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Sample records for beta particle calibrations

  1. Measurement quality assurance for beta particle calibrations at NIST

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, C.G.; Pruitt, J.S.

    1993-12-31

    Standardized beta-particle fields have been established in an international standard and have been adopted for use in several U.S. dosimeter and instrument testing standards. Calibration methods and measurement quality assurance procedures employed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for beta-particle calibrations in these reference fields are discussed. The calibration facility including the NIST-automated extrapolation ionization chamber is described, and some sample results of calibrations are shown. Methods for establishing and maintaining traceability to NIST of secondary laboratories are discussed. Currently, there are problems in finding a good method for routine testing of traceability to NIST. Some examples of past testing methods are given and solutions to this problem are proposed.

  2. Dose Rate Calibration of a Commercial Beta-Particle Irradiator Used In Archeological and Geological Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, S.M.

    2004-10-31

    The 801E Multiple Sample Irradiator, manufactured by Daybreak Nuclear Systems, is capable of exposing up to 30 samples to beta radiation by placing each sample one by one directly beneath a heavily shielded ceramic Sr-90/Y-90 source and opening a specially designed shutter. Daybreak Nuclear Systems does not provide the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y dose rate to the sample because of variations of up to 20% in the nominal activity of the beta sources (separately manufactured by AEA Technology). Thus it is left to the end user to determine. Here aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), in the form of Landauer's Luxel{trademark}, was irradiated to different known doses using a calibrated {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta particle irradiator, and the OSL signal monitored after each irradiation to generate a calibration curve. Comparison of the OSL Signal from the unknown 801E Irradiator dose with the calibration curve enabled the dose and therefore dose rate to be determined. The timing accuracy of the 801E Irradiator was also evaluated and found to be +/- 0.5 seconds. The dose rate of the beta source was found to be 0.147 +/- 0.007 Gy/s.

  3. Calibration of the Malvern particle sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, L. G.

    1984-01-01

    A relatively simple technique has been developed to calibrate particle- and droplet-sizing instruments manufactured by Malvern and other similar Fraunhofer diffraction particle-sizing instruments. Measurements of standard reticles using an instrument calibrated in this manner demonstrate the effectiveness of the procedure. In addition, guidelines are presented to avoid errors due to vignetting of the scattered light signal.

  4. Automated calibration of a flight particle spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    A system for calibrating both electron and ion imaging particle spectrometers was devised to calibrate flight instruments in a large vacuum facility in the Space Science Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center. An IBM-compatible computer was used to control, via an IEEE 488 buss protocol, a two-axis gimbled table, constructed to fit inside the tank. Test settings of various diagnostic voltages were also acquired via the buss. These spectrometers constructed by the author at UCSD were calibrated in an automatic procedure programmed on the small computer. Data was up-loaded to the SSL VAX where a program was developed to plot the results.

  5. Gamma-ray blind beta particle probe

    DOEpatents

    Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2001-01-01

    An intra-operative beta particle probe is provided by placing a suitable photomultiplier tube (PMT), micro channel plate (MCP) or other electron multiplier device within a vacuum housing equipped with: 1) an appropriate beta particle permeable window; and 2) electron detection circuitry. Beta particles emitted in the immediate vicinity of the probe window will be received by the electron multiplier device and amplified to produce a detectable signal. Such a device is useful as a gamma insensitive, intra-operative, beta particle probe in surgeries where the patient has been injected with a beta emitting radiopharmaceutical. The method of use of such a device is also described, as is a position sensitive such device.

  6. Calibration of optical particle-size analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Pechin, William H.; Thacker, Louis H.; Turner, Lloyd J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a system for the calibration of an optical particle-size analyzer of the light-intercepting type for spherical particles, wherein a rotary wheel or disc is provided with radially-extending wires of differing diameters, each wire corresponding to a particular equivalent spherical particle diameter. These wires are passed at an appropriate frequency between the light source and the light detector of the analyzer. The reduction of light as received at the detector is a measure of the size of the wire, and the electronic signal may then be adjusted to provide the desired signal for corresponding spherical particles. This calibrator may be operated at any time without interrupting other processing.

  7. Beta particle monitor for surfaces

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1997-01-01

    A beta radiation detector which is capable of reliably detecting beta radiation emitted from a surface. An electrically conductive signal collector is adjustably mounted inside an electrically conductive enclosure which may define a single large opening for placing against a surface. The adjustable mounting of the electrically conductive signal collector can be based on the distance from the surface or on the expected beta energy range. A voltage source is connected to the signal collector through an electrometer or other display means for creating an electric field between the signal collector and the enclosure. Air ions created by the beta radiation are collected and the current produced is indicated on the electrometer or other display means.

  8. Beta particle monitor for surfaces

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.

    1997-10-21

    A beta radiation detector which is capable of reliably detecting beta radiation emitted from a surface. An electrically conductive signal collector is adjustably mounted inside an electrically conductive enclosure which may define a single large opening for placing against a surface. The adjustable mounting of the electrically conductive signal collector can be based on the distance from the surface or on the expected beta energy range. A voltage source is connected to the signal collector through an electrometer or other display means for creating an electric field between the signal collector and the enclosure. Air ions created by the beta radiation are collected and the current produced is indicated on the electrometer or other display means. 2 figs.

  9. Test-Aerosol Generator For Calibrating Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Adams, Alois J.; Schwindt, Christian J.; Hodge, Timothy R.; Mallow, Tim J.; Duong, Anh A.; Bukauskas, Vyto V.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus generates clean, stable aerosol stream for use in testing and calibrating laser-based aerosol-particle counter. Size and concentration of aerosol particles controlled to ensure accurate calibration. Cheap, widely available medical nebulizers used to generate aerosols.

  10. Towards a Precise Energy Calibration of the CUORE Double Beta Decay Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dally, Adam G.

    The mass of the neutrino may hold the key to many problems in cosmology and astrophysics. The observation of neutrino oscillations shows that neutrinos have mass, which was something that was not accounted for in the Standard Model of particle physics. This thesis covers topics relating to measuring the value of neutrino mass directly using bolometers. The first section will discuss the neutrino mass and different experiments for measuring the mass using bolometers. The mass of the neutrino can be measured directly from beta-decay or inferred from observation of neutrinoless double beta decay (0nubetabeta). In this work I present Monte Carlo and analytic simulation of the MARE experiment including, pile-up and energy resolution effects. The mass measurement limits of a micro-calorimeter experiments as it relates to the quantity of decays measured is provided. A similar simulation is preformed for the HolMES experiment. The motivation is to determine the sensitivity of such experiments and the detector requirements to reach the goal sensitivity. Another possible method for determining the neutrino mass is to use neutrinoless double beta decay. The second section will cover the Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) detector calibration system (DCS). CUORE is a neutrinoless double beta decay (0nubetabeta) experiment with an active mass of 206 kg of 130Te. The detector consists of 988 TeO2 bolometers operating at 10 mK. The signature of 0 nubetabeta decay is an excess of events at the Q-value of 2528 keV. Understanding the energy response is critical for event identification, but this presents many challenges. Calibration is necessary to associate a known energy from a gamma with a voltage pulse from the detector. The DCS must overcome many design challenges. The calibration source must be placed safely and reliable within the detector. The temperature of the detector region of the cryostat must not be changed during calibration. To achieve this

  11. HgI sub 2 low energy beta particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.S.; Squillante, M.R.; Entine, G. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper reports on a HgI{sub 2} device structure designed and tested which allows HgI{sub 2} to be used to make low energy beta particle detectors. The devices detected tritium beta particles with about a 25% efficiency. In addition, an encapsulation scheme was identified which has the potential to protect the devices while permitting most of the beta particles to reach the active region.

  12. Automated calibration of a flight particle spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, Roy B.

    1986-01-01

    An automatic calibration system was designed for use in the vacuum facility at the Space Science Laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center. That system was developed and used in the intervening winter to calibrate the ion spectrometer that eventually flew in May 1986 aboard the NASA project, CRIT 1. During this summer, it is planned to implement the calibration of both an ion and electron spectrometer of a new design whose basic elements were conceived during the winter of 1985 to 1986. This spectrometer was completed in the summer and successfully mounted in the vacuum tank for calibration. However, the source gate valve malfunctioned, and, at the end of the summer, it still needed a replacement. During the inevitable delays in the experimental research, the numerical model of the Critical Velocity effect was completed and these results were presented.

  13. Monte Carlo calculation of the sensitivity of a commercial dose calibrator to gamma and beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Valley, Jean-François; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, François O

    2004-06-01

    The detection process used in a commercial dose calibrator was modeled using the GEANT 3 Monte Carlo code. Dose calibrator efficiency for gamma and beta emitters, and the response to monoenergetic photons and electrons was calculated. The model shows that beta emitters below 2.5 MeV deposit energy indirectly in the detector through bremsstrahlung produced in the chamber wall or in the source itself. Higher energy beta emitters (E > 2.5 MeV) deposit energy directly in the chamber sensitive volume, and dose calibrator sensitivity increases abruptly for these radionuclides. The Monte Carlo calculations were compared with gamma and beta emitter measurements. The calculations show that the variation in dose calibrator efficiency with measuring conditions (source volume, container diameter, container wall thickness and material, position of the source within the calibrator) is relatively small and can be considered insignificant for routine measurement applications. However, dose calibrator efficiency depends strongly on the inner-wall thickness of the detector.

  14. Techniques for precise energy calibration of particle pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, M.; Campbell-Ricketts, T.; Bahadori, A.; Empl, A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate techniques to improve the accuracy of the energy calibration of Timepix pixel detectors, used for the measurement of energetic particles. The typical signal from such particles spreads among many pixels due to charge sharing effects. As a consequence, the deposited energy in each pixel cannot be reconstructed unless the detector is calibrated, limiting the usability of such signals for calibration. To avoid this shortcoming, we calibrate using low energy X-rays. However, charge sharing effects still occur, resulting in part of the energy being deposited in adjacent pixels and possibly lost. This systematic error in the calibration process results in an error of about 5% in the energy measurements of calibrated devices. We use FLUKA simulations to assess the magnitude of charge sharing effects, allowing a corrected energy calibration to be performed on several Timepix pixel detectors and resulting in substantial improvement in energy deposition measurements. Next, we address shortcomings in calibration associated with the huge range (from kiloelectron-volts to megaelectron-volts) of energy deposited per pixel which result in a nonlinear energy response over the full range. We introduce a new method to characterize the non-linear response of the Timepix detectors at high input energies. We demonstrate improvement using a broad range of particle types and energies, showing that the new method reduces the energy measurement errors, in some cases by more than 90%.

  15. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  16. Preparation of calibrated test packages for particle impact noise detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A standard calibration method for any particle impact noise detection (PIND) test system used to detect loose particles responsible for failures in hybrid circuits was developed along with a procedure for preparing PIND standard test devices. Hybrid packages were seeded with a single gold ball, hermetically sealed, leak tested, and PIND tested. Conclusions are presented.

  17. HgI2 low energy beta particle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, K. S.; Squillante, M. R.; Entine, G.

    1990-01-01

    An HgI2 device structure was designed and tested which allows HgI2 to be used to make low-energy beta-particle detectors. The devices detected tritium beta particles with an efficiency of about 25 percent. A protective encapsulant has been developed which should protect the devices for up to 20 years and will attenuate only a small fraction of the beta particles. It is noted that the devices hold significant promise to provide a practical alternative to liquid scintillation counters and gas flow-through proportional counters.

  18. A Sr-90/Y-90 field calibrator for performance testing of beta-gamma survey instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Olsher, R.H.; Haynie, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    ANSI and regulatory agency guidelines prescribe periodic performance tests for radiation protection instrumentation. Reference readings should be obtained for one point on each scale or decade normally used. A small and lightweight calibrator has been developed that facilitates field testing of beta-gamma survey instruments. The calibrator uses a 45 microcurie Sr-90/Y-90 beta source with a filter wheel to generate variable dose rates in the range from 4 to 400 mrad/hr. Thus, several ranges may be checked by dialing in appropriate filters. The design, use, and typical applications of the calibrator are described.

  19. Calibration of the Solar Orbiter Energetic Particle Detector Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Rodriguez-Pacheco, J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Panitzsch, L.; Boettcher, S.; Mason, G. M.; Kohler, J.; Ho, G. C.; Boden, S.; Grunau, J.; Steinhagen, J.; Terasa, C.; Yu, J.; Prieto, M.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Blanco, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present the current status and plans for the calibration of the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) suite on ESA's Solar Orbiter mission. Solar Orbiter is scheduled to launch in January 2017, instrument delivery in January 2015. EPD consists of four sensors: the SupraThermal Electron and Proton (STEP) sensor covers electrons (protons) from 2 (3) keV up to 100 keV, the Electron Proton Telescope (EPT) from 20 to 300 (7000) keV, the Suprathermal Ion Spectrograph (SIS) determines the ionic composition from ~0.05 to ~10 MeV/nuc (species dependent), and the High Energy Telescope (HET) measures electrons and protons (ions) from 0.3 to 30 and 10 to >100 MeV/nuc (20 - 200 MeV/nuc species dependent). EPT, HET, and SIS have two approximately opposite-facing fields of view, EPT, and HET share a common electronics box, two EPT/HET sensors allow the determination of second-order anisotropies (a total of 4 FoVs). Apart from the use of radioactive sources, STEP will be calibrated at the Kiel calibration facilities, EPT both at Kiel (electrons and low-energy protons) as well as at PTB in Braunschweig. SIS will undergo calibration at the LBL 88' cyclotron, HET at HIMAC in Chiba, Japan. Tests of the electron/protons discrimination of EPT show the expected behavior, HET prototypes have already been calibrated and the results will be shown.

  20. Further measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N

    SciTech Connect

    France III, R. H.; Wilds, E. L.; McDonald, J. E.; Gai, M.

    2007-06-15

    We measured the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission spectrum of {sup 16}N with a sensitivity for {beta}-decay branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -10}. The {sup 16}N nuclei were produced using the d({sup 15}N,{sup 16}N)p reaction with 70 MeV {sup 15}N beams and a deuterium gas target 7.5 cm long at a pressure of 1250 torr. The {sup 16}N nuclei were collected (over 10 s) using a thin aluminum foil with an areal density of 180 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} tilted at 7 deg. with respect to the beam. The activity was transferred to the counting area by means of a stepping motor in less than 3 s with the counting carried out over 8 s. The {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particles were measured using a time-of-flight method to achieve a sufficiently low background. Standard calibration sources ({sup 148}Gd, {sup 241}Am, {sup 208,209}Po, and {sup 227}Ac) as well as {alpha} particles and {sup 7}Li from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction were used for an accurate energy calibration. The energy resolution of the catcher foil (180-220 keV) was calculated and the time-of-flight resolution (3-10 nsec) was measured using the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission from {sup 8}Li that was produced using the d({sup 7}Li,{sup 8}Li)p reaction with the same setup. The line shape was corrected to account for the variation in the energy and time resolution and a high statistics spectrum of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N is reported. However, our data (as well as earlier Mainz data and unpublished Seattle data) do not agree with an earlier measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N taken at TRIUMF after averaging over the energy resolution of our collection system. This disagreement, among other issues, prohibits accurate inclusion of the f-wave component in the R-matrix analysis.

  1. A technical study of TLD beta calibration factor for exposures to depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; McMahan, K.L.; Souleyrette, M.L.; Bogard, R.S.

    1995-06-01

    The beta calibration factor for converting light output (on reading a thermoluminescent dosimeter) to shallow dose equivalent has been reexamined through theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. The results support the previously determined value for contact with a depleted uranium slab but indicate that for many actual workplace situations, the contact value may be overly conservative.

  2. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of beta-induced Alfven eigenmode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. S.; Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Xiao, Y.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W. L.

    2010-11-15

    The beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE) in toroidal plasmas is studied using global gyrokinetic particle simulations. The BAE real frequency and damping rate measured in the initial perturbation simulation and in the antenna excitation simulation agree well with each other. The real frequency is slightly higher than the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accumulation point frequency due to the kinetic effects of thermal ions. Simulations with energetic particle density gradient show exponential growth of BAE with a growth rate sensitive to the energetic particle temperature and density. The nonperturbative contributions by energetic particles modify the mode structure and reduce the frequency relative to the MHD theory. The finite Larmor radius effects of energetic particles reduce the BAE growth rate. Benchmarks between gyrokinetic particle simulation and hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic simulation show good agreement in BAE real frequency and mode structure.

  3. SCALING PARAMETERS FOR HOT-PARTICLE BETA DOSIMETRY.

    PubMed

    Mangini, Colby D; Hamby, David M

    2016-12-01

    Scaling of dose-point kernel (DPK) values for beta particles transmitted by high-Z sources will overestimate dose at shallow depths while underestimating dose at greater depths due to spectral hardening. A new model has been developed based on a determination of the amount of monoenergetic electron absorption that occurs in a given source thickness through the use of EGSnrc (Electron Gamma Shower) Monte Carlo simulations. Integration over a particular beta spectrum provides the beta-particle DPK following self-absorption as a function of source thickness and radial depth in water, thereby accounting for spectral hardening that may occur in higher-Z materials. Beta spectra of varying spectral shapes and endpoint energies were used to test the model for select source materials with 7.42 ≤ Z ≤ 94. The results demonstrate that significant improvements can be made to DPK-based dosimetry models when dealing with high-Z volumetric sources. This new scaling model is currently being used to improve the accuracy of the beta-dosimetry calculations in VARSKIN 5.

  4. Monte Carlo based calibration of an air monitoring system for gamma and beta+ radiation.

    PubMed

    Sarnelli, A; Negrini, M; D'Errico, V; Bianchini, D; Strigari, L; Mezzenga, E; Menghi, E; Marcocci, F; Benassi, M

    2015-11-01

    Marinelli beaker systems are used to monitor the activity of radioactive samples. These systems are usually calibrated with water solutions and the determination of the activity in gases requires correction coefficients accounting for the different mass-thickness of the sample. For beta+ radionuclides the different distribution of the positrons annihilation points should be also considered. In this work a Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4 is used to compute correction coefficients for the measurement of the activity of air samples.

  5. Space Particle Modeling, Measurements, and Effects: Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor (CEASE) Proton Calibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-07

    particle telescope with high energy (> 20 MeV) protons. The two units calibrated were S/N 004 (flight unit w/tungsten collimator) and S/N 006 (engineering...Particle Telescope ...................................................................... 3 2 Experimental Configuration for the CEASE Calibrations...CEASE) instrument particle telescope with high energy (> 20 MeV) protons. Two units were calibrated: S/N 004 is the flight unit for an upcoming

  6. Tumor dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy: Methods of calculation for beta particles

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K. ); Kwok, C.S. )

    1993-03-01

    Calculational methods of beta-particle dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are reviewed for clinical and experimental studies and computer modeling of tumors. In clinical studies, absorbed-dose estimates are usually based on the [ital in]-[ital vivo] quantitation of the activity in tumors from gamma camera images. Because of the limited spatial resolution of gamma cameras, clinical dosimetry is necessarily limited to the macroscopic level (macrodosimetry) and the MIRD formalism for absorbed-dose calculations is appropriate. In experimental RIT, tumor dimensions are often comparable to or smaller than the beta-particle range of commonly used radionuclides (for example, [sup 131]I, [sup 67]Cu, [sup 186]Re, [sup 188]Re, [sup 90]Y) and deviations from the equilibrium dose must be taken into account in absorbed-dose calculations. Additionally, if small tumors are growing rapidly at the time of RIT, the effects of tumor growth will need to be included in absorbed-dose estimates. In computer modeling of absorbed-dose distributions, analytical, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods have been used to investigate the consequences of uniform and nonuniform activity distributions and the effects of inhomogeneous media. Measurements and calculations of the local absorbed dose at the multicellular level have shown that variations in this dose are large. Knowledge of the absorbed dose is essential for any form of radiotherapy. Therefore, it is important that clinical, experimental, and theoretical investigations continue to provide information on tumor dosimetry that is necessary for a better understanding of the radiobiological effects of RIT.

  7. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOEpatents

    Flower, William L.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    1998-07-07

    The instant invention discloses method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, and sampling probes, in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream.

  8. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOEpatents

    Flower, W.L.; Renzi, R.F.

    1998-07-07

    The invention discloses a method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, sampling probes, and in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream. 6 figs.

  9. Non-intrusive calibration for three-dimensional particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schosser, Constantin; Fuchs, Thomas; Hain, Rainer; Kähler, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    This letter introduces a non-intrusive calibration scheme for three-dimensional (3D) optical flow velocimetry techniques. For these 3D techniques, including tomographic PIV and 3D-PTV, calibration targets need to be imaged within the measurement volume at different depth positions. However, for domains with limited access and with small dimensions, it is difficult or impossible to place a calibration target. Therefore, a non-intrusive calibration approach is proposed to overcome these drawbacks, by employing light reflections of a continuous wave laser in the measurement domain. The laser is translated to different locations, yielding a set of calibration points, comprising the spatial coordinates of the light reflections and their corresponding sensor coordinates.

  10. Compact Beta Particle/Positron Imager for Plant Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Stolin, Alexander; Majewski, Stan; Majewski, Stanislaw; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, Alec; Smith, Mark

    2011-06-01

    The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research towards optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Plants typically have very thin leaves resulting in little medium for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. For the emitted positron from 11C decay approximately 1mm of water equivalent material is needed for positron annihilation. Thus most of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive beta-minus particle (BPBM) imager for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease and a 3mm thick glass plate to a 0.5mm thick Eljin EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation on the leaf of the plant of interest while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. We are planning to utilize the imaging device at the Duke University Phytotron to investigate dynamic carbon transport differences between invasive and native species.

  11. Direct Reading Particle Counters: Calibration Verification and Multiple Instrument Agreement via Bump Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jankovic, John; Zontek, Tracy L.; Ogle, Burton R.; Hollenbeck, Scott

    2015-01-27

    We examined the calibration records of two direct reading instruments designated as condensation particle counters in order to determine the number of times they were found to be out of tolerance at annual manufacturer's recalibration. For both instruments were found to be out of tolerance more times than within tolerance. And, it was concluded that annual calibration alone was insufficient to provide operational confidence in an instrument's response. Thus, a method based on subsequent agreement with data gathered from a newly calibrated instrument was developed to confirm operational readiness between annual calibrations, hereafter referred to as bump testing. The method consists of measuring source particles produced by a gas grille spark igniter in a gallon-size jar. Sampling from this chamber with a newly calibrated instrument to determine the calibrated response over the particle concentration range of interest serves as a reference. Agreement between this reference response and subsequent responses at later dates implies that the instrument is performing as it was at the time of calibration. Side-by-side sampling allows the level of agreement between two or more instruments to be determined. This is useful when simultaneously collected data are compared for differences, i.e., background with process aerosol concentrations. A reference set of data was obtained using the spark igniter. The generation system was found to be reproducible and suitable to form the basis of calibration verification. Finally, the bump test is simple enough to be performed periodically throughout the calibration year or prior to field monitoring.

  12. Direct Reading Particle Counters: Calibration Verification and Multiple Instrument Agreement via Bump Testing.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, John; Zontek, Tracy L; Ogle, Burton R; Hollenbeck, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The calibration records of two direct reading instruments designated as condensation particle counters were examined to determine the number of times they were found to be out of tolerance at annual manufacturer's recalibration. Both instruments were found to be out of tolerance more times than within tolerance. And, it was concluded that annual calibration alone was insufficient to provide operational confidence in an instrument's response. Therefore, a method based on subsequent agreement with data gathered from a newly calibrated instrument was developed to confirm operational readiness between annual calibrations, hereafter referred to as bump testing. The method consists of measuring source particles produced by a gas grille spark igniter in a gallon-size jar. Sampling from this chamber with a newly calibrated instrument to determine the calibrated response over the particle concentration range of interest serves as a reference. Agreement between this reference response and subsequent responses at later dates implies that the instrument is performing as it was at the time of calibration. Side-by-side sampling allows the level of agreement between two or more instruments to be determined. This is useful when simultaneously collected data are compared for differences, i.e., background with process aerosol concentrations. A reference set of data was obtained using the spark igniter. The generation system was found to be reproducible and suitable to form the basis of calibration verification. The bump test is simple enough to be performed periodically throughout the calibration year or prior to field monitoring.

  13. Calibration of TSI model 3025 ultrafine condensation particle counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kesten, J.; Reineking, A.; Porstendoerfer, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The registration efficiency of the TSI model 3025 ultrafine condensation particle counter for Ag and NaCl particles of between 2 and 20 nm in diameter was determined. Taking into account the different shapes of the input aerosol size distributions entering the differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and the transfer function of the DMA, the counting efficiencies of condensation nucleus counters (CNC) for monodisperse Ag and NaCl particles were estimated. In addition, the dependence of the CNC registration efficiency on the particle concentration was investigated.

  14. Hybrid dynamic radioactive particle tracking (RPT) calibration technique for multiphase flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khane, Vaibhav; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H.

    2017-04-01

    The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique has been utilized to measure three-dimensional hydrodynamic parameters for multiphase flow systems. An analytical solution to the inverse problem of the RPT technique, i.e. finding the instantaneous tracer positions based upon instantaneous counts received in the detectors, is not possible. Therefore, a calibration to obtain a counts-distance map is needed. There are major shortcomings in the conventional RPT calibration method due to which it has limited applicability in practical applications. In this work, the design and development of a novel dynamic RPT calibration technique are carried out to overcome the shortcomings of the conventional RPT calibration method. The dynamic RPT calibration technique has been implemented around a test reactor with 1foot in diameter and 1 foot in height using Cobalt-60 as an isotopes tracer particle. Two sets of experiments have been carried out to test the capability of novel dynamic RPT calibration. In the first set of experiments, a manual calibration apparatus has been used to hold a tracer particle at known static locations. In the second set of experiments, the tracer particle was moved vertically downwards along a straight line path in a controlled manner. The obtained reconstruction results about the tracer particle position were compared with the actual known position and the reconstruction errors were estimated. The obtained results revealed that the dynamic RPT calibration technique is capable of identifying tracer particle positions with a reconstruction error between 1 to 5.9 mm for the conditions studied which could be improved depending on various factors outlined here.

  15. Calibration and Laboratory Test of the Department of Energy Cloud Particle Imager

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, GM; Um, J

    2012-02-17

    Calibration parameters from the Connolly et al. (2007) algorithm cannot be applied to the Department of Energy's (DOE) CPI because the DOE CPI is version 2.0. Thus, Dr. Junshik Um and Prof. Greg McFarquhar brought the DOE CPI to the University of Manchester, UK, where facilities for calibrating it were available. In addition, two other versions of CPIs (1.0 and 1.5) were available on-site at the University of Manchester so that an intercomparison of three different versions of the CPI was possible. The three CPIs (versions 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) were calibrated by moving glass calibration beads and ice analogues of known size parallel to the object plane. The distance between the object plane and a particle, the particle's focus, its apparent maximum dimension, and a background image were measured in order to derive calibration parameters for each CPI version. The calibration parameters are used in two empirical equations that are applied to in situ CPI data to determine particle size and depth of field, and hence particle size distributions (PSDs). After the tests with the glass calibration beads to derive the calibration parameters, the three CPIs were installed at the base of the Manchester Ice Cloud Chamber and connected to air pumps that drew cloud through the sample volume. Warm liquid clouds at a temperature of 1-2 C and ice clouds at a temperature of -5 C were generated, and the resulting PSDs for each of the CPIs were determined by applying the results of each calibration.

  16. Calibration and Readiness of the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, R.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is an intravehicular energetic particle detector designed to measure a broad spectrum of charged particle and neutron radiation unique to the ISS radiation environment. In this presentation, a summary of calibration and readiness of the RAD Sensor Head (RSH) - also referred to as the Charged Particle Detector (CPD) - for ISS will be presented. Calibration for the RSH consists of p, He, C, O, Si, and Fe ion data collected at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). The RSH consists of four detectors used in measuring the spectroscopy of charged particles - A, B, C, and D; high-energy neutral particles and charged particles are measured in E; and the last detector - F - is an anti-coincidence detector. A, B, and C are made from Si; D is made from BGO; E and F are made from EJ260XL plastic scintillator.

  17. Full bandwidth calibration procedure for acoustic probes containing a pressure and particle velocity sensor.

    PubMed

    Basten, Tom G H; de Bree, Hans-Elias

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of acoustic particle velocity sensors is still difficult due to the lack of standardized sensors to compare with. Recently it is shown by Jacobsen and Jaud [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 830-837 (2006)] that it is possible to calibrate a sound pressure and particle velocity sensor in free field conditions at higher frequencies. This is done by using the known acoustic impedance at a certain distance of a spherical loudspeaker. When the sound pressure is measured with a calibrated reference microphone, the particle velocity can be calculated from the known impedance and the measured pressure. At lower frequencies, this approach gives unreliable results. The method is now extended to lower frequencies by measuring the acoustic pressure inside the spherical source. At lower frequencies, the sound pressure inside the sphere is proportional to the movement of the loudspeaker membrane. If the movement is known, the particle velocity in front of the loudspeaker can be derived. This low frequency approach is combined with the high frequency approach giving a full bandwidth calibration procedure which can be used in free field conditions using a single calibration setup. The calibration results are compared with results obtained with a standing wave tube.

  18. Direct Reading Particle Counters: Calibration Verification and Multiple Instrument Agreement via Bump Testing

    DOE PAGES

    Jankovic, John; Zontek, Tracy L.; Ogle, Burton R.; ...

    2015-01-27

    We examined the calibration records of two direct reading instruments designated as condensation particle counters in order to determine the number of times they were found to be out of tolerance at annual manufacturer's recalibration. For both instruments were found to be out of tolerance more times than within tolerance. And, it was concluded that annual calibration alone was insufficient to provide operational confidence in an instrument's response. Thus, a method based on subsequent agreement with data gathered from a newly calibrated instrument was developed to confirm operational readiness between annual calibrations, hereafter referred to as bump testing. The methodmore » consists of measuring source particles produced by a gas grille spark igniter in a gallon-size jar. Sampling from this chamber with a newly calibrated instrument to determine the calibrated response over the particle concentration range of interest serves as a reference. Agreement between this reference response and subsequent responses at later dates implies that the instrument is performing as it was at the time of calibration. Side-by-side sampling allows the level of agreement between two or more instruments to be determined. This is useful when simultaneously collected data are compared for differences, i.e., background with process aerosol concentrations. A reference set of data was obtained using the spark igniter. The generation system was found to be reproducible and suitable to form the basis of calibration verification. Finally, the bump test is simple enough to be performed periodically throughout the calibration year or prior to field monitoring.« less

  19. Method, apparatus and system for low-energy beta particle detection

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.; Drigert, Mark W.

    2012-09-25

    An apparatus, method, and system relating to radiation detection of low-energy beta particles are disclosed. An embodiment includes a radiation detector with a first scintillator and a second scintillator operably coupled to each other. The first scintillator and the second scintillator are each structured to generate a light pulse responsive to interaction with beta particles. The first scintillator is structured to experience full energy deposition of low-energy beta particles, and permit a higher-energy beta particle to pass therethrough and interact with the second scintillator. The radiation detector further includes a light-to-electrical converter operably coupled to the second scintillator and configured to convert light pulses generated by the first scintillator and the second scintillator into electrical signals. The first scintillator and the second scintillator have at least one mutually different characteristic to enable an electronic system to determine whether a given light pulse is generated in the first scintillator or the second scintillator.

  20. Calibration of H-alpha/H-beta Indexes for Emission Line Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Joner, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    In Joner and Hintz (2015) they report on a standard star system for calibration of H-alpha and H-beta observations. This work was based on data obtained with the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory 1.2-m telescope. As part of the data acquisition for that project, a large number of emission line objects were also observed. We will report on the preliminary results for the emission line data set. This will include a comparison of equivalent width measurements of each line with the matching index. We will also examine the relation between the absorption line objects previously published and the emission line objects, along with a discussion of the transition point. Object types included are Be stars, high mass x-ray binaries, one low mass x-ray binary, Herbig Ae/Be stars, pre-main sequence stars, T Tauri stars, young stellar objects, and one BY Draconis star. Some of these objects come from Cygnus OB-2, NGC 659, NGC 663, NGC 869 and NGC 884.

  1. Hot beta particles in the lung: Results from dogs exposed to fission product radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.; Hobbs, C.H.

    1995-12-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident resulted in the release of uranium dioxide fuel and fission product radionuclides into the environment with the fallout of respirable, highly radioactive particles that have been termed {open_quotes}hot beta particles.{close_quotes} There is concern that these hot beta particles (containing an average of 150-20,000 Bq/particle), when inhaled and deposited in the lung, may present an extraordinary hazard for the induction of lung cancer. We reviewed data from a group of studies in dogs exposed to different quantities of beta-emitting radionuclides with varied physical half-lives to determine if those that inhaled hot beta particles were at unusual risk for lung cancer. This analysis indicates that the average dose to the lung is adequate to predict biologic effects of lung cancer for inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides in the range of 5-50 Gy to the lung and with particle activities in the range of 0.10-50 Bq/particle.

  2. Calibration and optimization of the Project 8 Phase II apparatus toward a tritium beta decay spectrum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guigue, Mathieu; Project 8 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Project 8 collaboration aims to measure the absolute neutrino mass scale using a Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy technique on the beta decays of tritium. With the recent developments achieved in the Phase II of the experiment such as a molecular tritium gas handling system and a larger effective decay volume, we will be able to measure the differential-energy spectrum of tritium beta decays for the very first time and be sensitive to extract the tritium endpoint value on an eV or sub-eV scale. The measured frequency of monoenergetic electrons emitted by gaseous metastable Krypton 83 atoms can be used as an energy calibration and to optimize the instrument configuration for the tritium measurement. Here we present the status of this calibration procedure and the tritium data-taking plan.

  3. Absorption of Beta Particles in Different Materials: An Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The absorption of beta rays from a radioactive source in different materials was investigated by the use of a simple setup based on a Geiger counter and a set of absorber sheets. The number of electrons traversing the material was measured as a function of its thickness. Detailed GEANT simulations were carried out to reproduce the obtained…

  4. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of the beta-induced Alfven eigen mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huasen; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Wang, Xin; Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Wenlu

    2010-11-01

    The beta-induced Alfven eigen mode (BAE) is studied using the global gyrokinetic particle code GTC. In our simulation, BAE is successfully excited by antenna and energetic particle density gradient. Through the antenna frequency scan, we can measure the BAE frequency and damping rate by numerical fitting the saturation amplitude. BAE excitation by energetic particles shows that the BAE propagates in the ion diamagnetic direction and the frequency has a little downshift, which is due to modification of the energetic particles. The frequency and growth rate in gyrokinetic simulation is a little different from drift kinetic simulation, which is expected due to the finite larmor radius effect. We also find that the BAE frequency is related to the wavelength and the plasma beta while the growth rate is sensitive to the energetic particle properties. Benchmarks between GTC and HMGC are also done through initial perturbation, antenna excitation and energetic particle excitation. The simulation results agree with each other very well.

  5. Preparation of nanosized beta-tricalcium phosphate particles with Zn substitution.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chao; Weng, Wenjian; Cheng, Kui; Du, Piyi; Shen, Ge; Han, Gaorong

    2008-03-01

    Nanosized beta-ZnTCP powders with different Zn contents were prepared through coprecipitation of ACP out of the CaCl2-ZnCl2-Na3PO4-PEG system, and calcination of the ACP precursor at 800 degrees C for 3 h. The characterizations of the products showed that the products belong to beta-TCP phase, and the particles sizes of them are about 300 nm, smaller than that of beta-TCP (500 nm). Both the Zn2p binding energy and lattice parameter variations of beta-TCP evidenced that Zn had substituted for Ca in the lattice. Such nanosized beta-ZnTCP powders could be used as bone repair materials with desired and sustained release of Zn.

  6. The Nuclear and Particle Physics of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Wick

    2014-03-01

    Fortuitous properties of nuclei allow us to isolate and study the rare second-order weak process of double beta decay. In particular, the decay channel in which a final state of two electrons and no neutrinos is produced - neutrinoless double beta decay - provides our best test of lepton number conservation and the Majorana mass of the electron neutrino. I will describe the connections between this process and the charge conjugation properties of the neutrino, including the possibility that the presence of both Dirac and Majorana masses accounts for the anomalous scale of neutrino masses. The extraordinary progress made over the past two decades has prepared the way for next-generation experiments that will probe Majorana masses at levels where nonzero rates may be found, given what we now know about neutrino mass splittings. I will describe some of the heroic efforts underway to develop detectors of unprecedented size, radiopurity, depth, and thus sensitivity. Work supported by the Office of Science, US DOE.

  7. Development of a Cerenkov radiation sensor to detect low-energy beta-particles.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Han, Ki-Tek; Shin, Sang Hun; Seo, Jeong Ki; Jeon, Dayeong; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-11-01

    We fabricated a novel fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor using a Cerenkov radiator for measuring beta-particles. Instead of employing a scintillator, transparent liquids having various refractive indices were used as a Cerenkov radiator to serve as a sensing material. The experimental results showed that the amount of Cerenkov radiation due to the interaction with beta-particles increased as the refractive index of the Cerenkov radiator was increased as a results of a decrease of the Cerenkov threshold energy for electrons.

  8. Reversal of particle flux in collisional-finite beta tokamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Weiland, J.; Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.

    2015-01-15

    The mixed gradient method [Zhong et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 265001 (2013)] is adopted and effects of collisions and finite beta are included in the Weiland 9-equation fluid model. The particle flux and particle pinch, obtained using the Weiland anomalous transport fluid model, are compared with Tore Supra experimental results. Particle transport is also studied using predictive simulation data for an experimental advanced superconducting tokamak discharge in which neutral beam heating is utilized. The effects of collisions on particle transport are studied by turning collisions on and off in the Weiland model. It is found that the particle pinch region is related to the mode structure. The particle pinch region coincides with the region where the strong ballooning modes are present due to large gradients. The general properties of the fluid model are examined by finding regions where collisions can enhance the particle pinch.

  9. High beta, sawtooth-free tokamak operation using energetic trapped particles

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Bussac, M.N.; Romanelli, F.

    1988-08-01

    It is shown that a population of high energy trapped particles, such as that produced by ion cyclotron heating in tokamaks, can result in a plasma completely stable to both sawtooth oscillations and the fishbone mode. The stable window of operation increases in size with plasma temperature and with trapped particle energy, and provides a means of obtaining a stable plasma with high current and high beta. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Stellar spectral flux calibration of auroral H-beta photometer signal and background channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, Brian J.; Unick, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Observations of optical aurora typically require the operation of sensitive instruments at remote field sites. Absolute radiometric calibration of these devices is essential for quantitative comparison over time and with other measurements. In this study we present absolute calibration of a proton auroral photometer using star transits observed during regular data collection. This requires absolute flux spectra with sufficient resolution to account for structure in stellar Hβ absorption line profiles. Several flux spectral catalogs are combined and corrected for systematic differences. The resulting estimates of instrumental sensitivity are consistent with darkroom calibration to roughly 15%.

  11. Applications of Beta Particle Detection for Synthesis and Usage of Radiotracers Developed for Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooraghi, Alex Abreu

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging tool that requires the use of a radioactive compound or radiotracer which targets a molecular pathway of interest. We have developed and employed three beta particle radiation detection systems to advance PET. Specifically, the goals of these systems are to: 1. Automate dispensing of solutions containing a positron emitting isotope. 2. Monitor radioactivity on-chip during synthesis of a positron emitting radiotracer. 3. Assay cellular uptake on-chip of a positron emitting radiotracer. Automated protocols for measuring and dispensing solutions containing radioisotopes are essential not only for providing an optimum environment for radiation workers, but also to ensure a quantitatively accurate workflow. For the first project, we describe the development and performance of a system for automated radioactivity distribution of beta particle emitting radioisotopes such as fluorine-18 (F-18). Key to the system is a radiation detector in-line with a peristaltic pump. The system demonstrates volume accuracy within 5 % for volumes of 20 muL or greater. When considering volumes of 20 muL or greater, delivered radioactivity is in agreement with the requested radioactivity as measured with the dose calibrator. The integration of the detector and pump leads to a flexible system that can accurately dispense solutions containing F-18 in radioactivity concentrations directly produced from a cyclotron (~ 0.1-1 mCi/muL), to low activity concentrations intended for preclinical mouse scans (~ 1-10 muCi/muL), and anywhere in between. Electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) is an attractive microfluidic platform for batch synthesis of PET radiotracers. Visualization of radioisotopes on-chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. For the second project, we describe the development and performance of a Cerenkov/real-time imaging system for PET radiotracer synthesis on EWOD. We also investigate

  12. Characteristics of a 85Kr beta-particle source applied in Series 1 reference irradiations of DIS-1 direct ion storage dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Hakanen, A T; Sipilä, P M; Sahla, T T

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics necessary to specify an ISO 6980 Series 1 reference radiation field were determined for a commercially available 85Kr beta-particle source, using a BEAM EGS4 Monte Carlo code. The characteristics include residual maximum beta energy, E(res), and the uniformity of the dose rate over the calibration area. The E(res) and the uniformity were also determined experimentally, using an extrapolation ionization chamber (EC) and a 0.2 cm3 parallel plate ionization chamber, respectively. The depth-dose curve measured with the EC gave a value 0.62 MeV for the E(res). Series 2 90Sr + 90Y and Series 1(85) Kr beta-particle sources calibrated for H(p)(0.07) at the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) of STUK were used to determine the energy and angular responses of DIS-1 direct ion storage dosemeters. The averaged zero angle H(p)(0.07) responses to the 90Sr + 90Y and 85Kr reference radiations were 135 and 80%, respectively. The responses were normalized to 100%, H(p)(0.07) response to 137Cs photon radiation.

  13. Calibration and demonstration of a condensation nuclei counting system for airborne measurements of aircraft exhausted particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofer, Wesley R.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Winstead, Edward L.; Bagwell, Donald R.

    A system of multiple continuous-flow condensation nuclei counters (CNC) was assembled, calibrated, and demonstrated on a NASA T-39 Sabreliner jet aircraft. The mission was to penetrate the exhaust plumes and/or contrails of other subsonic jet aircraft and determine the concentrations of submicrometer diameter aerosol particles. Mission criteria required rapid response measurements ( ˜ 1 s) at aircraft cruise altitudes (9-12 km). The CNC sampling system was optimized to operate at 160 Torr. Aerosol samples were acquired through an externally mounted probe. Installed downstream of the probe was a critical flow orifice that provided sample to the CNC system. The orifice not only controlled volumetric flow rate, but also dampened probe pressure/flow oscillations encountered in the turbulent aircraft-wake vortex environment. Laboratory calibrations with NaCl particles under representative conditions are reported that indicate small amounts of particle loss and a maximum measurement efficiency of ˜ 75% for particles with diameters ranging from ⩾ 0.01- ⩽ 0.18 μm Data from exhaust/contrail samplings of a NASA B757 and DC-8 at cruise altitude are discussed. Data include exhaust/contrail measurements made during periods in which the B757 port jet engine burned low-sulfur fuel while the starboard engine simultaneously burned specially prepared high-sulfur fuel. The data discussed highlight the CNC systems performance, and introduce new observations pertinent to the behavior of sulfur in aircraft exhaust aerosol chemistry.

  14. Doubly stochastic Poisson processes in EMARG with detection of. beta. particles and internal-conversion electrons emitted from a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rusov, V.D.; Zelentsova, T.N.; Grechan, V.I.; Semenov, M.Y.; Kravchenko, S.N.

    1985-12-01

    The form of the counting statistics is determined for detection of ..beta.. particles and internal-conversion electrons by a nuclear emulsion. It is shown experimentally for the first time that photographic detection of ..beta.. particles and internal-conversion electrons obeys a Neyman type-A distribution, and not a Poisson distribution as was previously assumed.

  15. Characterization of YAG:Dy,Er for thermographic particle image velocimetry in a calibration cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertle, Ellen; Will, Stefan; Zigan, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a promising approach for remote and non-intrusive two-dimensional temperature sensing. However, the characteristics of each phosphor material have to be carefully evaluated to avoid measurement inaccuracies. We characterized the luminescent properties of the thermographic phosphor particles YAG:Dy,Er seeded to the gas flow in a flow cell. The particles were excited by a laser sheet of a 355 nm Nd:YAG laser, and two intensified cameras were used for two-color detection of the phosphorescence spectrum. The calibration cell enables homogeneous and repeatable measurement conditions. A newly designed seeder allowed to adjust the number of particles in the cell, achieving sufficient seeding densities even at low flow rates in a wide temperature range. Additionally, the influence of the seeding density and the laser fluence on the intensity ratio were studied, both having negligible effects on the estimated temperature.

  16. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. S.; Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Wang, X.; Xiao, Y.; Zhang, W. L.

    2010-11-01

    The beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (BAE) in toroidal plasmas is studied using global gyrokinetic particle simulations. The BAE real frequency and damping rate measured in the initial perturbation simulation and in the antenna excitation simulation agree well with each other. The real frequency is slightly higher than the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accumulation point frequency due to the kinetic effects of thermal ions. Simulations with energetic particle density gradient show exponential growth of BAE with a growth rate sensitive to the energetic particle temperature and density. The nonperturbative contributions by energetic particles modify the mode structure and reduce the frequency relative to the MHD theory. The finite Larmor radius effects of energetic particles reduce the BAE growth rate. Benchmarks between gyrokinetic particle simulation and hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic simulation show good agreement in BAE real frequency and mode structure.

  17. Improvement of the UV laser calibration of high energy particle spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbretti, R.; Seiler, P. G.

    1992-12-01

    The simulation of straight particle trajectories in gas filled detectors by means of pulsed UV laser beams is widely used for the calibration of spectrometers in HE physics. The accuracy of such calibrations can be increased if the width of the laser beam — a few mm for long beams — and its longitudinal variation is known and taken into account. We study a method to unfold the actual width of the laser induced ionization profile directly from the shape of the detector pulse itself. This is done with the help of the detector response to a point charge which we measure using a strongly focussed laser beam. In a first step of our study we showed that the inverse procedure works well: convolution of measured beam profiles of "parallel" beams with the point charge detector pulse leads to predicted pulse shapes which agree perfectly with those of measured pulses.

  18. Calibrations for Charged Particle Tracking with the GlueX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staib, Michael; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Two gas detectors comprise the tracking system for the GlueX experiment, the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) and the Forward Drift Chamber (FDC). The CDC is a cylindrical straw-tube detector covering polar angles between 6° and 168°, delivering spatial resolution of ~150 μm. The FDC is a Cathode Strip Chamber consisting of four packages, each with six alternating layers of anode wires and cathode strips. The FDC is designed to track forward-going charged particles with polar angles between 1° and 20° with a spatial resolution of ~200 μm. Both tracking detectors record timing information and energy loss measurements useful for particle identification. During Fall 2014 and Spring 2015, the first photon beam was delivered on target for commissioning of the GlueX detector in Hall-D at Jefferson Lab. These data are currently being used in a large effort to calibrate the individual detector subsystems to achieve design performance. Methods and results for calibrations of each of the tracking detectors are presented. Techniques for alignment of the tracking system using a combination of cosmic rays and beam data is discussed. Finally, some early results of physics measurements including charged final-state particles are presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  19. Fusion alpha-particle losses in a high-beta rippled tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bunno, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Matsunaga, G.; Tani, K.

    2013-08-15

    In tokamak plasmas, the confinement of energetic ions depends on the magnetic field structure. If the plasma pressure is finite, the equilibrium current (i.e., the Pfirsch-Schlüter current and diamagnetic current) flows in the plasma to maintain the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium. These plasma currents generate poloidal and toroidal magnetic field and alter the field structure. Moreover, if we consider the non-axisymmetry of magnetic field structures such as toroidal field (TF) ripples, the non-axisymmetric component of the equilibrium current can alter TF ripples themselves. When the plasma beta becomes high, the changes in the field structure due to the equilibrium current might affect the confinement of energetic ions significantly. We intend to clarify how these currents alter the field structure and affect the confinement of alpha particles in high-beta plasma. The MHD equilibrium is calculated using VMEC and the orbits of fusion alpha particles are followed by using the fully three-dimensional magnetic field orbit-following Monte Carlo code. In relatively low-beta plasma (e.g., the volume-averaged beta value <β>≤2%), the changes in the magnetic field component due to the plasma current negligibly affect the confinement of alpha particles except for the Shafranov shift effect. However, for <β>≥3%, the diamagnetic effect reduces the magnetic field strength and significantly increases alpha-particle losses. In these high-beta cases, the non-axisymmetric field component generated by the equilibrium current also increases these losses, but not as effectively as compared to the diamagnetic effect.

  20. A Monte Carlo Simulation for Understanding Energy Measurements of Beta Particles Detected by the UCNb Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chi; UCNb Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    It is theorized that contributions to the Fierz interference term from scalar interaction beyond the Standard Model could be detectable in the spectrum of neutron beta-decay. The UCNb experiment run at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center aims to accurately measure the neutron beta-decay energy spectrum to detect a nonzero interference term. The instrument consists of a cubic ``integrating sphere'' calorimeter attached with up to 4 photomultiplier tubes. The inside of the calorimeter is coated with white paint and a thin UV scintillating layer made of deuterated polystyrene to contain the ultracold neutrons. A Monte Carlo simulation using the Geant4 toolkit is developed in order to provide an accurate method of energy reconstruction. Offline calibration with the Kellogg Radiation Laboratory 140 keV electron gun and conversion electron sources will be used to validate the Monte Carlo simulation to give confidence in the energy reconstruction methods and to better understand systematics in the experiment data.

  1. hydroPSO: A Versatile Particle Swarm Optimisation R Package for Calibration of Environmental Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano-Bigiarini, M.; Rojas, R.

    2012-04-01

    Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) is a recent and powerful population-based stochastic optimisation technique inspired by social behaviour of bird flocking, which shares similarities with other evolutionary techniques such as Genetic Algorithms (GA). In PSO, however, each individual of the population, known as particle in PSO terminology, adjusts its flying trajectory on the multi-dimensional search-space according to its own experience (best-known personal position) and the one of its neighbours in the swarm (best-known local position). PSO has recently received a surge of attention given its flexibility, ease of programming, low memory and CPU requirements, and efficiency. Despite these advantages, PSO may still get trapped into sub-optimal solutions, suffer from swarm explosion or premature convergence. Thus, the development of enhancements to the "canonical" PSO is an active area of research. To date, several modifications to the canonical PSO have been proposed in the literature, resulting into a large and dispersed collection of codes and algorithms which might well be used for similar if not identical purposes. In this work we present hydroPSO, a platform-independent R package implementing several enhancements to the canonical PSO that we consider of utmost importance to bring this technique to the attention of a broader community of scientists and practitioners. hydroPSO is model-independent, allowing the user to interface any model code with the calibration engine without having to invest considerable effort in customizing PSO to a new calibration problem. Some of the controlling options to fine-tune hydroPSO are: four alternative topologies, several types of inertia weight, time-variant acceleration coefficients, time-variant maximum velocity, regrouping of particles when premature convergence is detected, different types of boundary conditions and many others. Additionally, hydroPSO implements recent PSO variants such as: Improved Particle Swarm

  2. Calibration of a Rocket-borne Probe for Aerosol Particles in the Polar Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, S.; Robertson, S.; Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.

    2006-12-01

    An instrument has been developed to detect charged, sub-visible aerosol particles in the polar mesosphere. This instrument has a 30 square centimeter entrance slit that admits a continuous flow of air. Venting ports are placed lower on the detector in order to let the air out and reduce pressure buildup. The air sample flows between four pairs of graphite electrodes biased symmetrically with increasing bias potentials. Electrons, light ions, cluster ions and heavy charged aerosol particles of both polarities are collected mass-selectively on the electrodes that are connected to sensitive electrometers. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes have been used to optimize the supersonic airflow within and around the instrument. A laboratory prototype of the instrument has been fabricated and calibrated using low energy ion beams. The calibration shows that the mass ranges that are collected by the plates are approximately those from the simulations. Two of these instruments are scheduled for launch in the summer of 2007 from Andoya, Norway. These in-situ measurements are planned to coincide with measurements by the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite. Acknowledgement: The project is supported by NASA.

  3. Calibration of the Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrett, G. M.; Campbell, J. L.; Gellert, R.; King, P. L.; Maxwell, J. A.; Andrushenko, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    We have used a suite of over 60 geochemical reference standards for the calibration of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). For the elements P, S, Cl and Br we have supplemented this suite by adding various amounts of relevant chemical compounds to a powdered basalt standard. Special attention has been paid to include phyllosilicates, sulphates and a broad selection of igneous basalts as these are predicted key deposits at the MSL landing site, Gale Crater. The calibration is performed from first principles using x-ray excitation cross sections for the alpha particle and x-ray radiation source and an assumed homogeneous sample matrix. Remaining deviations indicate significant influences of mineral phases especially for light elements in basalts, ultra-mafic rocks and trachytes. Supporting x-ray diffraction work has helped to derive empirical, iterative corrections for distinct rock types, based on the first APXS analysis, assuming a homogeneous sample. These corrections have the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of APXS analyses, especially when other MSL instrument results, such as x-ray diffraction data from ChemMin, are included in the overall analysis process.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of a beta particle detector for food samples.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Takahashi, H; Yamada, T; Unno, Y; Yunoki, A

    2013-11-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011 released radionuclides into the environment. There is concern that (90)Sr will be concentrated in seafood. To measure the activities of (90)Sr in a short time without chemical processes, we have designed a new detector for measuring activity that obtains count rates using 10 layers of proportional counters that are separated by walls that absorb beta particles. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to confirm that its design is appropriate.

  5. An application of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hot particle methodology for determining the most effective beta particle energy in causing skin ulcers

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, C.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare the effectiveness of hot particles with different energy betas in producing ulcers on skin. The sources were man-made hot particles similar in size and activity to those found in the commercial nuclear power industry. Four different particle types were used. These were thulium (Tm-170) with a 0.97 MeV maximum energy beta, ytterbium (Yb-175) with a maximum beta energy of 0.47 MeV, scandium (Sc-46) with a 0.36 MeV beta, which was used as a surrogate for cobalt-60 (0.31 MeV beta) and uranium (in the carbide form) with an average maximum beta energy of about 2.5 MeV. Since higher energy beta particles penetrate further in skin, they will affect a higher number and different populations of target cells. The experiments were designed as threshold studies such that the dose needed to produce ulcers ten percent of the time (ED 10%) for each particle type could be compared against each other.

  6. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  7. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS): Results from Gusev Crater and Calibration Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B.; Dreibus, G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.; Waenke, H.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.; Squyres, S.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of rocks and soils on Mars analyzed during the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit Mission was determined by X-ray analyses with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). Details of the data analysis method and the instrument calibration are presented. Measurements performed on Mars to address geometry effects and background contributions are shown. Cross calibration measurements among several instrument sensors and sources are discussed. An unintentional swap of the two flight instruments is evaluated. New concentration data acquired during the first 470 sols of rover Spirit in Gusev Crater are presented. There are two geological regions, the Gusev plains and the Columbia Hills. The plains contain soils that are very similar to previous landing sites on Mars. A meteoritic component in the soil is identified. Rocks in the plains revealed thin weathering rinds. The underlying abraded rock was classified as primitive basalt. One of these rocks contained significant Br that is probably associated with vein-filling material of different composition. One of the trenches showed large subsurface enrichments of Mg, S, and Br. Disturbed soils and rocks in the Columbia Hills revealed different elemental compositions. These rocks are significantly weathered and enriched in mobile elements, such as P, S, Cl, or Br. Even abraded rock surfaces have high Br concentrations. Thus, in contrast to the rocks and soils in the Gusev Plains, the Columbia Hills material shows more significant evidence of ancient aqueous alteration.

  8. Improvements on particle swarm optimization algorithm for velocity calibration in microseismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Wen, Jian; Chen, Xiaofei

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we apply particle swarm optimization (PSO), an artificial intelligence technique, to velocity calibration in microseismic monitoring. We ran simulations with four 1-D layered velocity models and three different initial model ranges. The results using the basic PSO algorithm were reliable and accurate for simple models, but unsuccessful for complex models. We propose the staged shrinkage strategy (SSS) for the PSO algorithm. The SSS-PSO algorithm produced robust inversion results and had a fast convergence rate. We investigated the effects of PSO's velocity clamping factor in terms of the algorithm reliability and computational efficiency. The velocity clamping factor had little impact on the reliability and efficiency of basic PSO, whereas it had a large effect on the efficiency of SSS-PSO. Reassuringly, SSS-PSO exhibits marginal reliability fluctuations, which suggests that it can be confidently implemented.

  9. Pareto optimal calibration of highly nonlinear reactive transport groundwater models using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siade, A. J.; Prommer, H.; Welter, D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater management and remediation requires the implementation of numerical models in order to evaluate the potential anthropogenic impacts on aquifer systems. In many situations, the numerical model must, not only be able to simulate groundwater flow and transport, but also geochemical and biological processes. Each process being simulated carries with it a set of parameters that must be identified, along with differing potential sources of model-structure error. Various data types are often collected in the field and then used to calibrate the numerical model; however, these data types can represent very different processes and can subsequently be sensitive to the model parameters in extremely complex ways. Therefore, developing an appropriate weighting strategy to address the contributions of each data type to the overall least-squares objective function is not straightforward. This is further compounded by the presence of potential sources of model-structure errors that manifest themselves differently for each observation data type. Finally, reactive transport models are highly nonlinear, which can lead to convergence failure for algorithms operating on the assumption of local linearity. In this study, we propose a variation of the popular, particle swarm optimization algorithm to address trade-offs associated with the calibration of one data type over another. This method removes the need to specify weights between observation groups and instead, produces a multi-dimensional Pareto front that illustrates the trade-offs between data types. We use the PEST++ run manager, along with the standard PEST input/output structure, to implement parallel programming across multiple desktop computers using TCP/IP communications. This allows for very large swarms of particles without the need of a supercomputing facility. The method was applied to a case study in which modeling was used to gain insight into the mobilization of arsenic at a deepwell injection site

  10. Does Your Optical Particle Counter Measure What You Think it Does? Calibration and Refractive Index Correction Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Phil; Dean, Angela; Williams, Paul; Dorsey, James; Minikin, Andreas; Pickering, Martyn; Petzold, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Optical Particle Counters (OPCs) are the de-facto standard for in-situ measurements of airborne aerosol size distributions and small cloud particles over a wide size range. This is particularly the case on airborne platforms where fast response is important. OPCs measure scattered light from individual particles and generally bin particles according to the measured peak amount of light scattered (the OPC's response). Most manufacturers provide a table along with their instrument which indicates the particle diameters which represent the edges of each bin. It is important to correct the particle size reported by OPCs for the refractive index of the particles being measured, which is often not the same as for those used during calibration. However, the OPC's response is not a monotonic function of particle diameter and obvious problems occur when refractive index corrections are attempted, but multiple diameters correspond to the same OPC response. Here we recommend that OPCs are calibrated in terms of particle scattering cross section as this is a monotonic (usually linear) function of an OPC's response. We present a method for converting a bin's boundaries in terms of scattering cross section into a bin centre and bin width in terms of diameter for any aerosol species for which the scattering properties are known. The relationship between diameter and scattering cross section can be arbitrarily complex and does not need to be monotonic; it can be based on Mie-Lorenz theory or any other scattering theory. Software has been provided on the Sourceforge open source repository for scientific users to implement such methods in their own measurement and calibration routines. As a case study data is presented showing data from Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP) calibrated using polystyrene latex spheres and glass beads before being deployed as part of the Fennec project to measure airborne dust in the inaccessible regions of

  11. Gallium Arsenide detectors for X-ray and electron (beta particle) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioliou, G.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Results characterizing GaAs p+-i-n+ mesa photodiodes with a 10 μm i layer for their spectral response under illumination of X-rays and beta particles are presented. A total of 22 devices, having diameters of 200 μm and 400 μm, were electrically characterized at room temperature. All devices showed comparable characteristics with a measured leakage current ranging from 4 nA/cm2 to 67 nA/cm2 at an internal electric field of 50 kV/cm. Their unintentionally doped i layers were found to be almost fully depleted at 0 V due to their low doping density. 55Fe X-ray spectra were obtained using one 200 μm diameter device and one 400 μm diameter device. The best energy resolution (FWHM at 5.9 keV) achieved was 625 eV using the 200 μm and 740 eV using the 400 μm diameter device, respectively. Noise analysis showed that the limiting factor for the energy resolution of the system was the dielectric noise; if this noise was eliminated by better design of the front end of the readout electronics, the achievable resolution would be 250 eV. 63Ni beta particle spectra obtained using the 200 μm diameter device showed the potential utility of these detectors for electron and beta particle detection. The development of semiconductor electron spectrometers is important particularly for space plasma physics; such devices may find use in future space missions to study the plasma environment of Jupiter and Europa and the predicted electron impact excitation of water vapor plumes from Europa hypothesized as a result of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV observations.

  12. A probabilistic respiratory tract dosimetry model with application to beta-particle and photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, Eduardo Balderrama

    2002-01-01

    Predicting equivalent dose in the human respiratory tract is significant in the assessment of health risks associated with the inhalation of radioactive aerosols. A complete respiratory tract methodology based on the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 66 model was used in this research project for beta-particle and photon emitters. The conventional methodology has been to use standard values (from Reference Man) for parameters to obtain a single dose value. However, the methods used in the current study allow lung dose values to be determined as probability distributions to reflect the spread or variability in doses. To implement the methodology, a computer code, LUDUC, has been modified to include inhalation scenarios of beta-particle and photon emitters. For beta particles, a new methodology was implemented into Monte Carlo simulations to determine absorbed fractions in target tissues within the thoracic region of the respiratory tract. For photons, a new mathematical phantom of extrathoracic and thoracic regions was created based on previous studies to determine specific absorbed fractions in several tissues and organs of the human body due to inhalation of radioactive materials. The application of the methodology and developed data will be helpful in dose reconstruction and prediction efforts concerning the inhalation of short-lived radionuclides or radionuclides of Inhalation Class S. The resulting dose distributions follow a lognormal distribution shape for all scenarios examined. Applying the probabilistic computer code LUDUC to inhalation of strontium and yttrium aerosols has shown several trends, which could also be valid for many S radionuclide compounds that are beta-particle emitters. The equivalent doses are, in general, found to follow lognormal distributions. Therefore, these distributions can be described by geometric means and geometric standard deviations. Furthermore, a mathematical phantom of the extrathoracic and

  13. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of fast-electron driven beta-induced Aflvén eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Junyi; Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Li, Ding; Chen, Yang; Cao, Jintao

    2016-05-01

    The fast-electron driven beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (e-BAE) in toroidal plasmas is investigated for the first time using global gyrokinetic particle simulations, where the fast electron is described by the drift kinetic equation. The simulation shows that the e-BAE propagates in the fast electron diamagnetic direction and its polarization is close to an ideal MHD mode. The phase space structure shows that only the fast electron processional resonance is responsible for the e-BAE excitations while fast-ion driven BAE can be excited through all the channels, including transit, bounce, and processional resonance.

  14. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Robert Y.L.; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  15. Thermally and optically stimulated luminescence of new ZnO nanophosphors exposed to beta particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-v&Ázquez, C.; Burruel-Ibarra, S. E.; Grijalva-Monteverde, H.; Chernov, V.; Bernal, R.

    In this work, we report on the thermoluminescence (TL) and the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of ZnO nanophosphors obtained by thermal annealing of ZnS powders synthesized by precipitation in a chemical bath deposition reaction. To obtain nanocrystalline ZnO, ZnS pellet-shaped samples were subjected to a sintering process at 700 °C during 24 h exposed to air at atmospheric pressure. Some samples were exposed to beta particles in the 0.15-10.15 kGy dose range and the integrated TL as a function of dose increased with dose level, with no saturation indication for the tested dose levels. Computerized glow-curve deconvolution of the experimental glow curves in individual peaks revealed a second-order kinetics. In order to test the OSL response, samples were irradiated with beta particles with doses up to 600 Gy, and an increasing intensity as dose increased was observed. We conclude that the new ZnO phosphors under investigation are good candidates to be used as dosimetric materials.

  16. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Y L; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone.

  17. CALIBRATION OF SEMI-ANALYTIC MODELS OF GALAXY FORMATION USING PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, Andrés N.; Domínguez, Mariano J.; Yaryura, Yamila; Lambas, Diego García; Cora, Sofía A.; Martínez, Cristian A. Vega-; Gargiulo, Ignacio D.; Padilla, Nelson D.; Tecce, Tomás E.; Orsi, Álvaro; Arancibia, Alejandra M. Muñoz

    2015-03-10

    We present a fast and accurate method to select an optimal set of parameters in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation and evolution (SAMs). Our approach compares the results of a model against a set of observables applying a stochastic technique called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), a self-learning algorithm for localizing regions of maximum likelihood in multidimensional spaces that outperforms traditional sampling methods in terms of computational cost. We apply the PSO technique to the SAG semi-analytic model combined with merger trees extracted from a standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter N-body simulation. The calibration is performed using a combination of observed galaxy properties as constraints, including the local stellar mass function and the black hole to bulge mass relation. We test the ability of the PSO algorithm to find the best set of free parameters of the model by comparing the results with those obtained using a MCMC exploration. Both methods find the same maximum likelihood region, however, the PSO method requires one order of magnitude fewer evaluations. This new approach allows a fast estimation of the best-fitting parameter set in multidimensional spaces, providing a practical tool to test the consequences of including other astrophysical processes in SAMs.

  18. Laboratory Simulation of Impacts upon Aluminum Foils of the Stardust Spacecraft: Calibration of Dust Particle Size from Comet Wild 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Horz, F.; Cole, M. J.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic aluminium alloy foils exposed on the forward, comet-facing surface of the aerogel tray on the Stardust spacecraft are likely to have been impacted by the same cometary particle population as the dedicated impact sensors and the aerogel collector. The ability of soft aluminium alloy to record hypervelocity impacts as bowl-shaped craters offers an opportunistic substrate for recognition of impacts by particles of a wide potential size range. In contrast to impact surveys conducted on samples from low Earth orbit, the simple encounter geometry for Stardust and Wild 2, with a known and constant spacecraft-particle relative velocity and effective surface-perpendicular impact trajectories, permits closely comparable simulation in laboratory experiments. For a detailed calibration programme we have selected a suite of spherical glass projectiles of uniform density and hardness characteristics, with well-documented particle size range from 10 microns to nearly 100 microns. Light gas gun buckshot firings of these particles at approximately 6km s)exp -1) onto samples of the same foil as employed on Stardust have yielded large numbers of craters. Scanning electron microscopy of both projectiles and impact features has allowed construction of a calibration plot, showing a linear relationship between impacting particle size and impact crater diameter. The close match between our experimental conditions and the Stardust mission encounter parameters should provide another opportunity to measure particle size distributions and fluxes close to the nucleus of Wild 2, independent of the active impact detector instruments aboard the Stardust spacecraft.

  19. Interaction of high-energy trapped particles with ballooning modes in a tokamak with a high-. beta. plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Novakovaskii, S. V.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    1988-12-01

    A theory is derived for the interaction of high-energy trapped particleswith ballooning modes in a tokamak with a high-..beta.. plasma. A dispersionrelation is derived to describe the ballooning modes in the presence ofsuch particles; the effects of the high plasma ..beta.. are taken into account.The stability boundary for ballooning modes with zero and finite frequenciesis studied. The effects of finite bananas on the stability of ballooningmodes with zero frequencies are determined.

  20. Betabox: a beta particle imaging system based on a position sensitive avalanche photodiode

    PubMed Central

    Dooraghi, AA; Vu, NT; Silverman, RW; Farrell, R; Shah, KS; Wang, J; Heath, JR; Chatziioannou, AF

    2013-01-01

    A beta camera has been developed that allows planar imaging of the spatial and temporal distribution of beta particles using a 14 × 14 mm2 position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD). This camera system, which we call Betabox, can be directly coupled to microfluidic chips designed for cell incubation or other biological applications. Betabox allows for imaging the cellular uptake of molecular imaging probes labeled with charged particle emitters such as 18F inside these chips. In this work, we investigate the quantitative imaging capabilities of Betabox for 18F beta particles, in terms of background rate, efficiency, spatial resolution, and count rate. Measurements of background and spatial resolution are considered both at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) and at an elevated operating temperature (37 °C ± 1 °C), as is often required for biological assays. The background rate measured with a 4 keV energy cutoff is below 2 cph mm−2 at both 21 and 37 °C. The absolute efficiency of Betabox for the detection of 18F positron sources in contact with a PSAPD with the surface passivated from ambient light and damage is 46% ± 1%. The lower detection limit is estimated using the Rose Criterion to be 0.2 cps mm−2 for 1 min acquisitions and a 62 × 62 µm2 pixel size. The upper detection limit is approximately 21 000 cps. The spatial resolution at both 21 and 37 °C ranges from 0.4 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view (FOV), and degrades to 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm away from center yielding a useful FOV of approximately 10 × 10 mm2. We also investigate the effects on spatial resolution and sensitivity that result from the use of a polymer based microfluidic chip. For these studies we place varying layers of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between the detector and the source and find that the spatial resolution degrades by ~180 µm for every 100 µm of LDPE film. Sensitivity is reduced by half with the inclusion of ~200 µm of additional LDPE film

  1. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Fast Electron Driven Beta-induced Alfven Eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Cheng, Junyi; Lin, Zhihong

    2016-10-01

    The fast electron driven beta induced Alfven eigenmode (e-BAE) has been routinely observed in HL-2A tokamak. We study e-BAE for the first time using global gyrokinetic GTC simulation, where the fast electrons are described by the drift kinetic model. Frequency chirping is observed in nonlinear simulations in the absence of sources and sinks, which provide a new nonlinear paradigm beyond the standard ``bump-on-tail'' model. For weakly driven case, nonlinear frequency is observed to be in phase with particle flux, and nonlinear mode structure is almost the same as linear stage. In the strongly driven case, BAAE is also unstable and co-exists with BAE after the BAE saturation. Analysis of nonlinear wave-particle interactions shows that the frequency chirping is induced by the nonlinear evolution of the coherent structures in the fast electron phase space, where the dynamics of the coherent structure is controlled by the formation and destruction of phrase space islands in the canonical variables. Zonal fields are found to affect wave-particle resonance in the nonlinear e-BAE simulations.

  2. Nuclear and particle physics aspects of the 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay of {sup 150}Nd

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornicky, R.; Simkovic, F.; Faessler, A.

    2007-10-12

    A discussion is given on possible realization of the Single State Dominance (SSD) hypothesis in the case of the two-neutrino double beta decay (2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay) of {sup l50}Nd with 1{sup -} ground state of the intermediate nucleus. We conclude that the SSD hypothesis is expected to be ruled out by precision measurement of differential characteristics of this process in running NEMO 3 or planed SuperNEMO experiments unlike some unknown low-lying 1{sup +} state of {sup 150}Pm does exist. This problem can be solved via (d,{sup 2}He) charge-exchange experiment on {sup l50}Sm. Further, we address the question about possible violation of the Pauli exclusion principle for neutrinos and its consequences for the energy distributions of the 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay of {sup l50}Nd. This phenomenon might be a subject of interest of NEMO 3 and SuperNEMO experiments as well.

  3. Calibration method for the lidar-observed stratospheric depolarization ratio in the presence of liquid aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Adachi, H; Shibata, T; Iwasaka, Y; Fujiwara, M

    2001-12-20

    A fine calibration of the depolarization ratio is required for a detailed interpretation of lidar-observed polar stratospheric clouds. We propose a procedure for analyzing data by using atmospheric depolarization lidar. The method is based on a plot of deltaT versus (1 - RT(-1)), where deltaT is the total depolarization ratio and RT is the total backscattering ratio. Assuming that there are only spherical particles in some altitude ranges of the lidar data, the characteristics of the plot of deltaT versus (1 - RT(-1)) lead to a simple but effective calibration method for deltaT. Additionally, the depolarization of air molecules deltam can be determined in the process of deltaT calibration. We compared determined values with theoretically calculated values for the depolarization of air to test the proposed method. The deltam value was calculated from the lidar data acquired at Ny-Alesund (79 degrees N, 12 degrees E), Svalbard in winter 1994-1995. When only sulfate aerosols were present on 24 December 1994, deltam was 0.46 +/- 0.35%. When the particles consisted of sulfate aerosols and spherical particles of polar stratospheric clouds on 4 January 1995, deltam was 0.45 +/- 0.07%. Both deltam values were in good agreement with the theoretically calculated value, 0.50 +/- 0.03%.

  4. Direct determination of 90Sr and 147Pm in Chernobyl hot particles collected in Kiev using beta absorption method.

    PubMed

    Papp, Z; Bolyós, A; Dezsó, Z; Daróczy, S

    1997-12-01

    59 hot particles were collected in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1987. All but one were prepared from a moss carpet of 360 cm2 area. Radionuclide composition of the hot particles was investigated by gamma-spectrometry and beta absorption method. Pure beta emitters 90Sr and 147Pm were determined in 25 hot particles measuring the beta absorption curves of the hot particles with an end-window Geiger-Müller counter and decomposing the curves in order to obtain the contributions of 90Sr and 147Pm to the total beta counting rate. All but one of the hot particles were found to be the debris of the fuel. The activity ratio 90Sr:l44Ce was 0.052 in good agreement with theoretical calculations on core inventories. This means that strontium behaved as a nonvolatile element in the process of the formation of the hot particles investigated. The activity ratio 147Pm:144Ce was 0.078 which is half of the theoretical result. Although 147Pm is considered to be a refractory nuclide, it seems that significant part of 147Pm went to the homogeneous fraction of the general fallout. The surface density of hot particles (of higher than about 50 Bq activity) was about 1,600 m(-2) and that of the activities of the nuclides 90Sr, 106Ru, 134Cs, 137Cs, 144Ce and 147Pm as components of hot particles was 12.2, 54.3, 5.9, 9.7, 234 and 18.3 kBq m(-2) (activity values counted for 26 April 1986), respectively, in downtown Kiev city in 1987.

  5. Particle acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a low-beta pair plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Daughton, William; Li, Xiaocan; Liu, Yi -Hsin

    2016-04-29

    Plasma energization through magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime featured by low plasma beta (β=8πnkT0/B2 <<1) and/or high magnetization (σ=B2/(4πnmc2)>>1) is important in a series of astrophysical systems such as solar flares, pulsar wind nebula, and relativistic jets from black holes. In this paper, we review the recent progress on kinetic simulations of this process and further discuss plasma dynamics and particle acceleration in a low-β reconnection layer that consists of electron–positron pairs. We also examine the effect of different initial thermal temperatures on the resulting particle energy spectra. While earlier papers have concluded that the spectral index is smaller for higher σ, our simulations show that the spectral index approaches p = 1 for sufficiently low plasma β, even if σ~1. Since this predicted spectral index in the idealized limit is harder than most observations, it is important to consider effects that can lead to a softer spectrum such as open boundary simulations. Here, we also remark that the effects of three-dimensional reconnection physics and turbulence on reconnection need to be addressed in the future.

  6. Beta camera for static and dynamic imaging of charged-particle emitting radionuclides in biologic samples.

    PubMed

    Ljunggren, K; Strand, S E

    1990-12-01

    A detection system based on microchannel plates has been constructed to image charged particles emitted by radionuclides in biomedical samples. This technique has significant advantages over conventional film autoradiography for investigating the distribution of radiolabeled compounds: shorter acquisition times due to the high sensitivity, easier sample handling, direct quantification and the ability to perform dynamic studies. The detector performance shows a spatial resolution of 0.9 mm for carbon-14 (14C) (0.156 MeV), good linearity and homogeneity. The noise level is below 50/(cm2.sec). Successful imaging with this system has been performed with beta-emitters 14C, sulfur-35 (35S), iodine-131 (131I), yttrium-90 (90Y), and positron emitters gallium-68 (68Ga), and fluorine-18 (18F). Dynamic studies of axonal transport of 35S-methionine in a nerve, and static images of 90Y-labeled monoclonal antibodies in slices of tumors are presented. The system shows promise for rapid quantitative imaging of charged-particle emitting radionuclides in small biologic samples.

  7. Particle acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a low-beta pair plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Daughton, William; ...

    2016-04-29

    Plasma energization through magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime featured by low plasma beta (β=8πnkT0/B2 <<1) and/or high magnetization (σ=B2/(4πnmc2)>>1) is important in a series of astrophysical systems such as solar flares, pulsar wind nebula, and relativistic jets from black holes. In this paper, we review the recent progress on kinetic simulations of this process and further discuss plasma dynamics and particle acceleration in a low-β reconnection layer that consists of electron–positron pairs. We also examine the effect of different initial thermal temperatures on the resulting particle energy spectra. While earlier papers have concluded that the spectral index ismore » smaller for higher σ, our simulations show that the spectral index approaches p = 1 for sufficiently low plasma β, even if σ~1. Since this predicted spectral index in the idealized limit is harder than most observations, it is important to consider effects that can lead to a softer spectrum such as open boundary simulations. Here, we also remark that the effects of three-dimensional reconnection physics and turbulence on reconnection need to be addressed in the future.« less

  8. Cellular uptake of beta-carotene from protein stabilized solid lipid nano-particles prepared by homogenization-evaporation method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a homogenization-evaporation method, beta-carotene (BC) loaded nano-particles were prepared with different ratios of food-grade sodium caseinate (SC), whey protein isolate (WPI), or soy protein isolate (SPI) to BC and evaluated for their physiochemical stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, and cel...

  9. Localization and quantitation of tritiated compounds in tissue sections with a gaseous detector of beta particles: comparison with film autoradiography.

    PubMed Central

    Tribollet, E; Dreifuss, J J; Charpak, G; Dominik, W; Zaganidis, N

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of tritium polymer standards and of brain sections labeled with tritiated vasopressin was carried out by using a gaseous detector of beta particles designed for this purpose. The gaseous detector showed major advantages compared with film autoradiography: the linearity and the large dynamic range of intensity measurements as well as the short time needed for data acquisition. Images PMID:1996346

  10. Measurement of the rate of wear of dental composite resins by a /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Moores, G.E.; Glentworth, P.; Harrison, A.

    1983-09-01

    The wear rate of restorative dental composite resins is an important parameter in the assessment of their in vivo performance. The two more widely used methods of quantifying wear are measuring the dimensional change and measuring the change in the mass of the specimen. The former method is complicated by uneven wear of specimens and presents difficulties with samples of irregular shape, and the latter method involves measurements of changes in mass as small as tens of micrograms with specimens of sizes similar to those encountered clinically. A /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge has been designed and constructed to enable the wear rate of small specimens of dental composite resins to be measured. The /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge enables indirect measurements of changes in mass to be made and overcomes some of the difficulties inherent in the direct measurement of mass and length. Applications of the /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge to the measurement of wear rates are given for restorative dental resins having a range of inorganic filler contents and types. The results show that the /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge is capable of measuring the rate of wear to a degree of precision similar to that of micrometer-derived measurements.

  11. Characterization of BT-2: Calibration Target for Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L. M.; King, P. L.; Spray, J. G.; Elliott, B. E.; Gellert, R.

    2012-03-01

    This work describes the ongoing effort to fully characterize BT-2 (the calibration standard for the APXS instrument onboard MSL) using a variety of techniques and instrumentation to aid in the interpretation of APXS data.

  12. Multi-variable calibration of temperature estimation in individual non-encapsulated thermo liquid crystal micro particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, Rodrigo; Cierpka, Christian; Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J.

    2012-11-01

    An experimental method to track the temperature of individual non-encapsulated thermo-liquid crystal (TLC) particles is presented. TLC thermography has been investigated for several years but the low quality of individual TLC particles, as well as the methods used to relate their color to temperature, has prevented the development of a reliable approach to track their temperature individually. In order to overcome these challenges, a Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG) membrane approach was used to produce an emulsion of stable non-encapsulated TLC micro particles, with a narrower size distribution than that of encapsulated TLC solutions which are commercially available (Segura et al., Microfluid Nanofluid, 2012). On the other hand, a multi-variable calibration approach was used, as opposed to the well known temperature-hue relationship, using the three-components of the HSI color space measured in each particle image. A third degree three-dimensional polynomial was fitted to the color data of thousands of particles to estimate their temperature individually. The method is able to measure individual temperatures over a range exceeding the nominal range of the TLC material, with lower uncertainty than any method used for individual particle thermography reported in the literature. Financial support from the German Research Foundation (DFG), under the Forschergruppe 856 grant program, is gratefully appreciated.

  13. Beta experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A focused laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was developed for the measurement of atmospheric backscatter (beta) from aerosols at infrared wavelengths. A Doppler signal generator was used in mapping the coherent sensitive focal volume of a focused LDV system. System calibration data was analyzed during the flight test activity scheduled for the Beta system. These analyses were performed to determine the acceptability of the Beta measurement system's performance.

  14. Calibration of a dual-PTZ-camera system for stereo vision based on parallel particle swarm optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yau-Zen; Wang, Huai-Ming; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Hsu, Ming-Hsi

    2014-02-01

    This work investigates the calibration of a stereo vision system based on two PTZ (Pan-Tilt-Zoom) cameras. As the accuracy of the system depends not only on intrinsic parameters, but also on the geometric relationships between rotation axes of the cameras, the major concern is the development of an effective and systematic way to obtain these relationships. We derived a complete geometric model of the dual-PTZ-camera system and proposed a calibration procedure for the intrinsic and external parameters of the model. The calibration method is based on Zhang's approach using an augmented checkerboard composed of eight small checkerboards, and is formulated as an optimization problem to be solved by an improved particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. Two Sony EVI-D70 PTZ cameras were used for the experiments. The root-mean-square errors (RMSE) of corner distances in the horizontal and vertical direction are 0.192 mm and 0.115 mm, respectively. The RMSE of overlapped points between the small checkerboards is 1.3958 mm.

  15. Integrated development facility for the calibration of low-energy charged particle flight instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, A. P.; Reynolds, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a low-energy ion facility for development and calibration of thermal ion instrumentation is examined. A directly heated cathode provides the electrons used to produce ions by impact ionization and an applied magnetic field increases the path length followed by the electrons. The electrostatic and variable geometry magnetic mirror configuration in the ion source is studied. The procedures for the charge neutralization of the beam and the configuration and function of the 1.4-m drift tube are analyzed. A microcomputer is utilized to control and monitor the beam energy and composition, and the mass- and angle-dependent response of the instrument under testing. The facility produces a high-quality ion beam with an adjustable range of energies up to 150 eV; the angular divergence and uniformity of the beam is obtained from two independent retarding potential analyzers. The procedures for calibrating the instrument being developed are described.

  16. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  17. Beta particle measurement and dosimetry Requirements at NRC-licensed facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, L.A.; Endres, G.W.R.; Fox, R.A.; Roberson, P.L.; Scherpelz, R.I.

    1984-08-01

    Researchers from Pacific Northwest Laboratroy (PNL) have conducted beta radiation measurements under laboratory and field conditions to assess the degree of the measurement problem and offer suggestions for possible remedies. The primary measurement systems selected for use in this study were the silicon (Si) surface barrier spectrometer system and the multielement beta dosimeter. Three boiling water reactors (BWRs), two pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and one fuel fabrication facility were visited during the course of the study. Although beta fields from cobalt-60 were the most common type found at commercial reactor facilities, higher energy beta fields were found at locations associated with spent fuel handling, liquid radioactive waste, and BWR turbine components. Commercially-available dosimeters and survey instruments were used to measure the same laboratory and licensee facility beta fields characterized with PNL's active and passive spectrometers. A prototype spectrometer was also used in the laboratory measurements. The commercial instruments and dosimeters used in this study typically responded low to the beta fields measured, especially where maximum beta energies were less than approximately 500 keV.

  18. Electron calibration of instrumentation for low energy, high intensity particle measurements at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Daly, S. F.; Eraker, J. H.; Perkins, M. A.; Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    Unique identification of the high intensity, impulsively accelerated charged particle fluxes discovered during Mariner 10's first encounter with Mercury (March 1974) requires a detailed knowledge of the responses of the two University of Chicago charged particle telescopes to low energy fluxes over a wide dynamic range of flux levels. The results of detailed analyses show that these telescopes can separate and identify unambiguously the presence of electron and proton fluxes for a wide range of electron spectra and intensities in the relevant overall range of about 30 keV to 2 MeV.

  19. Relative toxicity of chronic irradiation by 45Ca beta particles and 242Cm alpha particles with respect to the production of lung tumors in CBA/Ca mice.

    PubMed

    Priest, N D; Hoel, D G; Brooks, P N

    2006-11-01

    Approximately 1800 female CBA/Ca mice were exposed by inhalation at three dose levels to beta particles from (45)Ca-labeled fused aluminosilicate particles (FAP), to alpha particles from (242)Cm-labeled FAP, or to carrier control FAP. Another group of mice inhaled no FAP and were designated as untreated cage controls. The FAP in combination with these radionuclides was used to achieve the same spatial and temporal distribution of alpha- and beta-particle dose within the irradiated mice. Some mice were killed to determine the clearance of radiolabeled FAP from their lungs, and the remainder were allocated to a life-span study. All animals were subjected to a detailed necropsy. To facilitate the identification of small tumors, the lungs were rendered transparent in methyl salicylate and examined under back illumination for the presence of lesions. Lung nodules and other microscopic lesions were excised for histological examination. The median survival of mice in all groups was approximately 910 days. The control animals lived longer than those that were irradiated, but it was difficult to determine a dose-response relationship for survival among the exposed mice. Benign adenomas and, less frequently, malignant adenocarcinomas were identified in all animal groups. The prevalence of these tumors was approximately 28.8% in the control mice, which is consistent with the results of other studies using the same strain of mouse. After exposure to radionuclide-labeled FAP, there was a significant dose-related increase in the prevalence of lung tumors in (242)Cm- (peak prevalence 55%) and (45)Ca-exposed (peak prevalence 48.6%) mice. The prevalence of tumors in the mice that received (242)Cm-labeled FAP was approximately twice that in the mice that inhaled (45)Ca-labeled FAP within the range of doses employed (0.55-4.69 Gy). Using the ratio of the slope of the linear component of the dose-response curves, the toxicity of the alpha particles relative to the beta particles was 1

  20. Partial least squares-based multivariate spectral calibration method for simultaneous determination of beta-carboline derivatives in Peganum harmala seed extracts.

    PubMed

    Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Abbaspour, Abdolkarim; Maghami, Homeyra; Miri, Ramin; Panjehshahin, Mohhamad Reza

    2006-08-11

    The partial least squares regression method has been applied for simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of harmine, harmane, harmalol and harmaline in Peganum harmala L. (Zygophyllaceae) seeds. The effect of pH was optimized employing multivariate definition of selectivity and sensitivity and best results were obtained in basic media (pH>9). The calibration models were optimized for number of latent variables by the cross-validation procedure. Determinations were made over the concentration range of 0.15-10 microg mL(-1). The proposed method was validated by applying it to the analysis of the beta-carbolines in synthetic quaternary mixtures of media at pH 9 and 11. The relative standard errors of prediction were less than 4% in most cases. Analysis of P. harmala seeds by the proposed models for contents of the beta-carboline derivatives resulted in 1.84%, 0.16%, 0.25% and 3.90% for harmine, harmane, harmaline and harmalol, respectively. The results were validated against an existing HPLC method and it no significant differences were observed between the results of two methods.

  1. Quality assurance of personal beta particle dosemeters used for individual monitoring of occupationally exposed persons.

    PubMed

    Helmstädter, Klaus; Ambrosi, Peter

    2007-01-01

    As a result of investigations and intercomparison measurements organised from 1996 to 1999 by PTB, several types of personal dosemeters, all based on TLD, were selected by the dosimetry services for the measurement of the personal dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in beta and/or photon radiation fields. These dosemeters have now the status of legal personal beta partial-body dosemeters. Workplaces at which beta radiation might significantly contribute to the doses to the extremities are to be found today with increasing frequency in radiation therapy, radiation source production and nuclear power plants. Quality assurance for beta personal dosemeters is stipulated by guidelines for the official dosimetry service and is carried out by way of the intercomparison measurements organised periodically by the PTB. The results are evaluated based on the recommendations of the German Commission on Radiological Protection (SSK). The procedure of these intercomparison measurements will be explained in detail. The experience gained from three series of comparisons with seven types of fingerring dosemeters will be described and the results will be presented. The anonymity of the dosemeter types and of the participants in the intercomparison will be preserved.

  2. Observation of an Energetic-Particle-Driven Instability in the Wall-Stabilized High-beta Plasmas in the JT-60U Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Shinohara, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Isayama, A.; Takechi, M.; Suzuki, T.; Oyama, N.; Asakura, N.; Kamada, Y.; Ozeki, T.

    2009-07-24

    We have observed a bursting mode in the high-beta plasmas above the ideal beta limit without a conducting wall. The mode frequency is chirping down as the mode amplitude increases, and its initial value is close to the precession frequency of the trapped energetic particle from the perpendicular neutral beams. The mode structure is radially extended with a peak around the q=2 surface. This mode can finally trigger the resistive wall mode (RWM) despite enough plasma rotation for RWM stabilization. It is concluded that the mode is driven by trapped energetic particles. The mode is attributed to the interaction between the trapped energetic particles and a marginally stable mode in the wall-stabilized high-beta{sub N} region.

  3. Simulations toward Effective Calibrations of the CUORE Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Byron; Cuore Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    It is currently unknown whether or not the neutrino is a MAJORANA or Dirac particle, that is, whether or not the neutrino is its own antiparticle. Observing neutrinoless double-beta decay, a process only possible if neutrinos are MAJORANA particles, can answer this question. If observed, this process would indicate that Lepton number is not conserved. CUORE's (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) is a bolometer based detector with Te02 crystal bolometers that is used to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 130Te. To insure that this detector will identify the energy peaks resulting from neutrinoless double-beta decay precisely, the detectors must be calibrated with gamma sources. To calibrate the detector, twelve strings carrying the calibration source 232Th were cooled from 300K to 10mK and installed within and around the bolometer towers. Six strings are distributed around the outside of the towers, and six strings are among the towers. This organization of strings was chosen because the gamma ray radiation from the source strings cannot penetrate more than one or two crystals at low energy. I will present the results from Monte Carlo simulations run in order to understand how to calibrate the COURE detector during operations and how to calibrate the CUORE detector in circumstances where the twelve calibration strings fail to deploy properly. Maruyama Group / CUORE collaboration.

  4. Beta Androstenediol Mitigates the Damage of 1 GeV/n Fe Ion Particle Radiation to the Hematopoietic System

    SciTech Connect

    Loria R.; Guida P.; Loria, R.; Beckman, M.; Contaifer, D.; Tamariz, F.; Gibb, D.; Thompson, L.; Guida, P.

    2010-09-07

    Space exploration is associated with exposure to 1-3 Gy solar particle radiation and galactic cosmic radiation that could increase cancer rates. Effective nontoxic countermeasures to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure are highly desirable but currently not available. The aim was to determine whether a single subcutaneous injection of androstenediol ({Delta}(5) androsten-3{beta}, 17{beta}-diol [AED]) could mitigate and restore the mouse hematopoetic system from the radiation-mediated injury of 3 Gy whole-body high LET (56)Fe(26+) exposure. The findings show that postradiation AED treatment has an overall positive and significant beneficial effect to restore the levels of hematopoeitic elements (p < 0.001). Androstenediol treatment significantly increased monocyte levels at days 4, 7, and 14 and, similarly, increased red blood cell, hemoglobin, and platelet counts. Flow cytometry analysis 14 days after radiation and AED treatment demonstrated an increase (p < 0.05) in bone marrow cells counts. Ex vivo osteoclastogenesis studies show that AED treatment is necessary and advantageous for the development and restoration of osteoclastogenesis after radiation exposure. These findings clearly show that androstenediol functions as a countermeasure to remedy hematopoeitic injury mediated by high LET iron ion radiation. Presently, no other agent has been shown to have such properties.

  5. Near-bottom suspended matter concentration on the Continental Shelf during storms: estimates based on in situ observations of light transmission and a particle size dependent transmissometer calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Butman, B.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory calibration of Sea Tech and Montedoro-Whitney beam transmissometers shows a linear relation between light attenuation coefficient (cp) and suspended matter concentration (SMC) for natural sediments and for glass beads. However the proportionality constant between cp and SMC depends on the particle diameter and particle type. Thus, to measure SMC, observations of light attenuation must be used with a time-variable calibration when suspended particle characteristics change with time. Because of this variable calibration, time series of light attenuation alone may not directly reflect SMC and must be interpreted with care. The near-bottom concentration of suspended matter during winter storms on the U.S. East Coast Continental Shelf is estimated from light transmission measurements made 2 m above the bottom and from the size distribution of suspended material collected simultaneously in sediment traps 3 m above the bottom. The average concentrations during six storms between December 1979 and February 1980 in the Middle Atlantic Bight ranged from 2 to 4 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 7 mg l1) and 8 to 12 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 22 mg l1) on the south flank of Georges Bank. ?? 1987.

  6. Calibration Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurz, Peter; Balogh, Andre; Coffey, Victoria; Dichter, Bronislaw K.; Kasprzak, Wayne T.; Lazarus, Alan J.; Lennartsson, Walter; McFadden, James P.

    Calibration and characterization of particle instruments with supporting flight electronics is necessary for the correct interpretation of the returned data. Generally speaking, the instrument will always return a measurement value (typically in form of a digital number), for example a count rate, for the measurement of an external quantity, which could be an ambient neutral gas density, an ion composition (species measured and amount), or electron density. The returned values are used then to derive parameters associated with the distribution such as temperature, bulk flow speed, differential energy flux and others. With the calibration of the instrument the direct relationship between the external quantity and the returned measurement value has to be established so that the data recorded during flight can be correctly interpreted. While calibration and characterization of an instrument are usually done in ground-based laboratories prior to integration of the instrument in the spacecraft, it can also be done in space.

  7. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Continuously Driven Mirror and Ion Cyclotron Instabilities in High Beta Astrophysical and Heliospheric Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    We use particle-in-cell simulations to study the nonlinear evolution of ion velocity space instabilities in an idealized problem in which a background velocity shear continuously amplifies the magnetic field. We simulate the astrophysically relevant regime where the shear timescale is long compared to the ion cyclotron period, and the plasma beta is β ~ 1-100. The background field amplification in our calculation is meant to mimic processes such as turbulent fluctuations or MHD-scale instabilities. The field amplification continuously drives a pressure anisotropy with p > p ∥ and the plasma becomes unstable to the mirror and ion cyclotron instabilities. In all cases, the nonlinear state is dominated by the mirror instability, not the ion cyclotron instability, and the plasma pressure anisotropy saturates near the threshold for the linear mirror instability. The magnetic field fluctuations initially undergo exponential growth but saturate in a secular phase in which the fluctuations grow on the same timescale as the background magnetic field (with δB ~ 0.3 langBrang in the secular phase). At early times, the ion magnetic moment is well-conserved but once the fluctuation amplitudes exceed δB ~ 0.1 langBrang, the magnetic moment is no longer conserved but instead changes on a timescale comparable to that of the mean magnetic field. We discuss the implications of our results for low-collisionality astrophysical plasmas, including the near-Earth solar wind and low-luminosity accretion disks around black holes.

  8. PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF CONTINUOUSLY DRIVEN MIRROR AND ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITIES IN HIGH BETA ASTROPHYSICAL AND HELIOSPHERIC PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2015-02-10

    We use particle-in-cell simulations to study the nonlinear evolution of ion velocity space instabilities in an idealized problem in which a background velocity shear continuously amplifies the magnetic field. We simulate the astrophysically relevant regime where the shear timescale is long compared to the ion cyclotron period, and the plasma beta is β ∼ 1-100. The background field amplification in our calculation is meant to mimic processes such as turbulent fluctuations or MHD-scale instabilities. The field amplification continuously drives a pressure anisotropy with p > p {sub ∥} and the plasma becomes unstable to the mirror and ion cyclotron instabilities. In all cases, the nonlinear state is dominated by the mirror instability, not the ion cyclotron instability, and the plasma pressure anisotropy saturates near the threshold for the linear mirror instability. The magnetic field fluctuations initially undergo exponential growth but saturate in a secular phase in which the fluctuations grow on the same timescale as the background magnetic field (with δB ∼ 0.3 (B) in the secular phase). At early times, the ion magnetic moment is well-conserved but once the fluctuation amplitudes exceed δB ∼ 0.1 (B), the magnetic moment is no longer conserved but instead changes on a timescale comparable to that of the mean magnetic field. We discuss the implications of our results for low-collisionality astrophysical plasmas, including the near-Earth solar wind and low-luminosity accretion disks around black holes.

  9. Intracisternal A-particle element transposition into the murine beta-glucuronidase gene correlates with loss of enzyme activity: a new model for beta-glucuronidase deficiency in the C3H mouse.

    PubMed

    Gwynn, B; Lueders, K; Sands, M S; Birkenmeier, E H

    1998-11-01

    The severity of human mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII), or Sly syndrome, depends on the relative activity of the enzyme beta-glucuronidase. Loss of beta-glucuronidase activity can cause hydrops fetalis, with in utero or postnatal death of the patient. In this report, we show that beta-glucuronidase activity is not detectable by a standard fluorometric assay in C3H/HeOuJ (C3H) mice homozygous for a new mutation, gusmps2J. These gusmps2J/gusmps2J mice are born and survive much longer than the previously characterized beta-glucuronidase-null B6.C-H-2(bm1)/ByBir-gusmps (gusmps/gusmps) mice. Northern blot analysis of liver from gusmps2J/gusmps2J mice demonstrates a 750-bp reduction in size of beta-glucuronidase mRNA. A 5.4-kb insertion in the Gus-sh nucleotide sequence from these mice was localized by Southern blot analysis to intron 8. The ends of the inserted sequences were cloned by inverse PCR and revealed an intracisternal A-particle (IAP) element inserted near the 3' end of the intron. The sequence of the long terminal repeat (LTR) regions of the IAP most closely matches that of a composite LTR found in transposed IAPs previously identified in the C3H strain. The inserted IAP may contribute to diminished beta-glucuronidase activity either by interfering with transcription or by destabilizing the message. The resulting phenotype is much less severe than that previously described in the gusmps/gusmps mouse and provides an opportunity to study MPS VII on a genetic background that clearly modulates disease severity.

  10. Kinetics of Colloidal Deposition and Release of Polystyrene Latex Particles in the Presence of Adsorbed beta-Lactoglobulin Studied Using a Flow Cell

    PubMed

    Joscelyne; Trägårdh

    1997-08-15

    The effect of adsorbed whey protein, beta-lactoglobulin, has been investigated on the attachment of polystyrene latex particles to an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface and the subsequent release in anionic surfactant SDS solution and distilled-deionized water at pH 6.0. Experiments were carried out using a wall-jet flow cell and particle attachment was measured in situ using the technique of evanescent wave microscopy. The deposition rate of particles increased as predicted up to a shear rate of approximately 1000 s-1, for deposition at a diffusion-limited rate. There was a reduction in the rate at higher shear rates indicating a decrease in sticking efficiency. As the shear rate increased, the ITO surface became saturated more quickly due predominantly to blocking of the surface by deposited particles. The presence of adsorbed beta-lactoglobulin on the ITO surface caused a large reduction in the subsequent deposition rate of protein-coated particles. This was due to an increase in electrostatic repulsion. Differences were found in both the extent of removal and in the release (cleaning) kinetics of particles in SDS and in distilled-deionized water for the different particle-protein-ITO surface conditions investigated. Release of particles was also independent of the shear rate. Results were interpreted by considering the roles of protein replacement and elution which occurs in SDS solutions; >90% removal of protein-coated particles from a coated ITO surface was observed in SDS when both processes play a role. This compared to 55% removal in distilled-deionized water where they were considered negligible. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  11. Transport of carbon ion test particles and hydrogen recycling in the plasma of the Columbia tokamak HBT'' (High Beta Tokamak)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Hua.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon impurity ion transport is studied in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT), using a carbon tipped probe which is inserted into the plasma (n{sub e} {approx} 1 {minus} 5 {times} 10{sup 14} (cm{sup {minus}3}), T{sub e} {approx} 4 {minus} 10 (eV), B{sub t} {approx} 0.2 {minus} 0.4(T)). Carbon impurity light, mainly the strong lines of C{sub II}(4267A, emitted by the C{sup +} ions) and C{sub III} (4647A, emitted by the C{sup ++} ions), is formed by the ablation or sputtering of plasma ions and by the discharge of the carbon probe itself. The diffusion transport of the carbon ions is modeled by measuring the space-and-time dependent spectral light emission of the carbon ions with a collimated optical beam and photomultiplier. The point of emission can be observed in such a way as to sample regions along and transverse to the toroidal magnetic field. The carbon ion diffusion coefficients are obtained by fitting the data to a diffusion transport model. It is found that the diffusion of the carbon ions is classical'' and is controlled by the high collisionality of the HBT plasma; the diffusion is a two-dimensional problem and the expected dependence on the charge of the impurity ion is observed. The measurement of the spatial distribution of the H{sub {alpha}} emissivity was obtained by inverting the light signals from a 4-channel polychromator, the data were used to calculate the minor-radial influx, the density, and the recycling time of neutral hydrogen atoms or molecules. The calculation shows that the particle recycling time {tau}{sub p} is comparable with the plasma energy confinement time {tau}{sub E}; therefore, the recycling of the hot plasma ions with the cold neutrals from the walls is one of the main mechanisms for loss of plasma energy.

  12. Particle Fabrication Using Inkjet Printing onto Hydrophobic Surfaces for Optimization and Calibration of Trace Contraband Detection Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Greg; Najarro, Marcela; Wight, Scott; Walker, Marlon; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Windsor, Eric; Barr, Tim; Staymates, Matthew; Urbas, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    A method has been developed to fabricate patterned arrays of micrometer-sized monodisperse solid particles of ammonium nitrate on hydrophobic silicon surfaces using inkjet printing. The method relies on dispensing one or more microdrops of a concentrated aqueous ammonium nitrate solution from a drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet printer at specific locations on a silicon substrate rendered hydrophobic by a perfluorodecytrichlorosilane monolayer coating. The deposited liquid droplets form into the shape of a spherical shaped cap; during the evaporation process, a deposited liquid droplet maintains this geometry until it forms a solid micrometer sized particle. Arrays of solid particles are obtained by sequential translation of the printer stage. The use of DOD inkjet printing for fabrication of discrete particle arrays allows for precise control of particle characteristics (mass, diameter and height), as well as the particle number and spatial distribution on the substrate. The final mass of an individual particle is precisely determined by using gravimetric measurement of the average mass of solution ejected per microdrop. The primary application of this method is fabrication of test materials for the evaluation of spatially-resolved optical and mass spectrometry based sensors used for detecting particle residues of contraband materials, such as explosives or narcotics. PMID:26610515

  13. Design and calibration of a rocket-borne electron spectrometer for investigation of particle ionization in the nighttime midlatitude E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, H. D.; Smith, L. G.

    1974-01-01

    An explanation was developed for the formation, near midnight at midlatitudes, of a broad electron density layer extending approximately from 120 to 180 km and usually referred to as the intermediate E layer. The responsible mechanism is believed to be the converging vertical ion drifts resulting from winds of the solar semidiurnal tide. Numerical solutions of the continuity equation appropriate to the intermediate layer is described for particular models of ion drift, diffusion coefficents, and ionization production. Analysis of rocket observations of the layer show that the ionization rate is highly correlated with the planetary geomagnetic index, K sub p. Particle flux measurements support the idea that energetic electrons are the principal source of this ionization. A semiconductor spectrometer experiment for investigation of the particle flux, spectrum, and angular properties was designed and successfully flown on a Nike Apache rocket. A detailed description of the theory, design, and calibration of the experiment and some preliminary results presented.

  14. Monitoring of event-based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport in field and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Egner, Marius; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to mobilization of suspended particles which typically occurs during floods. Since the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants such as PAHs, PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. Online turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) would then also allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics if once calibrated against TSS and total pollutant concentrations for a given catchment. In this study, distinct flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting sub-catchments of the River Neckar in Southwest Germany (Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar itself and investigated for the total amount of PAHs and TSS in water; turbidity (NTU) and grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined as well. Laboratory experiments were performed with natural river bed sediments from different locations (Ammer) to investigate PAH concentrations, TSS and turbidity during sedimentation of suspended particles under controlled conditions (yielding smaller and smaller suspended particles and TSS with time). Laboratory and field results agreed very well and showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the field samples and up to 8000 NTU in lab experiments. This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on turbidity measurements and TSS vs. PAHs relationships - even for high turbidity values observed during flood events (>2000 NTU). Total PAH concentrations on suspended solids were independent of grain size of suspended particles. This implies that for the rivers investigated the sorption capacity of particles did not change significantly during the observed events.

  15. From particle counts to flux: Wind tunnel testing and calibration of the 'Wenglor' aeolian sediment transport sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Li, Bailiang; Neuman, Cheryl McKenna; Steven Sanderson, R.

    2014-12-01

    Despite almost a century of study, aeolian sediment transport remains difficult to measure. Low temporal resolution sediment traps filter sub-second scale variability hypothesized to be important, and high resolution electronic sensors are poorly tested, inconsistent, and often produce incomparable particle count outputs. No sediment transport prediction model can be validated or applied without quality empirical transport measurements. Here, we test a popular electronic laser gate sensor (Wenglor YH03PCT8, 'the Wenglor') in a wind tunnel. We have 3 goals: (i) assess the reproducibility of Wenglor measurements, (ii) examine saturation potential, and (iii) relate trap-measured sediment flux to particle counts. To assess reproducibility we measured particle counts with two co-located Wenglors. Temporally-autocorrelated sections of the time series occurred where one Wenglor deviated; this is likely the result of lens contamination. To examine saturation potential, we measured saltator velocity to calculate particle concentration within the airstream. Particle concentrations suggest the mean number of particles within the laser sampling volume is consistently less than one. To relate trap-measured sediment flux to particle counts, we used particle size samples to calculate an average mass per counted particle. We relate count predicted mass fluxes to trap-measured mass fluxes with linear regression and obtain the relation: trap flux = 2.1 * Wenglor predicted flux (r2 = 0.99). The constant represents aspects of the Wenglor operation that cannot be directly evaluated. Together, these investigations suggest the Wenglor provides a consistent and low-cost method to measure aeolian saltation flux at a high resolution in non-dusty settings.

  16. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  17. Relative rate constants for the heterogeneous reactions of OH, NO 2 and NO radicals with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed on carbonaceous particles. Part 1: PAHs adsorbed on 1-2 μm calibrated graphite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteve, Williams; Budzinski, Helene; Villenave, Eric

    2004-11-01

    A discharge flow reactor was used to study the heterogeneous reactions of OH, NO2 and NO radicals with 11 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed on 1-2 μm calibrated graphite particles. Graphite was chosen as a simple model of carbonaceous atmospheric particles. Relative kinetic information was obtained from the decays of particulate-PAH concentration vs. the time, measured using off-line gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Particulate-anthracene, -benzo(a)pyrene and -perylene are the most reactive with NO2, whereas all PAHs studied present similar reactivities with OH within uncertainties. The reactivity of NO under our experimental conditions could not be distinguished from the PAH desorption.

  18. Dust Impact Monitor DIM onboard Rosetta/Philae: Calibration experiments with ice particles as cometary analogue materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, H.; Albin, T.; Flandes, A.; Fischer, H.; Hirn, A.; Loose, A.; Seidensticker, K.; Arnold, W.

    2014-07-01

    The Rosetta lander spacecraft Philae will land on the nucleus surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014. Philae is equipped with the Dust Impact Monitor (DIM). DIM is part of the SESAME instrument package onboard Philae and employs piezoelectric PZT sensors to detect impacts by sub-millimetre and millimetre-sized ice and dust particles that are emitted from the nucleus and transported into the cometary coma by the escaping gas flow. DIM will measure fluxes, impact directions, as well as the speed and size of the impacting particles. We studied the performance of DIM based on impact experiments and compared the measurements with the sensor's expected theoretical behaviour as derived from the Hertz theory of elastic impacts. We simulated impacts onto the DIM sensor with spherical ice particles with radii of approximately 0.7 mm and porous particles of other materials with radii up to 4 mm. Impact speeds range up to 2 m s^{-1}. Cometary grains on ballistic trajectories will have impact speeds below the escape speed from the nucleus surface (approximately 1.5 m s^{-1}), thus the impact speeds achievable by our experiments cover the range expected at the comet. Our results show that the signal strength and the contact durations measured with the DIM PZT sensors can be well approximated by the Hertz contact mechanics.

  19. Guidelines for the calibration of personnel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Holbrook, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    This guide describes minimum acceptable performance levels for personnel dosimetry systems used at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal is to improve both the quality of radiological calibrations and the methods of comparing reported occupational doses between DOE facilities. Reference calibration techniques are defined. A standard for evaluation of personnel dosimetry systems and recommended design parameters for personnel dosimeters are also included. Approximate intervals for the radiation energies for which these guidelines are appropriate are 15 keV to 2 MeV for photons; above 0.3 MeV for beta particles; and 1 keV to 2 MeV for neutrons. An analysis of ANSI N13.11 was completed using performance evaluations of selected personnel dosimetry systems in use at DOE facilities. The results of this analysis are incorporated in the guidelines.

  20. Monitoring of event based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: Calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles which is typically enhanced during events such as floods, snow melts etc. As the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants in rivers such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. On-line turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) then allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics. In this study, pronounced flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting catchments in Southwest Germany (Rivers Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar. Samples were analyzed for turbidity, the total amount of PAH and total suspended solids (TSS) in water. Additionally, the grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined. Discharge and turbidity were measured on-line at gauging stations in three of the catchments. Results showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the flood samples (i.e. independent on grain size). This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on the turbidity measurements and TSS versus PAH relationships - even for very high turbidity or TSS values (> 2000 NTU or mg l-1, respectively). From these linear regressions concentrations of PAHs on suspended particles were obtained which varied by catchment. The values comprise a robust measure of the average sediment quality in a river network and may be correlated to the degree of urbanization represented by the number of inhabitants per total flux of suspended particles. Based on long-term on-line turbidity measurements mass flow rates of particle bound pollutants over time could be calculated. Results showed that by far the largest amount

  1. Calibration of polydimethylsiloxane and XAD-Pocket passive air samplers (PAS) for measuring gas- and particle-phase SVOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeme, Joseph O.; Saini, Amandeep; Yang, Congqiao; Zhu, Jiping; Smedes, Foppe; Klánová, Jana; Diamond, Miriam L.

    2016-10-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has seen wide use as the stationary phase of gas chromatographic columns, a passive sampler in water, and recently as a personal exposure sampler, while styrene divinyl-benzene copolymer (XAD) has been used extensively as a passive air sampler outdoors and indoors. We have introduced PDMS and XAD-Pocket as new indoor passive air samplers (PASs). The XAD-Pocket was designed to maximize the surface area-to-volume ratio of XAD and to minimize obstruction of air flow by the sampler housing. Methods were developed to expedite the use of these PASs for measuring phthalates, novel brominated flame-retardants (NFRs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) indoors. Sampling rates, Rs, (m3 day-1), were measured during a 7-week calibration study. Variability within and between analyte groups was not statistically significant. As a result, generic values of 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.5 ± 0.3 m3 day-1 dm-2 are recommended for PDMS and XAD-Pocket for a 50-day deployment time, respectively. PDMS has a higher uptake rate and is easier to use than XAD-Pocket.

  2. Verification and Validation of Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Fast Electron Driven Beta-induced Alfvén Eigenmodes on HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Junyi; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Chen, Wei; Yu, Limin; Ding, Xuantong

    2015-11-01

    A verification and validation study is carried out for a sequence of fast electron driven beta-induced Alfven eigenmodes in HL-2A tokamak plasma. The fast electron driven beta induced Alfvén eigenmode (e-BAE) in toroidal plasmas is investigated for the first time using global gyrokinetic particle simulations, where the fast electrons are described by the drift kinetic model. The phase space structure shows that only the processional resonance is responsible for the e-BAE excitations while fast-ion driven BAE can be excited through all the channels such as transit, drift-bounce, and processional resonance. For weakly nonlinear driven case, frequency is observed to be in phase with the particle energy flux, and mode structure is almost the same as linear stage . While in the strongly driven nonlinear case, BAAE is excited after the BAE mode saturated. The simulation of e-BAE with the HL-2A tokamak parameters is taken. Three modes n/m = 1/2 , 2/5 ,1/3 in HL-2A can be excited in our simulations.

  3. A novel model of murine mucopolysaccharidosis type VII due to an intracisternal a particle element transposition into the beta-glucuronidase gene: clinical and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Vogler, C; Levy, B; Galvin, N; Sands, M S; Birkenmeier, E H; Sly, W S; Barker, J

    2001-03-01

    We describe the clinical and pathologic findings in a murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis VII (Sly disease) that arose spontaneously in the C3H/HeOuJ mouse strain. Affected gus(mps2J)/gus(mps2J) mice are deficient in beta-glucuronidase because of insertion of an intracisternal A particle element into intron 8 of the gus structural gene. This is the first model of a human lysosomal storage disease caused by an intracisternal A particle element insertion. Mice with the gus(mps2J)/gus(mps2J) genotype have < 1% of normal beta-glucuronidase activity and secondary elevations of other lysosomal enzymes. The phenotype includes shortened life-span, dysmorphic features, and skeletal dysplasia. Lysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans is widespread and affects the brain, skeleton, eye, ear, heart valves, aorta, and the fixed tissue macrophage system. Thus the phenotypic and pathologic alterations in gus(mps2J)/gus(mps2J) mice are similar to those in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis VII. The finding of antibodies to beta-glucuronidase in some older gus(mps2J)/gus(mps2J) mice suggests the mice produce sufficient enzyme to elicit an immune response. The gus(mps2J)/gus(mps2J) model provides another well-defined genetic system for the study of the pathophysiology of mucopolysaccharidosis and for evaluation of experimental therapies for lysosomal storage diseases. The disease in gus(mps2J)/gus(mps2J) mice is less severe than that seen in the previously characterized B6.C-H2(bm1)/ByBir-gus(mps)/gus(mps) mouse model. Furthermore, unlike gus(mps)/gus(mps) mice, gus(mps2J)/gus(mps2J) mice are fertile and breed to produce litters, all of which are mucopolysaccharidosis VII pups. This feature makes them extremely useful for testing intrauterine therapies.

  4. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 42; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Calibration and Validation for the L4_C Beta-Release Data Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima (Editor); Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch Cal/Val Phase of SMAP there are two objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements according to the Cal/Val timeline. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product specifically for the beta release. The beta-release version of the SMAP L4_C algorithms utilizes a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily NEE and component carbon fluxes, particularly vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (<10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape FT controls on GPP and Reco (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and underlying freeze/thaw and soil moisture constraints to these processes, 2) documenting primary connections between terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, and 3) improving understanding of terrestrial carbon sink activity in northern ecosystems.

  5. Criteria for the operation of federally-owned secondary calibration laboratories (ionizing radiation). Special pub. (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhower, E.H.

    1991-08-01

    The document contains standards of performance for laboratories that calibrate instrumentation used to measure ionizing radiation. Such standards are useful for the development of a secondary level of calibration laboratories that can provide a high-quality link between the National Institute of Standards and Technology and those who make routine measurements at the field level. The standards may also be used as criteria on which a decision is based regarding accreditation of a particular laboratory. They were developed by representatives of federally-owned laboratories that perform calibrations of the type addressed by the document. The first major part contains general criteria that must be satisfied by all laboratories seeking accreditation. It includes requirements relating to management and staff, physical aspects of the laboratory, calibrations facilities and equipment, operational procedures, accuracy and quality assurance, and records and reports. Five subsequent major parts establish criteria for calibration of survey instruments, irradiation of personnel dosimeters, calibration of sources, calibration of instruments for diagnostic levels, and calibration of reference-class instruments. The types of radiation covered include gamma rays, x rays, beta particles, neutrons, and alpha particles. An appendix describes the proficiency tests administered by NIST to secondary laboratories as a prerequisite for their accreditation.

  6. Concepts and Results of New Method for Accurate Ground and In-Flight Calibration of the Particle Spectrometers of the Fast Plasma Investigation on NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliese, U.; Gershman, D. J.; Dorelli, J.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A. C.; Clark, G. B.; Kujawski, J. T.; Mariano, A. J.; Coffey, V. N.; Tucker, C. J.; Chornay, D. J.; Cao, N. T.; Zeuch, M. A.; Dickson, C.; Smith, D. L.; Salo, C.; MacDonald, E.; Kreisler, S.; Jacques, A. D.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission employs 16 Dual Electron Spectrometers and 16 Dual Ion Spectrometers with 4 of each type on each of 4 spacecraft to enable fast (30 ms for electrons; 150 ms for ions) and spatially differentiated measurements of the full 3D particle velocity distributions. This approach presents a new and challenging aspect to the calibration and operation of these instruments on ground and in flight. The response uniformity, the reliability of their calibration and the approach to handling any temporal evolution of these calibrated characteristics all assume enhanced importance in this application, where we attempt to understand the meaning of particle distributions within the ion and electron diffusion regions of magnetically reconnecting plasmas. We have developed a detailed model of the spectrometer detection system, its behavior and its signal, crosstalk and noise sources. Based on this, we have devised a new calibration method that enables accurate and repeatable measurement of micro-channel plate (MCP) gain, signal loss due to variation in MCP gain and crosstalk effects in one single measurement. The foundational concepts of this new calibration method, named threshold scan, are presented. It is shown how this method has been successfully applied both on ground and in-flight to achieve highly accurate and precise calibration of all 64 spectrometers. Calibration parameters that will evolve in flight are determined daily providing a robust characterization of sensor suite performance, as a basis for both in-situ hardware adjustment and data processing to scientific units, throughout mission lifetime. This is shown to be very desirable as the instruments will produce higher quality raw science data that will require smaller post-acquisition data-corrections using results from in-flight derived pitch angle distribution measurements and ground calibration measurements. The practical application

  7. Calibration Techniques of the XENON1T Dark Matter Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienaar, Jacques; Xenon Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The XENON1T experiment will probe new parameter spaces in direct dark matter searches. The successful operation of such a detector requires several calibration techniques to accurately reconstruct the position and energies of events within the active volume. 220Rn is introduced into the detector itself, through re-circulation of gaseous Xe, for use as an internal calibration sources. The decay of 220Rn and its daughters provides both high-energy alpha particles as well as a low-energy beta spectrum that can be used to calibrate the detector. Mono-energetic 2.5 MeV neutrons, allow for the in-situ calibration of the charge yield of nuclear recoil events within the detector, using double scatter events to reconstruct the deposited energy at the first scatter. Accurately positioned external Compton sources allow to determine the performance of fiducialization, as well as an insitu calibration of the charge yield of electronic recoils. This talk will present the calibration systems of the XENON1T detector.

  8. Effects of 17Beta-estradiol on cognitive performance of ovariectomized female rats exposed to 56Fe particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On exploratory class missions to other planets astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation (HZE particles) that are not experienced in low earth orbit. While it is likely that the crew will consist of both male and female astronauts, there has been little research on the effects of ...

  9. Field evaluation and calibration of a small axial passive air sampler for gaseous and particle bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygenated PAHs.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Roger; Arnoldsson, Kristina; Lejon, Christian; Hägglund, Lars; Wingfors, Håkan

    2016-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated analogues (OPAHs) are ubiquitous air pollutants known to cause adverse health effects. PAH air levels are commonly monitored by active sampling but passive sampling has become popular because of its lower cost and simplicity, which facilitate long-term sampling and increased spatial coverage. However, passive samplers are less suitable for short-term sampling and are in general less accurate than active samplers because they require reliable sampling rate (Rs) measurements for individual analytes under diverse environmental conditions. In this study a small passive sampler designed to sample both particle-bound and gaseous compounds was evaluated and calibrated for PAHs and OPAHs in a traffic environment by co-deployment with active samplers for two weeks. Despite the relatively low average air concentrations of PM10 (20 μg/m(3)), PM2.5 (5 μg/m(3)), total PAHs (4.2 ng/m(3)), and OPAHs (2.3 ng/m(3)) at the site, detectable quantities (on average 24 times above blank values) of the full range of PAHs and OPAHs were captured, with low variability (average RSD of 16%). This was accomplished by using a Tenax(®) TA-modified glass fiber substrate that is compatible with highly sensitive thermal desorption GC-MS analysis, which made it possible to achieve detection limits per sample in the pg range. Experiments with inverted samplers revealed that the relative contribution of gravitational settling to the sampling of particles carrying PAHs and OPAHs was around 3.5 times larger than other deposition mechanisms. Average Rs values for individual OPAHs and PAHs were 0.046 ± 0.03 m(3)/day and 0.12 ± 0.07 m(3)/day, respectively, with no appreciable difference between the values for particle-associated and gaseous compounds. Furthermore, the Rs values were competitive with other currently used passive samplers if normalized for substrate area. Overall, the new sampler's performance, simplicity and

  10. Chemical imaging of catalyst deactivation during the conversion of renewables at the single particle level: etherification of biomass-based polyols with alkenes over H-Beta zeolites.

    PubMed

    Parvulescu, Andrei N; Mores, Davide; Stavitski, Eli; Teodorescu, Cristian M; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Gebbink, Robertus J M Klein; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2010-08-04

    The etherification of biomass-based alcohols with various linear alpha-olefins under solvent-free conditions was followed in a space- and time-resolved manner on 9 microm large H-Beta zeolite crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy. This allowed us to visualize the interaction with the substrate and distribution of the coke products into the catalyst at the level of an individual zeolite crystal during the etherification process. The spectroscopic information obtained on the micrometer-scale zeolite was in line with the results obtained with bulk characterization techniques and further confirmed by the catalytic results obtained both for micrometer-scale and nanoscale zeolites. This allowed us to explain the influence of the substrate type (glycerol, glycols, and alkenes) and zeolite properties (Si/Al ratio and particle size) on the etherification activity. The etherification of the biomass-based alcohols takes place mainly on the external surface of the zeolite particles. The gradual blockage of the external surface of the zeolite results in a partial or total loss of etherification activity. The deactivation could be attributed to olefin oligomerization. The high conversions obtained in the etherification of 1,2-propylene glycol with long linear alkenes (up to 80%) and the pronounced deactivation of the zeolite observed in the etherification of glycerol with long linear alkenes (max. 20% conversion) were explained by the spectroscopic measurements and is due to differences in the adsorption, i.e., in the center of the zeolite particle for glycerol and on the external surface in the case of glycols.

  11. Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, Theodore Joseph

    1996-03-01

    To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of 31Cl, 27P and 28P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas ΔE-gas ΔE-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in 31Cl and 27P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of 31Cl were shown to be from the decay of 25Si. In 27P, two proton groups at 459 ± 14 keV and 610 ± 11 keV, with intensities of 7 ± 3% and 92 ± 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the β-decay of 28P, at 1,444 ± 12 keV with a 1.7 ± 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, 17Ne and 33Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 ± 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of 17Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from 17Ne and 33Ar were resolved.

  12. Beta Androstenediol Mitigates the Damage of 1 GeV/n Fe Ion Particle Radiation to the Hematopoietic System

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, Mathew; Contaifer, Daniel; Tamariz, Francisco; Gibb, David; Thompson, Laura; Guida, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Space exploration is associated with exposure to 1–3 Gy solar particle radiation and galactic cosmic radiation that could increase cancer rates. Effective nontoxic countermeasures to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure are highly desirable but currently not available. The aim was to determine whether a single subcutaneous injection of androstenediol (Δ5 androsten-3β, 17β-diol [AED]) could mitigate and restore the mouse hematopoetic system from the radiation-mediated injury of 3 Gy whole-body high LET 56Fe26+ exposure. The findings show that postradiation AED treatment has an overall positive and significant beneficial effect to restore the levels of hematopoeitic elements (p<0.001). Androstenediol treatment significantly increased monocyte levels at days 4, 7, and 14 and, similarly, increased red blood cell, hemoglobin, and platelet counts. Flow cytometry analysis 14 days after radiation and AED treatment demonstrated an increase (p<0.05) in bone marrow cells counts. Ex vivo osteoclastogenesis studies show that AED treatment is necessary and advantageous for the development and restoration of osteoclastogenesis after radiation exposure. These findings clearly show that androstenediol functions as a countermeasure to remedy hematopoeitic injury mediated by high LET iron ion radiation. Presently, no other agent has been shown to have such properties. PMID:21790310

  13. Beta measurement evaluation and upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, D.W.; Faust, L.G.; Selby, J.M.; Essig, T.H.; Vallario, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Safety, initiated a program to evaluate dosimeters and instruments used at DOE laboratories in the determination of personnel beta dose. The program focuses on significant problems which affect field measurements and is involved in the development and evaluation of new beta dosimetry systems (both dosimeters and instruments). Currently the program is reviewing systems and practices; developing calibration systems and procedures for the calibration of instruments and dosimeters; and developing new concepts which may improve beta dosimetry. The program has been designed to provide a continuing effort for resolution of problems of assessing personnel beta dose at DOE facilities. The current personnel beta dosimetry practices at DOE facilities are being surveyed.

  14. Removal of 17beta-estradiol (E2) and its chlorination by-products from water and wastewater using non-imprinted polymer (NIP) particles.

    PubMed

    Murray, Audrey; Ormeci, Banu; Lai, E P C

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds and their chlorination by-products are two classes of emerging contaminants. Surface water and wastewater treatment technologies have limitations in removing these contaminants. This study evaluated the ability of non-imprinted polymer particles (NIP) to remove the endocrine disruptor 17beta-estradiol (E2) and its chlorination by-products from water and wastewater. NIP effectively removed 98% of 10 mg/L E2 from wastewater. NIP were also effective in removing chlorination by-products of E2 by 84.9% after 10 mg/L E2 in water was chlorinated at 5 mg/L. In the presence of 5 mg/L humic acid, NIP were able to achieve removal of 10 mg/L E2 by greater than 99.9%. Furthermore, after chlorination of 10 mg/L E2 and 5 mg/L humic acid at 10 mg/L chlorine, NIP were also able to remove the chlorination by-products formed as well as the remaining E2 by greater than 99.9%. The presence of 5 mg/L humic acid did not adversely affect the adsorption efficiency. The results of this research indicate that NIPs have good potential as a final treatment step for surface water and wastewater treatment.

  15. Anemometer calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bate, T.; Calkins, D. E.; Price, P.; Veikins, O.

    1971-01-01

    Calibrator generates accurate flow velocities over wide range of gas pressure, temperature, and composition. Both pressure and flow velocity can be maintained within 0.25 percent. Instrument is essentially closed loop hydraulic system containing positive displacement drive.

  16. MOON for neutrino-less {beta}{beta} decays and {beta}{beta} nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Ejiri, H.

    2009-11-09

    The MOON project aims at spectroscopic 0v{beta}{beta} studies with the v-mass sensitivity of 100-30 meV by measuring two beta rays from {sup 100}Mo and/or {sup 82}Se. The detector is a compact super-module of multi-layer PL scintillator plates. R and D works made by the pro to-type MOON-1 and the small PL plate show the possible energy resolution of around {sigma}{approx}2.2%, as required for the mass sensitivity. Nuclear matrix elements M{sup 2v} for 2v{beta}{beta} are shown to be given by the sum {sigma}{sub L}M{sub k} of the 2v{beta}{beta} matrix elements M{sub k} through intermediate quasi-particle states in the Fermi-surface, where Mi is obtained experimentally by using the GT(J{sup {pi}} = 1{sup +}) matrix elements of M{sub i}(k) and M{sub f}(k) for the successive single-{beta} transitions through the k-th intermediate state.

  17. Determination of isoprene and alpha-/beta-pinene oxidation products in boreal forest aerosols from Hyytiälä, Finland: diel variations and possible link with particle formation events.

    PubMed

    Kourtchev, I; Ruuskanen, T M; Keronen, P; Sogacheva, L; Dal Maso, M; Reissell, A; Chi, X; Vermeylen, R; Kulmala, M; Maenhaut, W; Claeys, M

    2008-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as isoprene and alpha-/beta-pinene, are photo-oxidized in the atmosphere to non-volatile species resulting in secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The goal of this study was to examine time trends and diel variations of oxidation products of isoprene and alpha-/beta-pinene in order to investigate whether they are linked with meteorological parameters or trace gases. Separate day-night aerosol samples (PM(1)) were collected in a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland during 28 July-11 August 2005 and analyzed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In addition, inorganic trace gases (SO(2), CO, NO(x), and O(3)), meteorological parameters, and the particle number concentration were monitored. The median total concentration of terpenoic acids (i.e., pinic acid, norpinic acid, and two novel compounds, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid and 2-hydroxy-4-isopropyladipic acid) was 65 ng m(-3), while that of isoprene oxidation products (i.e., 2-methyltetrols and C(5) alkene triols) was 17.2 ng m(-3). The 2-methyltetrols exhibited day/night variations with maxima during day-time, while alpha-/beta-pinene oxidation products did not show any diel variation. The sampling period was marked by a relatively high condensation sink, caused by pre-existing aerosol particles, and no nucleation events. In general, the concentration trends of the SOA compounds reflected those of the inorganic trace gases, meteorological parameters, and condensation sink. Both the isoprene and alpha-/beta-pinene SOA products were strongly influenced by SO(2), which is consistent with earlier reports that acidity plays a role in SOA formation. The results support previous proposals that oxygenated VOCs contribute to particle growth processes above boreal forest.

  18. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  19. Calibration factors for determination of relativistic particle induced fission rates in natU, 235U, 232Th, natPb and 197Au foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Zhuk, Igor; Potapenko, A.; Kievets, M.; Krivopustov, M. I.

    2012-02-01

    Calibration factors w, for determination of fission rate in metallic foils of natU, 235U, 232Th, natPb and 197Au were determined for foils in contact with synthetic mica track detectors. Proton-induced fission at proton energies of 0.7 GeV and 1.5 GeV were used. Using our experimental results as well as those of the other authors, w for different foil-mica systems were determined. Two methods were used to calculate w, relative to the calibration factor for uranium-mica system, which has been obtained in a standard neutron field of energy 14.7 MeV. One of these methods requires the knowledge of the mean range of the fission fragments in the foils of interest and other method needs information on the values of the fission cross-sections at the required energies as well as the density of the tracks recorded in the track detectors in contact with the foil surfaces. The obtained w-values were compared with Monte Carlo calculations and good agreements were found. It is shown that a calibration factor obtained at low energy neutron induced fissions in uranium isotopes deviates only by less than 10% from those obtained at relativistic proton induced fissions.

  20. Beta Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Beta blockers, also called beta-adrenergic blocking agents, treat a variety of conditions, such as high blood pressure and migraines. Find out more about this ...

  1. Diffusion barriers for silicon carbide particle reinforcements by ion-beam assisted deposition: Effects on interphase stability in silicon carbide(p/beta)-nickel aluminide and silicon carbide(p/gamma)-nickel aluminide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhiwei

    In this study, aluminum nitride and aluminum oxide films were used as diffusion barriers for SiC particles that were consolidated with beta-NiAl and gamma-Ni3Al matrices at temperatures of 1673 K and 1373 K, respectively. The focus of this study was to understand factors influencing the effectiveness of the diffusion barriers during the consolidation processes of the two composite systems. The barrier films were deposited on SiC particles by ion-beam assisted vacuum evaporation during which the SiC particles were radiantly heated and acoustically levitated. The nitride film formed reactively on SiC particles, and consisted of 95% aluminum nitride (balanced with aluminum nitrate and oxide). The oxygen content in the nitride film was a result of the impingement of residual oxygen and water molecules in the deposition environment. A voided globular structure of fine-grained clusters was found in a nitride film deposited on SiC particles at 593 K, which was attributed to the levitation of the particles and the deposition temperature. Nitride films deposited at a higher temperature of 793 K consisted of a fine-grained dense structure with few voids. The oxide film deposited at room temperature had a fine-grained dense structure with some globular features. This study found that film material affected film's ability of retaining integrity during compositing process, which was important for the success of the barrier films. Annealed at 1673 K, grains in a nitride film (deposited at 793 K) coalesced to an average size of 0.5 mum that was comparable to the film thickness. Grain boundaries in the film were widened by the pore agglomeration, resulting in micro-cracks. The oxide film exhibited a similar phenomenon of uninhibited grain growth and micro-crack formation at a lower temperature of 1273 K. Both films failed to be an effective barrier in SiC/beta-NiAl composite during the compositing process at 1673 K. This study showed the influence of film structure on grain growth

  2. Determining orbital particle parameters of impacts into germanium using morphology analysis and calibration data from hypervelocity impact experiments in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Klaus G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the work that is done at the Lehrstuhl fur Raumfahrttechnik (lrt) at the Technische Universitat Munchen to examine particle impacts into germanium surfaces which were flown on board the LDEF satellite. Besides the description of the processing of the samples, a brief overview of the particle launchers at our institute is given together with descriptions of impact morphology of high- and hypervelocity particles into germanium. Since germanium is a brittle, almost glass-like material, the impact morphology may also be interesting for anyone dealing with materials such as optics and solar cells. The main focus of our investigations is to learn about the impacting particle's properties, for example mass, velocity and direction. This is done by examining the morphology, various geometry parameters, crater obliqueness and crater volume.

  3. SNLS calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnault, N.

    2015-08-01

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) is a massive imaging survey, conducted between 2003 and 2008, with the MegaCam instrument, mounted on the CFHT-3.6-m telescope. With a 1 degree wide focal plane, made of 36 2048 × 4612 sensors totalling 340 megapixels, MegaCam was at the time the largest imager on the sky. The Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) uses the cadenced observations of the 4 deg2 wide "DEEP" layer of the CFHTLS to search and follow-up Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and study the acceleration of the cosmic expansion. The reduction and calibration of the CFHTLS/SNLS datasets has posed a series of challenges. In what follows, we give a brief account of the photometric calibration work that has been performed on the SNLS data over the last decade.

  4. Study of influence of plastic scintillators thicknesses to detect Beta particles and Gamma radiation by means of spectral analysis of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 90}Y and {sup 137}Cs sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Jose Patricio Nahuel; Filho, Tufic Madi; Pereira, Maria da Conceicao Costa; Santos, Brianna B. dos; Correa, Eduardo de L.; Santos, Lucas Rodrigues dos; Lopes, Anderson Figueredo; Silva, Alexandre F.P. da; Santos, Diogo F. dos; Camilo, Douglas de S.; Purgato, Rafael T.; Aredes, Vitor O.G.

    2015-07-01

    The Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN, offers post-graduate programs, namely: Nuclear Technology - Applications (TNA), Nuclear Technology - Materials (TNM), Nuclear Technology - Reactors (TNR). The Institute programs mission is to form expert technicians, physicists and engineers with a strong knowledge in their discipline to work in the nuclear area. The course: 'Theoretical Fundamentals and Practices of the Instrumentation used in Nuclear Data Acquisition' covers the use of laboratory nuclear instrumentation and the accomplishment of experiments to obtain nuclear parameters. One of these experimental exercises is object of this work: 'Study of influence of plastic scintillators to detect Beta particles and Gamma radiation by means of spectral analysis of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 90}Y and {sup 137}Cs sources'. The use of scintillators plastic for the detection has the advantage of low cost, high mechanical strength, is not hygroscopic and can be manufactured in large volumes. This work aims to present the analysis of relative efficiency of detection of plastic scintillators of various thicknesses for beta particles and gamma radiation by the spectrum of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr. Due to lack of resolution of the detectors plastic scintillators we worked with relative efficiency. The evaluation was done by reading deposited energy, using the software MAESTRO, for each detector thickness. For beta particles was observed an ideal thickness around 3 mm and the better photon efficiency was observed with increasing the thickness of the detector. The present experiment does not intend to establish a new technique for this subject: it solely aims student's practical exercises in nuclear properties of elements and detectors being part of the nuclear experimental course. (authors)

  5. Quantification of particle sizes with metal replication under standard freeze-etching conditions: a gold ball standard for calibrating shadow widths was used to measure freeze-etched globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruben, G C

    1995-11-01

    The real size of platinum-carbon (Pt-C) replicated particles is not directly equivalent to either its metal-coated diameter or its shadow width. This paper describes two indirect methods, shadow widths and coated particle diameters, for determining a particle's actual size beneath a Pt-C replication film. Both produce equivalent measurements using the same standardized conditions: 2.3 nm Pt-C films deposited at a 45 degree angle on an approximately -100 degrees C surface in a 10(-6) torr vacuum. For the first method, gold balls nucleated in a partial pressure of helium and deposited on flat indirect carbon films (root mean square roughness of 0.8 nm) on 400 mesh grids were used as test particles for calibrating shadow widths as a function of particle size. The gold ball test specimens were replicated, and a distribution of Pt-C shadow widths orthogonal to the Pt-C deposition direction was measured and averaged for gold balls 1.5 +/- 0.25 nm, 2.0 +/- 0.25 nm, etc. The diameter of each gold ball was measured within the Pt-C film along with its shadow width because the Pt-C did not obscure or adhere well to the gold. The shadow width distributions for each gold size do not differ significantly from log normal. Two proteins, the lactose repressor and the mitochondrial ATPase, F1, were also used as replication test objects. Negative staining of both proteins was conducted to measure their average diameters. In the second method, a distribution of Pt-C-coated lac repressor diameters perpendicular to the shadow direction was measured. The Pt-C film thickness measured on the quartz crystal monitor was subtracted from the average metal-coated protein diameter to obtain the lac repressor's diameter. The Pt-C-coated particle diameter distributions also did not differ significantly from log normal. While doing this work it was discovered that outgassing the Pt-C electron gun greatly affected Pt-C film granularity: 19 sec produced a high contrast, granular Pt-C film, whereas

  6. Detection of alpha radiation in a beta radiation field

    DOEpatents

    Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Reese, Robert P.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting alpha particles in the presence of high activities of beta particles utilizing an alpha spectrometer. The apparatus of the present invention utilizes a magnetic field applied around the sample in an alpha spectrometer to deflect the beta particles from the sample prior to reaching the detector, thus permitting detection of low concentrations of alpha particles. In the method of the invention, the strength of magnetic field required to adequately deflect the beta particles and permit alpha particle detection is given by an algorithm that controls the field strength as a function of sample beta energy and the distance of the sample to the detector.

  7. A 102 kDa subunit of a Golgi-associated particle has homology to beta subunits of trimeric G proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison-Lavoie, K J; Lewis, V A; Hynes, G M; Collison, K S; Nutland, E; Willison, K R

    1993-01-01

    We have identified a 102 kDa protein, p102, which is found on the cytoplasmic face of Golgi membranes, exocytic transport vesicles and in the cytosol. A monoclonal antibody that cross-reacts with p102 is able to immunoprecipitate a 500-600 kDa protein complex containing p102 and additional subunits. The composition of this p102-containing protein complex resembles that of the Golgi coatomer complex, which constitutes the coat of non-clathrin coated vesicles. One of the subunits of the p102 complex reacts with a monoclonal antibody that detects beta-COP, a subunit of the Golgi coatomer complex. Like beta-COP, p102 exists in a brefeldin A-sensitive association with Golgi membranes. The sequence of p102 contains an N-terminal domain composed of six repeats which are similar to those found in the beta subunit of trimeric G proteins and other regulatory proteins. We suggest that p102 may be involved in regulating membrane traffic in the constitutive exocytic pathway. Images PMID:8335000

  8. Radioxenon detector calibration spike production and delivery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; Cameron, Ian M.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Kriss, Aaron A.; Lidey, Lance S.; Mendez, Jennifer M.; Prinke, Amanda M.; Riedmann, Robin A.

    2016-03-01

    Abstract Beta-Gamma coincidence radioxenon detectors must be calibrated for each of the four-radioxenon isotopes (135Xe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 131mXe). Without a proper calibration, there is potential for the misidentification of the amount of each isotope detected. It is important to accurately determine the amount of each radioxenon isotope, as the ratios can be used to distinguish between an anthropogenic source and a nuclear explosion. We have developed a xenon calibration system (XeCalS) that produces calibration spikes of known activity and pressure for field calibration of detectors. The activity concentrations of these calibration spikes are measured using a beta-gamma coincidence detector and a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. We will present the results from the development and commissioning of XeCalS, along with the future plans for a portable spike implementation system.

  9. Muon Energy Calibration of the MINOS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Paul S.

    2004-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment designed to search for conclusive evidence of neutrino oscillations and to measure the oscillation parameters precisely. MINOS comprises two iron tracking calorimeters located at Fermilab and Soudan. The Calibration Detector at CERN is a third MINOS detector used as part of the detector response calibration programme. A correct energy calibration between these detectors is crucial for the accurate measurement of oscillation parameters. This thesis presents a calibration developed to produce a uniform response within a detector using cosmic muons. Reconstruction of tracks in cosmic ray data is discussed. This data is utilized to calculate calibration constants for each readout channel of the Calibration Detector. These constants have an average statistical error of 1.8%. The consistency of the constants is demonstrated both within a single run and between runs separated by a few days. Results are presented from applying the calibration to test beam particles measured by the Calibration Detector. The responses are calibrated to within 1.8% systematic error. The potential impact of the calibration on the measurement of oscillation parameters by MINOS is also investigated. Applying the calibration reduces the errors in the measured parameters by ~ 10%, which is equivalent to increasing the amount of data by 20%.

  10. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina

    2016-05-02

    This poster presents the development, implementation, and operation of the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL) Longwave (LW) system at the Southern Great Plains Radiometric Calibration Facility for the calibration of pyrgeometers that provide traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group.

  11. Calibration of sound calibrators: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhomem, T. A. B.; Soares, Z. M. D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of calibration of sound calibrators. Initially, traditional calibration methods are presented. Following, the international standard IEC 60942 is discussed emphasizing parameters, target measurement uncertainty and criteria for conformance to the requirements of the standard. Last, Regional Metrology Organizations comparisons are summarized.

  12. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  13. Preparation of the rod-like {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} particles favoring the self-reinforcing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Jinhui; Li Jianbao; Chen Yongjun; Yang Liu; Sun Geliang

    2003-03-24

    The {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} particles were prepared by heating original {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder with rare earth oxide Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} additives at 1600-1700 deg. C for 1.5 h. The transformation ratio of {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was also investigated by XRD. The results showed that Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} could accelerate the transformation of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} more effectively than Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the powder heated at 1700 deg. C with over 4 wt.% Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a high transformation ratio of over 98%. The morphologies of the heated powders were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the powder heated at 1700 deg. C with 4 wt.% Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} had ideal {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} rod-like morphology particles. This heated powder was used as a seed by adding it to the original {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder to prepare self-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic by hot-pressed sintering. The fracture toughness of the seeded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics increased to 9.1 MPa m{sup 1/2} from 7.6 MPa m{sup 1/2} of the unseeded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics, while the high value of strength was still kept at 1200 deg. C.

  14. Development of a Calibration System for Cryogenic Light Detectors in CUPID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meng; Kolomensky, Yury; O'Donnell, Thomas; Schmidt, Benjamin; Cupid Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    If neutrino is a Majorana particle, it is possible to observe neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ), whose signature is a monochromatic line at the Q-value of the decay in the energy spectrum of the two electrons. Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an experiment which aims to search for 0 νββ in 130Te with TeO2 bolometers, whose background is dominated by α particles from natural radioactivity in the detector material. CUPID (CUORE Upgrade with Particle IDentification) is the next generation experiment proposed to distinguish 0 νββ events from those of α particles with Cherenkov radiation. An important part of CUPID R&D is to design, build and characterize a calibration system that can generate a known amount of light and transport that light to the dilution refrigerator at mK temperatures. We describe the design, implementation and performance of a calibration system developed for bolometric light detectors. Preparation work includes researching and selecting a light source (LED). A transport system (optical fiber) was developed to direct the light to the coldest part of the dilution refrigerator. Additionally, the light yield attenuation of optical fiber at cryogenic temperatures was measured. This project is supported by National Science Foundation and UC-Berkeley.

  15. Beta Decay Study of Neutron-rich Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, John; Rajabali, Mustafa; Griffin Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Within the ``island of inversion'' around the N = 20 shell gap, isotopes of magnesium, and aluminum deviate from the expected closed-shell structure. Particles promoted across the N = 20 shell gap result in a lower energy deformed ground state configuration rather than the expected spherical configuration. An experiment was conducted at TRIUMF laboratory in the summer of 2015 to study the decay of ``island of inversion'' isotopes 33 , 34 , 35Mg and the structure of the respective daughter nuclei. The isotopes of interest were produced by a proton beam from TRIUMF's 500 MeV cyclotron impacting on a UCx target. The magnesium decays populated states along the decay chain in Al, Si, P, and S isotopes. The new GRIFFIN spectrometer in the ISAC-I facility was used to detect the gamma rays. Two sets of scintillators, one for detecting the beta particles (SCEPTAR) and the other for detecting beta-delayed neutrons (DESCANT), were also used in conjunction with GRIFFIN. The GRIFFIN data were energy calibrated and partially analyzed for this project. New algorithms were developed for the analysis. Preliminary results for new transitions detected in 34Mg as well as the half lives obtained will be presented in their current form. This research was supported by the Tennessee Tech research office.

  16. Bremsstrahlung in Mo and Pt targets produced by {sup 90}Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2015-08-28

    Bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Mo and Pt, produced by beta emitter {sup 90}Sr (end point energy = 546 keV) have been studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured bremsstrahlung spectra measured with Si(Li) detector were compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH) theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH+PB) theory, which includes the polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into total bremsstrahlung (BS). The present results indicate the correctness of F{sub mod}BH+PB theory in the low energy region, where the contributions of PB into BS are dominant, which is described in terms of stripped atom (SA) approximation. But at the middle and higher energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, where the contribution of PB is negligible, the F{sub mod}BH theory is more close to the experimental results. Hence, it is clear that the production of PB in the low energy region, due to the dynamic response of the target atom suppresses the production of bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends.

  17. Calibrations of the SNO+ PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, Freija

    2013-04-01

    SNO+, the successor to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), is currently in the final phase of the hardware upgrade and commissioning. It is located at about 6000 m.w.e. in SNOLab, the world's deepest operating underground laboratory. By replacing SNO's heavy water with a liquid scintillator target (LAB), a much lower energy threshold can be achieved. This creates a new multipurpose neutrino detector with the potential to address a diverse set of physics goals. In a pure-scintillator phase, SNO+ will study low energy solar neutrinos, including those from the pep and CNO cycles. Loading the liquid scintillator with a double beta decay isotope, like neodymium, will then enable the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. SNO+ also aims at detecting reactor, geo- and supernova neutrinos. For all physics goals, an accurate understanding and calibration of the PMT response is essential. After a review of the general SNO+ setup and physics goals, the SNO+ PMT calibration will be presented in detail.

  18. Chemical Imaging of Catalyst Deactivation during the Conversion of Renewables at the Single Particle Level: The Etherification of Biomass-based Polyols with Alkenes over H-Beta Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    A Parvulescu; D Mores; E Stavitski; C Teodorescu; P Bruijnicx; R Klein Gebbing; B Weckhuysen

    2011-12-31

    The etherification of biomass-based alcohols with various linear {alpha}-olefins under solvent-free conditions was followed in a space- and time-resolved manner on 9 {micro}m large H-Beta zeolite crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy. This allowed us to visualize the interaction with the substrate and distribution of the coke products into the catalyst at the level of an individual zeolite crystal during the etherification process. The spectroscopic information obtained on the micrometer-scale zeolite was in line with the results obtained with bulk characterization techniques and further confirmed by the catalytic results obtained both for micrometer-scale and nanoscale zeolites. This allowed us to explain the influence of the substrate type (glycerol, glycols, and alkenes) and zeolite properties (Si/Al ratio and particle size) on the etherification activity. The etherification of the biomass-based alcohols takes place mainly on the external surface of the zeolite particles. The gradual blockage of the external surface of the zeolite results in a partial or total loss of etherification activity. The deactivation could be attributed to olefin oligomerization. The high conversions obtained in the etherification of 1,2-propylene glycol with long linear alkenes (up to 80%) and the pronounced deactivation of the zeolite observed in the etherification of glycerol with long linear alkenes (max. 20% conversion) were explained by the spectroscopic measurements and is due to differences in the adsorption, i.e., in the center of the zeolite particle for glycerol and on the external surface in the case of glycols.

  19. Modeling study of a proposed field calibration source using K-40 and high-Z targets for sodium iodide detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Rogers, Jeremy; Marianno, Craig; Kallenbach, Gene; ...

    2016-06-01

    Calibration sources based on the primordial isotope potassium-40 (40K) have reduced controls on the source’s activity due to its terrestrial ubiquity and very low specific activity. Potassium–40’s beta emissions and 1,460.8 keV gamma ray can be used to induce K-shell fluorescence x rays in high-Z metals between 60 and 80 keV. A gamma ray calibration source that uses potassium chloride salt and a high-Z metal to create a two-point calibration for a sodium iodide field gamma spectroscopy instrument is thus proposed. The calibration source was designed in collaboration with the Sandia National Laboratory using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX)more » transport code. Two methods of x-ray production were explored. First, a thin high-Z layer (HZL) was interposed between the detector and the potassium chloride-urethane source matrix. Second, bismuth metal powder was homogeneously mixed with a urethane binding agent to form a potassium chloride-bismuth matrix (KBM). The bismuth-based source was selected as the development model because it is inexpensive, nontoxic, and outperforms the high-Z layer method in simulation. As a result, based on the MCNPX studies, sealing a mixture of bismuth powder and potassium chloride into a thin plastic case could provide a light, inexpensive field calibration source.« less

  20. Modeling Study of a Proposed Field Calibration Source Using K-40 and High-Z Targets for Sodium Iodide Detectors.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jeremy; Marianno, Craig; Kallenbach, Gene; Trevino, Jose

    2016-06-01

    Calibration sources based on the primordial isotope potassium-40 (K) have reduced controls on the source's activity due to its terrestrial ubiquity and very low specific activity. Potassium-40's beta emissions and 1,460.8 keV gamma ray can be used to induce K-shell fluorescence x rays in high-Z metals between 60 and 80 keV. A gamma ray calibration source that uses potassium chloride salt and a high-Z metal to create a two-point calibration for a sodium iodide field gamma spectroscopy instrument is thus proposed. The calibration source was designed in collaboration with the Sandia National Laboratory using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code. Two methods of x-ray production were explored. First, a thin high-Z layer (HZL) was interposed between the detector and the potassium chloride-urethane source matrix. Second, bismuth metal powder was homogeneously mixed with a urethane binding agent to form a potassium chloride-bismuth matrix (KBM). The bismuth-based source was selected as the development model because it is inexpensive, nontoxic, and outperforms the high-Z layer method in simulation. Based on the MCNPX studies, sealing a mixture of bismuth powder and potassium chloride into a thin plastic case could provide a light, inexpensive field calibration source.

  1. Modeling study of a proposed field calibration source using K-40 and high-Z targets for sodium iodide detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Jeremy; Marianno, Craig; Kallenbach, Gene; Trevino, Jose

    2016-06-01

    Calibration sources based on the primordial isotope potassium-40 (40K) have reduced controls on the source’s activity due to its terrestrial ubiquity and very low specific activity. Potassium–40’s beta emissions and 1,460.8 keV gamma ray can be used to induce K-shell fluorescence x rays in high-Z metals between 60 and 80 keV. A gamma ray calibration source that uses potassium chloride salt and a high-Z metal to create a two-point calibration for a sodium iodide field gamma spectroscopy instrument is thus proposed. The calibration source was designed in collaboration with the Sandia National Laboratory using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code. Two methods of x-ray production were explored. First, a thin high-Z layer (HZL) was interposed between the detector and the potassium chloride-urethane source matrix. Second, bismuth metal powder was homogeneously mixed with a urethane binding agent to form a potassium chloride-bismuth matrix (KBM). The bismuth-based source was selected as the development model because it is inexpensive, nontoxic, and outperforms the high-Z layer method in simulation. As a result, based on the MCNPX studies, sealing a mixture of bismuth powder and potassium chloride into a thin plastic case could provide a light, inexpensive field calibration source.

  2. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, Ariel

    2015-11-10

    In this study, jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton–proton (p–p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiple p–p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo.

  3. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Schwartzman, Ariel

    2015-11-10

    In this study, jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton–proton (p–p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiplemore » p–p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo.« less

  4. Improving self-calibration.

    PubMed

    Enßlin, Torsten A; Junklewitz, Henrik; Winderling, Lars; Greiner, Maksim; Selig, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Response calibration is the process of inferring how much the measured data depend on the signal one is interested in. It is essential for any quantitative signal estimation on the basis of the data. Here, we investigate self-calibration methods for linear signal measurements and linear dependence of the response on the calibration parameters. The common practice is to augment an external calibration solution using a known reference signal with an internal calibration on the unknown measurement signal itself. Contemporary self-calibration schemes try to find a self-consistent solution for signal and calibration by exploiting redundancies in the measurements. This can be understood in terms of maximizing the joint probability of signal and calibration. However, the full uncertainty structure of this joint probability around its maximum is thereby not taken into account by these schemes. Therefore, better schemes, in sense of minimal square error, can be designed by accounting for asymmetries in the uncertainty of signal and calibration. We argue that at least a systematic correction of the common self-calibration scheme should be applied in many measurement situations in order to properly treat uncertainties of the signal on which one calibrates. Otherwise, the calibration solutions suffer from a systematic bias, which consequently distorts the signal reconstruction. Furthermore, we argue that nonparametric, signal-to-noise filtered calibration should provide more accurate reconstructions than the common bin averages and provide a new, improved self-calibration scheme. We illustrate our findings with a simplistic numerical example.

  5. Beta measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schotland, R. M.; Warren, A. J.; Funariu, O. M.

    1991-01-01

    The second year's results of the BETA project research are presented. The program is divided into two areas, aerosol modification and climatology in the trade wind region and the climatology of BETA (CO2) on remote mountain top locations. Limited data is available on the aerosol climatology of the marine free troposphere (MFT) in the trade wind region. In order to study the effects of cumulus convection on the MFT values of BETA, a cloud model was developed to simulate the evolution of a typical Pacific trade wind cumulus cloud. The stages involved in this development are outlined. The assembly of the major optical components of the lidar was made. Tests were run of the spectral bandwidth of the Synrad laser when a portion of the beam is mixed with a component which has traveled 450 meters corresponding to a delay of 1.5 microsecs. The bandwidth of the beat signal was measured to be 3 KHz. The data processing system based on a parallel processing filter bank analyzer using true time squaring detectors at each filter was completed.

  6. Calibration of pneumotachographs using a calibrated syringe.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongquan; Turner, Martin J; Yem, Johnny S; Baker, A Barry

    2003-08-01

    Pneumotachograph require frequent calibration. Constant-flow methods allow polynomial calibration curves to be derived but are time consuming. The iterative syringe stroke technique is moderately efficient but results in discontinuous conductance arrays. This study investigated the derivation of first-, second-, and third-order polynomial calibration curves from 6 to 50 strokes of a calibration syringe. We used multiple linear regression to derive first-, second-, and third-order polynomial coefficients from two sets of 6-50 syringe strokes. In part A, peak flows did not exceed the specified linear range of the pneumotachograph, whereas flows in part B peaked at 160% of the maximum linear range. Conductance arrays were derived from the same data sets by using a published algorithm. Volume errors of the calibration strokes and of separate sets of 70 validation strokes (part A) and 140 validation strokes (part B) were calculated by using the polynomials and conductance arrays. Second- and third-order polynomials derived from 10 calibration strokes achieved volume variability equal to or better than conductance arrays derived from 50 strokes. We found that evaluation of conductance arrays using the calibration syringe strokes yields falsely low volume variances. We conclude that accurate polynomial curves can be derived from as few as 10 syringe strokes, and the new polynomial calibration method is substantially more time efficient than previously published conductance methods.

  7. Comparison of DSB effects of the beta particles of iodine-131 and 6 MV X-ray at a dose of 2 Gy in the presence of 2-Methoxyestradiol, IUdR, and TPT in glioblastoma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshasteh-Riz, Ali; Eyvazzadeh, Nazila; Koosha, Fereshteh; Cheraghi, Susan

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the lethal brain tumors and one of the resistant tumors against radiotherapy. Multiple treatment methods and different types of radiation and Radiosensitizers drugs have been combined to optimize the efficacy of radiotherapy. Radiosensitizers are employed to reinforce tumor cell killing and have much fewer effects on the normal tissue. Inducing DNA double strand break in tumoral cells is a major goal of radiation sensitivity. In this study, the level of DNA double strand break in glioblastoma spheroids irradiated by 2 Gy beta particles of iodine-131 and 6 MV X-rays in the presence of 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2), iodo-deoxy-uridine (IUdR) and Topotecan (TPT) was measured using the PicoGreen method. Spheroids of the U87MG cell line were cultured to reach a 300 μm diameter. In the phase one of the study, the spheroids were treated in four groups individually, including 2 Gy of iodine-131, TPT+iodine-131, IUdR+iodine-131, IUdR+2ME2+iodine-131. In the next phase, the cells were treated with 2 Gy of 6 MV X-ray, TPT+6 MV X-ray, IUdR+6 MV X-ray, TPT+IUdR+6 MV X-ray. DSB lesions were measured by the Pico Green assay. The amount of DSB lesions in groups irradiated with iodine-131 individually was greater than the group irradiated with 6 MV X-ray (p<0.05). DNA double strand breaks became more significant in combination with TPT. However, the amount of DSBs in the two independent groups of TPT+IUdR+2ME2+iodine-131 and TPT+IUdR+2ME2+6 MV X-ray was approximately in the same range (P>0.05). The level of DNA double strand breaks in cells irradiated with Iodine-131 was higher than cells irradiated with 6 MV X-ray at the same dose and Topotecan had a positive effect on inducing the damage. The role of 2ME2+IUdR in increasing the damage caused by beta particles of iodine-131 was not significant. Iodine-131 could lead to major DSB damage than 6 MV X-ray at the same dose due to its cross fire effect and spatial distribution of energy in different angels. This

  8. Beta cell device using icosahedral boride compounds

    DOEpatents

    Aselage, Terrence L.; Emin, David

    2002-01-01

    A beta cell for converting beta-particle energies into electrical energy having a semiconductor junction that incorporates an icosahedral boride compound selected from B.sub.12 As.sub.2, B.sub.12 P.sub.2, elemental boron having an .alpha.-rhombohedral structure, elemental boron having a .beta.-rhombohedral structure, and boron carbides of the chemical formula B.sub.12-x C.sub.3-x, where 0.15beta radiation source, and means for transmitting electrical energy to an outside load. The icosahedral boride compound self-heals, resisting degradation from radiation damage.

  9. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    In order to explain certain features of radioactive beta decay, Wolfgang Pauli suggested in 1930 that the nucleus emitted, in addition to a beta particle, another particle of an entirely new type. The hypothesized particle, dubbed the neutrino, would not be discovered experimentally for another 25 years. It's not easy to detect neutrinos, because…

  10. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2007-06-01

    The recent results showing the presence of neutrino oscillations clearly indicate that the difference between the squared mass of neutrinos of different flavors is different from zero, but are unable to determine the nature and the absolute value of the neutrino mass. Neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is at present the most powerful tool to ascertain if the neutrino is a Majorana particle and to determine under this condition the absolute value of its mass. The results already obtained in this lepton violating process will be reported and the two presently running DBD experiments briefly discussed. The future second generation experiments will be reviewed with special emphasis to those already partially approved. In conclusion the peculiar and interdisciplinary nature of these searches will be stressed in their exciting aim to discover if neutrino is Dirac or Majorana particle.

  11. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  12. New radiation protection calibration facility at CERN.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Markus; Carbonez, Pierre; Pozzi, Fabio; Silari, Marco; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    The CERN radiation protection group has designed a new state-of-the-art calibration laboratory to replace the present facility, which is >20 y old. The new laboratory, presently under construction, will be equipped with neutron and gamma sources, as well as an X-ray generator and a beta irradiator. The present work describes the project to design the facility, including the facility placement criteria, the 'point-zero' measurements and the shielding study performed via FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Analytical multicollimator camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration with the U.S. Geological survey multicollimator determines the calibrated focal length, the point of symmetry, the radial distortion referred to the point of symmetry, and the asymmetric characteristiecs of the camera lens. For this project, two cameras were calibrated, a Zeiss RMK A 15/23 and a Wild RC 8. Four test exposures were made with each camera. Results are tabulated for each exposure and averaged for each set. Copies of the standard USGS calibration reports are included. ?? 1978.

  14. ORNL calibrations facility

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.D.; Gupton, E.D.; Lane, B.H.; Miller, J.H.; Nichols, S.W.

    1982-08-01

    The ORNL Calibrations Facility is operated by the Instrumentation Group of the Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division. Its primary purpose is to maintain radiation calibration standards for calibration of ORNL health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. This report includes a discussion of the radioactive sources and ancillary equipment in use and a step-by-step procedure for calibration of those survey instruments and personnel dosimeters in routine use at ORNL.

  15. Verification of 3D Dose Distributions of a Beta-Emitting Radionuclide Using PRESAGE^ Dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Mandi; Grant, Ryan; Ibbott, Geoff; Wendt, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Liquid Brachytherapy involves the direct administration of a beta-emitting radioactive solution into the selected tissue. The solution does not migrate from the injection point and uses the limited range of beta particles to produce a three-dimensional dose distribution. We simulated distributions by beta-dose kernels and validated those estimates by irradiating PRESAGE^ polyurethane dosimeters that measure the three-dimensional dose distributions by a change in optical density that is proportional to dose. The dosimeters were injected with internal beta-emitting radionuclide yttrium-90, exposed for 5.75 days, imaged with optical tomography, and analyzed with radiotherapy software. Dosimeters irradiated with an electron beam to 2 or 3 Gy were used for calibration. The shapes and dose distributions in the PRESAGE^ dosimeters were consistent with the predicted dose kernels. Our experiments have laid the groundwork for future application to individualized patient therapy by ultimately designing a treatment plan that conforms to the shape of any appropriate tumor.

  16. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. Part 4; 1.2 - 35 microns Spectra of Six Standard Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Walker, Russell G.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    We present five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 microns, constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars- beta Peg, alpha Boo, beta And, beta Gem, and alpha Hya-augment our already created complete absolutely calibrated spectrum for alpha Tau. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors.

  17. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. 4; 1.2-35um Spectra of Six Standard Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Walker, Russell G.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    We present five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 microns, constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars, Beta Peg, Delta Boo, Beta And, Beta Gem, and Delta Hya, augment our already created complete absolutely calibrated spectrum for a Tau. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors.

  18. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. Part 4; 1.2-35 micrometer Spectra of Six Standard Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Walker, Russell, G.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    Five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 microns are presented. The spectra were constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars (beta Peg, alpha Boo, beta And, beta Gem, and alpha Hya) augment the author's already created complete absolutely calibrated spectrum for alpha Tau. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors.

  19. SUMS calibration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Calibration was performed on the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer (SUMS). The results of the calibration and the as run test procedures are presented. The output data is described, and engineering data conversion factors, tables and curves, and calibration on instrument gauges are included. Static calibration results which include: instrument sensitive versus external pressure for N2 and O2, data from each scan of calibration, data plots from N2 and O2, and sensitivity of SUMS at inlet for N2 and O2, and ratios of 14/28 for nitrogen and 16/32 for oxygen are given.

  20. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  1. Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2010-12-01

    Almost exactly seventy years ago and only one year before his tragic disappearance the ingenious idea of Ettore Majorana is becoming one of the most important step in the development of fundamental physics. The problem of the nature of the neutrino, namely if it is a massless Dirac particle different from its antineutrino or a Majorana particle with finite mass, is discussed. In fact the recent results showing the presence of neutrino oscillations clearly indicates that the difference between the squared mass of neutrinos of different flavours is finite. Neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is at present the most powerful tool to determine the effective value of the mass of a Majorana neutrino. The results already obtained in this lepton violating process will be reported and the two presently running DBD experiments briefly discussed. The future second generation experiments will be reviewed with special emphasis to those already at least partially approved. In conclusion the peculiar and interdisciplinary nature of these searches will be stressed in their exciting aim to discover if neutrino is indeed a Majorana particle.

  2. Calibrated cylindrical Mach probe in a plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Dandurand, D.; Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Lukin, V. S.

    2011-03-15

    A simple cylindrical Mach probe is described along with an independent calibration procedure in a magnetized plasma wind tunnel. A particle orbit calculation corroborates our model. The probe operates in the weakly magnetized regime in which probe dimension and ion orbit are of the same scale. Analytical and simulation models are favorably compared with experimental calibration.

  3. Calibration and optimization of proportional counter modules using Garfield

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kiwhan; Brockwell, Michael I; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Green, J Andrew; Hogan, Gary E; Makela, Mark F; Mariam, Fesseha G; Morris, Christopher L

    2010-01-01

    Prototypes of radiation detector arrays used for charged-particle radiography require iniliol calibration to correlate the distribution of electron arrival time to the particle track locations. This step is crucial to obtaining the spatial resolution necessary to separate particle tracks traversing the individual proportional counters in the arrays. Our past attempts to use cosmic rays alone for the initial calibration have fallen short of obtaining the desired resolution due to the insufficient cosmic ray flux to provide the necessary number of particle tracks. A theoretical relation between electron drift time and radial drift distance is obtained with Garfield, a CERN gas detector simulation program. This relation is then used as an effective starting point for the initial calibration and results in a shorter calibration period and improved spatial resolution of the detectors.

  4. Fission Beta Particles Emitted into the Geomagnetosphere.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-15

    Energy Deposition by Monoenergetic Electrons ................................... 17 Accession For NTis GRA&I DTIC TAB Unannounned j.stification ’By...Carter ..." (p. 8-58). This spectrum is from thermal neutrons on 235U. As the results of Carter et al. (ref. 2) do not extend below 1 MeV or above 7 MeV... neutron -induced fission are tabulated. The power in each range is given as the sum of about 16 fitted terms. Each term is of the form ce " , the

  5. Beta scattering and beta back-scattering from a thin target

    SciTech Connect

    Bafandeh, H.R.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical technique is presented to determine the distribution of transmitted and back scattered beta particles as a function of angle of incident radiation on a target. Scatterers used consisted of metallic foils of various thicknesses and atomic number, such as Al, Zn, Fe, Ag, and Zr. Three pure beta-emitting radionuclides, [sup 32]P, [sup 204]Tl, and [sup 147]Pm characterized by end-point energies of 1.71 Mev, 0.769 Mev, and 0.225 Mev, respectively, were prepared as individual sources and used in the experimental work. A scintillation detector used in conjunction with the target scatterer and a specially designed fixture that allowed rotation about its vertical rotation axis provided the proper geometry and shielding for this experiment. Finally, the author attempted to compare experimental results with computer calculations and derived an algebraic equation to predict the intensity of beta particle back-scattered radiation as a function of energy of the source material, the scattering angle, scatterer thickness, and the material of the target scatterer. Unlike the case of heavy charged particles such as alpha particles, the effects of beta particle back scattering on dose calculations cannot be ignored. Scattering effects also have important implications with respect to the measurement of beta-emitting radionuclides and the measurements of beta radiation dose.

  6. Precision measurements in 20F beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Maximilian; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar; Voytas, Paul; George, Elizabeth; Paulauskas, Stan; Huyan, Xueying

    2017-01-01

    Precision measurements of the shape of the beta particle energy spectrum provide a sensitive window to search for new interactions beyond the standard model. The decay of 20F offers an attractive system due to the simple decay scheme for a coincidence measurement. A beam of 20F ions, produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, was implanted into a beta-detector. A gamma-ray detection system surrounded the beta detector to detect the beta-delayed gammas in coincidence to reduce the background. Preliminary analysis of these data focus on the half-life of 20F due to the statistical inconsistency of previous work. Monte Carlo simulations are ongoing to analyze the shape of the beta energy spectrum. Results of the analysis of the half-life will be presented. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1102511.

  7. Cereal beta-glucans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal beta-glucans occur predominantly in oats and barley, but can be found in other cereals. Beta-glucan structure is a mixture of single beta-1,3-linkages and consecutive beta-1,4-linkages, and cellotriosyl and cellotetraosyl units typically make up 90-95% of entire molecule. Lichenase can hydr...

  8. DOE Radiological Calibrations Intercomparison Program: Results of fiscal year 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; McDonald, J.C.

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the FY 1987 results of the radiological calibrations intercomparison program. The intercomparison operation is discussed, and the equipment is described, particularly the instrument set, the beta source set, and relevant calculations. Solutions to problems and improvements in the program are suggested, and conclusions are then introduced. 9 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Photogrammetric camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.; Ziemann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Section 2 (Calibration) of the document "Recommended Procedures for Calibrating Photogrammetric Cameras and Related Optical Tests" from the International Archives of Photogrammetry, Vol. XIII, Part 4, is reviewed in the light of recent practical work, and suggestions for changes are made. These suggestions are intended as a basis for a further discussion. ?? 1984.

  10. OLI Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Morfitt, Ron; Kvaran, Geir; Biggar, Stuart; Leisso, Nathan; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Goals: (1) Present an overview of the pre-launch radiance, reflectance & uniformity calibration of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) (1a) Transfer to orbit/heliostat (1b) Linearity (2) Discuss on-orbit plans for radiance, reflectance and uniformity calibration of the OLI

  11. Calibration facility safety plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    A set of requirements is presented to insure the highest practical standard of safety for the Apollo 17 Calibration Facility in terms of identifying all critical or catastrophic type hazard areas. Plans for either counteracting or eliminating these areas are presented. All functional operations in calibrating the ultraviolet spectrometer and the testing of its components are described.

  12. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhen, M.D.; Dean, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  13. Self-calibration performance in stereoscopic PIV acquired in a transonic wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-03-16

    Three stereoscopic PIV experiments have been examined to test the effectiveness of self-calibration under varied circumstances. Furthermore, we our measurements taken in a streamwise plane yielded a robust self-calibration that returned common results regardless of the specific calibration procedure, but measurements in the crossplane exhibited substantial velocity bias errors whose nature was sensitive to the particulars of the self-calibration approach. Self-calibration is complicated by thick laser sheets and large stereoscopic camera angles and further exacerbated by small particle image diameters and high particle seeding density. In spite of the different answers obtained by varied self-calibrations, each implementation locked onto an apparently valid solution with small residual disparity and converged adjustment of the calibration plane. Thus, the convergence of self-calibration on a solution with small disparity is not sufficient to indicate negligible velocity error due to the stereo calibration.

  14. Self-calibration performance in stereoscopic PIV acquired in a transonic wind tunnel

    DOE PAGES

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-03-16

    Three stereoscopic PIV experiments have been examined to test the effectiveness of self-calibration under varied circumstances. Furthermore, we our measurements taken in a streamwise plane yielded a robust self-calibration that returned common results regardless of the specific calibration procedure, but measurements in the crossplane exhibited substantial velocity bias errors whose nature was sensitive to the particulars of the self-calibration approach. Self-calibration is complicated by thick laser sheets and large stereoscopic camera angles and further exacerbated by small particle image diameters and high particle seeding density. In spite of the different answers obtained by varied self-calibrations, each implementation locked onto anmore » apparently valid solution with small residual disparity and converged adjustment of the calibration plane. Thus, the convergence of self-calibration on a solution with small disparity is not sufficient to indicate negligible velocity error due to the stereo calibration.« less

  15. Ophthalmic applicators: an overview of calibrations following the change to SI units.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Shannon M; Micka, John A; DeWerd, Larry A

    2009-05-01

    Since the NIST dose to water standard for 90Sr/90Y ophthalmic applicators was introduced, numerous sources have undergone calibration either at NIST or at the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL). From 1997 to 2008, 222 of these beta-emitting sources were calibrated at the UWADCL, and prior reference source strength values were available for 149 of these sources. A survey of UWADCL ophthalmic applicator calibrations is presented here, demonstrating an average discrepancy of -19% with a standard deviation of +/- 16% between prior reference values and the NIST-traceable UWADCL absorbed dose to water calibrations. Values ranged from -49% to +42%.

  16. Gamma camera calibration and validation for quantitative SPECT imaging with (177)Lu.

    PubMed

    D'Arienzo, M; Cazzato, M; Cozzella, M L; Cox, M; D'Andrea, M; Fazio, A; Fenwick, A; Iaccarino, G; Johansson, L; Strigari, L; Ungania, S; De Felice, P

    2016-06-01

    Over the last years (177)Lu has received considerable attention from the clinical nuclear medicine community thanks to its wide range of applications in molecular radiotherapy, especially in peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In addition to short-range beta particles, (177)Lu emits low energy gamma radiation of 113keV and 208keV that allows gamma camera quantitative imaging. Despite quantitative cancer imaging in molecular radiotherapy having been proven to be a key instrument for the assessment of therapeutic response, at present no general clinically accepted quantitative imaging protocol exists and absolute quantification studies are usually based on individual initiatives. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an approach to gamma camera calibration for absolute quantification in tomographic imaging with (177)Lu. We assessed the gamma camera calibration factors for a Philips IRIX and Philips AXIS gamma camera system using various reference geometries, both in air and in water. Images were corrected for the major effects that contribute to image degradation, i.e. attenuation, scatter and dead- time. We validated our method in non-reference geometry using an anthropomorphic torso phantom provided with the liver cavity uniformly filled with (177)LuCl3. Our results showed that calibration factors depend on the particular reference condition. In general, acquisitions performed with the IRIX gamma camera provided good results at 208keV, with agreement within 5% for all geometries. The use of a Jaszczak 16mL hollow sphere in water provided calibration factors capable of recovering the activity in anthropomorphic geometry within 1% for the 208keV peak, for both gamma cameras. The point source provided the poorest results, most likely because scatter and attenuation correction are not incorporated in the calibration factor. However, for both gamma cameras all geometries provided calibration factors capable of recovering the activity in

  17. Time calibration of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ANTARES Collaboration; Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J. J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J. L.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienzap, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J. P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2011-02-01

    The ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope comprises a three-dimensional array of photomultipliers to detect the Cherenkov light induced by upgoing relativistic charged particles originating from neutrino interactions in the vicinity of the detector. The large scattering length of light in the deep sea facilitates an angular resolution of a few tenths of a degree for neutrino energies exceeding 10 TeV. In order to achieve this optimal performance, the time calibration procedures should ensure a relative time calibration between the photomultipliers at the level of ˜1 ns. The methods developed to attain this level of precision are described.

  18. The double-beta decay: Theoretical challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Horoi, Mihai

    2012-11-20

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a unique process that could reveal physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics namely, if observed, it would prove that neutrinos are Majorana particles. In addition, it could provide information regarding the neutrino masses and their hierarchy, provided that reliable nuclear matrix elements can be obtained. The two neutrino double beta decay is an associate process that is allowed by the Standard Model, and it was observed for about ten nuclei. The present contribution gives a brief review of the theoretical challenges associated with these two process, emphasizing the reliable calculation of the associated nuclear matrix elements.

  19. Compact radiometric microwave calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wollack, E. J.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Fixsen, S. M.

    2006-06-15

    The calibration methods for the ARCADE II instrument are described and the accuracy estimated. The Steelcast coated aluminum cones which comprise the calibrator have a low reflection while maintaining 94% of the absorber volume within 5 mK of the base temperature (modeled). The calibrator demonstrates an absorber with the active part less than one wavelength thick and only marginally larger than the mouth of the largest horn and yet black (less than -40 dB or 0.01% reflection) over five octaves in frequency.

  20. Dynamic Pressure Calibration Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, P. C.; Cate, K. H.; Young, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrating columns of fluid used to calibrate transducers. Dynamic pressure calibration standard developed for calibrating flush diaphragm-mounted pressure transducers. Pressures up to 20 kPa (3 psi) accurately generated over frequency range of 50 to 1,800 Hz. System includes two conically shaped aluminum columns one 5 cm (2 in.) high for low pressures and another 11 cm (4.3 in.) high for higher pressures, each filled with viscous fluid. Each column mounted on armature of vibration exciter, which imparts sinusoidally varying acceleration to fluid column. Signal noise low, and waveform highly dependent on quality of drive signal in vibration exciter.

  1. DIRBE External Calibrator (DEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Clair L.; Thurgood, V. Alan; Allred, Glenn D.

    1987-01-01

    Under NASA Contract No. NAS5-28185, the Center for Space Engineering at Utah State University has produced a calibration instrument for the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). DIRBE is one of the instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Experiment Observatory (COBE). The calibration instrument is referred to as the DEC (Dirbe External Calibrator). DEC produces a steerable, infrared beam of controlled spectral content and intensity and with selectable point source or diffuse source characteristics, that can be directed into the DIRBE to map fields and determine response characteristics. This report discusses the design of the DEC instrument, its operation and characteristics, and provides an analysis of the systems capabilities and performance.

  2. Airdata Measurement and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This memorandum provides a brief introduction to airdata measurement and calibration. Readers will learn about typical test objectives, quantities to measure, and flight maneuvers and operations for calibration. The memorandum informs readers about tower-flyby, trailing cone, pacer, radar-tracking, and dynamic airdata calibration maneuvers. Readers will also begin to understand how some data analysis considerations and special airdata cases, including high-angle-of-attack flight, high-speed flight, and nonobtrusive sensors are handled. This memorandum is not intended to be all inclusive; this paper contains extensive reference and bibliography sections.

  3. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  4. New in-situ, non-intrusive calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, Heather; Adrian, Ronald; Ding, Liuyang; Prestridge, Kathy

    2014-11-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments require precise and accurate camera calibration. Standard techniques make assumptions about hard-to-measure camera parameters (i.e. optical axis angle, distortions, etc.)-reducing the calibration accuracy. Additionally, vibrations and slight movements after calibration may cause significant errors-particularly for tomographic PIV. These problems are exacerbated when a calibration target cannot be placed within the test section. A new PIV camera calibration method has been developed to permit precise calibration without placing a calibration target inside the test section or scanning the target over a volume. The method is capable of correcting for dynamic calibration changes occurring between PIV laser pulses. A transparent calibration plate with fine marks on both sides is positioned on the test section window. Dual-plane mapping makes it possible to determine a mapping function containing both position and angular direction of central rays from particles. From this information, central rays can be traced into the test section with high accuracy. Image distortion by the lens and refraction at various air-glass-liquid interfaces are accounted for, and no information about the position or angle of the camera(s) is required.

  5. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  6. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  7. Multigamma-ray calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Massey, T.N.

    1983-05-01

    We have calibrated a self-consistent set of multigamma-ray standards using the automated multi-spectrometry ..gamma..-ray counting facility at LLNL's Nuclear Chemistry Division. Pure sources of long-lived activity were produced by mass separation and/or chemical purification. The sources were counted individually and in combination on several different calibrated spectrometer systems. These systems utilize various detectors ranging from small (x-ray) detectors to large volume high-purity Ge detectors. This has allowed the use of the most ideal individual detector-efficiency characteristics for the determination of the relative ..gamma..-ray intensities. Precise energy measurements, reported earlier (Meyer, 1976) have been performed by an independent method. Both the energy and ..gamma..-ray-emission probabilities determined compare well with independently established values such as the recent ICRM intercomparison of /sup 152/Eu. We discuss our investigations aimed at resolving the shape of the efficiency response function up to 10 MeV for large volume Ge(Li) and high-purity Ge detectors. Recent results on the ..gamma..-ray-emission probabilities per decay for /sup 149/Gd and /sup 168/Tm multigamma-ray sources are discussed. For /sup 168/Tm, we deduce a 0.01% ..beta../sup -/ branch to the 87.73-keV level in /sup 168/Yb rather than the previous value which was a factor of 200 greater. In addition, we describe current cooperative efforts aimed at establishing a consistent set of data for short-lived fission products. Included are recent measurements on the bromine fission products with ..gamma.. rays up to 7 MeV.

  8. Roundness calibration standard

    DOEpatents

    Burrus, Brice M.

    1984-01-01

    A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

  9. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina; Webb, Craig

    2016-05-02

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the progress on the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations for all shortwave and longwave radiometers that are deployed by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program.

  10. In-place HEPA (high efficiency, particulate air) filter testing at Hanford: Operating experiences, calibrations, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, D.S.; Decelis, D.G.

    1989-10-01

    High Efficiency, Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters provide a minimum of 99.97% removal efficiency for particles greater than or equal to .3 microns in diameter. Each HEPA filter installation at Hanford is, at specified intervals, functionally tested for leaks. The test procedure involves a dioctylphthalate (DOP) smoke generator and a calibrated airborne particle detector. The DOP generator produces smoke of a known quantitative particle size distribution upstream of the filter. The airborne particle detector is first placed upstream, and then downstream of the filter to determine percent penetration. The smoke generator is characterized using a calibrated laser spectrometer, and the particle detector is calibrated using a calibrated picoammeter. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  11. AE activity during transient beta drops in high poloidal beta discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Gong, X. Z.; Ren, Q. L.; Ding, S. Y.; Qian, J. P.; Pan, C. K.; Li, G. Q.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Garofalo, A. M.; McClenaghan, J.

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced AE activity has been observed during transient beta drops in high poloidal beta DIII-D discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs). These drops in beta are believed to be caused by n=1 external kink modes. In some discharges, beta recovers within 200 ms but, in others, beta stays suppressed. A typical discharge has βP 3, qmin 3, and q95 12. The drop in beta affects both fast ions and thermal particles, and a drop is also observed in the density and rotation. The enhanced AE activity follows the instability that causes the beta drop, is largest at the lowest beta, and subsides as beta recovers. MHD stability analysis is planned. A database study of the plasma conditions associated with the collapse will be also presented. Supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC05-06OR23100, and by the National Natural Science Foundation of China 11575249, and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China No. 2015GB110005.

  12. Calibration Results Of The Strofio Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livi, S. A.; Allegrini, F.; Miles, P. F.

    2013-12-01

    The sensor Strofio is a mass spectrometer, part of the Serena plasma/neutral particles package for the BepiColombo mission to Mercury. During several campaignes of calibraion at the Southwest Research Institute and at the University of Bern we calibrated the characteristics of the Flight Unit and determined the calibration factors of the sensor. All the measured responses of Strofio to external stimuly are compatible with the requirements necessary to characterize the tenuous exosphere of Mercury. In the measured particluar sensitivity (0.14 (cts/sec)/(1/cm3)), resolution (m/dm>90), mass range (4-60 + 80-120) and capability of background rejection ( > 40) are well fitted to the expected conditions around the planet. We present the current understanding of composition and variability of the Hemean exosphere, the derived physical measurables, and show the relevant Strofio calibration results.

  13. Comparison of Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Calibration Using Earth Surface Targets in Laboratory and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana

    1999-01-01

    Routine backscatter, beta, measurements by an airborne or space-based lidar from designated earth surfaces with known and fairly uniform beta properties can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities. This can in turn be used to obtain accurate atmospheric aerosol and cloud beta measurements on large spatial scales. This is important because achieving a precise calibration factor for large pulsed lidars then need not rest solely on using a standard hard target procedure. Furthermore, calibration from designated earth surfaces would provide an inflight performance evaluation of the lidar. Hence, with active remote sensing using lasers with high resolution data, calibration of a space-based lidar using earth's surfaces will be extremely useful. The calibration methodology using the earth's surface initially requires measuring beta of various earth surfaces simulated in the laboratory using a focused continuous wave (CW) CO2 Doppler lidar and then use these beta measurements as standards for the earth surface signal from airborne or space-based lidars. Since beta from the earth's surface may be retrieved at different angles of incidence, beta would also need to be measured at various angles of incidences of the different surfaces. In general, Earth-surface reflectance measurements have been made in the infrared, but the use of lidars to characterize them and in turn use of the Earth's surface to calibrate lidars has not been made. The feasibility of this calibration methodology is demonstrated through a comparison of these laboratory measurements with actual earth surface beta retrieved from the same lidar during the NASA/Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on NASA's DC8 aircraft from 13 - 26 September, 1995. For the selected earth surface from the airborne lidar data, an average beta for the surface was established and the statistics of lidar efficiency was determined. This was compared with the actual lidar efficiency

  14. beta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (beta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    beta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( beta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 85 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asses

  15. Integrated calibration sphere and calibration step fixture for improved coordinate measurement machine calibration

    DOEpatents

    Clifford, Harry J [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and qualification is described, decreasing the time required for such qualification, thus allowing the CMM to be used more productively. A number of embodiments are disclosed that allow for new and retrofit manufacture to perform as integrated calibration sphere and calibration fixture devices. This invention renders unnecessary the removal of a calibration sphere prior to CMM measurement of calibration features on calibration fixtures, thereby greatly reducing the time spent qualifying a CMM.

  16. Derivation of Soil Screening Guidelines for Gross Alpha/Beta Radioactivity for United States Air Force Deployment Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-19

    a beta particle to become polonium -214 (99.98% of decays), or it can emit an alpha particle to become thallium- 210 (0.02% of decays). Bismuth-214...lead- 210 , and polonium - 210 . A decay of bismuth-214 will eventually yield 5 alpha particles and 4 beta particles. Four radionuclides that occur in...beta no yes Polonium -214 163.7 sec alpha no no Lead- 210 22.3 y beta yes no Bismuth- 210 5.01 d beta no no Polonium - 210 138.38 d alpha yes no Lead

  17. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    2011-03-01

    In order to explain certain features of radioactive beta decay, Wolfgang Pauli suggested in 1930 that the nucleus emitted, in addition to a beta particle, another particle of an entirely new type. The hypothesized particle, dubbed the neutrino, would not be discovered experimentally for another 25 years. It's not easy to detect neutrinos, because they respond to neither the EM force nor the strong force. For example, the mean free path (average penetration distance before it interacts) of a typical beta-decay neutrino moving through solid lead is about 1.5 light years! Enrico Fermi argued that neutrinos indicated a new force was at work. During the 1930s, he quickly adapted ideas from the developing new theory of QED to this new force, dubbed the weak force. Fermi's theory was able to predict the half-lives of beta-emitting nuclei and the range of energies of the emitted beta particles.

  18. DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; Roberson, P.L.; McDonald, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Department of Energy Radiological Calibration Intercomparison Program was initiated in January 1986, under the research portion of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program. The program operates via the exchange of transfer standards, consisting of instrument sets and standard secondary beta sources. There are two instrument sets and the scheduled use has been staggered such that one set is available for use during each month. One set of secondary standard beta sources is available for use bimonthly. During the 1986 fiscal year, five laboratories used the instrument sets and three laboratories used the beta source set. Results were reported for all the measurements. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to Pacific Northwest Laboratory calibration values were 1.12 +- 0.17 for gamma measurements. Those ratios for the gamma measurements varied from 0.98 to 3.06. The larger differences of results from measurements performed at two facilities were directly attributable to unfamiliarity with the intercomparison instruments. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to PNL calibration values obtained using the secondary /sup 90/Sr beta source was 1.02 +- 0.05, which is well within measurement uncertainties. The one participant who performed measurements using /sup 147/Pm and /sup 204/Tl sources obtained ratios of 0.68 and 1.11, respectively. No measurements were performed using neutron or x-ray sources.

  19. Calibrating reaction rates for the CREST model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Caroline A.; Christie, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    The CREST reactive-burn model uses entropy-dependent reaction rates that, until now, have been manually tuned to fit shock-initiation and detonation data in hydrocode simulations. This paper describes the initial development of an automatic method for calibrating CREST reaction-rate coefficients, using particle swarm optimisation. The automatic method is applied to EDC32, to help develop the first CREST model for this conventional high explosive.

  20. Measurement of Yields and Fluctuations using Background and Calibration Data from the LUX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, Evan; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector is a 350-kg liquid xenon (LXe) time-projection chamber designed for the direct detection of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. LUX operates on the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. Monoenergetic electronic recoil (ER) peaks in the WIMP search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the LUX detector have been used to measure ER light and charge yields in LXe between 5.2 keV and 662 keV. The energy resolution of the LUX detector at these energies will also be presented. Recombination fluctuations are observed to follow a linear dependence on the number of ions for the energies in this study, and this dependence is consistent with low-energy measurements made with a tritium beta source in the LUX detector. Using these results and additional measurements of the recoil bands from tritium and D-D neutron calibrations, I will compare recombination fluctuations in LXe response to electronic and nuclear recoils. The presenter is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program. The SCGSR program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the DOE under contract DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  1. GTC Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cesare, M. A.; Hammersley, P. L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2006-06-01

    We are currently developing the calibration programme for GTC using techniques similar to the ones use for the space telescope calibration (Hammersley et al. 1998, A&AS, 128, 207; Cohen et al. 1999, AJ, 117, 1864). We are planning to produce a catalogue with calibration stars which are suitable for a 10-m telescope. These sources will be not variable, non binary and do not have infrared excesses if they are to be used in the infrared. The GTC science instruments require photometric calibration between 0.35 and 2.5 microns. The instruments are: OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy), ELMER and EMIR (Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto Infrarrojo) and the Acquisition and Guiding boxes (Di Césare, Hammersley, & Rodriguez Espinosa 2005, RevMexAA Ser. Conf., 24, 231). The catalogue will consist of 30 star fields distributed in all of North Hemisphere. We will use fields containing sources over the range 12 to 22 magnitude, and spanning a wide range of spectral types (A to M) for the visible and near infrared. In the poster we will show the method used for selecting these fields and we will present the analysis of the data on the first calibration fields observed.

  2. Polarimetric Palsar Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzi, R.; Shimada, M.

    2008-11-01

    Polarimetric PALSAR system parameters are assessed using data sets collected over various calibration sites. The data collected over the Amazonian forest permits validating the zero Faraday rotation hypotheses near the equator. The analysis of the Amazonian forest data and the response of the corner reflectors deployed during the PALSAR acquisitions lead to the conclusion that the antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB). Theses results are confirmed using data collected over the Sweden and Ottawa calibration sites. The 5-m height trihedrals deployed in the Sweden calibration site by the Chalmers University of technology permits accurate measurement of antenna parameters, and detection of 2-3 degree Faraday rotation during day acquisition, whereas no Faraday rotation was noted during night acquisition. Small Faraday rotation angles (2-3 degree) have been measured using acquisitions over the DLR Oberpfaffenhofen and the Ottawa calibration sites. The presence of small but still significant Faraday rotation (2-3 degree) induces a CR return at the cross-polarization HV and VH that should not be interpreted as the actual antenna cross-talk. PALSAR antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB), and diagonal antenna distortion matrices (with zero cross-talk terms) can be used for accurate calibration of PALSAR polarimetric data.

  3. STIS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulbert, S.; Hodge, P.; Lindler, D.; Shaw, R.; Goudfrooij, P.; Katsanis, R.; Keener, S.; McGrath, M.; Bohlin, R.; Baum, S.

    1997-05-01

    Routine calibration of STIS observations in the HST data pipeline is performed by the CALSTIS task. CALSTIS can: subtract the over-scan region and a bias image from CCD observations; remove cosmic ray features from CCD observations; correct global nonlinearities for MAMA observations; subtract a dark image; and, apply flat field corrections. In the case of spectral data, CALSTIS can also: assign a wavelength to each pixel; apply a heliocentric correction to the wavelengths; convert counts to absolute flux; process the automatically generated spectral calibration lamp observations to improve the wavelength solution; rectify two-dimensional (longslit) spectra; subtract interorder and sky background; and, extract one-dimensional spectra. CALSTIS differs in significant ways from the current HST calibration tasks. The new code is written in ANSI C and makes use of a new C interface to IRAF. The input data, reference data, and output calibrated data are all in FITS format, using IMAGE or BINTABLE extensions. Error estimates are computed and include contributions from the reference images. The entire calibration can be performed by one task, but many steps can also be performed individually.

  4. Psychophysical contrast calibration

    PubMed Central

    To, Long; Woods, Russell L; Goldstein, Robert B; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Electronic displays and computer systems offer numerous advantages for clinical vision testing. Laboratory and clinical measurements of various functions and in particular of (letter) contrast sensitivity require accurately calibrated display contrast. In the laboratory this is achieved using expensive light meters. We developed and evaluated a novel method that uses only psychophysical responses of a person with normal vision to calibrate the luminance contrast of displays for experimental and clinical applications. Our method combines psychophysical techniques (1) for detection (and thus elimination or reduction) of display saturating nonlinearities; (2) for luminance (gamma function) estimation and linearization without use of a photometer; and (3) to measure without a photometer the luminance ratios of the display’s three color channels that are used in a bit-stealing procedure to expand the luminance resolution of the display. Using a photometer we verified that the calibration achieved with this procedure is accurate for both LCD and CRT displays enabling testing of letter contrast sensitivity to 0.5%. Our visual calibration procedure enables clinical, internet and home implementation and calibration verification of electronic contrast testing. PMID:23643843

  5. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  6. BATSE spectroscopy detector calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Ford, L.; Matteson, J.; Lestrade, J. P.; Teegarden, B.; Schaefer, B.; Cline, T.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the channel-to-energy calibration of the Spectroscopy Detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). These detectors consist of NaI(TI) crystals viewed by photomultiplier tubes whose output in turn is measured by a pulse height analyzer. The calibration of these detectors has been complicated by frequent gain changes and by nonlinearities specific to the BATSE detectors. Nonlinearities in the light output from the NaI crystal and in the pulse height analyzer are shifted relative to each other by changes in the gain of the photomultiplier tube. We present the analytical model which is the basis of our calibration methodology, and outline how the empirical coefficients in this approach were determined. We also describe the complications peculiar to the Spectroscopy Detectors, and how our understanding of the detectors' operation led us to a solution to these problems.

  7. Calibration Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2006-02-01

    The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact Quantum Cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared imaging systems. These on-board systems will improve the calibration technology for passive sensors, which enable stand-off detection for the proliferation or use of weapons of mass destruction, by replacing on-board blackbodies with QC laser-based systems. This alternative technology can minimize the impact on instrument size and weight while improving the quality of instruments for a variety of missions. The potential of replacing flight blackbodies is made feasible by the high output, stability, and repeatability of the QC laser spectral radiance.

  8. TA489A calibrator: SANDUS

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, R.

    1987-08-01

    The TA489A Calibrator, designed to operate in the MA164 Digital Data Acquisition System, is used to calibrate up to 128 analog-to-digital recording channels. The TA489A calibrates using a dc Voltage Source or any of several special calibration modes. Calibration schemes are stored in the TA489A memory and are initiated locally or remotely through a Command Link.

  9. Iterative Magnetometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative method for three-axis magnetometer (TAM) calibration that makes use of three existing utilities recently incorporated into the attitude ground support system used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The method combines attitude-independent and attitude-dependent calibration algorithms with a new spinning spacecraft Kalman filter to solve for biases, scale factors, nonorthogonal corrections to the alignment, and the orthogonal sensor alignment. The method is particularly well-suited to spin-stabilized spacecraft, but may also be useful for three-axis stabilized missions given sufficient data to provide observability.

  10. DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; McDonald, J.C.; Murphy, M.K.

    1989-08-01

    Calibration measurements for personnel dosimetry purposes must be both accurate and consistent with national standards. In order to satisfy these requirements, the following methods are usually employed. In one case, a radiation source is sent to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), formerly the National Bureau of Standards, for calibration and is returned to the laboratory to be used as a local standard. Another method involves the calibration of an instrument, such as an ionization chamber, by NIST. After calibration, this instrument is then used to measure the exposure rate delivered by radiation sources at the laboratory. Such calibrations by NIST are essential, but they do not provide a complete check on the quality of the calibrations that are carried out by the individual laboratory. Additional measurements are necessary to assure the quality of such measurements. When laboratory staff are asked to carry our measurements with calibrated instruments and report results for evaluation, they are participating in a measurement quality assurance (MQA) program. Such a program tests not only the quality of the equipment but also the ability of the staff to correctly use and interpret the results obtained with the equipment. The NIST operates an MQA program with a selected number of calibration laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) participates in this MQA program even though NIST test only x-ray and gamma-ray measurements. The US Department of Energy (DOE) intercomparison program was designed specifically to include x-ray, gamma-ray, beta, and neutron calibrations for personnel dosimetry purposes. This program serves a need that is not being met by NIST, and it provides documentation of the accuracy and uniformity of the radiological calibrations carried out in DOE facilities. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Beta Absorption Mass Monitoring of Particulates - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienfeld, Pedro

    1971-01-01

    The theory and application of beta-radiation absorption for the measurement and monitoring of airborne particulates are discussed. The use of this technique, both for source testing and for ambient air quality monitoring is reviewed. Various particle collection methods used in conjunction with beta absorption sensing configurations are considered. State of the art and current developments of instrumentation approaches for the automated measurement of mass concentration and size distribution of aerosols by beta absorption are discussed. Methods for electronic signal processing and recording are presented. The Beta absorption technique appears as a powerful tool for the unattended measurement of the mass of particulate pollution, compatible with telemetry and central data processing methods.

  12. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  13. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  14. Calibrating Communication Competencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surges Tatum, Donna

    2016-11-01

    The Many-faceted Rasch measurement model is used in the creation of a diagnostic instrument by which communication competencies can be calibrated, the severity of observers/raters can be determined, the ability of speakers measured, and comparisons made between various groups.

  15. TWSTFT Link Calibration Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Serrano, G. Brunetti (2013) Relative Calibration of the Time Transfer Link between CERN and LNGS for Precise Neutrino Time of Flight Measurements. Proc...Esteban, M. Pallavicini, Va. Pettiti, C. Plantard, A. Razeto (2012) Measurement of CNGS Muon Neutrinos Speed with Borexino: INRIM and ROA Contribution

  16. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  17. Optical detector calibrator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, James P. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An optical detector calibrator system simulates a source of optical radiation to which a detector to be calibrated is responsive. A light source selected to emit radiation in a range of wavelengths corresponding to the spectral signature of the source is disposed within a housing containing a microprocessor for controlling the light source and other system elements. An adjustable iris and a multiple aperture filter wheel are provided for controlling the intensity of radiation emitted from the housing by the light source to adjust the simulated distance between the light source and the detector to be calibrated. The geared iris has an aperture whose size is adjustable by means of a first stepper motor controlled by the microprocessor. The multiple aperture filter wheel contains neutral density filters of different attenuation levels which are selectively positioned in the path of the emitted radiation by a second stepper motor that is also controlled by the microprocessor. An operator can select a number of detector tests including range, maximum and minimum sensitivity, and basic functionality. During the range test, the geared iris and filter wheel are repeatedly adjusted by the microprocessor as necessary to simulate an incrementally increasing simulated source distance. A light source calibration subsystem is incorporated in the system which insures that the intensity of the light source is maintained at a constant level over time.

  18. Improved Regression Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrondal, Anders; Kuha, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    The likelihood for generalized linear models with covariate measurement error cannot in general be expressed in closed form, which makes maximum likelihood estimation taxing. A popular alternative is regression calibration which is computationally efficient at the cost of inconsistent estimation. We propose an improved regression calibration…

  19. Commodity-Free Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Commodity-free calibration is a reaction rate calibration technique that does not require the addition of any commodities. This technique is a specific form of the reaction rate technique, where all of the necessary reactants, other than the sample being analyzed, are either inherent in the analyzing system or specifically added or provided to the system for a reason other than calibration. After introduction, the component of interest is exposed to other reactants or flow paths already present in the system. The instrument detector records one of the following to determine the rate of reaction: the increase in the response of the reaction product, a decrease in the signal of the analyte response, or a decrease in the signal from the inherent reactant. With this data, the initial concentration of the analyte is calculated. This type of system can analyze and calibrate simultaneously, reduce the risk of false positives and exposure to toxic vapors, and improve accuracy. Moreover, having an excess of the reactant already present in the system eliminates the need to add commodities, which further reduces cost, logistic problems, and potential contamination. Also, the calculations involved can be simplified by comparison to those of the reaction rate technique. We conducted tests with hypergols as an initial investigation into the feasiblility of the technique.

  20. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    SciTech Connect

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  1. Simplified Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2010-01-01

    A measurement-based radiance estimation approach for vicarious radiometric calibration of spaceborne multispectral remote sensing systems has been developed. This simplified process eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and reduces the number of atmospheric assumptions required to perform sensor calibrations. Like prior approaches, the simplified method involves the collection of ground truth data coincident with the overpass of the remote sensing system being calibrated, but this approach differs from the prior techniques in both the nature of the data collected and the manner in which the data are processed. In traditional vicarious radiometric calibration, ground truth data are gathered using ground-viewing spectroradiometers and one or more sun photometer( s), among other instruments, located at a ground target area. The measured data from the ground-based instruments are used in radiative transfer models to estimate the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) target radiances at the time of satellite overpass. These TOA radiances are compared with the satellite sensor readings to radiometrically calibrate the sensor. Traditional vicarious radiometric calibration methods require that an atmospheric model be defined such that the ground-based observations of solar transmission and diffuse-to-global ratios are in close agreement with the radiative transfer code estimation of these parameters. This process is labor-intensive and complex, and can be prone to errors. The errors can be compounded because of approximations in the model and inaccurate assumptions about the radiative coupling between the atmosphere and the terrain. The errors can increase the uncertainty of the TOA radiance estimates used to perform the radiometric calibration. In comparison, the simplified approach does not use atmospheric radiative transfer models and involves fewer assumptions concerning the radiative transfer properties of the atmosphere. This new technique uses two neighboring uniform

  2. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  3. Producing Large-Particle Monodisperse Latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical process produces latex particles of relatively large, uniform size for use as size standards for instrument calibration. Process, based on seeding of mixture by very small latex particles, yields particles measuring 2 to 30 micrometer or more in average size. Produces monodisperse latexes in which deviation from average size is less than 2 percent. Particles used directly, without tedious separation procedures for removing off-size particles.

  4. Electron Temperature and Density Measurements by the Unicity of Particle Confinement Time on the TCABR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, M.; Nascimento, I. C.; Severo, J. H. F.; Sanada, E. K.; Galvao, R. M. O.; Daltrini, A. M.

    2006-12-04

    The electron temperature Te and density ne at inner border side of plasma on TCABR tokamak are determined using the unicity of particle confinement time {tau}p. In this method, the signals from hydrogen Balmer series emissions like H alfa, beta and gama are measured with an absolutely intensity calibrated spectrometer during the discharge and the particle confinement time then is evaluated using these three emissions for large range of electron temperature and density, until the unique value of {tau}p is achieved. The results show that during the current plateau, the values of the edge electron density and temperature in high fill density discharge, present much strong variations compared to the low fill pressure because of larger edge turbulence activity.

  5. Mercury Calibration System

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  6. The selectivity of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists at the human beta1, beta2 and beta3 adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jillian G

    2005-02-01

    Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists ("beta-blockers") are one of the most widely used classes of drugs in cardiovascular medicine (hypertension, ischaemic heart disease and increasingly in heart failure) as well as in the management of anxiety, migraine and glaucoma. Where known, the mode of action in cardiovascular disease is from antagonism of endogenous catecholamine responses in the heart (mainly at beta1-adrenoceptors), while the worrisome side effects of bronchospasm result from airway beta2-adrenoceptor blockade. The aim of this study was to determine the selectivity of beta-antagonists for the human beta-adrenoceptor subtypes. (3)H-CGP 12177 whole cell-binding studies were undertaken in CHO cell lines stably expressing either the human beta1-, beta2- or the beta3-adrenoceptor in order to determine the affinity of ligands for each receptor subtype in the same cell background. In this study, the selectivity of well-known subtype-selective ligands was clearly demonstrated: thus, the selective beta1 antagonist CGP 20712A was 501-fold selective over beta2 and 4169-fold selective over beta3; the beta2-selective antagonist ICI 118551 was 550- and 661-fold selective over beta1 and beta3, respectively, and the selective beta3 compound CL 316243 was 10-fold selective over beta2 and more than 129-fold selective over beta1. Those beta2-adrenoceptor agonists used clinically for the treatment of asthma and COPD were beta2 selective: 29-, 61- and 2818-fold for salbutamol, terbutaline and salmeterol over beta1, respectively. There was little difference in the affinity of these ligands between beta1 and beta3 adrenoceptors. The clinically used beta-antagonists studied ranged from bisoprolol (14-fold beta1-selective) to timolol (26-fold beta2-selective). However, the majority showed little selectivity for the beta1- over the beta2-adrenoceptor, with many actually being more beta2-selective. This study shows that the beta1/beta2 selectivity of most clinically used beta-blockers is

  7. Phase calibration generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A phase calibration system was developed for the Deep Space Stations to generate reference microwave comb tones which are mixed in with signals received by the antenna. These reference tones are used to remove drifts of the station's receiving system from the detected data. This phase calibration system includes a cable stabilizer which transfers a 20 MHz reference signal from the control room to the antenna cone. The cable stabilizer compensates for delay changes in the long cable which connects its control room subassembly to its antenna cone subassembly in such a way that the 20 MHz is transferred to the cone with no significant degradation of the hydrogen maser atomic clock stability. The 20 MHz reference is used by the comb generator and is also available for use as a reference for receiver LO's in the cone.

  8. Pipeline Calibration for STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Hulbert, S. J.; Lindler, D.; Busko, I.; Hsu, J.-C.; Baum, S.; McGrath, M.; Goudfrooij, P.; Shaw, R.; Katsanis, R.; Keener, S.; Bohlin, R.

    The CALSTIS program for calibration of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph data in the OPUS pipeline differs in several significant ways from calibration for earlier HST instruments, such as the use of FITS format, computation of error estimates, and association of related exposures. Several steps are now done in the pipeline that previously had to be done off-line by the user, such as cosmic ray rejection and extraction of 1-D spectra. Although the program is linked with IRAF for image and table I/O, it is written in ANSI C rather than SPP, which should make the code more accessible. FITS extension I/O makes use of the new IRAF FITS kernel for images and the HEASARC FITSIO package for tables.

  9. MIRO Calibration Switch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suchman, Jason; Salinas, Yuki; Kubo, Holly

    2001-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed, analyzed, built, and tested a calibration switch mechanism for the MIRO instrument on the ROSETTA spacecraft. MIRO is the Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter; this instrument hopes to investigate the origin of the solar system by studying the origin of comets. Specifically, the instrument will be the first to use submillimeter and millimeter wave heterodyne receivers to remotely examine the P-54 Wirtanen comet. In order to calibrate the instrument, it needs to view a hot and cold target. The purpose of the mechanism is to divert the instrument's field of view from the hot target, to the cold target, and then back into space. This cycle is to be repeated every 30 minutes for the duration of the 1.5 year mission. The paper describes the development of the mechanism, as well as analysis and testing techniques.

  10. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  11. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  12. Calibration of Germanium Resistance Thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladner, D.; Urban, E.; Mason, F. C.

    1987-01-01

    Largely completed thermometer-calibration cryostat and probe allows six germanium resistance thermometers to be calibrated at one time at superfluid-helium temperatures. In experiments involving several such thermometers, use of this calibration apparatus results in substantial cost savings. Cryostat maintains temperature less than 2.17 K through controlled evaporation and removal of liquid helium from Dewar. Probe holds thermometers to be calibrated and applies small amount of heat as needed to maintain precise temperature below 2.17 K.

  13. Fast calibration of gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, R. V.; Wilson, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Digital unit automates calibration sequence using calculator IC and programmable read-only memory to solve calibration equations. Infrared sensors start and stop calibration sequence. Instrument calibrates mass flowmeters or rotameters where flow measurement is based on mass or volume. This automatic control reduces operator time by 80 percent. Solid-state components are very reliable, and digital character allows system accuracy to be determined primarily by accuracy of transducers.

  14. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. H. Liu

    2003-02-14

    This report has documented the methodologies and the data used for developing rock property sets for three infiltration maps. Model calibration is necessary to obtain parameter values appropriate for the scale of the process being modeled. Although some hydrogeologic property data (prior information) are available, these data cannot be directly used to predict flow and transport processes because they were measured on scales smaller than those characterizing property distributions in models used for the prediction. Since model calibrations were done directly on the scales of interest, the upscaling issue was automatically considered. On the other hand, joint use of data and the prior information in inversions can further increase the reliability of the developed parameters compared with those for the prior information. Rock parameter sets were developed for both the mountain and drift scales because of the scale-dependent behavior of fracture permeability. Note that these parameter sets, except those for faults, were determined using the 1-D simulations. Therefore, they cannot be directly used for modeling lateral flow because of perched water in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. Further calibration may be needed for two- and three-dimensional modeling studies. As discussed above in Section 6.4, uncertainties for these calibrated properties are difficult to accurately determine, because of the inaccuracy of simplified methods for this complex problem or the extremely large computational expense of more rigorous methods. One estimate of uncertainty that may be useful to investigators using these properties is the uncertainty used for the prior information. In most cases, the inversions did not change the properties very much with respect to the prior information. The Output DTNs (including the input and output files for all runs) from this study are given in Section 9.4.

  15. Calibration of hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorefice, Salvatore; Malengo, Andrea

    2006-10-01

    After a brief description of the different methods employed in periodic calibration of hydrometers used in most cases to measure the density of liquids in the range between 500 kg m-3 and 2000 kg m-3, particular emphasis is given to the multipoint procedure based on hydrostatic weighing, known as well as Cuckow's method. The features of the calibration apparatus and the procedure used at the INRiM (formerly IMGC-CNR) density laboratory have been considered to assess all relevant contributions involved in the calibration of different kinds of hydrometers. The uncertainty is strongly dependent on the kind of hydrometer; in particular, the results highlight the importance of the density of the reference buoyant liquid, the temperature of calibration and the skill of operator in the reading of the scale in the whole assessment of the uncertainty. It is also interesting to realize that for high-resolution hydrometers (division of 0.1 kg m-3), the uncertainty contribution of the density of the reference liquid is the main source of the total uncertainty, but its importance falls under about 50% for hydrometers with a division of 0.5 kg m-3 and becomes somewhat negligible for hydrometers with a division of 1 kg m-3, for which the reading uncertainty is the predominant part of the total uncertainty. At present the best INRiM result is obtained with commercially available hydrometers having a scale division of 0.1 kg m-3, for which the relative uncertainty is about 12 × 10-6.

  16. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  17. Calibration Chamber Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-30

    penetrometers of different designs, (iii) the effect of rod friction, (iv) the effect of discontinuous operation, and (v) sensing an interface between two sand...layers. Other test results on two designs of 10 cm2 Fugro penetrometers, each with a different position of friction sleeve, assisted in the selection...at different stages in the penetration of a specimen. The calibration tests had the prime purpose of establishing correlations between the penetration

  18. Calibration of the active radiation detector for Spacelab-One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The flight models of the active radiation detector (ARD) for the ENV-01 environmental monitor were calibrated using gamma radiation. Measured sensitivities of the ion chambers were 6.1 + or - 0.3 micron rad per count for ARD S/N1, and 10.4 + or - 0.5 micron rad per count for ARD S/N2. Both were linear over the measured range 0.10 to 500 m/rad hour. The particle counters (proportional counters) were set to respond to approximately 85% of minimum ionizing particles of unit charge passing through them. These counters were also calibrated in the gamma field.

  19. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP

    DOEpatents

    Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

    1958-04-22

    The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

  20. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ghezzehej

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this model report is to document the calibrated properties model that provides calibrated property sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models (UZ models). The calibration of the property sets is performed through inverse modeling. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 1.2.6 and 2.1.1.6). Direct inputs to this model report were derived from the following upstream analysis and model reports: ''Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170038]); ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169855]); ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]); ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]). Additionally, this model report incorporates errata of the previous version and closure of the Key Technical Issue agreement TSPAI 3.26 (Section 6.2.2 and Appendix B), and it is revised for improved transparency.

  1. Radiation calibration targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several prominent features of Mars Pathfinder and surrounding terrain are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on the Red Planet. Portions of a lander petal are at the lower part of the image. At the left, the mechanism for the high-gain antenna can be seen. The dark area along the right side of the image represents a portion of the low-gain antenna. The radiation calibration target is at the right. The calibration target is made up of a number of materials with well-characterized colors. The known colors of the calibration targets allow scientists to determine the true colors of the rocks and soils of Mars. Three bull's-eye rings provide a wide range of brightness for the camera, similar to a photographer's grayscale chart. In the middle of the bull's-eye is a 5-inch tall post that casts a shadow, which is distorted in this image due to its location with respect to the lander camera.

    A large rock is located at the near center of the image. Smaller rocks and areas of soil are strewn across the Martian terrain up to the horizon line.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  2. Method of biodosimeter calibration for orbital flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladislav, Petrov

    A biodosimetry method, based on estimation of an absorbed dose on the basis of assessment of unstable aberration frequency in the lymphocytes of human's peripheral blood is used broadly in ground conditions for analysis of accidental exposure to personal and citizens. A calibration curve giving the relationship between aberration frequency (generally dicentrics and centric rings) and an absorbed dose in blood samples is used for assessment of crewmember exposure. As a rule gamma - rays corresponding to character of exposure in such accidents are used for these goals. At the same time the space radiation fields are formed mainly by charged particles for which the character of effect on the body cells and tissues differs strongly from that of gamma - rays. As biodosimetry is a relative method of dose measurement it is necessary to obtain a calibration curve corresponding to the conditions in which the measurements will be performed. That is a calibration curve for space application should give a relationship between aberration frequency and a dose formed by radiation field equal to that on the spacecraft trajectory. The report contains a method of obtaining a calibration curve for a case of an orbital flight on the ISS trajectory. The radiobiological basis of the method consists of relationships between chromosomal aberration frequency in human blood lymphocytes and an absorbed dose of protons with four energies (50 MeV, 150 MeV, 400 MeV, 625 MeV) obtained in the accelerator's experiments. Due to the fact that we had experimental data only for protons the calibration curve was obtained for the proton component on the ISS orbit which is mainly formed by trapped protons. Dose spectrum for this energy distribution of protons was calculated and weighting coefficients for taking into account the input of dose of protons with various energies in forming total frequency of chromosomal aberrations were obtained on its basis. The procedure of obtaining such weighting

  3. Variability in the BETA Science Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Jamie; Johnston, Simon; Bannister, Keith

    2011-04-01

    We propose to observe the Fornax BETA test field over a period of 6 months to characterise the variability of sources in the field. The resultant outcomes will (a) provide unique science, (b) contribute vital information for BETA observations, including calibration and imaging and (c) help refine the VAST science case. We will use novel on-the-fly mapping and CABB's increased bandwidth to cover 30 square degrees to 0.1 mJy sensitivity. We expect to detect in excess of 100 variable sources, providing us with insight into the structure of both the interstellar and intergalactic mediums. We have the potential to detect true transients and characterise them over the electromagnetic spectrum via ToO follow-ups.

  4. Internet-Based Calibration of a Multifunction Calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-12-19

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multijunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  5. Internet-based calibration of a multifunction calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-04-17

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multifunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  6. Beta-Carotene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-carotene is a pigment that occurs naturally in many photosynthetic plants and organisms and one of the most abundant carotenoids found in human blood. The richest dietary sources of beta-carotene are yellow, orange, and leafy green fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, spinach, sweet potatoes...

  7. Beta blockers in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thadani, U

    1983-11-10

    Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are effective in the management of patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension. Noncardioselective agents, cardioselective agents and beta blockers with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) are equally effective, provided they are used in equipotent doses. Beta blockers can be used as first-line therapy in the management of hypertension and can be safely combined with diuretics, vasodilators, or both, for a better control of blood pressure. The exact mechanism by which beta blockers decrease blood pressure remains speculative, but they all reduce cardiac output during long-term therapy; drugs with ISA lower cardiac output and heart rate less than do drugs without ISA. Pharmacokinetic properties of beta blockers differ widely; drugs metabolized by the liver have shorter plasma half-lives than drugs primarily excreted by the kidneys. Although many of the side effects of various beta blockers are similar, differences in water and lipid solubility account for a higher incidence of central nervous system side effects with lipid-soluble drugs (such as propranolol and metoprolol) than with hydrophilic drugs (such as atenolol and timolol). The incidence of cold extremities has been reported to be less with drugs with ISA, and the incidence of bronchospasm less with cardioselective drugs. In the management of uncomplicated mild-to-moderate hypertension, all beta blockers are equally effective and produce less troublesome side effects than alternative antihypertensive agents. For effective therapy beta blockers can be used in 2 divided daily doses or even once daily.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Calibration system for radon EEC measurements.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Y A M; Vasyanovich, M; Zhukovsky, M; Zaitceva, N

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon equivalent equilibrium concentration (EECRn) is very simple and quick technique for the estimation of radon progeny level in dwellings or working places. The most typical methods of EECRn measurements are alpha radiometry or alpha spectrometry. In such technique, the influence of alpha particle absorption in filters and filter effectiveness should be taken into account. In the authors' work, it is demonstrated that more precise and less complicated calibration of EECRn-measuring equipment can be conducted by the use of the gamma spectrometer as a reference measuring device. It was demonstrated that for this calibration technique systematic error does not exceed 3 %. The random error of (214)Bi activity measurements is in the range 3-6 %. In general, both these errors can be decreased. The measurements of EECRn by gamma spectrometry and improved alpha radiometry are in good agreement, but the systematic shift between average values can be observed.

  9. Characterization of the Basalt of Broken Tank, NM for the 'in situ' Calibration Target for the Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Upcoming Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkemper, L.; King, P. L.; Gellert, R.; Spilde, M. N.; Chamberlin, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    The MSL rover mission will launch in Fall 2009. It is equipped with an APXS for analyzing the bulk chemistry of rocks and soils. To monitor the APXS performance in situ on the martian surface over the extended mission, a calibration target will be included on the MSL rover. Engineering constraints led to a 4.2 cm diameter, 3 mm thick, homogeneous rock disc that would survive vibrations during launch. The basalt from Broken Tank, NM was chosen for the flight disc from ~200 volcanic rocks. The basalt is relatively homogeneous, fine- and even-grained, vesicle-free, and extremely dense and hard due to its ophitic texture. Other volcanic rocks - even well characterized samples of BCR - were ruled out due to vesicles, or high contents of glass, phenocrysts, secondary minerals, or fractures. The flight disc was prepared by hand- polishing to a 0.05 micron finish. We obtained scanning electron microscope back-scattered electron maps and X-ray maps (Al, Mg, Ca, Fe, Ti, Na, and K) on the polished, uncoated surface of the target. One pit (~0.03 mm2) and three tiny surface imperfections (<0.04 mm2) were observed on the surface. Electron microprobe analyses on two C-coated thin sections give the following compositions: olivine cores Fa23Fo77 and rims Fa40Fo60; plagioclase cores Ab42An56Or2 and discrete rims Ab62An7Or31; oxides Ilm67Hm33 and also trace chromite, apatite, chlorite, clays and devitrified glass. The NIH software Scion Image was used to determine the modal abundance of each phase in the basalt disk and in two thin sections. Bulk composition was established with multiple XRF laboratory analyses. There is no significant heterogeneity on the scale of the APXS analysis (~1.5 cm). Sulfides were not observed and XRF verified low Ni (<90 ppm) and S (70 ppm), making these elements ideal to monitor any Martian dust build-up during the surface operation. The rock slab is glued into a Ni frame, mounted vertically and accessible with a brush tool. The K- and L- X-ray lines of

  10. Primary calibration in acoustics metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacelar Milhomem, T. A.; Defilippo Soares, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    SI unit in acoustics is realized by the reciprocity calibrations of laboratory standard microphones in pressure field, free field and diffuse field. Calibrations in pressure field and in free field are already consolidated and the Inmetro already done them. Calibration in diffuse field is not yet consolidated, however, some national metrology institutes, including Inmetro, are conducting researches on this subject. This paper presents the reciprocity calibration, the results of Inmetro in recent key comparisons and the research that is being developed for the implementation of reciprocity calibration in diffuse field.

  11. Calibration of triaxial fluxgate gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Vcelak, Jan

    2006-04-15

    The description of simple and fast calibration procedures used for double-probe triaxial fluxgate gradiometer is provided in this paper. The calibration procedure consists of three basic steps. In the first step both probes are calibrated independently in order to reach constant total field reading in every position. Both probes are numerically aligned in the second step in order that the gradient reading is zero in homogenous magnetic field. The third step consists of periodic drift calibration during measurement. The results and detailed description of each calibration step are presented and discussed in the paper. The gradiometer is finally verified during the detection of the metal object in the measuring grid.

  12. aCORN Beta Spectrometer and Electrostatic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Md; aCORN Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    aCORN uses a high efficiency backscatter suppressed beta spectrometer to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation in neutron beta decay. We measure the correlation by counting protons and beta electrons in coincidence with precisely determined electron energy. There are 19 photomultiplier tubes arranged in a hexagonal array coupled to a single phosphor doped polystyrene scintillator. The magnetic field is shaped so that electrons that backscatter without depositing their full energy strike a tulip-shaped array of scintillator paddles and these events are vetoed. The detailed construction, performance and calibration of this beta spectrometer will be presented. I will also present the simulation, construction, and features of our novel electrostatic mirror. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation and the NIST Center for Neutron Research.

  13. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The

  14. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire's theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer.

  15. Calibration and Use of the Canberra iSolo 300G

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T; Graham, C L; Sundsmo, T; Shingleton, K L

    2010-11-24

    This procedure provides instructions for the calibration and use of the Canberra iSolo Low Background Alpha/Beta Counting System (iSolo) that is used for counting air filters and swipe samples. This detector is capable of providing radioisotope identification (e.g., it can discriminate between radon daughters and plutonium). This procedure includes step-by-step instructions for: (1) Performing periodic or daily 'Background' and 'Efficiency QC' checks; (2) Setting-up the iSolo for counting swipes and air filters; (3) Counting swipes and air filters for alpha and beta activity; and (4) Annual calibration.

  16. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  17. Automatic force balance calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, Alice T. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within .+-.0.05%, the entire system has an accuracy of a .+-.0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  18. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  19. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  20. Experimental Calibration of VUV Ring Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek, J.; Kramer, S. L.

    1997-05-01

    The individual quadrupole gradients, undulator focusing, beam position monitor (BPM) gains, and orbit steering magnet calibrations in the NSLS VUV Ring were determined by analyzing the measured orbit response matrix with the computer code LOCO (J. Safranek, Beam-based Modeling and Control of Storage Rings, these proceedings.). The measured orbit response matrix is the change in orbit at the BPMs with changes in steering magnet excitation. The analysis showed beta function distortions of 25 and 35 percent horizontally and vertically. The design periodicity of the optics was restored by adjusting the quadrupole gradients to restore the periodicity of the response matrix. This lead to an increase of about 18 percent in the beam lifetime at 500 mA with a slight (3 and 7 percent) decrease in both the horizontal and vertical electron emittances as determined from the beam sizes measured using a synchrotron light monitor.

  1. Chromium-51 calibrating neutrino source

    SciTech Connect

    Demchenko, N.F.; Karasev, V.I.; Karelin, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    The problem for measurement of the sun neutrino flux is resolved at the specially made Baksansk neutrino telescope and calls for calibration of registration system. For this a man made neutrino source is required with the known yield of particles and intensity comparable with the intensity of the measured subject. The most suitable radionuclide for production of this source is chromium-51 the radionuclide decay of which is accompanied with neutrino radiation. At the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (in Dimitrovgrad) the production technology is developed as well as the closed chromium-51 neutrino source is made of 4 x 10{sup 5} Ci activity. The parts of active source made in the form of core of metallic isotope-enriched chromium were irradiated in the high flux neutron trap of the SM-2 reactor. The sources were subsequently assembled at the shield cells with remote equipment application. The source was certificated as a special form radioactive material. Due to low half-life of chromium-51 (T 1/2 - 27 hours) all the operations on assembly, certification and delivery of source to the Baksansk Laboratory were performed at the earliest possible date (less than 3 days).

  2. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  3. Uncertainty and Dimensional Calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Doiron, Ted; Stoup, John

    1997-01-01

    The calculation of uncertainty for a measurement is an effort to set reasonable bounds for the measurement result according to standardized rules. Since every measurement produces only an estimate of the answer, the primary requisite of an uncertainty statement is to inform the reader of how sure the writer is that the answer is in a certain range. This report explains how we have implemented these rules for dimensional calibrations of nine different types of gages: gage blocks, gage wires, ring gages, gage balls, roundness standards, optical flats indexing tables, angle blocks, and sieves. PMID:27805114

  4. Transient Calorimeter Calibration System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    can withstand the high heat flux levels encountered during calibration. 3 d. The verification of absorptivity of a colloidal graphite coat- ing used...CC4-)Ŕ ýz- ix w- Vj m ~ CL 4) > r- 4-) r-)W *. M 0 0 a 4) u.) . CJ C4) Lfl 𔃺 4%. C6 0) 0 ~ 4 -0 E 36 The colloidal graphite remains the most...before and after exposure. Such tests performed with the colloidal graphite coating yielded no apparent change in absorptivity up through 5 kW/cm2 . In

  5. White Dwarf Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colina, Luis

    1994-01-01

    As a result of last November calibration workshop, all parties agreed that the HST should be switched to the WD basis for absolute fluxes. This proposal implements that decision. A measurement of the absolute sensitivity of the FOS detectors will be performed using theoretical pure hydrogen model atmosphere calculations for three white dwarfs. The high resolution gratings will be used in the 1 arcsec aperture. A four stage peakup of the standard star provides centering in the aperture. Observations are requested for fall 94 with repeated observations about two months after.

  6. Uncertainty and Dimensional Calibrations.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Ted; Stoup, John

    1997-01-01

    The calculation of uncertainty for a measurement is an effort to set reasonable bounds for the measurement result according to standardized rules. Since every measurement produces only an estimate of the answer, the primary requisite of an uncertainty statement is to inform the reader of how sure the writer is that the answer is in a certain range. This report explains how we have implemented these rules for dimensional calibrations of nine different types of gages: gage blocks, gage wires, ring gages, gage balls, roundness standards, optical flats indexing tables, angle blocks, and sieves.

  7. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  8. Dynamic Torque Calibration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agronin, Michael L.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed dynamic torque calibration unit (DTCU) measures torque in rotary actuator components such as motors, bearings, gear trains, and flex couplings. Unique because designed specifically for testing components under low rates. Measures torque in device under test during controlled steady rotation or oscillation. Rotor oriented vertically, supported by upper angular-contact bearing and lower radial-contact bearing that floats axially to prevent thermal expansion from loading bearings. High-load capacity air bearing available to replace ball bearings when higher load capacity or reduction in rate noise required.

  9. Calibration of the ISEE plasma composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugher, C. R.; Olsen, R. C.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Plasma Composition experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite was designed to measure ions from 1 to 16 amu, at energies from near zero to 16 keV. The two nearly identical flight instruments were calibrated by means of preflight laboratory tests and in-flight data comparisons. This document presents most of the details of those efforts, with special emphasis on the low energy (0 to 100 eV) portion of the instrument response. The analysis of the instrument includes a ray-tracing calculation, which follows an ensemble of test particles through the detector.

  10. Imaging plates calibration to X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, A.; Andreoli, P.; Cipriani, M.; Claps, G.; Consoli, F.; Cristofari, G.; De Angelis, R.; Giulietti, D.; Ingenito, F.; Pacella, D.

    2016-05-01

    The growing interest for the Imaging Plates, due to their high sensitivity range and versatility, has induced, in the last years, to detailed characterizations of their response function in different energy ranges and kind of radiation/particles. A calibration of the Imaging Plates BAS-MS, BAS-SR, BAS-TR has been performed at the ENEA-Frascati labs by exploiting the X-ray fluorescence of different targets (Ca, Cu, Pb, Mo, I, Ta) and the radioactivity of a BaCs source, in order to cover the X-ray range between few keV to 80 keV.

  11. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  12. Quadrature phase interferometer used to calibrate dial indicator calibrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shau-Chi; Liou, Huay-Chung; Peng, Gwo-Sheng; Lu, Ming-Feng

    2001-10-01

    To calibrate dial indicators, gage blocks or dial indicator calibrators are usually used. For better accuracy and resolution, interferometers are used to calibrate dial indicator calibrators. Systematic errors of laser interferometers can be classified into three categories of intrinsic errors, environment errors and installation errors. Intrinsic errors include laser wavelength error, electronic error and optics nonlinearity. In order to achieve nanometer accuracy, minimizing intrinsic error is crucial. In this paper, we will address the problems of minimizing the optics nonlinearity error and describe the discrete-time signal processing method to minimize the electronic error, nonlinearity error and drift by simply using quadrature phase interferometer for nanometer accuracy and linearity.

  13. PBX: the Princeton beta experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bol, K.; Chance, M.; Dewar, R.

    1983-09-01

    A rearrangement of the divertor coils in PDX will enable a test in 1984 of the MHD stability properties of deeply indented bean-shaped plasmas. The goal is a beta of 10%. Indentation is expected to counter the deterioration of MHD stability against pressure driven modes that is occasioned by the larger aspect ratios typical of anticipated reactor oriented devices. Indeed, as shown by M. Chance et al., indentation may offer direct access to the second region of stability for ballooning modes, and numerical analyses with PEST show the internal kink to be stabilized completely with even relatively modest indentation. The internal kink is implicated in the loss of beam ions in PDX. In this report the theoretical basis for the forthcoming experiment, and the design considerations underlying the modification from PDX to PBX, are described in detail. Additional theoretical material, including an analysis of particle orbits in an indented tokamak plasma, is appended.

  14. DREAM: Research to Operations Beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, Reiner; Reeves, Geoffrey; Zaharia, Sorin; Koller, Josef; Chen, Yue; Henderson, Mike; Thomsen, Davis

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a dataassimilative model of the Earth's radiation belts that has, until recently, been used primarily as a re-search tool to understand radiation belt dynamics and to develop Kalman filter techniques for application to magnetospheric modeling. More recently, the emphasis of the DREAM program has shifted toward implementation of an operational prototype for testing and validation at the Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL) Space Weather Forecast Laboratory (SWFL) and NASA's Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC). The transition has required significant effort, funding, and shifting of priorities that serve as a recent example of the oppor-tunities and challenges of transitioning a model from research to operations (R2O). DREAM is still in the early stages of transition to operations but we do not see any significant obstacles to success. We present here the BETA version of this model, operating in real-time, using GOES energetic particle data as input.

  15. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, S.D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

  16. Beta-carotene

    MedlinePlus

    ... cigarettes per day), former smokers, people exposed to asbestos, and those who use alcohol (one or more ... beta-carotene supplements if you smoke. History of asbestos exposure: In people who have been exposed to ...

  17. Beta experiment flight report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A focused laser Doppler velocimeter system was developed for the measurement of atmospheric backscatter (beta) from aerosols at infrared wavelengths. The system was flight tested at several different locations and the results of these tests are summarized.

  18. NASA Metrology and Calibration, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The proceedings of the fourth annual NASA Metrology and Calibration Workshop are presented. This workshop covered (1) review and assessment of NASA metrology and calibration activities by NASA Headquarters, (2) results of audits by the Office of Inspector General, (3) review of a proposed NASA Equipment Management System, (4) current and planned field center activities, (5) National Bureau of Standards (NBS) calibration services for NASA, (6) review of NBS's Precision Measurement and Test Equipment Project activities, (7) NASA instrument loan pool operations at two centers, (8) mobile cart calibration systems at two centers, (9) calibration intervals and decals, (10) NASA Calibration Capabilities Catalog, and (11) development of plans and objectives for FY 1981. Several papers in this proceedings are slide presentations only.

  19. APMP supplementary comparison report of absorbed dose rate in tissue for beta radiation (BIPM KCDB: APMP.RI(I)-S2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, M.; Kurosawa, T.; Saito, N.; Kadni, T. B.; Kim, I. J.; Kim, B. C.; Yi, C.-Y.; Pungkun, V.; Chu, C.-H.

    2017-01-01

    The supplementary comparison of absorbed dose rate in tissue for beta radiation (APMP.RI(I)-S2) was performed with five national metrology institutes in 2013 and 2014. Two commercial thin window ionization chambers were used as transfer instruments and circulated among the participants. Two of the NMIs measured the calibration coefficients of the chambers in reference fields produced from Pm-147, Kr-85 and Sr-90/Y-90, while the other three measured those only in Sr-90/Y-90 beta-particle field. The degree of equivalence for the participants was determined and this comparison verifies the calibration capabilities of the participating laboratories. In addition, most of the results of this comparison are consistent with another international comparison (EUROMET.RI(I)-S2) reported before this work. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Genetics Home Reference: beta-ureidopropionase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down N-carbamyl-beta-alanine to beta-alanine, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. Both beta-aminoisobutyric acid and ... beta-ureidopropionase deficiency Merck Manual Professional Version: Pyrimidine Metabolism Disorders Orphanet: Beta-ureidopropionase deficiency Patient Support and ...

  1. Internal Water Vapor Photoacoustic Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor absorption is ubiquitous in the infrared wavelength range where photoacoustic trace gas detectors operate. This technique allows for discontinuous wavelength tuning by temperature-jumping a laser diode from one range to another within a time span suitable for photoacoustic calibration. The use of an internal calibration eliminates the need for external calibrated reference gases. Commercial applications include an improvement of photoacoustic spectrometers in all fields of use.

  2. The beta cell immunopeptidome.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Nadine L; Purcell, Anthony W

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from the autoimmune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells, leading to beta cell loss and insulin deficiency. Presentation of peptides derived from beta cell proteins to autoreactive lymphocytes is critical for the development of disease, and the list of antigens recognized is increasing. A number of these proteins are found within the beta cell secretory granules, which are transiently exposed to the immune system during normal cellular function. How the interplay of environmental and genetic determinants culminates in destructive autoimmunity remains to be clearly defined. Nonconventional presentation of peptide ligands, posttranslational modification of peptides, and the role of the gut microbiome in the development of the immune system are all considered central topics in disease pathogenesis. Each of these may provide a mechanism by which presentation of antigenic peptides in the target tissue differs from presentation in the thymus, allowing autoreactive cells to escape tolerance induction. The high metabolic demand on pancreatic islets, the high concentration of granule proteins, and the susceptibility of islets to cellular stress may all contribute to the presentation of abnormal ligands in the pancreas. Moreover, the finding that small molecules can alter the repertoire of peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex molecules provides a tantalizing hypothesis for the presentation of autoantigenic peptides in the presence of microbial or endogenous metabolites. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the immunopeptidome of beta cells and the key factors that may influence presentation of beta cell antigens to the immune system.

  3. Beta cell dynamics: beta cell replenishment, beta cell compensation and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2013-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes, characterized by persistent hyperglycemia, arises mostly from beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance and remains a highly complex metabolic disease due to various stages in its pathogenesis. Glucose homeostasis is primarily regulated by insulin secretion from the beta cells in response to prevailing glycemia. Beta cell populations are dynamic as they respond to fluctuating insulin demand. Beta cell replenishment and death primarily regulate beta cell populations. Beta cells, pancreatic cells, and extra-pancreatic cells represent the three tiers for replenishing beta cells. In rodents, beta cell self-replenishment appears to be the dominant source for new beta cells supported by pancreatic cells (non-beta islet cells, acinar cells, and duct cells) and extra-pancreatic cells (liver, neural, and stem/progenitor cells). In humans, beta cell neogenesis from non-beta cells appears to be the dominant source of beta cell replenishment as limited beta cell self-replenishment occurs particularly in adulthood. Metabolic states of increased insulin demand trigger increased insulin synthesis and secretion from beta cells. Beta cells, therefore, adapt to support their physiology. Maintaining physiological beta cell populations is a strategy for targeting metabolic states of persistently increased insulin demand as in diabetes.

  4. Calibration Technique for Polarization-Sensitive Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hung, W. H.; Winker, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive lidars have proven to be highly effective in discriminating between spherical and non-spherical particles in the atmosphere. These lidars use a linearly polarized laser and are equipped with a receiver that can separately measure the components of the return signal polarized parallel and perpendicular to the outgoing beam. In this work we describe a technique for calibrating polarization-sensitive lidars that was originally developed at NASA s Langley Research Center (LaRC) and has been used continually over the past fifteen years. The procedure uses a rotatable half-wave plate inserted into the optical path of the lidar receiver to introduce controlled amounts of polarization cross-talk into a sequence of atmospheric backscatter measurements. Solving the resulting system of nonlinear equations generates the system calibration constants (gain ratio, G, and offset angle, theta) required for deriving calibrated measurements of depolarization ratio from the lidar signals. In addition, this procedure also determines the mean depolarization ratio within the region of the atmosphere that is analyzed. Simulations and error propagation studies show the method to be both reliable and well behaved. Operational details of the technique are illustrated using measurements obtained as part of Langley Research Center s participation in the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE).

  5. Neural networks for calibration tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    Artificial neural networks are suitable for performing pattern-to-pattern calibrations. These calibrations are potentially useful for facilities operations in aeronautics, the control of optical alignment, and the like. Computed tomography is compared with neural net calibration tomography for estimating density from its x-ray transform. X-ray transforms are measured, for example, in diffuse-illumination, holographic interferometry of fluids. Computed tomography and neural net calibration tomography are shown to have comparable performance for a 10 degree viewing cone and 29 interferograms within that cone. The system of tomography discussed is proposed as a relevant test of neural networks and other parallel processors intended for using flow visualization data.

  6. Radiance calibration of spherical integrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, James T.; Guenther, Bruce W.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for improving the knowledge of the radiance of large area spherical and hemispherical integrating energy sources have been investigated. Such sources are used to calibrate numerous aircraft and spacecraft remote sensing instruments. Comparisons are made between using a standard source based calibration method and a quantum efficient detector (QED) based calibration method. The uncertainty involved in transferring the calibrated values of the point source standard lamp to the extended source is estimated to be 5 to 10 percent. The use of the QED allows an improvement in the uncertainty to 1 to 2 percent for the measurement of absolute radiance from a spherical integrator source.

  7. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  8. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  9. Inspection system calibration methods

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2004-12-28

    An inspection system calibration method includes producing two sideband signals of a first wavefront; interfering the two sideband signals in a photorefractive material, producing an output signal therefrom having a frequency and a magnitude; and producing a phase modulated operational signal having a frequency different from the output signal frequency, a magnitude, and a phase modulation amplitude. The method includes determining a ratio of the operational signal magnitude to the output signal magnitude, determining a ratio of a 1st order Bessel function of the operational signal phase modulation amplitude to a 0th order Bessel function of the operational signal phase modulation amplitude, and comparing the magnitude ratio to the Bessel function ratio.

  10. Quality Management and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkus, Henk G.

    Good specification of a product’s performance requires adequate characterization of relevant properties. Particulate products are usually characterized by some PSD, shape or porosity parameter(s). For proper characterization, adequate sampling, dispersion, and measurement procedures should be available or developed and skilful personnel should use appropriate, well-calibrated/qualified equipment. The characterization should be executed, in agreement with customers, in a wellorganized laboratory. All related aspects should be laid down in a quality handbook. The laboratory should provide proof for its capability to perform the characterization of stated products and/or reference materials within stated confidence limits. This can be done either by internal validation and audits or by external GLP accreditation.

  11. Tracking system analytic calibration activities for the Mariner Mars 1971 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madrid, G. A.; Chao, C. C.; Fliegel, H. F.; Leavitt, R. K.; Mottinger, N. A.; Winn, F. B.; Wimberly, R. N.; Yip, K. B.; Zielenbach, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Data covering various planning aspects of Mariner Mars 1971 mission are summarized. Data cover calibrating procedures for tracking stations, radio signal propagation in the troposphere, effects of charged particles on radio transmission, orbit calculation, and data smoothing.

  12. TOD to TTP calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Piet; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Vos, Wouter K.; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Fanning, Jonathan D.

    2011-05-01

    The TTP (Targeting Task Performance) metric, developed at NVESD, is the current standard US Army model to predict EO/IR Target Acquisition performance. This model however does not have a corresponding lab or field test to empirically assess the performance of a camera system. The TOD (Triangle Orientation Discrimination) method, developed at TNO in The Netherlands, provides such a measurement. In this study, we make a direct comparison between TOD performance for a range of sensors and the extensive historical US observer performance database built to develop and calibrate the TTP metric. The US perception data were collected doing an identification task by military personnel on a standard 12 target, 12 aspect tactical vehicle image set that was processed through simulated sensors for which the most fundamental sensor parameters such as blur, sampling, spatial and temporal noise were varied. In the present study, we measured TOD sensor performance using exactly the same sensors processing a set of TOD triangle test patterns. The study shows that good overall agreement is obtained when the ratio between target characteristic size and TOD test pattern size at threshold equals 6.3. Note that this number is purely based on empirical data without any intermediate modeling. The calibration of the TOD to the TTP is highly beneficial to the sensor modeling and testing community for a variety of reasons. These include: i) a connection between requirement specification and acceptance testing, and ii) a very efficient method to quickly validate or extend the TTP range prediction model to new systems and tasks.

  13. Proposed experimental test of Bell's inequality in nuclear beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Skalsey, M.

    1986-04-15

    A ..beta.. decay experiment is proposed for testing Bell's inequality, related to hidden-variables alternatives to quantum mechanics. The experiment uses Mott scattering for spin polarization analysis of internal conversion electrons. Beta-decay electrons, in cascade with the conversion electrons, are longitudinally polarized due to parity violation in the weak interaction. So simply detecting the ..beta.. electron direction effectively measures the spin. A two-particle spin-spin correlation can thus be investigated and related, within certain assumptions, to Bell's inequality. The example of /sup 203/Hg decay is used for a calculation of expected results. Specific problems related to nuclear structure and experimental inconsistencies are also discussed.

  14. The Mars Science Laboratory APXS calibration target: Comparison of Martian measurements with the terrestrial calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; King, P. L.; Burkemper, L.; Berger, J. A.; Gellert, R.; Boyd, N. I.; Perrett, G. M.; Pradler, I.; Thompson, L.; Edgett, K. S.; Yingst, R. A.

    2014-03-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover carries a basalt calibration target for monitoring the performance of the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The spectrum acquired on Sol 34 shows increased contributions from Mg, S, Cl and Fe relative to laboratory spectra recorded before launch. Mars Hand Lens Imager images confirm changes in the appearance of the surface. Spectra taken on Sols 179 and 411 indicate some loss of the deposited material. The observations suggest deposition of a surface film likely consisting of dust mobilized by impingement of the sky crane's terminal descent engine plumes with surface fines during Curiosity's landing. New APXS software has been used to model the thin film that coated the calibration target on landing. The results suggest that a film of about 100 nm thickness, and containing predominantly MgO, Fe2O3, SO3, Cl and Na2O could give rise to the observed spectral changes. If this film is also present on the alpha particle sources within the APXS, then its effect is negligible and the terrestrial calibration remains appropriate.

  15. A new polarimetric active radar calibrator and calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaojian

    2015-10-01

    Polarimetric active radar calibrator (PARC) is one of the most important calibrators with high radar cross section (RCS) for polarimetry measurement. In this paper, a new double-antenna polarimetric active radar calibrator (DPARC) is proposed, which consists of two rotatable antennas with wideband electromagnetic polarization filters (EMPF) to achieve lower cross-polarization for transmission and reception. With two antennas which are rotatable around the radar line of sight (LOS), the DPARC provides a variety of standard polarimetric scattering matrices (PSM) through the rotation combination of receiving and transmitting polarization, which are useful for polarimatric calibration in different applications. In addition, a technique based on Fourier analysis is proposed for calibration processing. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed DPARC and processing technique.

  16. Studies of total bremsstrahlung in thick targets of Al, Ti, Sn and Pb for 90Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Total bremsstrahlung (BS) spectra in thick targets of Al, Ti, Sn and Pb produced by beta emitter 90Sr (End point energy=546 keV) are studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured BS spectra are compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [Fmod BH] theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the Avdonina and Pratt [Fmod BH+PB] theory, which include the contribution of polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into OB. The present results are indicating the correctness of Fmod BH+PB theory in the low energy region, where PB dominates into the BS, but at the middle and higher photon energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, the Fmod BH theory is more close to the experimental results. The description of the bremsstrahlung process in stripped atom (SA) approximation, which indicates the suppression of the bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends due to the production of PB in the low energy region, needs further considerations. Hence, the present measurements for BS for different target materials indicates that the considerations of the screening effects along with other secondary effects during the interaction of incident electrons with the target nuclei are important while describing the production of bremsstrahlung, particularly for the higher energy regions.

  17. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink and fishbone modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; White, R.B. )

    1994-10-01

    The effects of alpha particles on the internal kink and fishbone modes are studied analytically. The nonadiabatic contribution from untrapped alpha particles is negligible. Finite inverse aspect ratio, plasma [beta], and plasma shaping effects can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in the pitch angle space and reduce the bounce-averaged magnetic drift frequency. The decrease of the drift magnitude and drift reversal effects on the ideal kink mode is small, but the [beta][sub [alpha

  18. BXS Re-calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    Early in the commissioning it was noticed by Cecile Limborg that the calibration of the BXS spectrometer magnet seemed to be different from the strength of the BX01/BX02 magnets. First the BX01/BX02 currents were adjusted to 135 MeV and the beam energy was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit flat. Then BX01/BX02 magnets were switched off and BXS was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit in the spectrometer line flat, without changing the energy of the beam. The result was that about 140-141 MeV were required on the BXS magnet. This measurement was repeated several times by others with the same results. It was not clear what was causing the error: magnet strength or layout. A position error of about 19 mm of the BXS magnet could explain the difference. Because there was a significant misalignment of the vacuum chamber in the BXS line, the alignment of the whole spectrometer line was checked. The vacuum chamber was corrected, but the magnets were found to be in the proper alignment. So we were left with one (or conceivably two) magnet calibration errors. Because BXS is a wedged shaped magnet, the bend angle depends on the horizontal position of the incoming beam. As mentioned, an offset of the beam position of 19 mm would increase or decrease the bend angle roughly by the ratio of 135/141. The figure of 19 mm is special and caused a considerable confusion during the design and measurement of the BXS magnet. This is best illustrated in Figure 1 which was taken out of the BXS Traveler document. The distance between the horizontal midplanes of the poles and the apex of the beam path was chosen to be 19 mm so the beam is close to the good field region throughout its entire path. Thus it seemed possible that there was an error that resulted in the beam not being on this trajectory, or conversely, that the magnetic measurements were done on the wrong trajectory and the magnet was then mis-calibrated. Mechanical measurements of the vacuum chamber made in the tunnel

  19. CALIBRATION OF THERMOLUMINESCENCE AND FILM DOSEMETERS FOR SKIN DOSES FROM HIGH-ACTIVITY MICROPARTICLES.

    PubMed

    Eakins, J S; Hager, L G; Tanner, R J

    2016-09-01

    The use of EXT-RAD™ extremity TLDs and radiochromic film to measure doses from primarily beta-emitting microparticles is discussed. Specific calibration techniques have been developed, using both Monte Carlo modelling and experiments. Results for a (90)Sr/(90)Y microparticle are presented to illustrate the general techniques and to demonstrate reasonable agreement between the dosimetry methods.

  20. Calibration of the ARID robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L

    1992-01-01

    The author has formulated a new, general model for specifying the kinematic properties of serial manipulators. The new model kinematic parameters do not suffer discontinuities when nominally parallel adjacent axes deviate from exact parallelism. From this new theory the author develops a first-order, lumped-parameter, calibration-model for the ARID manipulator. Next, the author develops a calibration methodology for the ARID based on visual and acoustic sensing. A sensor platform, consisting of a camera and four sonars attached to the ARID end frame, performs calibration measurements. A calibration measurement consists of processing one visual frame of an accurately placed calibration image and recording four acoustic range measurements. A minimum of two measurement protocols determine the kinematics calibration-model of the ARID for a particular region: assuming the joint displacements are accurately measured, the calibration surface is planar, and the kinematic parameters do not vary rapidly in the region. No theoretical or practical limitations appear to contra-indicate the feasibility of the calibration method developed here.

  1. Side looking radar calibration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Calibration of an airborne sidelooking radar is accomplished by the use of a model that relates the radar parameters to the physical mapping situation. Topics discussed include: characteristics of the transmitters; the antennas; target absorption and reradiation; the receiver and map making or radar data processing; and the calibration process.

  2. Calibration of Discrete Element Heat Transfer Parameters by Central Composite Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zongquan; Cui, Jinsheng; Hou, Xuyan; Jiang, Shengyuan

    2017-03-01

    The efficiency and precision of parameter calibration in discrete element method (DEM) are not satisfactory, and parameter calibration for granular heat transfer is rarely involved. Accordingly, parameter calibration for granular heat transfer with the DEM is studied. The heat transfer in granular assemblies is simulated with DEM, and the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of these granular assemblies is measured with the transient method in simulations. The measurement testbed is designed to test the ETC of the granular assemblies under normal pressure and a vacuum based on the steady method. Central composite design (CCD) is used to simulate the impact of the DEM parameters on the ETC of granular assemblies, and the heat transfer parameters are calibrated and compared with experimental data. The results show that, within the scope of the considered parameters, the ETC of the granular assemblies increases with an increasing particle thermal conductivity and decreases with an increasing particle shear modulus and particle diameter. The particle thermal conductivity has the greatest impact on the ETC of granular assemblies followed by the particle shear modulus and then the particle diameter. The calibration results show good agreement with the experimental results. The error is less than 4%, which is within a reasonable range for the scope of the CCD parameters. The proposed research provides high efficiency and high accuracy parameter calibration for granular heat transfer in DEM.

  3. Boosted Beta Regression

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Matthias; Wickler, Florian; Maloney, Kelly O.; Mitchell, Richard; Fenske, Nora; Mayr, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1). Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures. PMID:23626706

  4. New Technique for Barium Daughter Ion Identification in a Liquid Xe-136 Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank, William

    2016-06-08

    This work addresses long-standing issues of fundamental interest in elementary particle physics. The most important outcome of this work is a new limit on neutrinoless double beta decay. This is an extremely rare and long-sought-after type of radioactive decay. If discovered, it would require changes in the standard model of the elementary constituents of matter, and would prove that neutrinos and antineutrinos are the same, a revolutionary concept in particle physics. Neutrinos are major components of the matter in the universe that are so small and so weakly interacting with other matter that their masses have not yet been discovered. A discovery of neutrinoless double beta decay could help determine the neutrino masses. An important outcome of the work on this project was the Colorado State University role in operating the EXO-200 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and in analysis of the data from this experiment. One type of double beta decay of the isotope 136Xe, the two-neutrino variety, was discovered in this work. Although the other type of double beta decay, the neutrinoless variety, was not yet discovered in this work, a world’s best sensitivity of 1.9x1025 year half-life was obtained. This result rules out a previous claim of a positive result in a different isotope. This work also establishes that the masses of the neutrinos are less than one millionth of that of electrons. A unique EXO-200 analysis, in which the CSU group had a leading role, has established for the first time ever in a liquid noble gas the fraction of daughter atoms from alpha and beta decay that are ionized. This result has important impact on other pending studies, including nucleon decay and barium tagging. Novel additional discoveries include multiphoton ionization of liquid xenon with UV pulsed lasers, which may find application in calibration of future noble liquid detectors, and studies of association and dissociation reactions of Ba

  5. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, V.L.; Carstensen, H.K.

    1959-11-24

    An improved time calibrated sweep circuit is presented, which extends the range of usefulness of conventional oscilloscopes as utilized for time calibrated display applications in accordance with U. S. Patent No. 2,832,002. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a pair of separate signal paths, each of which is phase and amplitude adjustable, to connect a high-frequency calibration oscillator to the output of a sawtooth generator also connected to the respective horizontal deflection plates of an oscilloscope cathode ray tube. The amplitude and phase of the calibration oscillator signals in the two signal paths are adjusted to balance out feedthrough currents capacitively coupled at high frequencies of the calibration oscillator from each horizontal deflection plate to the vertical plates of the cathode ray tube.

  6. Calibration of platinum resistance thermometers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, D. H.; Terbeek, H. G.; Malone, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results of five years experience in calibrating about 1000 commercial platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) are reported. These PRT were relatively small and rugged, with ice-point resistances from 200 to 5000 ohms. Calibrations normalized in terms of resistance-difference ratios (Cragoe Z function) were found to be remarkably uniform for five of six different types of PRT tested, and to agree very closely with normalized calibrations of the primary reference standard type PRT. The Z function normalization cancels residual resistances which are not temperature dependent and simplifies interpolation between calibration points when the quality of a given type of PRT has been established in terms of uniform values of the Z function. Measurements at five or six well spaced base-point temperatures with Z interpolation will suffice to calibrate a PRT accurately from 4 to 900 K.

  7. The Advanced LIGO photon calibrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, S.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Kandhasamy, S.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, T. D.; Anders, E. H.; Berliner, J.; Betzwieser, J.; Cahillane, C.; Canete, L.; Conley, C.; Daveloza, H. P.; De Lillo, N.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Izumi, K.; Kissel, J. S.; Mendell, G.; Quetschke, V.; Rodruck, M.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Schwinberg, P. B.; Sottile, A.; Wade, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; West, M.; Savage, R. L.

    2016-11-01

    The two interferometers of the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) recently detected gravitational waves from the mergers of binary black hole systems. Accurate calibration of the output of these detectors was crucial for the observation of these events and the extraction of parameters of the sources. The principal tools used to calibrate the responses of the second-generation (Advanced) LIGO detectors to gravitational waves are systems based on radiation pressure and referred to as photon calibrators. These systems, which were completely redesigned for Advanced LIGO, include several significant upgrades that enable them to meet the calibration requirements of second-generation gravitational wave detectors in the new era of gravitational-wave astronomy. We report on the design, implementation, and operation of these Advanced LIGO photon calibrators that are currently providing fiducial displacements on the order of 1 0-18m /√{Hz } with accuracy and precision of better than 1%.

  8. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  9. Factors affecting quality for beta dose rate measurements using ISO 6980 series I reference sources

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.E. Jr.; O`Brien, J.M. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Atlan-Tech, Inc. has performed several calibrations of ISO 6980 Series 1 reference beta sources over the past two to three years. There were many problems encountered in attempting to compare the results of these calibrations with those from other laboratories, indicating the need for more standardization in the methodology employed for the measurement of the absorbed dose rate from ISO 6980 Series 1 reference beta sources. This document describes some of the problems encountered in attempting to intercompare results of beta dose-rate measurements. It proposes some solutions in an attempt to open a dialogue among facilities using reference beta standards for the purpose of promoting better measurement quality assurance through data intercomparison.

  10. A calibrated Franklin chimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonta, Igor; Williams, Earle

    1994-05-01

    Benjamin Franklin devised a simple yet intriguing device to measure electrification in the atmosphere during conditions of foul weather. He constructed a system of bells, one of which was attached to a conductor that was suspended vertically above his house. The device is illustrated in a well-known painting of Franklin (Cohen, 1985). The elevated conductor acquired a potential due to the electric field in the atmosphere and caused a brass ball to oscillate between two bells. The purpose of this study is to extend Franklin's idea by constructing a set of 'chimes' which will operate both in fair and in foul weather conditions. In addition, a mathematical relationship will be established between the frequency of oscillation of a metallic sphere in a simplified geometry and the potential on one plate due to the electrification of the atmosphere. Thus it will be possible to calibrate the 'Franklin Chimes' and to obtain a nearly instantaneous measurement of the potential of the elevated conductor in both fair and foul weather conditions.

  11. Diode calibration manual

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, J.L.

    1989-09-01

    This procedure is not for the faint of heart. It is a time consuming, complex series of journeys through advanced GAMANAL and the vagueness of analyzer electronics. A knowledge of TRIX AC, DLTV, and IMP on the Octopus system and DSCOPE, PE2, and Symphony on a PC class machine is required. Be aware that the example in this document is a condensation of information that takes up four feet of shelf space. In the attempt to convert the nomenclature of the 7600 version of GAMANAL to that of the CRAY version, there will be confusion with some of the terms used. The 7600 versions relied on punched cards to a great extent where the CRAY version doesn't use them at all. In order not to introduce a new set of nomenclature, I have changed the reference from card to card image. I hope that this will cause the least impact on the vernacular and cause the least amount of confusion possible. This document is a rewritten update of an unpublished document by Bob Wikkerink in 1980. His document was the only written record of the procedures needed to calibrate the Environmental Sciences Low Level Counting Facility. This document updates and expands this information.

  12. PROSPECT: Optical Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Ken; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Precision Reactor Oscillation and SPECTrum Experiment (PROSPECT), is a short baseline, reactor neutrino experiment which focuses on measurements of the flux and energy spectrum of antineutrinos emitted from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Using these measurements, PROSPECT will probe for eV-scale sterile neutrinos while making a high precision measurement of the U-235 antineutrino spectrum. PROSPECT contains two phases; the first phase consists of a mobile detector near the reactor core while the second phase adds a larger fixed detector further from the core. The PROSPECT Phase 1 detector consists of a 2ton optically segmented liquid scintillator with each segment read-out by two photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs are calibrated with a photon source generated by a nanosecond pulsed laser. In this project, we developed a plan to determine the effectiveness of a 450nm fiber-pigtailed diode laser as it coupled with several modules including an optical fiber splitter, an optical diffuser, and an attenuator. The project tested for the system ability to deliver light uniformly to each of the cells in the detector. We will present the design and result of this project as well as discuss how it will be implemented in PROSPECT.

  13. Final Report for DUSEL R&D: BetaCage: A Screener of Ultra-Low-Level Radioactive Surface Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Golwala, Sunil R.

    2013-12-20

    The eventual full-size, radiopure BetaCage will be a low-background, atmospheric-pressure neon drift chamber with unprecedented sensitivity to emitters of low-energy electrons and alpha particles. We expect that the prototype BetaCage already developed will be an excellent screener of alpha particles. Both the prototype and final BetaCage will provide new infrastructure for rare-event science.

  14. Condensation Particle Counter Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Model 3772 CPC is a compact, rugged, and full-featured instrument that detects airborne particles down to 10 nm in diameter, at an aerosol flow rate of 1.0 lpm, over a concentration range from 0 to 1x104 #/cc. This CPC is ideally suited for applications without high concentration measurements, such as basic aerosol research, filter and air-cleaner testing, particle counter calibrations, environmental monitoring, mobile aerosol studies, particle shedding and component testing, and atmospheric and climate studies.

  15. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma

  16. Calibration of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter with LHC collision data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obertino, M. M.; CMS Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The CMS ECAL is a high resolution electromagnetic calorimeter which relies upon precision calibration in order to achieve and maintain its design performance. Variations in light collected from the lead tungstate crystals, due to intrinsic differences in crystals/photodetectors, as well as variations with time due to radiation damage for example, need to be taken into account. Sophisticated and effective methods of inter-crystal and absolute calibration have been devised, using collision data from the 2011 LHC run and a dedicated light injection system. For inter-calibration, low mass particle (π0 and η) decays to two photons are exploited, as well as the azimuthal symmetry of the average energy deposition at a given pseudorapidity. The light injection system monitors the channel response in real-time and enables the re-calibration of the measured energies over time. This is cross-checked by the comparison of E/p measurements of electrons from W decays (where the momentum is measured in the CMS tracker) with/without these re-calibrations applied. Absolute calibration has been performed using Z decays into electron-positron pairs.

  17. IO SUBSYSTEM 1 BETA

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, Greg

    2002-08-21

    "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" uses standard object-oriented principles to minimize dependencies between the underlying input or output database format and the client code (i.e., Sierra) using the io subsystem. The interface and priciples are simolar to the Facade pattern described in the "Design Patterns" book by Gamma, et.al. The software uses data authentication algorithms to ensure data input/output is consistent with model being defined. "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" is a database independent input/output library for finite element analysis, preprocessing, post processing, and translation programs.

  18. Ostwald ripening of beta-carotene nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Kathan, Kendra; Saad, Walid; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2007-01-19

    Ostwald ripening, the interfacial-energy-driven dissolution and reprecipitation of solutes, becomes an increasingly significant problem for nanoparticle formulations. We present the first quantitative study of Ostwald ripening for nanoparticle dispersions. The Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) theory of particle growth driven by diffusion is applied to study beta-carotene nanoparticles with sizes of O(100 nm) formed by our block-copolymer protected Flash Nanoprecipitation process. A numerical implementation of the LSW theory that accounts for the original particle size distribution is presented. The predicted particle sizes from the numerical simulation are compared with the experimental results measured by dynamical light scattering. The results show quantitative agreement with no adjustable parameters. The addition of antisolvent results in the reduction of the ripening rate by dramatically decreasing bulk solubility.

  19. Calibration of optical traps by dual trapping of one bead.

    PubMed

    Dutov, Pavel; Schieber, Jay

    2013-11-15

    We introduce a method for optical trap calibration that is suitable for viscoelastic material. The method is designed for use on experimental setups with two optical tweezers and is based on pulling a trapped particle with one trap while holding it with the other. No piezo stage is needed, and only one optical trap must be movable with galvo mirrors, piezo mirrors, or acousto-optical deflectors. The method combines advantages of commonly known PSD-fitting and fast-sweeping methods, allowing calibration of a completely fixed trap in a fluid of unknown viscosity/viscoelasticity. A detailed method description, a theoretical derivation, and an experimental comparison to other methods are reported.

  20. The Flux Calibration of Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Gaia mission is described, along with its scientific potential and its updated science perfomances. Although it is often described as a self-calibrated mission, Gaia still needs to tie part of its measurements to external scales (or to convert them in physical units). A detailed decription of the Gaia spectro-photometric standard stars survey is provided, along with a short description of the Gaia calibration model. The model requires a grid of approximately 200 stars, calibrated to a few percent with respect to Vega, and covering different spectral types.

  1. Design, fabrication, and testing of the CUORE detector calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dally, Adam

    2013-04-01

    CUORE, the Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events, is a neutrinoless double beta decay experiment with an active mass of 206 kg of ^130Te. The detector consists of 988 TeO2 bolometers operating at 10 mK. The signature of 0νββ decay is an excess of events at the Q-value of 2528 keV. Understanding the energy response is critical for event identification, but this presents many challenges. The detector requires ultra-low background radiation, vacuum compatible materials, and cryogenic temperatures. Individual energy calibration of the bolometers is achieved by placing radioactive sources between detectors inside the cryostat. A source deployment and thermalization system that meets the background and thermal requirements of the CUORE experiment has been developed. This talk will discuss the design, fabrication, and testing of the CUORE detector calibration system.

  2. Improving the energy calibration of CUORE-0 and CUORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, Jeremy S.; Cuore Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale cryogenic experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta (0 νββ) decay of 130Te. The experiment consists of 988 ultracold TeO2 bolometric crystals arranged into 19 towers, which act as both the 0 νββ decay sources and detectors. CUORE-0, an experiment using a single CUORE-like tower, completed physics data-taking in 2015 and set a new limit on the 0 νββ decay half-life of 130Te. CUORE installation is scheduled to be completed this year with commissioning and data taking to begin soon thereafter. I will discuss the analysis and results from CUORE-0, focusing on energy calibration, and the analysis techniques and calibration hardware that will allow us to improve our understanding of the detector energy scale in CUORE.

  3. beta-Propiolactone

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    beta - Propiolactone ; CASRN 57 - 57 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  4. beta-Chloronaphthalene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    beta - Chloronaphthalene ; CASRN 91 - 58 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  5. Trichoderma .beta.-glucosidase

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-01-03

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  6. A Laser Sheet Self-Calibration Method for Scanning PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutsen, Anna N.; Dawson, James R.; Lawson, John M.; Worth, Nicholas A.

    2016-11-01

    A laser sheet self-calibration method for scanning PIV has been developed to replace the current laser sheet calibration, which is complex, time consuming and very sensitive to misalignment of the optics or cameras during experiments. The new calibration method is simpler, faster and crucially more robust. The concept behind the method is to traverse a laser sheet through the measurement volume, take a series of images from two different views, and calculate the global 3D particle locations. This information is used to find the real space coordinates of the measurement volume and the orientation and width of the laser sheets. The spatial location of the particles is found by object matching and triangulation. The light intensity in the laser sheet has an approximately Gaussian shape, and the illumination of one particle which will be illuminated multiple times during the scan will thus vary as the sheet is scanned across the measurement volume. The thickness of the laser sheet is calculated by identifying the variation of illumination of the particles during a scan and fitting this to a Gaussian shaped curve, while the orientation is found using a least square fit. The accuracy of the new method will be presented with respect to both synthetic and experimental data.

  7. The detector calibration system for the CUORE cryogenic bolometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, Jeremy S.; Dally, Adam; Davis, Christopher J.; Ejzak, Larissa; Lenz, Daniel; Lim, Kyungeun E.; Heeger, Karsten M.; Maruyama, Reina H.; Nucciotti, Angelo; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Wise, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale cryogenic experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te and other rare events. The CUORE detector consists of 988 TeO2 bolometers operated underground at 10 mK in a dilution refrigerator at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Candidate events are identified through a precise measurement of their energy. The absolute energy response of the detectors is established by the regular calibration of each individual bolometer using gamma sources. The close-packed configuration of the CUORE bolometer array combined with the extensive shielding surrounding the detectors requires the placement of calibration sources within the array itself. The CUORE Detector Calibration System is designed to insert radioactive sources into and remove them from the cryostat while respecting the stringent heat load, radiopurity, and operational requirements of the experiment. This paper describes the design, commissioning, and performance of this novel source calibration deployment system for ultra-low-temperature environments.

  8. Particle dispersing system and method for testing semiconductor manufacturing equipment

    DOEpatents

    Chandrachood, Madhavi; Ghanayem, Steve G.; Cantwell, Nancy; Rader, Daniel J.; Geller, Anthony S.

    1998-01-01

    The system and method prepare a gas stream comprising particles at a known concentration using a particle disperser for moving particles from a reservoir of particles into a stream of flowing carrier gas. The electrostatic charges on the particles entrained in the carrier gas are then neutralized or otherwise altered, and the resulting particle-laden gas stream is then diluted to provide an acceptable particle concentration. The diluted gas stream is then split into a calibration stream and the desired output stream. The particles in the calibration stream are detected to provide an indication of the actual size distribution and concentration of particles in the output stream that is supplied to a process chamber being analyzed. Particles flowing out of the process chamber within a vacuum pumping system are detected, and the output particle size distribution and concentration are compared with the particle size distribution and concentration of the calibration stream in order to determine the particle transport characteristics of a process chamber, or to determine the number of particles lodged in the process chamber as a function of manufacturing process parameters such as pressure, flowrate, temperature, process chamber geometry, particle size, particle charge, and gas composition.

  9. The Auroral Particles experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An instrument for the detection of particles in the energy range of 0.1 ev to 80 Kev was designed, built, tested, calibrated, and flown onboard the spacecraft ATS-6. Data from this instrument generated the following research: intensive studies of the plasma in the vicinity of the spacecraft; global variations of plasmas; correlative studies using either other spacecraft or ground based measurements; and studies of spacecraft interactions with ambient plasmas including charging, local electric fields due to differential charging, and active control of spacecraft potential. Results from this research are presented.

  10. Measuring the skin dose protection afforded by protective apparel with a beta spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, D.E.; Rich, B.L.; Johnson, L.O. )

    1986-10-01

    This paper reports that the protective apparel worn by radiation workers to avoid skin contamination also provides measurable protection against external beta sources. The beta contribution to the skin dose rate depends on the residual energy spectrum of the beta particles after they have penetrated the protective apparel. The shift in the beta energy spectra and consequent reduction in the shallow dose rates afforded by various items of protective apparel were investigated for a few laboratory beta sources using a beta spectrometer that is capable of dose calculations. The results presented here indicate that significant dose rates to the skin can occur despite the presence of protective apparel if high energy beta emitting isotopes are present.

  11. Fixture For Calibrating Pressure Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Vasquez, Peter; Horsley, Lewis A.; Bowman, John T.; Zumbrun, Henry N.; Eves, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Fixture in form of specially designed clamshell housing enables in situ calibration of pressure transducer mounted in body of pressure probe in wind tunnel. Includes two metal half shells machined with necks and matching cavities, when put together, define larger neck and cavity accommodating probe. Probe secured to bottom half shell by use of clamp before installing top half shell: necessary to follow sequence to protect probe during assembly. Clamshell calibration fixture attached to pressure probe in few minutes, making it possible to calibrate pressure transducer at convenient times. Calibrations performed before and after wind-tunnel runs each day, between runs in event of delays or suspected malfunctions, and essentially any other time, without having to remove probe from wind tunnel.

  12. Calibration method for the reference parameter in Fernald and Klett inversion combining Raman and Elastic return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongzhu; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, He; Guo, Pan; Chen, Hao

    2017-02-01

    A calibration method is proposed to invert the extinction coefficient for Fernald and Klett inversion by using the particle backscattering coefficient inversed with Raman and Elastic return signals. The calibration method is analyzed theoretically and experimentally, the inversion accuracy can be improved by removing the dependence on reference altitudes and intervals in conventional calibration methods, which resulted from the introduction of backscattering coefficient with relatively higher accuracy obtained by Raman-Mie inversion method. The standard deviation of this new calibration method can be reduced by about 20×, compared to that of the conventional calibration methods of Fernald and Klett inversion. And, the more stable effective inversed range with this new calibration method can be obtained by removing the dimple phenomenon in clouds position.

  13. 40 CFR 1065.310 - Torque calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... range. Oscillate or rotate the dynamometer during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis... during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis. In this case, the reference torque...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.310 - Torque calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... range. Oscillate or rotate the dynamometer during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis... during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis. In this case, the reference torque...

  15. Rotary mode system initial instrument calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, B.R.

    1994-10-01

    The attached report contains the vendor calibration procedures used for the initial instrument calibration of the rotary core sampling equipment. The procedures are from approved vendor information files.

  16. Bayesian Calibration of Microsimulation Models.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Carolyn M; Miglioretti, Diana L; Savarino, James E

    2009-12-01

    Microsimulation models that describe disease processes synthesize information from multiple sources and can be used to estimate the effects of screening and treatment on cancer incidence and mortality at a population level. These models are characterized by simulation of individual event histories for an idealized population of interest. Microsimulation models are complex and invariably include parameters that are not well informed by existing data. Therefore, a key component of model development is the choice of parameter values. Microsimulation model parameter values are selected to reproduce expected or known results though the process of model calibration. Calibration may be done by perturbing model parameters one at a time or by using a search algorithm. As an alternative, we propose a Bayesian method to calibrate microsimulation models that uses Markov chain Monte Carlo. We show that this approach converges to the target distribution and use a simulation study to demonstrate its finite-sample performance. Although computationally intensive, this approach has several advantages over previously proposed methods, including the use of statistical criteria to select parameter values, simultaneous calibration of multiple parameters to multiple data sources, incorporation of information via prior distributions, description of parameter identifiability, and the ability to obtain interval estimates of model parameters. We develop a microsimulation model for colorectal cancer and use our proposed method to calibrate model parameters. The microsimulation model provides a good fit to the calibration data. We find evidence that some parameters are identified primarily through prior distributions. Our results underscore the need to incorporate multiple sources of variability (i.e., due to calibration data, unknown parameters, and estimated parameters and predicted values) when calibrating and applying microsimulation models.

  17. Practical Study of Psychrometer Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentved, Anders Bonde; Heinonen, Martti; Hudoklin, Domen

    2012-09-01

    Psychrometers remain the most widely used instruments for controlling the humidity in climatic test chambers, yet the calibration of these instruments is particularly challenging. Psychrometer calibrations require careful consideration of influence variables such as the fitting and cleanliness of the wick, the effect of the calibration chamber on the air flow past the sensors, on radiation incident on the sensors, and on the dissipation heat from the built-in fan (if included). In addition, uncertainty requirements for calibration of such psychrometers are typically around 1 %rh to 2 %rh, i.e., close to the best calibration and measurement uncertainties (CMCs) claimed by national metrology institutes (NMIs). As well as their role in supporting CMCs, inter-comparisons provide a good test-ground to ensure all influence variables are controlled or otherwise accounted for in the uncertainty budget. This paper presents the results of a comparison of psychrometer calibrations performed by the NMIs in Denmark, Slovenia, and Finland. The comparison was carried out under EURAMET Project No. 1033 with the aim to investigate the equivalence of psychrometer calibrations performed at the highest level and to gather practical experience to be used in similar comparisons in the future. An aspirated electro-psychrometer was used for the comparison, and calibrations were carried out in the range from 15 %rh to 93 %rh in a temperature range from 15 °C to 70 °C. While the results show good agreement at high relative humidity, significant differences at low relative humidity are reported. It is suggested that the differences are caused by a combination of psychrometer wick contamination and a difference in the wick-wetting methods used by the participant laboratories.

  18. Infrasound Sensor Calibration and Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    functions with faster rise times. SUMMARY We have documented past work on the determination of the calibration constant of the LANL infrasound sensor...Monitoring Technologies 735 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated...National Laboratory ( LANL ) has operated an infrasound sensor calibration chamber that operates over a frequency range of 0.02 to 4 Hz. This chamber has

  19. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans [Reno, NV; Chakrabarty, Rajan K [Reno, NV; Arnott, W Patrick [Reno, NV

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  20. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  1. Double Beta Decay in Gauge Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, J. D.

    2002-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a very important process both from the particle and nuclear physics point of view. From the elementary particle point of view it pops up in almost every model, giving rise among others to the following mechanisms: a) The traditional contributions like the light neutrino mass mechanism as well as the jL - jR leptonic interference (λ and η terms). b) The exotic R-parity violating supersymmetric (SUSY) contributions. From the nuclear physics point of view it is challenging, because: 1) The nuclei, which can undergo double beta decay, have complicated nuclear structure. 2) The energetically allowed transitions are suppressed (exhaust a small part of all the strength). 3) Since in some mechanisms the intermediate particles are very heavy one must cope with the short distance behavior of the transition operators. 4) The intermediate momenta involved are quite high and one has to consider momentum dependent terms of the nucleon current. Taking the above effects into account from the experimental limits on the interesting nuclei A = 76, 82, 96, 100, 116, 128, 130, 136 and 150, we have extracted new limits on the various lepton violating parameters. In particular we get a stringent limit on the R-parity violating parameter λ '111 < 4.0 × 10-4.

  2. Beta-delayed proton emission from 20Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, M. V.; Andreyev, A.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cederkäll, J.; De Witte, H.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Greenlees, P. T.; Harkness-Brennan, L. J.; Howard, A. M.; Huyse, M.; Jonson, B.; Judson, D. S.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Konki, J.; Kurcewicz, J.; Lazarus, I.; Lica, R.; Lindberg, S.; Madurga, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Marroquin, I.; Mihai, C.; Munch, M.; Nacher, E.; Negret, A.; Nilsson, T.; Page, R. D.; Pascu, S.; Perea, A.; Pucknell, V.; Rahkila, P.; Rapisarda, E.; Riisager, K.; Rotaru, F.; Sotty, C.; Stanoiu, M.; Tengblad, O.; Turturica, A.; Van Duppen, P.; Vedia, V.; Wadsworth, R.; Warr, N.

    2016-10-01

    Beta-delayed proton emission from 20 Mg has been measured at ISOLDE, CERN, with the ISOLDE Decay Station (IDS) setup including both charged-particle and gamma-ray detection capabilities. A total of 27 delayed proton branches were measured including seven so far unobserved. An updated decay scheme, including three new resonances above the proton separation energy in 20 Na and more precise resonance energies, is presented. Beta-decay feeding to two resonances above the Isobaric Analogue State (IAS) in 20 Na is observed. This may allow studies of the 4032.9(2.4)keV resonance in 19 Ne through the beta decay of 20 Mg, which is important for the astrophysically relevant reaction 15O( α, γ)19Ne . Beta-delayed protons were used to obtain a more precise value for the half-life of 20 Mg, 91.4(1.0)ms.

  3. Complementarity of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Lykken, Joseph

    2014-03-20

    Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments constrain one combination of neutrino parameters, while cosmic surveys constrain another. This complementarity opens up an exciting range of possibilities. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, and the neutrino masses follow an inverted hierarchy, then the upcoming sets of both experiments will detect signals. The combined constraints will pin down not only the neutrino masses but also constrain one of the Majorana phases. If the hierarchy is normal, then a beta decay detection with the upcoming generation of experiments is unlikely, but cosmic surveys could constrain the sum of the masses to be relatively heavy, thereby producing a lower bound for the neutrinoless double beta decay rate, and therefore an argument for a next generation beta decay experiment. In this case as well, a combination of the phases will be constrained.

  4. Nuclear Recoil Calibration of DarkSide-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edkins, Erin; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    DarkSide-50 dark matter experiment is a liquid argon time projection chamber (TPC) surrounded by a liquid scintillator active neutron veto, designed for the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The success of such an experiment is dependent upon a detailed understanding of both the expected signal and backgrounds, achieved using radioactive calibration sources of known energies. Nuclear recoils provide a measurement of both the expected signal and the most dangerous background, as nuclear recoils from neutrons cannot be distinguished from a dark matter signal on an event-by-event basis in the TPC. In this talk, I will present the DS-50 calibration system, and analysis of the results of the calibration of DarkSide-50 to nuclear recoils using radioactive neutron sources. See also the DS-50 presentations by X. Xiang and G. Koh.

  5. Blackbody comparator for thermocouple calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ojanen, M.; Hahtela, O. M.; Heinonen, M.

    2013-09-11

    MIKES is developing a measurement set-up for calibrating thermocouples in the temperature range 960 °C - 1500 °C. The calibration method is based on direct comparison of thermocouples and radiation thermometers. We have designed a graphite blackbody comparator cell, which is operated in a horizontal single-zone tube furnace. The cell includes two blackbody cavities for radiation temperature measurements. The cavities have openings on opposite sides of the cell, allowing simultaneous measurement with two radiation thermometers. The design of the comparator allows three thermocouples to be calibrated simultaneously. The thermocouples to be calibrated are inserted in thermometer wells around one of the measurement cavities. We characterize the blackbody comparator in terms of repeatability, temperature distribution and emissivity. Finally, we validate the uncertainty analysis by comparing calibration results obtained for type B and S thermocouples to the calibration results reported by Technical Research Institute of Sweden (SP), and MIKES. The agreement in the temperature range 1000 °C - 1500 °C is within 0.90 °C, the average deviation being 0.17 °C.

  6. Nuclear-structure aspects of double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Suhonen, Jouni

    2010-11-24

    Neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay of nuclei is a process that requires the neutrino to be a massive Majorana particle and thus cannot proceed in the standard model of electro-weak interactions. Recent results of the neutrino-oscillation experiments have produced accurate information on the mixing of neutrinos and their squared mass differences. The 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay takes place in atomic nuclei where it can be observed, at least in principle, by underground neutrino experiments. The need of nuclei in observation of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay bears two facets: The nucleus serves as laboratory for detection but at the same time its complicated many-nucleon structure interferes strongly with the analysis of the experimental data. The information about the weak-interaction observables, like the neutrino mass, has to be filtered from the data through the nuclear matrix elements (NMEs). Hence, exact knowledge about the NMEs is of paramount importance in the analysis of the data provided by the expensive and time-consuming underground experiments.

  7. Microphysics of a multidimensional high beta low Mach number shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukiyo, S.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2014-12-01

    It is generally thought that a high beta shock is weak so that its structre is relatively laminar and stationary. Such low Mach number shocks have not been paid much attention in terms of particle acceleration. However, Voyager spacecraft revealed that the fluxes of not only the non-thermal ions, which are called as the termination shock particles, but also of the non-thermal electrons are enhanced at the crossings of the termination shock. The heliospheric termination shock has a high effective beta due to the presence of pickup ions which are the component having rather high thermal energy. Radio synchrotron emissions from relics of galaxy cluster mergers imply the presence of relativistic electrons accelerated in merger shocks. A plasma beta of such a merger shock is also thought to be rather high so that the merger shocks are usually assumed to have low Mach numbers. These observational facts imply that even a low Mach number shock can be a good accelerator of non-thermal particles. Here, we perform two-dimensional full particle-in-cell simulation to study microstructure of a high beta low Mach number shock and the associated electron acceleration process. Although the effective magnotosonic Mach number is rather low, ~2.6, the structure of the transition region is highly complex. Ion and electron scale structures coexist. Furthermore, some electrons are accelerated to high energy. We will discuss the mechanisms of producing those two-dimensional microstructures and high energy electrons.

  8. Beta-rolls, beta-helices, and other beta-solenoid proteins.

    PubMed

    Kajava, Andrey V; Steven, Alasdair C

    2006-01-01

    Beta-rolls and beta-helices belong to a larger group of topologically similar proteins with solenoid folds: because their regular secondary structure elements are exclusively beta-strands, they are referred to as beta-solenoids. The number of beta-solenoids whose structures are known is now large enough to support a systematic analysis. Here we survey the distinguishing structural features of beta-solenoids, also documenting their notable diversity. Appraisal of these structures suggests a classification based on handedness, twist, oligomerization state, and coil shape. In addition, beta-solenoids are distinguished by the number of chains that wind around a common axis: the majority are single-stranded but there is a recently discovered subset of triple-stranded beta-solenoids. This survey has revealed some relationships of the amino acid sequences of beta-solenoids with their structures and functions-in particular, the repetitive character of the coil sequences and conformations that recur in tracts of tandem repeats. We have proposed the term beta-arc for the distinctive turns found in beta-solenoids and beta-arch for the corresponding strand-turn-strand motifs. The evolutionary mechanisms underlying these proteins are also discussed. This analysis has direct implications for sequence-based detection, structural prediction, and de novo design of other beta-solenoid proteins. The abundance of virulence factors, toxins and allergens among beta-solenoids, as well as commonalities of beta-solenoids with amyloid fibrils, imply that this class of folds may have a broader role in human diseases than was previously recognized. Thus, identification of genes with putative beta-solenoid domains promises to be a fertile direction in the search for viable targets in the development of new antibiotics and vaccines.

  9. CALET On-orbit Calibration and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaike, Yosui; Calet Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in August 2015, and has been accumulating high-statistics data to perform high-precision measurements of cosmic ray electrons, nuclei and gamma-rays. CALET has an imaging and a fully active calorimeter, with a total thickness of 30 radiation lengths and 1.3 proton interaction lengths, that allow measurements well into the TeV energy region with excellent energy resolution, 2% for electrons above 100 GeV, and powerful particle identification. CALET's performance has been confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations and beam tests. In order to maximize the detector performance and keep the high resolution for long observation on the ISS, it is required to perform the precise calibration of each detector component. We have therefore evaluated the detector response and monitored it by using penetrating cosmic ray events such as protons and helium nuclei. In this paper, we will present the on-orbit calibration and detector performance of CALET on the ISS. This research was supported by JSPS postdoctral fellowships for research abroad.

  10. Low energy stable plasma calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Frederick-Frost, K M; Lynch, K A

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a low energy plasma calibration facility for testing and calibration of rocket-borne charged-particle detectors and for the investigation of plasma sheath formation in an environment with ionospheric plasma energies, densities, and Debye lengths. We describe the vacuum system and associated plasma source, which was modified from a Naval Research Laboratory design [Bowles et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 455 (1996)]. Mechanical and electrical modifications to this cylindrical microwave resonant source are outlined together with a different method of operating the magnetron that achieves a stable discharge. This facility produces unmagnetized plasmas with densities from 1x10(3)/cm(3) to 6x10(5)/cm(3), electron temperatures from 0.1 to 1.7 eV, and plasma potentials from 0.5 to 8 V depending on varying input microwave power and neutral gas flow. For the range of input microwave power explored (350-600 W), the energy density of the plasma remains constant because of an inverse relationship between density and temperature. This relationship allows a wide range of Debye lengths (0.3-8.4 cm) to be investigated, which is ideal for simulating the ionospheric plasma sheaths we explore.

  11. Calibration curves for some standard Gap Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, A.L.; Sommer, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    The relative shock sensitivities of explosive compositions are commonly assessed using a family of experiments that can be described by the generic term ''Gap Test.'' Gap tests include a donor charge, a test sample, and a spacer, or gap, between two explosives charges. The donor charge, gap material, and test dimensions are held constant within each different version of the gap test. The thickness of the gap is then varied to find the value at which 50% of the test samples will detonate. The gap tests measure the ease with a high-order detonation can be established in the test explosive, or the ''detonability,'' of the explosive. Test results are best reported in terms of the gap thickness at the 50% point. It is also useful to define the shock pressure transmitted into the test sample at the detonation threshold. This requires calibrating the gap test in terms of shock pressure in the gap as a function of the gap thickness. It also requires a knowledge of the shock Hugoniot of the sample explosive. We used the 2DE reactive hydrodynamic code with Forest Fire burn rates for the donor explosives to calculate calibration curves for several gap tests. The model calculations give pressure and particle velocity on the centerline of the experimental set-up and provide information about the curvature and pulse width of the shock wave. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Simultaneous calibration of optical tweezers spring constant and position detector response.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Antoine; Perronet, Karen; Dulin, David; Villing, André; Bouyer, Philippe; Visscher, Koen; Westbrook, Nathalie

    2010-12-06

    We demonstrate a fast and direct calibration method for systems using a single laser for optical tweezers and particle position detection. The method takes direct advantage of back-focal-plane interferometry measuring not an absolute but a differential position, i.e. the position of the trapped particle relative to the center of the optical tweezers. Therefore, a fast step-wise motion of the optical tweezers yields the impulse response of the trapped particle. Calibration parameters such as the detector's spatial and temporal response and the spring constant of the optical tweezers then follow readily from fitting the measured impulse response.

  13. Pharmacogenetics of beta-blockers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaekyu; Johnson, Julie A

    2007-06-01

    Beta-blockers are an important cardiovascular drug class, recommended as first-line treatment of numerous diseases such as heart failure, hypertension, and angina, as well as treatment after myocardial infarction. However, responses to a beta-blocker are variable among patients. Results of numerous studies now suggest that genetic polymorphisms may contribute to variability in responses to beta-blockers. This review summarizes the pharmacogenetic data for beta-blockers in patients with various diseases and discusses the potential implications of beta-blocker pharmacogenetics in clinical practice.

  14. Providing radiometric traceability for the calibration home base of DLR by PTB

    SciTech Connect

    Taubert, D. R.; Hollandt, J.; Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Hoepe, A.; Hauer, K.-O.; Gege, P.; Schwarzmaier, T.; Lenhard, K.; Baumgartner, A.

    2013-05-10

    A dedicated calibration technique was applied for the calibration of the spectral radiance transfer standard (RASTA) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), consisting of two independent but complementing calibration procedures to provide redundancy and smallest possible calibration uncertainties. Procedure I included two calibration steps: In a first step the optical radiation source of RASTA, an FEL lamp, was calibrated in terms of its spectral irradiance E{sub {lambda}}({lambda}) in the wavelength range from 350 nm to 2400 nm using the PTB Spectral Irradiance Calibration Equipment (SPICE), while in a second step the spectral radiance factor {beta}{sub 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign }({lambda}) of the RASTA reflection standard was calibrated in a 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign -viewing geometry in the wavelength range from 350 nm to 1700 nm at the robot-based gonioreflectometer facility of PTB. The achieved relative standard uncertainties (k= 1) range from 0.6 % to 3.2 % and 0.1 % to 0.6 % respectively. Procedure II was completely independent from procedure I and allowed to cover the entire spectral range of RASTA from 350 nm to 2500 nm. In the second procedure, the 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign -viewing geometry spectral radiance L{sub {lambda},0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign }({lambda}) of RASTA was directly calibrated at the Spectral Radiance Comparator Facility (SRCF) of PTB. The relative uncertainties for this calibration procedure range from 0.8 % in the visible up to 7.5 % at 2500 nm (k= 1). In the overlapping spectral range of both calibration procedures the calculated spectral radiance L{sub {lambda},0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign ,calc}({lambda}) from procedure I is in good agreement with the direct measurement of procedure II, i.e. well within the combined expanded uncertainties (k= 2) of both procedures.

  15. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Chen, James M.; Yang, Ralph T.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  16. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-02-28

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  17. Investigation of horizon Beta.

    PubMed

    Windisch, C C; Leyden, R J; Worzel, J L; Saito, T; Ewing, J

    1968-12-27

    Horizon beta is a subbottom reflector in the North Atlantic deep ocean sediments that extends over a large portion of the North America basin. Cores from an outcrop of beta contained shallow-water Aptian-Albian sediments and deep-water Cenomanian sediments. A core near an outcrop of a deeper horizon, horizon B, contained shallow-water Lower Cretaceous (Barremian-Hauterivian) sediments. These cores can be interpreted to support extensive subsidence of the eastern portion of the basin in early Cretaceous time. It is equally likely that the shallow-water deposits are a result of sediments slumping into an already deep basin. A reconciliation of these interpretations depends upon the JOIDES project.

  18. Beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Galanello, Renzo; Origa, Raffaella

    2010-05-21

    Beta-thalassemias are a group of hereditary blood disorders characterized by anomalies in the synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin resulting in variable phenotypes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. The total annual incidence of symptomatic individuals is estimated at 1 in 100,000 throughout the world and 1 in 10,000 people in the European Union. Three main forms have been described: thalassemia major, thalassemia intermedia and thalassemia minor. Individuals with thalassemia major usually present within the first two years of life with severe anemia, requiring regular red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Findings in untreated or poorly transfused individuals with thalassemia major, as seen in some developing countries, are growth retardation, pallor, jaundice, poor musculature, hepatosplenomegaly, leg ulcers, development of masses from extramedullary hematopoiesis, and skeletal changes that result from expansion of the bone marrow. Regular transfusion therapy leads to iron overload-related complications including endocrine complication (growth retardation, failure of sexual maturation, diabetes mellitus, and insufficiency of the parathyroid, thyroid, pituitary, and less commonly, adrenal glands), dilated myocardiopathy, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis). Patients with thalassemia intermedia present later in life with moderate anemia and do not require regular transfusions. Main clinical features in these patients are hypertrophy of erythroid marrow with medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis and its complications (osteoporosis, masses of erythropoietic tissue that primarily affect the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, chest and spine, and bone deformities and typical facial changes), gallstones, painful leg ulcers and increased predisposition to thrombosis. Thalassemia minor is clinically asymptomatic but some subjects may have moderate anemia. Beta-thalassemias are caused by point mutations or, more rarely, deletions in the beta

  19. Beta-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Beta-thalassemias are a group of hereditary blood disorders characterized by anomalies in the synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin resulting in variable phenotypes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. The total annual incidence of symptomatic individuals is estimated at 1 in 100,000 throughout the world and 1 in 10,000 people in the European Union. Three main forms have been described: thalassemia major, thalassemia intermedia and thalassemia minor. Individuals with thalassemia major usually present within the first two years of life with severe anemia, requiring regular red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Findings in untreated or poorly transfused individuals with thalassemia major, as seen in some developing countries, are growth retardation, pallor, jaundice, poor musculature, hepatosplenomegaly, leg ulcers, development of masses from extramedullary hematopoiesis, and skeletal changes that result from expansion of the bone marrow. Regular transfusion therapy leads to iron overload-related complications including endocrine complication (growth retardation, failure of sexual maturation, diabetes mellitus, and insufficiency of the parathyroid, thyroid, pituitary, and less commonly, adrenal glands), dilated myocardiopathy, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis). Patients with thalassemia intermedia present later in life with moderate anemia and do not require regular transfusions. Main clinical features in these patients are hypertrophy of erythroid marrow with medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis and its complications (osteoporosis, masses of erythropoietic tissue that primarily affect the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, chest and spine, and bone deformities and typical facial changes), gallstones, painful leg ulcers and increased predisposition to thrombosis. Thalassemia minor is clinically asymptomatic but some subjects may have moderate anemia. Beta-thalassemias are caused by point mutations or, more rarely, deletions in the beta

  20. Geometric calibration of the SND detector electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, A. A.; Melnikova, N. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation and validation of the software alignment procedure used to perform geometric calibration of the electromagnetic calorimeter with respect to the tracking system of the SND detector which is taking data at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider (BINP, Novosibirsk). This procedure is based on the mathematical model describing the relative calorimeter position. The parameter values are determined by minimizing a χ2 function using the difference between particle directions reconstructed in these two subdetectors for e+e- →e+e- scattering events. The results of the calibration applied to data and MC simulation fit the model well and give an improvement in particle reconstruction. They are used in data reconstruction and MC simulation.

  1. Calibration issues for neutron diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, G.J.; Adams, J.M.; Barnes, C.W.

    1997-12-01

    The performance of diagnostic systems are limited by their weakest constituents, including their calibration issues. Neutron diagnostics are notorious for problems encountered while determining their absolute calibrations, due mainly to the nature of the neutron transport problem. In order to facilitate the determination of an accurate and precise calibration, the diagnostic design should be such as to minimize the scattered neutron flux. ITER will use a comprehensive set of neutron diagnostics--comprising radial and vertical neutron cameras, neutron spectrometers, a neutron activation system and internal and external fission chambers--to provide accurate measurements of fusion power and power densities as a function of time. The calibration of such an important diagnostic system merits careful consideration. Some thoughts have already been given to this subject during the conceptual design phase in relation to the time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron yield monitors. However, no overall calibration strategy has been worked out so far. This paper represents a first attempt to address this vital issue. Experience gained from present large tokamaks (JET, TFTR and JT60U) and proposals for ITER are reviewed. The need to use a 14-MeV neutron generator as opposed to radioactive sources for in-situ calibration of D-T diagnostics will be stressed. It is clear that the overall absolute determination of fusion power will have to rely on a combination of nuclear measuring techniques, for which the provision of accurate and independent calibrations will constitute an ongoing process as ITER moves from one phase of operation to the next.

  2. Regeneration of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hee-Sook

    2008-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus results from inadequate mass of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by absolute loss of beta cells due to autoimmune-mediated destruction. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by relative deficiency of beta cells due to lack of compensation for insulin resistance. Restoration of deficient beta cell mass by transplantation from exogenous sources or by endogenous regeneration of insulin-producing cells would be therapeutic options. Mature beta cells have an ability to proliferate; however, it has been shown to be difficult to expand adult beta cells in vitro. Alternatively, regeneration of beta cells from embryonic and adult stem cells and pancreatic progenitor cells is an attractive method to restore islet cell mass. With information obtained from the biology of pancreatic development, direct differentiation of stem and progenitor cells toward a pancreatic beta cell phenotype has been tried using various strategies, including forced expression of beta cell-specific transcription factors. Further research is required to understand how endogenous beta cells differentiate and to develop methods to regenerate beta cells for clinically applicable therapies for diabetes.

  3. Thermophilic Beta-Glycosidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grogan, Dennis W.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes identification of thermophilic Beta-glycosidase enzyme from isolate of Sulfolobus solfataricus, sulfur-metabolizing archaebacteria growing aerobically and heterotrophically to relatively high cell yields. Enzyme useful in enzymatic conversion of cellulose to D-glucose and important in recycling of biomass. Used for removal of lactose from milk products. Offers promise as model substance for elucidation of basic principles of structural stabilization of proteins.

  4. Calibration of the NASA Glenn Research Center 16 in. Mass-Flow Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Friedlander, David J.; Saunders, J. David; Frate, Franco C.; Foster, Lancert E.

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental calibration of the NASA Glenn Research Center 16 in. Mass-Flow Plug (MFP) are presented and compared to a previously obtained calibration of a 15 in. Mass-Flow Plug. An ASME low-beta, long-radius nozzle was used as the calibration reference. The discharge coefficient for the ASME nozzle was obtained by numerically simulating the flow through the nozzle from the WIND-US code. The results showed agreement between the 15 and 16 in. MFPs for area ratios (MFP to pipe area ratio) greater than 0.6 but deviate at area ratios below this value for reasons that are not fully understood. A general uncertainty analysis was also performed and indicates that large uncertainties in the calibration are present for low MFP area ratios.

  5. Calibration of the NASA GRC 16 In. Mass-Flow Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Friedlander, David J.; Saunders, J. David; Frate, Franco C.; Foster, Lancert E.

    2012-01-01

    The results of an experimental calibration of the NASA Glenn Research Center 16 in. Mass-Flow Plug (MFP) are presented and compared to a previously obtained calibration of a 15 in. Mass-Flow Plug. An ASME low-beta, long-radius nozzle was used as the calibration reference. The discharge coefficient for the ASME nozzle was obtained by numerically simulating the flow through the nozzle from the WIND-US code. The results showed agreement between the 15 in. and 16 in. MFPs for area ratios (MFP to pipe area ratio) greater than 0.6 but deviate at area ratios below this value for reasons that are not fully understood. A general uncertainty analysis was also performed and indicates that large uncertainties in the calibration are present for low MFP area ratios.

  6. Waveguide Calibrator for Multi-Element Probe Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    A calibrator, referred to as the spider design, can be used to calibrate probes incorporating multiple acoustic sensing elements. The application is an acoustic energy density probe, although the calibrator can be used for other types of acoustic probes. The calibrator relies on the use of acoustic waveguide technology to produce the same acoustic field at each of the sensing elements. As a result, the sensing elements can be separated from each other, but still calibrated through use of the acoustic waveguides. Standard calibration techniques involve placement of an individual microphone into a small cavity with a known, uniform pressure to perform the calibration. If a cavity is manufactured with sufficient size to insert the energy density probe, it has been found that a uniform pressure field can only be created at very low frequencies, due to the size of the probe. The size of the energy density probe prevents one from having the same pressure at each microphone in a cavity, due to the wave effects. The "spider" design probe is effective in calibrating multiple microphones separated from each other. The spider design ensures that the same wave effects exist for each microphone, each with an indivdual sound path. The calibrator s speaker is mounted at one end of a 14-cm-long and 4.1-cm diameter small plane-wave tube. This length was chosen so that the first evanescent cross mode of the plane-wave tube would be attenuated by about 90 dB, thus leaving just the plane wave at the termination plane of the tube. The tube terminates with a small, acrylic plate with five holes placed symmetrically about the axis of the speaker. Four ports are included for the four microphones on the probe. The fifth port is included for the pre-calibrated reference microphone. The ports in the acrylic plate are in turn connected to the probe sensing elements via flexible PVC tubes. These five tubes are the same length, so the acoustic wave effects are the same in each tube. The

  7. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  8. Calibration apparatus for precise barometers and vacuum gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, S. Y.; Choi, I. M.; Lee, Y. J.; Hong, S. S.; Chung, K. H.

    2004-07-01

    In order to calibrate highly accurate absolute pressure gauges, such as barometers and vacuum gauges, laser, or ultrasonic mercury manometers have been used. However, the complexity and cost of manometers have greatly reduced the use of this method in most calibration laboratories. As a substitute, a gas-operated pressure balance is used to calibrate precise gauges. In such cases, many commercially available pressure balances are unsuitable because the necessary exposure of the piston, cylinder, and masses to the atmosphere causes contamination problems and allows dust particles into the gap between the piston and cylinder. In this article, a weight-loading device is described that allows masses to be changed in situ without breaking the vacuum. This device makes it possible to add or remove weights easily during the calibration, thereby greatly reducing the time between observations. Using this device, we efficiently calibrated a precise quartz resonance barometer (Paroscientific, model 760-16B) over a pressure range of 940-1050 h Pa and a precise vacuum gauge (MKS, CDG 100 Torr) over a pressure range of 0-100 h Pa. .

  9. Calibration of a slimehole density sonde using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Byeongho; Hwang, Seho; Shin, Jehyun; Kim, Jongman

    2014-05-01

    The density log is a well logging tool that can continuously record bulk density of the formation. This is widely applied for a variety of fields such as the petroleum exploitation, mineral exploration, and geotechnical survey and so on. The density log is normally applied to open holes. But there are frequently difficult conditions such as cased boreholes, the variation of borehole diameter, the borehole fluid salinity, and the stand-off and so on. So we need a density correction curves for the various borehole conditions. The primary calibration curve by manufacturer is used for the formation density calculation. In case of density log used for the oil industry, the calibration curves for various borehole environments are applied to the density correction, but commonly used slim-hole density logging sonde normally have a calibration curve for the variation of borehole diameter. In order to correct the various borehole environmental conditions, it is necessary to make the primary calibration curve of density sonde using numerical modeling. Numerical modeling serves as a low-cost substitute for experimental test pits. We have performed numerical modeling using the MCNP based on Monte-Carlo methods can record average behaviors of radiation particles. In this study, the work for matching the primary calibration curve of FDGS (Formation Density Gamma Sonde) for slime borehole with a 100 mCi 137 Cs gamma source was performed. On the basis of this work, correction curves in various borehole environments were produced.

  10. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate...

  11. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate...

  12. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate...

  13. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate...

  14. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate...

  15. FTIR Calibration Methods and Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, Gaetan

    Over the past 10 years, several space-borne FTIR missions were launched for atmospheric research, environmental monitoring and meteorology. One can think of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) launched by the European Space Agency, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) launched by the Canadian Space Agency, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) launched by NASA and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched by Eumetsat in Europe. Others are near to be launched, namely the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) from the Integrated Program Of- fice in the United States and the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO) from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Moreover, several missions under definition foresee the use of this technology as sensor, e.g. Meteosat Third Generation (MTG), Eumetsat Polar System (EPS) and the Premier mission, one of the six candidates of the next ESA Earth Explorer Core Mission. In order to produce good quality products, calibration is essential. Calibrated data is the output of three main sub-systems that are tightly coupled: the instrument, the calibration targets and the level 1B processor. Calibration requirements must be carefully defined and propagated to each sub-system. Often, they are carried out by different parties which add to the complexity. Under budget and schedule pressure, some aspects are sometimes neglected and jeopardized final quality. For space-borne FTIR, level 1B outputs are spectra that are radiometrically, spectrally calibrated and geolocated. Radiometric calibration means to assign an intensity value in units to the y-axis. Spectral calibration means to assign to the x-axis the proper frequency value in units. Finally, geolocated means to assign a target position over the earth geoid i.e. longitude, latitude and altitude. This paper will present calibration methods and issues related to space-borne FTIR missions, e.g. two

  16. Spinning disk calibration method and apparatus for laser Doppler velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, P. K. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for calibrating laser Doppler velocimeters having one or more intersecting beam pairs are described. These velocimeters measure fluid velocity by observing the light scattered by particles in the fluid stream. Moving fluid particulates are simulated by fine taut wires that are radially mounted on a disk that is rotated at a known velocity. The laser beam intersection locus is first aimed at the very center of the disk and then the disk is translated so that the locus is swept by the rotating wires. The radial distance traversed is precisely measured so that the velocity of the wires (pseudo particles) may be calculated.

  17. COMPUTATIONS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF PARTICLE FILTERS AND ELECTRONIC AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses computations on the performance of particle filters and electronic air cleaners (EACs). The collection efficiency of particle filters and ACs is calculable if certain factors can be assumed or calibrated. For fibrous particulate filters, measurement of colle...

  18. Summary of AXAF calibration requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, E.

    1993-01-01

    The following summarizes requirements on the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) and HRMA/SI calibration. The lists of calibration measurements assume that the HRMA meets the CTT requirement that the XRCF test environment shall have not more than a 10 percent effect on the encircled energy in 1 arcsec and that it can be calibrated to 1 percent. This implies that the offloading scheme has been implemented in the HRMA. It should be remembered that there are additional calibrations needed for: aspect system; tracking; gyros; other parts of the PCAS; spacecraft timing and checks on timing accuracy for all SIs after integration in the spacecraft; ficucial lights and periscope; alignments; optical metrology data: lengths and diameters with errors on mirror elements and optical interferometer data on surface figure; and throughput and imaging stability test: an end-to-end test that can be used after the XRCF to verify that the x-ray throughput and imaging quality have not been degraded. The tables presented give a summary of the integration times for HRMA and HRMA/SI calibration.

  19. Internal to external wavelength calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.

    1999-01-01

    The spectra of Hen 1357 (the Stingray nebula) were used to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the STIS first order CCD modes. The radial velocity of the Stingray nebula is known to high accuracy (< 1 km/sec) and the line with of the nebular line is very narrow (< 8 km/sec for the integrated nebula). Thus the observations of the Stingray nebula are ideal to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the first order modes. The observations were taken in G430L and G750M modes using a 52 x 0.05 arcsec slit covering the wavelength range 2900 to 5700 A and 6295 to 6867 A, respectively. The observed wavelength range includes many nebular emission lines. The wavelengths of the nebular lines derived using the pipeline internal wavelength calibration were compared with the wavelengths derived from other ground based observations. In all cases, the wavelength match between the two is of the same order as the accuracy to which the line center can be measured. These results imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibrations for these modes. The HDF-S QSO observations were also used for this test both for the first order and the Echelle modes. The results of the HDF-S QSO observations further confirm the above finding for the first order modes, and imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibration for the Echelle modes.

  20. Complexation with tolbutamide modifies the physicochemical and tableting properties of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Suihko, E; Korhonen, O; Järvinen, T; Ketolainen, J; Jarho, P; Laine, E; Paronen, P

    2001-03-14

    The physicochemical and tableting properties of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) and its tolbutamide (TBM) complex were studied. The kinetics of TBM/HP-beta-CD inclusion complex formation in solution were determined by the phase solubility method. Solid complexes were prepared by freeze-drying and spray-drying. Water sorption-desorption behaviour of the materials were studied and compacts were made using a compaction simulator. TBM and HP-beta-CD formed 1:1 inclusion complexes in aqueous solution with an apparent stability constant of 63 M(-1). HP-beta-CDs and TBM/HP-beta-CD complexes were amorphous whereas the freeze-dried and spray-dried TBMs were polymorphic forms II and I, respectively. Sorption-desorption studies showed that HP-beta-CDs were deliquescent at high relative humidities. TBM/HP-beta-CD complexes had slightly lower water contents at low relative humidities than the physical mixtures. However, at high humidities their water sorption and desorption behaviours were similar to those of corresponding physical mixtures, indicating a glass transition of the complexed materials. TBM/HP-beta-CD complexes demonstrated a worse compactability than similarly prepared HP-beta-CDs or physical mixtures. Also particle properties that resulted from these preparation methods affected the compactability of the materials. In conclusion, the physicochemical and tableting properties of HP-beta-CD were modified by complexation it with TBM.

  1. Engineering considerations in anemometer calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meserole, L. T.

    The increased usage of portable anemometers has marked the need for better calibration quality. Efforts being made to achieve correlation between some US Department of Defense laboratories are described. A wind tunnel developed by the Navy Primary Standards Laboratory was used to calibrate 12 models of hot-wire anemometers and 13 models of vane anemometers. The latter category consisted of swinging-vane, mechanical rotating-vane, electrical rotating-vane, torsional-vane anemometers. Stable instruments such as the rotating-vane and electrical rotating-vane types were found to be fairly capable of comparing calibrations made by different facilities. However, greater accuracy and cost-efficiency would be achieved with fewer top-notch facilities as opposed to having a greater number of facilities but with minimum accuracy.

  2. Double Compton scatter telescope calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, B.; Simone, J.; Green, M.; Long, J.; Zanrosso, E.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Calibration techniques for a medium energy gamma ray telescope are described. Gain calibration using Compton edge spectra involves comparisons of pulse height spectra with spectra simulated by a Monte Carlo computer code which includes Compton scattering and pair production, plural scattering and variable energy resolution, and cell size. The telescope considered comprises 56 cells of liquid scintillator in four size groups, with a total liquid volume of 325 l; each cell has its own photomultiplier tube. Energy and angular resolutions and the PMT gain calibration procedure are verified with double scatter data for monoenergetic gamma rays at a known location. Detection probabilities for any cell combination in the two telescope arrays are calculated per steradian as a function of the scattering for a number of different energies with a Van de Graaff accelerator.

  3. Self-calibrating multiplexer circuit

    DOEpatents

    Wahl, Chris P.

    1997-01-01

    A time domain multiplexer system with automatic determination of acceptable multiplexer output limits, error determination, or correction is comprised of a time domain multiplexer, a computer, a constant current source capable of at least three distinct current levels, and two series resistances employed for calibration and testing. A two point linear calibration curve defining acceptable multiplexer voltage limits may be defined by the computer by determining the voltage output of the multiplexer to very accurately known input signals developed from predetermined current levels across the series resistances. Drift in the multiplexer may be detected by the computer when the output voltage limits, expected during normal operation, are exceeded, or the relationship defined by the calibration curve is invalidated.

  4. A low-noise beta-radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, G.I.; Savina, V.I.

    1995-12-01

    The two-channel detector for a low-noise (down to 0.06 sec{sup -1}) beta-radiometer for measuring the mass concentration of {sup 90}Sr in the environment after the chemical extraction of strontium by the oxalate-nitrate method was certified at the D.I. Mendeleev Institute of Metrology (certificate No. 137/93). A detector unit using two end-window self-quenching counters with thin input windows (8 {mu}m thick and 60 mm in diameter) operating as a Geiger-Mueller counter and filled with a mixture of 90% helium (atomic gas) and 10% ethanol (organic molecules) can measure the beta-activity of two substrates concurrently. It is often used to detect the beta-radiation of {sup 90}Sr. This isotope produces particles with energies ranging from 180 to 1000 keV, and the detection efficiency is 50% at a level of 0.1 Bq after measuring for 20 min with an uncertainty of 25%.

  5. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanlin; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-08-01

    The {alpha}-particle effects on the internal kink mode stability are studied. Finite Grad-Shafranov Shift, plasma {beta}, and plasma shape can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in pitch angle space and reduce average magnetic drift frequency. The drift reversal effect on the ideal kink mode is small, but the {beta}{sub {alpha}} threshold for the fishbone mode can be much lower than previously predicted. In addition, the ion diamagnetic drift has a stronger destabilizing effect.

  6. Method for calibrating mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2002-12-24

    A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

  7. Instrument Calibration and Certification Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. Wesley

    2016-05-31

    The Amptec 640SL-2 is a 4-wire Kelvin failsafe resistance meter, designed to reliably use very low-test currents for its resistance measurements. The 640SL-1 is a 2-wire version, designed to support customers using the Reynolds Industries type 311 connector. For both versions, a passive (analog) dual function DC Milliameter/Voltmeter allows the user to verify the actual 640SL output current level and the open circuit voltage on the test leads. This procedure includes tests of essential performance parameters. Any malfunction noticed during calibration, whether specifically tested for or not, shall be corrected before calibration continues or is completed.

  8. Mariner 9 television calibration - Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, Ken E.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Murray, Bruce C.; Danielson, G. Edward

    1988-01-01

    Mariner 9 TV data from the 1971-1972 encounter with Mars, which contain good synoptic coverage of of the planet as well as the highest-resolution images thus far obtained for the south polar region, can lead to more accurate photometric analysis if subjected to improved processing methods. While calibration errors are rather greater than those of the Viking Orbiter cameras, both calibration data and processing software applicable to an improvement program have become available through the USGS's Planetary Image Cartography System.

  9. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR: A Search for Neutrino less Double-beta Decay of Ge-76

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Abgrall, N.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Bertrand, F. E.; Efremenko, Yuri; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Green, M. P.; Radford, D. C.; Romero-Romero, E.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino less double-beta (Ov beta beta) decay is a hypothesized process where in some even-even nuclei it might be possible for two neutrons to simultaneously decay into two protons and two electrons without emitting neutrinos. This is possible only if neutrinos are Majorana particles, i.e. fermions that are their own antiparticles. Neutrinos being Majorana particles would explicitly violate lepton number conservation, and might play a role in the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. The observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay would also provide complementary information related to neutrino masses. The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, with a total of 40-kg Germanium detectors, to search for the Ov beta beta decay of Ge-76 and to demonstrate a background rate at or below 3 counts/ (ROI.t.y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROT) around the 2039 keV Q-value for Ge-76 Ov beta beta decay. In this paper, we discuss the physics of neutrinoless double beta decay and then focus on the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, including its design and approach to achieve ultra-low backgrounds and the status of the experiment.

  10. Evaluation of the beta energy spectrum from a distributed uranium mill tailings source

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, R.H.; Martz, D.E.; Carlson, D.S.; Turner, J.B. )

    1993-10-01

    The beta energy spectra from uranium mill tailings, 90Sr with different absorber thicknesses, and a uranium metal slab were measured and compared to select an appropriate beta source for calibrating a personal dosimeter to measure shallow dose equivalent when exposed to uranium mill tailings. The measured beta energy spectrum from the 90Sr source, with a 111 mg cm-2 cover thickness, was selected as a possible calibration source for a personnel dosimeter. The dose equivalent rate to the skin at 1 cm from a distributed tailings source of infinite thickness, with a 226Ra activity of 56 Bq g-1 (1.5 x 10(3) pCi g-1), was measured to be 0.024 mSv h-1 (2.4 mrem h-1).

  11. Evaluation of the beta energy spectrum from a distributed uranium mill tailings source.

    PubMed

    Reif, R H; Martz, D E; Carlson, D S; Turner, J B

    1993-10-01

    The beta energy spectra from uranium mill tailings, 90Sr with different absorber thicknesses, and a uranium metal slab were measured and compared to select an appropriate beta source for calibrating a personal dosimeter to measure shallow dose equivalent when exposed to uranium mill tailings. The measured beta energy spectrum from the 90Sr source, with a 111 mg cm-2 cover thickness, was selected as a possible calibration source for a personnel dosimeter. The dose equivalent rate to the skin at 1 cm from a distributed tailings source of infinite thickness, with a 226Ra activity of 56 Bq g-1 (1.5 x 10(3) pCi g-1), was measured to be 0.024 mSv h-1 (2.4 mrem h-1).

  12. (Depth-dose curves of the beta reference fields (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y produced by the beta secondary standard BSS2.

    PubMed

    Brunzendorf, Jens

    2012-08-01

    The most common reference fields in beta dosimetry are the ISO 6980 series 1 radiation fields produced by the beta secondary standard BSS2 and its predecessor BSS. These reference fields require sealed beta radiation sources ((147)Pm, (85)Kr or (90)Sr/(90)Y) in combination with a source-specific beam-flattening filter, and are defined only at a given distance from the source. Every radiation sources shipped with the BSS2 is sold with a calibration certificate of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The calibration workflow also comprises regular depth-dose measurements. This work publishes complete depth-dose curves of the series 1 sources (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y in ICRU tissue up to a depth of 11 mm,when all electrons are stopped. For this purpose, the individual depth-dose curves of all BSS2 sources calibrated so far have been determined, i.e. the complete datasets of all BSS2 beta sources have been re-evaluated. It includes 191 depth-dose curves of 116 different sources comprising more than 2200 data points in total. Appropriate analytical representations of the nuclide-specific depth-dose curves are provided for the first time.

  13. Solution structures of {beta}-amyloid{sub 10-35} and {beta}-amyloid{sub 10-35} PEG3000 aggregates.

    SciTech Connect

    Benzinger, T. L. S.; Burkoth, T. S.; Gordon, D.; Lynn, D. G.; Meredith, S. C.; Morgan, D. M.; Seifert, S.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Urban, V.

    1999-07-02

    Small angle neutron and x-ray scattering (SANS/SAXS) studies were conducted on the structure of the aggregates formed from both the truncated model peptide {beta}-Amyloid(10-35) (A{beta}{sub 10-35}) and a block copolymer {beta}-Amyloid (10-35)-PEG3000 (A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG) in D{sub 2}O at pHs from 3.0 to 7.0. These studies indicate that A{beta}{sub 10-35} aggregates into rod-like particles (fibril) and their radii are strongly dependent on the Pm of the solution. The fibril-fibril association in A{beta}{sub 10-35} solutions is less of pH < 5.6, but becomes larger at higher pH. A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG also assembles into rod-like particles whose radius is larger by about 30 {angstrom} than that for A{beta}{sub 10-35} fibril at pH 4.2, while it is about 23 {angstrom} larger at higher pH. Contrast matching SAXS/SANS experiments that eliminate the coherent scattering from PEG reveal that PEG moiety is located at the periphery of the fibril. Also, the mass per unit length of the peptide portion is similar for both A{beta}{sub 10-35} and A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG fibrils at pH 5.6. The mass per unit length of the rods from SANS provides key information on the packing of A{beta}{sub 10-35} peptides in the fibril.

  14. Space environment durability of beta cloth in LDEF thermal blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Whitaker, Ann F.; Finckenor, Miria M.

    1993-01-01

    Beta cloth performance for use on long-term space vehicles such as Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) requires resistance to the degrading effects of the space environment. The major issues are retention of thermal insulating properties through maintaining optical properties, preserving mechanical integrity, and generating minimal particulates for contamination-sensitive spacecraft surfaces and payloads. The longest in-flight test of beta cloth's durability was on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), where it was exposed to the space environment for 68 months. The LDEF contained 57 experiments which further defined the space environment and its effects on spacecraft materials. It was deployed into low-Earth orbit (LEO) in Apr. 1984 and retrieved Jan. 1990 by the space shuttle. Among the 10,000 plus material constituents and samples onboard were thermal control blankets of multilayer insulation with a beta cloth outer cover and Velcro attachments. These blankets were exposed to hard vacuum, thermal cycling, charged particles, meteoroid/debris impacts, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and atomic oxygen (AO). Of these space environmental exposure elements, AO appears to have had the greatest effect on the beta cloth. The beta cloth analyzed in this report came from the MSFC Experiment S1005 (Transverse Flat-Plate Heat Pipe) tray oriented approximately 22 deg from the leading edge vector of the LDEF satellite. The location of the tray on LDEF and the placement of the beta cloth thermal blankets are shown. The specific space environment exposure conditions for this material are listed.

  15. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  16. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  17. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  18. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  19. The plastic scintillator detector calibration circuit for DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haibo; Kong, Jie; Zhao, Hongyun; Su, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is being constructed as a scientific satellite to observe high energy cosmic rays in space. Plastic scintillator detector array (PSD), developed by Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMPCAS), is one of the most important parts in the payload of DAMPE which is mainly used for the study of dark matter. As an anti-coincidence detector, and a charged-particle identification detector, the PSD has a total of 360 electronic readout channels, which are distributed at four sides of PSD using four identical front end electronics (FEE). Each FEE reads out 90 charge signals output by the detector. A special calibration circuit is designed in FEE. FPGA is used for on-line control, enabling the calibration circuit to generate the pulse signal with known charge. The generated signal is then sent to the FEE for calibration and self-test. This circuit mainly consists of DAC, operation amplifier, analog switch, capacitance and resistance. By using controllable step pulse, the charge can be coupled to the charge measuring chip using the small capacitance. In order to fulfill the system's objective of large dynamic range, the FEE is required to have good linearity. Thus, the charge-controllable signal is needed to do sweep test on all channels in order to obtain the non-linear parameters for off-line correction. On the other hand, the FEE will run on the satellite for three years. The changes of the operational environment and the aging of devices will lead to parameter variation of the FEE, highlighting the need for regular calibration. The calibration signal generation circuit also has a compact structure and the ability to work normally, with the PSD system's voltage resolution being higher than 0.6%.

  20. Using natural beta emission for detecting concealed tobacco in parcels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Jeremy; Hussein, Esam M. A.

    2007-10-01

    It is suspected that postal systems are used for the illegal shipment of tobacco products to circumvent taxation and excise payments. This paper demonstrates that beta-particle emission from the potassium-40 contained in tobacco can be used to passively detect its presence in paperboard postal parcels. The same concept can be utilized for the detection of marijuana, whose leaves are also rich in 40K. The combination of high beta activity and a low weight is a good indicator of the presence of these two contraband materials.

  1. Unbound particles in dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Loeb, Abraham; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2013-06-13

    We investigate unbound dark matter particles in halos by tracing particle trajectories in a simulation run to the far future (a = 100). We find that the traditional sum of kinetic and potential energies is a very poor predictor of which dark matter particles will eventually become unbound from halos. We also study the mass fraction of unbound particles, which increases strongly towards the edges of halos, and decreases significantly at higher redshifts. We discuss implications for dark matter detection experiments, precision calibrations of the halo mass function, the use of baryon fractions to constrain dark energy, and searches for intergalactic supernovae.

  2. Ultrasonic Calibration Wire Test Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Fisher, K A; Werve, M; Chambers, D H

    2004-09-24

    We designed and built a phantom consisting of vertical wires maintained under tension to be used as an ultrasonic test, calibration, and reconstruction object for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory annular array scanner. We provide a description of the phantom, present example data sets, preliminary reconstructions, example metadata, and MATLAB codes to read the data.

  3. Practical intraoperative stereo camera calibration.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Philip; Bergeles, Christos; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Many of the currently available stereo endoscopes employed during minimally invasive surgical procedures have shallow depths of field. Consequently, focus settings are adjusted from time to time in order to achieve the best view of the operative workspace. Invalidating any prior calibration procedure, this presents a significant problem for image guidance applications as they typically rely on the calibrated camera parameters for a variety of geometric tasks, including triangulation, registration and scene reconstruction. While recalibration can be performed intraoperatively, this invariably results in a major disruption to workflow, and can be seen to represent a genuine barrier to the widespread adoption of image guidance technologies. The novel solution described herein constructs a model of the stereo endoscope across the continuum of focus settings, thereby reducing the number of degrees of freedom to one, such that a single view of reference geometry will determine the calibration uniquely. No special hardware or access to proprietary interfaces is required, and the method is ready for evaluation during human cases. A thorough quantitative analysis indicates that the resulting intrinsic and extrinsic parameters lead to calibrations as accurate as those derived from multiple pattern views.

  4. Calibrator for microflow delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinozzi, Franco; Bini, Fabiano; Cappa, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating the fluid flow rate down to 3×10-2ml/h is proposed, based on the volumetric pump working principle. Constant flow rate is assured by means of the constant speed at which the plunger of a laboratory syringe is moved. To test effectiveness of the system, a flow sensor, composed by a differential pressure transducer and a needle was calibrated and afterward utilized for characterizing a clinical drug infusion device. The proposed apparatus showed a full scale (FS) uncertainty approximately equal to 3.5% over a range of 6 ml/h. The calibration range starts at 3×10-2ml/h with a 1 ml syringe and at 3×10-3ml/h with a 0.1 ml syringe. The minimum detectable signal (evaluated at 6 dB SNR) was equal to about 1.4×10-2ml/h by using a syringe of 1 ml. The outcomes of the adopted procedure allowed a characterization of the performance of an infusion pump, without the need of the usual but somewhat cumbersome gravimetric calibration standard. Moreover, some issues about the expected resolution and uncertainty, depending on the characteristics of the system, is also reported.

  5. Autonomous Attitude Sensor Calibration (ASCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Chariya; Rowe, John; Mueller, Karl; Ziyad, Nigel

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to increase the degree of autonomy of flight software is proposed. We describe an enhancement of the Attitude Determination and Control System by augmenting it with self-calibration capability. Conventional attitude estimation and control algorithms are combined with higher level decision making and machine learning algorithms in order to deal with the uncertainty and complexity of the problem.

  6. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  7. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  8. GEO-GEO Cross-Calibration Results for AE9 Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-18

    1 - 1. INTRODUCTION This document summarizes cross calibration of energetic electron observations between pairs of LANL geosynchronous (GEO... document reviews cross calibration between various pairings of LANL GEO satellites. Data are available from seven Synchronous Orbit Particle Analyzer...specifications, or other data included in this document for any purpose other than Government procurement does not in any way obligate the U.S. Government

  9. NEW CALIBRATION OF THE MICROMETEOROID FLUX ON EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Cremonese, G.; Borin, P.; Martellato, E.; Marzari, F.; Bruno, M.

    2012-04-20

    Mass accretion rate on Earth is an important tool to discriminate the extraterrestrial nature of particles or isotopes found in different environments on the ground. In this context, the knowledge of the micrometeoroid flux arriving in our atmosphere is a key parameter and it needs to be calibrated. We provide a new calibration of the flux of submillimeter particles impacting the Earth in the mass range from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -4} g, derived by computing a specific scaling law for impact craters on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). We use the hydrocode iSALE to calculate the outcome of impacts on LDEF, adopting realistic impact velocities for dust particles derived from the numerical integration of their trajectories assuming either asteroidal or cometary origin. We estimate a particle mass accretion rate of (7.4 {+-} 1.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} kg yr{sup -1} if the Main Belt is assumed as the major source of dust, while it reduces to (4.2 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} kg yr{sup -1} if cometary dust dominates. These values agree with the estimates provided by independent measurements made on ice core and ocean sediments and based on the abundance of some elements in the samples.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of beta-induced Alfven eigenmode in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. S.; Lin, Z.; Deng, W.; Holod, I.; Wang, Z. X.; Xiao, Y.; Zhang, W. L.

    2013-01-15

    The beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE) excited by energetic particles in toroidal plasmas is studied in the global gyrokinetic simulations. It is found that the nonlinear BAE dynamics depends on the deviation from the marginality. In the strongly driven case, the mode exhibits a bursting state with fast and repetitive chirping. The nonlinear saturation is determined by the thermal ion nonlinearity and has no clear dependence on the linear growth rate. In the weakly driven case, the mode reaches a nearly steady state with small frequency chirping. The nonlinear dynamics is dominated by the energetic particle nonlinearity. In both cases, the nonlinear intensity oscillation and frequency chirping are correlated with the evolution of the coherent structures in the energetic particle phase space. Due to the radial variation of the mode amplitude and the radially asymmetric guiding center dynamics, the wave-particle interaction in the toroidal geometry is much more complex than the conventional one-dimensional wave-particle interaction paradigm.

  11. GIADA - Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator - Onboard Rosetta spacecraft: Extended calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Corte, V.; Sordini, R.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Rotundi, A.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Fulle, M.; Mazzotta-Epifani, E.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Morales, R.; Cosi, M.

    2016-09-01

    Despite a long tradition of dust instruments flown on-board space mission, the largest number of these can be considered unique as they used different detection techniques. GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator), is one of the dust instruments on-board the Rosetta spacecraft and is devoted to measure the dust dynamical parameters in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It couples two different techniques to measure the mass and speed of individual dust particles. We report here the results of an extended calibration activity carried-out, during the hibernation phase of the Rosetta mission, on the GIADA Proto Flight Model (PFM) operative in a clean room in our laboratory. The main aims of an additional calibration campaign are: to verify the algorithms and procedures for data calibration developed before Rosetta launch; to improve the comprehension of GIADA response after the increased knowledge on cometary dust, e.g. the composition of dust particles after Stardust mission. These calibration improvements implied a final step, which consisted in defining transfer functions to correlate the new calibration curves obtained for the GIADA PFM to those to be used for GIADA onboard the Rosetta spacecraft. The extended calibration activity allowed us to analyze GIADA data acquired in the 67P/C-G coma permitting to infer additional information on cometary dust particles, e.g. density and tensile strength.

  12. A precise in situ calibration of the RHIC H-Jet polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Poblaguev, A. A.

    2014-03-05

    Two new methods of calibration of the hydrogen jet target polarimeter (H-Jet) at RHIC are discussed. First method is based on the measurement of low amplitude signal time of fast particles penetrating through detector. The second, geometry based, method employs correlation between z-coordinate of the recoil proton and its kinetic energy. Both methods can be used for in situ calibration of the H-Jet polarimeter. These two methods are compared with a traditional calibration of the H-Jet which uses α-sources.

  13. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  14. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  15. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  16. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  17. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  18. CALET Data Processing and On-Orbit Detector Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaoka, Yoichi

    2016-07-01

    The CALET (CALorimetric Electron Telescope), launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in August 2015 and accumulating scientific data since October 2015, aims at long duration observations of high-energy cosmic rays onboard the ISS. The CALET detector features the very thick calorimeter of 30 radiation-length which consists of imaging and total absorption calorimeters (IMC and TASC respectively). It will directly measure the cosmic-ray electron spectrum in the energy range of 1 GeV-20 TeV with 2% energy resolution. In addition, the instrument has capabilities to measure the spectra of gamma-rays, protons and nuclei well into the TeV range. Precise pointing direction is determined with an attached Advanced Stellar Camera (ASC). To operate the CALET onboard ISS, the CALET Ground Support Equipment (CALET-GSE) and Waseda CALET Operations Center (WCOC) have been established at JAXA and Waseda Univ., respectively. Scientific operations of CALET are planned in the WCOC taking into account the orbital variations of geomagnetic rigidity cutoff. Scheduled command sequence is utilized to control CALET observation mode on orbit. A calibration data trigger mode, such as recording pedestal and penetrating particle events, a low-energy electron trigger mode operating at high geomagnetic latitude, and other dedicated trigger modes are scheduled around the ISS orbit while maintaining the maximum exposure to high-energy electrons. Scientific raw data called CALET Level 0 data are generated from raw telemetry packets in the CALET-GSE on an hourly basis by correcting time-order and by completing the data set using stored data taken during loss of real-time telemetry downlink. Level 0 data are processed to CALET Level 1 data in the WCOC by interpreting all the raw packets and building cosmic-ray event data as well as house keeping data. Level 1 data are then distributed to the collaboration for scientific data analysis. Level 1 data analysis is focused on the detector

  19. UCN enhances TGF-beta-mediated mitoinhibition of VSMCs via counteracting TGF-beta-induced cPLA2 expression and activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chao; Cao, Changchun; Wang, Xiaofei; Yuan, Jie; Jin, Lai; Li, Shengnan

    2016-11-01

    Urocortins (UCNs) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) have been demonstrated to participate in various cardiovascular diseases, many of which involve vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2)-mediated arachidonic acid (AA) release is an important cause of VSMCs proliferation. The work was to investigate the regulation of VSMCs proliferation by UCN/TGF-beta and whether cPLA2 was a link between their signaling pathways. VSMCs proliferation was measured by colorimetric assay and immunofluorescence microscopy. Using cell flow cytometry, the changes in the cell cycle phases were investigated. Lentiviral Vector Particle was performed to overexpress cPLA2 gene. Both UCN and TGF-beta inhibited VSMCs proliferation and an additive effect was observed when the cells were treated with UCN plus TGF-beta. TGF-beta increased the percentage of cells in G1-phase while UCN increased the cell percentage in G2-phase with a concomitant decrease in S-phase. Furthermore, cPLA2 expression was increased by TGF-beta but decreased by UCN and UCN attenuated TGF-beta-induced cPLA2 expression. In primary VSMCs, TGF-beta induced cPLA2 phosphorylation, and this effect was also attenuated by UCN. Similar to UCN, the cPLA2 inhibitor, pyrrophenone (PYR), also played a role in enhancing TGF-beta-mediated mitoinhibition. Inversely, overexpression of cPLA2 eliminated the effect of UCN on the mitoinhibition. The pretreatment with UCN counteracted TGF-beta-mediated cPLA2 expression and activation, thereby contributing to TGF-beta-mediated mitoinhibition of VSMCs.

  20. Contribution of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors of human atrium and ventricle to the effects of noradrenaline and adrenaline as assessed with (-)-atenolol.

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, H.; Schönell, H.; Kaumann, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    1. (-)-Atenolol was used as a tool to assess the function of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in human heart. Right atrial and left ventricular preparations from patients undergoing open heart surgery were set up to contract isometrically. Membrane particles were prepared for beta-adrenoceptor labelling with [3H]-(-)-bupranolol and adenylate cyclase assays. 2. The positive inotropic effects of (-)-noradrenaline were antagonized to a similar extent by (-)-atenolol in atrial and ventricular preparations. (-)-Atenolol consistently antagonized the effects of (-)-adrenaline to a lesser extent than those of (-)-noradrenaline in atrial preparations. In ventricular preparations (-)-atenolol antagonized the effects of low concentrations of (-)-adrenaline to a lesser extent than those of high concentrations. 3. pKB values (M) of (-)-atenolol, estimated with non-linear analysis from the blockade of the positive inotropic effects of the catecholamines, were 7.4 for beta 1-adrenoceptors and 6.0 for beta 2-adrenoceptors. 4. (-)-Atenolol inhibited the binding of [3H]-(-)-bupranolol to ventricular beta 1-adrenoceptors with a pKD (M) of 5.9 and to ventricular beta 2-adrenoceptors with a pKD of 4.6. 5. (-)-Atenolol inhibited the catecholamine-induced adenylate cyclase stimulation in the atrium and ventricle with pKB values of 5.8-6.4 for beta 1- and pKB values of 4.7-5.7 for beta 2-adrenoceptors. The binding and cyclase assays suggest a partial affinity loss for (-)-atenolol inherent to membrane preparations. 6. beta 1-Adrenoceptors mediate the maximum positive inotropic effects of (-)-noradrenaline in both the atrium and ventricle of man. beta 2-Adrenoceptors appear to be capable of mediating maximal positive inotropic effects of (-)-adrenaline in atrium. In contrast, ventricular beta 2-adrenoceptors mediated only submaximal effects of (-)-adrenaline. PMID:2851354

  1. Gross-beta activity in ground water: natural sources and artifacts of sampling and laboratory analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Alan H.

    1995-01-01

    activities are expected to be low.Ingrowth of beta-emitting radionuclides during sample holding times can contribute to gross-beta activity, particularly in ground water with gross-beta activities > 10 pCi/L. Ingrowth of beta-emitting progeny of238U, specifically234Pa and234Th, contributes much of the measured gross-beta activity in ground water from 4 of the 5 areas studied. Consequently, gross-beta activity measurements commonly overestimate the abundance of beta-emitting radionuclides actually present in ground water. Differing sample holding times before analysis lead to differing amounts of ingrowth of the two progeny. Therefore, holding times can affect observed gross-beta measurements, particularly in ground water with238U activities that are moderate to high compared with the activity of40K plus228Ra. Uncertainties associated with counting efficiencies for beta particles with different energies further complicate the interpretation of gross-beta measurements.

  2. Calculating Capstone depleted uranium aerosol concentrations from beta activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Szrom, Frances; Falo, Gerald A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Whicker, Jeffrey J; Alberth, David P

    2009-03-01

    Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the DU source term for the subsequent Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Values for the equilibrium fraction ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92. This paper describes the process used and adjustments necessary to calculate uranium mass from proportional counting measurements.

  3. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  4. Calibration of BGO Calorimeter of the DAMPE in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explore (DAMPE) is a satellite based experiment which launched on December 2015 and aims at indirect searching for dark matter by measuring the spectra of high energy e±, γ from 5GeV up to 10TeV originating from deep space. The 3D imaging BGO calorimeter of DAMPE was designed to precisely measurement the primary energy of the electromagnetic particle and provides a highly efficient rejection of the hadronic background by reconstruct the longitudinal and lateral profiles of showers. To achieve the expected accuracy on the energy measurement, each signal channel has to be calibrated. The energy equalization is performed using the signal that Minimum Ionizing Particles (MIP) leave in each BGO bar, the MIPs measurement method with orbit data and, data quality, time stability using MIPs data will be presented, too.

  5. RAVEN Beta Release

    SciTech Connect

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Mandelli, Diego; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Wang, Congjian; Maljovec, Daniel Patrick; Talbot, Paul William

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  6. Just a beta....

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, K. S.; Bailey, D. W.; Dorman, K. F.; Moos, M. K.

    1999-01-01

    Traditional implementation of clinical information systems follows a predictable project management process. The selection, development, implementation, and evaluation of the system and the project management aspects of those phases require considerable time and effort. The purpose of this paper is to describe the beta site implementation of a knowledge-based clinical information system in a specialty area of a southeastern hospital that followed a less than traditional approach to implementation. Highlighted are brief descriptions of the hospital's traditional process, the nontraditional process, and key findings from the experience. Preliminary analysis suggests that selection of an implementation process is contextual. Selection of elements from each of these methods may provide a more useful process. The non-traditional process approached the elements of communication, areas of responsibility, training, follow-up and leadership differently. These elements are common to both processes and provide a focal point for future research. PMID:10566425

  7. Superallowed Fermi beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J. C.; Towner, I. S.

    1998-12-21

    Superallowed 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} nuclear beta decay provides a direct measure of the weak vector coupling constant, G{sub V}. We survey current world data on the nine accurately determined transitions of this type, which range from the decay of {sup 10}C to that of {sup 54}Co, and demonstrate that the results confirm conservation of the weak vector current (CVC) but differ at the 98% confidence level from the unitarity condition for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. We examine the reliability of the small calculated corrections that have been applied to the data, and assess the likelihood of even higher quality nuclear data becoming available to confirm or deny the discrepancy. Some of the required experiments depend upon the availability of intense radioactive beams. Others are possible today.

  8. Double beta decay: Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brofferio, Chiara

    2008-11-01

    Calorimeters or, with a more specific definition, low temperature detectors, have been used by now for more than 15 years in Double Beta Decay (DBD) searches, with excellent results: they compete with Ge diodes for the rank of detectors with the highest sensitivity to the effective neutrino mass, which is defined as a linear combination of the neutrino mass eigenvalues. After a brief introduction to the argument, with some notes on DBD and on bolometers, an update on the now closed experiment CUORICINO and on its successor, CUORE, is given. The fundamental role of background is then revealed and commented, introducing in this way the importance of the specific experiment now under construction, CUORE-0, that will precede CUORE to help optimizing the struggle against surface background. The possible future of this technique is then commented, quoting important R&D studies that are going on, for active shielding bolometers and for scintillating bolometers coupled with light detecting bolometers.

  9. Extending the Range for Force Calibration in Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J.; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates. PMID:25992733

  10. Extending the range for force calibration in magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates.

  11. Novel measure for the calibration of laser Doppler flowmetry devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaev, Andrey V.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Rogatkin, Dmitrii A.; Stewart, Neil A.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2014-03-01

    The metrological basis for optical non-invasive diagnostic devices is an unresolved issue. A major challenge for laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is the need to compare the outputs from individual devices and various manufacturers to identify variations useful in clinical diagnostics. The most common methods for instrument calibration are simulants or phantoms composed of colloids of light-scattering particles which simulate the motion of red blood cells based on Brownian motion. However, such systems have limited accuracy or stability and cannot calibrate for the known rhythmic components of perfusion (0.0095-1.6 Hz). To solve this problem, we propose the design of a novel technique based on the simulation of moving particles using an electromechanical transducer, in which a precision piezoelectric actuator is used (e.g., P-602.8SL with maximum movement less than 1 mm). In this system, Doppler shift is generated in the layered structure of different solid materials with different optical light diffusing properties. This comprises a fixed, light transparent upper plane-parallel plate and an oscillating fluoroplastic (PTFE) disk. Preliminary studies on this experimental setup using the LDF-channel of a "LAKK-M" system demonstrated the detection of the linear portion (0-10 Hz with a maximum signal corresponding to Doppler shift of about 20 kHz) of the LDF-signal from the oscillating frequency of the moving layer. The results suggest the possibility of applying this technique for the calibration of LDF devices.

  12. New weight-loading device for calibration of precise barometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, S. Y.; Lee, Y. J.; Choi, I. M.; Choi, J. W.

    2004-02-01

    In order to calibrate highly accurate barometers, laser/ultrasonic mercury manometers have been used. However, the complexity and cost of mercury manometers have gradually taken them out of use in most calibration laboratories. As a substitute, a gas-operated pressure balance is used to calibrate precise barometers. In such a case, many commercially available pressure balances are not desirable because the consequent exposure of the piston, cylinder and masses to the atmosphere causes the problem of contamination and the ingress of dust particles to the gap between the piston and cylinder. In this paper, a novel weight-loading device for changing the masses in situ without breaking the vacuum is described. This device makes it possible to add or remove weights easily in the absolute mode, thereby greatly reducing the time between observations. Using this device we could easily calibrate a precise quartz resonance barometer (Paroscientific, Model 760-16B) from 940 hPa to 1050 hPa.

  13. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  14. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.

    1995-03-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD`s) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD`s, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  15. Automated Attitude Sensor Calibration: Progress and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph; Hashmall, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing work a NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center to improve the quality of spacecraft attitude sensor calibration and reduce costs by automating parts of the calibration process. The new calibration software can autonomously preview data quality over a given time span, select a subset of the data for processing, perform the requested calibration, and output a report. This level of automation is currently being implemented for two specific applications: inertial reference unit (IRU) calibration and sensor alignment calibration. The IRU calibration utility makes use of a sequential version of the Davenport algorithm. This utility has been successfully tested with simulated and actual flight data. The alignment calibration is still in the early testing stage. Both utilities will be incorporated into the institutional attitude ground support system.

  16. Recent Infrasound Calibration Activity at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, R. W.; Marcillo, O. E.

    2014-12-01

    Absolute infrasound sensor calibration is necessary for estimating source sizes from measured waveforms. This can be an important function in treaty monitoring. The Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber is capable of absolute calibration. Early in 2014 the Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber resumed operations in its new location after an unplanned move two years earlier. The chamber has two sources of calibration signals. The first is the original mechanical piston, and the second is a CLD Dynamics Model 316 electro-mechanical unit that can be digitally controlled and provide a richer set of calibration options. During 2008-2010 a number of upgrades were incorporated for improved operation and recording. In this poster we give an overview of recent chamber work on sensor calibrations, calibration with the CLD unit, some measurements with different porous hoses and work with impulse sources.

  17. Attitude Sensor and Gyro Calibration for Messenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Pittelkau, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    The Redundant Inertial Measurement Unit Attitude Determination/Calibration (RADICAL(TM)) filter was used to estimate star tracker and gyro calibration parameters using MESSENGER telemetry data from three calibration events. We present an overview of the MESSENGER attitude sensors and their configuration is given, the calibration maneuvers are described, the results are compared with previous calibrations, and variations and trends in the estimated calibration parameters are examined. The warm restart and covariance bump features of the RADICAL(TM) filter were used to estimate calibration parameters from two disjoint telemetry streams. Results show that the calibration parameters converge faster with much less transient variation during convergence than when the filter is cold-started at the start of each telemetry stream.

  18. Beta Decay of 101Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Kavatsyuk, O.; Mazzocchi, C.; Janas, Z.; Banu, A.; Batist, L.; Becker, F.; Blazhev, A.; Bruchle, W.; Doring, J.; Faestermann, T.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Jungclaus, A.; Karny, M.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Klepper, O.; Kirchner, R.; La Commara, M.; Miernik, K.; Mukha, I.; Plettner, C.; Plochocki, A.; Roeckl, E.; Romoli, M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Schadel, M.; Schmidt, K.; Schwengner, R.; Zylicz, J.

    2007-01-01

    The {beta} decay of the very neutron-deficient isotope 101Sn was studied at the GSI on-line mass separator using silicon detectors for recording charged particles and germanium detectors for {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Based on the {beta}-delayed proton data the production cross-section of 101Sn in the 50Cr + 58Ni fusion-evaporation reaction was determined to be about 60nb. The half-life of 101Sn was measured to be 1.9(3)s. For the first time {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays of 101Sn were tentatively identified, yielding weak evidence for a cascade of 352 and 1065keV transitions in 101In. The results for the 101Sn decay as well as those from previous work on the 103Sn decay are discussed by comparing them to predictions obtained from shell model calculations employing a new interaction in the 88Sr to 132Sn model space.

  19. Thermal Targets for Satellite Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2001-01-10

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is currently calibrating the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite sponsored by the Department of Energy. The MTI imager is a research and development project with 15 wavebands in the visible, near-infrared, short-wave infrared, mid-wave infrared and long-wave infrared spectral regions. A plethora of targets with known temperatures such as power plant heated lakes, volcano lava vents, desert playas and aluminized Mylar tarps are being used in the validation of the five thermal bands of the MTI satellite. SRTC efforts in the production of ''cold targets'' with aluminized Mylar tarps will be described. Visible and thermal imagery and wavelength dependent radiance measurements of the calibration targets will be presented.

  20. Calibration and control in haemoglobinometry.

    PubMed

    van Assendelft, O W; Horton, B R; Parvin, R M

    1990-01-01

    In assigning values to fresh blood specimens used for calibrating automated blood cell analysers, haemoglobin concentration should be determined by the ICSH recommended hemiglobincyanide (HiCN) method. Errors in the reference method may be caused by inadequate blood collection, e.g. incorrect anticoagulation; inadequate dilution, e.g. use of inadequately calibrated pipettes; incomplete conversion of haemoglobins to HiCN, e.g. insufficient time for reactions to come to completion; during measurement, e.g. due to turbidity of the HiCN solution to be measured; or by transcription error. Readily available commercial reagent systems and secondary standards are compared with ICSH standards as to their compliance with these standards.

  1. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  2. Bolometers as particle spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroke, H. H.; Artzner, G.; Coron, N.; Dambier, G.; Hansen, P. G.

    1986-02-01

    A spectrometer based on low-temperature calorimetry has been under development since 1983. The present detector, capable of recording individual alpha and beta particles and X-ray photons, is based on a composite diamond-germanium bolometer. The advantage of a composite bolometer is that it separates the absorption and detection functions. Diamond, as an absorber, is of particular advantage because of its low heat capacity and high thermal diffusivity. The goal is a theoretical energy resolution of a few eV at 0.1 K. Initial experiments at 1.3 K and 0.9 K, which give resolutions in the keV range, are still noise-limited. High-resolution applications, such as in X-ray astronomy and nuclear physics (in particular, neutron mass measurements) are foreseen.

  3. Calibrating and Measuring Bedload Transport Using a Magnetic Detection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, J.; Hassan, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    One of the problems in bedload transport research is that no measurement technique has been commonly accepted as superior, and there are no standard protocols. There is a need for continuous bedload measurement to adequately resolve patterns in temporal and spatial variability, especially at high transport rates. Magnetic detection systems are a promising method as they can sense the movement of natural stones, and provide high frequency data in both time and space. A number of magnetic systems have been deployed in the field, but they have not been adequately calibrated. This has limited the analysis to counting the number of pulses, and not allowed confident estimations of the true amount of sediment transport, sediment texture or particle velocities. We developed a series of lab and flume experiments to calibrate the BMD system used by Tunnicliffe et al (2000). Experiments were run with both artificial and natural stones to isolate the effects of particle size, velocity and magnetic content (susceptibility and moment) on the shape of the recorded signal. A large number of experiments were conducted to cover wide range of flow conditions, particle sizes, and particle velocities. The results show that the system is sensitive enough to detect particles down to at least 8mm. Using artificial stones we were able to relate the signal amplitude, width and area to particle size, velocity and magnetic content. These results suggest that the magnetic system can be used to estimate transport rates in natural streams. Work is continuing with natural stones both in the laboratory and the field to further develop of the system. Tunnicliffe, J., Gottesfeld, A.S., and Mohamed, M. 2000. High-resolution measurement of bedload transport, Hydrological Processes, 14, 2631-2643.

  4. A Careful Consideration of the Calibration Concept

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, S. D.; Estler, W. T.; Doiron, T.; Eberhardt, K. R.; Levenson, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed discussion of the technical aspects of the calibration process with emphasis on the definition of the measurand, the conditions under which the calibration results are valid, and the subsequent use of the calibration results in measurement uncertainty statements. The concepts of measurement uncertainty, error, systematic error, and reproducibility are also addressed as they pertain to the calibration process. PMID:27500027

  5. Automated Camera Array Fine Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clouse, Daniel; Padgett, Curtis; Ansar, Adnan; Cheng, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Using aerial imagery, the JPL FineCalibration (JPL FineCal) software automatically tunes a set of existing CAHVOR camera models for an array of cameras. The software finds matching features in the overlap region between images from adjacent cameras, and uses these features to refine the camera models. It is not necessary to take special imagery of a known target and no surveying is required. JPL FineCal was developed for use with an aerial, persistent surveillance platform.

  6. Nonlinear Observers for Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear observers for gyro calibration are presented. The first observer estimates a constant gyro bias. The second observer estimates scale factor errors. The third observer estimates the gyro alignment for three orthogonal gyros. The convergence properties of all three observers are discussed. Additionally, all three observers are coupled with a nonlinear control algorithm. The stability of each of the resulting closed loop systems is analyzed. Simulated test results are presented for each system.

  7. ASCAL: Autonomous Attitude Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Chariya; Rowe, John; Mueller, Karl; Ziyad, Nigel

    1999-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, an approach to increase the degree of autonomy of flight software is proposed. We describe an enhancement of the Attitude Determination and Control System by augmenting it with self-calibration capability. Conventional attitude estimation and control algorithms are combined with higher level decision making and machine learning algorithms in order to deal with the uncertainty and complexity of the problem.

  8. Calibration Fixture For Welding Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, Krisztina J.

    1990-01-01

    Compact, lightweight device used in any position or orientation. Calibration fixture designed for use on robotic gas/tungsten-arc welding torch equipped with vision-based seam-tracking system. Through optics in hollow torch cylinder, video camera obtains image of weld, viewing along line of sight coaxial with welding electrode. Attaches to welding-torch cylinder in place of gas cup normally attached in use. By use of longer or shorter extension tube, fixture accommodates welding electrode of unusual length.

  9. Calibrating thermal behavior of electronics

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2017-01-03

    A method includes determining a relationship between indirect thermal data for a processor and a measured temperature associated with the processor, during a calibration process, obtaining the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor, and determining an actual significant temperature associated with the processor during the actual operation using the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor and the relationship.

  10. Calibrating thermal behavior of electronics

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2016-05-31

    A method includes determining a relationship between indirect thermal data for a processor and a measured temperature associated with the processor, during a calibration process, obtaining the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor, and determining an actual significant temperature associated with the processor during the actual operation using the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor and the relationship.

  11. High Spectral Resolution Lidar: System Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek Vivekanandan, J.; Morley, Bruce; Spuler, Scott; Eloranta, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    One of the unique features of the high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) is simultaneous measurements of backscatter and extinction of atmosphere. It separates molecular scattering from aerosol and cloud particle backscatter based on their Doppler spectrum width. Scattering from aerosol and cloud particle are referred as Mie scattering. Molecular or Rayleigh scattering is used as a reference for estimating aerosol extinction and backscatter cross-section. Absolute accuracy of the backscattered signals and their separation into Rayleigh and Mie scattering depends on spectral purity of the transmitted signals, accurate measurement of transmit power, and precise performance of filters. Internal calibration is used to characterize optical subsystems Descriptions of high spectral resolution lidar system and its measurement technique can be found in Eloronta (2005) and Hair et al.(2001). Four photon counting detectors are used to measure the backscatter from the combined Rayleigh and molecular scattering (high and low gain), molecular scattering and cross-polarized signal. All of the detectors are sensitive to crosstalk or leakage through the optical filters used to separate the received signals and special data files are used to remove these effects as much as possible. Received signals are normalized with respect to the combined channel response to Mie and Rayleigh scattering. The laser transmit frequency is continually monitored and tuned to the 1109 Iodine absorption line. Aerosol backscatter cross-section is measured by referencing the aerosol return signal to the molecular return signal. Extinction measurements are calculated based on the differences between the expected (theoretical) and actual change in the molecular return. In this paper an overview of calibration of the HSRL is presented. References: Eloranta, E. W., High Spectral Resolution Lidar in Lidar: Range-Resolved Optical Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere, Klaus Weitkamp editor, Springer Series in Optical

  12. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  13. Model Calibration in Watershed Hydrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yilmaz, Koray K.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2009-01-01

    Hydrologic models use relatively simple mathematical equations to conceptualize and aggregate the complex, spatially distributed, and highly interrelated water, energy, and vegetation processes in a watershed. A consequence of process aggregation is that the model parameters often do not represent directly measurable entities and must, therefore, be estimated using measurements of the system inputs and outputs. During this process, known as model calibration, the parameters are adjusted so that the behavior of the model approximates, as closely and consistently as possible, the observed response of the hydrologic system over some historical period of time. This Chapter reviews the current state-of-the-art of model calibration in watershed hydrology with special emphasis on our own contributions in the last few decades. We discuss the historical background that has led to current perspectives, and review different approaches for manual and automatic single- and multi-objective parameter estimation. In particular, we highlight the recent developments in the calibration of distributed hydrologic models using parameter dimensionality reduction sampling, parameter regularization and parallel computing.

  14. Variability among polysulphone calibration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casale, G. R.; Borra, M.; Colosimo, A.; Colucci, M.; Militello, A.; Siani, A. M.; Sisto, R.

    2006-09-01

    Within an epidemiological study regarding the correlation between skin pathologies and personal ultraviolet (UV) exposure due to solar radiation, 14 field campaigns using polysulphone (PS) dosemeters were carried out at three different Italian sites (urban, semi-rural and rural) in every season of the year. A polysulphone calibration curve for each field experiment was obtained by measuring the ambient UV dose under almost clear sky conditions and the corresponding change in the PS film absorbance, prior and post exposure. Ambient UV doses were measured by well-calibrated broad-band radiometers and by electronic dosemeters. The dose-response relation was represented by the typical best fit to a third-degree polynomial and it was parameterized by a coefficient multiplying a cubic polynomial function. It was observed that the fit curves differed from each other in the coefficient only. It was assessed that the multiplying coefficient was affected by the solar UV spectrum at the Earth's surface whilst the polynomial factor depended on the photoinduced reaction of the polysulphone film. The mismatch between the polysulphone spectral curve and the CIE erythemal action spectrum was responsible for the variability among polysulphone calibration curves. The variability of the coefficient was related to the total ozone amount and the solar zenith angle. A mathematical explanation of such a parameterization was also discussed.

  15. Nonlinear Observers for Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    High precision estimation and control algorithms, to achieve unprecedented levels of pointing accuracy, will be required to support future formation flying missions such as interferometry missions. Achieving high pointing accuracy requires precise knowledge of the spacecraft rotation rate. Typically, the rotation rate is measured by a gyro. The measured rates can be corrupted by errors in alignment and scale factor, gyro biases, and noise. In this work, we present nonlinear observers for gyro calibration. Nonlinear observers are superior to extended or pseudo-linear Kalman filter type approaches for large errors and global stability. Three nonlinear gyro calibration observers are developed. The first observer estimates a constant gyro bias. The second observer estimates scale factor errors. The third observer estimates the gyro alignment for three orthogonal gyros. The convergence properties of all three observers are discussed. Additionally, all three observers are coupled with a nonlinear control algorithm. The stability of each of the resulting closed loop systems is analyzed. The observers are then combined, and the gyro calibration parameters are estimated simultaneously. The stability of the combined observers is addressed, as well as the stability of the resulting closed loop systems. Simulated test results are presented for each scenario. Finally, the nonlinear observers are compared to a pseudo-linear Kalman filter.

  16. PACS photometer calibration block analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, A.; Müller, T. G.; Kiss, C.; Balog, Z.; Billot, N.; Marton, G.

    2014-07-01

    The absolute stability of the PACS bolometer response over the entire mission lifetime without applying any corrections is about 0.5 % (standard deviation) or about 8 % peak-to-peak. This fantastic stability allows us to calibrate all scientific measurements by a fixed and time-independent response file, without using any information from the PACS internal calibration sources. However, the analysis of calibration block observations revealed clear correlations of the internal source signals with the evaporator temperature and a signal drift during the first half hour after the cooler recycling. These effects are small, but can be seen in repeated measurements of standard stars. From our analysis we established corrections for both effects which push the stability of the PACS bolometer response to about 0.2 % (stdev) or 2 % in the blue, 3 % in the green and 5 % in the red channel (peak-to-peak). After both corrections we still see a correlation of the signals with PACS FPU temperatures, possibly caused by parasitic heat influences via the Kevlar wires which connect the bolometers with the PACS Focal Plane Unit. No aging effect or degradation of the photometric system during the mission lifetime has been found.

  17. Calibration of CCD detector after damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudka, A. P.

    2015-11-01

    An Xcalibur X-ray diffractometer with a Sapphire 3 CCD detector (Rigaku Oxford Diffraction) has been calibrated to remove damage effects. Visual proof of the validity of the detector calibration map is obtained for the first time. The calibration has significantly improved the reliability of the structural data on Ba3TaFe3Si2O14 single crystal.

  18. Standard Leak Calibration Facility software system

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    A Standard Leak Calibration Facility Software System has been developed and implemented for controlling, and running a standard Leak Calibration Facility. Primary capabilities provided by the software system include computer control of the vacuum system, automatic leak calibration, and data acquisition, manipulation, and storage.

  19. Achieving calibration cost savings through data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, A.H.; Clark, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    Air displacement type pipettes have been used effectively at the Savannah River Site (SRS) since the mid-1980`s when they replaced expensive glass microliter pipettes. A paper presented at the 1987 INMM Annual Meeting by John P. Clark detailed the implementation at SRS. At that time, calibration frequency and required documentation were established according to regulatory and standard practice requirements. Pipettes are still being used at SRS in compliance with NQA-1-12, ``Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M and TE)`` requirements, which includes defined calibration intervals and 5-year calibration record retention. A recent analysis of the pipette calibration historical data indicated that pipettes were rarely out of calibration when they were checked. In other words, calibration checks were being performed too frequently. As a result, pipette calibration frequencies were decreased, with the potential accompanying annual cost savings of over $30,000 in reduced labor and materials. Concurrently, the number of calibration check replicates was increased to prevent statistical errors in calibration check decision making. The benefits derived in the pipette calibration example are applicable to any M and TE where calibration history data are maintained and where analysis indicates excessive calibration checks. Details of the data analysis and cost savings are presented in the paper.

  20. 14 CFR 33.85 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.85 Section 33.85... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.85 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to those calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics and...

  1. 14 CFR 33.85 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.85 Section 33.85... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.85 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to those calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics and...

  2. 14 CFR 33.85 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.85 Section 33.85... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.85 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to those calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics and...

  3. 14 CFR 33.45 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.45 Section 33.45... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.45 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to the calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics...

  4. 14 CFR 33.45 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.45 Section 33.45... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.45 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to the calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics...

  5. 14 CFR 33.45 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.45 Section 33.45... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.45 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to the calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics...

  6. MODIS Radiometric Calibration and Uncertainty Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chiang, Vincent; Sun, Junqiang; Wu, Aisheng

    2011-01-01

    Since launch, Terra and Aqua MODIS have collected more than II and 9 years of datasets for comprehensive studies of the Earth's land, ocean, and atmospheric properties. MODIS observations are made in 36 spectral bands: 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) and 16 thermal emissive bands (TEB). Compared to its heritage sensors, MODIS was developed with very stringent calibration and uncertainty requirements. As a result, MODIS was designed and built with a set of state of the art on-board calibrators (OBC), which allow key sensor performance parameters and on-orbit calibration coefficients to be monitored and updated if necessary. In terms of its calibration traceability, MODIS RSB calibration is reflectance based using an on-board solar diffuser (SD) and the TEB calibration is radiance based using an on-board blackbody (BB). In addition to on-orbit calibration coefficients derived from its OBC, calibration parameters determined from sensor pre-launch calibration and characterization are used in both the RSB and TEB calibration and retrieval algorithms. This paper provides a brief description of MODIS calibration methodologies and discusses details of its on-orbit calibration uncertainties. It assesses uncertainty contributions from individual components and differences between Terra and Aqua MODIS due to their design characteristics and on-orbit periormance. Also discussed in this paper is the use of MODIS LIB uncertainty index CUI) product.

  7. Calibration and Confidence: Where to next?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    2013-01-01

    One of the key feedback questions is "where to next?" and this article provides some directions as to where to next for research based on a review of the five articles in this special issue. The directions relate to the critical importance of calibration, the multidimensionality of calibration, the relation of calibration to self-regulation…

  8. The Characterization of Deep Convective Cloud Albedo as a Calibration Target Using MODIS Reflectances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doelling, David R.; Hong, Gang; Morstad, Daniel; Bhatt, Rajendra; Gopalan, Arun; Xiong, Jack

    2010-01-01

    There are over 25 years of historical satellite data available to climate analysis. The historical satellite data needs to be well calibrated, especially in the visible, where there is no onboard calibration on operational satellites. The key to the vicarious calibration of historical satellites relies on invariant targets, such as the moon, Dome C, and deserts. Deep convective clouds (DCC) also show promise of being a stable invariant or predictable target viewable by all satellites, since they behave as solar diffusers. However DCC have not been well characterized for calibration. Ten years of well-calibrated MODIS is now available. DCC can easily be identified using IR thresholds, where the IR calibration can be traced to the onboard black-bodies. The natural variability of DCC albedo will be analyzed geographically and seasonally, especially difference of convection initiated over land or ocean. Functionality between particle size and ozone absorption with DCC albedo will be examined. Although DCC clouds are nearly Lambertion, the angular distribution of reflectances will be sampled and compared with theoretical models. Both Aqua and Terra MODIS DCC angular models will be compared for consistency. Normalizing angular geostationary DCC reflectances, which were calibrated against MODIS, with SCIAMACHY spectral reflectances and comparing them to MODIS DCC reflectances will inspect the usage of DCC albedos as an absolute calibration target.

  9. Alpha-particles for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, George

    2008-09-01

    Alpha-particles are helium nuclei that deposit DNA damaging energy along their track that is 100 to 1000 times greater than that of conventionally used beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted therapy; the damage caused by alpha-particles is predominately double-stranded DNA breaks severe enough so as to be almost completely irreparable. This means that a small number of tracks through a cell nucleus can sterilize a cell and that, because the damage is largely irreparable, alpha-particle radiation is not susceptible to resistance as seen with external radiotherapy (e.g., in hypoxic tissue). The ability of a single track to influence biological outcome and the stochastic nature of alpha-particle decay require statistical or microdosimetric techniques to properly reflect likely biological outcome when the biologically relevant target is small or when a low number of radionuclide decays have occurred. In therapeutic implementations, microdosimetry is typically not required and the average absorbed dose over a target volume is typically calculated. Animal and cell culture studies have shown that, per unit absorbed dose, the acute biological effects of alpha-particles are 3 to 7 times greater than the damage caused by external beam or beta-particle radiation. Over the past ten to 15 years, alpha-particle emitting radionuclides have been investigated as a possible new class of radionuclides for targeted therapy. Results from the small number of clinical trials reported to date have shown efficacy without significant toxicity.

  10. High Temperature Stability of Potassium Beta Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Objectives section: Evaluate the stability of potassium beta alumina under potassium AMTEC operating conditions. Evaluate the stability regime in which potassium beta alumina can be fabricated.

  11. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  12. Dynamic size spectrometry of airborne microorganisms: Laboratory evaluation and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yinge; Willeke, Klaus; Ulevicius, Vidmantas; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Donnelly, Jean

    Bioaerosol samplers need to be calibrated for the microorganisms of interest. The Aerosizer, a relatively new aerodynamic size spectrometer, is shown to be a suitable dynamic instrument for the evaluation and calibration of such samplers in the laboratory, prior to their use in the field. It provides the necessary reference count against which the microbiological response of the sampler can be compared. It measures the health-significant aerodynamic diameters of microorganisms down to 0.5 μm, thus including most of the bacteria, fungi and pollen found in outdoor and indoor air environments. Comparison tests with a laser size spectrometer indicate that the suspension of microorganisms needs to be washed several times before aerosolization to avoid coating of the airborne microorganisms with nutrients and microbial slime from the suspension, and to reduce the residue particles to sizes below the lowest size of the aerosolized microorganisms.

  13. In situ calibrated defocusing PTV for wall-bounded measurement volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, T.; Hain, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    In many situations, 3D velocity measurements in thin (∼1 mm) but wide (∼100  ×  100 mm2) flow channels is an important task. To resolve the in-plane and out-of-plane velocity gradients properly, a precise calibration is required, since 3D measurement approaches rely strongly on the accuracy of the calibration procedure. It is likely that calibration targets do not fit domains with small depths, due to their size. Furthermore, in fields where such measurements are of interest, the accessibility of the measurement volume is often limited or even impossible. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper introduces an in situ calibrated defocusing particle tracking velocimetry approach for wall-bounded measurement domains with depths in the low millimeter range. The calibration function for the particle depth location is directly derived from the particle image geometries and their displacements between two frames. Employing only a single camera, this defocusing approach is capable of measuring the air flow between two parallel glass plates at a distance of 1 mm with an average uncertainty of 2.43% for each track, relative to the maximum velocity. A tomographic particle tracking velocimetry measurement, serving as a benchmark for the single camera technique, reaches an average uncertainty of 1.59%. Altogether, with its straightforward set-up and without requiring a calibration target, this in situ calibrated defocusing approach opens new areas of application for optical flow velocimetry. In particular, for measurement domains with small optical windows and a lack of accessibility.

  14. Airborne stellar spectrophotometry from 1.2 to 5.5 microns - Absolute calibration and spectra of stars earlier than M3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.; Erickson, E. F.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne infrared spectrophotometry (1.2-5.5 microns, 1.5% resolution) is presented for 13 stars which have been extensively used as infrared calibration objects: alpha Lyr, alpha CMA, alpha UMi, beta Dra, and mu Her; the K giants beta Gem, alpha UMa, alpha Boo, gamma-1 And, and alpha Tau; and the M giants beta And, beta Peg, and alpha Cet. These spectra, obtained using NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory and Lear Jet Observatory, are virtually free of the interfering effects of terrestrial absorptions. Absolute calibration of the spectrophotometry was based on the theoretical model of alpha Lyr by Schild, Peterson, and Oke (1971), which fits photometric measurements at shorter wavelengths. The resulting flux densities are compared with previous ground-based photometry.

  15. Spectral calibration for convex grating imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Chen, Yuheng; Shen, Weimin

    2013-12-01

    Spectral calibration of imaging spectrometer plays an important role for acquiring target accurate spectrum. There are two spectral calibration types in essence, the wavelength scanning and characteristic line sampling. Only the calibrated pixel is used for the wavelength scanning methods and he spectral response function (SRF) is constructed by the calibrated pixel itself. The different wavelength can be generated by the monochromator. The SRF is constructed by adjacent pixels of the calibrated one for the characteristic line sampling methods. And the pixels are illuminated by the narrow spectrum line and the center wavelength of the spectral line is exactly known. The calibration result comes from scanning method is precise, but it takes much time and data to deal with. The wavelength scanning method cannot be used in field or space environment. The characteristic line sampling method is simple, but the calibration precision is not easy to confirm. The standard spectroscopic lamp is used to calibrate our manufactured convex grating imaging spectrometer which has Offner concentric structure and can supply high resolution and uniform spectral signal. Gaussian fitting algorithm is used to determine the center position and the Full-Width-Half-Maximum(FWHM)of the characteristic spectrum line. The central wavelengths and FWHMs of spectral pixels are calibrated by cubic polynomial fitting. By setting a fitting error thresh hold and abandoning the maximum deviation point, an optimization calculation is achieved. The integrated calibration experiment equipment for spectral calibration is developed to enhance calibration efficiency. The spectral calibration result comes from spectral lamp method are verified by monochromator wavelength scanning calibration technique. The result shows that spectral calibration uncertainty of FWHM and center wavelength are both less than 0.08nm, or 5.2% of spectral FWHM.

  16. Langley method of calibrating UV filter radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusser, James; Gibson, James; Bigelow, David; Kolinski, Donald; Disterhoft, Patrick; Lantz, Kathleen; Beaubien, Arthur

    2000-02-01

    The Langley method of calibrating UV multifilter shadow band radiometers (UV-MFRSR) is explored in this paper. This method has several advantages over the traditional standard lamp calibrations: the Sun is a free, universally available, and very constant source, and nearly continual automated field calibrations can be made. Although 20 or so Langley events are required for an accurate calibration, the radiometer remains in the field during calibration. Difficulties arise as a result of changing ozone optical depth during the Langley event and the breakdown of the Beer-Lambert law over the finite filter band pass since optical depth changes rapidly with wavelength. The Langley calibration of the radiometers depends critically upon the spectral characterization of each channel and on the wavelength and absolute calibration of the extraterrestrial spectrum used. Results of Langley calibrations for two UV-MFRSRs at Mauna Loa, Hawaii were compared to calibrations using two National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable lamps. The objectives of this study were to compare Langley calibration factors with those from standard lamps and to compare field-of-view effects. The two radiometers were run simultaneously: one on a Sun tracker and the other in the conventional shadow-band configuration. Both radiometers were calibrated with two secondary 1000 W lamp, and later, the spectral response functions of the channels were measured. The ratio of Langley to lamp calibration factors for the seven channels from 300 nm to 368 nm using the shadow-band configuration ranged from 0.988 to 1.070. The estimated uncertainty in accuracy of the Langley calibrations ranged from ±3.8% at 300 nm to ±2.1% at 368 nm. For all channels calibrated with Central Ultraviolet Calibration Facility (CUCF) lamps the estimated uncertainty was ±2.5% for all channels.

  17. The Application of Global Kinetic Models to HMX Beta-Delta Transition and Cookoff Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wemhoff, A P; Burnham, A K; Nichols III, A L

    2006-12-07

    The reduction of the number of reactions in kinetic models for both the HMX beta-delta phase transition and thermal cookoff provides an attractive alternative to traditional multi-stage kinetic models due to reduced calibration effort requirements. In this study, we use the LLNL code ALE3D to provide calibrated kinetic parameters for a two-reaction bidirectional beta-delta HMX phase transition model based on Sandia Instrumented Thermal Ignition (SITI) and Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) temperature history curves, and a Prout-Tompkins cookoff model based on One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) data. Results show that the two-reaction bidirectional beta-delta transition model presented here agrees as well with STEX and SITI temperature history curves as a reversible four-reaction Arrhenius model, yet requires an order of magnitude less computational effort. In addition, a single-reaction Prout-Tompkins model calibrated to ODTX data provides better agreement with ODTX data than a traditional multi-step Arrhenius model, and can contain up to 90% less chemistry-limited time steps for low-temperature ODTX simulations. Manual calibration methods for the Prout-Tompkins kinetics provide much better agreement with ODTX experimental data than parameters derived from Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements at atmospheric pressure. The predicted surface temperature at explosion for STEX cookoff simulations is a weak function of the cookoff model used, and a reduction of up to 15% of chemistry-limited time steps can be achieved by neglecting the beta-delta transition for this type of simulation. Finally, the inclusion of the beta-delta transition model in the overall kinetics model can affect the predicted time to explosion by 1% for the traditional multi-step Arrhenius approach, while up to 11% using a Prout-Tompkins cookoff model.

  18. Auroral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-06-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  19. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  20. Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, J. D.; Ejiri, H.; Šimkovic, F.

    2016-11-01

    The observation of neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) will have important consequences. First it will signal that lepton number is not conserved and the neutrinos are Majorana particles. Second, it represents our best hope for determining the absolute neutrino mass scale at the level of a few tens of meV. To achieve the last goal, however, certain hurdles have to be overcome involving particle, nuclear and experimental physics. Particle physics is important since it provides the mechanisms for neutrinoless DBD. In this review, we emphasize the light neutrino mass mechanism. Nuclear physics is important for extracting the useful information from the data. One must accurately evaluate the relevant nuclear matrix elements (NMEs), a formidable task. To this end, we review the recently developed sophisticated nuclear structure approaches, employing different methods and techniques of calculation. We also examine the question of quenching of the axial vector coupling constant, which may have important consequences on the size of the NMEs. From an experimental point of view it is challenging, since the life times are extremely long and one has to fight against formidable backgrounds. One needs large isotopically enriched sources and detectors with good energy resolution and very low background.