteins. The epitope on fibrinogen recognized by Ab2 resides in the B beta chain, and is likely contained within the first 42 amino acids from the NH2 terminus. Since OG IgG inhibits fibrinogen binding to alpha IIb beta 3, the specificity of the OG idiotype defines a novel binding motif for the integrin alpha IIb beta 3 that is shared by fibrinogen, vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor, but

  7. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  8. Short-chain fatty acids and poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates: (New) Biocontrol agents for a sustainable animal production.

    PubMed

    Defoirdt, Tom; Boon, Nico; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Verstraete, Willy; Bossier, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Because of the risk of antibiotic resistance development, there is a growing awareness that antibiotics should be used more carefully in animal production. However, a decreased use of antibiotics could result in a higher frequency of pathogenic bacteria, which in its turn could lead to a higher incidence of infections. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have long been known to exhibit bacteriostatic activity. These compounds also specifically downregulate virulence factor expression and positively influence the gastrointestinal health of the host. As a consequence, there is currently considerable interest in SCFAs as biocontrol agents in animal production. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are polymers of beta-hydroxy short-chain fatty acids. Currently, PHAs are applied as replacements for synthetic polymers. These biopolymers can be depolymerised by many different microorganisms that produce extracellular PHA depolymerases. Interestingly, different studies provided some evidence that PHAs can also be degraded upon passage through the gastrointestinal tract of animals and consequently, adding these compounds to the feed might result in biocontrol effects similar to those described for SCFAs.

  9. The beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in sickle cell anemia patients from Northeast Brazil: a clinical and molecular view.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Elisângela Vitória; Zanette, Angela; Lyra, Isa; Souza, Cyntia Cajado; Santos, Leandro Ferraz; Menezes, Joelma Figueiredo; Dupuit, Marie France; Almeida, Mari Ney Tavares; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Gonçalves, Marilda Souza

    2004-08-01

    The beta(S)-globin haplotypes were studied in 78 sickle cell Brazilian patients from Bahia, Northeast Brazil, that has a large population of African origin. Hemoglobin (Hb) profiles were developed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and beta(S)-globin gene haplotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques. We identified 44 (55.0%) patients with the CAR/Ben (Central African Republic/Benin) genotype, 16 (20.0%) Ben/Ben, 13 (16.2%) CAR/CAR and seven (8.8%) with other genotypes. Analyses of the phenotypes showed clinical differences related only to Hb F levels and blood transfusion therapy; the presence of -alpha(-3.7)-thalassemia (thal) demonstrated statistical significance when associated with hematocrit (p=0.044), MCV (p=0.0007), MCH (p=0.012) and spleen sequestration events. The haplotype diversity found in the present study can be justified by information about the origin of the slave traffic period in Bahia during the 19th century. The specific characteristics described among the Bahian sickle cell patients could be confirmed by increasing the number of patients with specific genotypes and further studies of genetic markers.

  10. Structure, chromosome location, and expression of the human. gamma. -actin gene: Differential evolution, location, and expression of the cytoskeletal BETA- and. gamma. -actin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Erba, H.P.; Eddy, R.; Shows, T.; Kedes, L.; Gunning, P.

    1988-04-01

    The accumulation of the cytoskeletal ..beta..-and ..gamma..-actin mRNAs was determined in a variety of mouse tissues and organs. The ..beta..-iosform is always expressed in excess of the ..gamma..-isoform. However, the molar ratio of ..beta..- to ..gamma..-actin mRNA varies from 1.7 in kidney and testis to 12 in sarcomeric muscle to 114 in liver. The authors conclude that, whereas the cytoskeletal ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actins are truly coexpressed, their mRNA levels are subject to differential regulation between different cell types. The human ..gamma..-actin gene has been cloned and sequenced, and its chromosome location has been determined. The gene is located on human chromosome 17, unlike ..beta..-actin which is on chromosome 7. Thus, if these genes are also unlinked in the mouse, the coexpression of the ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin genes in rodent tissues cannot be determined by gene linkage. Comparison of the human ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin genes reveals that noncoding sequences in the 5'-flanking region and in intron III have been conserved since the duplication that gave rise to these two genes. In contrast, there are sequences in intron III and the 3'-untranslated region which are not present in the ..beta..-actin gene but are conserved between the human ..gamma..-actin and the Xenopus borealis type 1 actin genes. Such conserved noncoding sequences may contribute to the coexpression of ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin or to the unique regulation and function of the ..gamma..-actin gene. Finally, the authors demonstrate that the human ..gamma..-actin gene is expressed after introduction into mouse L cells and C2 myoblasts and that, upon fusion of C2 cells to form myotubes, the human ..gamma..-actin gene is appropriately regulated.

  11. Nonrandom association of polymorphic restriction sites in the beta-globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Antonarakis, S E; Boehm, C D; Giardina, P J; Kazazian, H H

    1982-01-01

    By using probes for epsilon-, Psibeta(1)-, and beta-globin genes, we found four additional polymorphic restriction sites that have frequencies >0.1 in persons of Mediterranean area origin, Asian Indians, and American Blacks. Three of these (HincII sites) and the two previously described polymorphic HindIII sites [one in intervening sequence (IVS) II of each gamma-globin gene] are distributed over 32 kilobases (kb) of DNA located 5' to the delta-globin gene. This region of DNA comprises two-thirds of the beta-globin gene cluster. Since each of these five polymorphic sites can be present (+) or absent (-), in theory there exist 32 possible combinations of sites (haplotypes). However, in Italians, Greeks, Indians, and Turks, 3 of the 32 haplotypes, (+----), (-+-++), and (-++-+), account for 92% of 89 beta(A) chromosomes examined. The observed frequencies for these haplotypes are 0.64, 0.15, and 0.13 in the populations studied, in contrast to expected frequencies (based on the observed gene frequencies at each of the five sites) of 0.20, 0.006, and 0.005, respectively. In American Blacks, a fourth haplotype, (----+), which is rare in non-Black populations, has a frequency of 0.37 in contrast to its expected frequency of 0.05. These results suggest a nonrandom association of DNA sequences over 32 kb 5' to the delta-globin gene in all populations studied. Two other polymorphic sites 3' to the delta gene (the newly discovered Ava II site in IVS II of the beta-globin gene and the BamHI site 3' to it) are nonrandomly associated with each other but randomly distributed with respect to the above haplotypes. This suggests that randomization of sequences has occurred within 12 kb of DNA between these two nonrandomly associated sequence clusters. Nonrandom association of polymorphic restriction sites has practical consequences in that it limits the usefulness of these additional HincII sites for prenatal diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies by linkage analysis. These sites provide

  12. Dominant-negative mutation in the beta2 and beta6 proteasome subunit genes affect alternative cell fate decisions in the Drosophila sense organ lineage.

    PubMed

    Schweisguth, F

    1999-09-28

    In Drosophila, dominant-negative mutations in the beta2 and beta6 proteasome catalytic subunit genes have been identified as dominant temperature-sensitive (DTS) mutations. At restrictive temperature, beta2 and beta6 DTS mutations confer lethality at the pupal stage. I investigate here the role of proteasome activity in regulating cell fate decisions in the sense organ lineage at the early pupal stage. Temperature-shift experiments in beta2 and beta6 DTS mutant pupae occasionally resulted in external sense organs with two sockets and no shaft. This double-socket phenotype was strongly enhanced in conditions in which Notch signaling was up-regulated. Furthermore, conditional overexpression of the beta6 dominant-negative mutant subunit led to shaft-to-socket and to neuron-to-sheath cell fate transformations, which are both usually associated with increased Notch signaling activity. Finally, expression of the beta6 dominant-negative mutant subunit led to the stabilization of an ectopically expressed nuclear form of Notch in imaginal wing discs. This study demonstrates that mutations affecting two distinct proteasome catalytic subunits affect two alternative cell fate decisions and enhance Notch signaling activity in the sense organ lineage. These findings raise the possibility that the proteasome targets an active form of the Notch receptor for degradation in Drosophila.

  13. beta-Glucuronidase is an optimal normalization control gene for molecular monitoring of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong Won; Chen, Qiaofang; Knowles, Daniel M; Cesarman, Ethel; Wang, Y Lynn

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative monitoring of breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-Abelson kinase (ABL) transcripts has become indispensable in the clinical care of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. Because quantity and quality of RNA in clinical samples are highly variable, a suitable internal normalization control is required for accurate BCR-ABL quantification. However, few studies have examined suitability of the control genes using criteria relevant to residual disease testing. In this study, we evaluated a number of control genes with the application of several novel criteria, including control gene performance on serial patient sample testing and in a residual disease model. We also examined expression of the control genes in BCR-ABL-positive K562 cells in response to Gleevec treatment. We found that beta-glucuronidase is the best control gene among those studied. Importantly, ABL, a widely used control gene, generates misleading BCR-ABL changes that potentially affect the clinical management of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients.

  14. The Polymorphisms of Ser49Gly and Gly389Arg in Beta-1-Adrenergic Receptor Gene in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    KOKUT, Süleyman; ATAY, İnci Meltem; UZ, Efkan; AKPINAR, Abdullah; DEMİRDAŞ, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It was reported that the genetic susceptibility of major depressive disorder (MDD) is related with genetic polymorphisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of the genotype and allele frequencies of Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly polymorphisms in MDD by comparing them with healthy subjects. Methods A total of 144 patients with MDD diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria and 105 healthy controls were included in the study. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used for genotyping. Results Of the 144 participants in the MDD group, 77 (53.5%) had homozygous wild type (AA), 57 (39.6%) had heterozygous type (AG), and 10 (6.9%) had mutant (GG) genotype for Ser49Gly, whereas 75 (52.1%) had homozygous wild type (GG), 59 (41.0%) had heterozygous (GC) type, and 10 (6.9%) had mutant homozygous (CC) genotype for Gly386Arg. There were no significant difference in the allele and genotype frequencies of the beta-1-adrenergic receptor (ADRB1) gene for Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly polymorphisms after comparing with healthy controls (p=0.626; p=0.863 and p=0.625; p=0.914). Conclusion The results of our study did not reveal a major effect of the polymorphism of Ser49Gly and Gly389Arg in the ADRB1 gene in MDD. Further studies with larger sample size are required to elucidate the role of other beta-1 adrenergic gene polymorphisms in MDD. PMID:28360691

  15. Comparison of the canine and human acid {beta}-galactosidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern-Rindell, A.J.; Kretz, K.A.; O`Brien, J.S.

    1996-05-17

    Several canine cDNA libraries were screened with human {beta}-galactosidase cDNA as probe. Seven positive clones were isolated and sequenced yielding a partial (2060 bp) canine {beta}-galactosidase cDNA with 86% identity to the human {beta}-galactosidase cDNA. Preliminary analysis of a canine genomic library indicated conservation of exon number and size. Analysis by Northern blotting disclosed a single mRNA of 2.4 kb in fibroblasts and liver from normal dogs and dogs affected with GM1 gangliosidosis. Although incomplete, these results indicate canine GM1 gangliosidosis is a suitable animal model of the human disease and should further efforts to devise a gene therapy strategy for its treatment. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Bifunctional peptides derived from homologous loop regions in the laminin alpha chain LG4 modules interact with both alpha 2 beta 1 integrin and syndecan-2.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Fumiharu; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Kadoya, Yuichi; Utani, Atsushi; Nakatsuka, Hiroko; Nishi, Norio; Haruki, Masahiro; Kleinman, Hynda K; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2005-07-19

    Laminin alpha chains show diverse biological functions in a chain-specific fashion. The laminin G-like modules (LG modules) of the laminin alpha chains consist of a 14-stranded beta-sheet sandwich structure with biologically active sequences found in the connecting loops. Previously, we reported that connecting loop regions between beta-strands E and F in the mouse laminin alpha chain LG4 modules exhibited chain-specific activities. In this study, we focus on the homologous loop regions in human laminin alpha chain LG4 modules using five synthetic peptides (hEF-1-hEF-5). These homologous peptides induced chain-specific cellular responses in various cell types. Next, to examine the dual-receptor recognition model, we synthesized chimeras (cEF13A-cEF13E) derived from peptides hEF-1 and hEF-3. All of the chimeric peptides promoted fibroblast attachment as well as the parental peptides. Attachment of fibroblasts to cEF13A and cEF13B was inhibited by anti-integrin alpha2 and beta1 antibodies and by heparin, while cell adhesion to cEF13C, cEF13D, and cEF13E was blocked only by heparin. Actin organization of fibroblasts on cEF13C was not different from that on hEF-3, but cEF13B induced membrane ruffling at the tips of the actin stress fibers. These results suggest that cEF13B had bifunctional effects on cellular behaviors through alpha2beta1 integrin and heparin/heparan sulfate proteoglycan. We conclude that the approach utilizing chimeric peptides is useful for examining cellular mechanisms in dual-receptor systems.

  17. Two mutations in the transforming growth factor beta-induced gene associated with familial Lattice corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wen-Ping; Yuan, Hai-Gang; Liu, Ping; Li, Xue; Hu, Qi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To report a phenotypic variant pedigree of lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD) associated with two mutations, R124C and A546D, in the transforming growth factor beta-induced gene (TGFBI). METHODS A detailed ocular examination was taken for all participants of a LCD family. Peripheral blood leukocytes from each participant were extracted to obtain the DNA. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of all seventeen exons of TGFBI gene was performed. The products were sequenced and analyzed. Histological examination was carried out after a penetrating keratoplasty from the right eye of proband. RESULTS Genetic analysis showed that the proband and all 6 affected individuals harbored both a heterozygous CGC to TGC mutation at codon 124 and a heterozygous GCC to GAC mutation at codon 546 of TGFBI. None of the 100 control subjects and unaffected family members was positive for these two mutations. Ocular examination displayed multiple refractile lattice-like opacities in anterior stroma of the central cornea and small granular deposits in the peripheral cornea. The deposits were stained positively with Congo red indicating be amyloid in nature and situated mainly in the anterior and middle stroma. CONCLUSION We observed a novel LCD family which carried two pathogenic mutations (R124C and A546D) in the TGFBI gene. The phenotypic features were apparently different from those associated with corresponding single mutations. The result reveals that although the definite mutation is the most important genetic cause of the disease, some different modifier alleles may influence the phenotype.

  18. MHC evolution in three salmonid species: a comparison between class II alpha and beta genes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Daniela; Conejeros, Pablo; Marshall, Sergio H; Consuegra, Sofia

    2010-08-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are amongst the most variable in vertebrates and represent some of the best candidates to study processes of adaptive evolution. However, despite the number of studies available, most of the information on the structure and function of these genes come from studies in mammals and birds in which the MHC class I and II genes are tightly linked and class II alpha exhibits low variability in many cases. Teleost fishes are among the most primitive vertebrates with MHC and represent good organisms for the study of MHC evolution because their class I and class II loci are not physically linked, allowing for independent evolution of both classes of genes. We have compared the diversity and molecular mechanisms of evolution of classical MH class II alpha and class II beta loci in farm populations of three salmonid species: Oncorhynchus kisutch, Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo salar. We found single classical class II loci and high polymorphism at both class II alpha and beta genes in the three species. Mechanisms of evolution were common for both class II genes, with recombination and point mutation involved in generating diversity and positive selection acting on the peptide-binding residues. These results suggest that the maintenance of variability at the class IIalpha gene could be a mechanism to increase diversity in the MHC class II in salmonids in order to compensate for the expression of one single classical locus and to respond to a wider array of parasites.

  19. Limited T cell receptor beta-chain usage in the sperm whale myoglobin 110-121/E alpha dA beta d response by H-2d congenic mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Sellins, K S; Danska, J S; Paragas, V; Fathman, C G

    1992-10-01

    The specificity and TCR gene usage of a panel of sperm whale myoglobin (SpWMb)-reactive T cell clones from DBA/2 mice have previously been characterized, to study structure-function relationships between components of the ternary complex consisting of Ag, TCR, and MHC class II molecules, whose interaction leads to Th cell activation. These DBA/2 clones were specific for epitopes within the residue 110 to 121 region of SpWMb, in the context of the mixed isotype molecule E alpha dA beta d, and expressed the TCR V beta 8.2 gene element. SpWMb-specific T cell hybridomas from the H-2d-congenic B10.D2 mouse strain, which differs from the DBA/2 strain only in the non-MHC background, were generated and compared with the T cell hybridomas from DBA/2 mice, in order to investigate the influence of non-MHC genes on the specificity of the T cell response to the 110-121 epitope. V beta usage by these hybridomas was very homogeneous; three of three DBA/2 and eight of nine B10.D2 hybridomas specific for the 110-121 epitope, in the context of the mixed isotype molecule E alpha dA beta d, expressed the V beta 8.2 gene product. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of D beta, J beta, and N regions were also similar. One 110-121/E alpha dA beta d-specific B10.D2 hybridoma used V beta 7, a V beta that is clonally deleted in DBA/2 mice. These experiments suggest that a similar set of TCR beta genes are used to respond to a given epitope, regardless of non-MHC background, and they support the hypothesis that, despite great variability between individuals in their non-MHC background genes, human HLA-associated diseases might result from the formation of a particular ternary complex consisting of a shared MHC molecule, a common "disease-associated" epitope, and a shared TCR.

  20. Expression of Caveolin-1 reduces cellular responses to TGF-{beta}1 through down-regulating the expression of TGF-{beta} type II receptor gene in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Youn Sook; Han, In-Oc; Park, Seok Hee . E-mail: parks@skku.edu

    2007-07-27

    Transcriptional repression of Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} type II receptor (T{beta}RII) gene has been proposed to be one of the major mechanisms leading to TGF-{beta} resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) gene in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells down-regulates the expression of T{beta}RII gene in the transcriptional level, eventually resulting in the decreased responses to TGF-{beta}. The reduced expression of T{beta}RII gene by Cav-1 appeared to be due to the changes of the sequence-specific DNA binding proteins to either Positive Regulatory Element 1 (PRE1) or PRE2 of the T{beta}RII promoter. In addition, Cav-1 expression inhibited TGF-{beta}-mediated cellular proliferation and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor (PAI)-1 gene expression as well as TGF-{beta}-induced luciferase activity. Furthermore, the inhibition of endogeneous Cav-1 by small interfering RNA increased the expression of T{beta}RII gene. These findings strongly suggest that expression of Cav-1 leads to the decreased cellular responsiveness to TGF-{beta} through down-regulating T{beta}RII gene expression.

  1. Behavioral responses to odorants in drosophila require nervous system expression of the beta integrin gene myospheroid.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Poonam; Gargano, Julia Warner; Goddeeris, Matthew M; Grotewiel, Michael S

    2006-09-01

    Integrins are cell adhesion molecules that mediate numerous developmental processes in addition to a variety of acute physiological events. Two reports implicate a Drosophila beta integrin, betaPS, in olfactory behavior. To further investigate the role of integrins in Drosophila olfaction, we used Gal4-driven expression of RNA interference (RNAi) transgenes to knock down expression of myospheroid (mys), the gene that encodes betaPS. Expression of mys-RNAi transgenes in the wing reduced betaPS immunostaining and produced morphological defects associated with loss-of-function mutations in mys, demonstrating that this strategy knocked down mys function. Expression of mys-RNAi transgenes in the antennae, antennal lobes, and mushroom bodies via two Gal4 lines, H24 and MT14, disrupted olfactory behavior but did not alter locomotor abilities or central nervous system structure. Olfactory behavior was normal in flies that expressed mys-RNAi transgenes via other Gal4 lines that specifically targeted the antennae, the projection neurons, the mushroom bodies, bitter and sweet gustatory neurons, or Pox neuro neurons. Our studies confirm that mys is important for the development or function of the Drosophila olfactory system. Additionally, our studies demonstrate that mys is required for normal behavioral responses to both aversive and attractive odorants. Our results are consistent with a model in which betaPS mediates events within the antennal lobes that influence odorant sensitivity.

  2. A pseudodeficiency allele (D152N) of the human beta-glucuronidase gene.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, R; Islam, M R; Sly, W; Chabas, A; Wevers, R; de Jong, J; Liebaers, I; Lissens, W

    1995-10-01

    We present evidence that a 480G-->A transition in the coding region of the beta-glucuronidase gene, which results in an aspartic-acid-to-asparagine substitution at amino acid position 152 (D152N), produces a pseudodeficiency allele (GUSBp) that leads to greatly reduced levels of beta-glucuronidase activity without apparent deleterious consequences. The 480G-->A mutation was found initially in the pseudodeficient mother of a child with mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPSVII), but it was not on her disease-causing allele, which carried the L176F mutation. The 480G-->A change was also present in an unrelated individual with another MPSVII allele who had unusually low beta-glucuronidase activity, but whose clinical symptoms were probably unrelated to beta-glucuronidase deficiency. This individual also had an R357X mutation, probably on his second allele. We screened 100 unrelated normal individuals for the 480G-->A mutation with a PCR method and detected one carrier. Reduced beta-glucuronidase activity following transfection of COS cells with the D152N cDNA supported the causal relationship between the D152N allele and pseudodeficiency. The mutation reduced the fraction of expressed enzyme that was secreted. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the reduced activity in COS cells was due to accelerated intracellular turnover of the D152N enzyme. They also suggested that a potential glycosylation site created by the mutation is utilized in approximately 50% of the enzyme expressed.

  3. Localisation of Neuregulin 1-{beta}3 to different sub-nuclear structures alters gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ming; Trim, Carol M.; Gullick, William J.

    2011-02-15

    Neuregulins are growth factors that signal via the ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors. Here we show using immunohistochemistry that they are often expressed in the nucleus of a range of tumour types including soft tissue and breast. The Neuregulin 1 type I-{beta}3 (NRG1-{beta}3) isoform localises to two sub-nuclear compartments in animal cells, nucleoli and spliceosomes. We used NRG1-{beta}3 tagged with photoactivatable GFP and demonstrated that this re-localised from nucleoli to spliceosomes over 90 min. Tyrosine kinase activity was not required for retaining the NRG1-{beta}3 within the nucleus. Mutation of the lysines 14 and 16 or 15 and 16 together prevented nucleolar uptake while four positively charged residues were identified which were required for spliceosome uptake. Molecular modelling suggests that three of these may form a binding site. We showed using a kinome array that NRG1-{beta}3 and a mutant exclusively localising to spliceosomes increased phosphorylation and/or expression of the HER4 and HER2 receptors. Using a transcriptomic analysis the same two constructs induced expression of several messenger RNAs and we confirmed the increased expression at the protein level of the most highly induced, Heat Shock Protein 70B'. These results suggest that Neuregulin activates receptor signalling in spliceosomes leading to altered gene expression.

  4. Analysis and expression of the alpha-expansin and beta-expansin gene families in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.; Meeley, R. B.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Expansins comprise a multigene family of proteins in maize (Zea mays). We isolated and characterized 13 different maize expansin cDNAs, five of which are alpha-expansins and eight of which are beta-expansins. This paper presents an analysis of these 13 expansins, as well as an expression analysis by northern blotting with materials from young and mature maize plants. Some expansins were expressed in restricted regions, such as the beta-expansins ExpB1 (specifically expressed in maize pollen) and ExpB4 (expressed principally in young husks). Other expansins such as alpha-expansin Exp1 and beta-expansin ExpB2 were expressed in several organs. The expression of yet a third group was not detected in the selected organs and tissues. An analysis of expansin sequences from the maize expressed sequence tag collection is also presented. Our results indicate that expansin genes may have general, overlapping expression in some instances, whereas in other cases the expression may be highly specific and limited to a single organ or cell type. In contrast to the situation in Arabidopsis, beta-expansins in maize seem to be more numerous and more highly expressed than are alpha-expansins. The results support the concept that beta-expansins multiplied and evolved special functions in the grasses.

  5. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase genes from Sf9 cells.

    PubMed

    Aumiller, Jared J; Hollister, Jason R; Jarvis, Donald L

    2006-06-01

    Sf9, a cell line derived from the lepidopteran insect, Spodoptera frugiperda, is widely used as a host for recombinant glycoprotein expression and purification by baculovirus vectors. Previous studies have shown that this cell line has one or more beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase activities that may be involved in the degradation and/or processing of N-glycoprotein glycans. However, these enzymes and their functions remain poorly characterized. Therefore, the goal of this study was to isolate beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase genes from Sf9 cells, over-express the gene products, and characterize their enzymatic activities. A degenerate PCR approach yielded three Sf9 cDNAs, which appeared to encode two distinct beta-N-acetylglucosaminidases, according to bioinformatic analyses. Baculovirus-mediated expression of these two cDNA products induced membrane-associated beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase activities in Sf9 cells, which cleaved terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues from the alpha-3 and -6 branches of a biantennary N-glycan substrate with acidic pH optima and completely hydrolyzed chitotriose to its constituent N-acetylglucosamine monomers. GFP-tagged forms of both enzymes exhibited punctate cytoplasmic fluorescence, which did not overlap with either lysosomal or Golgi-specific dyes. Together, these results indicated that the two new Sf9 genes identified in this study encode broad-spectrum beta-N-acetylglucosaminidases that appear to have unusual intracellular distributions. Their relative lack of substrate specificity and acidic pH optima are consistent with a functional role for these enzymes in glycoprotein glycan and chitin degradation, but not with a role in N-glycoprotein glycan processing.

  6. The heavy chain of neonatal Fc receptor for IgG is sequestered in endoplasmic reticulum by forming oligomers in the absence of beta2-microglobulin association.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Peng, Junmin; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Nakajima, Atsushi; Lencer, Wayne I; Blumberg, Richard S

    2002-01-01

    The heavy chain (HC) of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) for IgG is non-convalently associated with beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m). In beta(2)m(-/-) mice, FcRn functions are greatly impaired. We sought to determine how FcRn HC, particularly its structure and biogenesis, is affected by the absence of beta(2)m. Human FcRn HC, expressed from the beta(2)m-null cell line FO-1(FcRn), was present as a monomeric 45-kDa protein under reducing conditions but primarily as a 92-kDa oligomeric protein under non-reducing conditions. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and MS analysis showed that the 92-kDa protein was a dimer of the 45-kDa HC. Immunostaining showed that FcRn HC in FO-1(FcRn) was co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein Bip/GRP78 but not with an endosome protein, EEA1. In contrast, FcRn HC in FO-1(FcRn+beta2m) was detected in both the ER and endosome. The dimeric HC in FcRn oligomers was free of beta(2)m association in FO-1(FcRn+beta2m). Mutation of non-paired cysteine residues at positions 48 and 251 within the human FcRn cDNA failed to eliminate the oligomers. The FcRn HC oligomers could be reduced by reconstitution of FO-1(FcRn) with beta(2)m or by balanced expression of FcRn HC with beta(2)m, or beta(2)m fused with a KDEL retention sequence. Similarly, the majority of FcRn HC isolated from neonatal beta(2)m(-/-) mice was in a dimeric form under non-reducing conditions. The amount of FcRn HC was significantly decreased in beta(2)m(-/-) mice and FO-1(FcRn). Furthermore, beta(2)m-free FcRn HC was sensitive to endoglycosidase digestion. These results indicate that FcRn HC alone can form disulphide-bonded oligomers in the ER, which may represent a misfolded protein. The beta(2)m association with FcRn HC is critical for correct folding of FcRn and exiting the ER for routing to endosomes and the cell surface. PMID:12162790

  7. Hemoglobins of reptiles. The primary structures of the alpha I- and beta I-chains of common iguana (Iguana iguana) hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Rücknagel, K P; Braunitzer, G; Wiesner, H

    1988-10-01

    The primary structures of alpha I- and beta I-chains from the hemoglobins of the Common Iguana (Iguana iguana) are presented. The globin chains were separated on CM-cellulose in 8 M urea buffer. The amino-acid sequences were established by automatic Edman degradation of the native chains, the tryptic peptides and a peptide obtained by cyanogen bromide cleavage. The sequences are compared with human hemoglobin. Amino-acid replacements at positions critical for structure and function of the hemoglobin are discussed. The requirements for binding of ATP and also of DPG as allosteric effectors at the beta-chains seem to be fulfilled. Comparison of the alpha-chains with those of the Viper (Vipera aspis) shows 66 amino-acid substitutions. This number is in the same order of magnitude as the ones found by comparison with alpha-chains of crocodiles and mammals as well as with alpha A-chains of a turtle and birds. This result points towards a period of independent evolution of the reptile lines leading to the Common Iguana on one hand and to the Viper on the other. This time span is comparable to the one separating mammals from reptiles.

  8. Genetic structures at the origin of acquisition of the beta-lactamase bla KPC gene.

    PubMed

    Naas, Thierry; Cuzon, Gaelle; Villegas, Maria-Virginia; Lartigue, Marie-Frédérique; Quinn, John P; Nordmann, Patrice

    2008-04-01

    Genetic structures surrounding the carbapenem-hydrolyzing Ambler class A bla KPC gene were characterized in several KPC-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from the United States, Colombia, and Greece. The bla KPC genes were associated in all cases with transposon-related structures. In the K. pneumoniae YC isolate from the United States, the beta-lactamase bla KPC-2 gene was located on a novel Tn3-based transposon, Tn4401. Tn4401 was 10 kb in size, was delimited by two 39-bp imperfect inverted repeat sequences, and harbored, in addition to the beta-lactamase bla KPC-2 gene, a transposase gene, a resolvase gene, and two novel insertion sequences, ISKpn6 and ISKpn7. Tn4401 has been identified in all isolates. However, two isoforms of this transposon were found: Tn4401a was found in K. pneumoniae YC and K. pneumoniae GR from the United States and Greece, respectively, and differed by a 100-bp deletion, located just upstream of the bla KPC-2 gene, compared to the sequence of Tn4401b, which was found in the Colombian isolates. In all isolates tested, Tn4401 was flanked by a 5-bp target site duplication, the signature of a recent transposition event, and was inserted in different open reading frames located on plasmids that varied in size and nature. Tn4401 is likely at the origin of carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase KPC mobilization to plasmids and its further insertion into various-sized plasmids identified in nonclonally related K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa isolates.

  9. Insertion/deletion-related polymorphisms in the human T cell receptor beta gene complex

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Insertion/deletion related polymorphisms (IDRP) involving stretches of 15-30 kb within the human TCR-beta gene complex were revealed by pulse- field gel electrophoresis. Two independent IDRP systems were detected by analysis of Sfi I- and Sal I-digested human DNA samples using probes for TCR C and V region gene segments. The allelic nature of these systems was verified in family studies, and mapping data allowed localization of one area of insertion/deletion among the V gene segments and the other near the C region genes. All but one of 50 individuals tested could be typed for the two allelic systems, and gene frequencies for the two allelic forms were 0.37/0.61 and 0.46/0.54, indicating that these polymorphisms are widespread. PMID:2571667

  10. Sequence and diversity of rabbit T-cell receptor gamma chain genes

    SciTech Connect

    Isono, T.; Kim, C.J.; Seto, A.

    1995-03-01

    The nucleotide sequences of one constant (C), six variable (V), and two joining (J) gene segments coding for the rabbit T-cell receptor gamma chain (Tcrg) were determined by directly sequencing fragments amplified by the cassette-ligation mediated polymerase chain reaction. The Tcrg-C gene segment did not encode a cysteine residue for connection to the Tcr delta chain in the connecting region, and two variant forms of the Tcrg-C gene segment were generated by alternative splicing, like the human Tcrg-C2 gene. Five of six rabbit Tcrg-V gene segments belonged to the same family and displayed similarity to five productive human Tcrg-V1 family genes as well as the mouse Tcrg-V5 gene. The remaining rabbit Tcrg-V gene segment displayed similarity to the human Tcrg-V3 gene. Both rabbit Tcrg-J gene segments displayed similarity to the human Tcrg-J2.1 and 2.3, respectively. These findings suggested that the genomic organization of rabbit Tcrg genes is more similar to that of human than of mouse Tcrg genes. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Individual effects of the DR11-variable beta-chain residues 67, 71, and 86 upon DR(alpha,beta 1*1101)-restricted, peptide-specific T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    McKinney, J S; Fu, X T; Swearingen, C; Klohe, E; Karr, R W

    1994-12-15

    The four members of the HLA-DR11 family of class II molecules vary only by three or fewer amino acids via dimorphisms among DR beta-chain residues 67, 71, and 86. However, they differ markedly in their abilities to induce proliferation of DR(alpha,beta 1*1101)-restricted, peptide-specific T cell clones. To dissect which DR11-variable residues, individually and in combination, mediate these functional differences, we used as APC transfectants expressing DR molecules with one of all possible permutations of DR11-variable sequences, including the four DR11 family members, and four additional DR11 variant mutants. The abilities of the wild-type or mutant molecules to present two distinct influenza peptide Ags, HA307-19 and HA128-45, to T cells was assessed in in vitro T cell proliferation assays. Of the naturally dimorphic DR11 positions, residue beta 71 variation significantly influenced the ability of DR11 molecules to present both peptides to DR(alpha,beta 1*1101)-restricted T cells. Residue beta 86 variation had relatively less influence than reported in several other DR and peptide systems. Residue beta 67 variation usually appeared irrelevant to T cell proliferation, but in two mutants led to unexpected T cell proliferation independent of nominal peptide Ag. Peptide binding, assessed by flow cytometry, was not found to be altered by any mutations that disrupted DR(alpha,beta 1*1101)-like presentation. These data indicate that residue beta 71 exerts a central role in influencing the functional differences among DR11 molecules, whereas the widely studied dimorphism of residue beta 86 is not as generally influential in DR11 as in other alleles.

  12. Nested polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing analysis of the light-chain and heavy-chain variable regions in the influenza A H1N1 virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody gene.

    PubMed

    Li, H J; Guo, C Y; Sun, J Y; Sun, L J; Zhao, P H; Hu, L; Li, Y; Hu, J

    2014-06-11

    The nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was used for the amplification of the influenza A H1N1 virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody light-chain and heavy-chain genes. Sequence analysis of the obtained genes was then used to identify common cloning methods of the mouse immunoglobulin-kappa (Igκ) light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions. Twenty-two pairs of amplification primers for the mouse Igκ light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions were designed, and 6 mouse anti-human H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions were cloned and sequenced. Comparative analysis was conducted between our results and the mouse Ig sequences published in the National Center of Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The nested PCR method effectively avoided cloning the pseudogenes of the monoclonal antibody, and the amino acid sequence obtained was consistent with the characteristics of the mouse Ig variable region. A general method of cloning the mouse Ig light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions was established, which provides a basis for further cloning of mouse monoclonal antibody variable gene regions. This study also provides data for further studies of H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin antibody binding sites.

  13. A self-excising beta-recombinase/six cassette for repetitive gene deletion and homokaryon purification in Neurospora crassa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study we developed a cassette employing a bacterial beta-recombinase acting on six recognition sequences (beta-rec/six), which allowed repetitive site-specific gene deletion and marker recycling in Neurospora crassa. However, only one positive selection marker was used in the cassette...

  14. A single-base change at a splice site in a beta 0-thalassemic gene causes abnormal RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Treisman, R; Proudfoot, N J; Shander, M; Maniatis, T

    1982-07-01

    We have studied the structure and transcription of a cloned human beta-globin gene from a fetus diagnosed for beta 0 thalassemia. The sequence of the beta 0 gene differs from that of a normal beta-globin gene at positions 1 and 74 of the second intervening sequence (IVS2). The position 1 change alters the GT dinucleotide conserved at 5' splice sites, while the position 74 change is a common sequence polymorphism. When the cloned beta 0 gene is introduced into HeLa cells by use of an SV40-derived plasmid vector, two abnormally spliced cytoplasmic beta-globin RNAs are detected. The predominant RNA differs from normal beta-globin mRNA by the insertion of the first 47 nucleotides of IVS2 between exons 2 and 3. The less abundant RNA comprises the normal first exon spliced directly to the third. Analysis of nuclear RNA suggests that the beta 0 transcript is inefficiently spliced and that the removal of the two intervening sequences is coupled.

  15. Molecular analysis of the beta-glucuronidase gene: novel mutations in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII and heterogeneity of the polyadenylation region.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, R; Buist, N R; Kleijer, W J; Wevers, R; Fryns, J P; Liebaers, I; Lissens, W

    1997-04-01

    We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing of the coding region of the beta-glucuronidase cDNA and gene to detect mutations causing beta-glucuronidase enzyme deficiency in five MPS VII patients. Four patients presented with hydrops fetalis, one with an early infantile form of the disease. Genetic heterogeneity of MPS VII alleles was further confirmed in this study. Recurrent mutations were observed in patients of related origin. Previously unknown alleles detected were RII0X, F361delta9, 1270 + 1G-->A, S52F and 1480delta4. Reverse transcription/PCR analysis of the 1270 + 1G-->A messenger showed aberrant splicing: inclusion of intron 7 or skipping of exons 6-7 and 9. Messenger RNA transcribed from the R110X and 1480delta4 alleles was unstable. We detected a 2154A/G change in the 3' non-coding region of the gene, in the neighbourhood of the two consensus polyadenylation sites. 3'-Rapid amplification of cDNA ends/PCR of fibroblast cDNA revealed equal usage of two alternative polyadenylation sites. The 2154A/G substitution did not influence adenylation-site choice, nor the amount of stable messenger produced. The finding that 2 out of 30 normal controls carried the 2154G allele indicated that the 2154A/G substitution is a harmless polymorphism. The S52F and F361delta9 cDNAs were constructed in vitro and used to transfect COS cells transiently. Both mutations completely abolished enzyme activity.

  16. The human and mouse sex-determining SRY genes repress the Rspol/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yun-Fai Chris; Li, Yunmin

    2009-04-01

    The sex-determining region Y (SRY) is the gene on the Y chromosome responsible for switching on male sex determination during mammalian embryogenesis. In its absence, ovaries develop in the embryo. Hence, ovarian determination and differentiation is considered to be a default, or passive, developmental pathway. Recently this classical paradigm of sex determination has been challenged with the discovery of the R-spondin 1 (RSPO1) as an active ovarian determinant. Mutations of RSPO1 cause a female-to-male sex reversal. RSPO1 synergizes with WNT4 in activating an ovarian development in the bipotential gonad via the canonical Wnt signaling. Early studies showed that SRY represses such Wnt signaling, but also generated discrepancies on whether only mouse Sry is capable of inhibiting such Wnt signaling and whether both human and mouse SRY proteins are able to interact with beta-catenin, the intracellular messenger responsible for executing the Wnt signals. Our studies show that both human SRY and mouse Sry are capable of repressing the Rspo1/Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. However, the repression activities vary among different SRY/Sry proteins and paradoxically related to the presence and/or size of an acidic/glutamine-rich domain. The HMG box of human SRY could bind directly to beta-catenin while the mouse Sry binds to beta-catenin via its HMG box and glutamine-rich domain. The results clarify some of the initial discrepancies, and raise the possibility that SRY interacts with beta-catenin in the nucleus and represses the transcriptional activation of the Rspo1/Wnt target genes involved in ovarian determination, thereby switching on testis determination.

  17. beta. amyloid gene duplication in Alzheimer's disease and karyotypically normal Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Delabar, J.; Goldgaber, D.; Lamour, Y.; Nicole, A.; Huret, J.; De Groucy, J.; Brown, P.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Sinet, P.

    1987-03-13

    With the recently cloned complementary DNA probe, lambdaAm4 for the chromosome 21 gene encoding brain amyloid polypeptide (..beta.. amyloid protein) of Alzheimer's disease, leukocyte DNA from three patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease and two patients with karyotypically normal Down syndrome was found to contain three copies of this bene. Because a small region of chromosome 21 containing the ets-2 gene is duplicated in patients with Alzheimer's disease, as well as in karyotypically normal Down syndrome, duplication of a subsection of the critical segment of chromosome 21 that is duplicated in Down syndrome may be the genetic defect in Alzeimer's disease.

  18. Use of microarray analysis to unveil transcription factor and gene networks contributing to Beta cell dysfunction and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Eizirik, Decio L; Kutlu, Burak; Rasschaert, Joanne; Darville, Martine; Cardozo, Alessandra K

    2003-11-01

    The beta cell fate following immune-mediated damage depends on an intricate pattern of dozens of genes up- or downregulated in parallel and/or sequentially. We are utilizing microarray analysis to clarify the pattern of gene expression in primary rat beta cells exposed to the proapoptotic cytokines, IL-1beta and/or IFN-gamma. The picture emerging from these experiments is that beta cells are not passive bystanders of their own destruction. On the contrary, beta cells respond to damage by activating diverse networks of transcription factors and genes that may either lead to apoptosis or preserve viability. Of note, cytokine-exposed beta cells produce and release chemokines that may contribute to the homing and activation of T cells and macrophages during insulitis. Several of the effects of cytokines depend on the activation of the transcription factor, NF-kappaB. NF-kappaB blocking prevents cytokine-induced beta cell death, and characterization of NF-kappaB-dependent genes by microarray analysis indicated that this transcription factor controls diverse networks of transcription factors and effector genes that are relevant for maintenance of beta cell differentiated status, cytosolic and ER calcium homeostasis, attraction of mononuclear cells, and apoptosis. Identification of this and additional "transcription factor networks" is being pursued by cluster analysis of gene expression in insulin-producing cells exposed to cytokines for different time periods. Identification of complex gene patterns poses a formidable challenge, but is now technically feasible. These accumulating evidences may finally unveil the molecular mechanisms regulating the beta cell "decision" to undergo or not apoptosis in early T1DM.

  19. Increase in expression level of alpha- and beta-tubulin genes in Arabidopsis seedlings under hypergravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Hoson, T.

    Hypergravity, a gravitational force of more than 1 g, suppresses elongation growth of shoots of various plants. The analysis of the changes in gene expression by hypergravity treatment in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by the differential display method showed that a gene encoding alpha-tubulin, which is a component of microtubules, was up-regulated by hypergravity [Yoshioka et al. (2003) Adv. Space Res. 31: 2187-2193]. However, the detailed relation between hypergravity treatment and the changes in alpha-tubulin gene levels has not been determined yet. Microtubules are formed by the spontaneous polymerization of dimers consisting of one alpha- and one beta-tubulin protein molecule. Thus, the expression levels of beta-tubulin genes may also be affected by hypergravity. In the present study, we examined the dose-response and the time course relations of change in the expression of both alpha- and beta-tubulin genes in Arabidopsis hypocotyls grown under hypergravity conditions. Elongation growth of Arabidopsis hypocotyls was suppressed by increasing gravity. The expression levels of both alpha- and beta-tubulin genes were increased depending on the magnitude of gravity. At 300 g, expression levels of alpha- and beta-tubulin genes were about 400% and 350% of the 1 g control, respectively. The increases in expression of both tubulin genes were detected within a few hours, when the seedlings grown at 1 g were transferred to hypergravity conditions. The increase in alpha- and beta-tubulin genes preceded or occurred at the same time as growth suppression. These results suggest that Arabidopsis hypocotyls regulate the expression level of alpha- and beta-tubulin genes promptly in response to gravity stimuli. The increase in the amount of microtubules due to the activation of tubulin gene expression may be involved in the regulation by gravity signal of shoot growth.

  20. Influence of coding region polymorphism on the peripheral expression of a human TCR V[beta] gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vissinga, C.S.; Charmley, P.; Concannon, P. )

    1994-02-01

    A number of human TCR V[beta] gene segments are reported to be polymorphic, with alleles differing by one or a small number of amino acid substitutions. In the absence of detailed structural information regarding the interaction of specific positions in the TCR with Ag or MHC, the significance of such variation is difficult to assess. In this report the relative use of the two common alleles of the human V[beta]6.7 gene, 6.7a and 6.7b, which differ by two nonconservative amino acid substitutions, and the use of two common alleles of the V[beta]12.2 gene, which differ by only silent substitutions, were measured in PBL derived from individuals heterozygous for these alleles. Equal use of V[beta]12.2 alleles was observed, consistent with the inability of selection mechanisms to discriminate between the products of these alleles that are indistinguishable at the amino acid level. However, statistically significant skewing in the use of V[beta]6.7 alleles was observed in 15 of 16 individuals studied. Expression levels for each allele ranged from 16 to 84% of the total V[beta]6.7 signal in heterozygous individuals, with either the 6.7a or the 6.7b allele predominant in different individuals. Based on segregation studies in families, it seems unlikely that other unidentified polymorphism in the TCR[beta] locus, such as in the V[beta]6.7 promoter, was responsible for the differential allele expression. Family studies provided no evidence for an association between specific HLA haplotypes and V[beta]6.7 allele use. These results indicate that even modest allelic variation in human TCR V[beta] coding regions can have a significant impact on the expression of human V[beta] genes in the peripheral repertoire. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Interaction of SOCS3 with NonO attenuates IL-1beta-dependent MUC8 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyoung Seob; Kim, Kyubo; Chung, Kwang Chul; Seol, Jae Hong; Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2008-12-19

    The intracellular negatively regulatory mechanism which affects IL-1beta-induced MUC8 gene expression remains unclear. We found that SOCS3 overexpression suppressed IL-1beta-induced MUC8 gene expression in NCI-H292 cells, whereas silencing of SOCS3 restored IL-1beta-induced MUC8 gene expression. Sequentially activated ERK1/2, RSK1, and CREB by IL-1beta were not affected by SOCS3, indicating that SOCS3 has an independent mechanism of action. Using immunoprecipitaion and nano LC mass analysis, we found that SOCS3 bound NonO (non-POU-domain containing, octamer-binding domain protein) in the absence of IL-1beta, whereas IL-1beta treatment dissociated the direct binding of SOCS3 and NonO. A dominant-negative SOCS3 mutant (Y204F/Y221F) did not bind to NonO. Interestingly, SOCS3 overexpression dramatically suppressed MUC8 gene expression in cells transfected with wild-type or siRNA of NonO. Moreover, silencing of SOCS3 dramatically increased NonO-mediated MUC8 gene expression caused by IL-1beta compared to NonO overexpression alone, suggesting that SOCS3 acts as a suppressor by regulating the action of NonO.

  2. Species-dependent expression of the hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase gene in the pericycle.

    PubMed

    Kanegae, T; Kajiya, H; Amano, Y; Hashimoto, T; Yamada, Y

    1994-06-01

    The tropane alkaloid scopolamine is synthesized in the pericycle of branch roots in certain species of the Solanaceae. The enzyme responsible for the synthesis of scopolamine from hyoscyamine is hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase (H6H). The gene for H6H was isolated from Hyoscyamus niger. It has an exon/intron organization very similar to those for ethylene-forming enzymes, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. The 827-bp 5' flanking region of the H6H gene was fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and transferred to three solanaceous species by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation systems: H. niger and belladonna (Atropa belladonna), which have high and low levels, respectively, of H6H mRNA in the root, and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), which has no endogenous H6H gene. Histochemical analysis showed that GUS expression occurred in the pericycle and at the root meristem of transgenic H. niger hairy roots, but only at the root meristem of transgenic H. niger hairy roots, but only at the root meristem of hairy roots and plants of transgenic tobacco. In transgenic hairy roots and regenerated plants of belladonna, the root meristem was stained with GUS activity, except for a few transformants in which the vascular cylinder was also stained. These studies indicate that the cell-specific expression of the H6H gene is controlled by some genetic regulation specific to scopolamine-producing plants.

  3. Expression of the Acremonium chrysogenum cefT gene in Penicillum chrysogenum indicates that it encodes an hydrophilic beta-lactam transporter.

    PubMed

    Ullán, Ricardo V; Teijeira, Fernando; Martín, Juan F

    2008-09-01

    The Acremonium chryrsogenum cefT gene encoding a membrane protein of the major facilitator superfamily implicated in the cephalosporin biosynthesis in A. chrysogenum was introduced into Penicillium chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 (a benzylpenicillin producer), P. chrysogenum npe6 pyrG(-) (a derivative of Wisconsin 54-1255 lacking a functional penDE gene) and P. chrysogenum TA98 (a deacetylcephalosporin producer containing the cefD1, cefD2, cefEF and cefG genes from A. chrysogenum). RT-PCR analysis revealed that the cefT gene was expressed in P. chrysogenum strains. HPLC analysis of the culture broths of the TA98 transformants showed an increase in the secretion of deacetylcephalosporin C and hydrophilic penicillins (isopenicillin N and penicillin N). P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 strain transformed with cefT showed increased secretion of the isopenicillin N intermediate and a drastic decrease in the benzylpenicillin production. Southern and northern blot analysis indicated that the untransformed P. chrysogenum strains contain an endogenous gene similar to cefT that may be involved in the well-known secretion of the isopenicillin N intermediate. In summary, the cefT transporter is a hydrophilic beta-lactam transporter that is involved in the secretion of hydrophilic beta-lactams containing alpha-aminoadipic acid side chain (isopenicillin N, penicillin N and deacetylcephalosporin C).

  4. Beta-rolls, beta-helices, and other beta-solenoid proteins.

    PubMed

    Kajava, Andrey V; Steven, Alasdair C

    2006-01-01

    Beta-rolls and beta-helices belong to a larger group of topologically similar proteins with solenoid folds: because their regular secondary structure elements are exclusively beta-strands, they are referred to as beta-solenoids. The number of beta-solenoids whose structures are known is now large enough to support a systematic analysis. Here we survey the distinguishing structural features of beta-solenoids, also documenting their notable diversity. Appraisal of these structures suggests a classification based on handedness, twist, oligomerization state, and coil shape. In addition, beta-solenoids are distinguished by the number of chains that wind around a common axis: the majority are single-stranded but there is a recently discovered subset of triple-stranded beta-solenoids. This survey has revealed some relationships of the amino acid sequences of beta-solenoids with their structures and functions-in particular, the repetitive character of the coil sequences and conformations that recur in tracts of tandem repeats. We have proposed the term beta-arc for the distinctive turns found in beta-solenoids and beta-arch for the corresponding strand-turn-strand motifs. The evolutionary mechanisms underlying these proteins are also discussed. This analysis has direct implications for sequence-based detection, structural prediction, and de novo design of other beta-solenoid proteins. The abundance of virulence factors, toxins and allergens among beta-solenoids, as well as commonalities of beta-solenoids with amyloid fibrils, imply that this class of folds may have a broader role in human diseases than was previously recognized. Thus, identification of genes with putative beta-solenoid domains promises to be a fertile direction in the search for viable targets in the development of new antibiotics and vaccines.

  5. Isolation of novel human cDNA (hGMF-gamma) homologous to Glia Maturation Factor-beta gene.

    PubMed

    Asai, K; Fujita, K; Yamamoto, M; Hotta, T; Morikawa, M; Kokubo, M; Moriyama, A; Kato, T

    1998-03-13

    A novel full-length human cDNA homologous to Glia Maturation Factor-beta (GMF-beta) gene was isolated. Sequence analysis of the entire cDNA revealed an open reading frame of 426 nucleotides with a deduced protein sequence of 142 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequences of its putative product is highly homologous to human GMF-beta (82% identity) and named for GMF-gamma. Northern blot analysis indicated that a message of 0.9 kb long, but not 4.1 kb of GMF-beta, is predominantly expressed in human lung, heart, and placenta.

  6. Allelic inclusion in a pre-B-cell line that generates immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Engeser, G; Jäck, H M; Wabl, M

    1987-01-01

    In a pre-B-cell line that rearranges its heavy chain gene segments in vitro, we found that the rate of productive rearrangement on one allele was not influenced by the presence of heavy chain protein encoded by the other allele. This shows that allelic exclusion of heavy chain genes is not regulated at the genetic level. Images PMID:3103122

  7. Interaction between two discontiguous chain segments from the beta-sheet of Escherichia coli thioredoxin suggests an initiation site for folding.

    PubMed

    Tasayco, M L; Fuchs, J; Yang, X M; Dyalram, D; Georgescu, R E

    2000-09-05

    The approach of comparing folding and folding/binding processes is exquisitely poised to narrow down the regions of the sequence that drive protein folding. We have dissected the small single alpha/beta domain of oxidized Escherichia coli thioredoxin (Trx) into three complementary fragments (N, residues 1-37; M, residues 38-73; and C, residues 74-108) to study them in isolation and upon recombination by far-UV CD and NMR spectroscopy. The isolated fragments show a minimum of ellipticity of ca. 197 nm in their far-UV CD spectra without concentration dependence, chemical shifts of H(alpha) that are close to the random coil values, and no medium- and long-range NOE connectivities in their three-dimensional NMR spectra. These fragments behave as disordered monomers. Only the far-UV CD spectra of binary or ternary mixtures that contain N- and C-fragments are different from the sum of their individual spectra, which is indicative of folding and/or binding of these fragments. Indeed, the cross-peaks corresponding to the rather hydrophobic beta(2) and beta(4) regions of the beta-sheet of Trx disappear from the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of isolated labeled N- and C-fragments, respectively, upon addition of the unlabeled complementary fragments. The disappearing cross-peaks indicate interactions between the beta(2) and beta(4) regions, and their reappearance at lower temperatures indicates unfolding and/or dissociation of heteromers that are predominantly held by hydrophobic forces. Our results argue that the folding of Trx begins by zippering two discontiguous and rather hydrophobic chain segments (beta(2) and beta(4)) corresponding to neighboring strands of the native beta-sheet.

  8. Harnessing the theoretical foundations of the exponential and beta-Poisson dose-response models to quantify parameter uncertainty using Markov Chain Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Philip J; Pintar, Katarina D M; Fazil, Aamir M; Topp, Edward

    2013-09-01

    Dose-response models are the essential link between exposure assessment and computed risk values in quantitative microbial risk assessment, yet the uncertainty that is inherent to computed risks because the dose-response model parameters are estimated using limited epidemiological data is rarely quantified. Second-order risk characterization approaches incorporating uncertainty in dose-response model parameters can provide more complete information to decisionmakers by separating variability and uncertainty to quantify the uncertainty in computed risks. Therefore, the objective of this work is to develop procedures to sample from posterior distributions describing uncertainty in the parameters of exponential and beta-Poisson dose-response models using Bayes's theorem and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (in OpenBUGS). The theoretical origins of the beta-Poisson dose-response model are used to identify a decomposed version of the model that enables Bayesian analysis without the need to evaluate Kummer confluent hypergeometric functions. Herein, it is also established that the beta distribution in the beta-Poisson dose-response model cannot address variation among individual pathogens, criteria to validate use of the conventional approximation to the beta-Poisson model are proposed, and simple algorithms to evaluate actual beta-Poisson probabilities of infection are investigated. The developed MCMC procedures are applied to analysis of a case study data set, and it is demonstrated that an important region of the posterior distribution of the beta-Poisson dose-response model parameters is attributable to the absence of low-dose data. This region includes beta-Poisson models for which the conventional approximation is especially invalid and in which many beta distributions have an extreme shape with questionable plausibility.

  9. The crystal structure of progesterone 5beta-reductase from Digitalis lanata defines a novel class of short chain dehydrogenases/reductases.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Andrea; Egerer-Sieber, Claudia; Jäger, Christof M; Herl, Vanessa; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang; Muller, Yves A

    2008-06-20

    Progesterone 5beta-reductase (5beta-POR) catalyzes the stereospecific reduction of progesterone to 5beta-pregnane-3,20-dione and is a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of cardenolides in Digitalis (foxglove) plants. Sequence considerations suggested that 5beta-POR is a member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family of proteins but at the same time revealed that the sequence motifs that in standard SDRs contain the catalytically important residues are missing. Here we present crystal structures of 5beta-POR from Digitalis lanata in complex with NADP(+) at 2.3A and without cofactor bound at 2.4A resolution together with a model of a ternary complex consisting of 5beta-POR, NADP(+), and progesterone. Indeed, 5beta-POR displays the fold of an extended SDR. The architecture of the active site is, however, unprecedented because none of the standard catalytic residues are structurally conserved. A tyrosine (Tyr-179) and a lysine residue (Lys-147) are present in the active site, but they are displayed from novel positions and are part of novel sequence motifs. Mutating Tyr-179 to either alanine or phenylalanine completely abolishes the enzymatic activity. We propose that the distinct topology reflects the fact that 5beta-POR reduces a conjugated double bond in a steroid substrate via a 1-4 addition mechanism and that this requires a repositioning of the catalytically important residues. Our observation that the sequence motifs that line the active site are conserved in a number of bacterial and plant enzymes of yet unknown function leads us to the proposition that 5beta-POR defines a novel class of SDRs.

  10. Activation of the beta myosin heavy chain promoter by MEF-2D, MyoD, p300, and the calcineurin/NFATc1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Joachim D; Umeda, Patrick K; Chang, Kin-Chow; Gros, Gerolf; Scheibe, Renate J

    2007-04-01

    Calcium is a key element in intracellular signaling in skeletal muscle. Changes in intracellular calcium levels are thought to mediate the fast-to-slow transformation of muscle fiber type. One factor implicated in gene regulation in adult muscle is the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) isoform c1, whose dephosphorylation by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin facilitates its nuclear translocation. Here, we report that differentiated C2C12 myotubes predominantly expressing fast-type MyHCII protein undergo fast-to-slow transformation following calcium-ionophore treatment, with several transcription factors and a transcriptional coactivator acting in concert to upregulate the slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) beta promoter. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that the calcineurin/NFATc1 signaling pathway is essential for MyHCbeta promoter activation during transformation of C2C12 myotubes but is not sufficient for complete fast MyHCIId/x promoter inhibition. Along with NFATc1, myocyte enhancer factor-2D (MEF-2D) and the myogenic transcription factor MyoD transactivated the MyHCbeta promoter in calcium-ionophore-treated myotubes in a calcineurin-dependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism involved in regulating MyHCbeta gene expression, we analyzed the -2.4-kb MyHCbeta promoter construct for cis-regulatory elements. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP), and nuclear complex coimmunoprecipitation (NCcoIP) assays, we demonstrated calcium-ionophore-induced binding of NFATc1 to a NFAT consensus site adjacent to a MyoD-binding E-box. At their respective binding sites, both NFATc1 and MyoD recruited the transcriptional coactivator p300, and in turn, MEF-2D bound to the MyoD complex. The calcium-ionophore-induced effects on the MyHCbeta promoter were shown to be calcineurin-dependent. Together, our findings demonstrate calcium-ionophore-induced activation of the beta MyHC promoter by

  11. Mutation in a structural gene for a beta-tubulin specific to testis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Kemphues, K J; Raff, R A; Kaufman, T C; Raff, E C

    1979-01-01

    By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of tubulins prepared from tissues of Drosophila melanogaster we have identified a beta-tubulin subunit that is present only in the testis. Furthermore, we have isolated, as a male sterile, a third chromosome dominant mutation [ms(3)KKD] in the structural gene for this beta-tubulin. Males heterozygous for this mutation produce no motile spermatozoa. Beginning with meiosis, all processes in spermatogenesis are abnormal to some extent. Many microtubules (including both cytoplasmic microtubules and doublet tubules of the axoneme) show aberrant structure in cross section, and the overall morphology of the developing spermatids is disorganized. Testes from these males were shown, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, to contain both the normal testis-specific beta-tubulin and an electrophoretic variant of this tubulin in equal amounts. Both wild-type and mutant testis-specific beta-tubulins were characterized by vinblastine sulfate precipitation, coassembly with purified Drosophila embryo tubulin, and peptide mapping. Images PMID:115008

  12. Presence of the bla(Z) beta-lactamase gene in isolates of Staphylococcus aureus that appear penicillin susceptible by conventional phenotypic methods.

    PubMed

    El Feghaly, Rana E; Stamm, Jennifer E; Fritz, Stephanie A; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2012-12-01

    Beta-lactamase production may not be reliably detected by commonly used susceptibility testing methods such as Kirby-Bauer penicillin disk diffusion and nitrocefin beta-lactamase detection. We assayed 105 apparently penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates using multiple methods to detect beta-lactamase production. The bla(Z) beta-lactamase gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction in 10 (9.5%) of the 105 isolates. The average disk diffusion zone diameter was 34 and 38 mm for the bla(Z)-positive and -negative isolates, respectively (P < 0.001). Qualitative description of the zone edge was observer-dependent. The "cloverleaf assay" was positive in 6 of the 10 phenotypically susceptible isolates possessing bla(Z). The results of this study suggest that conventional methods for S. aureus penicillin susceptibility testing may not reliably detect penicillin resistance in all isolates; however, increasing the disk diffusion zone size interpretive criteria to 35 mm for this antimicrobial/organism combination from the current 29-mm breakpoint may improve the sensitivity of phenotypic penicillin susceptibility testing.

  13. Expression of the human beta-globin gene after retroviral transfer into murine erythroleukemia cells and human BFU-E cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, M A; Miller, A D; Gelinas, R E

    1988-01-01

    Replication-defective amphotropic retrovirus vectors containing either the human beta-globin gene with introns or an intronless beta-globin minigene were constructed and used to study beta-globin expression following gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. The beta-globin genes were marked by introducing a 6-base-pair insertion into the region corresponding to the 5' untranslated region of the beta-globin mRNA to allow detection of RNA encoded by the new gene in human cells expressing normal human beta-globin RNA. Introduction of a virus containing the beta-globin gene with introns into murine erythroleukemia cells resulted in inducible expression of human beta-globin RNA and protein, while the viruses containing the minigene were inactive. The introduced human beta-globin gene was 6 to 110% as active as the endogenous mouse beta maj-globin genes in six randomly chosen cell clones. Introduction of the viruses into human BFU-E cells, followed by analysis of marked and unmarked globin RNAs in differentiated erythroid colonies, revealed that the introduced beta-globin gene was about 5% as active as the endogenous genes in these normal human erythroid cells and that again the minigene was inactive. These data are discussed in terms of the potential treatment of genetic disease by gene therapy. Images PMID:3288863

  14. Morbidity, beta S haplotype and alpha-globin gene patterns among sickle cell anemia patients in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Adekile, A D; Haider, M Z

    1996-01-01

    Admission records of children with sickle cell anemia (SS), in the two main teaching hospitals in Kuwait, were reviewed for a 1-year period. The haplotypes of 92 beta s chromosomes (from 39 SS, 11 AS, 2 S beta-thalassemia [S beta-thal] and 1 SD individuals) were determined using an allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization technique, while the alpha-globin gene status of 27 SS and 33 AS individuals, i.e. 120 chromosomes, was determined with a combination of polymerase chain reaction and AS techniques. A vasooclusive crisis was the most common (60.0%) cause of hospitalization, followed by infections (20%). Hospital admissions were most common during the hottest month of the year (July). Few complications of the disease were seen among patients on follow-up; however, splenomegaly was present in 24.0%, hepatomegaly in 15.2%, gallstones in 15.2% and aseptic necrosis of the femoral head in 6.1%. Haplotype 31 (Saudi Arabia/India) is the most frequent in this community, being present in 80.4% of the chromosomes tested; Benin haplotype 19 was found in 12.0% and Bantu haplotype 20 in 6.5%. Hb F in the haplotype 31 homozygotes and heterozygotes ranged from 11.4 to 35.1% (mean 22.5 +/- 5.2%). The frequency of alpha-thal determinants in the study was 40.0%, the commonest being the -alpha 3.7-kb deletion (27.5%), the alpha 2 polyadenylation signal (AATAAA-> AATAAG) mutation (10.2%) and the IVS-I 5' end GAGGT-GAGG->GAGG pentanucleotide (5 nt) deletion (3.3%). SS patients with coexistent alpha-thal trait did not have severe recurrent infections and none had gallstones. The high frequencies of the Saudi Arabia/India beta s haplotype and alpha-thalassemia trait contribute to the mild nature of SS disease among Kuwaiti Arabs comparable to that in eastern Saudi Arabia.

  15. Cloning and characterization of a novel human clathrin heavy chain gene (CLTCL)

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.R.; Trofatter, J.A.; McCormick, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    An exon representing a novel clathrin heavy chain gene (CLTCL) was isolated during gene identification studies and transcription mapping of human chromosome 22. Isolation and sequencing of cDNA clones corresponding to this exon revealed extensive similarity of the predicted amino acid sequence of this gene product to those of clathrin heavy chain genes of other species. Northern blot analysis has revealed an apparent developmental expression pattern of an approximately 6-kb mRNA. The gene appears to be expressed ubiquitously in the limited number of fetal tissues that were tested, but is selectively expressed in certain adult tissues, particularly in skeletal muscle. In addition, alternative splicing of an exon was observed near the carboxyl terminus of the predicted gene product. Its location overlaps the domain putatively involved in clathrin light chain binding and is adjacent to the heavy chain self-assembly (or trimerization) region, suggesting that alternative splicing may be involved in regulating one or both of these interactions. The expression pattern of this gene, in addition to its potential role in receptor-mediated endocytosis and signal transduction, suggests that is may be important in some developmental processes. The location of CLTCL on human chromosome 22 near the region commonly deleted in DiGeorge and other apparent haploinsufficiency syndromes warrants further investigation into its relationship with these developmental disorders. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Systemic hyperosmolality improves beta-glucuronidase distribution and pathology in murine MPS VII brain following intraventricular gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, A; Stein, C; Derksen, T; Martins, I; Anderson, R D; Davidson, B L

    1999-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII, a classical lysosomal storage disease, is caused by deficiency of the enzyme beta-glucuronidase. Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations are severe with accumulations of storage vacuoles in all cell types. Intraventricular gene transfer can lead to transduction of the ependyma, with production and secretion of beta-glucuronidase into the cerebral spinal fluid and underlying cortex resulting in reversal of disease pathology restricted to the periventricular areas. We tested if systemic hyperosmolality would increase the distribution of beta-glucuronidase in brain parenchyma after intraventricular virus injection. Mice were administered mannitol, intraperitoneally, 20 days after gene transfer and 1 day prior to sacrifice. Mannitol-induced systemic hyperosmolality caused a marked penetration of beta-glucuronidase into the brain parenchyma. If mannitol was administered at the time of the intraventricular injection of virus, there was penetration of vector across the ependymal cell layer, with infection of cells in the subependymal region. This also resulted in increased beta-glucuronidase activity throughout the brain. Sections of brains from beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice showed correction of cellular pathology in the subependymal region plus cortical structures away from the ventricular wall. These data indicate that virus-mediated gene transfer to the brain via the ventricles, coupled with systemic mannitol administration, can lead to extensive CNS distribution of beta-glucuronidase with concomitant correction of the storage defect. Our findings have positive therapeutic implications for the treatment of CNS disorders with gene transfer vectors and recombinant proteins.

  17. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes.

  18. A Putatively Functional Haplotype in the Gene Encoding Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 as a Potential Biomarker for Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Markus A.; Brockmoeller, Juergen; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Virsik, Patricia; Wilken, Barbara; Kuehnle, Elna; Campean, Radu; Hoffmann, Arne O.; Mueller, Katarina; Goetze, Robert G.; Neumann, Michael; Janke, Joerg H.; Nasser, Fatima; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans; Hille, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether genetic variability in TGFB1 is related to circulating transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) plasma concentrations after radiotherapy and to radiosensitivity of lymphoid cells. Patients and Methods: Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 plasma concentrations (n = 79) were measured in patients 1 year after radiotherapy and chromosomal aberrations (n = 71) ex vivo before therapy start. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}1 secretion and apoptosis were measured in isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 55 healthy volunteers. These phenotypes were analyzed in relation to five germline polymorphisms in the 5' region of the TGFB1 gene. Because of high linkage disequilibrium, these five polymorphisms reflect frequent genetic variation in this region. A presumed impact of TGF-{beta}1 on DNA damage or repair was measured as micronucleus formation in 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines. Results: We identified a hypofunctional genetic haplotype termed H3 tagging the 5' region of the TGFB1 gene encoding TGF-{beta}1. H3 was associated with lower TGF-{beta}1 plasma concentrations in patients (p = 0.01) and reduced TGF-{beta}1 secretion in irradiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (p = 0.003). Furthermore, cells with H3 were less prone to induction of chromosomal aberrations (p = 0.001) and apoptosis (p = 0.003) by irradiation. The hypothesis that high TGF-{beta}1 could sensitize cells to DNA damage was further supported by increased micronuclei formation in 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines when preincubated with TGF-{beta}1 before irradiation (p = 0.04). Conclusions: On the basis of TGF-{beta}1 plasma levels and radiation sensitivity of lymphoid cells, this study revealed a putatively hypofunctional TGFB1 haplotype. The significance of this haplotype and the suggested link between TGF-{beta}1 function and DNA integrity should be further explored in other cell types, as well as other experimental and clinical conditions.

  19. Functional analysis of the human neurofilament light chain gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanbakhsh, K; Fraser, P; Kioussis, D; Vidal, M; Grosveld, F; Lindenbaum, M

    1993-01-01

    We have carried out a structural and functional analysis on the human NF-L (H-NF-L) gene. It contains a methylation-free island, spanning the 5' flanking sequences and the first exon and a number of neuronal-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites have been identified in the upstream region as well as within the body of the gene. Analysis in cell lines and transgenic mice using a combination of these sites has revealed the presence of a conserved element(s) between -300bp and -190bp which is required for neuronal-specific expression. Images PMID:8441658

  20. Assignment of human {alpha}-synuclein (SNCA) and {beta}-synuclein (SNCB) genes to chromosomes 4q21 and 5q35

    SciTech Connect

    Spillantini, M.G.; Goedert, M.; Divane, A.

    1995-05-20

    The authors previously identified two human brain proteins of 140 and 134 amino acids by virtue of their reactivity with a monoclonal antibody raised against a tangle preparation from Alzheimer disease brain. The 140-amino-acid protein is homologous to synuclein from Torpedo electroplaques and rat brain and identical to the precursor of the non-A{beta} component of Alzheimer disease amyloid plaques. The 134-amino-acid protein is homologous to bovine phosphoneuroprotein 14. In view fo the fact that both proteins are 61% identical in sequence, they have called them {alpha}-synuclein and {beta}-synuclein, respectively. Both proteins are present in nerve terminals, where they may be involved in the events mediating exocytosis of synaptic vesicles following nerve stimulation. They have now determined the chromosomal localizations of the {alpha}-synuclein and {beta}-synuclein genes. To map the two genes analyzed a panel of monochromosomal human-rodent somatic cell hybride by polymerase chain reaction and performed fluorescence in situ hybridization on metaphase spreads f human chromosomes.

  1. Human alcohol dehydrogenase: structural differences between the beta and gamma subunits suggest parallel duplications in isoenzyme evolution and predominant expression of separate gene descendants in livers of different mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, R; Hempel, J; Kaiser, R; von Wartburg, J P; Vallee, B L; Jörnvall, H

    1984-01-01

    Human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) occurs in multiple forms, which exhibit distinct electrophoretic mobilities and enzymatic properties. The homogeneous isoenzymes beta 1 beta 1 and gamma 1 gamma 1 were isolated from livers of Caucasians with "typical" ADH phenotype by double ternary complex affinity chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. The differences between the beta 1 and gamma 1 subunits were determined by structural analysis of all tryptic peptides from the carboxymethylated proteins. The human beta 1 and gamma 1 chains differ at 21 of the 373 positions (5.6%). Ten tryptic peptides account for the differences. All residue substitutions are compatible with one-base mutations and result in largely unaltered properties, but five lead to charge differences. Sixteen substitutions are at positions corresponding to the catalytic domain of the well-known horse enzyme; five correspond to the coenzyme-binding domain. Substitutions adjacent to important regions may correlate with differences in coenzyme binding, substrate specificities, and active-site relationships. The residue replacements between the beta 1 and gamma 1 subunits of human ADH are not identical to the known substitutions between ethanol-active (E) and steroid-active (S) subunits of horse ADH. Thus, the duplication leading to human beta 1 and gamma 1 subunits is separate and different from that leading to equine E and S subunits. Both duplications are likely to have occurred after the ancestral separation of human and equine ADH. Of the 21 residues that are different between beta 1/gamma 1, 13 in gamma 1 but only 6 in beta 1 are identical to those of the horse E chain. This suggests a closer relationship between gamma 1 and E, although beta 1 in man and E in the horse are the subunits recovered in highest yield from liver ADH preparations. Consequently, in these two mammalian species, relative activities of genes for an isoenzyme family appear to be

  2. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  3. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  4. Gene expression responses of European flounder (Platichthys flesus) to 17-beta estradiol.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tim D; Diab, Amer M; George, Stephen G; Sabine, Victoria; Chipman, James K

    2007-02-05

    Male European flounder (Platichthys flesus) were intraperitoneally injected with 10mg/kg 17-beta estradiol and tissues taken from individuals over a timecourse of 16 days. The GENIPOL P. flesus cDNA microarray was employed to detect hepatic gene expression differences between fish treated with estradiol and saline controls. Known biomarkers of estrogen exposure, choriogenin L and vitellogenins, showed sustained induction over the time-course. Among 175 identified clones showing sustained statistically significant induction or repression, those associated with the Gene Ontology terms mitochondria, amino acid synthesis, ubiquitination and apoptosis were included amongst those induced while those associated with immune function, electron transport, cell signalling and protein phosphorylation were repressed. Thus, we show the gene expression response of an environmentally relevant fish species to a high dose of an estrogenic endocrine disruptor and also report the sequencing of a further 2121 flounder ESTs.

  5. A second gene for cerulean cataracts maps to the {beta} crystallin region on chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.; Yount, J.; Lovrien, E.

    1996-08-01

    Cogenital cataracts are one of the most common major eye abnormalities and often lead to blindness in infants. At least a third of all cases are familial. Within this group, highly penetrant, autosomal dominant forms of congenital cataracts (ADCC) are most common. ADCC is a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, in which at least eight different loci have been identified for nine clinically distinct forms. Among these, Armitage et al. mapped a gene for cerulean blue cataracts to chromosome 17q24. Bodker et al. described a large family with cerulean blue cataracts, in which the affected daughter of affected first cousins was presumed to be homozygous for the purported gene. We report linkage in this family to the region on chromosome 22q that includes two {beta} crystallin genes (CRYBB2, CRYBB3) and one pseudogene (CRYBB2P1). The affected female in question is homozygous at all markers. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Transcriptome analysis of sugar beet root maggot (Tetanops myopaeformis) genes modulated by the Beta vulgaris host.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Smigocki, Ann C

    2016-10-03

    Sugar beet root maggot (SBRM, Tetanops myopaeformis von Röder) is a major but poorly understood insect pest of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). The molecular mechanisms underlying plant defense responses are well documented, however, little information is available about complementary mechanisms for insect adaptive responses to overcome host resistance. To date, no studies have been published on SBRM gene expression profiling. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) generated more than 300 SBRM ESTs differentially expressed in the interaction of the pest with a moderately resistant (F1016) and a susceptible (F1010) sugar beet line. Blast2GO v. 3.2 search indicated that over 40% of the differentially expressed genes had known functions, primarily driven by fruit fly D. melanogaster genes. Expression patterns of 18 selected EST clones were confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis predicted a dominance of metabolic and catalytic genes involved in the interaction of SBRM with its host. SBRM genes functioning during development, regulation, cellular process, signaling and under stress conditions were annotated. SBRM genes that were common or unique in response to resistant or susceptible interactions with the host were identified and their possible roles in insect responses to the host are discussed.

  7. Editing of the heavy chain gene of Bombyx mori using transcription activator like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujun; Nakagaki, Masao

    2014-07-18

    The silk gland of Bombyx mori represents an established in vivo system for producing recombinant proteins. However, low yields of recombinant proteins have limited the system's further development because endogenous silk proteins were present. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) tool which work in pairs to bind and cleave DNA at specific sites, have recently been shown to be effective for genome editing in various organisms, including silkworms. To improve the yield of recombinant proteins synthesized in the silkworm by eliminated competition with endogenous fibroin synthesis, the heavy chain (H-chain) gene was knocked out using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). A pair of TALENs that targets the 1st exon in the H-chain gene was synthesized and microinjected into silkworm embryos; the injected silkworms were screened for H-chain gene knock out (H-KO) based on their sericin cocoon-making characteristics. Sequence analysis revealed that the H-chain of the mutation was successfully edited. The TALENs was very efficient in editing the genome DNA of silkworm. By being eliminated competition with the H-chain, the production of recombinant proteins would be expected to increase markedly if this H-KO system is used.

  8. Cationic amphiphiles with fatty acyl chain asymmetry of coconut oil deliver genes selectively to mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekhar, Voshavar; Srujan, Marepally; Prabhakar, Rairala; Reddy, Rakesh C; Sreedhar, Bojja; Rentam, Kiran K R; Kanjilal, Sanjit; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2011-03-16

    Recent structure-activity studies have revealed a dramatic influence of hydrophobic chain asymmetry in enhancing gene delivery efficacies of synthetic cationic amphiphiles (Nantz, M. H. et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics2010, 7, 786-794; Koynova, R. et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics2009, 6, 951-958). The present findings demonstrate for the first time that such a transfection enhancing influence of asymmetric hydrocarbon chains observed in pure synthetic cationic amphiphiles also works for cationic amphiphiles designed with natural, asymmetric fatty acyl chains of a food-grade oil. Herein, we demonstrate that cationic amphiphiles designed with the natural fatty acyl chain asymmetry of food-grade coconut oil are less cytotoxic and deliver genes selectively to mouse lung. Despite lauroyl chains being the major fatty acyl chains of coconut oil, both the in vitro and In vivo gene transfer efficiencies of such cationic amphiphiles were found to be remarkably superior (>4-fold) to those of their pure dilauroyl analogue. Mechanistic studies involving the technique of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) revealed higher biomembrane fusibility of the cationic liposomes of the coconut amphiphiles than that of the symmetric dilauroyl analogue. AFM study revealed pronounced fusogenic nonlamellar structures of the liposomes of coconut amphiphiles. Findings in the FRET and cellular uptake study, taken together, support the notion that the higher cellular uptake resulting from the more fusogenic nature of the liposomes of coconut amphiphiles 1 are likely to play a dominant role in making the coconut amphiphiles transfection competent.

  9. Cloning and sequence of the gene encoding a cefotaxime-hydrolyzing class A beta-lactamase isolated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Y; Ohno, A; Taguchi, H; Imajo, S; Ishiguro, M; Matsuzawa, H

    1995-01-01

    Escherichia coli TUH12191, which is resistant to piperacillin, cefazolin, cefotiam, ceftizoxime, cefuzonam, and aztreonam but is susceptible to cefoxitin, latamoxef, flomoxef, and imipenem, was isolated from the urine of a patient treated with beta-lactam antibiotics. The beta-lactamase (Toho-1) purified from the bacteria had a pI of 7.8, had a molecular weight of about 29,000, and hydrolyzed beta-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin G, ampicillin, oxacillin, carbenicillin, piperacillin, cephalothin, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and aztreonam. Toho-1 was markedly inhibited by beta-lactamase inhibitors such as clavulanic acid and tazobactam. Resistance to beta-lactams, streptomycin, spectinomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim was transferred by conjugational transfer from E. coli TUH12191 to E. coli ML4903, and the transferred plasmid was about 58 kbp, belonging to incompatibility group M. The cefotaxime resistance gene for Toho-1 was subcloned from the 58-kbp plasmid by transformation of E. coli MV1184. The sequence of the gene for Toho-1 was determined, and the open reading frame of the gene consisted of 873 or 876 bases (initial sequence, ATGATG). The nucleotide sequence of the gene (DDBJ accession number D37830) was found to be about 73% homologous to the sequence of the gene encoding a class A beta-lactamase produced by Klebsiella oxytoca E23004. According to the amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence, the precursor consisted of 290 or 291 amino acid residues, which contained amino acid motifs common to class A beta-lactamases (70SXXK, 130SDN, and 234KTG). Toho-1 was about 83% homologous to the beta-lactamase mediated by the chromosome of K. oxytoca D488 and the beta-lactamase mediated by the plasmid of E. coli MEN-1. Therefore, the newly isolated beta-lactamase Toho-1 produced by E. coli TUH12191 is similar to beta-lactamases produced by K. oxytoca D488, K. oxytoca E23004, and E. coli MEN-1 rather than to mutants of TEM or SHV enzymes

  10. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Jianguo

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  11. Mouse Cmu heavy chain immunoglobulin gene segment contains three intervening sequences separating domains.

    PubMed

    Calame, K; Rogers, J; Early, P; Davis, M; Livant, D; Wall, R; Hood, L

    1980-04-03

    The IgM molecule is composed of subunits made up of two light chain and two heavy chain (mu) polypeptides. The mu chain is encoded by several gene segments--variable (V), joining (J) and constant (Cmu). The Cmu gene segment is of particular interest for several reasons. First, the mu chain must exist in two very different environments--as an integral membrane protein in receptor IgM molecules (micrometer) and as soluble serum protein in IgM molecules into the blood (mus). Second, the Cmu region in mus is composed of four homology units or domains (Cmu1, Cmu2, Cmu3 and Cmu4) of approximately 110 amino acid residues plus a C-terminal tail of 19 residues. We asked two questions concerning the organisation of the Cmu gene segment. (1) Are the homology units separated by intervening DNA sequences as has been reported for alpha (ref. 5), gamma 1 (ref. 6) and gamma 2b (ref. 7) heavy chain genes? (2) Is the C-terminal tail separated from the Cmu4 domain by an intervening DNA sequence? If so, DNA rearrangements or RNA splicing could generate hydrophilic and hydrophobic C-terminal tails for the mus and micrometer polypeptides, respectively. We demonstrate here that intervening DNA sequences separate each of the four coding regions for Cmu domains, and that the coding regions for the Cmu4 domains and the C-terminal tail are directly contiguous.

  12. Mutations in the c-erbA beta 1 gene: do they underlie euthyroid fibromyalgia?

    PubMed

    Lowe, J C; Cullum, M E; Graf, L H; Yellin, J

    1997-02-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic condition of widespread pain, stiffness, and fatigue, has proven unresponsive to drugs, the use of which is based on the 'serotonin-deficiency hypothesis'. An alternative hypothesis-failed transcription regulation by thyroid hormone-can explain the serotonin deficiency and other objective findings and symptoms of euthyroid fibromyalgia. Virtually every feature of fibromyalgia corresponds to signs or symptoms associated with failed transcription regulation by thyroid hormone. In hypothyroid fibromyalgia, failed transcription regulation would result from thyroid-hormone deficiency. In euthyroid fibromyalgia, failed transcription regulation may result from low-affinity thyroid hormone receptors coded by a mutated c-erbA beta 1 gene, yielding partial peripheral resistance to thyroid hormone. The hypothesis of this paper is that, in euthyroid fibromyalgia, a mutant c-erbA beta 1 gene (or alternately, the c-erbA alpha 1 gene) results in low-affinity thyroid-hormone receptors that prevent normal thyroid hormone regulation of transcription. As in hypothyroidism, this would cause a shift toward alpha-adrenergic dominance and increases in both cyclic adenosine 3'-5'-phosphate phosphodiesterase and inhibitory Gi proteins. The result would be tissue-specific hypothyroid-like symptoms despite normal circulating thyroid-hormone levels.

  13. Regulation of the laminin beta 1 (LAMB1), retinoic acid receptor beta, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 genes in mutant F9 teratocarcinoma cell lines partially deficient in cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, J; Li, C; Gudas, L J

    1997-12-01

    We stably transfected a gene encoding a dominant negative regulatory subunit of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) into F9 cells and generated cell lines partially deficient in PKA activity (DN16 and DN19). In these cell lines, the retinoic acid (RA) receptor beta and laminin beta(1) chain (LAMB1) genes were regulated normally by RA alone, indicating that in the absence of exogenous modulation of cAMP levels, the PKA signaling pathway does not seem to play a major role in the RA-associated regulation of these genes. However, alterations in gene regulation were observed when the mutant cell lines were treated with a combination of RA and cAMP analogues. Moreover, in the DN16 cell line, which exhibits the lowest PKA activity among the mutant cell lines [22% of wild type (WT) at 1 microM cAMP], there was a significant decrease in the cAMP-associated activation of the LAMB1 gene DNase I hypersensitivity site 2 enhancer, as measured by chloramphenicol acetyl transferase assays. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, less protein binding was observed at one of the motifs (C2) within this enhancer region in the DN16 cells as compared to the F9 WT cells after treatment of the cells with RA and cAMP analogues for 24 h. Furthermore, no increase in C2 binding was observed when extracts from RA-treated F9 ST or DN16 cells were subjected to in vitro phosphorylation, suggesting that PKA is involved in the induction of the C2-binding protein in RA-treated cells. In contrast to the results with RA receptor beta and LAMB1, the effects of cAMP analogues on the RA-associated regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene were not altered in the cell lines that exhibited reduced PKA activity. These results suggest that a partial reduction in PKA activity is not sufficient to abrogate the effects of cAMP analogues on all of the genes regulated by RA.

  14. Developmental regulation of {beta}-hexosaminidase {alpha}- and {beta}-subunit gene expression in the rat reproductive system

    SciTech Connect

    Trasler, J.M.; Wakamatsu, N.; Gravel, R.A.; Benoit, G.

    1994-09-01

    {beta}-Hexosaminidase is an essential lysosomal enzyme whose absence in man results in a group of disorders, the G{sub M2} gangliosidoses. Enzyme activity for {beta}-hexosaminidase is many fold higher in the epididymis than in other tissues, is present in sperm and is postulated to be required for mammalian fertilization. To better understand how {beta}-hexosaminidase is regulated in the reproductive system, we quantitated the mRNA expression of the {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits (Hex {alpha} and Hex {beta}) of the enzyme in the developing rat testis and epididymis. Hex {alpha} mRNA was differentially expressed and abundant in adult rat testis and epididymis, 13- and 2-fold brain levels, respectively. In contrast, Hex {beta} mRNA levels in the testis and epididymis were .3- and 5-fold brain levels. Within the epididymis both Hex {alpha} and Hex {beta} mRNA concentrations were highest in the corpus, 1.5-fold and 9-fold initial segment values, respectively. During testis development from 7-91 days of age, testis levels of Hex {alpha} mRNA increased 10-fold and coincided with the appearance of spermatocytes and spermatids in the epithelium. In isolated male germ cells, Hex {alpha} expression was most abundant in haploid round spermatids. Hex {alpha} mRNA was undetectable after hypophysectomy and returned to normal after testosterone administration and the return of advanced germ cells to the testis. Hex {beta} mRNA was expressed at constant low levels throughout testis development. In the caput-corpus and cauda regions of the epididymis Hex {alpha} mRNA levels increased 2-fold between 14 and 91 days; during the same developmental period epididymal Hex {beta} mRNA levels increased dramatically, by 10-20 fold. In summary, Hex {alpha} and Hex {beta} mRNAs are differentially and developmentally expressed at high levels in the rat testis and epididymis and augur for an important role for {beta}-hexosaminidase in normal male reproductive function.

  15. Hyaluronic acid modulates gene expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human fibroblast-like synovial cells from advanced-stage osteoarthritis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Tsang; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wang, Jyh-Horng; Liu, Haw-Chang; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Young, Tai-Horng

    2010-04-01

    Intraarticular injection of hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid; HA) is the common way to treat osteoarthritis (OA) of knees. This treatment cannot only maintain the viscoelastic properties of knee but also release the OA pain. However, the exact molecular mechanism is unknown. In this study, after human synovial cells were stimulated with HA and Hylan (Synvisc) for 24 h, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was used to detect the alteration of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression, which were specific genes related to pathogenesis of OA knees. Our results illustrated that both HA and Hylan might not cause cytotoxicity or apoptosis of synovial cells in serum deprivation environment. The gene expressions of TGF-beta1 and VEGF were significantly increased at the concentration of 0.1 mg/mL HA and 0.1 mg/mL Hylan, respectively (alpha < 0.05). The synovial cells with treatment of 0.1 mg/mL Hylan decreased the CTGF gene expression (0.66-fold) and VEGF (0.78-fold) compared to 0.1 mg/mL HA (alpha < 0.05). We suggested that the profile of CTGF, TGF-beta1, and VEGF gene expressions in our study might provide the rational mechanism for the therapeutic effect of hyaluronan on OA knees.

  16. Cloning and sequencing of a molluscan endo-beta-1,4-glucanase gene from the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Janson, J C; Sellos, D

    2001-07-01

    Using polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing techniques, a complementary DNA encoding a low molecular mass cellulase (endo-1,4-beta-D-glucanase, EC 3.2.1.4) has been identified in the digestive gland of the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis. It contains a 5' untranslated region, a 633-nucleotide ORF encoding a 211 amino-acid protein, including a 17 amino-acid signal peptide and a complete 3' untranslated region. At the C-terminal end of the purified mature protein, a 13 amino-acid peptide is lacking in comparison to the protein sequence deduced from the ORF. This peptide is probably removed as a consequence of post-translational amidation of the C-terminal glutamine. The endoglucanase genes have been isolated and sequenced from both Swedish and French mussels. The coding parts of these two sequences are identical. Both genes contain two introns, the positions of which are conserved. However the length of the introns are different due to base substitutions, insertions or deletions showing the existence of interspecies length polymorphism. The percentage of similarity for the introns of the two gene sequences is 96.9%. This is the first time a molluscan cellulase is characterized at DNA level. Amino acid sequence-based classification has revealed that the enzyme belongs to the glycosyl hydrolase family 45 [B. Henrissat (Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Végétales, CNRS, Joseph Fourier Université, Grenoble, France), personal communication]. There is no cellulose binding domain associated with the sequence.

  17. Low beta-glucuronidase enzyme activity and mutations in the human beta-glucuronidase gene in mild mucopolysaccharidosis type VII, pseudodeficiency and a heterozygote.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, R; Gitzelmann, R; Bosshard, N; Maire, I; Liebaers, I; Lissens, W

    1998-01-01

    Deficiency of beta-glucuronidase is the cause of the human lysosomal storage disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII). The wide interfamilial variation in the presentation of this disorder complicates clinical diagnosis. Since greatly reduced beta-glucuronidase enzyme activity may also be found in healthy individuals (pseudodeficiency), diagnosis based on the biochemical phenotype is also difficult. This is illustrated by the patients studied here, who had extremely mild symptoms confined to the spine, or tachycardia, or upper respiratory infection, and who had low beta-glucuronidase activity, and excessive granulation of granulocytes and monocytes on routine blood smears. Low enzyme activity was caused by mutations in the beta-glucuronidase gene in all cases. One patient was homozygous for the previously described D152N allele. Family information and 35SO4-uptake studies clearly demonstrated that he was pseudodeficient, with symptoms unrelated to his low beta-glucuronidase activity. Two patients of another family were compound heterozygotes for a C38G and a Y626H allele, and were probably extremely mild MPS VII patients. The low beta-glucuronidase activity in another mild MPS VII patient was due to reduced biosynthesis of stable mRNA from one allele, and a W446X mutation on the second. Extremely low beta-glucuronidase enzyme activity was also found in the serum of a carrier of a 1801deltaT allele, possibly as a consequence of a dominant-negative effect. A combination of investigations is necessary in order to differentiate between mild disease and pseudodeficiency in individuals with enzyme activities close to the threshold.

  18. Mice doubly deficient in the midkine and pleiotrophin genes exhibit deficits in the expression of beta-tectorin gene and in auditory response.

    PubMed

    Zou, Peng; Muramatsu, Hisako; Sone, Michihiko; Hayashi, Hideo; Nakashima, Tsutomu; Muramatsu, Takashi

    2006-07-01

    alpha-Tectorin and beta-tectorin are major noncollagenous proteins of the tectorial membrane, which plays a crucial role in the reception of sonic signals in the cochlea. Midkine and pleiotrophin are closely related proteins that serve as growth factors and cytokines. In mice doubly deficient in the midkine gene and pleiotrophin gene, expression of beta-tectorin mRNA was nearly abolished in the cochlea on day 1 and 7 after birth. Expression of alpha-tectorin mRNA was unaffected in the double knockout mice, and expression of beta-tectorin mRNA was not altered in mice deficient in only the midkine or pleiotrophin gene. In newborn wild-type mice, both midkine and pleiotrophin were expressed in the greater epithelial ridge of the cochlea, in which beta-tectorin mRNA was strongly expressed. These results indicate that either midkine or pleiotrophin is required for significant expression of beta-tectorin. In agreement with the view that beta-tectorin is essential for normal auditory function, mice doubly deficient in both midkine and pleiotrophin genes exhibited very severe auditory deficits. We observed that mice deficient in either midkine or pleiotrophin gene were also impaired in their auditory response, but the level of the deficit was generally low or moderate. The present finding illustrates the importance of growth factor expression in the cochlea for auditory function.

  19. Human neural stem cells transduced with IFN-beta and cytosine deaminase genes intensify bystander effect in experimental glioma.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Natsume, A; Shimato, S; Ohno, M; Kato, T; Chansakul, P; Wakabayashi, T; Kim, S U

    2010-05-01

    Previously, we have shown that the genetically modified human neural stem cells (NSCs) show remarkable migratory and tumor-tropic capability to track down brain tumor cells and deliver therapeutic agents with significant therapeutic benefit. Human NSCs that were retrovirally transduced with cytosine deaminase (CD) gene showed remarkable 'bystander killer effect' on the glioma cells after application of the prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Interferon-beta (IFN-beta) is known for its antiproliferative effects in a variety of cancers. In our pilot clinical trial in glioma, the IFN-beta gene has shown potent antitumor activity in patients with malignant glioma. In the present study, we sought to examine whether human NSCs genetically modified to express both CD and IFN-beta genes intensified antitumor effect on experimental glioma. In vitro studies showed that CD/IFN-beta-expressing NSCs exerted a remarkable bystander effect on human glioma cells after the application of 5-FC, as compared with parental NSCs and CD-expressing NSCs. In animal models with human glioma orthotopic xenograft, intravenously infused CD/IFN-beta-expressing NSCs produced striking antitumor effect after administration of the prodrug 5-FC. Furthermore, the same gene therapy regimen prolonged survival periods significantly in the experimental animals. The results of the present study indicate that the multimodal NSC-based treatment strategy might have therapeutic potential against gliomas.

  20. Beta s gene in Central Iran is in linkage disequilibrium with the Indian-Arab haplotype.

    PubMed

    Rahgozar, S; Poorfathollah, A A; Moafi, A R; Old, J M

    2000-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia is not considered to be a significant disease in Iran, although the sickle cell trait is estimated to have a high incidence in the Southern provinces. Since 1977, when the presence of a mild sickle cell anemia was reported in this country, there have been no further investigations published giving precise data on the incidence and origins of the sickle cell mutation in Iran. We report here the finding of patients with the sickle cell trait, sickle cell anemia, and sickle-beta thalassemia in Central Iran. A survey of 300 individuals from a village in Southeast Esfahan revealed an incidence of the sickle cell trait of 8.33%. "Cascade screening" enabled 96 relatives in four surrounding villages to be tested, and the at-risk couples were offered counseling as a "sickle cell control program." The hematological indices and HbF levels of the affected patients were determined. The HbF levels were unusually high, ranging from 18% to 41.4%, and SS patients with the highest levels were asymptomatic. Linkage analysis revealed the betaS gene haplotype in this population to be the Indian-Arab haplotype.

  1. Effect of interleukin-1beta gene functional polymorphism on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Papiol, Sergi; Molina, Vicente; Rosa, Araceli; Sanz, Javier; Palomo, Tomás; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2007-12-05

    Hypoactivity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during cognitive tasks is among the most consistent findings in schizophrenia. The biological factors contributing to this hypofrontality are only partially known. Previous reports have shown the influence of genes mapped to IL-1 cluster (i) in the risk to develop schizophrenia and (ii) on brain morphological abnormalities in these patients. Moreover, Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), encoded by IL-1B gene (IL-1 cluster, chromosome 2q13) has a key role in dopaminergic differentiation and dendrite growth in developing cortical neurons. The authors explored the role of a genetic functional polymorphism at IL-1B gene in relation to DLPFC activity. DLPFC (left and right) metabolic activity was measured in a sample of 19 DSM-IV diagnosed schizophrenic patients of Spanish origin using a procedure based on MRI/PET image fusion. During PET studies, subjects performed a contingent Continuous Performance Test aiming to activate DLPFC. Functional promoter polymorphism -511 C/T (rs16944) of IL-1B gene was genotyped in these patients. Those patients who were allele 2 (-511 T) carriers showed a lower metabolic activity in the left DLPFC with respect to patients homozygous for allele 1 (-511 C) (U = 16, z = -2.32, P = 0.02). Our results suggest that hypofrontality reported in some schizophrenic patients might be explained, at least in part, by this functional polymorphism at IL-1B gene. Genetic variants with influence on brain functionality may account for the neurocognitive heterogeneity observed in schizophrenic patients.

  2. Predictive value of serum ALT and T-cell receptor beta variable chain for HBeAg seroconversion in chronic hepatitis B patients during tenofovir treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiezuan; Yan, Dong; Guo, Renyong; Chen, Jiajia; Li, Yongtao; Fan, Jun; Fu, Xuyan; Yao, Xinsheng; Diao, Hongyan; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Effective antiviral therapy plays a key role in slowing the progression of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Identification of serum indices, including hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) expression and seroconversion, will facilitate evaluation of the efficacy of antiviral therapy in HBeAg-positive CHB patients. The biochemical, serological, virological parameters, and the frequency of circulating CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cell (Treg) in 32 patients were measured at baseline and every 12 weeks during 96 weeks of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) treatment. The relationship between the hepatitis B virus (HBV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and Treg and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels was analyzed, respectively. The molecular profiles of T-cell receptor beta variable chain (TRBV) were determined using gene melting spectral pattern. For the seroconverted 12 patients, ALT declined to normal levels by week 24 and remained at this level in subsequent treatment; moreover, the predictive cutoff value of ALT for HBeAg seroconversion (SC) was 41.5 U/L at week 24. The positive correlation between HBV DNA and Treg and ALT was significant in SC patients, but not in non-SC patients. Six TRBV families (BV3, BV11, BV12, BV14, BV20, and BV24) were predominantly expressed in SC patients at baseline. The decline of ALT could be used to predict HBeAg seroconversion for CHB patients during TDF treatment. In addition, the profile of Tregs and TRBVs may be associated with HBeAg seroconversion and could also be a potential indicator for predicting HBeAg SC and treatment outcome for CHB patients. PMID:28272219

  3. Predictive value of serum ALT and T-cell receptor beta variable chain for HBeAg seroconversion in chronic hepatitis B patients during tenofovir treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiezuan; Yan, Dong; Guo, Renyong; Chen, Jiajia; Li, Yongtao; Fan, Jun; Fu, Xuyan; Yao, Xinsheng; Diao, Hongyan; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-03-01

    Effective antiviral therapy plays a key role in slowing the progression of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Identification of serum indices, including hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) expression and seroconversion, will facilitate evaluation of the efficacy of antiviral therapy in HBeAg-positive CHB patients. The biochemical, serological, virological parameters, and the frequency of circulating CD4CD25 regulatory T cell (Treg) in 32 patients were measured at baseline and every 12 weeks during 96 weeks of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) treatment. The relationship between the hepatitis B virus (HBV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and Treg and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels was analyzed, respectively. The molecular profiles of T-cell receptor beta variable chain (TRBV) were determined using gene melting spectral pattern. For the seroconverted 12 patients, ALT declined to normal levels by week 24 and remained at this level in subsequent treatment; moreover, the predictive cutoff value of ALT for HBeAg seroconversion (SC) was 41.5 U/L at week 24. The positive correlation between HBV DNA and Treg and ALT was significant in SC patients, but not in non-SC patients. Six TRBV families (BV3, BV11, BV12, BV14, BV20, and BV24) were predominantly expressed in SC patients at baseline. The decline of ALT could be used to predict HBeAg seroconversion for CHB patients during TDF treatment. In addition, the profile of Tregs and TRBVs may be associated with HBeAg seroconversion and could also be a potential indicator for predicting HBeAg SC and treatment outcome for CHB patients.

  4. Identification of suitable reference genes for investigating gene expression in human gallbladder carcinoma using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Yang, Qiwei; Yang, Jing Hui; Du, Zhenwu; Zhang, Guizhen

    2015-04-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) has become a frequently used strategy in gene expression studies. The relative quantification method is an important and commonly used method for the evaluation of RT‑qPCR data. The key aim of this method is to identify an applicable internal reference gene, however, there are currently no suitable reference genes for gene analysis in gallbladder carcinoma. In the present study, screening was performed using 12 common reference genes, which were selected in order to provide an experimental basis for the investigation of gene expression in gallbladder carcinoma. A total of 16 tissue samples of gallbladder carcinoma and their matched normal gallbladder tissues were used. The gene expression stability and applicability of the 12 reference gene candidates were determined using the geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software programs. Following comparison of the results of the three software programs, HPRT1 was identified as the most stably expressed reference gene. In the normal gallbladder group, the relative stably expressed reference gene was PPIA and in the entire sample group, the relatively stably expressed reference gene was PPIA. The present study also demonstrated that the combination of the three reference genes was the most appropriate. The recommended combinations were PPIA + PUM1 + ACTB for the total sample group, GAPDH + PBGD + ALAS1 for the gallbladder carcinoma group and PPIA + PUM1 + TBP for the paired normal gallbladder group.

  5. The effects of mutation of the anr gene on the aerobic respiratory chain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Williams, H D

    1997-11-15

    The anr gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes a transcriptional regulator of anaerobic gene expression, homologous to the Fnr protein of Escherichia coli. We report here that Anr has a role in regulating the activity of the aerobic respiratory chain of P. aeruginosa. Strains with internal deletions in their anr gene had lowered levels of membrane bound cytochromes whilst the activity of the cytochrome c oxidase, cytochrome co (likely to be a cytochrome cbb3-type oxidase), and the cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway was markedly higher than in the wild-type strains. These data, and the finding that provision of multiple copies of the anr gene led to severe repression of these respiratory activities, suggest that Anr is a repressor of aerobic respiratory pathways and possibly the terminal oxidases themselves. In contrast, Anr activated cytochrome c peroxidase, a respiratory chain linked enzyme induced under low oxygen conditions.

  6. Increased gene expression of Alzheimer disease beta-amyloid precursor protein in senescent cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Adler, M J; Coronel, C; Shelton, E; Seegmiller, J E; Dewji, N N

    1991-01-01

    The pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in the brains of patients. Plaque cores contain a 4- to 5-kDa amyloid beta-protein fragment which is also found in the cerebral blood vessels of affected individuals. Since amyloid deposition in the brain increases with age even in normal people, we sought to establish whether the disease state bears a direct relationship with normal aging processes. As a model for biological aging, the process of cellular senescence in vitro was used. mRNA levels of beta-amyloid precursor protein associated with Alzheimer disease were compared in human fibroblasts in culture at early passage and when the same fibroblasts were grown to senescence after more than 52 population doublings. A dramatic increase in mRNA was observed in senescent IMR-90 fibroblasts compared with early-passage cells. Hybridization of mRNA from senescent and early proliferating fibroblasts with oligonucleotide probes specific for the three alternatively spliced transcripts of the gene gave similar results, indicating an increase during senescence of all three forms. A similar, though more modest, increase in message levels was also observed in early-passage fibroblasts made quiescent by serum deprivation; with repletion of serum, however, the expression returned to previous low levels. ELISAs were performed on cell extracts from senescent, early proliferating, and quiescent fibroblasts, and quiescent fibroblasts repleted with serum for over 48 hr, using polyclonal antibodies to a synthetic peptide of the beta-amyloid precursor. The results confirmed that the differences in mRNA expression were partially reflected at the protein level. Regulated expression of beta-amyloid precursor protein may be an important determinant of growth and metabolic responses to serum and growth factors under physiological as well as pathological conditions.

  7. Inefficiency in GM2 ganglioside elimination by human lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase beta-subunit gene transfer to fibroblastic cell line derived from Sandhoff disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Tomohiro; Kuroki, Aya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Daisuke; Kawashita, Eri; Higashine, Yukari; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Yamanaka, Shoji; Itoh, Kohji

    2006-08-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive GM2 gangliosidosis caused by the defect of lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase (Hex) beta-subunit gene associated with neurosomatic manifestations. Therapeutic effects of Hex subunit gene transduction have been examined on Sandhoff disease model mice (SD mice) produced by the allelic disruption of Hexb gene encoding the murine beta-subunit. We demonstrate here that elimination of GM2 ganglioside (GM2) accumulated in the fibroblastic cell line derived from SD mice (FSD) did not occur when the HEXB gene only was transfected. In contrast, a significant increase in the HexB (betabeta homodimer) activity toward neutral substrates, including GA2 (asialo-GM2) and oligosaccharides carrying the terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues at their non-reducing ends (GlcNAc-oligosaccharides) was observed. Immunoblotting with anti-human HexA (alphabeta heterodimer) serum after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Native-PAGE) revealed that the human HEXB gene product could hardly form the chimeric HexA through associating with the murine alpha-subunit. However, co-introduction of the HEXA encoding the human alpha-subunit and HEXB genes caused significant corrective effect on the GM2 degradation by producing the human HexA. These results indicate that the recombinant human HexA could interspeciesly associate with the murine GM2 activator protein to degrade GM2 accumulated in the FSD cells. Thus, therapeutic effects of the recombinant human HexA isozyme but not human HEXB gene product could be evaluated by using the SD mice.

  8. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and expression of human beta-glucuronidase gene in the liver, spleen, and central nervous system in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, T; Watabe, K; Uehara, K; Sly, W S; Vogler, C; Eto, Y

    1997-02-18

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase. A murine model of this disorder has been well characterized and used to study a number of forms of experimental therapies, including gene therapy. We produced recombinant adenovirus that expresses human beta-glucuronidase and administered this recombinant adenovirus to beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice intravenously. The beta-glucuronidase activities in liver and spleen were elevated to 40% and 20%, respectively, of the heterozygote enzymatic level at day 16. Expression persisted for at least 35 days. Pathological abnormalities of these tissues were also improved, and the elevated levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans were reduced in treated mice. However, the beta-glucuronidase activity in kidney and brain was not significantly increased. After administration of the recombinant adenovirus directly into the lateral ventricles of mutant mice, the beta-glucuronidase activity in crude brain homogenates increased to 30% of heterozygote activity. Histochemical demonstration of beta-glucuronidase activity in brain revealed that the enzymatic activity was mainly in ependymal cells and choroid. However, in some regions, the adenovirus-mediated gene expression was also evident in brain parenchyma associated with vessels and in the meninges. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated gene delivery might improve the central nervous system pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis in addition to correcting visceral pathology.

  9. Atypical haplotypes linked to the beta S gene in Africa are likely to be the product of recombination.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, R; Dunda, O; Krishnamoorthy, R; Fabry, M E; Georges, A; Labie, D; Nagel, R L

    1988-09-01

    We report here the haplotypes of 10 MstII-defined SS patients and a S/beta o thalassemia from the Central African Republic, exhibiting 7 different atypical haplotypes that are different from the typical Bantu haplotype that characterize over 93% of the beta s bearing chromosomes in that region of Africa. Of the seven atypical haplotypes, six can be easily interpreted as the result of recombination around the "hot spot" 5' of the beta gene, between a typical Bantu haplotype and other haplotypes available in the normal population. Except for one case that requires further study, this result demonstrates that the main mutational event leading to sickle hemoglobin in Bantu-speaking Africa was the mutation of the beta gene in a Bantu haplotype background.

  10. Repression of the c-fms gene in fibroblast cells by c-Myc-MM-1-TIF1beta complex.

    PubMed

    Satou, Akiko; Hagio, Yuko; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2004-08-13

    MM-1 has been reported to repress the E-box-dependent transcription activity of c-Myc by recruiting histone deacetylase 1 complex via TIF1beta/KAP1. In this study, to identify target genes for c-Myc-MM-1-TIF1beta, we established rat-1 cells harboring the dominant-negative form of TIF1beta to abrogate the pathway from TIF1beta to MM-1-c-Myc. This cell line, in which transcription activity of c-Myc was activated, was found to be tumorigenic. By DNA-microarray analysis of this cell line, expression and promoter activity of the c-fms oncogene were found to be upregulated. Of the two promoters, pE1 and pE2, in the c-fms gene, pE1 promoter activity was found to be activated in an E-box-dependent manner.

  11. In vivo topological analysis of Ste2, a yeast plasma membrane protein, by using beta-lactamase gene fusions.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, C P; Tipper, D J

    1991-01-01

    Gene fusions were constructed between Ste2, the receptor for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-factor, and beta la, the secreted form of beta-lactamase encoded by the bla gene of pBR322. The Ste2 and beta la components were linked by a processing fragment (P) from the yeast killer preprotoxin containing a C-terminal lysine-arginine site for cleavage by the Golgi-associated Kex2 protease. Ste2 is predicted to have a rhodopsinlike topology, with an external N terminus and seven transmembrane segments. Fusions to three of the four Ste2 domains predicted to be external resulted in beta la secretion from yeast cells. A fusion at a site just preceding the first transmembrane segment was an exception; the product was cell associated, indicating that the first 44 residues of Ste2 are insufficient to direct secretion of beta la; translocation of this domain presumably requires the downstream transmembrane segment. Expression of fusions located in two domains predicted to be cytoplasmic failed to result in beta la secretion. Following insertion of the preprotoxin signal peptide (S) between the Ste2 and P components of these cytoplasmic fusions, secretion of beta la activity occurred, which is consistent with inversion of the orientation of the beta la reporter. Conversely, insertion of S between Ste2 and P in an external fusion sharply reduced beta la secretion. Complementary information about both cytoplasmic and external domains of Ste2 was therefore provided, and most aspects of the predicted topology were confirmed. The steady-state levels of beta la detected were low, presumably because of efficient degradation of the fusions in the secretory pathway; levels, however, were easily detectable. This method should be valuable in the analysis of in vivo topologies of both homologous and foreign plasma membrane proteins expressed in yeast cells. Images PMID:2017168

  12. Comparative evolution of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and nuclear beta-fibrinogen intron 7 in woodpeckers.

    PubMed

    Prychitko, T M; Moore, W S

    2000-07-01

    Most molecular phylogenetic studies of vertebrates have been based on DNA sequences of mitochondrial-encoded genes. MtDNA evolves rapidly and is thus particularly useful for resolving relationships among recently evolved groups. However, it has the disadvantage that all of the mitochondrial genes are inherited as a single linkage group so that only one independent gene tree can be inferred regardless of the number of genes sequenced. Introns of nuclear genes are attractive candidates for independent sources of rapidly evolving DNA: they are pervasive, most of their nucleotides appear to be unconstrained by selection, and PCR primers can be designed for sequences in adjacent exons where nucleotide sequences are conserved. We sequenced intron 7 of the beta-fibrinogen gene (beta-fibint7) for a diversity of woodpeckers and compared the phylogenetic signal and nucleotide substitution properties of this DNA sequence with that of mitochondrial-encoded cytochrome b (cyt b) from a previous study. A few indels (insertions and deletions) were found in the beta-fibint7 sequences, but alignment was not difficult, and the indels were phylogentically informative. The beta-fibint7 and cyt b gene trees were nearly identical to each other but differed in significant ways from the traditional woodpecker classification. Cyt b evolves 2.8 times as fast as beta-fibint7 (14. 0 times as fast at third codon positions). Despite its relatively slow substitution rate, the phylogenetic signal in beta-fibint7 is comparable to that in cyt b for woodpeckers, because beta-fibint7 has less base composition bias and more uniform nucleotide substitution probabilities. As a consequence, compared with cyt b, beta-fibint7 nucleotide sites are expected to enter more distinct character states over the course of evolution and have fewer multiple substitutions and lower levels of homoplasy. Moreover, in contrast to cyt b, in which nearly two thirds of nucleotide sites rarely vary among closely related taxa

  13. Hematopoietic stem cell mobilization strategies for gene therapy of beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Yannaki, Evangelia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2010-08-01

    Effective gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies will require high numbers of autologous gene-engineered hematopoetic stem cells to be reintroduced into the patients. Stem cell mobilization using G-CSF is the most convenient and effective approach to achieve this goal, but it can have severe side effects in sickle cell anemia and be potentially harmful in the case of severe thalassemia. Hence, the optimal way of collection of hematopoetic stem cells from patients with thalassemia and sickle cell disease needs to be determined. In this paper, we review the possible risks of G-CSF mobilization in hemoglobinopathies and we outline the approaches used in an on-going clinical trial in which pretreatment with hydroxyurea is used to reduce potential risks of G-CSF administration to patients with severe beta thalassemia.

  14. Hormonal regulation of platypus Beta-lactoglobulin and monotreme lactation protein genes.

    PubMed

    Enjapoori, Ashwantha Kumar; Lefèvre, Christophe M; Nicholas, Kevin R; Sharp, Julie A

    2017-02-01

    Endocrine regulation of milk protein gene expression in marsupials and eutherians is well studied. However, the evolution of this complex regulation that began with monotremes is unknown. Monotremes represent the oldest lineage of extant mammals and the endocrine regulation of lactation in these mammals has not been investigated. Here we characterised the proximal promoter and hormonal regulation of two platypus milk protein genes, Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a whey protein and monotreme lactation protein (MLP), a monotreme specific milk protein, using in vitro reporter assays and a bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV1). Insulin and dexamethasone alone provided partial induction of MLP, while the combination of insulin, dexamethasone and prolactin was required for maximal induction. Partial induction of BLG was achieved by insulin, dexamethasone and prolactin alone, with maximal induction using all three hormones. Platypus MLP and BLG core promoter regions comprised transcription factor binding sites (e.g. STAT5, NF-1 and C/EBPα) that were conserved in marsupial and eutherian lineages that regulate caseins and whey protein gene expression. Our analysis suggests that insulin, dexamethasone and/or prolactin alone can regulate the platypus MLP and BLG gene expression, unlike those of therian lineage. The induction of platypus milk protein genes by lactogenic hormones suggests they originated before the divergence of marsupial and eutherians.

  15. Pituitary transcription factor Prop-1 stimulates porcine follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit gene expression.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Satoko; Kato, Takako; Susa, Takao; Tomizawa, Kyoko; Ogawa, Satoshi; Kato, Yukio

    2004-11-12

    Molecular cloning of the transcription factor that modulates the expression of porcine follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit (FSHbeta) gene was performed by the yeast one-hybrid cloning system using the -852/-746 upstream region (Fd2) as a bait sequence. We eventually cloned a pituitary transcription factor, Prop-1, which has been identified as an upstream transcription factor of Pit-1 gene. Binding ability of Prop-1 to the bait sequence was confirmed using recombinant Prop-1, and the binding property was investigated by DNase I footprinting, revealing that Prop-1 certainly bound to the large AT-rich region throughout the Fd2. Co-transfection of Prop-1 expression vector together with a reporter gene fused with Fd2 in CHO cells demonstrated an attractive stimulation of reporter gene expression. Immunohistochemistry of adult porcine pituitary confirmed the colocalization of the Prop-1 and FSHbeta subunit. This study is the first to report that Prop-1 participates in the regulation of FSHbeta gene. The present finding will provide new insights into the development of pituitary cell lineage and combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD), since why the defect of Prop-1 causes CPHD including gonadotropins (FSH and LH) has yet to be clarified.

  16. Worldwide diversity of Klebsiella pneumoniae that produce beta-lactamase blaKPC-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Naas, Thierry; Truong, HaVy; Villegas, Maria Virginia; Wisell, Karin T; Carmeli, Yehuda; Gales, Ana C; Venezia, Shiri Navon; Quinn, John P; Nordmann, Patrice

    2010-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniaeisolates that produce carbapenemases (KPCs) are rapidly disseminating worldwide. To determine their genetic background, we investigated 16 blaKPC-2-harboring K. pneumoniae isolates from 5 countries. The isolates were multidrug resistant, possessed the blaKPC-2 gene, and differed by additional Beta-lactamase content. They harbored a naturally chromosome-encoded bla gene (blaSHV-1 [12.5%], blaSHV-11 [68.7%], or blaOKP-AVB [18.8%]) and several acquired and plasmid-encoded genes (blaTEM-1 [81.3%], blaCTX-M-2 [31.3%], blaCTX-M-12 [12.5%], blaCTX-M-15 [18.7%], and blaOXA-9 [37.5%]). The blaKPC-2 gene was always associated with 1 of the Tn4401 isoforms (a, b, or c). Tn4401 was inserted on different-sized plasmids that belonged to different incompatibility groups. Several blaKPC-containing K. pneumoniae clones were found: 9 different pulsotypes with 1 major (sequence type 258) and 7 minor distinct allelic profiles. Different clones harboring different plasmids but having identical genetic structure, Tn4401, could be at the origin of the worldwide spread of this emerging resistance gene.

  17. Nucleotide sequence analysis of beta tubulin gene in a wide range of dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Mirhendi, Hossein; Makimura, Koichi; de Hoog, G Sybren; Satoh, Kazuo; Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Shidfar, Mohammad Reza

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the resolving power of the beta tubulin protein-coding gene (BT2) for systematic study of dermatophyte fungi. Initially, 144 standard and clinical strains belonging to 26 species in the genera Trichophyton, Microsporum, and Epidermophyton were identified by internal transcribe spacer (ITS) sequencing. Subsequently, BT2 was partially amplified in all strains, and sequence analysis performed after construction of a BT2 database that showed length ranged from approximately 723 (T. ajelloi) to 808 nucleotides (M. persicolor) in different species. Intraspecific sequence variation was found in some species, but T. tonsurans, T. equinum, T. concentricum, T. verrucosum, T. rubrum, T. violaceum, T. eriotrephon, E. floccosum, M. canis, M. ferrugineum, and M. audouinii were invariant. The sequences were found to be relatively conserved among different strains of the same species. The species with the closest resemblance were Arthroderma benhamiae and T. concentricum and T. tonsurans and T. equinum with 100% and 99.8% identity, respectively; the most distant species were M. persicolor and M. amazonicum. The dendrogram obtained from BT2 topology was almost compatible with the species concept based on ITS sequencing, and similar clades and species were distinguished in the BT2 tree. Here, beta tubulin was characterized in a wide range of dermatophytes in order to assess intra- and interspecies variation and resolution and was found to be a taxonomically valuable gene.

  18. Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene usage and (super)-antigen drive in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Andreas; Zenz, Thorsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2010-01-15

    Increasing evidence supports the prognostic relevance of specific immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes or stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCR) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The clonotypic BCRs differ in their specificity and affinity toward classical antigens and/or superantigens. The BCR-triggered mechanisms are distinct but could explain in part the different clinical behavior among CLL subgroups.

  19. A striking similarity in the organization of the E-selectin and beta interferon gene promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, M Z; Thanos, D; Read, M A; Maniatis, T; Collins, T

    1994-01-01

    Transcription of the endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (E-selectin or ELAM-1) gene is induced by the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). In this report, we identify four positive regulatory domains (PDI to PDIV) in the E-selectin promoter that are required for maximal levels of TNF-alpha induction in endothelial cells. In vitro DNA binding studies reveal that two of the domains contain novel adjacent binding sites for the transcription factor NF-kappa B (PDIII and PDIV), a third corresponds to a recently described CRE/ATF site (PDII), and a fourth is a consensus NF-kappa B site (PDI). Mutations that decrease the binding of NF-kappa B to any one of the NF-kappa B binding sites in vitro abolished cytokine-induced E-selectin gene expression in vivo. Previous studies demonstrated a similar correlation between ATF binding to PDII and E-selectin gene expression. Here we show that the high-mobility-group protein I(Y) [HMG I(Y)] also binds specifically to the E-selectin promoter and thereby enhances the binding of both ATF-2 and NF-kappa B to the E-selectin promoter in vitro. Moreover, mutations that interfere with HMG I(Y) binding decrease the level of cytokine-induced E-selectin expression. The organization of the TNF-alpha-inducible element of the E-selectin promoter is remarkably similar to that of the virus-inducible promoter of the human beta interferon gene in that both promoters require NF-kappa B, ATF-2, and HMG I(Y). We propose that HMG I(Y) functions as a key architectural component in the assembly of inducible transcription activation complexes on both promoters. Images PMID:7523851

  20. Activation of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase gene promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor-1beta in human papillary thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jimin; Capezzone, Marco; Xu, Xiao; Hershman, Jerome M

    2005-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that the human nicotinamide N-methytransferase (NNMT) gene was highly expressed in many papillary thyroid cancers and cell lines. The expression in other papillary and follicular cancers or cell lines and normal thyroid cells was low or undetectable. To gain an understanding of the molecular mechanism of this cell-specific expression, the NNMT promoter was cloned and studied by luciferase reporter gene assay. The promoter construct was expressed highly in papillary cancer cell lines, including those with higher (e.g. BHP 2-7) and lower (e.g. BHP 14-9) NNMT gene expression, and expressed weakly in follicular thyroid cancer cell lines. Further study with 5'-deletion promoter construct suggested that the NNMT promoter was regulated differently in BHP 2-7 and BHP 14-9 cells. In BHP 2-7 cells, promoter activity was dependent on an upstream sequence. In BHP 14-9 cells, sequence in the basal promoter region contributed notably to the overall promoter activity. RT-PCR or Western blot analysis indicated that hepatocyte nuclear factor-1beta (HNF-1beta) was expressed in only papillary cancer cell lines with high NNMT gene expression. HNF-1beta was not expressed or expressed very weakly in other papillary, follicular, and Hurthle cancer cell lines and primary cultures of normal thyroid cells and benign thyroid conditions. A HNF-1 binding site was identified in the NNMT basal promoter region. Mutations in this site decreased NNMT promoter activity in the HNF-1beta-positive BHP 2-7 cells, but not in the HNF-1beta-negative BHP 14-9 cells. HNF-1beta bound to the HNF-1 site specifically as a homodimer as determined by gel retardation assays with HNF-1beta-specific antibody. Cotransfection of a HNF-1beta expression plasmid increased NNMT promoter activity significantly in both HNF-1beta-positive and -negative thyroid cancer cell lines and Hep G2 liver cancer cells. Furthermore, transient expression of HNF-1beta in BHP 14-9 cells increased endogenous NNMT

  1. [Molecular cloning of the DNA sequence of activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides from panda and related species and its application in the research of phylogeny and taxonomy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Xi-Zhong; He, Guang-Xin; Chen, Hong-Wei; Fei, Li-Song

    2002-09-01

    Activin, which is included in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) superfamily of proteins and receptors, is known to have broad-ranging effects in the creatures. The mature peptide of beta A subunit of this gene, one of the most highly conserved sequence, can elevate the basal secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary and FSH is pivotal to organism's reproduction. Reproduction block is one of the main reasons which cause giant panda to extinct. The sequence of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides has been successfully amplified from giant panda, red panda and malayan sun bear's genomic DNA by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a pair of degenerate primers. The PCR products were cloned into the vector pBlueScript+ of Esherichia coli. Sequence analysis of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides shows that the length of this gene segment is the same (359 bp) and there is no intron in all three species. The sequence encodes a peptide of 119 amino acid residues. The homology comparison demonstrates 93.9% DNA homology and 99% homology in amino acid among these three species. Both GenBank blast search result and restriction enzyme map reveal that the sequences of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides of different species are highly conserved during the evolution process. Phylogeny analysis is performed with PHYLIP software package. A consistent phylogeny tree has been drawn with three different methods. The software analysis outcome accords with the academic view that giant panda has a closer relationship to the malayan sun bear than the red panda. Giant panda should be grouped into the bear family (Uersidae) with the malayan sun bear. As to the red panda, it would be better that this animal be grouped into the unique family (red panda family) because of great difference between the red panda and the bears (Uersidae).

  2. Conservation and divergence of autonomous pathway genes in the flowering regulatory network of Beta vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elwafa, Salah F; Büttner, Bianca; Chia, Tansy; Schulze-Buxloh, Gretel; Hohmann, Uwe; Mutasa-Göttgens, Effie; Jung, Christian; Müller, Andreas E

    2011-06-01

    The transition from vegetative growth to reproductive development is a complex process that requires an integrated response to multiple environmental cues and endogenous signals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, which has a facultative requirement for vernalization and long days, the genes of the autonomous pathway function as floral promoters by repressing the central repressor and vernalization-regulatory gene FLC. Environmental regulation by seasonal changes in daylength is under control of the photoperiod pathway and its key gene CO. The root and leaf crop species Beta vulgaris in the caryophyllid clade of core eudicots, which is only very distantly related to Arabidopsis, is an obligate long-day plant and includes forms with or without vernalization requirement. FLC and CO homologues with related functions in beet have been identified, but the presence of autonomous pathway genes which function in parallel to the vernalization and photoperiod pathways has not yet been reported. Here, this begins to be addressed by the identification and genetic mapping of full-length homologues of the RNA-regulatory gene FLK and the chromatin-regulatory genes FVE, LD, and LDL1. When overexpressed in A. thaliana, BvFLK accelerates bolting in the Col-0 background and fully complements the late-bolting phenotype of an flk mutant through repression of FLC. In contrast, complementation analysis of BvFVE1 and the presence of a putative paralogue in beet suggest evolutionary divergence of FVE homologues. It is further shown that BvFVE1, unlike FVE in Arabidopsis, is under circadian clock control. Together, the data provide first evidence for evolutionary conservation of components of the autonomous pathway in B. vulgaris, while also suggesting divergence or subfunctionalization of one gene. The results are likely to be of broader relevance because B. vulgaris expands the spectrum of evolutionarily diverse species which are subject to differential developmental and/or environmental regulation

  3. Polymerase chain reaction-mediated gene synthesis: synthesis of a gene coding for isozyme c of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, K; Fingar, S A; Shah, J; Fyles, J

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis of a gene coding for horseradish peroxidase (HRP, isozyme c; EC 1.11.1.7) is described using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated gene synthesis approach developed in our laboratory. In this approach, all the oligonucleotides making up the gene are ligated in a single step by using the two outer oligonucleotides as PCR primers and the crude ligation mixture as the target. The PCR facilitates synthesis and purification of the gene simultaneously. The gene for HRP was synthesized by ligating all 40 oligonucleotides in a single step followed by PCR amplification. The gene was also synthesized from its fragments by using an overlap extension method similar to the procedure as described [Horton, R. M., Hunt, H. D., Ho, S. N., Pullen, J. K. & Pease, L. R. (1989) Gene 77, 61-68]. A method for combining different DNA fragments, in-frame, by using the PCR was also developed and used to synthesize the HRP gene from its gene fragments. This method is applicable to the synthesis of even larger genes and to combine any DNA fragments in-frame. After the synthesis, preliminary characterization of the HRP gene was also carried out by the PCR to confirm the arrangement of oligonucleotides in the gene. This was done by carrying out the PCR with several sets of primers along the gene and comparing the product sizes with the expected sizes. The gene and the fragments generated by PCR were cloned in Escherichia coli and the sequence was confirmed by manual and automated DNA sequencing. Images PMID:1851991

  4. Polymerase chain reaction-mediated gene synthesis: synthesis of a gene coding for isozyme c of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, K; Fingar, S A; Shah, J; Fyles, J

    1991-05-15

    The synthesis of a gene coding for horseradish peroxidase (HRP, isozyme c; EC 1.11.1.7) is described using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated gene synthesis approach developed in our laboratory. In this approach, all the oligonucleotides making up the gene are ligated in a single step by using the two outer oligonucleotides as PCR primers and the crude ligation mixture as the target. The PCR facilitates synthesis and purification of the gene simultaneously. The gene for HRP was synthesized by ligating all 40 oligonucleotides in a single step followed by PCR amplification. The gene was also synthesized from its fragments by using an overlap extension method similar to the procedure as described [Horton, R. M., Hunt, H. D., Ho, S. N., Pullen, J. K. & Pease, L. R. (1989) Gene 77, 61-68]. A method for combining different DNA fragments, in-frame, by using the PCR was also developed and used to synthesize the HRP gene from its gene fragments. This method is applicable to the synthesis of even larger genes and to combine any DNA fragments in-frame. After the synthesis, preliminary characterization of the HRP gene was also carried out by the PCR to confirm the arrangement of oligonucleotides in the gene. This was done by carrying out the PCR with several sets of primers along the gene and comparing the product sizes with the expected sizes. The gene and the fragments generated by PCR were cloned in Escherichia coli and the sequence was confirmed by manual and automated DNA sequencing.

  5. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for enzymatically active fragments of the Bacillus polymyxa beta-amylase.

    PubMed

    Kawazu, T; Nakanishi, Y; Uozumi, N; Sasaki, T; Yamagata, H; Tsukagoshi, N; Udaka, S

    1987-04-01

    The gene encoding beta-amylase was cloned from Bacillus polymyxa 72 into Escherichia coli HB101 by inserting HindIII-generated DNA fragments into the HindIII site of pBR322. The 4.8-kilobase insert was shown to direct the synthesis of beta-amylase. A 1.8-kilobase AccI-AccI fragment of the donor strain DNA was sufficient for the beta-amylase synthesis. Homologous DNA was found by Southern blot analysis to be present only in B. polymyxa 72 and not in other bacteria such as E. coli or B. subtilis. B. polymyxa, as well as E. coli harboring the cloned DNA, was found to produce enzymatically active fragments of beta-amylases (70,000, 56,000, or 58,000, and 42,000 daltons), which were detected in situ by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the cloned 3.1-kilobase DNA revealed that it contains one open reading frame of 2,808 nucleotides without a translational stop codon. The deduced amino acid sequence for these 2,808 nucleotides encoding a secretory precursor of the beta-amylase protein is 936 amino acids including a signal peptide of 33 or 35 residues at its amino-terminal end. The existence of a beta-amylase of larger than 100,000 daltons, which was predicted on the basis of the results of nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene, was confirmed by examining culture supernatants after various cultivation periods. It existed only transiently during cultivation, but the multiform beta-amylases described above existed for a long time. The large beta-amylase (approximately 160,000 daltons) existed for longer in the presence of a protease inhibitor such as chymostatin, suggesting that proteolytic cleavage is the cause of the formation of multiform beta-amylases.

  6. Two peptides derived from trout IL-1beta have different stimulatory effects on immune gene expression after intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suhee; Secombes, Chris J

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the biological activities of two IL-1beta derivatives on immune gene expression (i.e. IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-8, MX, lysozyme) in fish using RT-PCR analysis, as a means to establish whether such peptides have value as immunostimulants in vivo. Two functional domains (P1 and P3) of the trout IL-1beta molecule were produced as synthetic peptides and tested for biological effects following intraperitoneal administration into rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). P1 and P3 showed different regulatory effects on the examined genes. P1 did not stimulate proinflammatory gene expression but induced rapid expression of the antiviral gene MX. In contrast, P3 showed more widespread stimulatory effects, and increased expression of the proinflammatory genes IL-1beta and IL-8, as well as the antibacterial lysozyme gene. Such data confirm that it is possible to produce bioactive peptide derivatives of cytokine molecules, and in addition that it is possible to engineer the peptides for different stimulatory repertoires, that may have value in enhancing particular types of immune response to enhance disease resistance in fish.

  7. Altered ceramide acyl chain length and ceramide synthase gene expression in Parkinson’s disease.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sarah K; Li, Hongyun; Muñoz, Sonia Sanz; Knoch, Bianca; Batterham, Marijka; Murphy, Karen E; Halliday, Glenda M; Garner, Brett

    2014-04-01

    Genetic studies have provided increasing evidence that ceramide homeostasis plays a role in neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is known that the relative amounts of different ceramide molecular species, as defined by their fatty acyl chain length, regulate ceramide function in lipid membranes and in signaling pathways. In the present study we used a comprehensive sphingolipidomic case-control approach to determine the effects of PD on ceramide composition in postmortem brain tissue from the anterior cingulate cortex (a region with significant PD pathology) and the occipital cortex (spared in PD), also assessing mRNA expression of the major ceramide synthase genes that regulate ceramide acyl chain composition in the same tissue using quantitative PCR. In PD anterior cingulate cortex but not occipital cortex, total ceramide and sphingomyelin levels were reduced from control levels by 53% (P < 0.001) and 42% (P < 0.001), respectively. Of the 13 ceramide and 15 sphingomyelin molecular lipid species identified and quantified, there was a significant shift in the ceramide acyl chain composition toward shorter acyl chain length in the PD anterior cingulate cortex. This PD-associated change in ceramide acyl chain composition was accompanied by an upregulation of ceramide synthase-1 gene expression, which we consider may represent a response to reduced ceramide levels. These data suggest a significant shift in ceramide function in lipid membranes and signaling pathways occurs in regions with PD pathology. Identifying the regulatory mechanisms precipitating this change may provide novel targets for future therapeutics.

  8. Candidate Gene Study of TRAIL and TRAIL Receptors: Association with Response to Interferon Beta Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Órpez-Zafra, Teresa; Pinto-Medel, María Jesús; Oliver-Martos, Begoña; Ortega-Pinazo, Jesús; Arnáiz, Carlos; Guijarro-Castro, Cristina; Varadé, Jezabel; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    TRAIL and TRAIL Receptor genes have been implicated in Multiple Sclerosis pathology as well as in the response to IFN beta therapy. The objective of our study was to evaluate the association of these genes in relation to the age at disease onset (AAO) and to the clinical response upon IFN beta treatment in Spanish MS patients. We carried out a candidate gene study of TRAIL, TRAILR-1, TRAILR-2, TRAILR-3 and TRAILR-4 genes. A total of 54 SNPs were analysed in 509 MS patients under IFN beta treatment, and an additional cohort of 226 MS patients was used to validate the results. Associations of rs1047275 in TRAILR-2 and rs7011559 in TRAILR-4 genes with AAO under an additive model did not withstand Bonferroni correction. In contrast, patients with the TRAILR-1 rs20576-CC genotype showed a better clinical response to IFN beta therapy compared with patients carrying the A-allele (recessive model: p = 8.88×10−4, pc = 0.048, OR = 0.30). This SNP resulted in a non synonymous substitution of Glutamic acid to Alanine in position 228 (E228A), a change previously associated with susceptibility to different cancer types and risk of metastases, suggesting a lack of functionality of TRAILR-1. In order to unravel how this amino acid change in TRAILR-1 would affect to death signal, we performed a molecular modelling with both alleles. Neither TRAIL binding sites in the receptor nor the expression levels of TRAILR-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets (monocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells) were modified, suggesting that this SNP may be altering the death signal by some other mechanism. These findings show a role for TRAILR-1 gene variations in the clinical outcome of IFN beta therapy that might have relevance as a biomarker to predict the response to IFN beta in MS. PMID:23658636

  9. The unusual coordination abilities of the peptides with betaXaaHisGlyHis sequence. The influence of structural modification of the peptide chain on the copper(II) binding.

    PubMed

    Brasuń, Justyna; Czapor, Hanna; Matera-Witkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kotynia, Aleksandra; Sochacka, Aleksandra; Cebrat, Marek

    2010-07-28

    The coordination abilities of tetrapeptides containing beta-amino acids towards Cu(II) ions are presented. The studied tetrapeptides were: Ac-betaAlaHisGlyHis, betaAlaHisGlyHis, Ac-betaAspHisGlyHis, betaAspHisGlyHis, Ac-betaAspHisGly-dHis and betaAspHisGly-dHis. Thorough potentiometric titrations were carried out to establish the stoichiometry of the resulting metal-ligand complexes and the role of free -alphaCOO(-) side chain group in metal binding. The copper(II) coordination mode of the complexes was investigated by performing detailed spectroscopic analyses (UV-Vis, EPR, CD) in strict correlation with potentiometric measurements.

  10. Revised nomenclature for the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase gene family.

    PubMed

    Mashek, Douglas G; Bornfeldt, Karin E; Coleman, Rosalind A; Berger, Johannes; Bernlohr, David A; Black, Paul; DiRusso, Concetta C; Farber, Steven A; Guo, Wen; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Khodiyar, Varsha; Kuypers, Frans A; Maltais, Lois J; Nebert, Daniel W; Renieri, Alessandra; Schaffer, Jean E; Stahl, Andreas; Watkins, Paul A; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Yamamoto, Tokuo T

    2004-10-01

    By consensus, the acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) community, with the advice of the human and mouse genome nomenclature committees, has revised the nomenclature for the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases. ACS is the family root name, and the human and mouse genes for the long-chain ACSs are termed ACSL1,3-6 and Acsl1,3-6, respectively. Splice variants of ACSL3, -4, -5, and -6 are cataloged. Suggestions for naming other family members and for the nonmammalian acyl-CoA synthetases are made.

  11. DNA methylation of retrotransposons, DNA transposons and genes in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Falk; Schmidt, Martin; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Schmidt, Thomas

    2017-03-03

    The methylation of cytosines shapes the epigenetic landscape of plant genomes, coordinates transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, represses activity of transposable elements (TEs), affects gene expression, and, hence, can influence the phenotype. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris), an important crop that accounts for 30% of the worldwide sugar needs, has a relatively small genome size (758 Mbp) consisting of approximately 485 Mbp repetitive DNA (64%) in particular, satellite DNA, retrotransposons, and DNA transposons. Genome-wide cytosine methylation in the sugar beet genome was studied in leaves and leaf-derived callus with a focus on repetitive sequences, including retrotransposons and DNA transposons, the major groups of repetitive DNA sequences and compared with gene methylation. Genes showed a specific methylation pattern for CG, CHG (H=A, C, and T), and CHH sites, whereas the TE pattern differed, depending on the classes 1 (retrotransposons) and 2 (DNA transposons), respectively. Along genes and TEs, the CG and CHG methylation was higher than that of adjacent genomic regions. In contrast to the relatively low CHH methylation in retrotransposons and genes, the level of CHH methylation in DNA transposons was strongly increased, pointing toward a functional role of asymmetric methylation in DNA transposon silencing. Comparison of genome-wide DNA methylation between sugar beet leaves and callus revealed a differential methylation upon tissue culture. Potential epialleles were hypomethylated (lower methylation) at CG and CHG sites in retrotransposons and genes and hypermethylated (higher methylation) at CHH sites in DNA transposons of callus when compared to leaves. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by leukotoxin gene-specific hybridization and polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed Central

    Tønjum, T; Haas, R

    1993-01-01

    Eleven strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from cases of systemic infections, local abscesses, and periodontitis were identified by genetic assays using the leukotoxin gene as the target. We have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, based on the leukotoxin structural gene of this pathogen, which clearly identified all tested strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and separated them from the closely related Haemophilus aphrophilus as well as other bacterial species. Furthermore, DNA-DNA hybridization was performed with the cloned partial leukotoxin structural gene (lktA) as a probe, which again clearly distinguished A. actinomycetemcomitans from H. aphrophilus, parts of the normal oral flora, and species harboring RTX (repeats in toxin) family-related cytotoxins. The PCR fragment amplified from the leukotoxin structural gene gave results similar to those given by the cloned leukotoxin gene when used as a probe in hybridization experiments. The hybridization and PCR assays described here are fundamental improvements for the identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:8349764

  13. A gene encoding the major beta tubulin of the mitotic spindle in Physarum polycephalum plasmodia

    SciTech Connect

    Burland, T.G.; Paul, E.C.A.; Oetliker, M.; Dove, W.F.

    1988-03-01

    The multinucleate plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is unusual among eucaryotic cells in that it uses tubulins only in mitotic-spindle microtubules; cytoskeletal, flagellar, and centriolar microtubules are absent in this cell type. The authors identified a ..beta..-tubulin cDNA clone, ..beta..105, which is shown to correspond to the transcript of the betC ..beta..-tubulin locus and to encode ..beta..2 tubulin, the ..beta.. tubulin expressed specifically in the plasmodium and used exclusively in the mitotic spindle. Physarum amoebae utilize tubulins in the cytoskeleton, centrioles, and flagella, in addition to the mitotic spindle. Sequence analysis shows that ..beta..2 tubulin is only 83% identical to the two ..beta.. tubulins expressed in amoebae. This compares with 70 to 83% identity between Physarum ..beta..2 tubulin and the ..beta.. tubulins of yeasts, fungi, alga, trypanosome, fruit fly, chicken, and mouse. On the other hand, Physarum ..beta..2 tubulin is no more similar to, for example, Aspergillus ..beta.. tubulins than it is to those of Drosophila melanogaster or mammals. Several eucaryotes express at least one widely diverged ..beta.. tubulin as well as one or more ..beta.. tubulins that conform more closely to a consensus ..beta..-tubulin sequence. The authors suggest that ..beta..-tubulins diverge more when their expression pattern is restricted, especially when this restriction results in their use in fewer functions. This divergence among ..beta.. tubulins could have resulted through neutral drift. For example, exclusive use of Physarum ..beta..2 tubulin in the spindle may have allowed more amino acid substitutions than would be functionally tolerable in the ..beta.. tubulins that are utilized in multiple microtubular organelles. Alternatively, restricted use of ..beta.. tubulins may allow positive selection to operate more freely to refine ..beta..-tubulin function.

  14. Integron-associated mobile gene cassettes code for folded proteins: the structure of Bal32a, a new member of the adaptable alpha+beta barrel family.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew; Wu, Peter S-C; Harrop, Stephen J; Schaeffer, Patrick M; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Gillings, Michael R; Holmes, Andrew J; Nevalainen, K M Helena; Stokes, H W; Otting, Gottfried; Dixon, Nicholas E; Curmi, Paul M G; Mabbutt, Bridget C

    2005-03-11

    The wide-ranging physiology and large genetic variability observed for prokaryotes is largely attributed, not to the prokaryotic genome itself, but rather to mechanisms of lateral gene transfer. Cassette PCR has been used to sample the integron/gene cassette metagenome from different natural environments without laboratory cultivation of the host organism, and without prior knowledge of any target protein sequence. Since over 90% of cassette genes are unrelated to any sequence in the current databases, it is not clear whether these genes code for folded functional proteins. We have selected a sample of eight cassette-encoded genes with no known homologs; five have been isolated as soluble protein products and shown by biophysical techniques to be folded. In solution, at least three of these proteins organise as stable oligomeric assemblies. The tertiary structure of one of these, Bal32a derived from a contaminated soil site, has been solved by X-ray crystallography to 1.8 A resolution. From the three-dimensional structure, Bal32a is found to be a member of the highly adaptable alpha+beta barrel family of transport proteins and enzymes. In Bal32a, the barrel cavity is unusually deep and inaccessible to solvent. Polar side-chains in its interior are reminiscent of catalytic sites of limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase and nogalonic acid methyl ester cyclase. These studies demonstrate the viability of direct sampling of mobile DNA as a route for the discovery of novel proteins.

  15. Characterization of Acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms in pancreatic beta cells: Gene silencing shows participation of ACSL3 and ACSL4 in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Israr-Ul H; Longacre, Melissa J; Stoker, Scott W; Kendrick, Mindy A; O'Neill, Lucas M; Zitur, Laura J; Fernandez, Luis A; Ntambi, James M; MacDonald, Michael J

    2017-03-15

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) convert fatty acids to fatty acyl-CoAs to regulate various physiologic processes. We characterized the ACSL isoforms in a cell line of homogeneous rat beta cells (INS-1 832/13 cells) and human pancreatic islets. ACSL4 and ACSL3 proteins were present in the beta cells and human and rat pancreatic islets and concentrated in insulin secretory granules and less in mitochondria and negligible in other intracellular organelles. ACSL1 and ACSL6 proteins were not seen in INS-1 832/13 cells or pancreatic islets. ACSL5 protein was seen only in INS-1 832/13 cells. With shRNA-mediated gene silencing we developed stable ACSL knockdown cell lines from INS-1 832/13 cells. Glucose-stimulated insulin release was inhibited ∼50% with ACSL4 and ACSL3 knockdown and unaffected in cell lines with knockdown of ACSL5, ACLS6 and ACSL1. Lentivirus shRNA-mediated gene silencing of ACSL4 and ACSL3 in human pancreatic islets inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin release. ACSL4 and ACSL3 knockdown cells showed inhibition of ACSL enzyme activity more with arachidonate than with palmitate as a substrate, consistent with their preference for unsaturated fatty acids as substrates. ACSL4 knockdown changed the patterns of fatty acids in phosphatidylserines and phosphatidylethanolamines. The results show the involvement of ACLS4 and ACLS3 in insulin secretion.

  16. Analyzing the CDR3 Repertoire with respect to TCR-Beta Chain V-D-J and V-J Rearrangements in Peripheral T Cells using HTS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Long; Yang, Liwen; Bin Shi; He, Xiaoyan; Peng, Aihua; Li, Yuehong; Zhang, Teng; Sun, Suhong; Ma, Rui; Yao, Xinsheng

    2016-07-12

    V-D-J rearrangement of the TCR-beta chain follows the 12/23 rule and the beyond 12/23 restriction. Currently, the proportion and characteristics of TCR-beta chain V-J rearrangement is unclear. We used high-throughput sequencing to compare and analyze TCR-beta chain V-J rearrangement and V-D-J rearrangement in the CDR3 repertoires of T cells from the PBMCs of six volunteers and six BALB/c mice. The results showed that the percentage of V-J rearrangement of the volunteers was approximately 0.7%, whereas that of the mice was 2.2%. The clonality of mice V-J rearrangement was significantly reduced compared with the V-D-J rearrangement, whereas the clonality of human V-J rearrangement was slightly reduced compared with the V-D-J rearrangement. V-J rearrangement in CDR3 involved the significant usage of N, S, F and L, whereas V-D-J rearrangement in CDR3 involved the significant usage of R and G. The levels of V deletion and J deletion in V-J rearrangement were significantly reduced compared with V-D-J rearrangement. TRBD and TRBJ usage in V-J rearrangement differed from that of V-D-J rearrangement, including dominant usage of TRBV and TRBJ and their pairing. Taken together, these results provide new ideas and technology for studies of V-D-J rearrangement and V-J rearrangement in the CDR3 repertoire.

  17. Evidence for gene conversion among immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region genes.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S H; Rudikoff, S

    1984-03-01

    We have previously reported that the VH region amino acid sequence of a phosphocholine (PC)-binding hybridoma antibody of CBA/J origin, HP101 6G6 (6G6), differs extensively from the VH regions of other PC-binding antibodies. The sequence of 6G6 VH appears to be derived from a gene homologous to the BALB/c V11 gene, a member of the PC VH (T15 VH) gene family not normally used to encode PC-binding antibodies. The 6G6 VH sequence differs from the translated sequence of V11 by six amino acids, four of which occur at the same position in other members of this gene family. This coincidence led to the proposal that the 6G6 VH gene was derived by gene conversion involving three genes of the PC VH gene family. We report here the nucleic acid sequence of the rearranged VH gene of hybridoma 6G6. This sequence supports our previous suggestion of gene conversion by confirming those differences, relative to the BALB/c V11 gene sequence, that are encoded by other members of this gene family, and extends this correlation to include three silent base pair substitutions as well. In addition, 5' noncoding region sequence and Southern blot analysis using probes derived from the coding and 5' noncoding regions confirm that the 6G6 VH gene is likely to be derived from the V11 homologue in CBA/J mice, and suggest that all three genes believed to be involved in the generation of the 6G6 VH gene are present in the CBA/J genome, a prerequisite for their involvement in gene conversion.

  18. Insertion of the beta Geo promoter trap into the Fem1c gene of ROSA3 mice.

    PubMed

    Schlamp, Cassandra L; Thliveris, Andrew T; Li, Yan; Kohl, Louis P; Knop, Claudia; Dietz, Joel A; Larsen, Inna V; Imesch, Pascal; Pinto, Lawrence H; Nickells, Robert W

    2004-05-01

    ROSA3 mice were developed by retroviral insertion of the beta Geo gene trap vector. Adult ROSA3 mice exhibit widespread expression of the trap gene in epithelial cells found in most organs. In the central nervous system the highest expression of beta Geo is found in CA1 pyramidal cells of the hippocampus, Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, and ganglion cells of the retina. Characterization of the genomic insertion site for beta Geo in ROSA3 mice shows that the trap vector is located in the first intron of Fem1c, a gene homologous to the sex-determining gene fem-1 of Caenorhabditis elegans. Transcription of the Rosa3 allele (R3) yields a spliced message that includes the first exon of Fem1c and the beta Geo coding region. Although normal processing of the Fem1c transcript is disrupted in homozygous Rosa3 (Fem1c(R3/R3)) mice, some tissues show low levels of a partially processed transcript containing exons 2 and 3. Since the entire coding region of Fem1c is located in these two exons, Fem1c(R3/R3) mice may still be able to express a putative FEM1C protein. To this extent, Fem1c(R3/R3) mice show no adverse effects in their sexual development or fertility or in the attenuation of neuronal cell death, another function that has been attributed to both fem-1 and a second mouse homolog, Fem1b. Examination of beta Geo expression in ganglion cells after exposure to damaging stimuli indicates that protein levels are rapidly depleted prior to cell death, making the beta Geo reporter gene a potentially useful marker to study early molecular events in damaged neurons.

  19. Gene fusions of signal sequences with a modified beta-glucuronidase gene results in retention of the beta-glucuronidase protein in the secretory pathway/plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Yan, X; Gonzales, R A; Wagner, G J

    1997-11-01

    Signal sequences and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signals are known to play central roles in targeting and translocation in the secretory pathway, but molecular aspects about their involvement are poorly understood. We tested the effectiveness of deduced signal sequences from various genes (hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein [HRGP] from Phaseolus vulgaris; Serpin from Manduca sexta) to direct a modified beta-glucuronidase (GUS) protein into the secretory pathway in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). The reporter protein was not secreted to the cell wall/extracellular space as monitored using extracellular fluid analysis (low- or high-ionic-strength conditions) but occurred in membranes with a density of 1.16 to 1.20 g/mL. Membrane-bound GUS equilibrated with the plasma membrane (PM) and the ER on linear sucrose gradients with or without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, suggesting that GUS associates with the ER and the PM. Confocal microscopy of fixed cultured cells prepared from GUS control and HRGP signal peptide (SP)-GUS-expressing plants suggested only cytosolic localization in GUS-expressing plants but substantial peripheral localization in HRGP SP-GUS plants, which is consistent with GUS being associated with the PM. Aqueous two-phase partitioning of microsomal membranes from HRGP SP-GUS and Serpin SP-GUS transgenic leaves also indicated that GUS activity was enriched in the ER and the PM. These observations, together with hydrophobic moment plot analysis, suggest that properties of the SP-GUS protein result in its retention in the secretory pathway and PM.

  20. Gene fusions of signal sequences with a modified beta-glucuronidase gene results in retention of the beta-glucuronidase protein in the secretory pathway/plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, X; Gonzales, R A; Wagner, G J

    1997-01-01

    Signal sequences and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signals are known to play central roles in targeting and translocation in the secretory pathway, but molecular aspects about their involvement are poorly understood. We tested the effectiveness of deduced signal sequences from various genes (hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein [HRGP] from Phaseolus vulgaris; Serpin from Manduca sexta) to direct a modified beta-glucuronidase (GUS) protein into the secretory pathway in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). The reporter protein was not secreted to the cell wall/extracellular space as monitored using extracellular fluid analysis (low- or high-ionic-strength conditions) but occurred in membranes with a density of 1.16 to 1.20 g/mL. Membrane-bound GUS equilibrated with the plasma membrane (PM) and the ER on linear sucrose gradients with or without ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, suggesting that GUS associates with the ER and the PM. Confocal microscopy of fixed cultured cells prepared from GUS control and HRGP signal peptide (SP)-GUS-expressing plants suggested only cytosolic localization in GUS-expressing plants but substantial peripheral localization in HRGP SP-GUS plants, which is consistent with GUS being associated with the PM. Aqueous two-phase partitioning of microsomal membranes from HRGP SP-GUS and Serpin SP-GUS transgenic leaves also indicated that GUS activity was enriched in the ER and the PM. These observations, together with hydrophobic moment plot analysis, suggest that properties of the SP-GUS protein result in its retention in the secretory pathway and PM. PMID:9390428

  1. Glycosaminoglycan storage in cultured neonatal murine mucopolysaccharidosis type VII neuroglial cells and correction by beta-glucuronidase gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R M; Wolfe, J H

    1997-05-01

    The inherited deficiency of beta-glucuronidase activity causes the lysosomal storage disorder mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VII (Sly disease). The sequential catabolism of glycosaminoglycans in lysosomes is blocked, and undegraded substrates accumulate in cells of many tissues, including neurons and glia in the brain. To evaluate the deficient metabolic pathway, primary cultures of mixed brain cells were established from newborn MPS VII mice. beta-Glucuronidase levels and glycosaminoglycan accumulation were studied in normal, carrier, and MPS VII cells. Retroviral vector-mediated transfer of a normal beta-glucuronidase cDNA corrected the enzymatic deficiency in MPS VII cells and restored glycosaminoglycan catabolism to normal. High levels of beta-glucuronidase expression were sustained in vector-corrected nondividing glial cell cultures for >2 months. These studies provide an in vitro model for evaluating somatic gene transfer in neural cells affected in mucopolysaccharidoses.

  2. Detection of three nonsense mutations and one missense mutation in the interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] chain gene in SCIDX1 that differently affect the mRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Markiewicz, S.; Fischer, A.; Saint Basile, G. de ); Subtil, A.; Dautry-Varsat, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] (IL-2R[gamma]) chain gene encodes a 64-kDa protein that not only composes the high-affinity form of the IL-2 binding receptor in association with the 2R [alpha] and [beta] chains, but also participates in at least the IL-4 and IL-7 receptor complexes. Mutations in this gene have recently been shown to cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCIDX1). This disease of the immune system results from an early block of T lymphocyte and natural killer (NK) cell differentiation, which leads to a severe cellular and humoral immune defect that is lethal unless treated by bone marrow transplantation. Analysis of the IL-2R[gamma] gene in SCIDX1 patients has revealed the presence of heterogeneous mutations principally located in the extracellular domain of the molecule. We report here three intraexonic mutations and one deletion in the IL-2R[gamma] gene in four SCIDX1 patients. These mutations appear to differentially affect RNA processing, either by decreasing IL-2R[gamma] mRNA level or by the skipping of a constitutive exon. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Rearrangement of immunoglobulin light chain genes in the chicken occurs prior to colonization of the embryonic bursa of Fabricius.

    PubMed Central

    Mansikka, A; Sandberg, M; Lassila, O; Toivanen, P

    1990-01-01

    We have applied polymerase-chain-reaction-directed immunoglobulin gene analysis to study the embryonic differentiation of chicken B cells. Immunoglobulin light chain DNA segments in the rearranged configuration were amplified from cells of the intraembryonic mesenchyme as early as day 7 of incubation. We showed by sequencing that the rearranged variable region genes in these early B-cell progenitors were not different from the germ-line V lambda 1 gene (the single functional light chain variable region gene in chickens). In the bursal B lymphocytes, on the other hand, clear gene conversion events were first observed at day 15 of embryonic development. The present data indicate that rearrangement of light chain genes in the chicken occurs independently of the bursa of Fabricius and that diversification of the variable region begins only later, when the surface immunoglobulin-positive B cells are proliferating in the bursal follicles. Images PMID:2123557

  4. Distinct functions for thyroid hormone receptors alpha and beta in brain development indicated by differential expression of receptor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, D; Hallböök, F; Persson, H; Vennström, B

    1991-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for correct brain development, and since vertebrates express two thyroid hormone receptor genes (TR alpha and beta), we investigated TR gene expression during chick brain ontogenesis. In situ hybridization analyses showed that TR alpha mRNA was widely expressed from early embryonic stages, whereas TR beta was sharply induced after embryonic day 19 (E19), coinciding with the known hormone-sensitive period. Differential expression of TR mRNAs was striking in the cerebellum: TR beta mRNA was induced in white matter and granule cells after the migratory phase, suggesting a main TR beta function in late, hormone-dependent glial and neuronal maturation. In contrast, TR alpha mRNA was expressed in the earlier proliferating and migrating granule cells, and in the more mature granular and Purkinje cell layers after hatching, indicating a role for TR alpha in both immature and mature neural cells. Surprisingly, both TR genes were expressed in early cerebellar outgrowth at E9, before known hormone requirements, with TR beta mRNA restricted to the ventricular epithelium of the metencephalon and TR alpha expressed in migrating cells and the early granular layer. The results implicate TRs with distinct functions in the early embryonic brain as well as in the late phase of hormone requirement. Images PMID:1991448

  5. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the human HSD11K gene encoding the kidney (type 2) isozyme of 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Rogerson, F.M.; Mune, T.; White, P.C.

    1995-09-01

    11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11{beta}HSD) converts glucocorticoids to inactive products and is thus thought to confer specificity for aldosterone on the type I mineralocorticoid receptor in the kidney. Recent studies indicate the presence of at least two isozymes of 11{beta}HSD. In vitro, the NAD{sup +}-dependent kidney (type 2) isozyme catalyzes 11{beta}-dehydrogenase but not reductase reactions, whereas the NADP{sup +}-dependent liver (type 1) isozyme catalyzes both reactions. We have now characterized the human gene encoding kidney 11{beta}HSD (HSD11K). A bacteriophage P1 clone was isolated after screening a human genomic library by hybridization with sheep HSD11K cDNA. The gene consists of 5 exons spread over 6 kb. The nucleotide binding domain lies in the first exon are GC-rich (80%), suggesting that the gene may be transcriptionally regulated by factors that recognize GC-rich sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes with a positive P1 clone localized the gene to chromosome 16q22. In contrast, the HSD11L (liver isozyme) gene is located on chromosome 1 and contains 6 exons; the coding sequences of these genes are only 21% identical. HSD11K is expressed at high levels in the placenta and kidney of midgestation human fetuses and at lower levels in lung and testes. Different transcriptional start sites are utilized in kidney and placenta. These data should be applicable to genetic analysis of the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess, which may represent a deficiency of 11{beta}HSD. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  6. The nagA gene of Penicillium chrysogenum encoding beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Díez, Bruno; Rodríguez-Sáiz, Marta; de la Fuente, Juan Luis; Moreno, Miguel Angel; Barredo, José Luis

    2005-01-15

    We purified the beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase from the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum and its N-terminal sequence was determined, showing the presence of a mixture of two proteins (P1 and P2). A genomic DNA fragment was cloned by using degenerated oligonucleotides from the Nt sequences. The nucleotide sequence showed the presence of an ORF (nagA gene) lacking introns, with a length of 1791 bp, and coding for a protein of 66.5 kDa showing similarity to acetylglucosaminidases. The NagA deduced protein includes P1 and P2 as incomplete forms of the mature protein, and contains putative features for protein maturation: an 18-amino acid signal peptide, a KEX2 processing site, and four glycosylation motifs. The sequence just after the signal peptide corresponds to P2 and that after the KEX2 site to P1. The nagA transcript has a size of about 2.1 kb and is present until the end of the fermentation process for penicillin production. NagA is one of the most largely represented proteins in P. chrysogenum, increasing along the fermentation process. The suitability of the nagA promoter (PnagA) for gene expression in fungi was demonstrated by expressing the bleomycin resistance gene (ble(R)) from Streptoalloteichus hindustanus in P. chrysogenum.

  7. Ectopic mitotic recombination in Drosophila probed with bacterial beta-galactosidase gene-based reporter transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bärtsch, S; Dücker, K; Würgler, F E; Sengstag, C

    1997-01-01

    Plasmids were constructed to investigate homologous mitotic recombination in Drosophila cells. Heteroalleles containing truncated but overlapping segments of the bacterial beta-galactosidase gene (lacZ) were positioned either on separate plasmids or as direct repeats on the same chromosome. Recombination reconstituted a functional lacZgene leading to expression of LacZ+activity detectable by histochemical staining. High extrachromosomal recombination (ECR) frequencies between unlinked heteroalleles were observed upon transient co-transfection into Drosophila melanogaster Schneider line 2 (S2) cells. Stably transfected cells containing the lacZ heteroalleles linked on a chromosome exhibited intrachromosomal recombination (ICR) frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than ECR frequencies. Recombination was inducible by exposing the cells to ethyl methanesulphonate or mitomycin C. Recombination products were characterized by multiplex PCR analysis and unequal sister chromatid recombination was found as the predominant mechanism reconstituting the lacZ gene. To investigate recombination in vivo imaginal disc cells from transgenic larvae carrying the reporter gene on the X chromosome were isolated and stained for LacZ+ activity. The presence of a few LacZ+ clones indicated that mitotic recombination events occurred at frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding event in cultured cells and late during larval development. PMID:9380517

  8. A systematic optimization of medium chain fatty acid biosynthesis via the reverse beta-oxidation cycle in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Xia; Xia, Xiudong; Dong, Mingsheng

    2017-04-06

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs, 6-10 carbons) are valuable precursors to many industrial biofuels and chemicals, recently engineered reversal of the β-oxidation (r-BOX) cycle has been proposed as a potential platform for efficient synthesis of MCFAs. Previous studies have made many exciting achievements on functionally characterizing four core enzymes of this r-BOX cycle. However, the information about bottleneck nodes in this cycle is elusive. Here, a quantitative assessment of the inherent limitations of this cycle was conducted to capitalize on its potential. The selection of the core β-oxidation reversal enzymes in conjunction with acetyl-CoA synthetase endowed the ability to synthesize about 1g/L MCFAs. Furthermore, a gene dosage experiment was developed to identify two rate-limiting enzymes (acetyl-CoA synthetase and thiolase). The de novo pathway was then separated into two modules at thiolase and MCFA production titer increased to 2.8g/L after evaluating different construct environments. Additionally, the metabolism of host organism was reprogrammed to the desired biochemical product by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference system, resulted in a final MCFA production of 3.8g/L. These findings described here identified the inherent limitations of r-BOX cycle and further unleashed the lipogenic potential of this cycle, thus paving the way for the development of a bacterial platform for microbial production of high-value oleo-chemicals from low-value carbons in a sustainable and environmentally friendly manner.

  9. Early peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulated genes involved in expansion of pancreatic beta cell mass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The progression towards type 2 diabetes depends on the allostatic response of pancreatic beta cells to synthesise and secrete enough insulin to compensate for insulin resistance. The endocrine pancreas is a plastic tissue able to expand or regress in response to the requirements imposed by physiological and pathophysiological states associated to insulin resistance such as pregnancy, obesity or ageing, but the mechanisms mediating beta cell mass expansion in these scenarios are not well defined. We have recently shown that ob/ob mice with genetic ablation of PPARγ2, a mouse model known as the POKO mouse failed to expand its beta cell mass. This phenotype contrasted with the appropriate expansion of the beta cell mass observed in their obese littermate ob/ob mice. Thus, comparison of these models islets particularly at early ages could provide some new insights on early PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses involved in the process of beta cell mass expansion Results Here we have investigated PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses occurring during the early stages of beta cell adaptation to insulin resistance in wild type, ob/ob, PPARγ2 KO and POKO mice. We have identified genes known to regulate both the rate of proliferation and the survival signals of beta cells. Moreover we have also identified new pathways induced in ob/ob islets that remained unchanged in POKO islets, suggesting an important role for PPARγ in maintenance/activation of mechanisms essential for the continued function of the beta cell. Conclusions Our data suggest that the expansion of beta cell mass observed in ob/ob islets is associated with the activation of an immune response that fails to occur in POKO islets. We have also indentified other PPARγ dependent differentially regulated pathways including cholesterol biosynthesis, apoptosis through TGF-β signaling and decreased oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:22208362

  10. Targeting of lacZ reporter gene expression with radioiodine-labelled phenylethyl-beta- d-thiogalactopyranoside.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Han; Byun, Sang Sung; Choi, Joon Hun; Paik, Jin-Young; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2004-03-01

    There has recently been increasing interest in the development of radioprobes that specifically target proteins transcribed from expression of reporter genes of interest. The purpose of this study was to develop a radioprobe that targets one of the most widely used reporter genes, the bacterial lacZ gene. We synthesised and purified radioiodine-labelled phenylethyl-beta- d-thiogalactopyranoside (PETG), a competitive inhibitor specific against Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. We showed that [(125)I]iodo-PETG specifically binds to beta-galactosidase as verified by column chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after incubation of radiotracer with the protein. We also showed through enzyme kinetic studies that iodo-PETG retains inhibitory action against beta-galactosidase activity. COS-7 cells infected with a recombinant adenovirus expressing the lacZ gene had viral titre-dependent enhancements in [(125)I]iodo-PETG uptake ( r(2)=0.897; P=0.001), which reached up to 642.5%+/-16.7% of control levels ( P<0.00001). Moreover, the level of uptake was highly correlated to luminescent measurements of beta-galactosidase activity ( r(2)=0.878; P<0.0001). These results confirm that radioiodine-labelled PETG specifically targets beta-galactosidase and that its uptake rates faithfully reflect levels of expression of the lacZ reporter gene. Further investigations were performed in nude mice bearing human neuroblastoma tumours transferred with the lacZ gene. Compared with control tumours, lacZ-expressing tumours were slightly better visualised on [(123)I]iodo-PETG images and had a modest increase in tumour to muscle count ratio (2.6+/-0.2 vs 1.9+/-0.1, P<0.05). The present results provide proof-of-principle for the potential of radiolabelled inhibitors as promising radiotracers to monitor lacZ gene expression levels. Future modifications to improve cell permeability should enhance in vivo contrast levels and may allow the use of radiolabelled beta

  11. Carbamate-linked cationic lipids with different hydrocarbon chains for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jia; Yu, Shijun; Zhu, Jie; Zhi, Defu; Zhao, Yinan; Cui, Shaohui; Zhang, Shubiao

    2016-05-01

    A series of carbamate-linked cationic lipids containing saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbon chains and quaternary ammonium head were designed and synthesized. After recrystallization, carbamate-linked cationic lipids with high purity (over 95%) were obtained. The structures of these lipids were proved by IR spectrum, HR-ESI-MS, HPLC, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. The liposomes were prepared by using these cationic lipids and neutral lipid DOPE. Particle size and zeta-potential were studied to show that they were suitable for gene transfection. The DNA-bonding ability of C12:0, C14:0 and C18:1 cationic liposomes was much better than others. The results of transfection showed that hydrophobic chains of these lipids have great effects on their transfection activity. The lipids bearing C12:0, C14:0 saturated chains or C18:1 unsaturated chain showed relatively higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity. So these cationic lipids could be used as non-viral gene carriers for further studies.

  12. Regulation of nitrogen metabolism, starch utilisation and the beta-hbd-adh1 gene cluster in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Woods, D R; Reid, S J

    1995-10-01

    The successful genetic manipulation of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the increased production of solvents will depend on an understanding of gene structure and regulation in the bacterium. The glutamine synthetase (glnA) gene is regulated by antisense RNA, transcribed from a downstream promoter, in the opposite direction to the glnA gene. An open reading frame (ORF) was detected downstream of the glnA gene, which has sequence homology to response regulators with anti-termination activity and may be involved in sensing nitrogen conditions. The expression of the linked beta-hbd, adh1 and fixB genes was investigated throughout the bacterial growth cycle by RNA hybridisation techniques. The adh1 gene was independently expressed as a 2.4-kb transcript which peaked at 12 h, immediately prior to the solventogenic phase. The beta-hbd and fixB genes were transcribed throughout the acidogenic and solventogenic phases. A regulator gene, regA, which complements a Bacillus subtilis ccpA mutant, has been identified and sequenced from C. acetobutylicum P262. The regA gene repressed the degradation of starch by an uncharacterised C. acetobutylicum gene, and may therefore play a role in the utilisation of carbohydrate substrates in this organism.

  13. Evolution of the Iga Heavy Chain Gene in the Genus Mus

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, B. A.; Golde, T. E.; Schwartz, R. L.; Rudikoff, S.

    1988-01-01

    To examine questions of immunoglobulin gene evolution, the IgA α heavy chain gene from Mus pahari, an evolutionarily distant relative to Mus musculus domesticus, was cloned and sequenced. The sequence, when compared to the IgA gene of BALB/c or human, demonstrated that the IgA gene is evolving in a mosaic fashion with the hinge region accumulating mutations most rapidly and the third domain at a considerably lower frequency. In spite of this pronounced accumulation of mutations, the hinge region appears to maintain the conformation of a random coil. A marked propensity to accumulate replacement over silent site changes in the coding regions was noted, as was a definite codon bias. The possibility that these two phenomena are interrelated is discussed. PMID:2842228

  14. Detection of DNA sequence polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism genes by polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, D.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The glutathione transferase mu gene (GST1) and the debrisoquine hydroxylase gene (CYP2D6) are known to be polymorphic in the human population and have been associated with increased susceptibility to cancer. Smokers with low lymphocyte GST mu activity are at higher risk for lung cancer, while low debrisoquine hydroxylase activity has been correlated with lower risk for lung and bladder cancer. Phenotypic characterization of these polymorphisms by lymphocyte enzyme activity (GST) and urine metabolite ratios (debrisoquine) is cumbersome for population studies. Recent cloning and sequencing of the mutant alleles of these genes has allowed genotyping via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Advantages of PCR approaches are speed, technical simplicity, and minimal sample requirements. This article reviews the PCR-based methods for detection of genetic polymorphisms in human cancer susceptibility genes.

  15. Regulatory elements and structural features of Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein gene for fungal and pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are involved in plant defense. PGIPs are cell wall leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins that are known to inhibit pathogen and pest polygalacturonases (PGs) during the infection process. Several sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes (BvPGIP) were clon...

  16. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, P M; Kornberg, A; Sakakibara, Y

    1981-01-01

    An Escherichia coli mutant, dnaN59, stops DNA synthesis promptly upon a shift to a high temperature; the wild-type dnaN gene carried in a transducing phage encodes a polypeptide of about 41,000 daltons [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553; Yuasa, S. & Sakakibara, Y. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 180, 267-273]. We now find that the product of dnaN gene is the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, the principal DNA synthetic multipolypeptide complex in E. coli. The conclusion is based on the following observations: (i) Extracts from dnaN59 cells were defective in phage phi X174 and G4 DNA synthesis after the mutant cells had been exposed to the increased temperature. (ii) The enzymatic defect was overcome by addition of purified beta subunit but not by other subunits of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme or by other replication proteins required for phi X174 DNA synthesis. (iii) Partially purified beta subunit from the dnaN mutant, unlike that from the wild type, was inactive in reconstituting the holoenzyme when mixed with the other purified subunits. (iv) Increased dosage of the dnaN gene provided by a plasmid carrying the gene raised cellular levels of the beta subunit 5- to 6-fold. PMID:6458041

  17. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Burgers, P M; Kornberg, A; Sakakibara, Y

    1981-09-01

    An Escherichia coli mutant, dnaN59, stops DNA synthesis promptly upon a shift to a high temperature; the wild-type dnaN gene carried in a transducing phage encodes a polypeptide of about 41,000 daltons [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553; Yuasa, S. & Sakakibara, Y. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 180, 267-273]. We now find that the product of dnaN gene is the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, the principal DNA synthetic multipolypeptide complex in E. coli. The conclusion is based on the following observations: (i) Extracts from dnaN59 cells were defective in phage phi X174 and G4 DNA synthesis after the mutant cells had been exposed to the increased temperature. (ii) The enzymatic defect was overcome by addition of purified beta subunit but not by other subunits of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme or by other replication proteins required for phi X174 DNA synthesis. (iii) Partially purified beta subunit from the dnaN mutant, unlike that from the wild type, was inactive in reconstituting the holoenzyme when mixed with the other purified subunits. (iv) Increased dosage of the dnaN gene provided by a plasmid carrying the gene raised cellular levels of the beta subunit 5- to 6-fold.

  18. Inter-ethnic polymorphism of the beta-globin gene locus control region (LCR) in sickle-cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Périchon, B; Ragusa, A; Lapouméroulie, C; Romand, A; Moi, P; Ikuta, T; Labie, D; Elion, J; Krishnamoorthy, R

    1993-06-01

    Sequence polymorphisms within the 5'HS2 segment of human locus control region is described among sickle cell anemia patients. Distinct polymorphic patterns of a simple sequence repeat are observed in strong linkage disequilibrium with each of the five major beta s haplotypes. Potential functional relevance of this polymorphic region in globin gene expression is discussed.

  19. Molecular characterisation of the metallo-beta-lactamase genes in imipenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from a university hospital in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Feng; Peng, Chien-Fang; Hsu, Hui-Jine; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2008-12-01

    In this study, 260 non-replicate imipenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria isolated between January 2002 and December 2006 were subjected to a screening test for detection of metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) using the Etest containing imipenem and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA). Among the 260 strains, 123 (47.3%) appeared to produce MBL. Of these 123 strains, 113 (91.9%) were found by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to carry MBL genes of types blaVIM-2, blaVIM-3, blaVIM-11 (blaVIM-11a), blaIMP-8 and novel blaIMP-24. One strain of Serratia marcescens harboured two MBL genes (blaVIM-11 and blaIMP-8) simultaneously. Of the 123 strains, 116 strains (94.3%) carrying the intI1 gene and 21 strains carrying integron-associated blaVIM-3, blaVIM-11 and blaIMP-8 genes were identified among Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter haemolyticus and S. marcescens. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Southern hybridisation with the blaVIM gene probe for I-CeuI-digested genomic DNA, P. aeruginosa 9527 strain harboured two class 1 integron-associated MBL genes in the chromosome, including blaVIM-3-orf2-aacA4 and novel bla(VIM-3)-orf2-aacA4-aadB-aacA4. This is the first description of the blaVIM-11 gene spreading among P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii strains in southern Taiwan. This finding suggests that clinical spread of this blaVIM-11 gene is a matter of great concern for carbapenem resistance in southern Taiwan.

  20. Expression and developmental control of platelet-derived growth factor A-chain and B-chain/Sis genes in rat aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Majesky, M.W.; Benditt, E.P.; Schwartz, S.M.

    1988-03-01

    Cultured arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC) can produce platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-like molecules. This property raises the possibility that SMC-derived PDGFs function as autocrine/paracrine regulators in the formation and maintenance of the artery wall. In this study the authors have asked if levels of mRNAs directing synthesis of PDFG are modulated in aortic SMC during postnatal development. The authors report here that genes encoding PDGF A- and B-chain precursors are expressed at similar low levels in intact aortas from newborn and adult rats. Marked differences in regulation of transcript abundance of these genes were revealed when aortic SMC were grown in cell culture. PDGF B-chain transcripts accumulated in passaged newborn rat SMC but not adult rat SMC, whereas PDGF A-chain RNA was found in comparable amounts in SMC from both age groups. Similarly, SMC from newborn rats secreted at least 60-fold more PDGF-like activity into conditioned medium than did adult rat SMC. These results show that PDGF A- and B-chain genes are transcribed in the normal rat aorta and provide evidence for age-related change in the control of PDGF B-chain gene expression in aortic SMC. Independent regulation of transcript levels in cultured SMC leaves open the possibility that PDGFs of different composition (AA, AB, BB) play different roles in normal function of the artery wall.

  1. TGF beta secreted by B16 melanoma antagonizes cancer gene immunotherapy bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Penafuerte, Claudia; Galipeau, Jacques

    2008-08-01

    Tumor-targeted delivery of immune stimulatory genes, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and suicide genes, has shown to cure mouse models of cancer. Total tumor eradication was also found to occur despite subtotal tumor engineering; a phenomenon coined the "bystander effect". The bystander effect in immune competent animals arises mostly from recruitment of a cancer lytic cell-mediated immune response to local and distant tumor cells which escaped gene modification. We have previously described a Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and Interleukin 2 (IL2) fusokine (aka GIFT2) which serves as a potent anticancer cytokine and it here served as a means to understand the mechanistic underpinnings to the immune bystander effect in an immune competent model of B16 melanoma. As expected, we observed that GIFT2 secreted by genetically engineered B16 tumor cells induces a bystander effect on non modified B16 cells, when admixed in a 1:1 ratio. However, despite keeping the 1:1 ratio constant, the immune bystander effect was completely lost as the total B16 cell number was increased from 10(4) to 10(6) which correlated with a sharp reduction in the number of tumor-infiltrating NK cells. We found that B16 secrete biologically active TGFbeta which in turn inhibited GIFT2 dependent immune cell proliferation in vitro and downregulated IL-2R beta expression and IFN gamma secretion by NK cells. In vivo blockade of B16 originating TGFbeta significantly improved the immune bystander effect arising from GIFT2. We propose that cancer gene immunotherapy of pre-established tumors will be enhanced by blockade of tumor-derived TGFbeta.

  2. Defects in the HSD11 gene encoding 11[beta]-hydroxysteriod dehydrogenase are not found in patients with apparent mineralocorticoid excess or 11-oxoreductase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkila, H.; White, P.C. ); Tannin, G.M. ); New, M.I.; Taylor, N.F. ); Kalaitzoglou, G.; Monder, C. )

    1993-09-01

    The syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is a form of low renin hypertension that is thought to be caused by congenital deficiency of 11[beta]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11HSD) activity. This enzyme converts cortisol to cortisone and apparently prevents cortisol from acting as a ligand for the mineralocorticoid (type I) receptor. It also catalyzes the reverse oxoreductase (cortisone to cortisol) reaction. Four patients with AME and the parents of the first patient described (now deceased) were analyzed for mutations in the cloned HSD11 gene encoding an 11HSD enzyme. A patient with suspected cortisone reductase deficiency was also studied. No gross deletions or rearrangements in the HSD11 gene were apparent on hybridizations of blot of genomic DNA. Direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified fragments corresponding to the coding sequences, intronexon junctions, and proximal untranslated regions of this gene revealed no mutations. AME may involve mutations in a gene for another enzyme with 11HSD activity or perhaps another cortisol metabolizing enzyme. 48 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Human self-reactive T cell clones expressing identical T cell receptor beta chains differ in their ability to recognize a cryptic self-epitope

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Recognition of self-antigens by T lymphocytes is a central event in autoimmunity. Understanding of the molecular interactions between T cell receptors (TCR) and self-epitopes may explain how T cells escape thymic education and initiate an autoimmune reaction. We have studied five human in vivo activated T cell clones specific for the region 535- 551 of human thyroid peroxidase (TPO) established from a Graves' patient. Three clones (37, 72, and 73) expressed identical TCR beta and alpha chains rearranging V beta 1.1 and V alpha 15.1, and were considered sister clones. Clone 43 differed from clone 37 and its sisters in the J alpha region only. Clone NP-7 expressed V beta 6.5 but rearranged two in-frame TCR alpha chain, both using the V alpha 22.1 segment. Fine epitope mapping using nested peptides showed that clones using identical TCR beta chains, identical V alpha, but a different J alpha recognized distinct, nonoverlapping epitopes in the TPO 535-551 region. This finding shows that a different J alpha region alone leads to a heterogeneous pattern of recognition. This indicates that the "restricted" TCR V region usage sometimes found in autoimmune diseases may not always correspond to identical epitope recognition. To confirm that clones 37 (and its sisters) and 43 recognize different epitopes, the T cell clones were stimulated with a TPO-transfected autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) cell line (TPO-EBV) that presents TPO epitopes afer endogenous processing. Only clone 37 and its sisters recognizes the TPO-EBV cell line, suggesting that the epitope recognized by clone 43 is not presented upon endogenous processing. We have shown that thyroid epithelial cells (TEC), the only cells that produce TPO, express HLA class II molecules in Graves' disease and can act as an antigen-presenting cells, presenting TPO after endogenous processing to autoantigen-reactive T cell clones. We tested, therefore, whether autologous TEC induced the same pattern of stimulation as TPO

  4. Abnormal oxidant sensitivity and beta-chain structure of spectrin in hereditary spherocytosis associated with defective spectrin-protein 4.1 binding.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, P S; Morrow, J S; Lux, S E

    1987-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is an inherited disorder of erythrocyte shape associated with spectrin deficiency and hemolytic anemia. In a subset of patients with the autosomal dominant form of HS, spectrin displays a reduced capacity to bind protein 4.1 and, therefore, actin; both functions that are critical to the membrane skeleton. A specific structural defect has not been identified in the spectrin from these patients. Chymotryptic digestion of the isolated spectrin chains shows impaired cleavage of the distal peptide of the beta subunit, the beta IV domain. In previous work, we have shown that mild oxidation markedly diminishes the binding capacity of normal spectrin for protein 4.1. Here we observe that chemical reduction of freshly isolated, untreated HS spectrin dramatically improves its function. Thus, a primary structural defect in the beta subunit of spectrin in this subtype of HS may lead to oxidant sensitivity, and secondarily, to a functional defect in the binding of spectrin to protein 4.1 and actin. Images PMID:3611357

  5. The PPFLMLLKGSTR motif in globular domain 3 of the human laminin-5 {alpha}3 chain is crucial for integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding and cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Man; Park, Won Ho; Min, Byung-Moo . E-mail: bmmin@snu.ac.kr

    2005-03-10

    Laminin-5 regulates various cellular functions, including cell adhesion, spreading, and motility. Here, we expressed the five human laminin {alpha}3 chain globular (LG) domains as monomeric, soluble fusion proteins, and examined their biological functions and signaling. Recombinant LG3 (rLG3) protein, unlike rLG1, rLG2, rLG4, and rLG5, played roles in cell adhesion, spreading, and integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding. More significantly, we identified a novel motif (PPFLMLLKGSTR) in the LG3 domain that is crucial for these responses. Studies with the synthetic peptides delineated the PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide within LG3 domain as a major site for both integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding and cell adhesion. Substitution mutation experiments suggest that the Arg residue is important for these activities. rLG3 protein- and PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide-induced keratinocyte adhesion triggered cell signaling through FAK phosphorylation at tyrosine-397 and -577. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide within the LG3 domain is a novel motif that is capable of supporting integrin {alpha}3{beta}1-dependent cell adhesion and spreading.

  6. Clathrin light chain B: gene structure and neuron-specific splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, S; Casper, D; Dinsmore, J; Kaufmann, C A; Brosius, J; Helfman, D M

    1992-01-01

    The clathrin light chains are components of clathrin coated vesicles, structural constituents involved in endocytosis and membrane recycling. The clathrin light chain B (LCB) gene encodes two isoforms, termed LCB2 and LCB3, via an alternative RNA splicing mechanism. We have determined the structure of the rat clathrin light chain B gene. The gene consists of six exons that extend over 11.9 kb. The first four exons and the last exon are common to the LCB2 and LCB3 isoforms. The fifth exon, termed EN, is included in the mRNA in brain, giving rise to the brain specific form LCB2 but is excluded in other tissues, generating the LCB3 isoform. Primary rat neuronal cell cultures express predominantly the brain specific LCB2 isoform, whereas primary rat cultures of glia express only the LCB3 isoform, suggesting that expression of the brain-specific LCB2 form is limited to neurons. Further evidence for neuronal localization of the LCB2 form is provided using a teratocarcinoma cell line, P19, which can be induced by retinoic acid to express a neuronal phenotype, concomitant with the induction of the LCB2 form. In order to determine the sequences involved in alternative splice site selection, we constructed a minigene containing the alternative spliced exon EN and its flanking intron and exon sequences. This minigene reflects the splicing pattern of the endogenous gene upon transfection in HeLa cell and primary neuronal cell cultures, indicating that this region of the LCB gene contains all the necessary information for neuron-specific splicing. Images PMID:1408826

  7. Analysis of the T-cell receptor beta-chain variable-region (V beta) repertoire in monozygotic twins discordant for human immunodeficiency virus: evidence for perturbations of specific V beta segments in CD4+ T cells of the virus-positive twins.

    PubMed Central

    Rebai, N; Pantaleo, G; Demarest, J F; Ciurli, C; Soudeyns, H; Adelsberger, J W; Vaccarezza, M; Walker, R E; Sekaly, R P; Fauci, A S

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed the T-cell receptor (TCR) V beta repertoire in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals at different stages of disease. To circumvent the effect of HLA and other loci on the expressed TCR repertoire, we compared the TCR repertoire in nine pairs of monozygotic twins who were discordant for HIV infection. A semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and flow cytometry enabled us to show distinct differences in the V beta repertoire in the HIV-positive twin compared with the HIV-negative twin. By combining PCR and cytofluorometry, these differences were restricted to a specific set of TCR V beta segments, with members of the V beta 13 family perturbed in six out of seven cases and those of the V beta 21 family perturbed in four out of seven cases studied. Most of the other V beta families remained unchanged. Our results provide direct evidence for a skewed TCR repertoire in HIV infection. Images PMID:7906416

  8. Site-specific PEGylation of hemoglobin at Cys-93(beta): correlation between the colligative properties of the PEGylated protein and the length of the conjugated PEG chain.

    PubMed

    Manjula, B N; Tsai, A; Upadhya, R; Perumalsamy, K; Smith, P K; Malavalli, A; Vandegriff, K; Winslow, R M; Intaglietta, M; Prabhakaran, M; Friedman, J M; Acharya, A S

    2003-01-01

    Increasing the molecular size of acellular hemoglobin (Hb) has been proposed as an approach to reduce its undesirable vasoactive properties. The finding that bovine Hb surface decorated with about 10 copies of PEG5K per tetramer is vasoactive provides support for this concept. The PEGylated bovine Hb has a strikingly larger molecular radius than HbA (1). The colligative properties of the PEGylated bovine Hb are distinct from those of HbA and even polymerized Hb, suggesting a role for the colligative properties of PEGylated Hb in neutralizing the vasoactivity of acellular Hb. To correlate the colligative properties of surface-decorated Hb with the mass of the PEG attached and also its vasoactivity, we have developed a new maleimide-based protocol for the site-specific conjugation of PEG to Hb, taking advantage of the unusually high reactivity of Cys-93(beta) of oxy HbA and the high reactivity of the maleimide to protein thiols. PEG chains of 5, 10, and 20 kDa have been functionalized at one of their hydroxyl groups with a maleidophenyl moiety through a carbamate linkage and used to conjugate the PEG chains at the beta-93 Cys of HbA to generate PEGylated Hbs carrying two copies of PEG (of varying chain length) per tetramer. Homogeneous preparations of (SP-PEG5K)(2)-HbA, (SP-PEG10K)(2)-HbA, and (SP-PEG20K)(2)-HbA have been isolated by ion exchange chromatography. The oxygen affinity of Hb is increased slightly on PEGylation, but the length of the PEG-chain had very little additional influence on the O(2) affinity. Both the hydrodynamic volume and the molecular radius of the Hb increased on surface decoration with PEG and exhibited a linear correlation with the mass of the PEG chain attached. On the other hand, both the viscosity and the colloidal osmotic pressure (COP) of the PEGylated Hbs exhibited an exponential increase with the increase in PEG chain length. In contrast to the molecular volume, viscosity, and COP, the vasoactivity of the PEGylated Hbs was not a

  9. Gene therapy by allele selection in a mouse model of beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Sigrid; Leu, N Adrian; Yanchik, Ashley; Hatada, Seigo; Kyba, Michael; McLaughlin, K John

    2011-02-01

    To be of therapeutic use, autologous stem cells derived from patients with inherited genetic disorders require genetic modification via gene repair or insertion. Here, we present proof of principle that, for diseases associated with dominant alleles (gain-of-function or haploinsufficient loss-of-function), disease allele–free ES cells can be derived from afflicted individuals without genome manipulation. This approach capitalizes on the derivation of uniparental cells, such as parthenogenetic (PG) ES cell lines from disease allele–free gametes. Diploid mammalian uniparental embryos with only maternally (oocyte-) or paternally (sperm-)derived genomes fail early in development due to the nonequivalence of parental genomes caused by genomic imprinting. However, these uniparental embryos develop to the blastocyst stage, allowing the derivation of ES cell lines. Using a mouse model for dominant beta-thalassemia, we developed disease allele–free PG ES cell lines from the oocytes of affected animals. Phenotype correction was obtained in donor-genotype recipients after transplantation of in vitro hematopoietic ES cell derivatives. This genetic correction strategy without gene targeting is potentially applicable to any dominant disease. It could also be the sole approach for larger or more complex mutations that cannot be corrected by homologous recombination.

  10. Extensive beta-glucuronidase activity in murine central nervous system after adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to brain.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, A; Stein, C; Derksen, T; Yang, G; Anderson, R D; Davidson, B L

    1998-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII), caused by beta-glucuronidase deficiency, is a classic lysosomal storage disease. In the central nervous system (CNS), there is widespread pathology with distention of vacuoles in neurons and glia. An approach to therapy for MPS VII would require extensive delivery of enzyme to the CNS and subsequent uptake by the affected cells. In this study we show that intrastriatal injection of recombinant adenovirus encoding beta-glucuronidase (Ad betagluc) to MPS VII or wild-type mice results in focal, intense beta-glucuronidase mRNA expression near the injection site. Further, histochemical staining for enzyme activity showed that beta-glucuronidase activity extended well beyond transduced cells. Activity was detected throughout the ipsilateral striatum as well as in the corpus callosum, ventricles, and bilateral neocortex. Similarly, after injection into the right lateral ventricle or cisterna magna, enzyme activity was present in the ependymal cells of the ventricles, in the subarachnoid spaces, and also in the underlying cortex (150-500 microm from ependyma). The distribution of enzyme was most extensive 21 days after gene transfer to normal mouse brain, with more than 50% of the hemisphere positive for beta-glucuronidase activity. Eighty-four days after adenovirus injection a substantial level of enzyme expression remained (>40% of hemisphere positive for beta-glucuronidase activity). Histological sections from striatum of beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice injected with Ad betagluc showed a marked reduction in the number of distended vacuoles in both neurons and glia, as compared with uninjected striatum. Importantly, correction was noted in both hemispheres. Our finding that a relatively small number of transduced cells produce enzyme that reaches a large proportion of the CNS has favorable implications in developing direct gene transfer therapies for lysosomal storage disorders.

  11. Insertions of IS256-like element flanking the chromosomal beta-lactamase gene of Enterococcus faecalis CX19.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, L B; Marshall, S H

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified an inverted repeat characteristic of staphylococcal beta-lactamase transposons adjacent to the chromosomal beta-lactamase genes of Enterococcus faecalis CH19 and its beta-lactamase-producing transconjugant CX19. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the CH19 beta-lactamase structural gene (blaZ) reveals it to be identical to the blaZ gene from E. faecalis HH22 and to the blaZ gene from the staphylococcal beta-lactamase transposon Tn552. We also report the presence of nucleotide sequence identical to a 317-bp region of the staphylococcal insertion sequence IS256 upstream of the blaZ gene in both CH19 and CX19. The identical segment of IS256 is present downstream of the blaZ gene of CX19, suggesting a second insertion of the element (in the inverted orientation) accompanying transfer to the recipient strain. Restriction analysis of the areas beyond the ClaI sites used to clone these regions suggests that full copies of the IS256-like element (designated IS256E) are present in all positions but that these elements were not directly involved in the transfer of the beta-lactamase gene to the recipient strain. We have also identified a region downstream of the second IS256E insertion site which exhibits substantial homology to ISSIW, an iso-ISSI insertion originally identified in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris. These data suggest that the two enterococcal blaZ genes sequenced to date evolved from a common ancestor and may at one time have been incorporated into a transposon similar to Tn552. They also suggest that IS256-like elements are mobile in E. faecalis and capable of inserting in a manner consistent with the formation of novel composite transposons. Finally, they provide the first confirmation of the presence of an ISSI-like element in enterococci, raising the possibility that these elements play a role in the exchange of chromosomal antimicrobial resistance determinants. Images PMID:8031032

  12. Drosophila Dynein intermediate chain gene, Dic61B, is required for spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Roshan

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the identification and characterization of a novel gene, Dic61B, required for male fertility in Drosophila. Complementation mapping of a novel male sterile mutation, ms21, isolated in our lab revealed it to be allelic to CG7051 at 61B1 cytogenetic region, since two piggyBac insertion alleles, CG7051(c05439) and CG7051(f07138) failed to complement. CG7051 putatively encodes a Dynein intermediate chain. All three mutants, ms21, CG7051(c05439) and CG7051(f07138), exhibited absolute recessive male sterility with abnormally coiled sperm axonemes causing faulty sperm individualization as revealed by Phalloidin staining in Don Juan-GFP background. Sequencing of PCR amplicons uncovered two point mutations in ms21 allele and confirmed the piggyBac insertions in CG7051(c05439) and CG7051(f07138) alleles to be in 5'UTR and 4(th) exon of CG7051 respectively, excision of which reverted the male sterility. In situ hybridization to polytene chromosomes demonstrated CG7051 to be a single copy gene. RT-PCR of testis RNA revealed defective splicing of the CG7051 transcripts in mutants. Interestingly, expression of cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain, α, β, γ tubulins and α-spectrin was normal in mutants while ultra structural studies revealed defects in the assembly of sperm axonemes. Bioinformatics further highlighted the homology of CG7051 to axonemal dynein intermediate chain of various organisms, including DNAI1 of humans, mutations in which lead to male sterility due to immotile sperms. Based on these observations we conclude that CG7051 encodes a novel axonemal dynein intermediate chain essential for male fertility in Drosophila and rename it as Dic61B. This is the first axonemal Dic gene of Drosophila to be characterized at molecular level and shown to be required for spermatogenesis.

  13. Dynein light chain family genes in 15 plant species: Identification, evolution and expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Li, Xiangyang; Lv, Yueqing

    2017-01-01

    Dynein light chain (DLC) is one important component of the dynein complexes, which have been proved involving in a variety of cellular functions. However, higher plants lack all other components of the complexes except DLCs, suggesting that in plants, the DLC protein does not carry out the same function as it in animals. Therefore, the function of this family in plants is mysterious. In this study, we investigated the DLC gene family in 15 plant species and analyzed their expression profiles. In total, 128 DLC genes were identified from the 15 studied plant species and were divided into eight groups by their phylogenetic relation. Highly conserved gene structure and motif arrangement was discovered within each group, indicating their functional correlation. Genetic variation and recombination events were also detected in DLC genes. Through selection analyses, we also identified some significant site-specific constraints in most of the DLC paralogs. In addition, DLC genes presented various expression profiles in different development stages, or under different abiotic stresses or phytohormone treatments. This may be associated with a variety of cis-elements responding to stress and phytohormone in the upstream sequences of the DLC genes. Functional network analysis exhibited 123 physical or functional interactions. The results provide a foundation for exploring the characterization of the DLC genes in plants and offer insights for additional functional studies.

  14. Cooperative signaling by alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 1 integrins regulates metalloproteinase gene expression in fibroblasts adhering to fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Rabbit synovial fibroblasts (RSF) express basal levels of the metalloproteinases (MMP) collagenase, stromelysin-1 and 92-kD gelatinase when plated on intact fibronectin (FN), but elevated levels when plated on either the central RGD-containing cell-binding region of FN (120FN) or antibody against the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin, suggesting that domains outside 120FN may suppress the induction of MMP (Werb, Z., P. M. Tremble, O. Behrendtsen, E. Crowley, and C.H. Damsky. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:877-889). We therefore attempted to reconstitute the basal signaling of intact FN by plating RSF on 120FN together with domains of FN outside this region. Large COOH-terminal fragments containing both the heparin-binding and HICS domains suppressed MMP when combined with 120FN. To map the active sequences, peptides from this region and larger fragments that did, or did not, include the CS-1 portion of IIICS were tested. Only CS-1 peptide, or larger fragments containing CS-1, suppressed MMP expression induced by 120FN. In contrast, peptide V from the heparin-binding region, shown previously to stimulate focal contact formation, further enhanced MMP expression by RSF when present on the substrate with 120FN. RSF expressed alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, the receptor for CS-1, and the anti-alpha 4 mAb blocked the ability of CS-1 to suppress MMP induction by 120FN. These results show that signals modulating MMP expression and focal contact assembly are regulated independently, and that cooperative signaling by alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 1 integrins plays a dominant role in regulating expression of these extracellular matrix-remodeling genes in response to FN. This work demonstrates directly the modular way in which information in the extracellular matrix is detected and processed by cell surface receptors. PMID:7537277

  15. Developmental and environmental regulation of a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase-beta-glucuronidase gene fusion in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, X W; Dron, M; Schmid, J; Dixon, R A; Lamb, C J

    1989-01-01

    A 1.1-kilobase promoter fragment of the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) gene PAL2 was translationally fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene and transferred to tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated leaf disk transformation. The distribution of beta-glucuronidase activity in these transgenic plants is very similar to that of endogenous PAL2 transcripts in bean, with very high levels in petals; marked accumulation in anthers, stigmas, roots, and shoots; and low levels in sepals, ovaries, and leaves. Histochemical analysis of the spatial pattern of beta-glucuronidase activity showed that the PAL2 promoter is highly active in the shoot apical meristem, the zone of cell proliferation immediately adjacent to the root apical meristem, and in the early stages of vascular development at the inception of xylem differentiation. Wounding and light evoke specific changes in the spatial pattern of beta-glucuronidase activity in stems, including induction in the epidermis. These data indicate that the PAL2 promoter transduces a complex set of developmental and environmental cues into an integrated spatial and temporal program of gene expression to regulate the synthesis of a diverse array of phenylpropanoid natural products. Images PMID:2594769

  16. beta-Glucosidase as a reporter for the gene expression studies in Thermus thermophilus and constitutive expression of DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Toshihiro; Tokishita, Shin-Ichi; Imazuka, Reiko; Mori, Ichiro; Okamura, Jin; Yamagata, Hideo

    2006-07-01

    Thermus thermophilus is an extremely thermophilic eubacterium that grows optimally at 70-75 degrees C. Because the frequency of DNA damage, such as deamination, depurination and single-strand breaks, increases as the temperature rises, the regulation of expression as well as the specificities and activities of T.thermophilus DNA repair systems are of particular interest. To study those systems, we developed a gene expression vector using the T.thermophilus beta-glucosidase gene (bgl) with host strain JOS9 (Deltabgl) derived from the T.thermophilus wild-type strain HB27. Since HB27 has two putative beta-galactosidase genes, the use of a single bgl gene as a reporter in combination with a Deltabgl host strain permits the study of gene expression against a low background level. We assayed Bgl activity with 2-nitrophenyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside as the substrate at 80 degrees C. We measured the expression of seven genes involved in DNA repair--three nucleotide excision repair genes (uvrA, uvrB and uvrC) and four recombinational repair genes (recA, ruvA, ruvB and ruvC). Expression levels of uvrA and uvrB were about three times those of uvrC, while those of ruvA, ruvB and ruvC were almost equal. Both ruvA and ruvC formed an operon with their adjacent 5'-upstream gene paaG and ftsQAZ, respectively. recA was transcribed as an operon of four genes, amt-cinA-ligT-recA. All seven DNA repair genes were expressed constitutively, and the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C did not increase their expression.

  17. Pest protection conferred by a Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene.

    PubMed

    Smigocki, Ann C; Ivic-Haymes, Snezana; Li, Haiyan; Savić, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases.

  18. A second glutamine synthetase gene with expression in the gills of the gulf toadfish (opsanus beta)

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Patrick J.; Mayer, Gregory D.; Medina, Monica; Bernstein, Matthew L.; Barimo, John F.; Mommsen, Thomas P.

    2003-05-08

    Enzyme and molecular biology approaches were used to more completely characterize the expression of the nitrogen metabolism enzyme glutamine synthetase [GSase; L-glutamate: ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), E.C. 6.3.1.2] in a variety of tissues of the gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) subjected to unconfined (ammonotelic) and confined (ureotelic) conditions. Enzymological results demonstrate that while weight-specific GSase activities rank in the order of brain > liver > stomach {approx} kidney > intestine > gill> heart/spleen > muscle, when tissue mass is used to calculate a glutamine synthetic potential, the liver has the greatest, followed by muscle > stomach and intestine with minor contributions from the remaining tissues. Additionally, during confinement stress, GSase activity only increases significantly in liver (5-fold) and muscle (2-fold), tissues which previously showed significant expression of the other enzymes of urea synthesis. RT PCR and RACE PCR revealed the presence of a second GSas e cDNA from gill tissue that appears to share relatively low nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarity ({approx}73 percent) with the original GSase cloned from liver, and furthermore lacks a mitochondrial leader targeting sequence. RT PCR and restriction digestion experiments demonstrated that mRNA from the original ''liver'' GSase is expressed in all tissues examined (liver, gill, stomach, intestine, kidney, brain and muscle), whereas the new ''gill'' form shows expression primarily in the gill. Enzyme activities of gill GSase also exhibit a different subcellular compartmentation with apparent exclusive expression in the soluble compartment, whereas other tissues expressing the ''liver'' form show both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial activities. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of a number of GSases demonstrates that the toadfish gill GSase has a greater affinity for a clade that includes the Xenopus GSase genes and one of two Fugu GSase genes, than it has for a clade

  19. Baseline Gene Expression Signatures in Monocytes from Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Nurtdinov, Ramil N.; Río, Jordi; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background A relatively large proportion of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFNb) treatment. In previous studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we identified a subgroup of IFNb non-responders that was characterized by a baseline over-expression of type I IFN inducible genes. Additional mechanistic experiments carried out in IFNb non-responders suggested a selective alteration of the type I IFN signaling pathway in the population of blood monocytes. Here, we aimed (i) to investigate whether the type I IFN signaling pathway is up-regulated in isolated monocytes from IFNb non-responders at baseline; and (ii) to search for additional biological pathways in this cell population that may be implicated in the response to IFNb treatment. Methods Twenty RRMS patients classified according to their clinical response to IFNb treatment and 10 healthy controls were included in the study. Monocytes were purified from PBMC obtained before treatment by cell sorting and the gene expression profiling was determined with oligonucleotide microarrays. Results and discussion Purified monocytes from IFNb non-responders were characterized by an over-expression of type I IFN responsive genes, which confirms the type I IFN signature in monocytes suggested from previous studies. Other relevant signaling pathways that were up-regulated in IFNb non-responders were related with the mitochondrial function and processes such as protein synthesis and antigen presentation, and together with the type I IFN signaling pathway, may also be playing roles in the response to IFNb. PMID:23637780

  20. Diacyltransferase Activity and Chain Length Specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PapA5 in the Synthesis of Alkyl Beta-Diol Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Touchette, Megan H.; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Delle Bovi, Richard J.; Gadbery, John E.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Metz, Thomas O.; Martin, Dwight W.; Sampson, Nicole S.; Miller, W. Todd; Tonge, Peter J.; Seeliger, Jessica C.

    2015-01-01

    Although classified as Gram-positive bacteria, Corynebacterineae possess an asymmetric outer membrane that imparts structural and thereby physiological similarity to more distantly related Gram-negative bacteria. Like lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria, lipids in the outer membrane of Corynebacterineae have been associated with the virulence of pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). For example, Mtb strains that lack long, branched-chain alkyl esters known as dimycocerosates (DIMs) are significantly attenuated in model infections. The resultant interest in the biosynthetic pathway of these unusual virulence factors has led to the elucidation of many of the steps leading to the final esterification of the alkyl beta-diol, phthiocerol, with branched-chain fatty acids known as mycocerosates. PapA5 is an acyltransferase implicated in these final reactions. We here show that PapA5 is indeed the terminal enzyme in DIM biosynthesis by demonstrating its dual esterification activity and chain-length preference using synthetic alkyl beta-diol substrate analogues. Applying these analogues to a series of PapA5 mutants, we also revise a model for the substrate binding within PapA5. Finally, we demonstrate that the Mtb Ser/Thr kinases PknB and PknE modify PapA5 on three overlapping Thr residues and a fourth Thr is unique to PknE phosphorylation. These results clarify the DIM biosynthetic pathway and indicate post-translational modifications that warrant further elucidation for their roles in regulation DIM biosynthesis. PMID:26271001

  1. Conservation of the lipooligosaccharide synthesis locus lgt among strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: requirement for lgtE in synthesis of the 2C7 epitope and of the beta chain of strain 15253

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the extent to which the lgt locus varies among strains of gonococci. This locus encodes five glycosyl transferases involved in the synthesis of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. We examined seven gonococcal strains and found that the structure of the lgt locus is conserved among six of these strains. The locus is strikingly altered in strain 15253. This is one of the few strains where extensive structural analysis of its LOS is available, and therefore, we defined the altered lgt locus and focused on the reactivity of mAB 2C7. We found that strain 15253 contains only two lgt genes, lgtA and lgtE. As in F62, lgtA encodes a GlcNAc transferase and is subject to phase variation. In addition, by analysis of deletion mutants, we found that lgtE, which encodes a galactosyl transferase that is required for elongating the alpha-chain, is also necessary for completing the beta chain. PMID:8879194

  2. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for the analysis of plant gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Timothy L; McQualter, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is used to simultaneously amplify and quantify a targeted DNA molecule. It can be used to determine exact copy number of a molecule within a sample and/or to compare the quantity of a molecule between samples. When combined with reverse transcription, it is a powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression, and it is widely used for this purpose in plant species. Here we provide an introduction to fundamental concepts relevant for the analysis of gene expression in plants using this technique and a protocol for quantification of the relative expression of a sucrose phosphate synthase gene along the maturation gradient of a sugarcane leaf.

  3. Assignment of the gene for the. beta. subunit of thyroid-stimulating hormone to the short arm of human chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dracopoli, N.C.; Rettig, W.J.; Whitfield, G.K.; Darlington, G.J.; Spengler, B.A.; Biedler, J.L.; Old, L.J.; Kourides, I.A.

    1986-03-01

    The chromosomal locations of the genes for the ..beta.. subunit of human thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and the glycoprotein hormone ..cap alpha.. subunit have been determined by restriction enzyme analysis of DNA extracted from rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. Human chorionic gonadotropin (CG) ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA and a cloned 0.9-kilobase (kb) fragment of the human TSH ..beta..-subunit gene were used as hybridization probes in the analysis of Southern blots of DNA extracted from rodent-human hybrid clones. Analysis of the segregation of 5- and 10-kb EcoRI fragments hybridizing to CG ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA confirmed the previous assignment of this gene to chromosome 6. Analysis of the patterns of segregation of a 2.3-kb EcoRI fragment containing human TSH ..beta..-subunit sequences permitted the assignment of the TSH ..beta..-subunit gene to human chromosome 1. The subregional assignment of TSH ..beta.. subunit to chromosome 1p22 was made possible by the additional analysis of a set of hybrids containing partially overlapping segments of this chromosome. Human TSH ..beta.. subunit is not syntenic with genes encoding the ..beta.. subunits of CG, luteinizing hormone, or follicle-stimulating hormone and is assigned to a conserved linkage group that also contains the structural genes for the ..beta.. subunit of nerve growth factor (NGFB) and the proto-oncogene N-ras (NRAS).

  4. Expression of human beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit gene (the gene defect of Tay-Sachs disease) in mouse brains upon engraftment of transduced progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Lacorazza, H D; Flax, J D; Snyder, E Y; Jendoubi, M

    1996-04-01

    In humans, beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit deficiency prevents the formation of a functional beta-hexosaminidase A heterodimer resulting in the severe neurodegenerative disorder, Tay-Sachs disease. To explore the feasibility of using ex vivo gene transfer in this lysosomal storage disease, we produced ecotropic retroviruses encoding the human beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit cDNA and transduced multipotent neural cell lines. Transduced progenitors stably expressed and secreted high levels of biologically active beta-hexosaminidase A in vitro and cross-corrected the metabolic defect in a human Tay-Sachs fibroblasts cell line in vitro. These genetically engineered CNS progenitors were transplanted into the brains of both normal fetal and newborn mice. Engrafted brains, analyzed at various ages after transplant, produced substantial amounts of human beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit transcript and protein, which was enzymatically active throughout the brain at a level reported to be therapeutic in Tay-Sachs disease. These results have implications for treating neurologic diseases characterized by inherited single gene mutations.

  5. Automated two-column purification of iminobiotin and BrdU-labeled PCR products for rapid cloning: application to genes synthesized by polymerase chain assembly.

    PubMed

    TerMaat, Joel R; Mamedov, Tarlan G; Pienaar, Elsje; Whitney, Scott E; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Polymerase chain assembly (PCA) is a powerful tool for basic biological research and biotechnology applications. During the last several years, major advances have been made in de novo gene synthesis. However, there is still a need for fast and reproducible methods to automatically purify the synthesized genes. Upon completion of PCA, the subsequent PCR-amplified product mixture still contains undesired shorter DNA fragments that hinder cloning efforts. To avoid tedious gel purification, an automated two-column purification has been developed and used in conjunction with rapid PCA. The system enables fast synthesis and isolation of the full-length DNA of interest, important for facile cloning of desired DNA fragments. During the PCR amplification step, forward and reverse primers tagged with iminobiotin and bromodeoxyuridine labels, respectively, were used. The automated purification was then performed on the PCR mixture using two affinity/immunocapture columns in series to isolate only the desired full-length product. The procedure has been applied to the pUC19 beta-lactamase gene (929 bp). Follow-up PCR of the purified product, cloning, and sequencing demonstrated the technique's effectiveness in obtaining the pure full-length gene. The purification has also been performed on other synthesized genes, indicating its utility as a general approach.

  6. Human lambda light-chain constant region gene CMor lambda: the primary structure of lambda VI Bence Jones protein Mor.

    PubMed Central

    Frangione, B; Moloshok, T; Prelli, F; Solomon, A

    1985-01-01

    Serologic, structural, and genetic analyses have shown that the constant (C) region of human kappa light chains is encoded by a single gene, whereas that of lambda chains is encoded by multiple genes. We have determined the complete C region amino acid sequence of two monoclonal lambda VI light chains, Bence Jones proteins Sut and Mor. The C region of lambda chains Sut and Mor consists of 105 residues, as is characteristic for human lambda light chains, of which 102 are identical in sequence. Protein Sut has the C region sequence associated with the C lambda isotype Mcg-, Kern-, Oz+ and represents a product of the C lambda 3 (Kern-, Oz+) gene. Protein Mor has a C region sequence associated with Mcg-, Kern-, and Oz- proteins but differs from protein Sut by the presence of three amino acid interchanges at positions 168, 176, and 194. These substitutions distinguish protein Mor from lambda chains encoded by the C lambda 1 (Mcg+), C lambda 2 (Kern-, Oz-), and C lambda 3 (Kern-, Oz+) genes and provide further evidence for polymorphism of the human C lambda genome. The gene encoding the C region sequence of lambda chain Mor is designated CMor lambda. PMID:3923477

  7. GM2-gangliosidosis B1 variant: analysis of beta-hexosaminidase alpha gene abnormalities in seven patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, A; Ohno, K; Sandhoff, K; Maire, I; Kolodny, E H; Brown, A; Suzuki, K

    1990-01-01

    A single nucleotide transition within exon 5 of the beta-hexosaminidase alpha chain gene was identified in a Puerto Rican patient with GM2-gangliosidosis B1 variant as the mutation responsible for the unusual enzymological characteristics of this variant (G533----A; Arg178----His) (the DN-allele). A total of seven patients with enzymological characteristics of B1 variant have since been studied. They were Puerto Rican (DN), Italian, French, Spanish, two patients of mixed ethnic origin (English/Italian/Hungarian and English/French/Azores), and a Czechoslovakian. In confirmation of our earlier finding based on screening with allele-specific probes, all patients except the one from Czechoslovakia carried the same DN-allele. A new point mutation found in this patient changed the same codon affected in the DN-allele (C532----T; Arg178----Cys). An asymptomatic Japanese individual included as a control also carried one allele with the DN-mutation. Site-directed mutagenesis and expression studies in COS I cells demonstrated that either of the two point mutations abolishes the catalytic activity of the alpha subunit. The Spanish patient was homozygous for the DN-allele, but others were all compound heterozygotes. The Puerto Rican patient was a compound heterozygote with the DN-mutation in one allele and with the four-base insertion in exon 11, one of the two mutations found in the classical Ashkenazi Jewish Tay-Sachs disease, in the other allele. Abnormalities of the other allele were not identified in all other compound heterozygous patients. In these patients, the level of mRNA derived from the other allele was variable, ranging from being undetectable to being much lower than normal. This series of studies uncovered a new B1 variant mutation, confirmed our preliminary finding that the DN-allele has a surprisingly wide geographic and ethnic distribution, and pointed out the highly complex nature of the molecular genetics of this rare disorder. They also support our

  8. Possible deletion of a developmentally regulated heavy-chain variable region gene in autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Olee, Tsaiwei; Kozin, F.; Carson, D.A.; Chen, P.P. ); Olsen, N.J. ); Siminovitch, K.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Several autoantibody-associated variable region (V) genes are preferentially expressed during early ontogenic development, suggesting strongly that they are of developmental and physiological importance. As such, it is possible that polymorphisms in one or more of these genes may alter susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The authors have searched extensively for a probe related to a developmentally regulated V gene that has the power to differentiate among highly homologous V genes in human populations. Using such a probe (i.e., Humhv3005/P1) related to both anti-DNA and anti-IgG autoantibodies, they studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus and found an apparent heavy-chain V (V{sub H}) gene deletion that was nearly restricted to the autoimmune patients. These data suggest that deletions of physiologically important V{sub H} genes may increase the risk of autoimmunity through indirect effects on the development and homeostasis of the B-cell repertoire.

  9. Phylogeny, genomic organization and expression of lambda and kappa immunoglobulin light chain genes in a reptile, Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wei, Zhiguo; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Tao; Ren, Liming; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Meng, Qingyong; Guo, Ying; Zhu, Qinghong; Robert, Jacques; Hammarström, Lennart; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2010-05-01

    The reptiles are the last major taxon of jawed vertebrates in which immunoglobulin light chain isotypes have not been well characterized. Using the recently released genome sequencing data, we show in this study that the reptile Anolis carolinensis expresses both lambda and kappa light chain genes. The genomic organization of both gene loci is structurally similar to their respective counterparts in mammals. The identified lambda locus contains three constant region genes each preceded by a joining gene segment, and a total of 37 variable gene segments. In contrast, the kappa locus contains only a single constant region gene, and two joining gene segments with a single family of 14 variable gene segments located upstream. Analysis of junctions of the recombined VJ transcripts reveals a paucity of N and P nucleotides in both expressed lambda and kappa sequences. These results help us to understand the generation of the immunoglobulin repertoire in reptiles and immunoglobulin evolution in vertebrates.

  10. Variation in the FFAR1 Gene Modifies BMI, Body Composition and Beta-Cell Function in Overweight Subjects: An Exploratory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Celia G.; Goff, Louise; Bluck, Les J.; Griffin, Bruce A.; Jebb, Susan A.; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Sanders, Thomas A. B.; Frost, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Background FFAR1 receptor is a long chain fatty acid G-protein coupled receptor which is expressed widely, but found in high density in the pancreas and central nervous system. It has been suggested that FFAR1 may play a role in insulin sensitivity, lipotoxicity and is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here we investigate the effect of three common SNPs of FFAR1 (rs2301151; rs16970264; rs1573611) on pancreatic function, BMI, body composition and plasma lipids. Methodology/Principal Findings For this enquiry we used the baseline RISCK data, which provides a cohort of overweight subjects at increased cardiometabolic risk with detailed phenotyping. The key findings were SNPs of the FFAR1 gene region were associated with differences in body composition and lipids, and the effects of the 3 SNPs combined were cumulative on BMI, body composition and total cholesterol. The effects on BMI and body fat were predominantly mediated by rs1573611 (1.06 kg/m2 higher (P = 0.009) BMI and 1.53% higher (P = 0.002) body fat per C allele). Differences in plasma lipids were also associated with the BMI-increasing allele of rs2301151 including higher total cholesterol (0.2 mmol/L per G allele, P = 0.01) and with the variant A allele of rs16970264 associated with lower total (0.3 mmol/L, P = 0.02) and LDL (0.2 mmol/L, P<0.05) cholesterol, but also with lower HDL-cholesterol (0.09 mmol/L, P<0.05) although the difference was not apparent when controlling for multiple testing. There were no statistically significant effects of the three SNPs on insulin sensitivity or beta cell function. However accumulated risk allele showed a lower beta cell function on increasing plasma fatty acids with a carbon chain greater than six. Conclusions/Significance Differences in body composition and lipids associated with common SNPs in the FFAR1 gene were apparently not mediated by changes in insulin sensitivity or beta-cell function. PMID:21552566

  11. Genes involved in long-chain alkene biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, Harry R.; Goh, Ee-Been; Keasling, Jay D.

    2010-01-07

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are highly appealing targets for advanced cellulosic biofuels, as they are already predominant components of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuels. We have studied alkene biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698, a close relative of Sarcina lutea (now Kocuria rhizophila), which four decades ago was reported to biosynthesize iso- and anteiso branched, long-chain alkenes. The underlying biochemistry and genetics of alkene biosynthesis were not elucidated in those studies. We show here that heterologous expression of a three-gene cluster from M. luteus (Mlut_13230-13250) in a fatty-acid overproducing E. coli strain resulted in production of long-chain alkenes, predominantly 27:3 and 29:3 (no. carbon atoms: no. C=C bonds). Heterologous expression of Mlut_13230 (oleA) alone produced no long-chain alkenes but unsaturated aliphatic monoketones, predominantly 27:2, and in vitro studies with the purified Mlut_13230 protein and tetradecanoyl-CoA produced the same C27 monoketone. Gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry confirmed the elemental composition of all detected long-chain alkenes and monoketones (putative intermediates of alkene biosynthesis). Negative controls demonstrated that the M. luteus genes were responsible for production of these metabolites. Studies with wild-type M. luteus showed that the transcript copy number of Mlut_13230-13250 and the concentrations of 29:1 alkene isomers (the dominant alkenes produced by this strain) generally corresponded with bacterial population over time. We propose a metabolic pathway for alkene biosynthesis starting with acyl-CoA (or -ACP) thioesters and involving decarboxylative Claisen condensation as a key step, which we believe is catalyzed by OleA. Such activity is consistent with our data and with the homology (including the conserved Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad) of Mlut_13230 (OleA) to FabH (?-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III), which catalyzes decarboxylative Claisen condensation during

  12. Efficient targeting of a SCID gene by an engineered single-chain homing endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Grizot, Sylvestre; Smith, Julianne; Daboussi, Fayza; Prieto, Jesús; Redondo, Pilar; Merino, Nekane; Villate, Maider; Thomas, Séverine; Lemaire, Laetitia; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J.; Pâques, Frédéric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific endonucleases recognizing long target sequences are emerging as powerful tools for genome engineering. These endonucleases could be used to correct deleterious mutations or to inactivate viruses, in a new approach to molecular medicine. However, such applications are highly demanding in terms of safety. Mutations in the human RAG1 gene cause severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Using the I-CreI dimeric LAGLIDADG meganuclease as a scaffold, we describe here the engineering of a series of endonucleases cleaving the human RAG1 gene, including obligate heterodimers and single-chain molecules. We show that a novel single-chain design, in which two different monomers are linked to form a single molecule, can induce high levels of recombination while safeguarding more effectively against potential genotoxicity. We provide here the first demonstration that an engineered meganuclease can induce targeted recombination at an endogenous locus in up to 6% of transfected human cells. These properties rank this new generation of endonucleases among the best molecular scissors available for genome surgery strategies, potentially avoiding the deleterious effects of previous gene therapy approaches. PMID:19584299

  13. Efficient targeting of a SCID gene by an engineered single-chain homing endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Grizot, Sylvestre; Smith, Julianne; Daboussi, Fayza; Prieto, Jesús; Redondo, Pilar; Merino, Nekane; Villate, Maider; Thomas, Séverine; Lemaire, Laetitia; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J; Pâques, Frédéric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Sequence-specific endonucleases recognizing long target sequences are emerging as powerful tools for genome engineering. These endonucleases could be used to correct deleterious mutations or to inactivate viruses, in a new approach to molecular medicine. However, such applications are highly demanding in terms of safety. Mutations in the human RAG1 gene cause severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Using the I-CreI dimeric LAGLIDADG meganuclease as a scaffold, we describe here the engineering of a series of endonucleases cleaving the human RAG1 gene, including obligate heterodimers and single-chain molecules. We show that a novel single-chain design, in which two different monomers are linked to form a single molecule, can induce high levels of recombination while safeguarding more effectively against potential genotoxicity. We provide here the first demonstration that an engineered meganuclease can induce targeted recombination at an endogenous locus in up to 6% of transfected human cells. These properties rank this new generation of endonucleases among the best molecular scissors available for genome surgery strategies, potentially avoiding the deleterious effects of previous gene therapy approaches.

  14. Genes associated with long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in bovine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Perez, R; Cañón, J; Dunner, S

    2010-01-01

    Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) influence meat tenderness, juiciness, and flavor, and are beneficial to human health. The percentage of long-chain n-3 FAs in total FAs is termed the omega-3 index (O3I). It is thus of great interest to favor rising this index in bovine skeletal muscle, to obtain healthier, tastier, and more nutritive meat. This study was aimed to detect transcriptomic variations related to O3I in muscles in 15-month-old males of 4 Spanish cattle breeds raised under the same conditions. Through the analysis of extreme O3I phenotypes, 3 genes of interest (AANAT, UCP2 and AHA1) were identified. AANAT and UCP2 were strongly up-regulated, while AHA1 was repressed in animals with a high O3I. Moreover, gene expression differed between GDF8-null animal muscles (tested for nt821del11 and Q204X mutations) and the wild-type muscles for genes GDH1, IGF2R, FADS1, ASPH, and AIM1, all showing down-regulation in Asturiana de los Valles calves with muscle hypertrophy (GDF8-null). This shows that in GDF8-null animals other pathways are used for FA synthesis.

  15. Shared Gene Structures and Clusters of Mutually Exclusive Spliced Exons within the Metazoan Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kollmar, Martin; Hatje, Klas

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc) protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs). The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes) and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis). Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both) have independently been developed several times

  16. Induction of cross clade reactive specific antibodies in mice by conjugates of HGP-30 (peptide analog of HIV-1(SF2) p17) and peptide segments of human beta-2-microglobulin or MHC II beta chain.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, D H; Lloyd, J P; Heisey, D; Winship, M D; Siwek, M; Talor, E; Sarin, P S

    2001-09-14

    HGP-30, a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide homologous to a conserved region of HIV-1(SF2) p17 (aa86-115), has previously been shown to elicit both cellular and humoral immune responses when conjugated to KLH and adsorbed to alum. However, the free HGP-30 peptide is not immunogenic in animals. In order to improve the immunogenicity of HGP-30, peptide conjugates consisting of a modified HGP-30 sequence (m-HGP-30/aa82-111) and a peptide segment, residues 38-50, of the MHC I accessory molecule, human beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-M), referred to as Peptide J, or a peptide from the MHC II beta chain (peptide G) were evaluated in mice. The effects of carriers and adjuvants on serum antibody titers, specificities to various HIV-1 clade peptides similar to HGP-30 and isotype patterns were examined. Peptides J or especially G conjugated to modified-HGP-30 (LEAPS 102 and LEAPS 101, respectively) generated comparable or better immune responses to modified HGP-30 than KLH conjugates as judged by the induction of: (1) similar antibody titers; (2) broader HIV clade antigen binding; and (3) antibody isotype response patterns indicative of a TH1 pathway (i.e. increased amounts of IgG2a and IgG2b antibodies). The ISA 51 and MPL(R)-SE adjuvants induced higher antibody responses than alum, with the ISA 51 being more potent. Immune responses to LEAPS 102, as compared to LEAPS 101, were weaker and slower to develop as determined by antibody titers and cross clade reactivity of the antibodies induced. Compared to KLH conjugates which induced significant anti-KLH antibody titers, minimal antibody responses were observed to peptide G, the more immunogenic conjugate, and peptide J. These results suggest that modified HGP-30 L.E.A.P.S. constructs may be useful as HIV vaccine candidates for preferential induction of TH1 directed cell mediated immune responses.

  17. The Beta-Binomial Distribution for Estimating the Number of False Rejections in Microarray Gene Expression Studies.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Daniel L; Cheng, Cheng; Pounds, Stanley

    2009-03-15

    In differential expression analysis of microarray data, it is common to assume independence among null hypotheses (and thus gene expression levels). The independence assumption implies that the number of false rejections V follows a binomial distribution and leads to an estimator of the empirical false discovery rate (eFDR). The number of false rejections V is modeled with the beta-binomial distribution. An estimator of the beta-binomial false discovery rate (bbFDR) is then derived. This approach accounts for how the correlation among non-differentially expressed genes influences the distribution of V. Permutations are used to generate the observed values for V under the null hypotheses and a beta-binomial distribution is fit to the values of V. The bbFDR estimator is compared to the eFDR estimator in simulation studies of correlated non-differentially expressed genes and is found to outperform the eFDR for certain scenarios. As an example, this method is also used to perform an analysis that compares the gene expression of soft tissue sarcoma samples to normal tissue samples.

  18. Effects of Ghrelin on Sexual Behavior and Luteinizing Hormone Beta-subunit Gene Expression in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Babaei-Balderlou, Farrin; Khazali, Homayoun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hormones of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis have facilitative effects on reproductive behavior in mammals. Ghrelin as a starvation hormone has an inhibitory effect on HPG axis’ function. Hence, it is postulated that ghrelin may reduce the sexual behavior through inhibiting of HPG axis. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ghrelin and its antagonist, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6, on sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats. Methods: In this experimental study, 128 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups. Each group was further subdivided into eight subgroups (n=8 rats/subgroup) including the animals that received saline, ghrelin (2, 4 or 8 nmol), [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) or co-administration of ghrelin (4 nmol) and [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) through the stereotaxically implanted cannula into the third cerebral ventricle. The sexual behavior of male rats encountering with females and the hypo-physeal LH beta-subunit gene expression were evaluated at two different groups. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) significantly (p<0.01) increased the latencies to the first mount, intromission and ejaculation as well as the post-ejaculatory interval. Also, 4 and 8 nmol ghrelin significantly (p<0.05) increased the number of mount and decreased the number of ejaculation. In co-administrated groups, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonized the effects of ghrelin. Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) reduced the LH beta-subunit gene expression while pretreatment with [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 improved the gene expression. Conclusion: Ghrelin decreased the sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats, whereas [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonizes these effects. PMID:27141463

  19. Exonic Sp1 sites are required for neural-specific expression of the glycine receptor beta subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Tintrup, H; Fischer, M; Betz, H; Kuhse, J

    2001-01-01

    The gene encoding the beta subunit of the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) is widely expressed throughout the mammalian central nervous system. To unravel the elements regulating its transcription, we isolated its 5' non-coding and upstream flanking regions from mouse. Sequence analysis revealed significant differences between the 5' region of the beta subunit gene and the corresponding regions of the homologous GlyR alpha subunit genes; it also identified a novel exon (exon 0) that encodes most of the 5'-untranslated portion of the GlyR beta mRNA. Primer extension experiments disclosed multiple transcriptional start sites. Transfection experiments with luciferase reporter gene constructs showed that sequences encompassing 1.58 kb of upstream flanking region and 180 bp of exon 0 displayed high promoter activity in two neuroblastoma cell lines but not in non-neural cells. Analysis of various deletion constructs showed that the 5' flanking region preceding the transcriptional start sites silences expression in non-neural cells but is not essential for general promoter activity. In contrast, the deletion of sequences within exon 0 drastically decreased or abolished transcription; the removal of sequences harbouring Sp1 consensus sequences within exon 0 decreased expression specifically in a neuroblastoma cell line. Band-shift assays confirmed the binding of Sp1 to sites within the deleted sequence. Our results indicate that neural-specific expression of the GlyR beta subunit gene might depend on a direct interaction of Sp1 transcription factors with cis elements located downstream from transcription initiation sites. PMID:11256962

  20. Mutations in the dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene are associated with human norepinephrine deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chun-Hyung; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Cubells, Joseph F.; Cho, Sonhae; Biaggioni, Italo; Cohen, Bruce M.; Robertson, David; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2002-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE), a key neurotransmitter of the central and peripheral nervous systems, is synthesized by dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that catalyzes oxidation of dopamine (DA) to NE. NE deficiency is a congenital disorder of unknown etiology, in which affected patients suffer profound autonomic failure. Biochemical features of the syndrome include undetectable tissue and circulating levels of NE and epinephrine, elevated levels of DA, and undetectable levels of DBH. Here, we report identification of seven novel variants including four potentially pathogenic mutations in the human DBH gene (OMIM 223360) from analysis of two unrelated patients and their families. Both patients are compound heterozygotes for variants affecting expression of DBH protein. Each carries one copy of a T-->C transversion in the splice donor site of DBH intron 1, creating a premature stop codon. In patient 1, there is a missense mutation in DBH exon 2. Patient 2 carries missense mutations in exons 1 and 6 residing in cis. We propose that NE deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from heterogeneous molecular lesions at DBH. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Pit-1/GHF-1 binds to TRH-sensitive regions of the rat thyrotropin beta gene.

    PubMed

    Mason, M E; Friend, K E; Copper, J; Shupnik, M A

    1993-08-31

    Three regions within the 5'-flanking region of the TSH beta gene have A-T-rich sequences which have sequence similarity to binding sites for the pituitary-specific POU domain transcription factor Pit-1/GHF-1. These three regions have been termed TSH A (-274 to -258 bp), TSH B (-336 to -326 bp), and TSH C (-402 to -384 bp). TSH A and TSH C are able to confer 2-6-fold TRH stimulation to the heterologous viral thymidine kinase (tk) promoter in transient expression assays in GH3 pituitary cells; TSH C can confer a 3-10-fold increase in basal enhancer activity as well. TSH A, B, and C DNAs all bound Pit-1 from GH3 cell nuclear extracts, based on gel mobility shift analysis in which antibody against Pit-1 prevented the formation of specific DNA-GH3 nuclear protein complexes. TSH A and TSH C also each formed several additional DNA-nuclear protein complexes which were not observed with TSH B. Some of these complexes may contain Pit-1 as their formation was inhibited by the addition of Pit-1 antibody; other complexes, however, were not altered by antibody treatment. All three A-T-rich elements bound in vitro translated Pit-1, with calculated affinities of 360 (A), 125 (B), and 38 (C) nM, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Screening of nineteen unrelated families with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone for known point mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta gene and the detection of a new mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, K; Balzano, S; Sakurai, A; DeGroot, L J; Refetoff, S

    1991-01-01

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH) is a syndrome characterized by impaired tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Two distinct point mutations in the hormone binding domain of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta have recently been identified in two unrelated families with GRTH. One, Mf, involves a replacement of the normal glycine-345 for arginine in exon 7 and another, Mh, replaces the normal proline-453 for histidine in exon 8. To probe for the presence of the Mf and Mh defect in 19 unrelated families with GRTH, we applied separate polymerase chain reactions using allele-specific oligonucleotide primers containing the normal and each of the two mutant nucleotides at the 3'-position. A total of 24 affected subjects and 13 normal family members were studied. The mode of inheritance was dominant in 13 families, was unknown in 5 families, and was clearly recessive in 1 family in which only the consanguineous subjects were affected. Primers containing the substitutions specific for Mf and Mh amplified exons 7 and 8, respectively, only in affected members of each of the two index families. Primers containing the normal sequences amplified exons 7 and 8 of the TR beta gene in all subjects except affected members of one family. In this family with recessively inherited GRTH, neither exon could be amplified using any combinations of primers and DNA blot revealed absence of all coding exons. These results indicate a major deletion of the TR beta gene, including both DNA and hormone binding domains. Since heterozygous members of this family are not affected, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient for normal function of the TR beta. These data also support the hypothesis that in the dominant mode of GRTH inheritance the presence of an abnormal TR beta interferes with the function of the normal TR beta. Distinct mutations are probably responsible for GRTH in unrelated families. Images PMID:1991834

  3. A polymerase chain reaction-based methodology to detect gene doping.

    PubMed

    Carter, Adam; Flueck, Martin

    2012-04-01

    The non-therapeutic use of genes to enhance athletic performance (gene doping) is a novel threat to the world of sports. Skeletal muscle is a prime target of gene therapy and we asked whether we can develop a test system to produce and detect gene doping. Towards this end, we introduced a plasmid (pCMV-FAK, 3.8 kb, 50 μg) for constitutive expression of the chicken homologue for the regulator of muscle growth, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), via gene electro transfer in the anti-gravitational muscle, m. soleus, or gastrocnemius medialis of rats. Activation of hypertrophy signalling was monitored by assessing the ribosomal kinase p70S6K and muscle fibre cross section. Detectability of the introduced plasmid was monitored with polymerase chain reaction in deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) from transfected muscle and serum. Muscle transfection with pCMV-FAK elevated FAK expression 7- and 73-fold, respectively, and increased mean cross section by 52 and 16% in targeted muscle fibres of soleus and gastrocnemius muscle 7 days after gene electro transfer. Concomitantly p70S6K content was increased in transfected soleus muscle (+110%). Detection of the exogenous plasmid sequence was possible in DNA and cDNA of muscle until 7 days after transfection, but not in serum except close to the site of plasmid deposition, 1 h after injection and surgery. The findings suggest that the reliable detection of gene doping in the immoral athlete is not possible unless a change in the current practice of tissue sampling is applied involving the collection of muscle biopsy close to the site of gene injection.

  4. Human-Specific SNP in Obesity Genes, Adrenergic Receptor Beta2 (ADRB2), Beta3 (ADRB3), and PPAR γ2 (PPARG), during Primate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Akiko; Nakamura, Shin; Mitsunaga, Fusako; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Udono, Toshifumi; Suryobroto, Bambang

    2012-01-01

    Adrenergic-receptor beta2 (ADRB2) and beta3 (ADRB3) are obesity genes that play a key role in the regulation of energy balance by increasing lipolysis and thermogenesis. The Glu27 allele in ADRB2 and the Arg64 allele in ADRB3 are associated with abdominal obesity and early onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in many ethnic groups. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG) is required for adipocyte differentiation. Pro12Ala mutation decreases PPARG activity and resistance to NIDDM. In humans, energy-expense alleles, Gln27 in ADRB2 and Trp64 in ADRB3, are at higher frequencies than Glu27 and Arg64, respectively, but Ala12 in PPARG is at lower frequency than Pro12. Adaptation of humans for lipolysis, thermogenesis, and reduction of fat accumulation could be considered by examining which alleles in these genes are dominant in non-human primates (NHP). All NHP (P. troglodytes, G. gorilla, P. pygmaeus, H. agilis and macaques) had energy-thrifty alleles, Gly16 and Glu27 in ADRB2, and Arg64 in ADRB3, but did not have energy-expense alleles, Arg16, Gln27 and Trp64 alleles. In PPARG gene, all NHP had large adipocyte accumulating type, the Pro12 allele. Conclusions These results indicate that a tendency to produce much more heat through the energy-expense alleles developed only in humans, who left tropical rainforests for savanna and developed new features in their heat-regulation systems, such as reduction of body hair and increased evaporation of water, and might have helped the protection of entrails from cold at night, especially in glacial periods. PMID:22937051

  5. Interleukin (IL)1beta, IL-1alpha, and IL-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphisms in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kanemoto, K; Kawasaki, J; Miyamoto, T; Obayashi, H; Nishimura, M

    2000-05-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1beta, are known to modulate effects of neurotoxic neurotransmitters discharged during excitation or inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). They also regulate development of glial scars at sites of CNS injury. To elucidate a genetic predisposition of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS+), we studied polymorphisms in the IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) genes in 50 patients with TLE-HS+ and in 112 controls. Fifty-three patients who had TLE without HS were also examined (TLE-HS-) as disease controls. The distribution of the biallelic polymorphism in the promoter region at position -511 of the IL-1beta gene (IL-1B-511) was significantly different both between TLE-HS+ patients and controls and between TLE-HS+ and TLE-HS- patients. The differences were due to overrepresentation of the homozygotes for IL-1B-511*2, which is suggested to be a high producer of IL-1beta, in TLE-HS+ patients compared with both controls and TLE-HS- patients. In contrast, there was no difference between TLE-HS- patients and controls. Our data suggest that, in the homozygotes for IL-IB-511*2, minor events in development such as febrile convulsions could set up a cascade leading to HS.

  6. Occurrence of bacteria producing broad-spectrum beta-lactamases and qnr genes in hospital and urban wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Röderová, Magdaléna; Sedláková, Miroslava Htoutou; Pudová, Vendula; Hricová, Kristýna; Silová, Romana; Imwensi, Peter Eghonghon Odion; Bardoň, Jan; Kolář, Milan

    2016-04-01

    The aims were to investigate the level of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospital and urban wastewater and to determine the similarity of isolates obtained from wastewater and hospitalized patients. Wastewater samples were collected in September 2013 and 2014. After identification using MALDI-TOF MS, beta-lactamase production was determined by relevant phenotypic tests. Genes responsible for the production of single beta-lactamase groups and Qnr proteins were established. The epidemiological relationship of the isolates from wastewater and hospitalized patients was determined by PFGE. A total of 51 isolates of enterobacteria were obtained. Overall, 45.1% of them produced broad-spectrum beta-lactamases. Genes encoding TEM, SHV, CTX-M, CIT, DHA and EBC types of enzymes and Qnr proteins were detected. No broad-spectrum beta-lactamase production was confirmed in the urban wastewater treatment plant. The most important finding was the detection of two identical isolates of K. pneumoniae in 2013, one from a patient's urinary catheter and the other from a wastewater sample.

  7. Functional analysis of a proline to serine mutation in codon 453 of the thyroid hormone receptor {beta}1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ozata, M.; Suzuki, Satoru; Takeda, Teiji

    1995-10-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human thyroid hormone receptor {beta}(hTR{beta}) have been associated with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH). This disorder is associated with significant behavoral abnormalities. We examined the hTR{beta} gene in a family with members who manifest inappropriately normal TSH, elevated free T{sub 4}, and free and total T{sub 3}. Sequence analysis showed a cytosine to thymine transition at nucleotide 1642 in one allele of the index patient`s genomic DNA. This altered proline to serine at codon 453. The resulting mutant receptor when expressed in vitro bound DNA with high affinity, but the T{sub 3} affinity of the receptor was impaired. The mutant TR demonstrated a dominant negative effect when cotransfected with two isoforms of wild-type receptor and also in the presence of TR variant {alpha}2 in COS-1 cells. Mutations of codon 453 occur more frequently than at other sites, and four different amino acid substitutions have been reported. Significant differences in phenotype occur among affected individuals, varying from normality to moderately severe GRTH. There is no clear correlation between K{sub a} or in vitro function of the mutant receptor, and phenotype. This study extends the association between GRTH and illness, and indicates that early diagnosis and counseling are needed in families with TR{beta}1 abnormalities. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Sequential mutations in the interleukin-3 (IL3)/granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/IL5 receptor beta-subunit genes are necessary for the complete conversion to growth autonomy mediated by a truncated beta C subunit.

    PubMed

    Hannemann, J; Hara, T; Kawai, M; Miyajima, A; Ostertag, W; Stocking, C

    1995-05-01

    An amino-terminally truncated beta C receptor (beta C-R) subunit of the interleukin-3 (IL3)/granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/IL5 receptor complex mediates factor-independent and tumorigenic growth in two spontaneous mutants of a promyelocytic cell line. The constitutive activation of the JAK2 protein kinase in these mutants confirms that signaling occurs through the truncated receptor protein. Noteworthily, in addition to a 10-kb deletion in the beta C-R subunit gene encoding the truncated receptor, several secondary and independent mutations that result in the deletion or functional inactivation of the allelic beta C-R subunit and the closely related beta IL3-R subunit genes were observed in both mutants, suggesting that such mutations are necessary for the full oncogenic penetrance of the truncated beta C-R subunit. Reversion of these mutations by the expression of the wild-type beta C-R in the two mutants resulted in a fivefold decrease in cloning efficiency of the mutants in the absence of IL3, confirming a functional interaction between the wild-type and truncated proteins. Furthermore, expression of the truncated beta C-R subunit in factor-dependent myeloid cells did not immediately render the cells autonomous but increased the spontaneous frequency to factor-independent growth by 4 orders of magnitude. Implications for both leukemogenic progression and receptor-subunit interaction and signaling are discussed.

  9. Differentiation of Giardia duodenalis from other Giardia spp. by using polymerase chain reaction and gene probes.

    PubMed Central

    Mahbubani, M H; Bej, A K; Perlin, M H; Schaefer, F W; Jakubowski, W; Atlas, R M

    1992-01-01

    Giardia spp. are waterborne organisms that are the most commonly identified pathogenic intestinal protozoans in the United States. Current detection techniques for Giardia species in water include microscopy and immunofluorescence techniques. Species of the genus Giardia are classified on the basis of taxonomic criteria, such as cell morphology, and on host specificity. We have developed a polymerase chain reaction- and gene probe-based detection system specific for Giardia spp., which can discriminate between the relevant species of the G. duodenalis type pathogenic to humans and other Giardia species that are not human pathogens. This method can detect a single Giardia cyst and is therefore sensitive enough for environmental monitoring. Images PMID:1734070

  10. [Effects of intergenic interaction of the high pigmentation gene hp-2(dg) (high pigment-2 dark green) with the gene B (beta-carotene) in tomato].

    PubMed

    Kuzemenskiĭ, A V

    2008-01-01

    It was shown that during intergenic interaction of genes hp-2(dg) and B in dihomozygote an additive factor is formed activating biogenesis of beta-carotene in tomato fruits. In the genotype B/B//hp-2(dg)/hp-2(dg) there is preserved the positive effects of the gene hp-2(dg) on the content of ascorbic acid and the negative one on the content of titrated acids. With this stabilization of the gene hp-2(dg) genetic depression is observed, which is manifested in the increased productivity of B/B//hp-2(dg)/hp-2(dg)-genotypes.

  11. Mapping of the gene encoding the. beta. -amyloid precursor protein and its relationship to the Down syndrome region of chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, D.; Gardiner, K.; Kao, F.T.; Tanzi, R.; Watkins, P.; Gusella, J.F. )

    1988-11-01

    The gene encoding the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein has been assigned to human chromosome 21, as has a gene responsible for at least some cases of familial Alzheimer disease. Linkage studies strongly suggest that the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein and the product corresponding to familial Alzheimer disease are from two genes, or at least that several million base pairs of DNA separate the markers. The precise location of the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 has not yet been determined. Here the authors show, by using a somatic-cell/hybrid-cell mapping panel, in situ hybridization, and transverse-alternating-field electrophoresis, that the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene is located on chromosome 21 very near the 21q21/21q/22 border and probably within the region of chromosome 21 that, when trisomic, results in Down syndrome.

  12. No Effect of the Transforming Growth Factor {beta}1 Promoter Polymorphism C-509T on TGFB1 Gene Expression, Protein Secretion, or Cellular Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Reuther, Sebastian; Metzke, Elisabeth; Bonin, Michael; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Raabe, Annette

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To study whether the promoter polymorphism (C-509T) affects transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGFB1) expression, protein secretion, and/or cellular radiosensitivity for both human lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed with lymphocytes taken either from 124 breast cancer patients or 59 pairs of normal monozygotic twins. We used 15 normal human primary fibroblast strains as controls. The C-509T genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism or TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. The cellular radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was measured by G0/1 assay and that of fibroblasts by colony assay. The amount of extracellular TGFB1 protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TGFB1 expression was assessed via microarray analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The C-509T genotype was found not to be associated with cellular radiosensitivity, neither for lymphocytes (breast cancer patients, P=.811; healthy donors, P=.181) nor for fibroblasts (P=.589). Both TGFB1 expression and TGFB1 protein secretion showed considerable variation, which, however, did not depend on the C-509T genotype (protein secretion: P=.879; gene expression: lymphocytes, P=.134, fibroblasts, P=.605). There was also no general correlation between TGFB1 expression and cellular radiosensitivity (lymphocytes, P=.632; fibroblasts, P=.573). Conclusion: Our data indicate that any association between the SNP C-509T of TGFB1 and risk of normal tissue toxicity cannot be ascribed to a functional consequence of this SNP, either on the level of gene expression, protein secretion, or cellular radiosensitivity.

  13. A homozygous nonsense mutation in the {alpha}3 chain gene of laminin 5 (LAMA3) in Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa: Prenatal exclusion in a fetus at risk

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, J.A. |; Ciatti, S.; Christiano, A.M.

    1995-09-01

    Mutations in the three genes (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) that encode the three chains ({alpha}3, {Beta}3, and {gamma}2, respectively) of laminin 5, a protein involved in epidermal-dermal adhesion, have been established as the genetic basis for the inherited blistering skin disorder, Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB). In this study, we performed mutational analysis on genomic DNA from a child with H-JEB and identified a nonsense mutation in the {alpha}3 chain gene (LAMA3) consisting of a homozygous C-to-T transition resulting in a premature termination codon (CGA {r_arrow} TGA) on both alleles. The parents were shown to be heterozygous carriers of the same mutation. Direct mutation analysis was used to perform DNA-based prenatal diagnosis from a chorionic villus biopsy at 10 weeks` gestation in a subsequent pregnancy. The fetus was predicted to be genotypically normal with respect to the LAMA3 mutation. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction reference genes in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain: validation and literature search

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a widely used, highly sensitive laboratory technique to rapidly and easily detect, identify and quantify gene expression. Reliable RT-qPCR data necessitates accurate normalization with validated control genes (reference genes) whose expression is constant in all studied conditions. This stability has to be demonstrated. We performed a literature search for studies using quantitative or semi-quantitative PCR in the rat spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain to verify whether any reference genes had previously been validated. We then analyzed the stability over time of 7 commonly used reference genes in the nervous system – specifically in the spinal cord dorsal horn and the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). These were: Actin beta (Actb), Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), ribosomal proteins 18S (18S), L13a (RPL13a) and L29 (RPL29), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) and hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS). We compared the candidate genes and established a stability ranking using the geNorm algorithm. Finally, we assessed the number of reference genes necessary for accurate normalization in this neuropathic pain model. Results We found GAPDH, HMBS, Actb, HPRT1 and 18S cited as reference genes in literature on studies using the SNI model. Only HPRT1 and 18S had been once previously demonstrated as stable in RT-qPCR arrays. All the genes tested in this study, using the geNorm algorithm, presented gene stability values (M-value) acceptable enough for them to qualify as potential reference genes in both DRG and spinal cord. Using the coefficient of variation, 18S failed the 50% cut-off with a value of 61% in the DRG. The two most stable genes in the dorsal horn were RPL29 and RPL13a; in the DRG they were HPRT1 and Actb. Using a 0.15 cut-off for pairwise variations we found that any pair of stable reference gene was sufficient for the

  15. Silencing megalin and cubilin genes inhibits myeloma light chain endocytosis and ameliorates toxicity in human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Balamuthusamy, Saravanan; Simon, Eric E; Batuman, Vecihi

    2008-07-01

    Using target-specific short interfering (si) RNAs, we silenced the tandem endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin genes in cultured human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. Transfection by siRNA resulted in up to 90% suppression of both megalin and cubilin protein and mRNA expression. In HK-2 cells exposed to kappa-light chain for up to 24 h, light chain endocytosis was reduced in either megalin- or cubilin-silenced cells markedly but incompletely. Simultaneous silencing of both the cubilin and megalin genes, however, resulted in near-complete inhibition of light chain endocytosis, as determined by measuring kappa-light chain protein concentration in cell cytoplasm and by flow cytometry using FITC-labeled kappa-light chain. In these cells, light chain-induced cytokine responses (interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as the associated cellular and morphological alterations were also markedly suppressed. The results demonstrate that light chain endocytosis is predominantly mediated by the megalin-cubilin tandem endocytic receptor and identify endocytosis as a key step in light chain cytotoxicity. Blocking light chain endocytosis prevents its nephrotoxic effects on human kidney proximal tubule cells.

  16. Cloning and characterization of two genes from Bacillus polymyxa expressing beta-glucosidase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    González-Candelas, L; Aristoy, M C; Polaina, J; Flors, A

    1989-01-01

    DNA fragments from Bacillus polymyxa which encode beta-glucosidase activity were cloned in Escherichia coli by selection of yellow transformants able to hydrolyze the artificial chromogenic substrate p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside. Restriction endonuclease maps and Southern analysis of the cloned fragments showed the existence of two different genes. Expression of either one of these genes allowed growth of E. coli in minimal medium with cellobiose as the only carbon source. One of the two enzymes was found in the periplasm of E. coli, hydrolyzed arylglucosides more actively than cellobiose, and rendered glucose as the only product upon cellobiose hydrolysis. The other enzyme was located in the cytoplasm, was more active toward cellobiose, and hydrolyzed this disaccharide, yielding glucose and another, unidentified compound, probably a phosphorylated sugar. Images PMID:2515802

  17. Sardinian delta beta zero-thalassemia: a further example of a C to T substitution at position -196 of the A gamma globin gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Ottolenghi, S; Giglioni, B; Pulazzini, A; Comi, P; Camaschella, C; Serra, A; Guerrasio, A; Saglio, G

    1987-04-01

    Selective overexpression (50- to 100-fold) in adult erythroid cells of either G gamma or A gamma fetal globin gene is observed in hereditary conditions known as delta beta zero-thalassemia and hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH). Recently, a C----T change at position -196 of an overexpressed A gamma globin gene from an Italian HPFH was hypothesized, on the basis of indirect evidence, to represent the cause of the functional defect. We now show that the same mutation is present in a different overexpressed A gamma-globin gene from a Sardinian patient with a different syndrome (delta beta zero-thalassemia). The Sardinian A gamma globin gene differs from both the HPFH and the normal A gamma globin gene at nucleotide 1,560 in the noncoding portion of the third exon, where an A is deleted. In addition, the mutant -196 A gamma-globin gene is linked to a normal beta globin gene in HPFH, and to a beta-thalassemic gene (beta 39CAG----TAG) in delta beta zero-thalassemia. These data strengthen the suggestion that -196 mutation is causally linked to the abnormal phenotype and raise the question of whether the same or multiple mutational events are responsible for the appearance of the -196 mutation in different syndromes.

  18. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  19. Plasma acylcarnitine profiles suggest incomplete long-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation and altered tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in type 2 diabetic African-American women.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sean H; Hoppel, Charles L; Lok, Kerry H; Zhao, Ling; Wong, Scott W; Minkler, Paul E; Hwang, Daniel H; Newman, John W; Garvey, W Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Inefficient muscle long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) combustion is associated with insulin resistance, but molecular links between mitochondrial fat catabolism and insulin action remain controversial. We hypothesized that plasma acylcarnitine profiling would identify distinct metabolite patterns reflective of muscle fat catabolism when comparing individuals bearing a missense G304A uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3 g/a) polymorphism to controls, because UCP3 is predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle and g/a individuals have reduced whole-body fat oxidation. MS analyses of 42 carnitine moieties in plasma samples from fasting type 2 diabetics (n = 44) and nondiabetics (n = 12) with or without the UCP3 g/a polymorphism (n = 28/genotype: 22 diabetic, 6 nondiabetic/genotype) were conducted. Contrary to our hypothesis, genotype had a negligible impact on plasma metabolite patterns. However, a comparison of nondiabetics vs. type 2 diabetics revealed a striking increase in the concentrations of fatty acylcarnitines reflective of incomplete LCFA beta-oxidation in the latter (i.e. summed C10- to C14-carnitine concentrations were approximately 300% of controls; P = 0.004). Across all volunteers (n = 56), acetylcarnitine rose and propionylcarnitine decreased with increasing hemoglobin A1c (r = 0.544, P < 0.0001; and r = -0.308, P < 0.05, respectively) and with increasing total plasma acylcarnitine concentration. In proof-of-concept studies, we made the novel observation that C12-C14 acylcarnitines significantly stimulated nuclear factor kappa-B activity (up to 200% of controls) in RAW264.7 cells. These results are consistent with the working hypothesis that inefficient tissue LCFA beta-oxidation, due in part to a relatively low tricarboxylic acid cycle capacity, increases tissue accumulation of acetyl-CoA and generates chain-shortened acylcarnitine molecules that activate proinflammatory pathways implicated in insulin resistance.

  20. Worldwide differences in the incidence of type I diabetes are associated with amino acid variation at position 57 of the HLA-DQ. beta. chain

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, J.S.; LaPorte, R.E.; Trucco, M. ); Stone, R.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The presence of an amino acid other than aspartic acid at position 57 of the HLA-DQ {beta} chain (non-Asp-57) is highly associated with susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), whereas an aspartic acid at this position (Asp-57) appears to confer resistance to the disease. The authors hypothesize that the 30-fold difference in IDDM incidence across racial groups and countries is related to variability in the frequency of these alleles. Diabetic and nondiabetic individuals were evaluated in five populations, including those at low, moderate, and high risk. HLA-DQ {beta} genotype distributions among the IDDM case groups were markedly different as were those among nondiabetic controls. Non-Asp-57 alleles were significantly associated with IDDM in all areas; population-specific odds ratios for non-Asp-57 homozygotes relative to Asp-57 homozygotes ranged from 14 to 111. Relative risk information from the case-control study and population incidence data were combined to estimate genotype-specific incidence rates for the Allegheny county, PA, Caucasians. These rates were used to predict the overall incidence rates in the remaining populations, which were within the 95% confidence intervals of the actual rates established from incidence registries. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that population variation in the distribution of non-Asp-57 alleles may explain much of the geographic variation in IDDM incidence.

  1. Limited pattern of TCR delta chain gene rearrangement on the RNA level in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, J; Januszkiewicz, D; Pernak, M; Hertmanowska, H; Nowicka-Kujawska, K; Rembowska, J; Lewandowski, K; Nowak, T; Wender, M

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) is most likely affected by a number of genes, including HLA and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes. T cells expressing gamma/delta receptors seem to contribute to autoagression in MS, as evidenced by their localization in the MS plaques in the brain. The aim of this study was to analyse the TCRdelta chain gene rearrangement at the RNA (cDNA) level and compare to the DNA pattern rearrangement. TCRdelta gene rearrangement was analysed in MS patients and healthy individuals with the use of primers specific for Vdelta1-6 and Jdelta1 genes (at the DNA level) and specific for Vdelta1-6 and Cdelta1 genes (at the cDNA level). The size of PCR products was analysed on agarose gel and by ALF-Express (Pharmacia). Additionally, the lymphocyte surface immunophenotype was studied with specific monoclonal antibodies. At the DNA level a restricted pattern of Vdelta3-Jdelta1 and Vdelta5-Jdelta1 was found only in MS patients. Contrary to DNA, mono-, oligoclonal RNA (cDNA) rearrangements were limited to Vdelta1-Cdelta1, Vdelta2-Cdelta1 and Vdelta3-Cdelta1 only in MS patients as well. Surface immunophenotype analysis revealed in MS a much higher frequency of activated gamma/delta T lymphocytes, i.e. expressing HLA-DR and CD25. An elevated level of CD56 positive cells in MS was recorded. Mono-oligoclonal pattern of TCRdelta gene rearrangement at the RNA level, along with increase in activated gamma/delta T cells, strongly argue for a significant role of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of MS.

  2. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  3. Cloning of the RHO1 gene from Candida albicans and its regulation of beta-1,3-glucan synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, O; Tachibana, Y; Ohya, Y; Arisawa, M; Watanabe, T

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RHO1 gene encodes a low-molecular-weight GTPase. One of its recently identified functions is the regulation of beta-1,3-glucan synthase, which synthesizes the main component of the fungal cell wall (J. Drgonova et al., Science 272:277-279, 1996; T. Mazur and W. Baginsky, J. Biol. Chem. 271:14604-14609, 1996; and H. Qadota et al., Science 272:279-281, 1996). From the opportunistic pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, we cloned the RHO1 gene by the PCR and cross-hybridization methods. Sequence analysis revealed that the Candida RHO1 gene has a 597-nucleotide region which encodes a putative 22.0-kDa peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence predicts that Candida albicans Rho1p is 82.9% identical to Saccharomyces Rho1p and contains all the domains conserved among Rho-type GTPases from other organisms. The Candida albicans RHO1 gene could rescue a S. cerevisiae strain containing a rho1 deletion. Furthermore, recombinant Candida albicans Rho1p could reactivate the beta-1,3-glucan synthesis activities of both C. albicans and S. cerevisiae membranes in which endogenous Rho1p had been depleted by Tergitol NP-40-NaCl treatment. Candida albicans Rho1p was copurified with the beta-1,3-glucan synthase putative catalytic subunit, Candida albicans Gsc1p, by product entrapment. Candida albicans Rho1p was shown to interact directly with Candida albicans Gsc1p in a ligand overlay assay and a cross-linking study. These results indicate that Candida albicans Rho1p acts in the same manner as Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho1p to regulate beta-1,3-glucan synthesis. PMID:9401032

  4. Two translational initiation sites in the infB gene are used to express initiation factor IF2 alpha and IF2 beta in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Plumbridge, J A; Deville, F; Sacerdot, C; Petersen, H U; Cenatiempo, Y; Cozzone, A; Grunberg-Manago, M; Hershey, J W

    1985-01-01

    The gene infB codes for the two forms of translational initiation factor IF2: IF2 alpha (97 300 daltons) and IF2 beta (79 700 daltons). To determine whether the two forms differ at their N terminus, purified IF2 alpha and IF2 beta were subjected to 11 or more steps of Edman degradation. The N-terminal amino acid sequences are completely different, but match perfectly the DNA sequences at the beginning of the infB open reading frame and an in-phase region 471 bp downstream. A fusion was constructed between the proximal half of the infB gene and the lacZ gene lacking the region coding for the first eight amino acids. The fused gene expresses two products of 170 000 and 150 000 daltons, corresponding to the fused proteins IF2 alpha-beta-galactosidase and IF2 beta-beta-galactosidase, which confirms in vivo that the IF2 forms differ at their N terminus. A deletion of the 5'-non-translated region of the fused gene, including the Shine/Dalgarno ribosomal binding site, results in the expression of IF2 beta-beta-galactosidase but not IF2 alpha-beta-galactosidase. This strongly suggests that IF2 beta results from independent translation rather than from a precise proteolytic cleavage of IF2 alpha. Further evidence for initiation of protein synthesis at the putative IF2 alpha and IF2 beta start sites was sought by using an in vitro dipeptide synthesis assay. A DNA fragment containing the entire infB gene was cloned into three plasmid vectors and the resulting recombinant DNAs were used as templates in assays containing fMet-tRNA and various labelled aminoacyl-tRNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. PMID:3894004

  5. Analysis of CD2 and TCR-{beta} gene expression in jurkat cell mutants suggests a cis regulation of gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Kamoun, M.; Woods, J.S.; Sano, N.

    1995-10-15

    Thirty CD2{sup -} J32 stable clones, derived by mutagenesis and subsequent immunoselection with anti-CD2 Ab, were used to study the regulation of CD2 and TCR gene expression. Analysis of RNA expression revealed that the loss of surface expression of CD2 was due to a lack of expression of CD2 mRNA and was associated with a lack of expression of VDJ TCR-{beta} transcripts in 12 of these mutants, sparing the expression of DJ TCR-{beta}, TCR-{alpha}, CD3{gamma}, {delta}, {epsilon}, and {zeta} RNA. The expression of other differentiation molecules was unaffected, except for CD1, CD4, and CD5, which were either decreased or absent in most of these mutants. A gain in the expression of TCR-{gamma} transcripts was observed in each of these mutants, while, as expected, no TCR-{gamma} transcripts were detected in wild-type J32 cells. Several mutants were able to use the human CD2 enhancer and the murine TCR-{beta} enhancer and promoter to activate transcription from reporter genes in the context of heterologous promoters, indicating that the mutation(s) does not affect transcription pathways. Consistent with this finding is the adequate expression in these mutants of several lineage-specific transcription factors. The expression of CD2 in several of these mutants was rescued by gene transfer using a genomic 28.5-kb CD2 fragment, suggesting that the enchancer function of this gene may be dependent on the enhancer site. These observations suggest that the coordinate expressions of CD2 and TCR-{beta} genes share common regulatory mechanisms involving factors regulating chromatin structure and accessibility. 51 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Effect of heat stress and feeding phosphorus levels on pig electron transport chain gene expression.

    PubMed

    Weller, M M D C A; Alebrante, L; Campos, P H R F; Saraiva, A; Silva, B A N; Donzele, J L; Oliveira, R F M; Silva, F F; Gasparino, E; Lopes, P S; Guimarães, S E F

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of temperature and different levels of available phosphorus (aP) on the expression of nine genes encoding electron transport chain proteins in the Longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of pigs. Two trials were carried out using 48 high-lean growth pigs from two different growth phases: from 15 to 30 kg (phase 1) and from 30 to 60 kg (phase 2). Pigs from growth phase 1 were fed with three different levels of dietary aP (0.107%, 0.321% or 0.535%) and submitted either to a thermoneutral (24°C and RH at 76%) or to a heat stress (34°C and RH at 70%) environment. Pigs from growth phase 2 were fed with three different levels of dietary aP (0.116%, 0.306% or 0.496%) and submitted either to a thermoneutral (22ºC and RH at 77%) or to a heat stress (32ºC and RH at 73%) environment. Heat stress decreased (P<0.001) average daily feed intake at both growth phases. At 24°C, pigs in phase 1 fed the 0.321% aP diet had greater average daily gain and feed conversion (P<0.05) than those fed the 0.107% or 0.535% while, at 34°C pigs fed the 0.535% aP had the best performance (P<0.05). Pigs from phase 2 fed the 0.306% aP had best performance in both thermal environments. Gene expression profile was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Irrespective of growing phase, the expression of six genes was lower (P<0.05) at high temperature than at thermoneutrality. The lower expression of these genes under high temperatures evidences the effects of heat stress by decreasing oxidative metabolism, through adaptive physiological mechanisms in order to reduce heat production. In pigs from phase 1, six genes were differentially expressed across aP levels (P<0.05) in the thermoneutral and one gene in the heat stress. In pigs from phase 2, two genes were differentially expressed across aP levels (P<0.05) in both thermal environments. These data revealed strong evidence that phosphorus and thermal environments are key factors to