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Sample records for beta-catenin signaling levels

  1. Negative regulation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in AGS gastric cancer cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ju Hyung; Park, Chi Hoon; Jung, Kyung Chae; Rhee, Ho Sung; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-09-30

    Functional activation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling plays an important role in early events in carcinogenesis. We examined the effect of naringenin against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that naringenin inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that the {beta}-catenin distribution and the levels of nuclear {beta}-catenin and Tcf-4 proteins were unchanged after naringenin treatment. Moreover, the binding activities of Tcf complexes to consensus DNA were not affected by naringenin. Taken together, these data suggest that naringenin inhibits {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer with unknown mechanisms.

  2. Roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in epithelial differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yajing; Sun, Zhaorui; Qiu, Xuefeng; Li, Yan; Qin, Jizheng; Han, Xiaodong

    2009-12-25

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to be able to differentiate into epithelial lineage, but the precise mechanisms controlling this process are unclear. Our aim is to explore the roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin in the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Using indirect co-culture of rat MSCs with rat airway epithelial cells (RTE), MSCs expressed several airway epithelial markers (cytokeratin 18, tight junction protein occudin, cystic fibrosis transmembrance regulator). The protein levels of some important members in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling were determined, suggested down-regulation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin with epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, Wnt3{alpha} can inhibit the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. A loss of {beta}-catenin induced by Dickkopf-1 can enhance MSCs differentiation into epithelial cells. Lithium chloride transiently activated {beta}-catenin expression and subsequently decreased {beta}-catenin level and at last inhibited MSCs to differentiate into airway epithelium. Taken together, our study indicated that RTE cells can trigger epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Blocking Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling may promote MSCs to differentiate towards airway epithelial cells.

  3. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates {beta}-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of {beta}-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of {beta}-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and {beta}-catenin-induced cell death.

  4. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates beta-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of beta-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of beta-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and beta-catenin-induced cell death.

  5. Wnt-3A/beta-catenin signaling induces transcription from the LEF-1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Filali, Mohammed; Cheng, Ningli; Abbott, Duane; Leontiev, Vladimir; Engelhardt, John F

    2002-09-06

    Members of the Wnt family of secreted molecules have been established as key factors in determining cell fate and morphogenic signaling. It has long been recognized that Wnt induces morphogenic signaling through the Tcf/LEF-1 cascade by regulating free intracellular levels of beta-catenin, a co-factor for Tcf/LEF-1 transcription factors. In the present study, we have demonstrated that Wnt-3A can also directly induce transcription from the LEF-1 promoter. This induction was dependent on glycogen synthase kinase 3beta inactivation, a rise in free intracellular beta-catenin, and a short 110-bp Wnt-responsive element (WRE) in the LEF-1 promoter. Linear and internal deletion of this WRE led to a dramatic increase in constitutive LEF-1 promoter activity and loss of Wnt-3A responsiveness. In isolation, the 110-bp WRE conferred context-independent Wnt-3A or beta-catenin(S37A) responsiveness to a heterologous SV40 promoter. Studies expressing dominant active and negative forms of LEF-1, beta-catenin, GSK-3beta, and beta-catenin/LEF-1 fusions suggest that Wnt-3A activates the LEF-1 promoter through a beta-catenin-dependent and LEF-1-independent process. Wnt-3A expression also induced multiple changes in the binding of factors to the WRE and suggests that regulatory mechanisms may involve modulation of a multiprotein complex. In summary, these results provide evidence for transcriptional regulation of the LEF-1 promoter by Wnt and enhance the mechanistic understanding of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the regulation of LEF-1-dependent developmental processes.

  6. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, nabumetone, differentially inhibits beta-catenin signaling in the MIN mouse and azoxymethane-treated rat models of colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Hemant K; Karolski, William J; Wali, Ramesh K; Ratashak, Anne; Hart, John; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2005-01-20

    The mechanisms through which beta-catenin signaling is inhibited during colorectal cancer chemoprevention by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents is incompletely understood. We report that nabumetone decreased uninvolved intestinal mucosal beta-catenin levels in the MIN mouse with a concomitant increase in glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta levels, an enzyme that targets beta-catenin for destruction. However, in the azoxymethane-treated rat, where beta-catenin is frequently rendered GSK-3beta-insensitive, nabumetone failed to alter beta-catenin levels but did decrease beta-catenin nuclear localization and transcriptional activity as gauged by cyclin D1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the differential mechanisms for beta-catenin suppression may be determined, at least partly, by GSK-3beta.

  7. Teaching resource. Beta-catenin signaling and axis specification.

    PubMed

    Moon, Randall T

    2004-06-29

    This animation provides a representation of the beta-catenin signaling pathway in response to fertilization and the process of axis specification that occurs early in development. The process shown is based on analysis of embryos of the amphibian Xenopus. This animation would be useful in illustrating events that occur early in embryogenesis and how embryos become polarized as a consequence of localized signaling processes.

  8. Once upon a time there was beta-catenin in cadherin-mediated signalling.

    PubMed

    Gavard, Julie; Mège, René-Marc

    2005-12-01

    beta-Catenin was initially characterized as a protein interacting with the cadherin cytoplasmic tail and regulating cell-cell contacts and actin cytoskeleton interactions. Moreover, the gene coding for the Drosophila orthologue of beta-catenin, armadillo, was independently identified downstream of wingless in the segment-polarity signalling pathway. In fact, beta-catenin/Armadillo turned out to be key mediators of the Wnt/Wingless pathways in vertebrates and invertebrates. beta-Catenin participates in both adhesion and signalling functions in a mutually exclusive manner; bound to cadherins at the plasma membrane or 'unbound' in cytosolic or nuclear complexes. This model had placed beta-catenin at the crossroads between cadherin and Wnt signalling, leading to the dogma of inhibition of beta-catenin signalling by cadherins.

  9. Teaching resource. Canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Randall T

    2004-06-29

    This animation provides an interactive presentation of the Wnt signaling pathway as it may occur in multiple cell types. This animation would be useful in teaching developmental biology, immunology, and cell signaling courses. Activation of Wnt pathways can modulate cell proliferation, cell survival, cell behavior, and cell fate. In the basal, unstimulated state in the absence of ligand, there is a constitutively active kinase, which phosphorylates target proteins, resulting in their degradation. Thus, the presence of the ligand Wnt inactivates the kinase allowing accumulation of beta-catenin, which then translocates to the nucleus and acts as a transcriptional regulator.

  10. PAK1 interacts with beta-catenin and is required for the regulation of the beta-catenin signalling pathway by gastrins.

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2008-10-01

    Beta-catenin regulates cell-cell adhesion by binding to E-cadherin at the cell membrane and, when translocated into the nucleus, mediates signalling by activation of transcription factors such as TCF4. Mutations of the components of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway are found in many gastrointestinal cancers. Gastrins, including amidated (Gamide) and glycine-extended (Ggly) gastrin(17), stimulate the proliferation of gastrointestinal cancer cells. Gastrins also regulate beta-catenin signalling through multiple pathways which seem to converge on p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In this study, we have investigated the role of PAK1 in the regulation of beta-catenin signalling by gastrins. Here we report for the first time that PAK1 associated with beta-catenin. Both Gamide and Ggly stimulated the phosphorylation and activation of beta-catenin in a PAK1-dependent manner. A kinase-inactive mutant PAK1(K299A) blocked the gastrin-stimulated dissociation of beta-catenin from E-cadherin, translocation of beta-catenin from the cell membrane to the nucleus, and association of beta-catenin with the transcription factor TCF4. The PAK1(K299A) mutant also inhibited the stimulation of the expression of c-myc and cyclin D1, and of cell proliferation and migration, by gastrins. The results indicate that gastrins regulate beta-catenin signalling through a PAK1-dependent pathway. PAK1 seems to be the point of convergence of multiple signalling pathways activated by gastrins.

  11. alpha-Catenin overrides Src-dependent activation of beta-catenin oncogenic signaling.

    PubMed

    Inge, Landon J; Rajasekaran, Sigrid A; Wolle, Daniel; Barwe, Sonali P; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Ewing, Charles M; Isaacs, William B; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K

    2008-06-01

    Loss of alpha-catenin is one of the characteristics of prostate cancer. The catenins (alpha and beta) associated with E-cadherin play a critical role in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion. Tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin dissociates it from E-cadherin and facilitates its entry into the nucleus, where beta-catenin acts as a transcriptional activator inducing genes involved in cell proliferation. Thus, beta-catenin regulates cell-cell adhesion and cell proliferation. Mechanisms controlling the balance between these functions of beta-catenin invariably are altered in cancer. Although a wealth of information is available about beta-catenin deregulation during oncogenesis, much less is known about how or whether alpha-catenin regulates beta-catenin functions. In this study, we show that alpha-catenin acts as a switch regulating the cell-cell adhesion and proliferation functions of beta-catenin. In alpha-catenin-null prostate cancer cells, reexpression of alpha-catenin increased cell-cell adhesion and decreased beta-catenin transcriptional activity, cyclin D1 levels, and cell proliferation. Further, Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin is a major mechanism for decreased beta-catenin interaction with E-cadherin in alpha-catenin-null cells. alpha-Catenin attenuated the effect of Src phosphorylation by increasing beta-catenin association with E-cadherin. We also show that alpha-catenin increases the sensitivity of prostate cancer cells to a Src inhibitor in suppressing cell proliferation. This study reveals for the first time that alpha-catenin is a key regulator of beta-catenin transcriptional activity and that the status of alpha-catenin expression in tumor tissues might have prognostic value for Src targeted therapy.

  12. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway in hepatocellular carcinomas cases from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Suarez M, Iris; Uribe, Diego; Jaramillo, Carlos M; Osorio, German; Perez, Juan C; Lopez, Rocio; Hoyos, Sergio; Hainaut, Pierre; Pineau, Pascal; Navas, Maria-C

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer diagnosed worldwide. Deregulation of Wnt/beta-catenin pathway has been associated with the development of HCC in a substantial number of cases in Europe and far less in Asia. Nothing is known about this pathway in HCC cases from South America. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of mutations in beta-catenin gene (CTNNB1) and the subcellular localization of beta-catenin in HCC cases from Colombia. We determine by direct sequencing the frequency of mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1 gene and by immunohistochemistry the subcellular localization of beta-catenin in 54 samples of HCC obtained from three pathology units in Bogota and Medellin cities. Only three HCC cases (5.6%) were found mutated at residues (G34E, S45P, P44S, T41I) important for phosphorylation and ubiquitination of beta-catenin protein. Strikingly, nuclear or cytoplasmic accumulation of beta-catenin, hallmark of Wnt pathway activation, was found in 42.6% HCC cases (23/54). Interestingly, beta-catenin accumulation was significantly more frequent in young patients and hepatitis B virus-related HCC. Although, CTNNB1 exon 3 mutations are not frequent in HCC from Colombian patients, our findings indicate that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is activated in 42.6% of HCC samples. Furthermore, Wnt signaling was demonstrated in HCC cases associated of HBV infection, one of the most important HCC risk factors in Colombia.

  13. IKK and (Beta) - Catenin in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    activity is not due to a decrease in total beta-catenin protein levels, however, the dephosphorylated form of beta-catenin within the nucleus...2000. 19. Staal F J, Noort MM, Strous G J, and Clevers HC, Wnt signals are transmitted through N-terminally dephosphorylated beta-catenin. EMBO Rep. 3...catenin is phoshorylated sequentially by casein kinase 1 (CK1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3-P (GSK-313) (4,52); activation of frizzled receptors by Wnt

  14. [Dual-role regulations of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Chen-guang; Zhou, Chun-yan

    2010-04-18

    In recent years, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been identified as a key player in embryogenesis and human diseases. Canonical Wnt signaling pathway is controlled by a variety of classic molecules like Wnt, beta-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK-3beta and CK1, which interact and coordinate to regulate the expressions of cell signaling molecules. The latest evidences suggest that some components of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, like APC, GSK-3beta, CK1, Dkk2 and WISE, play dual roles different from what they have been thought previously. Here we reviewed some recent discoveries on the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway to provide some new ideas and principles for signaling transduction studies.

  15. Excessive Wnt/beta-catenin signaling promotes midbrain floor plate neurogenesis, but results in vacillating dopamine progenitors.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Navid; Patel, Meera J; Joksimovic, Milan; Poulin, Jean-Francois; Anderegg, Angela; Taketo, M Mark; Ma, Yong-Chao; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2015-09-01

    The floor plate (FP), a ventral midline structure of the developing neural tube, has differential neurogenic capabilities along the anterior-posterior axis. The midbrain FP, unlike the hindbrain and spinal cord floor plate, is highly neurogenic and produces midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons. Canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, at least in part, is thought to account for the difference in neurogenic capability. Removal of beta-catenin results in mDA progenitor specification defects as well as a profound reduction of neurogenesis. To examine the effects of excessive Wnt/beta-catenin signaling on mDA specification and neurogenesis, we have analyzed a model wherein beta-catenin is conditionally stabilized in the Shh+domain. Here, we show that the Foxa2+/Lmx1a+ domain is extended rostrally in mutant embryos, suggesting that canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling can drive FP expansion along the rostrocaudal axis. Although excess canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling generally promotes neurogenesis at midbrain levels, less tyrosine hydroxylase (Th)+, mDA neurons are generated, particularly impacting the Substantia Nigra pars compacta. This is likely because of improper progenitor specification. Excess canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling causes downregulation of net Lmx1b, Shh and Foxa2 levels in mDA progenitors. Moreover, these progenitors assume a mixed identity to that of Lmx1a+/Lmx1b+/Nkx6-1+/Neurog1+ progenitors. We also show by lineage tracing analysis that normally, Neurog1+ progenitors predominantly give rise to Pou4f1+ neurons, but not Th+ neurons. Accordingly, in the mutant embryos, Neurog1+ progenitors at the midline generate ectopic Pou4f1+ neurons at the expense of Th+ mDA neurons. Our study suggests that an optimal dose of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is critical for proper establishment of the mDA progenitor character. Our findings will impact embryonic stem cell protocols that utilize Wnt pathway reagents to derive mDA neuron models and therapeutics for

  16. Beta-Catenin Signaling in Hepatic Development and Progenitors: Which Way Does the WNT Blow?

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Abigale G.; Monga, Satdarshan P. S.

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is an evolutionarily conserved signaling cascade that plays key roles in development and adult tissue homeostasis and is aberrantly activated in many tumors. Over a decade of work in mouse, chick, xenopus, and zebrafish models has uncovered multiple functions of this pathway in hepatic pathophysiology. Specifically, beta-catenin, the central component of the canonical Wnt pathway, is implicated in the regulation of liver regeneration, development, and carcinogenesis. Wnt-independent activation of beta-catenin by receptor tyrosine kinases has also been observed in the liver. In liver development across various species, through regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation, beta-catenin directs foregut endoderm specification, hepatic specification of the foregut, and hepatic morphogenesis. Its role has also been defined in adult hepatic progenitors or oval cells especially in their expansion and differentiation. Thus, beta-catenin undergoes tight temporal regulation to exhibit pleiotropic effects during hepatic development and in hepatic progenitor biology. PMID:21337461

  17. TGF-{beta} modulates {beta}-Catenin stability and signaling in mesenchymal proliferations

    SciTech Connect

    Amini Nik, Saeid; Ebrahim, Rasoul Pour; Dam, Kim van; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Tejpar, Sabine . E-mail: sabine.tejpar@med.kuleuven.be

    2007-08-01

    Here for the first time we showed, despite the oncogenic mutations in {beta}-Catenin, that TGF-{beta} is a modulator of {beta}-Catenin levels in tumoral fibroblasts as well as non-tumoral fibroblasts. The results show that the TGF-{beta} pathway is active in desmoids cells and in in situ tumors. A dose dependent increase in {beta}-Catenin protein levels was observed after TGF-{beta} treatment in combination with an increased repression of GSK-3{beta} both in normal and tumoral fibroblasts. TGF-{beta} stimulation also led to an altered - up to 5 fold - transcriptional activity of {beta}-Catenin responsive promoters, such as IGFBP6 as well as increase of TOPflash activity. TGF-{beta} stimulation increased cell proliferation and BrdU incorporation 2.5 times. Taken together, we propose that TGF-{beta} is a modulator of {beta}-Catenin levels in tumoral fibroblasts and non-tumoral fibroblasts, despite the oncogenic mutations already present in this gene in tumoral fibroblasts of desmoid tumors. This modulation of {beta}-Catenin levels by TGF-{beta} may be involved in determining the tumoral phenotype of the cells.

  18. Sonic hedgehog acts as a negative regulator of {beta}-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Fabian T; Schänzer, Anne; Czupalla, Cathrin J; Thom, Sonja; Engels, Knut; Schmidt, Mirko H H; Plate, Karl H; Liebner, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in taste papilla development; however, its role in epithelial maintenance and tumor progression in the adult tongue remains elusive. We show Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activation in reporter mice and by nuclear beta-catenin staining in the epithelium and taste papilla of adult mouse and human tongues. beta-Catenin activation in APC(min/+) mice, which carry a mutation in adenomatous poliposis coli (APC), up-regulates Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Jagged-2 (JAG2) in the tongue epithelium without formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We demonstrate that Shh suppresses beta-catenin transcriptional activity in a signaling-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. A similar regulation and function was observed for JAG2, suggesting that both pathways negatively regulate beta-catenin, thereby preventing SCC formation in the tongue. This was supported by reduced nuclear beta-catenin in the tongue epithelium of Patched(+/-) mice, exhibiting dominant active Shh signaling. At the invasive front of human tongue cancer, nuclear beta-catenin and Shh were increased, suggesting their participation in tumor progression. Interestingly, Shh but not JAG2 was able to reduce beta-catenin signaling in SCC cells, arguing for a partial loss of negative feedback on beta-catenin transcription in tongue cancer. We show for the first time that the putative Wnt/beta-catenin targets Shh and JAG2 control beta-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium, a function that is partially lost in lingual SCC.

  19. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling regulates cancer stem cells in lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Ying; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Yawei; Ma, Daoxin

    2010-02-12

    Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling plays an important role not only in cancer, but also in cancer stem cells. In this study, we found that {beta}-catenin and OCT-4 was highly expressed in cisplatin (DDP) selected A549 cells. Stimulating A549 cells with lithium chloride (LiCl) resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin and up-regulation of a typical Wnt target gene cyclin D1. This stimulation also significantly enhanced proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities in A549 cells. Moreover, the up-regulation of OCT-4, a stem cell marker, was observed through real-time PCR and Western blotting. In a reverse approach, we inhibited Wnt signaling by knocking down the expression of {beta}-catenin using RNA interference technology. This inhibition resulted in down-regulation of the Wnt target gene cyclin D1 as well as the proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities. Meanwhile, the expression of OCT-4 was reduced after the inhibition of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Taken together, our study provides strong evidence that canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in lung cancer stem cell properties, and it also regulates OCT-4, a lung cancer stem cell marker.

  20. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway interacts differentially with PTHrP signaling to control chondrocyte hypertrophy and final maturation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xizhi; Mak, Kinglun Kingston; Taketo, Makoto M; Yang, Yingzi

    2009-06-26

    Sequential proliferation, hypertrophy and maturation of chondrocytes are required for proper endochondral bone development and tightly regulated by cell signaling. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway acts through beta-catenin to promote chondrocyte hypertrophy whereas PTHrP signaling inhibits it by holding chondrocytes in proliferating states. Here we show by genetic approaches that chondrocyte hypertrophy and final maturation are two distinct developmental processes that are differentially regulated by Wnt/beta-catenin and PTHrP signaling. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling regulates initiation of chondrocyte hypertrophy by inhibiting PTHrP signaling activity, but it does not regulate PTHrP expression. In addition, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling regulates chondrocyte hypertrophy in a non-cell autonomous manner and Gdf5/Bmp signaling may be one of the downstream pathways. Furthermore, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling also controls final maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, but such regulation is PTHrP signaling-independent.

  1. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    SciTech Connect

    Scherbakov, Alexander M.; Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E.; Berstein, Lev M.; Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A.

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  2. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans, gomisins J and N inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Chul Young; Nho, Chu Won

    2012-11-16

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the possible molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway and the induction of G0/G1-phase arrest by gomisins J and N, derived from the fruits of S. chinensis, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N disrupted the binding of {beta}-catenin to specific DNA sequences, TBE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the HCT116 cell proliferation through G0/G1 phase arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the expression of Cyc D1, a Wnt/{beta}-catenin target gene. -- Abstract: Here, we report that gomisin J and gomisin N, dibenzocyclooctadiene type lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis, inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in HCT116 cells. Gomisins J and N appear to inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction between {beta}-catenin and its specific target DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) rather than by altering the expression of the {beta}-catenin protein. Gomisins J and N inhibit HCT116 cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase arrest induced by gomisins J and N appears to be caused by a decrease in the expression of Cyclin D1, a representative target gene of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway, as well as Cdk2, Cdk4, and E2F-1. Therefore, gomisins J and N, the novel Wnt/{beta}-catenin inhibitors discovered in this study, may serve as potential agents for the prevention and treatment of human colorectal cancers.

  3. The human and mouse sex-determining SRY genes repress the Rspol/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yun-Fai Chris; Li, Yunmin

    2009-04-01

    The sex-determining region Y (SRY) is the gene on the Y chromosome responsible for switching on male sex determination during mammalian embryogenesis. In its absence, ovaries develop in the embryo. Hence, ovarian determination and differentiation is considered to be a default, or passive, developmental pathway. Recently this classical paradigm of sex determination has been challenged with the discovery of the R-spondin 1 (RSPO1) as an active ovarian determinant. Mutations of RSPO1 cause a female-to-male sex reversal. RSPO1 synergizes with WNT4 in activating an ovarian development in the bipotential gonad via the canonical Wnt signaling. Early studies showed that SRY represses such Wnt signaling, but also generated discrepancies on whether only mouse Sry is capable of inhibiting such Wnt signaling and whether both human and mouse SRY proteins are able to interact with beta-catenin, the intracellular messenger responsible for executing the Wnt signals. Our studies show that both human SRY and mouse Sry are capable of repressing the Rspo1/Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. However, the repression activities vary among different SRY/Sry proteins and paradoxically related to the presence and/or size of an acidic/glutamine-rich domain. The HMG box of human SRY could bind directly to beta-catenin while the mouse Sry binds to beta-catenin via its HMG box and glutamine-rich domain. The results clarify some of the initial discrepancies, and raise the possibility that SRY interacts with beta-catenin in the nucleus and represses the transcriptional activation of the Rspo1/Wnt target genes involved in ovarian determination, thereby switching on testis determination.

  4. Convergence of 3',5'-cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate/protein kinase A and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin signaling in corpus luteum progesterone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Lynn; McDonald, Claudia A; Jiang, Chao; Maroni, Dulce; Zeleznik, Anthony J; Wyatt, Todd A; Hou, Xiaoying; Davis, John S

    2009-11-01

    Progesterone secretion by the steroidogenic cells of the corpus luteum (CL) is essential for reproduction. Progesterone synthesis is under the control of LH, but the exact mechanism of this regulation is unknown. It is established that LH stimulates the LH receptor/choriogonadotropin receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor, to increase cAMP and activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that cAMP/PKA-dependent regulation of the Wnt pathway components glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta and beta-catenin contributes to LH-dependent steroidogenesis in luteal cells. We observed that LH via a cAMP/PKA-dependent mechanism stimulated the phosphorylation of GSK3beta at N-terminal Ser9 causing its inactivation and resulted in the accumulation of beta-catenin. Overexpression of N-terminal truncated beta-catenin (Delta90 beta-catenin), which lacks the phosphorylation sites responsible for its destruction, significantly augmented LH-stimulated progesterone secretion. In contrast, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3beta (GSK-S9A) reduced beta-catenin levels and inhibited LH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the association of beta-catenin with the proximal promoter of the StAR gene, a gene that expresses the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, which is a cholesterol transport protein that controls a rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. Collectively these data suggest that cAMP/PKA regulation of GSK3beta/beta-catenin signaling may contribute to the acute increase in progesterone production in response to LH.

  5. Beta-catenin and Hedgehog signal strength can specify number and location of hair follicles in adult epidermis without recruitment of bulge stem cells.

    PubMed

    Silva-Vargas, Violeta; Lo Celso, Cristina; Giangreco, Adam; Ofstad, Tyler; Prowse, David M; Braun, Kristin M; Watt, Fiona M

    2005-07-01

    Using K14deltaNbeta-cateninER transgenic mice, we show that short-term, low-level beta-catenin activation stimulates de novo hair follicle formation from sebaceous glands and interfollicular epidermis, while only sustained, high-level activation induces new follicles from preexisting follicles. The Hedgehog pathway is upregulated by beta-catenin activation, and inhibition of Hedgehog signaling converts the low beta-catenin phenotype to wild-type epidermis and the high phenotype to low. beta-catenin-induced follicles contain clonogenic keratinocytes that express bulge markers; the follicles induce dermal papillae and provide a niche for melanocytes, and they undergo 4OHT-dependent cycles of growth and regression. New follicles induced in interfollicular epidermis are derived from that cellular compartment and not through bulge stem cell migration or division. These results demonstrate the remarkable capacity of adult epidermis to be reprogrammed by titrating beta-catenin and Hedgehog signal strength and establish that cells from interfollicular epidermis can acquire certain characteristics of bulge stem cells.

  6. Jade-1 inhibits Wnt signalling by ubiquitylating beta-catenin and mediates Wnt pathway inhibition by pVHL.

    PubMed

    Chitalia, Vipul C; Foy, Rebecca L; Bachschmid, Markus M; Zeng, Liling; Panchenko, Maria V; Zhou, Mina I; Bharti, Ajit; Seldin, David C; Lecker, Stewart H; Dominguez, Isabel; Cohen, Herbert T

    2008-10-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau protein pVHL suppresses renal tumorigenesis in part by promoting the degradation of hypoxia-inducible HIF-alpha transcription factors; additional mechanisms have been proposed. pVHL also stabilizes the plant homeodomain protein Jade-1, which is a candidate renal tumour suppressor that may correlate with renal cancer risk. Here we show that Jade-1 binds the oncoprotein beta-catenin in Wnt-responsive fashion. Moreover, Jade-1 destabilizes wild-type beta-catenin but not a cancer-causing form of beta-catenin. Whereas the well-established beta-catenin E3 ubiquitin ligase component beta-TrCP ubiquitylates only phosphorylated beta-catenin, Jade-1 ubiquitylates both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated beta-catenin and therefore regulates canonical Wnt signalling in both Wnt-off and Wnt-on phases. Thus, the different characteristics of beta-TrCP and Jade-1 may ensure optimal Wnt pathway regulation. Furthermore, pVHL downregulates beta-catenin in a Jade-1-dependent manner and inhibits Wnt signalling, supporting a role for Jade-1 and Wnt signalling in renal tumorigenesis. The pVHL tumour suppressor and the Wnt tumorigenesis pathway are therefore directly linked through Jade-1.

  7. Activation of beta-catenin signalling increases StarD7 gene expression in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Rena, V; Angeletti, S; Panzetta-Dutari, G; Genti-Raimondi, S

    2009-10-01

    StarD7 gene encodes a protein that belongs to the StAR-related lipid transfer proteins involved in intracellular transport and metabolism of lipids. It has been previously documented that StarD7 has a wide-spread mRNA expression in trophoblastic tissues and several tumour cell lines with highest levels in both choriocarcinoma JEG-3 and JAR cells, hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, and colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of the human StarD7 gene, we have cloned and characterized the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Transient transfections of several 5'deleted StarD7-promoter-firefly luciferase constructs into JEG-3 cells indicated that the -312/+157 region contains the gene minimal promoter. In addition, sequence analysis of a 1.6kb gene fragment revealed the presence of a TATA-less promoter as well as multiple regulatory motifs, including one regulatory element corresponding to the T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) binding site. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta), a component of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling, increased both StarD7 mRNA and protein expression as well as its promoter activity. Co-transfection experiments in JEG-3 cell line revealed that the StarD7 promoter is activated by TCF4 transcription factor and by its beta-catenin coactivator. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of the TCF4 site located -614/-608bp relative to the transcription start site markedly diminished StarD7 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that beta-catenin and TCF4 are bound in vivo to the StarD7 gene promoter in JEG-3 cells treated with lithium chloride. Collectively, these studies show that beta-catenin and TCF4 activate the human StarD7 gene interacting with its promoter region through Wnt/beta-catenin signalling.

  8. Pituitary gland and beta-catenin signaling: from ontogeny to oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gueorguiev, Maria; Grossman, Ashley B

    2009-01-01

    Although pituitary tumors are mostly benign, they share certain molecular events with more malignant neoplasia, although their precise pathogenesis is far from established. The acquisition of new functional characteristics during their evolution suggests a multistep process that leads to tumor transformation. Mutations in classical tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes are infrequently associated with pituitary tumorigenesis. However, alterations in different signaling pathways, especially those involved in pituitary gland development, have emerged as significant features in pituitary adenomas. In particular, changes in inhibitory components of the beta-catenin pathway and its relationship to the cadherin family of peptides may well play an important role in tumorigenesis. We review and assess the role of the beta-catenin signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas.

  9. Apc bridges Wnt/{beta}-catenin and BMP signaling during osteoblast differentiation of KS483 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miclea, Razvan L.; Horst, Geertje van der; Robanus-Maandag, Els C.; Loewik, Clemens W.G.M.; Oostdijk, Wilma; Wit, Jan M.; Karperien, Marcel

    2011-06-10

    The canonical Wnt signaling pathway influences the differentiation of mesenchymal cell lineages in a quantitative and qualitative fashion depending on the dose of {beta}-catenin signaling. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) is the critical intracellular regulator of {beta}-catenin turnover. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of Apc in regulating the differentiation capacity of skeletal progenitor cells, we have knocked down Apc in the murine mesenchymal stem cell-like KS483 cells by stable expression of Apc-specific small interfering RNA. In routine culture, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells displayed a mesenchymal-like spindle shape morphology, exhibited markedly decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Apc knockdown resulted in upregulation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin and the BMP/Smad signaling pathways, but osteogenic differentiation was completely inhibited. This effect could be rescued by adding high concentrations of BMP-7 to the differentiation medium. Furthermore, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells showed no potential to differentiate into chondrocytes or adipocytes. These results demonstrate that Apc is essential for the proliferation, survival and differentiation of KS483 cells. Apc knockdown blocks the osteogenic differentiation of skeletal progenitor cells, a process that can be overruled by high BMP signaling.

  10. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cross-talks with canonical Wnt signaling via phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junxing; Yue, Wanfu; Zhu, Mei J.; Sreejayan, Nair; Du, Min

    2010-04-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism; its activity is regulated by a plethora of physiological conditions, exercises and many anti-diabetic drugs. Recent studies show that AMPK involves in cell differentiation but the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Wingless Int-1 (Wnt)/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway regulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through enhancing {beta}-catenin/T-cell transcription factor 1 (TCF) mediated transcription. The objective of this study was to determine whether AMPK cross-talks with Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling through phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin. C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells were used. Chemical inhibition of AMPK and the expression of a dominant negative AMPK decreased phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552. The {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription was correlated with AMPK activity. In vitro, pure AMPK phosphorylated {beta}-catenin at Ser 552 and the mutation of Ser 552 to Ala prevented such phosphorylation, which was further confirmed using [{gamma}-{sup 32}P]ATP autoradiography. In conclusion, AMPK phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at Ser 552, which stabilizes {beta}-catenin, enhances {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription, expanding AMPK from regulation of energy metabolism to cell differentiation and development via cross-talking with the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  11. Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling and Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Voronkov, Andrey; Krauss, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a branch of a functional network that dates back to the first metazoans and it is involved in a broad range of biological systems including stem cells, embryonic development and adult organs. Deregulation of components involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in a wide spectrum of diseases including a number of cancers and degenerative diseases. The key mediator of Wnt signaling, β-catenin, serves several cellular functions. It functions in a dynamic mode at multiple cellular locations, including the plasma membrane, where β-catenin contributes to the stabilization of intercellular adhesive complexes, the cytoplasm where β-catenin levels are regulated and the nucleus where β-catenin is involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin interactions. Central effectors of β-catenin levels are a family of cysteine-rich secreted glycoproteins, known as Wnt morphogens. Through the LRP5/6-Frizzled receptor complex, Wnts regulate the location and activity of the destruction complex and consequently intracellular β- catenin levels. However, β-catenin levels and their effects on transcriptional programs are also influenced by multiple other factors including hypoxia, inflammation, hepatocyte growth factor-mediated signaling, and the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The broad implications of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in development, in the adult body and in disease render the pathway a prime target for pharmacological research and development. The intricate regulation of β-catenin at its various locations provides alternative points for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23016862

  12. Regulation of intracellular beta-catenin levels by the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor-suppressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Munemitsu, S; Albert, I; Souza, B; Rubinfeld, B; Polakis, P

    1995-01-01

    The APC tumor-suppressor protein associates with beta-catenin, a cell adhesion protein that is upregulated by the WNT1 oncogene. We examined the effects of exogenous APC expression on the distribution and amount of beta-catenin in a colorectal cancer cell containing only mutant APC. Expression of wild-type APC caused a pronounced reduction in total beta-catenin levels by eliminating an excessive supply of cytoplasmic beta-catenin indigenous to the SW480 colorectal cancer cell line. This reduction was due to an enhanced rate of beta-catenin protein degradation. Truncated mutant APC proteins, characteristic of those associated with cancer, lacked this activity. Mutational analysis revealed that the central region of the APC protein, which is typically deleted or severely truncated in tumors, was responsible for the down-regulation of beta-catenin. These results suggest that the tumor-suppressor activity of mutant APC may be compromised due to a defect in its ability to regulate beta-catenin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708772

  13. EpCAM Intracellular Domain Promotes Porcine Cell Reprogramming by Upregulation of Pluripotent Gene Expression via Beta-catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tong; Ma, Yangyang; Wang, Huayan

    2017-01-01

    Previous study showed that expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) was significantly upregulated in porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs). However, the regulatory mechanism and the downstream target genes of EpCAM were not well investigated. In this study, we found that EpCAM was undetectable in fibroblasts, but highly expressed in piPSCs. Promoter of EpCAM was upregulated by zygotic activated factors LIN28, and ESRRB, but repressed by maternal factors OCT4 and SOX2. Knocking down EpCAM by shRNA significantly reduced the pluripotent gene expression. Conversely, overexpression of EpCAM significantly increased the number of alkaline phosphatase positive colonies and elevated the expression of endogenous pluripotent genes. As a key surface-to-nucleus factor, EpCAM releases its intercellular domain (EpICD) by a two-step proteolytic processing sequentially. Blocking the proteolytic processing by inhibitors TAPI-1 and DAPT could reduce the intracellular level of EpICD and lower expressions of OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, and ESRRB. We noticed that increasing intracellular EpICD only was unable to improve activity of EpCAM targeted genes, but by blocking GSK-3 signaling and stabilizing beta-catenin signaling, EpICD could then significantly stimulate the promoter activity. These results showed that EpCAM intracellular domain required beta-catenin signaling to enhance porcine cell reprogramming. PMID:28393933

  14. Positive reciprocal regulation of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 and beta-catenin/TCF signaling.

    PubMed

    Bheda, Anjali; Yue, Wei; Gullapalli, Anuradha; Whitehurst, Chris; Liu, Renshui; Pagano, Joseph S; Shackelford, Julia

    2009-06-18

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are involved in the regulation of distinct critical cellular processes. Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase L1 (UCH L1) has been linked to several neurological diseases as well as human cancer, but the physiological targets and the regulation of UCH L1 expression in vivo have been largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that UCH L1 up-regulates beta-catenin/TCF signaling: UCH L1 forms endogenous complexes with beta-catenin, stabilizes it and up-regulates beta-catenin/TCF-dependent transcription. We also show that, reciprocally, beta-catenin/TCF signaling up-regulates expression of endogenous UCH L1 mRNA and protein. Moreover, using ChIP assay and direct mutagenesis we identify two TCF4-binding sites on the uch l1 promoter that are involved in this regulation. Since the expression and deubiquitinating activity of UCH L1 are required for its own basic promoter activity, we propose that UCH L1 up-regulates its expression by activation of the oncogenic beta-catenin/TCF signaling in transformed cells.

  15. Inhibition of {beta}-catenin-mediated transactivation by flavanone in AGS gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chi Hoon; Hahm, Eun Ryeong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Kyung Chae; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-06-17

    Recently, data which prove that Wnt pathway activation may be an early event in multistep carcinogenesis in the stomach have been accumulating. We examined the effect of flavanone against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in AGS gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that flavanone inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by flavanone in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that there is no change of {beta}-catenin distribution and of nuclear {beta}-catenin levels through flavanone. In addition, the binding of Tcf complexes to DNA is not influenced by flavanone. The {beta}-catenin/Tcf transcriptional target gene cyclinD1 was downregulated by flavanone. These data suggest that flavanone inhibits the transcription of {beta}-catenin/Tcf responsive genes, by modulating Tcf activity without disrupting {beta}-catenin/Tcf complex formation.

  16. Selection of multipotent stem cells during morphogenesis of small intestinal crypts of Lieberkuhn is perturbed by stimulation of Lef-1/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Melissa H; Huelsken, Joerg; Birchmeier, Walter; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2002-05-03

    Studies of chimeric mice have disclosed that the stem cell hierarchy in the small intestinal epithelium is established during formation of its proliferative units (crypts of Lieberkühn). This process involves a selection among several multipotential progenitors so that ultimately only one survives to supply descendants to the fully formed crypt. In this report, we examine the hypothesis that the level of beta-catenin (beta-cat)-mediated signaling is an important factor regulating this stem cell selection. In the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, beta-catenin can partner with Lef-1/Tcf high mobility group (HMG) box transcription factors to control gene expression. Both Lef-1 and Tcf-4 mRNAs are produced in the fetal mouse small intestine. Tcf-4 expression is sustained, whereas Lef-1 levels fall as crypt formation is completed during the first two postnatal weeks. A Tcf-4 gene knockout is known to block intestinal epithelial proliferation in late fetal life. Therefore, to test the hypothesis, we enhanced beta-catenin signaling in a chimeric mouse model in which the stem cell selection could be monitored. A fusion protein containing the HMG box domain of Lef-1 linked to the trans-activation domain of beta-catenin (Lef-1/beta-cat) was constructed to promote direct stimulation of signaling without being retained in the cytoplasm through interactions with E-cadherin and Apc/Axin. Lef-1/beta-cat was expressed in 129/Sv embryonic stem cell-derived small intestinal epithelial progenitors present in developing B6-ROSA26<-->129/Sv chimeras. Lef-1/beta-cat stimulated expression of a known beta-catenin target (E-cadherin), suppressed expression of Apc and Axin, and induced apoptosis in 129/Sv but not in neighboring B6-ROSA26 epithelial cells. This apoptotic response was not associated with any detectable changes in cell division within the Lef-1/beta-cat-expressing epithelium. By the time crypt development was completed, all 129/Sv epithelial cells were lost. These results

  17. Downregulation of HDPR1 is associated with poor prognosis and affects expression levels of p120-catenin and beta-catenin in nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jun-Yi; Zhang, Sheng; Jiang, Gui-Yang; Zhang, Peng-Xin; Yang, Lian-He; Liu, Di; Li, Qing-Chang; Wang, En-Hua

    2010-05-01

    HDPR1 (human homologue of Dapper) is considered as a Dishevelled (DVL) antagonist in WNT signaling. We recently reported that DVL was associated with cytoplasmic accumulation of beta-catenin in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Whether cytoplasmic accumulation of beta-catenin is correlated with HDPR1 is unclear. Xenopus Dapper (XDpr) was found to stabilize p120-catenin (p120ctn) in Xenopus embryogenesis. However, whether HDPR1 can regulate p120ctn expression level is not reported. Furthermore, how HDPR1 influences invasiveness in lung carcinogenesis is also not well understood. In this study, our aims were to explore the effects of HDPR1 on the lung carcinogenesis and to examine the relationship among HDPR1, beta-catenin, and p120ctn. Immunohistochemical analysis in 120 NSCLC tissues showed that HDPR1 was significantly lower in 82 specimens (68.3%). Reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression of HDPR1 were lower in tumor tissues as compared to corresponding nontumorous tissues. Moreover, reduced HDPR1 expression was related to the clinicopathological factors and was an independent risk factor for prognosis of the patients with NSCLC. In addition, HDPR1 expression was also associated with the expression of p120ctn and beta-catenin in lung cancer tissues. Knockdown of HDPR1 gene enhanced the invasive ability of lung cancer cells, which was dependent on p120ctn and independent of beta-catenin. In conclusion, the function of HDPR1 on regulating p120ctn may play an important role in human lung carcinogenesis. Restoration of HDPR1 gene may be a new therapeutic target of lung cancer. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling plays an essential role in activation of odontogenic mesenchyme during early tooth development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianquan; Lan, Yu; Baek, Jin-A; Gao, Yang; Jiang, Rulang

    2009-10-01

    Classical tissue recombination studies demonstrated that initiation of tooth development depends on activation of odontogenic potential in the mesenchyme by signals from the presumptive dental epithelium. Although several members of the Wnt family of signaling molecules are expressed in the presumptive dental epithelium at the beginning of tooth initiation, whether Wnt signaling is directly involved in the activation of the odontogenic mesenchyme has not been characterized. In this report, we show that tissue-specific inactivation of beta-catenin, a central component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, in the developing tooth mesenchyme caused tooth developmental arrest at the bud stage in mice. We show that mesenchymal beta-catenin function is required for expression of Lef1 and Fgf3 in the developing tooth mesenchyme and for induction of primary enamel knot in the developing tooth epithelium. Expression of Msx1 and Pax9, two essential tooth mesenchyme transcription factors downstream of Bmp and Fgf signaling, respectively, were not altered in the absence of beta-catenin in the tooth mesenchyme. Moreover, we found that constitutive stabilization of beta-catenin in the developing palatal mesenchyme induced aberrant palatal epithelial invaginations that resembled early tooth buds both morphologically and in epithelial molecular marker expression, but without activating expression of Msx1 and Pax9 in the mesenchyme. Together, these results indicate that activation of the mesenchymal odontogenic program during early tooth development requires concerted actions of Bmp, Fgf and Wnt signaling from the presumptive dental epithelium to the mesenchyme.

  19. beta-Catenin regulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Easwaran, Vijay; Lee, Sang H; Inge, Landon; Guo, Lida; Goldbeck, Cheryl; Garrett, Evelyn; Wiesmann, Marion; Garcia, Pablo D; Fuller, John H; Chan, Vivien; Randazzo, Filippo; Gundel, Robert; Warren, Robert S; Escobedo, Jaime; Aukerman, Sharon L; Taylor, Robert N; Fantl, Wendy J

    2003-06-15

    To evaluate whether beta-catenin signaling has a role in the regulation of angiogenesis in colon cancer, a series of angiogenesis-related gene promoters was analyzed for beta-catenin/TCF binding sites. Strikingly, the gene promoter of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, or VEGF-A) contains seven consensus binding sites for beta-catenin/TCF. Analysis of laser capture microdissected human colon cancer tissue indicated a direct correlation between up-regulation of VEGF-A expression and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutational status (activation of beta-catenin signaling) in primary tumors. In metastases, this correlation was not observed. Analysis by immunohistochemistry of intestinal polyps in mice heterozygous for the multiple intestinal neoplasia gene (Min/+) at 5 months revealed an increase and redistribution of VEGF-A in proximity to those cells expressing nuclear beta-catenin with a corresponding increase in vessel density. Transfection of normal colon epithelial cells with activated beta-catenin up-regulated levels of VEGF-A mRNA and protein by 250-300%. When colon cancer cells with elevated beta-catenin levels were treated with beta-catenin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, VEGF-A expression was reduced by more than 50%. Taken together, our observations indicate a close link between beta-catenin signaling and the regulation of VEGF-A expression in colon cancer.

  20. Tumors from rats given 1,2-dimethylhydrazine plus chlorophyllin or indole-3-carbinol contain transcriptional changes in beta-catenin that are independent of beta-catenin mutation status.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Dashwood, W Mohaiza; Bailey, George S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2006-10-10

    Tumors induced in the rat by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) contain mutations in beta-catenin, but the spectrum of such mutations can be influenced by phytochemicals such as chlorophyllin (CHL) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C). In the present study, we determined the mutation status of beta-catenin in more than 50 DMH-induced colon tumors and small intestine tumors, and compared this with the concomitant expression of beta-catenin mRNA using quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis. In total, 19/57 (33%) of the tumors harbored mutations in beta-catenin, and 14/19 (74%) of the genetic changes substituted amino acids adjacent to Ser33, a key site for phosphorylation and beta-catenin degradation. These tumors were found to express a 10-fold range of beta-catenin mRNA levels, independent of the beta-catenin mutation status and phytochemical exposure, i.e. CHL or I3C given post-initiation. However, beta-catenin mRNA levels were strongly correlated with mRNA levels of c-myc, c-jun and cyclin D1, which are targets of beta-catenin/Tcf signaling. Tumors with the highest levels of beta-catenin mRNA often had over-expressed beta-catenin protein, and those with lower beta-catenin mRNA typically had low beta-catenin protein expression, but there were exceptions (high beta-catenin mRNA/low beta-catenin protein, or vice versa). We conclude that DMH-induced mutations stabilize beta-catenin protein in tumors, which increase c-myc, c-jun and cyclin D1, but there also can be over-expression of beta-catenin itself at the mRNA level, contributing to high beta-catenin protein levels. Similar findings have been reported in primary human colon cancers and their liver metastases, compared with matched normal-looking tissue. Thus, further studies are warranted on the mechanisms that upregulate beta-catenin at the transcriptional level in human and rodent colon cancers.

  1. Rhesus lymphocryptovirus latent membrane protein 2A activates {beta}-catenin signaling and inhibits differentiation in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Catherine A.; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is a {gamma}-herpesvirus closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is highly homologous to EBV LMP2A. EBV LMP2A activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and {beta}-catenin signaling pathways in epithelial cells and affects differentiation. In the present study, the biochemical and biological properties of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells were investigated. The expression of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells induced Akt activation, GSK3{beta} inactivation and accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The nuclear translocation, but not accumulation of {beta}-catenin was dependent on Akt activation. Rhesus LMP2A also impaired epithelial cell differentiation; however, this process was not dependent upon Akt activation. A mutant rhesus LMP2A lacking six transmembrane domains functioned similarly to wild-type rhesus LMP2A indicating that the full number of transmembrane domains is not required for effects on {beta}-catenin or cell differentiation. These results underscore the similarity of LCV to EBV and the suitability of the macaque as an animal model for studying EBV pathogenesis.

  2. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi; Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong; Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho; Saeki, Shigeru

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  3. Wnt-beta-catenin pathway signals metastasis-associated tumor cell phenotypes in triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    De, Pradip; Carlson, Jennifer H.; Wu, Hui; Marcus, Adam; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Dey, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells acquire metastasis-associated (MA) phenotypes following genetic alterations in them which cause deregulation of different signaling pathways. Earlier, we reported that an upregulation of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway (WP) is one of the genetic salient features of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and WP signaling is associated with metastasis in TNBC. Using cBioPortal, here we found that collective % of alteration(s) in WP genes, CTNNB1, APC and DVL1 among breast-invasive-carcinomas was 21% as compared to 56% in PAM50 Basal. To understand the functional relevance of WP in the biology of heterogeneous/metastasizing TNBC cells, we undertook this comprehensive study using 15 cell lines in which we examined the role of WP in the context of integrin-dependent MA-phenotypes. Directional movement of tumor cells was observed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative confocal-video-microscopy while matrigel-invasion was studied by MMP7-specific casein-zymography. WntC59, XAV939, sulindac sulfide and beta-catenin siRNA (1) inhibited fibronectin-directed migration, (2) decreased podia-parameters and motility-descriptors, (3) altered filamentous-actin, (4) decreased matrigel-invasion and (5) inhibited cell proliferation as well as 3D clonogenic growth. Sulindac sulfide and beta-catenin siRNA decreased beta-catenin/active-beta-catenin and MMP7. LWnt3ACM-stimulated proliferation, clonogenicity, fibronection-directed migration and matrigel-invasion were perturbed by WP-modulators, sulindac sulfide and GDC-0941. We studied a direct involvement of WP in metastasis by stimulating brain-metastasis-specific MDA-MB231BR cells to demonstrate that LWnt3ACM-stimulated proliferation, clonogenicity and migration were blocked following sulindac sulfide, GDC-0941 and beta-catenin knockdown. We present the first evidence showing a direct functional relationship between WP activation and integrin-dependent MA-phenotypes. By proving the functional relationship

  4. Prenatal cadmium exposure dysregulates sonic hedgehog and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the thymus resulting in altered thymocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Tou, Janet C.; Barnett, John B.

    2010-01-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is both an environmental pollutant and a component of cigarette smoke. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports in the literature of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt/beta-catenin pathways are required for thymocyte maturation. Several studies have demonstrated that Cd exposure affects these pathways in different organ systems. This study was designed to investigate the effect of prenatal Cd exposure on thymocyte development, and to determine if these effects were linked to dysregulation of Shh and Wnt/beta-catenin pathways. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose (10 ppm) of Cd throughout pregnancy and effects on the thymus were assessed on the day of birth. Thymocyte phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. A Gli:luciferase reporter cell line was used to measure Shh signaling. Transcription of target genes and translation of key components of both signaling pathways were assessed using real-time RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Prenatal Cd exposure increased the number of CD4{sup +} cells and a subpopulation of double-negative cells (DN; CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}), DN4 (CD44{sup -}CD25{sup -}). Shh and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling were both decreased in the thymus. Target genes of Shh (Patched1 and Gli1) and Wnt/beta-catenin (c-fos, and c-myc) were affected differentially among thymocyte subpopulations. These findings suggest that prenatal exposure to Cd dysregulates two signaling pathways in the thymus, resulting in altered thymocyte development.

  5. Flavonoids of Herba Epimedii regulate osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells through BMP and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-fang; Li, Guo; Chan, Chu-yan; Meng, Chun-ling; Lin, Marie Chia-mi; Chen, Yang-chao; He, Ming-liang; Leung, Ping-chung; Kung, Hsiang-fu

    2010-01-15

    Herba Epimedii is one of the most commonly used Chinese herbs for treating osteoporosis. In the present study, the flavonoids of Herba Epimedii (HEF) have shown to promote the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. They were noted to enhance the mRNA expression of BMP-2, BMP-4, Runx2, beta-catenin and cyclinD1, all of which are BMP or Wnt-signaling pathway related regulators. The osteogenic effect was inhibited by the introduction of noggin and DKK-1, which is classical inhibitor of BMP and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, respectively. These results suggest that HEF exerts promoting effect on osteogenic differentiation, which plausibly functions via the BMP and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways. Considering the therapeutic efficiency and economical issues, HEF may be a potential candidate for promoting bone regeneration. On the other hand, osteogenic differentiation of MSCs may also be a promising and attractive tool to apply in bone repair.

  6. Polyethylenimine-cationized beta-catenin protein transduction activates the Wnt canonical signaling pathway more effectively than cationic lipid-based transduction.

    PubMed

    Kitazoe, Midori; Futami, Junichiro; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Yamada, Hidenori; Maeda, Yoshitake

    2010-04-01

    The Wnt canonical signaling pathway is essential for the early development of eukaryotic organisms and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis. Moreover, the Wnt canonical signaling pathway contributes to the self-renewal of mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here, we demonstrate artificial activation of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway by beta-catenin protein transduction. Constitutively active beta-catenin protein was introduced into human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells using a polyethylenimine (PEI) cationization method, or with the BioPORTER protein transduction reagent. We have previously shown that modification with PEI effectively causes proteins to be internalized by living mammalian cells. PEI-cationized, constitutively active beta-catenin protein was added to HEK-293 cells, and induction of several Wnt/beta-catenin target genes was detected by real-time PCR. However, using BioPORTER to introduce active beta-catenin did not activate the Wnt canonical signaling pathway. Introduction of eGFPNuc (enhanced green fluorescent protein variant containing a nuclear localization signal) into HEK-293 cells using the BioPORTER reagent caused significant cell death, as determined by propidium iodide staining. In contrast, the PEI-modified eGFPNuc did not impair survival of HEK-293 cells. These results indicate that the Wnt canonical signaling pathway could be successfully activated by transduction of PEI-cationized active beta-catenin, and the PEI-cationization method is an effective and safe technology for protein transduction into mammalian cells.

  7. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling changes C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation by inducing Id3 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long; Shi, Songting; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Fangfang; Dijke, Peter ten

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Id3 but not Id1 is induced by Wnt3a stimulation in C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a induces Id3 expression via canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a-induced Id3 expression does not depend on BMP signaling activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Induction of Id3 expression is critical determinant in Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Canonical Wnt signaling plays important roles in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we report that inhibitor of differentiation (Id)3 is a Wnt-inducible gene in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Wnt3a induced Id3 expression in a {beta}-catenin-dependent manner. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) also potently induced Id3 expression. However, Wnt-induced Id3 expression occurred independent of the BMP/Smad pathway. Functional studies showed that Id3 depletion in C2C12 cells impaired Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast cells. Id3 depletion elevated myogenin induction during myogenic differentiation and partially impaired Wnt3a suppressed myogenin expression in C2C12 cells. These results suggest that Id3 is an important Wnt/{beta}-catenin induced gene in myoblast cell fate determination.

  8. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV is a target gene of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Arrázola, Macarena S; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Colombres, Marcela; Toledo, Enrique M; Cruzat, Fernando; Pavez, Leonardo; Assar, Rodrigo; Aravena, Andrés; González, Mauricio; Montecino, Martín; Maass, Alejandro; Martínez, Servet; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2009-12-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) plays a key role in the regulation of calcium-dependent gene expression. The expression of CaMKIV and the activation of CREB regulated genes are involved in memory and neuronal survival. We report here that: (a) a bioinformatic analysis of 15,476 promoters of the human genome predicted several Wnt target genes, being CaMKIV a very interesting candidate; (b) CaMKIV promoter contains TCF/LEF transcription motifs similar to those present in Wnt target genes; (c) biochemical studies indicate that lithium and the canonical ligand Wnt-3a induce CaMKIV mRNA and protein expression levels in rat hippocampal neurons as well as CaMKIV promoter activity; (d) treatment of hippocampal neurons with Wnt-3a increases the binding of beta-catenin to the CaMKIV promoter: (e) In vivo activation of the Wnt signaling improve spatial memory impairment and restores the expression of CaMKIV in a mice double transgenic model for Alzheimer's disease which shows decreased levels of the kinase. We conclude that CaMKIV is regulated by the Wnt signaling pathway and that its expression could play a role in the neuroprotective function of the Wnt signaling against the Alzheimer's amyloid peptide.

  9. Regulation of AR and (beta)-Catenin Signaling by Pin 1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    phosphatidylinositol 3 - kinase AKT pathway in human cancer . Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:489–501. 51. Voeller, H. J., C. I. Truica, and E. P. Gelmann. 1998. Beta-catenin...4 complex imposes a crypt progenitor phenotype on colorectal cancer cells. Cell 111:241–250. 50. Vivanco, I., and C. L. Sawyers. 2002. The

  10. Amide derivatives of ethacrynic acid: synthesis and evaluation as antagonists of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and CLL cell survival.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guangyi; Lu, Desheng; Yao, Shiyin; Wu, Christina C N; Liu, Jerry X; Carson, Dennis A; Cottam, Howard B

    2009-02-01

    A series of amides of ethacrynic acid was prepared and evaluated for their ability to inhibit Wnt signaling and decrease the survival of CLL cells. Several of the most potent derivatives were active in the low micromolar range. Reduction of the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbon-carbon double bond of EA abrogated both the inhibition of Wnt signaling as well as the decrease in CLL survival. Preliminary mechanism of action studies suggest that these derivatives covalently modify sulfhydryl groups present on transcription factors important for Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

  11. Deciphering the function of canonical Wnt signals in development and disease: conditional loss- and gain-of-function mutations of beta-catenin in mice.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Tamara; Wend, Peter; Klaus, Alexandra; Birchmeier, Walter

    2008-09-01

    Wnt signaling is one of a handful of powerful signaling pathways that play crucial roles in the animal life by controlling the genetic programs of embryonic development and adult homeostasis. When disrupted, these signaling pathways cause developmental defects, or diseases, among them cancer. The gateway of the canonical Wnt pathway, which contains >100 genes, is an essential molecule called beta-catenin (Armadillo in Drosophila). Conditional loss- and gain-of-function mutations of beta-catenin in mice provided powerful tools for the functional analysis of canonical Wnt signaling in many tissues and organs. Such studies revealed roles of Wnt signaling that were previously not accessible to genetic analysis due to the early embryonic lethality of conventional beta-catenin knockout mice, as well as the redundancy of Wnt ligands, receptors, and transcription factors. Analysis of conditional beta-catenin loss- and gain-of-function mutant mice demonstrated that canonical Wnt signals control progenitor cell expansion and lineage decisions both in the early embryo and in many organs. Canonical Wnt signaling also plays important roles in the maintenance of various embryonic or adult stem cells, and as recent findings demonstrated, in cancer stem cell types. This has opened new opportunities to model numerous human diseases, which have been associated with deregulated Wnt signaling. Our review summarizes what has been learned from genetic studies of the Wnt pathway by the analysis of conditional beta-catenin loss- and gain-of-function mice.

  12. SKI-606 decreases growth and motility of colorectal cancer cells by preventing pp60(c-Src)-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin and its nuclear signaling.

    PubMed

    Coluccia, Addolorata Maria Luce; Benati, Daniela; Dekhil, Hafedh; De Filippo, Annamaria; Lan, Cathy; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2006-02-15

    Inhibition of deregulated protein tyrosine kinases represents an attractive strategy for controlling cancer growth. However, target specificity is an essential aim of this strategy. In this report, pp60(c-Src) kinase and beta-catenin were found physically associated and constitutively activated on tyrosine residues in human colorectal cancer cells. The use of specific small-interfering RNAs (siRNA) validated pp60(c-Src) as the major kinase responsible for beta-catenin tyrosine phosphorylation in colorectal cancer. Src-dependent activation of beta-catenin was prevented by SKI-606, a novel Src family kinase inhibitor, which also abrogated beta-catenin nuclear function by impairing its binding to the TCF4 transcription factor and its trans-activating ability in colorectal cancer cells. These effects were seemingly specific, as cyclin D1, a crucial beta-catenin/TCF4 target gene, was also down-regulated by SKI-606 in a dose-dependent manner accounting, at least in part, for the reduced growth (IC50, 1.5-2.4 micromol/L) and clonogenic potential of colorectal cancer cells. Protein levels of beta-catenin remained substantially unchanged by SKI-606, which promoted instead a cytosolic/membranous retention of beta-catenin as judged by immunoblotting analysis of cytosolic/nuclear extracts and cell immunofluorescence staining. The SKI-606-mediated relocalization of beta-catenin increased its binding affinity to E-cadherin and adhesion of colorectal cancer cells, with ensuing reduced motility in a wound healing assay. Interestingly, the siRNA-driven knockdown of beta-catenin removed the effect of SKI-606 on cell-to-cell adhesion, which was associated with prolonged stability of E-cadherin protein in a pulse-chase experiment. Thus, our results show that SKI-606 operates a switch between the transcriptional and adhesive function of beta-catenin by inhibiting its pp60(c-Src)-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation; this could constitute a new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer.

  13. Activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanchun; Guan, Yingjun; Liu, Huancai; Wu, Xin; Yu, Li; Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyan; Du, Hongmei; Wang, Xin

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 were upregulated in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus in the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin and Cyclin D1 co-localized for astrocytes were all increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. -- Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive and fatal loss of motor neurons. In ALS, there is a significant cell proliferation in response to neurodegeneration; however, the exact molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation are unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative processes. Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 are three key signaling molecules of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. We determined the expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 in the adult spinal cord of SOD1{sup G93A} ALS transgenic mice at different stages by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. We found that the mRNA and protein of Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 in the spinal cord of the ALS mice were upregulated compared to those in wild-type mice. In addition, {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus and subsequently activated transcription of the target gene, Cyclin D1. BrdU and Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of these mice. Moreover, Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 were also expressed in both neurons and astrocytes. The expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin or Cyclin D1 in mature GFAP{sup +} astrocytes increased. Moreover, BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. Our findings suggest that

  14. Transient activation of beta-catenin signalling in adult mouse epidermis is sufficient to induce new hair follicles but continuous activation is required to maintain hair follicle tumours.

    PubMed

    Lo Celso, Cristina; Prowse, David M; Watt, Fiona M

    2004-04-01

    When beta-catenin signalling is disturbed from mid-gestation onwards lineage commitment is profoundly altered in postnatal mouse epidermis. We have investigated whether adult epidermis has the capacity for beta-catenin-induced lineage conversion without prior embryonic priming. We fused N-terminally truncated, stabilised beta-catenin to the ligand-binding domain of a mutant oestrogen receptor (DeltaNbeta-cateninER). DeltaNbeta-cateninER was expressed in the epidermis of transgenic mice under the control of the keratin 14 promoter and beta-catenin activity was induced in adult epidermis by topical application of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT). Within 7 days of daily 4OHT treatment resting hair follicles were recruited into the hair growth cycle and epithelial outgrowths formed from existing hair follicles and from interfollicular epidermis. The outgrowths expressed Sonic hedgehog, Patched and markers of hair follicle differentiation, indicative of de novo follicle formation. The interfollicular epidermal differentiation program was largely unaffected but after an initial wave of sebaceous gland duplication sebocyte differentiation was inhibited. A single application of 4OHT was as effective as repeated doses in inducing new follicles and growth of existing follicles. Treatment of epidermis with 4OHT for 21 days resulted in conversion of hair follicles to benign tumours resembling trichofolliculomas. The tumours were dependent on continuous activation of beta-catenin and by 28 days after removal of the drug they had largely regressed. We conclude that interfollicular epidermis and sebaceous glands retain the ability to be reprogrammed in adult life and that continuous beta-catenin signalling is required to maintain hair follicle tumours.

  15. Targeted disruption of beta-catenin in Sf1-expressing cells impairs development and maintenance of the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Alex C; Reuter, Anne L; Zubair, Mohamad; Else, Tobias; Serecky, Kerri; Bingham, Nathan C; Lavery, Gareth G; Parker, Keith L; Hammer, Gary D

    2008-08-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (Sf1, Nr5a1) is essential for adrenal development and regulates genes that specify differentiated adrenocortical function. The transcriptional coactivator beta-catenin reportedly synergizes with Sf1 to regulate a subset of these target genes; moreover, Wnt family members, signaling via beta-catenin, are also implicated in adrenocortical development. To investigate the role of beta-catenin in the adrenal cortex, we used two Sf1/Cre transgenes to inactivate conditional beta-catenin alleles. Inactivation of beta-catenin mediated by Sf1/Cre(high), a transgene expressed at high levels, caused adrenal aplasia in newborn mice. Analysis of fetal adrenal development with Sf1/Cre(high)-mediated beta-catenin inactivation showed decreased proliferation in presumptive adrenocortical precursor cells. By contrast, the Sf1/Cre(low) transgene effected a lesser degree of beta-catenin inactivation that did not affect all adrenocortical cells, permitting adrenal survival to reveal age-dependent degeneration of the cortex. These results define crucial roles for beta-catenin--presumably as part of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway--in both embryonic development of the adrenal cortex and in maintenance of the adult organ.

  16. Soy isoflavone genistein upregulates epithelial adhesion molecule e-cadherin expression and attenuates beta-catenin signaling in mammary epithelial cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enhanced Wnt/beta -catenin signaling and loss of E-cadherin expression are considered hallmarks of mammary tumorigenesis. Mammary tumor protection by dietary intake of soy-rich foods and the soy isoflavone genistein (Gen) is widely regarded based on numerous epidemiological and animal studies; howev...

  17. {beta}-Catenin up-regulates Nanog expression through interaction with Oct-3/4 in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Yukinari; Yokota, Takashi; Koide, Hiroshi . E-mail: hkoide@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2007-02-16

    It is well known that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be maintained by the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Recent studies have revealed that Wnt also exhibits activity similar to LIF. The molecular mechanism behind the maintenance of ES cells by these factors, however, is not fully understood. In this study, we found that LIF enhances level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, a component of the Wnt signaling pathway. Expression of an activated mutant of {beta}-catenin led to the long-term proliferation of ES cells, even in the absence of LIF. Furthermore, it was found that {beta}-catenin up-regulates Nanog in an Oct-3/4-dependent manner and that {beta}-catenin physically associates with Oct-3/4. These results suggest that up-regulating Nanog through interaction with Oct-3/4 involves {beta}-catenin in the LIF- and Wnt-mediated maintenance of ES cell self-renewal.

  18. miR-92b controls glioma proliferation and invasion through regulating Wnt/beta-catenin signaling via Nemo-like kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Xuan; Zou, Jian; Zhang, Anling; Wan, Yingfeng; Pu, Peiyu; Song, Zhengfei; Qian, Cong; Chen, Yili; Yang, Shuxu; Wang, Yirong

    2013-01-01

    Background Nemo-like kinase (NLK) is an evolutionarily conserved protein kinase involved in Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, which has been reported to be associated with gliomagenesis. In the present study, we aimed to identify a concrete mechanism of Wnt/beta-catenin pathway regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) in glioma. Methods Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization were conducted to detect the expression of miR-92b. The cell proliferation rate and cell cycle kinetics were detected using 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1)-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry, cell invasion and migration were evaluated using Transwell assay and wound healing assay, and cell apoptosis was detected using annexin V staining. Furthermore, the relevant molecules regulating proliferation and invasion were examined using Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence staining. Luciferase reporter assay was used to identify the direct regulation of NLK by miR-92b and beta-catenin/TCF4 activity. Results We first showed that the expression of miR-92b was elevated in both glioma samples and glioma cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of miR-92b triggered growth inhibition, induced apoptosis, and suppressed invasion of glioma in vitro and in vivo. Luciferase assay and Western blot analysis revealed that NLK is a direct target of miR-92b. Restoring expression of NLK inhibited glioma proliferation and invasion. Mechanistic investigation revealed that miR-92b deletion suppressed beta-catenin/TCF-4 transcription activity by targeting NLK. Moreover, expression of NLK was inversely correlated with miR-92b in glioma samples and was predictive of patient survival in a retrospective analysis. Conclusions Our findings identify a role for miR-92b in glioma proliferation and invasion after activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling via NLK. PMID:23416699

  19. Beta-catenin--a supporting role in the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Case, Natasha; Rubin, Janet

    2010-06-01

    In the last 5 years a role for beta-catenin in the skeleton has been cemented. Beginning with mutations in the Lrp5 receptor that control beta-catenin canonical downstream signals, and progressing to transgenic models with bone-specific alteration of beta-catenin, research has shown that beta-catenin is required for normal bone development. A cell critical to bone in which beta-catenin activity determines function is the marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), where sustained beta-catenin prevents its distribution into adipogenic lineage. beta-Catenin actions are less well understood in mature osteoblasts: while beta-catenin contributes to control of osteoclastic bone resorption via alteration of the osteoprotegerin/RANKL ratio, a specific regulatory role during osteoblast bone synthesis has not yet been determined. The proven ability of mechanical factors to prevent beta-catenin degradation and induce nuclear translocation through Lrp-independent mechanisms suggests processes by which exercise might modulate bone mass via control of lineage allocation, in particular, by preventing precursor distribution into the adipocyte pool. Effects resulting from mechanical activation of beta-catenin in mature osteoblasts and osteocytes likely modulate bone resorption, but whether beta-catenin is involved in osteoblast synthetic function remains to be proven for both mechanical and soluble mediators. As beta-catenin appears to support the downstream effects of multiple osteogenic factors, studies clarifying when and where beta-catenin effects occur will be relevant for translational approaches aimed at preventing bone loss and terminal adipogenic conversion.

  20. Activity-dependent regulation of {beta}-catenin via {epsilon}-cleavage of N-cadherin

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Kengo; Kihara, Takeshi; Kuzuya, Akira; Okawa, Katsuya; Nishimoto, Takaaki; Bito, Haruhiko; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Kinoshita, Ayae . E-mail: akinoshita@hs.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Shimohama, Shun

    2006-07-07

    N-cadherin is essential for excitatory synaptic contact in the hippocampus. Presenilin 1 (PS1) is located at sites of synaptic contact, forming a complex with N-cadherin and {beta}-catenin. Here, we report that human N-cadherin is cleaved by PS1/{gamma}-secretase in response to physiological concentration of glutamate (Glu) stimulation, yielding a fragment Ncad/CTF2. The expression of Ncad/CTF2 in neuronal cells led to its translocation to the nucleus, and caused a prominent enhancement of cytoplasmic and nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in a cell-cell contact dependent manner, via following mechanisms: 1, inhibition of {beta}-catenin phosphorylation; 2, transactivation of {beta}-catenin; and 3, inhibition of N-cadherin transcription, and finally enhanced {beta}-catenin nuclear signaling. Since the regulation of cellular {beta}-catenin level is essential for synaptic function, disruption in the cleavage of N-cadherin may be causally linked to the synaptic dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD)

  1. Negative regulation of p21 by beta-catenin/TCF signaling: a novel mechanism by which cell adhesion molecules regulate cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junko; Toyofuku, Toshihiko; Hori, Masatsugu

    2003-12-12

    Cell proliferation is regulated in part by cell-cell interactions mediated by cadherin and connexin. Here we present evidence that these two molecules act synergistically to suppress HEK293 cell proliferation by prolonging the G2/M phase. This event was accompanied by expression of p21, a potent Cdc2 kinase inhibitor. Not surprisingly, there was a concomitant decline in Cdc2 kinase activity. beta-Catenin/TCF signaling, which was downregulated by overexpression of N-cadherin, was found to inhibit transactivation of p21 gene expression. The effect of N-cadherin on cell proliferation and p21 expression was augmented by co-expression of connexin-43. Moreover, the magnitude of the connexin's effect was dependent on its ability to mediate intercellular communication. We conclude, therefore, that two major components of cell-cell interaction synergistically regulate cell cycle progression in HEK293 cells by regulating p21 expression in a beta-catenin/TCF-dependent manner.

  2. Critical interactions between TGF-beta signaling/ELF, and E-cadherin/beta-catenin mediated tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Katuri, V; Tang, Y; Li, C; Jogunoori, W; Deng, C-X; Rashid, A; Sidawy, A N; Evans, S; Reddy, E P; Mishra, B; Mishra, L

    2006-03-23

    Inactivation of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) pathway occurs often in malignancies of the gastrointestinal (GI) system. However, only a fraction of sporadic GI tumors exhibit inactivating mutations in early stages of cancer formation, suggesting that other mechanisms play a critical role in the inactivation of this pathway. Here, we show a wide range of GI tumors, including those of the stomach, liver and colon in elf+/- and elf+/- / Smad4+/- mutant mice. We found that embryonic liver fodrin (ELF), a beta-Spectrin originally identified in endodermal stem/progenitor cells committed to foregut lineage, possesses potent antioncogenic activity and is frequently inactivated in GI cancers. Specifically, E-cadherin accumulation at cell-cell contacts and E-cadherin-beta-catenin-dependent epithelial cell-cell adhesion is disrupted in elf+/- / Smad4+/- mutant gastric epithelial cells, and could be rescued by ectopic expression of full-length elf, but not Smad3 or Smad4. Subcellular fractionation revealed that E-cadherin is expressed mainly at the cell membrane after TGF-beta stimulation. In contrast, elf+/- / Smad4+/- mutant tissues showed abnormal distribution of E-cadherin that could be rescued by overexpression of ELF but not Smad3 or Smad4. Our results identify a group of common lethal malignancies in which inactivation of TGF-beta signaling, which is essential for tumor suppression, is disrupted by inactivation of the ELF adaptor protein.

  3. Activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling increases insulin sensitivity through a reciprocal regulation of Wnt10b and SREBP-1c in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Abiola, Mounira; Favier, Maryline; Christodoulou-Vafeiadou, Eleni; Pichard, Anne-Lise; Martelly, Isabelle; Guillet-Deniau, Isabelle

    2009-12-30

    Intramyocellular lipid accumulation is strongly related to insulin resistance in humans, and we have shown that high glucose concentration induced de novo lipogenesis and insulin resistance in murin muscle cells. Alterations in Wnt signaling impact the balance between myogenic and adipogenic programs in myoblasts, partly due to the decrease of Wnt10b protein. As recent studies point towards a role for Wnt signaling in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, we hypothesized that activation of Wnt signaling could play a crucial role in muscle insulin sensitivity. Here we demonstrate that SREBP-1c and Wnt10b display inverse expression patterns during muscle ontogenesis and regeneration, as well as during satellite cells differentiation. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway was reactivated in contracting myotubes using siRNA mediated SREBP-1 knockdown, Wnt10b over-expression or inhibition of GSK-3beta, whereas Wnt signaling was inhibited in myoblasts through silencing of Wnt10b. SREBP-1 knockdown was sufficient to induce Wnt10b protein expression in contracting myotubes and to activate the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Conversely, silencing Wnt10b in myoblasts induced SREBP-1c protein expression, suggesting a reciprocal regulation. Stimulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway i) drastically decreased SREBP-1c protein and intramyocellular lipid deposition in myotubes; ii) increased basal glucose transport in both insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant myotubes through a differential activation of Akt and AMPK pathways; iii) restored insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant myotubes. We conclude that activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in skeletal muscle cells improved insulin sensitivity by i) decreasing intramyocellular lipid deposition through downregulation of SREBP-1c; ii) increasing insulin effects through a differential activation of the Akt/PKB and AMPK pathways; iii) inhibiting the MAPK pathway. A crosstalk between these pathways and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in skeletal

  4. RhoA GTPase interacts with beta-catenin signaling in clinorotated osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue under constant remodeling in response to various signals including mechanical loading. A lack of proper mechanical loading induces disuse osteoporosis that reduces bone mass and structural integrity. β-catenin signaling together with a network of GTPases is known to play a primary role in load-driven bone formation, but little is known about potential interactions of β-catenin signaling and GTPases in bone loss. In this study, we addressed a question: Does unloading suppress an activation level of RhoA GTPase and β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts? If yes, what is the role of RhoA GTPase and actin filaments in osteoblasts in regulating β-catenin signaling? Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique with a biosensor for RhoA together with a fluorescent T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) reporter, we examined the effects of clinostat-driven simulated unloading. The results revealed that both RhoA activity and TCF/LEF activity were downregulated by unloading. Reduction in RhoA activity was correlated to a decrease in cytoskeletal organization of actin filaments. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling blocked unloading-induced RhoA suppression, and dominant negative RhoA inhibited TCF/LEF suppression. On the other hand, a constitutively active RhoA enhanced unloading-induced reduction of TCF/LEF activity. The TCF/LEF suppression by unloading was enhanced by co-culture with osteocytes, but it was independent on organization of actin filaments, myosin II activity, or a myosin light chain kinase. Collectively, the results suggest that β-catenin signaling is required for unloading-driven regulation of RhoA, and RhoA, but not actin cytoskeleton or intracellular tension, mediates the responsiveness of β-catenin signaling to unloading. PMID:23529802

  5. Sulindac reverses aberrant expression and localization of beta-catenin in papillary thyroid cancer cells with the BRAFV600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nancy L; Lin, Chi-Iou; Whang, Edward E; Carothers, Adelaide M; Moore, Francis D; Ruan, Daniel T

    2010-06-01

    Activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway is implicated in thyroid tumorigenesis, and up to 90% of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) demonstrate aberrant expression of beta-catenin. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs reverse aberrant beta-catenin expression and localization in colon cancer. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug sulindac would reverse aberrant beta-catenin activity in thyroid cancer cells. beta-catenin protein levels were determined in thyroidectomy specimens from six consecutive patients and in three different thyroid cancer cells lines (8505-C, KTC-1, and TPC-1) by immunoblotting. Cells of 8505-C and KTC-1 harbor the BRAF(V600E) mutation, and TPC-1 has the RET/PTC rearrangement. All cell lines were treated with sulindac (100 microM for up to 72 hours). Protein levels of c-myc and cyclin D1 were detected by immunoblotting, and beta-catenin localization was determined by immunocytochemistry in the PTC cell lines. PCCL3 rat thyroid cells that conditionally overexpress either BRAF(V600E) or RET/PTC were also treated with sulindac. All PTC specimens and cell lines expressed high levels of beta-catenin protein and displayed aberrant nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of beta-catenin. Exposure to sulindac for 48 hours reduced beta-catenin expression in 8505-C and KTC-1 cells, but not in TPC-1 cells. Further, sulindac treatment reduced c-myc and cyclin D1 levels in 8505-C and KTC-1 cells, but had no effect in TPC-1 cells. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated that sulindac treatment redistributed beta-catenin from the nucleus to the membrane in 8505-C and KTC-1 cells. However, sulindac did not affect beta-catenin localization in TPC-1 cells. Finally, sulindac was effective in decreasing beta-catenin expression and cellular proliferation in BRAF(V600E)-overexpressing cells, but not in RET/PTC3-overexpressing cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that sulindac treatment reverses beta-catenin

  6. CB1 cannabinoid receptors increase neuronal precursor proliferation through AKT/glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Trazzi, Stefania; Steger, Martin; Mitrugno, Valentina Maria; Bartesaghi, Renata; Ciani, Elisabetta

    2010-03-26

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in the regulation of many physiological effects in the central and peripheral nervous system. Recent findings have demonstrated the presence of a functional endocannabinoid system within neuronal progenitors located in the hippocampus and ventricular/subventricular zone that participates in the regulation of cell proliferation. It is presently unknown whether the endocannabinoid system exerts a widespread effect on neuronal precursors from different neurogenic regions, and very little is known about the signaling by which it regulates neuronal precursor proliferation. Herein, we demonstrate the presence of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in granule cell precursors (GCPs) during early cerebellar development. Activation of CB(1) receptors by HU-210 promoted GCP proliferation in vitro, an effect that was prevented by a selective CB(1) antagonist. Accordingly, in vivo experiments showed that GCP proliferation was increased by chronic HU-210 treatment and that in CB(1)-deficient mice cell proliferation was significantly lower than in wild-type littermates, indicating that the endocannabinoid system is physiologically involved in regulation of GCP proliferation. The pro-proliferative effect of cannabinoids in GCPs was mediated through the CB(1)/AKT/glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin pathway. Involvement of this pathway was also observed in cultures of neuronal precursors from the subventricular zone, suggesting that this pathway may be a general mechanism by which endocannabinoids regulate proliferation of neuronal precursors. These observations suggest that endocannabinoids constitute a new family of lipid signaling cues that may exert a widespread effect on neuronal precursor proliferation during brain development.

  7. Inhibition of beta-catenin signaling by Pb leads to incomplete fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Beier, Eric E; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Buckley, Taylor; Yukata, Kiminori; O'Keefe, Regis; Zuscik, Michael J; Puzas, J Edward

    2014-11-01

    There is strong evidence in the clinical literature to suggest that elevated lead (Pb) exposure impairs fracture healing. Since Pb has been demonstrated to inhibit bone formation, and Wnt signaling is an important anabolic pathway in chondrocyte maturation and endochondral ossification, we investigated the impact of Wnt therapy on Pb-exposed mice undergoing bone repair in a mouse tibial fracture model. We established that tibial fracture calluses from Pb-treated mice were smaller and contained less mineralized tissue than vehicle controls. This resulted in the persistence of immature cartilage in the callus and decreased β-catenin levels. Reduction of β-catenin protein was concurrent with systemic elevation of LRP5/6 antagonists DKK1 and sclerostin in Pb-exposed mice throughout fracture healing. β-catenin stimulation by the GSK3 inhibitor BIO reversed these molecular changes and restored the amount of mineralized callus. Overall, Pb is identified as a potent inhibitor of endochondral ossification in vivo with correlated effects on bone healing with noted deficits in β-catenin signaling, suggesting the Wnt/β-catenin as a pivotal pathway in the influence of Pb on fracture repair.

  8. Inhibition of beta-catenin signaling by Pb leads to incomplete fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Eric E; Buckley, Taylor; Yukata, Kiminori; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; O’Keefe, Regis; Zuscik, Michael J; Puzas, J Edward

    2015-01-01

    There is strong evidence in the clinical literature to suggest that elevated lead (Pb) exposure impairs fracture healing. Since Pb has been demonstrated to inhibit bone formation, and Wnt signaling is an important anabolic pathway in chondrocyte maturation and endochondral ossification, we investigated the impact of Wnt therapy on Pb-exposed mice undergoing bone repair in a mouse tibial fracture model. We established that tibial fracture calluses from Pb-treated mice were smaller and contained less mineralized tissue than vehicle controls. This resulted in the persistence of immature cartilage in the callus and decreased β-catenin levels. Reduction of β-catenin protein was concurrent with systemic elevation of LRP5/6 antagonists DKK1 and sclerostin in Pb-exposed mice throughout fracture healing. β-catenin stimulation by the GSK3 inhibitor BIO reversed these molecular changes and restored the amount of mineralized callus. Overall, Pb is identified as a potent inhibitor of endochondral ossification in vivo with correlated effects on bone healing with noted deficits in β-catenin signaling, suggesting the Wnt/β-catenin as a pivotal pathway in the influence of Pb on fracture repair. PMID:25044211

  9. P53 levels determine outcome during beta-catenin tumor initiation and metastasis in the mammary gland and male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, A G; McMenamin, J; Leder, P

    2006-06-15

    beta-Catenin, an oncogene, and P53, a tumor suppressor, are common targets of mutation in human cancers. It has been observed that P53 is often inactivated in tumors involving beta-catenin activation. In an attempt to model this situation in vivo, we crossed the previously characterized MMTV-DeltaN-beta-catenin mouse with the P53 knockout mouse. Female multiparous mice that carry the MMTV-DeltaN-beta-catenin transgene and that are heterozygous for P53 (Tg(DeltaN-betaCat)/+, P53+/-) display an increased tumor burden (2.05 vs 1.31 tumors/animal), with a generally more advanced pathology, and increased metastatic rate (39 vs 0%) relative to transgenic female mice that are wild type for P53 (Tg(DeltaN-betaCat)/+, P53+/+). These differences were not due to complete loss of P53 as only one of 21 tumors demonstrated loss of heterozygosity at the P53 locus. Furthermore, no mutations were present in tumors retaining a single wild-type allele. Tg(DeltaN-betaCat)/+, P53-/- male mice developed testicular teratomas and survived an average of 65 days, whereas non-Tg(DeltaN-betaCat), P53-/- males survived an average of 84 days. Sixty-two percent of Tg(DeltaN-betaCat), P53-/- mice developed testicular teratomas, whereas only 10% of the non-Tg(DeltaN-betaCat), P53-/- mice developed these tumors. These results indicate that the level of P53 and the tissue of origin are important factors in determining outcome of cancer caused by oncogene activation.

  10. Bisindoylmaleimide I suppresses adipocyte differentiation through stabilization of intracellular {beta}-catenin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Munju; Park, Seoyoung; Gwak, Jungsug; Kim, Dong-Eun; Yea, Sung Su; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-02-29

    The Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway plays important roles in cell differentiation. Activation of this pathway, likely by Wnt-10b, has been shown to inhibit adipogenesis in cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and mice. Here we revealed that bisindoylmaleimide I (BIM), which is widely used as a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), inhibits adipocyte differentiation through activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. BIM increased {beta}-catenin responsive transcription (CRT) and up-regulated intracellular {beta}-catenin levels in HEK293 cells and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. BIM significantly decreased intracellular lipid accumulation and reduced expression of important adipocyte marker genes including peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and CAATT enhancer-binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Taken together, our findings indicate that BIM inhibits adipogenesis by increasing the stability of {beta}-catenin protein in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells.

  11. Neutrophil transmigration triggers repair of the lung epithelium via beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Zemans, Rachel L; Briones, Natalie; Campbell, Megan; McClendon, Jazalle; Young, Scott K; Suzuki, Tomoko; Yang, Ivana V; De Langhe, Stijn; Reynolds, Susan D; Mason, Robert J; Kahn, Michael; Henson, Peter M; Colgan, Sean P; Downey, Gregory P

    2011-09-20

    Injury to the epithelium is integral to the pathogenesis of many inflammatory lung diseases, and epithelial repair is a critical determinant of clinical outcome. However, the signaling pathways regulating such repair are incompletely understood. We used in vitro and in vivo models to define these pathways. Human neutrophils were induced to transmigrate across monolayers of human lung epithelial cells in the physiological basolateral-to-apical direction. This allowed study of the neutrophil contribution not only to the initial epithelial injury, but also to its repair, as manifested by restoration of transepithelial resistance and reepithelialization of the denuded epithelium. Microarray analysis of epithelial gene expression revealed that neutrophil transmigration activated β-catenin signaling, and this was verified by real-time PCR, nuclear translocation of β-catenin, and TOPFlash reporter activity. Leukocyte elastase, likely via cleavage of E-cadherin, was required for activation of β-catenin signaling in response to neutrophil transmigration. Knockdown of β-catenin using shRNA delayed epithelial repair. In mice treated with intratracheal LPS or keratinocyte chemokine, neutrophil emigration resulted in activation of β-catenin signaling in alveolar type II epithelial cells, as demonstrated by cyclin D1 expression and/or reporter activity in TOPGAL mice. Attenuation of β-catenin signaling by IQ-1 inhibited alveolar type II epithelial cell proliferation in response to neutrophil migration induced by intratracheal keratinocyte chemokine. We conclude that β-catenin signaling is activated in lung epithelial cells during neutrophil transmigration, likely via elastase-mediated cleavage of E-cadherin, and regulates epithelial repair. This pathway represents a potential therapeutic target to accelerate physiological recovery in inflammatory lung diseases.

  12. Role of Wnt/Beta-Catenin Signaling in Liver Metabolism and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monga, Satdarshan Pal Singh

    2009-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is known for its role in embryogenesis as well as carcinogenesis. In the liver, it plays many critical roles during hepatic development and regeneration, and its dysregulation is evident in aberrant hepatic growth during various liver tumors. Its chief cellular roles in the liver include regulation of processes of cell proliferation, apoptosis, oxidative stress and differentiation, which in turn contributes to hepatic growth, zonation, xenobiotic metabolism and other metabolic processes inherent to the liver. Most of these functions of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling are dictated through the highly temporal and tissue-specific or non-specific transcriptional targets of the pathway. In addition, some of the critical functions such as cell-cell adhesion and perhaps maintenance of various junctions that are critical from an epithelial cell biology perspective are also a function of β-catenin, which is the central component of the canonical Wnt pathway. Various animal models and clinical studies have demonstrated the spectra of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in liver health and disease. Thus therapeutic modulation of this pathway for improved hepatic health is inevitable in the future. The current review discusses the advances in our understanding of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling in liver physiology and pathology especially in hepatic metabolism and various tumors in adult liver and goes on to extrapolate the preclinical significance and possible translational implications of such findings. PMID:19747566

  13. BETA-CATENIN SIGNALING, LIVER REGENERATION AND HEPATOCELLULAR CANCER: SORTING THE GOOD FROM THE BAD

    PubMed Central

    Nejak-Bowen, Kari Nichole; Monga, Satdarshan P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Among the adult organs, liver is unique for its ability to regenerate. A concerted signaling cascade enables optimum initiation of the regeneration process following insults brought about by surgery or a toxicant. Additionally, there exists a cellular redundancy, whereby a transiently amplifying progenitor population appears and expands to ensure regeneration, when differentiated cells of the liver are unable to proliferate in both experimental and clinical scenarios. One such pathway of relevance in these phenomena is Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which is activated relatively early during regeneration mostly through post-translational modifications. Once activated, β-catenin signaling drives the expression of target genes that are critical for cell cycle progression and contribute to initiation of the regeneration process. The role and regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is now documented in rats, mice, zebrafish and patients. More recently, a regenerative advantage of the livers in β-catenin overexpressing mice was reported, as was also the case after exogenous Wnt-1 delivery to the liver paving the way for assessing means to stimulate the pathway for therapeutics in liver failure. β-Catenin is also pertinent in hepatic oval cell activation and differentiation. However, aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling is reported in a significant subset of hepatocellular cancers (HCC). While many mechanisms of such activation have been reported, the most functional means of aberrant and sustained activation is through mutations in the β-catenin gene or in AXIN1/2, which encodes for a scaffolding protein critical for β-catenin degradation. Intriguingly, in experimental models hepatic overexpression of normal or mutant β-catenin is insufficient for tumorigenesis. In fact β-catenin loss promoted chemical carcinogenesis in the liver due to alternate mechanisms. Since most HCC occur in the backdrop of chronic hepatic injury, where hepatic regeneration is

  14. Developing Strategies to Block Beta-Catenin Action in Signaling and Cell Adhesion During Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    sequencing and by cloning Wnt signaling directs the orientation of mitotic spindles in into TA-vectors (Promega) and sequencing at least two independent...Fz is required for orientation of the mitotic spindles of bristle precursor cells (Gho and Schweisguth, 1998). Fz also plays a key role in orienting A...those of actin (Fig. 3). Sequential changes in MT or- spindle in metaphase and anaphase (Fig. 4, E and F, ar- ganization as nuclei proceed through

  15. PTEN Regulates Beta-Catenin in Androgen Signaling: Implication in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    modulation of the PI3K/Akt downstream effector, GSK3 3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3 3). Its inactivation by phosphorylation results in increased nuclear...ng 30 ng MNormal IgG - + Figure 3. Overexpression of IGF-1 receptors enhances AR-mediated transcription. (A) Transient transfections were performed in...Ruel, L. and Woodgett, J.R. (1996) Lithium inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity and mimics wingless signalling in intact cells. Curr Biol, 6

  16. Developing Strategies to Block Beta-Catenin Action in Signaling and Cell Adhesion During Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    lx Riesgo -Escovar et al., 1996; Sluss et al., 1996), as well as the HYB buffer (50% formamide, 5x SSC, 100 gg/ml salmon sperm transcription factors Fos...2. Armadillo:dTCF, a bipartite transcription factor Year 1 1. Construct, introduce into flies and begin to test effects of arm mutants with C-termini...junctions but effectively inhibited 03-catenin-mediated signaling. This suggests that the interaction between /3-catenin and T cell factor family

  17. Developing Strategies to Block Beta-Catenin Action in Signaling and Cell Adhesion During Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    interactions of B- 6 catenin and its partners, which might have therapeutic value in cancer or other diseases . With this information in hand, we have...model system for the tumor suppressor APC" Keystone Meeting on "Wnt and B-catenin signaling in Develo and Disease ", Taos NM March 2002. "Cell adhesion...recent data suggest that the picture is shown to associate with the Rho-GEF ASEF ( Kawasaki et more complex: DE-cadherin promotes border cell migration al

  18. Anti-Cadherin-17 Antibody Modulates Beta-Catenin Signaling and Tumorigenicity of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling Xiao; Zhang, Xiao Qian; Yuan, Yi; Khin, Ester; Hu, Mei-yu; Wang, Jian Hua; Poon, Ronnie T. P.; Hong, Wanjin; Lee, Nikki P.; Luk, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Cadherin-17 (CDH17) is an oncofetal molecule associated with poor prognostic outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), for which the treatment options are very limited. The present study investigates the therapeutic potential of a monoclonal antibody (Lic5) that targets the CDH17 antigen in HCC. In vitro experiments showed Lic5 could markedly reduce CDH17 expression in a dose-dependent manner, suppress β-catenin signaling, and induce cleavages of apoptotic enzymes caspase-8 and -9 in HCC cells. Treatment of animals in subcutaneous HCC xenograft model similarly demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition (TGI) using Lic5 antibody alone (5 mg/kg, i.p., t.i.w.; ca.60–65% TGI vs. vehicle at day 28), or in combination with conventional chemotherapy regimen (cisplatin 1 mg/kg; ca. 85–90% TGI). Strikingly, lung metastasis was markedly suppressed by Lic5 treatments. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses of xenograft explants revealed inactivation of the Wnt pathway and suppression of Wnt signaling components in HCC tissues. Collectively, anti-CDH17 antibody promises as an effective biologic agent for treating malignant HCC. PMID:24039755

  19. O-GlcNAc-glycosylation of {beta}-catenin regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayat, Ria; Leber, Brian; Grubac, Vanja; Wiltshire, Lesley; Persad, Sujata

    2008-09-10

    {beta}-catenin plays a role in intracellular adhesion and regulating gene expression. The latter role is associated with its oncogenic properties. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin controls its intracellular expression but mechanism/s that regulates the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin is unknown. We demonstrate that O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of {beta}-catenin negatively regulates its levels in the nucleus. We show that normal prostate cells (PNT1A) have significantly higher amounts of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin compared to prostate cancer (CaP) cells. The total nuclear levels of {beta}-catenin are higher in the CaP cells than PNT1A but only a minimal fraction of the nuclear {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing the levels of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells with PUGNAc (O- (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-gluco-pyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate) treatment is associated with a progressive decrease in the levels of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus. TOPFlash reporter assay and mRNA expressions of {beta}-catenin's target genes indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of {beta}-catenin results in a decrease in its transcriptional activity. We define a novel modification of {beta}-catenin that regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional function.

  20. Activation of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhances monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Kun . E-mail: leedk@memorialhealthsource.com; Nathan Grantham, R.; Trachte, Aaron L.; Mannion, John D.; Wilson, Colleen L.

    2006-08-18

    Monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium has been reported to be one of the early processes in the development of atherosclerosis. In an attempt to develop strategies to prevent or delay atherosclerosis progression, we analyzed effects of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway on monocyte adhesion to various human endothelial cells. Adhesion of fluorescein-labeled monocytes to various human endothelial cells was analyzed under a fluorescent microscope. Unlike sodium chloride, lithium chloride enhanced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3{beta} or proteosome enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Results of semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway did not change expression levels of mRNA for adhesion molecules. In conclusion, the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion without changing expression levels of adhesion molecules.

  1. The Role of Siah1-Induced Degradation of Beta-Catenin in Androgen Receptor Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    2 Introduction…………………………………………………………….…………....4 Body …………………………………………………………………………………….5 Key Research Accomplishments...targeted for degradation by Siah1 besides β- Catenin? 6 Body : We have made excellent progress in the first year of renewed funding towards...1374-1381. 2. Sanchez-Prieto, R., Lleonart, M., Ramon, Y., and Cajal , S. Lack of correlaqtion between p53 protein level and sensitivity of DNA

  2. Promotion versus suppression of rat colon carcinogenesis by chlorophyllin and chlorophyll: modulation of apoptosis, cell proliferation, and beta-catenin/Tcf signaling.

    PubMed

    Blum, Carmen A; Xu, Meirong; Orner, Gayle A; Darío Díaz, G; Li, Qingjie; Dashwood, Wan Mohaiza; Bailey, George S; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2003-01-01

    chlorophyllin had no effect and copper promoted the number of small ACF induced by IQ. The results suggest that further investigation of the dose-response for suppression versus promotion by chlorophyll and chlorophyllin is warranted, including studies of the beta-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway and its influence on cell proliferation and apoptosis in the colonic crypt.

  3. Loss of p53 expression is accompanied by upregulation of beta-catenin in meningiomas: a concomitant reciprocal expression.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Vladušić, Tomislav; Tomas, Davor; Logara, Monika; Skoko, Josip; Hrašćan, Reno

    2016-04-01

    Crosstalk between Wnt and p53 signalling pathways in cancer has long been suggested. Therefore in this study we have investigated the involvement of these pathways in meningiomas by analysing their main effector molecules, beta-catenin and p53. Cellular expression of p53 and beta-catenin proteins and genetic changes in TP53 were analysed by immunohistochemistry, PCR/RFLP and direct sequencing of TP53 exon 4. All the findings were analysed statistically. Our analysis showed that 47.5% of the 59 meningiomas demonstrated loss of expression of p53 protein. Moderate and strong p53 expression in the nuclei was observed in 8.5% and 6.8% of meningiomas respectively. Gross deletion of TP53 gene was observed in one meningioma, but nucleotide alterations were observed in 35.7% of meningiomas. In contrast, beta-catenin, the main Wnt signalling molecule, was upregulated in 71.2%, while strong expression was observed in 28.8% of meningiomas. The concomitant expressions of p53 and beta-catenin were investigated in the same patients. In the analysed meningiomas, the levels of the two proteins were significantly negatively correlated (P = 0.002). This indicates that meningiomas with lost p53 upregulate beta-catenin and activate Wnt signalling. Besides showing the reciprocal relationship between proteins, we also showed that the expression of p53 was significantly (P = 0.021) associated with higher meningioma grades (II and III), while beta-catenin upregulation was not associated with malignancy grades. Additionally, women exhibited significantly higher values of p53 loss when compared to males (P = 0.005). Our findings provide novel information about p53 involvement in meningeal brain tumours and reveal the complex relationship between Wnt and p53 signalling, they suggest an important role for beta-catenin in these tumours.

  4. Inhibition of the Tcf/beta-catenin complex increases apoptosis and impairs adrenocortical tumor cell proliferation and adrenal steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Letícia F.; Bueno, Ana Carolina; Gomes, Débora C.; Abduch, Rafael; de Castro, Margaret; Antonini, Sonir R.

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, there is no effective therapy for patients with advanced/metastatic adrenocortical cancer (ACC). The activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is frequent in ACC and this pathway is a promising therapeutic target. Aim To investigate the effects of the inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin in ACC cells. Methods Adrenal (NCI-H295 and Y1) and non-adrenal (HeLa) cell lines were treated with PNU-74654 (5–200 μM) for 24–96 h to assess cell viability (MTS-based assay), apoptosis (Annexin V), expression/localization of beta-catenin (qPCR, immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and western blot), expression of beta-catenin target genes (qPCR and western blot), and adrenal steroidogenesis (radioimmunoassay, qPCR and western blot). Results In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 significantly decreased cell proliferation 96 h after treatment, increased early and late apoptosis, decreased nuclear beta-catenin accumulation, impaired CTNNB1/beta-catenin expression and increased beta-catenin target genes 48 h after treatment. No effects were observed on HeLa cells. In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased cortisol, testosterone and androstenedione secretion 24 and 48 h after treatment. Additionally, in NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased SF1 and CYP21A2 mRNA expression as well as the protein levels of STAR and aldosterone synthase 48 h after treatment. In Y1 cells, PNU-74654 impaired corticosterone secretion 24 h after treatment but did not decrease cell viability. Conclusions Blocking the Tcf/beta-catenin complex inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in adrenocortical tumor cells triggering increased apoptosis, decreased cell viability and impairment of adrenal steroidogenesis. These promising findings pave the way for further experiments inhibiting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in pre-clinical models of ACC. The inhibition of this pathway may become a promising adjuvant therapy for patients with ACC. PMID:26515592

  5. LRP6 expression promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by altering beta-catenin subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; He, Xi; Schwartz, Alan L; Bu, Guojun

    2004-12-02

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays key roles in both embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6), a novel member of the expanding LDL receptor family, functions as an indispensable co-receptor for the Wnt signaling pathway. Although the role of LRP6 in embryonic development is now well established, its role in tumorigenesis is unclear. We report that LRP6 is readily expressed at the transcript level in several human cancer cell lines and human malignant tissues. Furthermore, using a retroviral gene transfer system, we find that stable expression of LRP6 in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells alters subcellular beta-catenin distribution such that the cytosolic beta-catenin level is significantly increased. This is accompanied by a significant increase in Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and cell proliferation. Finally, we demonstrate that LRP6 expression promotes tumorigenesis in vivo. These results thus indicate that LRP6 may function as a potential oncogenic protein by modulating Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

  6. {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effect of baicalin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Haeyong; Bae, Sungmin; Kim, Kijeong; Kim, Wonyong; Chung, Sang-In; Yoon, Yoosik

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} Baicalin maintains the levels of {beta}-Catenin during adipogenesis. {yields} {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effect of baicalin. {yields} Baicalin maintains the WNT/{beta}-Catenin pathway during adipogenesis. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin reportedly inhibits adipogenesis through the down-regulations of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){gamma} and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP){alpha}. We report that baicalin, a natural flavonoid compound, inhibits adipogenesis by modulating {beta}-Catenin. During 3T3-L1 cell adipogenesis, {beta}-Catenin was down-regulated, but baicalin treatment maintained {beta}-Catenin expression. Anti-adipogenic effects of baicalin were significantly attenuated by {beta}-Catenin siRNA transfection. {beta}-Catenin siRNA rescued the reduced expressions of PPAR{gamma}, C/EBP{alpha}, fatty acid binding protein 4 and lipoprotein lipase by baicalin. Furthermore, baicalin modulated members of the WNT/{beta}-Catenin pathway by maintaining the expressions of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6, disheveled (DVL)2 and DVL3. These findings suggest that {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effects of baicalin.

  7. Expression of beta-catenin is regulated by PI-3 kinase and sodium butyrate in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Turecková, Jolana; Kucerová, Dana; Vojtechová, Martina; Sloncová, Eva; Tuhácková, Zdena

    2006-01-01

    beta-catenin has a dual function; it is implicated in intercellular junctions and transcriptional co-activation. Here we examined the regulation of the expression and localization of beta-catenin in HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Our results showed that inhibition of PI-3 kinase with wortmannin was accompanied by a considerably reduced expression of beta-catenin. This effect was overcome by butyrate and occurred at the protein level, not at the level of mRNA. Moreover, NaBT significantly increased the phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein, S6, known to participate in the translational control of gene expression. This was accompanied by the increased phosphorylation of p70 S6K and MAPKs, the effector proteins that are upstream of protein S6 in the distinct signaling pathways. These facts indicate that different signaling pathways may be involved in the regulation of beta-catenin synthesis. Modulation of beta-catenin expression induced by NaBT appeared to occur at the level of protein translation, suggesting that NaBT may act as a translational regulator.

  8. Crystal Structure of a Full-Length [beta]-Catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yi; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Liu, Jing; Berndt, Jason D.; Zheng, Jie J.; Moon, Randall T.; Xu, Wenqing

    2008-08-19

    {beta}-catenin plays essential roles in cell adhesion and Wnt signaling, while deregulation of {beta}-catenin is associated with multiple diseases including cancers. Here, we report the crystal structures of full-length zebrafish {beta}-catenin and a human {beta}-catenin fragment that contains both the armadillo repeat and the C-terminal domains. Our structures reveal that the N-terminal region of the C-terminal domain, a key component of the C-terminal transactivation domain, forms a long {alpha} helix that packs on the C-terminal end of the armadillo repeat domain, and thus forms part of the {beta}-catenin superhelical core. The existence of this helix redefines our view of interactions of {beta}-catenin with some of its critical partners, including ICAT and Chibby, which may form extensive interactions with this C-terminal domain {alpha} helix. Our crystallographic and NMR studies also suggest that the unstructured N-terminal and C-terminal tails interact with the ordered armadillo repeat domain in a dynamic and variable manner.

  9. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin promotes angiogenic and anti-apoptotic signaling through the induction of VEGF, Bcl-2 and survivin expression in rat ischemic preconditioned myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Shigeaki; Zhan, Lijun; Altaf, Elham; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2006-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Bcl-2 and survivin expression after myocardial infarction (MI). Mechanisms of angiogenic and anti-apoptotic effects due to IP still remain unclear. The present study attempts to address whether GSK-3beta-beta-catenin signaling in turn interacts with T-cell transcription factor/lymphoid-enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF) and regulates these genes in the ischemic preconditioned myocardium. In a rat MI model with permanent occlusion of left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), IP (four cycles of 4-min of ischemia and 4-min of reperfusion) significantly phosphorylated and inhibited GSK-3beta and accumulated beta-catenin in the cytosol and nucleus. Wortmannin, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, repressed this effect in our model. We examined whether pretreatment with GSK-3beta inhibitor lithium or SB216763, mimicked IP-mediated angiogenesis and cardioprotection. Lithium- or SB216763- treated rats revealed accumulation of cytosolic and nuclear beta-catenin. This was followed by increased TCF/LEF transcriptional activity and the upregulation of VEGF, Bcl-2 and survivin mRNA expression accompanied by reduction of apoptotic cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells and increased capillary density after MI. The results of this study demonstrate, first time that inhibition of GSK-3beta followed by accumulation of beta-catenin in the cytosol and nucleus has potent anti-apoptotic and angiogenic effects after MI and that the PI3-kinase/GSK-3beta/beta-catenin signaling pathway plays an important role in IP.

  10. E-cadherin and APC compete for the interaction with beta-catenin and the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    beta-Catenin is involved in the formation of adherens junctions of mammalian epithelia. It interacts with the cell adhesion molecule E- cadherin and also with the tumor suppressor gene product APC, and the Drosophila homologue of beta-catenin, armadillo, mediates morphogenetic signals. We demonstrate here that E-cadherin and APC directly compete for binding to the internal, armadillo-like repeats of beta-catenin; the NH2-terminal domain of beta-catenin mediates the interaction of the alternative E-cadherin and APC complexes to the cytoskeleton by binding to alpha-catenin. Plakoglobin (gamma-catenin), which is structurally related to beta-catenin, mediates identical interactions. We thus show that the APC tumor suppressor gene product forms strikingly similar associations as found in cell junctions and suggest that beta-catenin and plakoglobin are central regulators of cell adhesion, cytoskeletal interaction, and tumor suppression. PMID:7806582

  11. Molecular plasticity of beta-catenin: new insights from single-molecule measurements and MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Ritco-Vonsovici, Monica; Ababou, Abdessamad; Horton, Michael

    2007-09-01

    The multifunctional protein, beta-catenin, has essential roles in cell adhesion and, through the Wnt signaling pathway, in controlling cell differentiation, development, and generation of cancer. Could distinct molecular forms of beta-catenin underlie these two functions? Our single-molecule force spectroscopy of armadillo beta-catenin, with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, suggests a model in which the cell generates various forms of beta-catenin, in equilibrium. We find beta-catenin and the transcriptional factor Tcf4 form two complexes with different affinities. Specific cellular response is achieved by the ligand binding to a particular matching preexisting conformer. Our MD simulation indicates that complexes derive from two conformers of the core region of the protein, whose preexisting molecular forms could arise from small variations in flexible regions of the beta-catenin main binding site. This mechanism for the generation of the various forms offers a route to tailoring future therapeutic strategies.

  12. PPARgamma and Wnt/beta-Catenin pathway in human breast cancer: expression pattern, molecular interaction and clinical/prognostic correlations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Zou, Lin; Zhang, Chunhui; He, Song; Cheng, Chun; Xu, Junfei; Lu, Weiqi; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Donglin; Shen, Aiguo

    2009-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is a nuclear receptor expressed in a large number of human cancers and plays important roles in breast cancer cell proliferation. Its association with clinicopathologic features and Wnt/beta-Catenin signaling pathway, a crucial factor in embryonic and malignant development, in breast cancer has not been reported systematically. In the present study, expression patterns, interaction and the correlations with clinical/prognostic factors of PPARgamma and beta-Catenin were investigated among patients with breast cancer. Using immunohistochemistry, we performed a study on 70 patient-derived human breast tumors and compared the protein expression levels of PPARgamma, beta-Catenin and Ki-67. Correlations were then analyzed between IHC-assessed level of these molecules and major clinicopathologic variables and survival. Furthermore, western blot (WB) analysis before and after immunoprecipitation with PPARgamma and beta-Catenin were performed on breast cancer tissues and cell lines to evaluate their protein level and molecular interaction. We showed that PPARgamma expression was of significant prognostic value in the outcome of breast carcinomas, which positively correlated with ER status (P = 0.012) and inversely associated with histologic grade (P = 0.012), tumor size (P = 0.007), axillary lymph node status (P = 0.044), TNM stage (P = 0.026), Ki-67 (P = 0.006) and abnormal beta-Catenin expression (P = 0.023), whereas no correlation was seen between PPARgamma and age (P = 0.513), histology (P = 0.764), PR (P = 0.099) or HER-2 status (P = 0.175). Kaplan-Meier survival curves of the study population showed that high expression level of PPARgamma significantly correlated with long-term survival. Molecular interaction could also be demonstrated between PPARgamma and beta-Catenin both in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. On the basis of these results, we suggested that PPARgamma might serve as a future

  13. beta-Catenin promotes self-renewal of skeletal-muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Ana; Ono, Yusuke; Gnocchi, Viola F; Zammit, Peter S

    2008-05-01

    Satellite cells are the resident stem cells of adult skeletal muscle. As with all stem cells, how the choice between self-renewal or differentiation is controlled is central to understanding their function. Here, we have explored the role of beta-catenin in determining the fate of myogenic satellite cells. Satellite cells express beta-catenin, and expression is maintained as they activate and undergo proliferation. Constitutive retroviral-driven expression of wild-type or stabilised beta-catenin results in more satellite cells expressing Pax7 without any MyoD -- therefore, adopting the self-renewal pathway, with fewer cells undergoing myogenic differentiation. Similarly, preventing the degradation of endogenous beta-catenin by inhibiting GSK3beta activity also results in more Pax7-positive-MyoD-negative (Pax7(+)MyoD(-)) satellite-cell progeny. Consistent with these observations, downregulation of beta-catenin using small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the proportion of satellite cells that express Pax7 and augmented myogenic differentiation after mitogen withdrawal. Since a dominant-negative version of beta-catenin had the same effect as silencing beta-catenin using specific siRNA, beta-catenin promotes self-renewal via transcriptional control of target genes. Thus, beta-catenin signalling in proliferating satellite cells directs these cells towards the self-renewal pathway and, so, contributes to the maintenance of this stem-cell pool in adult skeletal muscle.

  14. The prognostic value of the immunohistochemical expression and mutational pattern of the key mediator of Wnt signaling: beta-catenin in Tunisian patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khiari, Meriem; Arfaoui, Amira; Kriaa, Lilia; Chaar, Inés; Amara, Sameh; Lounis, Med Amine; Sammoud, Souraya; Dhraeif, Monia; Gharbi, Lassaad; Mzabi-Regaya, Sabeh; Bouraoui, Saadia

    2012-01-01

    Beta-catenin plays a critical role with E-cadherin in cell-cell adhesion and is also a key molecule of the highly conserved Wnt signaling pathway that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. Abrogation of this pathway is implicated in the carcinogenesis of several malignancies, especially colorectal cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of β-catenin/E-cadherin complex in Tunisian patients with colorectal cancer. Matched primary tumors from 150 patients with sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas were stained for β-catenin and E-cadherin by using immunohistochemistry. Deletion of exon 3 of CTNNB1 gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction. Our results showed that β-catenin and E-cadherin expressions were related inversely to tumor differentiation. Furthermore, the nuclear expression of β-catenin was considerably increased in advanced colorectal adenocarcinomas and was highly associated with shorter survival of patients. Deletion of exon 3 of CTNNB1 was identified in 2 cases by using polymerase chain reaction and was significantly related to tumor invasion and aberrant expression of E-cadherin. The major finding of this study is that activation of β-catenin gene by deletions involving exon 3 may be considered as an advanced event in colorectal tumorigenesis in Tunisian patients, in contrast to some worldwide studies. Moreover, disruption of β-catenin/E-cadherin complex may be considered as a dependent predictor of disease outcome.

  15. PECAM-1 (CD31) functions as a reservoir for and a modulator of tyrosine-phosphorylated beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ilan, N; Mahooti, S; Rimm, D L; Madri, J A

    1999-09-01

    Catenins function as regulators of cellular signaling events in addition to their previously documented roles in adherens junction formation and function. Evidence to date suggests that beta and gamma catenins can act as signaling molecules, bind transcriptional factors and translocate to the nucleus. Beta- and gamma-catenin are also major substrates for protein tyrosine kinases, and tyrosine phosphorylation of junctional proteins is correlated with decreased adhesiveness. One way in which catenin functions are modulated is by dynamic incorporation into junctional complexes which controls, in part, the cytoplasmic levels of catenins. Here we show that: (1) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces beta-catenin tyrosine phosphorylation in a time-, and dose-dependent manner and that VEGF receptors co-localize to areas of endothelial cell-cell contact in vitro and in vivo. (2) Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 can function as a reservoir for, and modulator of, tyrosine phosphorylated beta-catenin. (3) PECAM-1 can prevent beta-catenin nuclear translocation in transfected SW480 colon carcinoma cells. We suggest that PECAM-1 may play a role in modulating beta-catenin tyrosine phosphorylation levels, localization and signaling and by doing so, functions as an important modulator of the endothelium.

  16. {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 activated enamelin expression in ameloblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hua; Lv, Ping; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Xuejun

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 complex could activate enamelin gene transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 can directly bind to enamelin 5' regulatory region. {yields} Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling can upregulate enamelin expression in ameloblast-like cells. -- Abstract: Enamelin is an ameloblast-specific matrix protein believed to play essential roles in enamel formation. However, mechanisms of enamelin transcription regulation are not clear. {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 is a key transcriptional complex involved in tooth development. In this study, the role of {beta}-catenin/LEF1 in enamelin expression was investigated. The 5'-flanking region of the mouse enamelin gene was analyzed and cloned. Co-transfection analysis and mutation assays revealed that two conserved LEF1 responsive elements located at -1002 and -597 bp upstream of the enamelin translation initiation site could augment transcriptional activity of the enamelin. The interaction between the enamelin elements and {beta}-catenin/LEF1 was further confirmed by electrophoresis mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In addition, LiCl treatment induced nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin and elevated endogenous enamelin expression in mouse ameloblast-like cells. The results suggested that Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling could function in enamelin gene expression by direct interaction through two conserved LEF1 responsive elements on the enamelin gene in ameloblast-like cells.

  17. IGFBP-4 activates the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway and induces M-CAM expression in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Koji; Hirata, Hiroshi; Majid, Shahana; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Hinoda, Yuji; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2011-11-15

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is inactivated by Wnt antagonists in most cancers and IGFBP-4 is an antagonist of the Wnt/ β-catenin signaling pathway. However, the function of IGFBP-4 is not currently understood in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We initially found that the expression of IGFBP-4 was significantly lower in primary RCC and higher in metastatic RCC compared to normal human kidney tissues. To assess the function of IGFBP4, we established IGFBP4 transfectants (primary renal cancer cell line) and performed functional analyses including Tcf reporter assays, cell viability, invasive capability, mortality, and in vivo tumor growth. Interestingly IGFBP-4 transfectants promoted cell growth (in vitro and in vivo), invasion, and motility in primary renal cancer. Tcf transcriptional activity was significantly increased in IGFBP-4 transfectants compared to mock cells and β-catenin expression was increased. Also the β-catenin downstream effector, MT1-MMP showed increased expression in IGFBP4 transfectants. Additionally IGFBP4 induced the expression of M-CAM, a marker of tumor progression. In order to assess the role of IGFBP4 in metastatic renal cancer, IGFBP-4 mRNA in a metastatic renal cancer cell lines (ACHN) was knocked-down using a siRNA technique. The cell growth and motility was decreased in si-IGFBP4 transfected ACHN cells compared to cells transfected with control siRNA. Tcf activity in ACHN cells was also decreased with si-IGFBP-4 transfection. This is a first report documenting that IGFBP-4 expression in RCC activates cell growth, metastasis, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and may be involved in RCC metastasis.

  18. Regulation of beta catenin signaling and parathyroid hormone anabolic effects in bone by the matricellular protein periostin.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Conway, Simon J; Ferrari, Serge L

    2012-09-11

    Periostin (Postn) is a matricellular protein preferentially expressed by osteocytes and periosteal osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Whether and how periostin expression influences bone anabolism, however, remains unknown. We investigated the skeletal response of adult Postn(-/-) and Postn(+/+) mice to intermittent PTH. Compared with Postn(+/+), Postn(-/-) mice had a lower bone mass, cortical bone volume, and strength response to PTH. PTH-stimulated bone-forming indices were all significantly lower in Postn(-/-) mice, particularly at the periosteum. Furthermore, in vivo stimulation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling by PTH, as evaluated in TOPGAL reporter mice, was inhibited in the absence of periostin (TOPGAL;Postn(-/-) mice). PTH stimulated periostin and inhibited MEF2C and sclerostin (Sost) expression in bone and osteoblasts in vitro. Recombinant periostin also suppressed Sost expression, which was mediated through the integrin αVβ3 receptor, whereas periostin-blocking antibody prevented inhibition of MEF2C and Sost by PTH. In turn, administration of a Sost-blocking antiboby partially restored the PTH-mediated increase in bone mass in Postn(-/-) mice. In addition, primary osteoblasts from Postn(-/-) mice showed a lower proliferation, mineralization, and migration, both spontaneously and in response to PTH. Osteoblastic gene expression levels confirmed a defect of Postn(-/-) osteoblast differentiation with and without PTH, as well as an increased osteoblast apoptosis in the absence of periostin. These data elucidate the complex role of periostin on bone anabolism, through the regulation of Sost, Wnt-β-catenin signaling, and osteoblast differentiation.

  19. Baicalin promotes embryo adhesion and implantation by upregulating fucosyltransferase IV (FUT4) via Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Bulbul, Ahmmed; Shan, Xiu; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Yan, Qiu

    2015-05-08

    Glycosylation plays a significant role in determining the receptivity of the uterine endometrium to embryo. Fucosyltransferase IV (FUT4) is expressed stage-specifically in the uterine endometrium of mammalians, and considered as a marker of the endometrial receptivity. Baicalin, a monomer of flavonoids, is known to have functions in improving reproduction. However, the mechanism by which baicalin regulates the expression of FUT4 in embryo-endometrium adhesion remains unclear. Our results showed that baicalin significantly increased FUT4 mRNA and protein expression levels both in human endometrial cells and mouse endometrial tissue, and consistently elevated embryo adhesion rate during implantation in vitro and embryonic implantation competence in pregnant mouse. This study suggests that baicalin facilitates endometrial reproduction via elevating FUT4 expression through Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  20. Expression of beta-catenin by acute myeloid leukemia cells predicts enhanced clonogenic capacities and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ysebaert, L; Chicanne, G; Demur, C; De Toni, F; Prade-Houdellier, N; Ruidavets, J-B; Mansat-De Mas, V; Rigal-Huguet, F; Laurent, G; Payrastre, B; Manenti, S; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2006-07-01

    Activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway has recently been shown to be crucial to the establishment of leukemic stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. We sought to determine whether beta-catenin was correlated to clonogenic capacity also in the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) setting. Eighty-two patients were retrospectively evaluated for beta-catenin expression by Western blot. beta-Catenin was expressed (although at various protein levels) in 61% of patients, and was undetectable in the remaining cases. In our cohort, beta-catenin expression was correlated with the clonogenic proliferation of AML-colony forming cells (AML-CFC or CFU-L) in methylcellulose in the presence of 5637-conditioned medium, and more strikingly with self-renewing of leukemic cells, as assessed in vitro by a re-plating assay. In survival analyses, beta-catenin appeared as a new independent prognostic factor predicting poor event-free survival and shortened overall survival (both with P<0.05). Furthermore, variations in beta-catenin protein levels were dependent on post-transcriptional mechanisms involving the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway only in leukemic cells. Indeed, beta-catenin negative leukemic cells were found to increase beta-catenin in response to Wnt3a agonist in contrast to normal counterparts. Altogether, our data pave the way to the evaluation of Wnt pathway inhibition as a new rationale for eradicating the clonogenic pool of AML cells.

  1. Regulation of beta catenin signaling and parathyroid hormone anabolic effects in bone by the matricellular protein periostin

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Conway, Simon J.; Ferrari, Serge L.

    2012-01-01

    Periostin (Postn) is a matricellular protein preferentially expressed by osteocytes and periosteal osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Whether and how periostin expression influences bone anabolism, however, remains unknown. We investigated the skeletal response of adult Postn−/− and Postn+/+ mice to intermittent PTH. Compared with Postn+/+, Postn−/− mice had a lower bone mass, cortical bone volume, and strength response to PTH. PTH-stimulated bone-forming indices were all significantly lower in Postn−/− mice, particularly at the periosteum. Furthermore, in vivo stimulation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling by PTH, as evaluated in TOPGAL reporter mice, was inhibited in the absence of periostin (TOPGAL;Postn−/− mice). PTH stimulated periostin and inhibited MEF2C and sclerostin (Sost) expression in bone and osteoblasts in vitro. Recombinant periostin also suppressed Sost expression, which was mediated through the integrin αVβ3 receptor, whereas periostin-blocking antibody prevented inhibition of MEF2C and Sost by PTH. In turn, administration of a Sost-blocking antiboby partially restored the PTH-mediated increase in bone mass in Postn−/− mice. In addition, primary osteoblasts from Postn−/− mice showed a lower proliferation, mineralization, and migration, both spontaneously and in response to PTH. Osteoblastic gene expression levels confirmed a defect of Postn−/− osteoblast differentiation with and without PTH, as well as an increased osteoblast apoptosis in the absence of periostin. These data elucidate the complex role of periostin on bone anabolism, through the regulation of Sost, Wnt-β-catenin signaling, and osteoblast differentiation. PMID:22927401

  2. URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by modulation of E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Rui; Huang, Chen; Bi, Qian; Zhai, Ying; Xia, Lin; Liu, Jie; Sun, Shiren; Fan, Daiming

    2010-01-01

    Upregulated gene 11 (URG11), recently identified as a new HBx-upregulated gene that may activate {beta}-catenin and Wnt signaling, was found to be upregulated in a human tubule cell line under low oxygen. Here, we investigated the potential role of URG11 in hypoxia-induced renal tubular epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT). Overexpression of URG11 in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK2) promoted a mesenchymal phenotype accompanied by reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and {alpha}-SMA, while URG11 knockdown by siRNA effectively reversed hypoxia-induced EMT. URG11 promoted the expression of {beta}-catenin and increased its nuclear accumulation under normoxic conditions through transactivation of the {beta}-catenin promoter. This in turn upregulated {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) and its downstream effector genes, vimentin, and {alpha}-SMA. In vivo, strong expression of URG11 was observed in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and a Western blot analysis demonstrated a close correlation between HIF-1{alpha} and URG11 protein levels. Altogether, our results indicate that URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through the suppression of E-cadherin and the activation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF pathway.

  3. Maintenance of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-mutant colorectal cancer is dependent on Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Scholer-Dahirel, Alix; Schlabach, Michael R; Loo, Alice; Bagdasarian, Linda; Meyer, Ronald; Guo, Ribo; Woolfenden, Steve; Yu, Kristine K; Markovits, Judit; Killary, Karen; Sonkin, Dmitry; Yao, Yung-Mae; Warmuth, Markus; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Stegmeier, Frank; Mosher, Rebecca E; McLaughlin, Margaret E

    2011-10-11

    Persistent expression of certain oncogenes is required for tumor maintenance. This phenotype is referred to as oncogene addiction and has been clinically validated by anticancer therapies that specifically inhibit oncoproteins such as BCR-ABL, c-Kit, HER2, PDGFR, and EGFR. Identifying additional genes that are required for tumor maintenance may lead to new targets for anticancer drugs. Although the role of aberrant Wnt pathway activation in the initiation of colorectal cancer has been clearly established, it remains unclear whether sustained Wnt pathway activation is required for colorectal tumor maintenance. To address this question, we used inducible β-catenin shRNAs to temporally control Wnt pathway activation in vivo. Here, we show that active Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for maintenance of colorectal tumor xenografts harboring APC mutations. Reduced tumor growth upon β-catenin inhibition was due to cell cycle arrest and differentiation. Upon reactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway colorectal cancer cells resumed proliferation and reacquired a crypt progenitor phenotype. In human colonic adenocarcinomas, high levels of nuclear β-catenin correlated with crypt progenitor but not differentiation markers, suggesting that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway may also control colorectal tumor cell fate during the maintenance phase of tumors in patients. These results support efforts to treat human colorectal cancer by pharmacological inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  4. Lithium and neuropsychiatric therapeutics: neuroplasticity via glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, beta-catenin, and neurotrophin cascades.

    PubMed

    Wada, Akihiko

    2009-05-01

    Mood disorders are not merely attributed to the functional defect of neurotransmission, but also are due to the structural impairment of neuroplasticity. Chronic stress decreases neurotrophin levels, precipitating or exacerbating depression; conversely, antidepressants increase expression of various neurotrophins (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor), thereby blocking or reversing structural and functional pathologies via promoting neurogenesis. Since the worldwide approval of lithium therapy in 1970, lithium has been used for its anti-manic, antidepressant, and anti-suicidal effects, yet the therapeutic mechanisms at the cellular level remain not-fully defined. During the last five years, multiple lines of evidence have shown that the mood stabilization and neurogenesis by lithium are due to the lithium-induced inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), allowing accumulation of beta-catenin and beta-catenin-dependent gene transcriptional events. Altered levels of GSK-3beta and beta-catenin are associated with various neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, while various classical neuropsychiatric drugs inhibit GSK-3beta and up-regulate beta-catenin expression. In addition, evidence has emerged that insulin-like growth factor-I enhances antidepression, anti-anxiety, memory, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis; antidepressants up-regulate expression of insulin-like growth factor-I, while insulin-like growth factor-I up-regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and its receptor TrkB level, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced synaptic protein levels. More importantly, physical exercise and healthy diet raise transport of peripheral circulating insulin-like growth factor I into the brain, reinforcing the expression of neurotrophins (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and the strength of cell survival signalings (e.g., phosphoinositide 3-kinase / Akt / GSK-3beta pathway

  5. Cytoplasmic beta-catenin in esophageal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Shiozaki, H; Doki, Y; Yamamoto, M; Utsunomiya, T; Kawanishi, K; Fukuchi, N; Inoue, M; Tsujinaka, T; Monden, M

    1999-04-20

    beta-Catenin has 2 distinct roles in E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and carcinogenesis through APC gene mutation. One occurs at cell-adhesion sites, where cadherins become linked to the actin-based cytoskeleton. The others occur in the cytoplasm and nuclei and are thought to regulate cell transformation. We studied these different beta-catenins and evaluated their significance in carcinogenesis. Fresh surgical specimens were obtained from 22 patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the esophagus. beta-Catenin in the free soluble fraction and the insoluble fraction was immunoblotted separately. At the same time, its localization was observed by immuno-histochemical techniques. In the normal esophageal epithelium, 91% of beta-catenin was detected in the insoluble fraction and beta-catenin staining occurred at the cell membrane, in co-existence with E-cadherin. In cancerous tissues, the amount of soluble beta-catenin was significantly (about 4-fold) higher than in normal tissues. Also, in cancerous tissues with higher amounts of soluble beta-catenin, immuno-histochemical techniques revealed the presence of beta-catenin in the cytoplasm and nuclei, as well as in the cell membrane. However, in samples with lower amounts of beta-catenin, expression was found only at the cell boundaries. The amount of soluble beta-catenin was not associated with the clinico-pathological grading of the tumors. Our results show that the accumulation of free soluble beta-catenin in the cytoplasm and nuclei frequently occurs during carcinogenesis of the squamous epithelium of the esophagus.

  6. Dact2 represses PITX2 transcriptional activation and cell proliferation through Wnt/beta-catenin signaling during odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Florez, Sergio; Wang, Jianbo; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Dact proteins belong to the Dapper/Frodo protein family and function as cytoplasmic attenuators in Wnt and TGFβ signaling. Previous studies show that Dact1 is a potent Wnt signaling inhibitor by promoting degradation of β-catenin. We report a new mechanism for Dact2 function as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by interacting with PITX2. PITX2 is a downstream transcription factor in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and PITX2 synergizes with Lef-1 to activate downstream genes. Immunohistochemistry verified the expression of Dact2 in the tooth epithelium, which correlated with Pitx2 epithelial expression. Dact2 loss of function and PITX2 gain of function studies reveal a feedback mechanism for controlling Dact2 expression. Pitx2 endogenously activates Dact2 expression and Dact2 feeds back to repress Pitx2 transcriptional activity. A Topflash reporter system was employed showing PITX2 activation of Wnt signaling, which is attenuated by Dact2. Transient transfections demonstrate the inhibitory effect of Dact2 on critical dental epithelial differentiation factors during tooth development. Dact2 significantly inhibits PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 and amelogenin promoters. Multiple lines of evidence conclude the inhibition is achieved by the physical interaction between Dact2 and Pitx2 proteins. The loss of function of Dact2 also reveals increased cell proliferation due to up-regulated Wnt downstream genes, cyclinD1 and cyclinD2. In summary, we have identified a novel role for Dact2 as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway in embryonic tooth development through its regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  7. Dact2 Represses PITX2 Transcriptional Activation and Cell Proliferation through Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling during Odontogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Florez, Sergio; Wang, Jianbo; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Dact proteins belong to the Dapper/Frodo protein family and function as cytoplasmic attenuators in Wnt and TGFβ signaling. Previous studies show that Dact1 is a potent Wnt signaling inhibitor by promoting degradation of β-catenin. We report a new mechanism for Dact2 function as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by interacting with PITX2. PITX2 is a downstream transcription factor in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and PITX2 synergizes with Lef-1 to activate downstream genes. Immunohistochemistry verified the expression of Dact2 in the tooth epithelium, which correlated with Pitx2 epithelial expression. Dact2 loss of function and PITX2 gain of function studies reveal a feedback mechanism for controlling Dact2 expression. Pitx2 endogenously activates Dact2 expression and Dact2 feeds back to repress Pitx2 transcriptional activity. A Topflash reporter system was employed showing PITX2 activation of Wnt signaling, which is attenuated by Dact2. Transient transfections demonstrate the inhibitory effect of Dact2 on critical dental epithelial differentiation factors during tooth development. Dact2 significantly inhibits PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 and amelogenin promoters. Multiple lines of evidence conclude the inhibition is achieved by the physical interaction between Dact2 and Pitx2 proteins. The loss of function of Dact2 also reveals increased cell proliferation due to up-regulated Wnt downstream genes, cyclinD1 and cyclinD2. In summary, we have identified a novel role for Dact2 as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway in embryonic tooth development through its regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:23349981

  8. Cardiac tissue-restricted deletion of plakoglobin results in progressive cardiomyopathy and activation of {beta}-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jifen; Swope, David; Raess, Natalia; Cheng, Lan; Muller, Eliane J; Radice, Glenn L

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in the plakoglobin (JUP) gene have been identified in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) patients. However, the mechanisms underlying plakoglobin dysfunction involved in the pathogenesis of ARVC remain poorly understood. Plakoglobin is a component of both desmosomes and adherens junctions located at the intercalated disc (ICD) of cardiomyocytes, where it functions to link cadherins to the cytoskeleton. In addition, plakoglobin functions as a signaling protein via its ability to modulate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. To investigate the role of plakoglobin in ARVC, we generated an inducible cardiorestricted knockout (CKO) of the plakoglobin gene in mice. Plakoglobin CKO mice exhibited progressive loss of cardiac myocytes, extensive inflammatory infiltration, fibrous tissue replacement, and cardiac dysfunction similar to those of ARVC patients. Desmosomal proteins from the ICD were decreased, consistent with altered desmosome ultrastructure in plakoglobin CKO hearts. Despite gap junction remodeling, plakoglobin CKO hearts were refractory to induced arrhythmias. Ablation of plakoglobin caused increase β-catenin stabilization associated with activated AKT and inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β. Finally, β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity may contribute to the cardiac hypertrophy response in plakoglobin CKO mice. This novel model of ARVC demonstrates for the first time how plakoglobin affects β-catenin activity in the heart and its implications for disease pathogenesis.

  9. Multiple roles of mesenchymal beta-catenin during murine limb patterning.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theo P; Taketo, Makoto M; Birchmeier, Walter; Hartmann, Christine

    2006-04-01

    Recently canonical Wnt signaling in the ectoderm has been shown to be required for maintenance of the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and for dorsoventral signaling. Using conditional gain- and loss-of-function beta-catenin alleles, we have studied the role of mesenchymal beta-catenin activity during limb development. Here, we show that loss of beta-catenin results in limb truncations due to a defect in AER maintenance. Stabilization of beta-catenin also results in truncated limbs, caused by a premature regression of the AER. Concomitantly, in these limbs, the expression of Bmp2, Bmp4 and Bmp7, and of the Bmp target genes Msx1, Msx2 and gremlin, is expanded in the mesenchyme. Furthermore, we found that the expression of Lmx1b, a gene exclusively expressed in the dorsal limb mesenchyme and involved in dorsoventral patterning, is reduced upon loss of beta-catenin activity and is expanded ventrally in gain-of-function limbs. However, the known ectodermal regulators Wnt7a and engrailed 1 are expressed normally. This suggests that Lmx1b is also regulated, in part, by a beta-catenin-mediated Wnt signal, independent of the non-canoncial Wnt7a signaling pathway. In addition, loss of beta-catenin results in a severe agenesis of the scapula. Concurrently, the expression of two genes, Pax1 and Emx2, which have been implicated in scapula development, is lost in beta-catenin loss-of-function limbs; however, only Emx2 is upregulated in gain-of-function limbs. Mesenchymal beta-catenin activity is therefore required for AER maintenance, and for normal expression of Lmx1b and Emx2.

  10. Invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum activates beta-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer via a TLR4/P-PAK1 cascade.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyu; Peng, Yan; Yu, Jiahui; Chen, Ting; Wu, Yaxin; Shi, Lei; Li, Qing; Wu, Jiao; Fu, Xiangsheng

    2017-05-09

    The underlying mechanism of Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) in the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC) is poorly understood. Here, we examined Fn abundance in CRC tissues, as well as β-catenin, TLR4 and PAK1 protein abundance in Fn positive and Fn negative CRCs. Furthermore, we isolated a strain of Fn (F01) from a CRC tissue and examined whether Fn (F01) infection of colon cancer cells activated β-catenin signaling via the TLR4/P-PAK1/P-β-catenin S675 cascade. Invasive Fn was abundant in 62.2% of CRC tissues. TLR4, PAK1 and nuclear β-catenin proteins were more abundant within Fn-positive over Fn-negative CRCs (P < 0.05). Fn and its lipopolysaccharide induced a significant increase in TLR4/P-PAK1/P-β-catenin S675/C-myc/CyclinD1 protein abundance, as well as in the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Furthermore, inhibition of TLR4 or PAK1 prior to challenge with Fn significantly decreased protein abundance of P-β-catenin S675, C-myc and Cyclin D1, as well as nuclear β-catenin accumulation. Inhibition of TLR4 significantly decreased P-PAK1 protein abundance, and for the first time, we observed an interaction between TLR4 and P-PAK1 using immunoprecipitation. Our data suggest that invasive Fn activates β-catenin signaling via a TLR4/P-PAK1/P-β-catenin S675 cascade in CRC. Furthermore, TLR4 and PAK1 could be potential pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of Fn-related CRCs.

  11. APC and beta-catenin protein expression patterns in HNPCC-related endometrial and colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kariola, Reetta; Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Ollikainen, Miina; Butzow, Ralf; Peltomäki, Päivi; Nyström, Minna

    2005-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1) genes are the two major components of the Wnt signaling pathway that has been shown to play an important role in the formation of certain cancers. The overactivation of the pathway, which results in abnormal accumulation of beta-catenin protein in nuclei, contributes to most colorectal cancers (CRCs), both sporadic and hereditary, as well as sporadic endometrial cancers (ECs). Here, we studied the involvement of APC and beta-catenin in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC)-related ECs, and compared the expression patterns to those in HNPCC-related CRCs. Nineteen ECs and 31 CRCs derived from HNPCC patients were immunohistochemically stained with anti-APC- and anti-beta-catenin-antibodies. Tumor-specific loss of APC was observed in 16 of endometrial cancers (3 of 19) and in 39 of colorectal cancers (12 of 31). Consistently, the loss of APC expression was associated with nuclear beta-catenin staining. Altogether, aberrant beta-catenin localization was observed in 53 of ECs (10 of 19) as compared to 84 of CRCs (26 of 31) (P=0.02). Our results suggest a frequent overactivation of the Wnt signaling pathway in hereditary endometrial cancer. In accordance with studies on sporadic cancers, abnormal accumulation of beta-catenin protein in nuclei occurred much less frequently in HNPCC-related ECs than CRCs, which may reflect organ-specific differences in their pathogenesis.

  12. Organized Emergence of Multiple-Generations of Teeth in Snakes Is Dysregulated by Activation of Wnt/Beta-Catenin Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Gaete, Marcia; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, most reptiles constantly regenerate their teeth. In the snake, the epithelial dental lamina ends in a successional lamina, which proliferates and elongates forming multiple tooth generations, all linked by a permanent dental lamina. To investigate the mechanisms used to control the initiation of new tooth germs in an ordered sequential pattern we utilized the polyphodont (multiple-generation) corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus). We observed that the dental lamina expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a multipotent stem cell marker, whereas the successional lamina cells expressed the transcription factor Lef1, a Wnt/β-catenin pathway target gene. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in culture increased the number of developing tooth germs, in comparison to control untreated cultures. These additional tooth germs budded off from ectopic positions along the dental lamina, rather than in an ordered sequence from the successional lamina. Wnt/β-catenin activation enhanced cell proliferation, particularly in normally non-odontogenic regions of the dental lamina, which widely expressed Lef1, restricting the Sox2 domain. This suggests an expansion of the successional lamina at the expense of the dental lamina. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cultured snake dental organs, therefore, led to changes in proliferation and to the molecular pattern of the dental lamina, resulting in loss of the organised emergence of tooth germs. These results suggest that epithelial compartments are critical for the arrangement of organs that develop in sequence, and highlight the role of Wnt/β-catenin signalling in such processes. PMID:24019968

  13. Organized emergence of multiple-generations of teeth in snakes is dysregulated by activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Gaete, Marcia; Tucker, Abigail S

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, most reptiles constantly regenerate their teeth. In the snake, the epithelial dental lamina ends in a successional lamina, which proliferates and elongates forming multiple tooth generations, all linked by a permanent dental lamina. To investigate the mechanisms used to control the initiation of new tooth germs in an ordered sequential pattern we utilized the polyphodont (multiple-generation) corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus). We observed that the dental lamina expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a multipotent stem cell marker, whereas the successional lamina cells expressed the transcription factor Lef1, a Wnt/β-catenin pathway target gene. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in culture increased the number of developing tooth germs, in comparison to control untreated cultures. These additional tooth germs budded off from ectopic positions along the dental lamina, rather than in an ordered sequence from the successional lamina. Wnt/β-catenin activation enhanced cell proliferation, particularly in normally non-odontogenic regions of the dental lamina, which widely expressed Lef1, restricting the Sox2 domain. This suggests an expansion of the successional lamina at the expense of the dental lamina. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cultured snake dental organs, therefore, led to changes in proliferation and to the molecular pattern of the dental lamina, resulting in loss of the organised emergence of tooth germs. These results suggest that epithelial compartments are critical for the arrangement of organs that develop in sequence, and highlight the role of Wnt/β-catenin signalling in such processes.

  14. Ghrelin Increases Beta-Catenin Level through Protein Kinase A Activation and Regulates OPG Expression in Rat Primary Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Mrak, Emanuela; Casati, Lavinia; Pagani, Francesca; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Zarattini, Guido; Sibilia, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, by binding growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), promotes osteoblast proliferation but the signaling mechanism of GHS-R on these cells remains unclear. Since canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is critically associated with bone homeostasis, we investigated its involvement in mediating ghrelin effects in osteoblasts and in osteoblast-osteoclast cross talk. Ghrelin (10−10M) significantly increased β-catenin levels in rat osteoblasts (rOB). This stimulatory action on β-catenin involves a specific interaction with GHS-R1a, as it is prevented by the selective GHS-R1a antagonist, D-Lys3-GHRP-6 (10−7M). The effect of ghrelin on β-catenin involves the phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β via protein kinase A (PKA). Inhibition of PKA activity reduces the facilitatory action of ghrelin on β-catenin stabilization. Ghrelin treatment of rOB significantly increases the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), which plays an important role in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis, and this effect is blocked by D-Lys3-GHRP-6. Furthermore, ghrelin reduced RANKL/OPG ratio thus contrasting osteoclastogenesis. Accordingly, conditioned media from rOB treated with ghrelin decreased the number of multinucleated TRAcP+ cells as compared with the conditioned media from untreated-control rOB. Our data suggest new roles for ghrelin in modulating bone homeostasis via a specific interaction with GHSR-1a in osteoblasts with subsequent enhancement of both β-catenin levels and OPG expression. PMID:25866509

  15. Murrayafoline A attenuates the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway by promoting the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyuk; Gwak, Jungsug; Cho, Munju; Ryu, Min-Jung; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Gye Won; Yun, Mi-Young; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Shin, Jae-Gook; Song, Gyu-Yong; Oh, Sangtaek

    2010-01-01

    Molecular lesions in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling and subsequent up-regulation of {beta}-catenin response transcription (CRT) occur frequently during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that suppress CRT, we screened natural compounds in a cell-based assay for detection of TOPFalsh reporter activity. Murrayafoline A, a carbazole alkaloid isolated from Glycosmis stenocarpa, antagonized CRT that was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium (Wnt3a-CM) or LiCl, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}), and promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin without altering its N-terminal phosphorylation at the Ser33/37 residues, marking it for proteasomal degradation, or the expression of Siah-1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Murrayafoline A repressed the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is known {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes and thus inhibited the proliferation of various colon cancer cells. These findings indicate that murrayafoline A may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for use in the treatment of colon cancer.

  16. Interactions Between the Canonical WNT/Beta-Catenin Pathway and PPAR Gamma on Neuroinflammation, Demyelination, and Remyelination in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Alexandre; Vallée, Jean-Noël; Guillevin, Rémy; Lecarpentier, Yves

    2017-09-13

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is marked by neuroinflammation and demyelination with loss of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. The immune response is regulated by WNT/beta-catenin pathway in MS. Activated NF-kappaB, a major effector of neuroinflammation, and upregulated canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway positively regulate each other. Demyelinating events present an upregulation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway, whereas proper myelinating phases show a downregulation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway essential for the promotion of oligodendrocytes precursors cells proliferation and differentiation. The activation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway results in differentiation failure and impairment in remyelination. However, PI3K/Akt pathway and TCF7L2, two downstream targets of WNT/beta-catenin pathway, are upregulated and promote proper remyelination. The interactions of these signaling pathways remain unclear. PPAR gamma activation can inhibit NF-kappaB, and can also downregulate the WNT/beta-catenin pathway. PPAR gamma and canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway act in an opposite manner. PPAR gamma agonists appear as a promising treatment for the inhibition of demyelination and the promotion of proper remyelination through the control of both NF-kappaB activity and canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway.

  17. beta-Catenin associates with the actin-bundling protein fascin in a noncadherin complex

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Catenins were first characterized as linking the cytoplasmic domains of cadherin cell-cell adhesion molecules to the cortical actin cytoskeleton. In addition to their essential role in modulating cadherin adhesivity, catenins have more recently been indicated to participate in cell and developmental signaling pathways. beta-Catenin, for example, associates directly with at least two receptor tyrosine kinases and transduces developmental signals within the Wnt pathway. Catenins also complex with the tumor suppressor protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), which appears to have a role in regulating cell proliferation. We have used the yeast two-hybrid method to reveal that fascin, a bundler of actin filaments, binds to beta-catenin's central Armadillo repeat domain. Western blotting of immunoprecipitates from cell line and mouse and rat brain extracts indicate that this interaction exists in vivo. Fascin and beta-catenin's association was further substantiated in vitro using purified proteins isolated from recombinant bacterial and baculoviral sources. Immunoprecipitation analysis indicates that fascin additionally binds to plakoglobin, which is highly homologous to beta-catenin but not to p120cas, a newly described catenin which contains a more divergent Armadillo-repeat domain. Immunoprecipitation, in vitro competition, and domain-mapping experiments demonstrate that fascin and E-cadherin utilize a similar binding site within beta-catenin, such that they form mutually exclusive complexes with beta-catenin. Immunofluorescence microscopy reveals that fascin and beta-catenin colocalize at cell-cell borders and dynamic cell leading edges of epithelial and endothelial cells. In addition to cell-cell borders, cadherins were unexpectedly observed to colocalize with fascin and beta-catenin at cell leading edges. It is conceivable that beta-catenin participates in modulating cytoskeletal dynamics in association with the microfilament-bundling protein fascin, perhaps in a

  18. Excess beta-catenin promotes accumulation of transcriptionally active p53.

    PubMed Central

    Damalas, A; Ben-Ze'ev, A; Simcha, I; Shtutman, M; Leal, J F; Zhurinsky, J; Geiger, B; Oren, M

    1999-01-01

    beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein, acting both as a structural component of the cell adhesion machinery and as a transducer of extracellular signals. Deregulated beta-catenin protein expression, due to mutations in the beta-catenin gene itself or in its upstream regulator, the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, is prevalent in colorectal cancer and in several other tumor types, and attests to the potential oncogenic activity of this protein. Increased expression of beta-catenin is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and is usually followed by a later mutational inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. To examine whether these two key steps in carcinogenesis are interrelated, we studied the effect of excess beta-catenin on p53. We report here that overexpression of beta-catenin results in accumulation of p53, apparently through interference with its proteolytic degradation. This effect involves both Mdm2-dependent and -independent p53 degradation pathways, and is accompanied by augmented transcriptional activity of p53 in the affected cells. Increased p53 activity may provide a safeguard against oncogenic deregulation of beta-catenin, and thus impose a pressure for mutational inactivation of p53 during the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:10357817

  19. Beta-catenin up-regulates the expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator in human colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Hiendlmeyer, Elke; Regus, Susanne; Wassermann, Stella; Hlubek, Falk; Haynl, Angela; Dimmler, Arno; Koch, Claudia; Knoll, Claudia; van Beest, Moniek; Reuning, Ute; Brabletz, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas

    2004-02-15

    Expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) increases during the progression of colorectal tumors from adenomas to carcinomas. The highest amounts of uPA are found at the invasion front of carcinomas, which also displays a strong expression of nuclear beta-catenin and is therefore a region expressing beta-catenin target genes at high levels. Here we show that beta-catenin contributes to the transactivation of uPA. Therefore, beta-catenin might have an impact on the capacity of colorectal tumors for invasion and metastasis, as well as dormancy, which are hallmarks of cancer.

  20. An ancient role for nuclear beta-catenin in the evolution of axial polarity and germ layer segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikramanayake, Athula H.; Hong, Melanie; Lee, Patricia N.; Pang, Kevin; Byrum, Christine A.; Bince, Joanna M.; Xu, Ronghui; Martindale, Mark Q.

    2003-01-01

    The human oncogene beta-catenin is a bifunctional protein with critical roles in both cell adhesion and transcriptional regulation in the Wnt pathway. Wnt/beta-catenin signalling has been implicated in developmental processes as diverse as elaboration of embryonic polarity, formation of germ layers, neural patterning, spindle orientation and gap junction communication, but the ancestral function of beta-catenin remains unclear. In many animal embryos, activation of beta-catenin signalling occurs in blastomeres that mark the site of gastrulation and endomesoderm formation, raising the possibility that asymmetric activation of beta-catenin signalling specified embryonic polarity and segregated germ layers in the common ancestor of bilaterally symmetrical animals. To test whether nuclear translocation of beta-catenin is involved in axial identity and/or germ layer formation in 'pre-bilaterians', we examined the in vivo distribution, stability and function of beta-catenin protein in embryos of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (Cnidaria, Anthozoa). Here we show that N. vectensis beta-catenin is differentially stabilized along the oral-aboral axis, translocated into nuclei in cells at the site of gastrulation and used to specify entoderm, indicating an evolutionarily ancient role for this protein in early pattern formation.

  1. Role of cyclin D1 as a mediator of c-Met- and beta-catenin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mohini A; Lee, Susie A; Macias, Everardo; Lam, Ernest T; Xu, Chuanrui; Jones, Kirk D; Ho, Coral; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo; Chen, Xin

    2009-01-01

    Activation of c-Met signaling and beta-catenin mutations are frequent genetic events observed in liver cancer development. Recently, we demonstrated that activated beta-catenin can cooperate with c-Met to induce liver cancer formation in a mouse model. Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is an important cell cycle regulator that is considered to be a downstream target of beta-catenin. To determine the importance of CCND1 as a mediator of c-Met- and beta-catenin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, we investigated the genetic interactions between CCND1, beta-catenin, and c-Met in liver cancer development using mouse models. We coexpressed CCND1 with c-Met in mice and found CCND1 to cooperate with c-Met to promote liver cancer formation. Tumors induced by CCND1/c-Met had a longer latency period, formed at a lower frequency, and seemed to be more benign compared with those induced by beta-catenin/c-Met. In addition, when activated beta-catenin and c-Met were coinjected into CCND1-null mice, liver tumors developed despite the absence of CCND1. Intriguingly, we observed a moderate accelerated tumor growth and increased tumor malignancy in these CCND1-null mice. Molecular analysis showed an up-regulation of cyclin D2 (CCND2) expression in CCND1-null tumor samples, indicating that CCND2 may replace CCND1 in hepatic tumorigenesis. Together, our results suggest that CCND1 functions as a mediator of beta-catenin during HCC pathogenesis, although other molecules may be required to fully propagate beta-catenin signaling. Moreover, our data suggest that CCND1 expression is not essential for liver tumor development induced by c-Met and beta-catenin.

  2. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Il-Rae; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong; Choi, Young-Whan; Horio, Yoshiyuki; Oh, Sangtaek; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons disrupt axial development in sea urchin embryos through a beta-catenin dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Murali C; Vines, Carol A; Wikramanayake, Athula H; Cherr, Gary N

    2003-04-15

    Sea urchin (Lytechinus anemesis) embryos were used as an experimental system to investigate the mechanisms of the developmental toxicity of creosote, one of the most widely used wood preserving chemicals, as well as some of its polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) constituents (phenanthrene, fluoranthene, fluorene, pyrene and quinoline). Data suggest that creosote and PAHs affect axial development and patterning in sea urchin embryos by disrupting the regulation of beta-catenin, a crucial transcriptional co-activator of specific target genes in the Wnt/wg signaling pathway. When ciliated blastula stage embryos were exposed to these compounds, they developed into exogastrulae with completely evaginated archentera, demonstrating that these chemicals disrupt axial development and patterning. This response occurred in a dose-dependent fashion, with the EC(50) of creosote for complete exogastrulation being 1.57 ppm, while the EC(50)s of the PAHs ranged from 0.41 ppm (2.0 microM) to 4.33 ppm (33.5 microM). Morphologically, the exogastrulae that developed from embryos exposed to creosote and PAHs appeared to be identical to those that resulted from exposure to lithium chloride, a classical agent known to induce vegetalization and exogastrulation in sea urchin embryos. Immunological studies using antibodies against beta-catenin, a multi-functional protein known to be involved in cell-cell adhesion and cell fate specification during embryonic development, revealed high levels of nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin by cells of creosote- and PAH-exposed embryos, irrespective of their positions in the developing embryo. Dissociated embryonic cells cultured in the presence of these agents rapidly responded in a similar fashion. Since beta-catenin accumulation occurs in nuclei of several types of cancer cells, it is possible this may be a general mechanism by which PAHs affect a variety of different cell types.

  4. Chronic oxidative stress causes amplification and overexpression of ptprz1 protein tyrosine phosphatase to activate beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Shang, Donghao; Akatsuka, Shinya; Ohara, Hiroki; Dutta, Khokon Kumar; Mizushima, Katsura; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Izumiya, Masashi; Abe, Kouichiro; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Noriko; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2007-12-01

    Ferric nitrilotriacetate induces oxidative renal tubular damage via Fenton-reaction, which subsequently leads to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in rodents. Here, we used gene expression microarray and array-based comparative genomic hybridization analyses to find target oncogenes in this model. At the common chromosomal region of amplification (4q22) in rat RCCs, we found ptprz1, a tyrosine phosphatase (also known as protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta or receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta) highly expressed in the RCCs. Analyses revealed genomic amplification up to eightfold. Despite scarcity in the control kidney, the amounts of PTPRZ1 were increased in the kidney after 3 weeks of oxidative stress, and mRNA levels were increased 16 approximately 552-fold in the RCCs. Network analysis of the expression revealed the involvement of the beta-catenin pathway in the RCCs. In the RCCs, dephosphorylated beta-catenin was translocated to nuclei, resulting in the expression of its target genes cyclin D1, c-myc, c-jun, fra-1, and CD44. Furthermore, knockdown of ptprz1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA), in FRCC-001 and FRCC-562 cell lines established from the induced RCCs, decreased the amounts of nuclear beta-catenin and suppressed cellular proliferation concomitant with a decrease in the expression of target genes. These results demonstrate that chronic oxidative stress can induce genomic amplification of ptprz1, activating beta-catenin pathways without the involvement of Wnt signaling for carcinogenesis. Thus, iron-mediated persistent oxidative stress confers an environment for gene amplification.

  5. beta-Catenin/TCF pathway plays a vital role in selenium induced-growth inhibition and apoptosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yan, Shuang; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Guo; Yang, Shangbin; He, Shun; Bai, Jinfeng; Quan, Lanping; Zhu, Hongxia; Dong, Yan; Xu, Ningzhi

    2010-10-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have indicated selenium could reduce the risk of some cancers. In our present study, growth inhibition and apoptosis were detected upon methylseleninic acid (MSA) treatment in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines EC9706 and KYSE150. MSA reduced beta-catenin protein levels, while there was no significant change observed on transcriptional levels. Moreover, we found MSA accelerated the degradation of beta-catenin and activated glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta). Some targets of beta-catenin/TCF pathway and apoptosis-related genes altered after MSA treatment. Notably, utilizing the inducible 293-TR/beta-catenin cell line, we found the apoptotic phenotypes induced by MSA were partially reversed by the overexpression of beta-catenin. Overall, our data indicate the effects induced by MSA in ESCC cells may act on the inhibition of beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

  6. Differential sensitivity of epidermal cell subpopulations to beta-catenin-induced ectopic hair follicle formation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher M; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Jensen, Kim B; Watt, Fiona M

    2010-07-01

    Wnt signalling is required for hair follicle development and for the growth phase (anagen) of postnatal follicles. When the pathway is activated at high levels in adult mouse epidermis, ectopic follicles form from existing follicles, interfollicular epidermis (IFE) and sebaceous glands, revealing a remarkable ability of the tissue to be reprogrammed. To compare the competence of different epidermal cell populations to form ectopic follicles, we expressed a 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4OHT) inducible, stabilised beta-catenin transgene (DeltaNbeta-cateninER) under the control of two different promoters. We targeted the reservoir of stem cells in the hair follicle bulge via the keratin 15 (K15) promoter and targeted the sebaceous glands and base of the follicle (bulb) with a truncated K5 promoter (DeltaK5). No ectopic follicles formed in the IFE in either model, establishing the autonomy of the IFE stem cell compartment in undamaged epidermis. Activation of beta-catenin in the bulge stimulated proliferation and bulge expansion. Existing hair follicles entered anagen, but no ectopic follicles formed. DeltaK5DeltaNbeta-cateninER expressing hair follicles also entered anagen on 4OHT treatment. In addition, a subpopulation of cells at the base of the sebaceous gland readily formed ectopic follicles, resulting in complete and reversible conversion of sebaceous glands into hair follicles. Combined activation of beta-catenin and the vitamin D receptor enhanced differentiation of sebaceous gland-derived hair follicles and stimulated ectopic follicle formation in the hair follicle bulb, but not in the bulge. Our results suggest that the bulge and sebaceous gland are, respectively, non-permissive and permissive niches for Wnt induced hair follicle differentiation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence that the beta-catenin nuclear translocation assay allows for measuring presenilin 1 dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gassen, G.; De Jonghe, C.; Nishimura, M.; Yu, G.; Kuhn, S.; St George-Hyslop, P.; Van Broeckhoven, C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the presenilin (PSEN) genes are responsible for the majority of early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) cases. PSEN1 is a component of a high molecular weight, endoplasmic reticulum, membrane-bound protein complex, including beta-catenin. Pathogenic PSEN1 mutations were demonstrated to have an effect on beta-catenin and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta(GSK-3beta), two members of the wingless Wnt pathway. The nuclear translocation and the stability of beta-catenin, and the interaction between GSK3beta and PSEN1 were influenced. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stably transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells overexpressing wild-type (wt) and mutant (mt) PSEN1, treated with and without LiCl, were used to isolate cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. By Western blot analysis, endogenous beta-catenin levels were examined. By analyzing cytosolic fractions of PSEN1, transfected and nontransfected HEK 293 cells, and total brain extracts of AD patients and controls, we evaluated the effect of PSEN1 overexpression on beta-catenin stability. Finally, we analyzed the effect of pathogenic PSEN1 mutations on the interaction between PSEN1 and GSK3beta by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. RESULTS: We report reduced nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in cells stably expressing I143T, G384A, and T113-114ins PSEN1. The G384A PSEN1 mutation showed a similar pronounced effect on nuclear translocation of beta-catenin, as reported for processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) into amyloid beta(Abeta). Overexpression of PSEN1 and the presence of pathogenic mutations in PSEN1 had no significant effect on the stability of beta-catenin. Nonspecific binding of overexpressed PSEN1 to endogenous GSK3beta was observed when GSK3beta was immunoprecipitated. Immunoprecipitation of PSEN1 in cells overexpressing PSEN1 and in native cells, however, did not result in co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous GSK3beta. CONCLUSION: Our results further establish the nuclear

  8. MiR-214 inhibits cell growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Ji; Li, Feng; Lin, Yanting; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei; Jiang, Jiaji

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 is frequently downregulated in human HCC cell lines and tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 overexpression inhibits HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 directly targets {beta}-catenin 3 Prime -UTR in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 regulates {beta}-catenin downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: Mounting evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in carcinogenesis and can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Recent profile studies of miRNA expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-214) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its potential functions and underlying mechanisms in hepatocarcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we confirmed that miR-214 is significantly downregulated in HCC cells and specimens. Ectopic overexpression of miR-214 inhibited proliferation of HCC cells in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Further studies revealed that miR-214 could directly target the 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) of {beta}-catenin mRNA and suppress its protein expression. Similar to the restoring miR-214 expression, {beta}-catenin downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas restoring the {beta}-catenin expression abolished the function of miR-214. Moreover, miR-214-mediated reduction of {beta}-catenin resulted in suppression of several downstream genes including c-Myc, cyclinD1, TCF-1, and LEF-1. These findings indicate that miR-214 serves as tumor suppressor and plays substantial roles in inhibiting the tumorigenesis of HCC through suppression of {beta}-catenin. Given these, miR-214 may serve as a useful prognostic or therapeutic target for treatment of HCC.

  9. Mutational activation of the beta-catenin proto-oncogene is a common event in the development of Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed

    Koesters, R; Ridder, R; Kopp-Schneider, A; Betts, D; Adams, V; Niggli, F; Briner, J; von Knebel Doeberitz, M

    1999-08-15

    Activation of beta-catenin-mediated transcription is the nuclear end point of organ-specific Wnt signaling. In the developing kidney, Wnt-4, a secreted glycoprotein, acts as an autoinducer of the mesenchymal to epithelial transition that underlies normal nephron development. Dysregulation of this epithelial transformation process may lead to Wilms' tumors (WTs). In this study, we investigated the potential role of the beta-catenin proto-oncogene, a candidate downstream target molecule of Wnt-4 signaling, in the development of WTs. In 6 of 40 tumors (15%), mutation analysis revealed heterozygous missense mutations or small deletions that result in the loss of important regulatory phosphorylation sites within the beta-catenin protein. These findings indicate that activating beta-catenin mutations may play a significant role in the development of WTs and establish a direct link between Wilms' tumorigenesis and the Wnt signal transduction pathway governing normal kidney development.

  10. Chronic chemotherapeutic stress promotes evolution of stemness and WNT/beta-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer cells: implications for clinical use of WNT-signaling inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Meriam; Bouygues, Anaïs; Ouaret, Djamila; Ferrand, Nathalie; Chouaib, Salem; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Muchardt, Christian; Sabbah, Michèle; Larsen, Annette K

    2015-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain a subfraction of cells with stem/progenitor cell features. Stem cells are naturally chemoresistant suggesting that chronic chemotherapeutic stress may select for cells with increased “stemness”. We carried out a comprehensive molecular and functional analysis of six independently selected colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with acquired resistance to three different chemotherapeutic agents derived from two distinct parental cell lines. Chronic drug exposure resulted in complex alterations of stem cell markers that could be classified into three categories: 1) one cell line, HT-29/5-FU, showed increased “stemness” and WNT-signaling, 2) three cell lines showed decreased expression of stem cell markers, decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, attenuated WNT-signaling and lost the capacity to form colonospheres and 3) two cell lines displayed prominent expression of ABC transporters with a heterogeneous response for stem cell markers. While WNT-signaling could be attenuated in the HT-29/5-FU cells by the WNT-signaling inhibitors ICG-001 and PKF-118, this was not accompanied by any selective growth inhibitory effect suggesting that the cytotoxic activity of these compounds is not directly linked to WNT-signaling inhibition. We conclude that classical WNT-signaling inhibitors have toxic off-target activities that need to be addressed for clinical development. PMID:26041882

  11. Interactions between PPAR Gamma and the Canonical Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Type 2 Diabetes and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Victor

    2017-01-01

    In both colon cancer and type 2 diabetes, metabolic changes induced by upregulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) may help account for the frequent association of these two diseases. In both diseases, PPAR gamma is downregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated. In colon cancer, upregulation of the canonical Wnt system induces activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and deactivation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. As a result, a large part of cytosolic pyruvate is converted into lactate through activation of lactate dehydrogenase. Lactate is extruded out of the cell by means of activation of monocarboxylate lactate transporter-1. This phenomenon is called Warburg effect. PPAR gamma agonists induce beta-catenin inhibition, while inhibition of the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activates PPAR gamma. PMID:28298922

  12. The emergence of pattern in embryogenesis: regulation of beta-catenin localization during early sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Ettensohn, Charles A

    2006-11-14

    The accumulation of beta-catenin in the nuclei of blastomeres at one pole of the early embryo is a highly conserved and essential feature of animal development. In the sea urchin, beta-catenin accumulates in the nuclei of vegetal blastomeres during early cleavage and activates gene regulatory networks that drive mesoderm and endoderm formation. Measurements of beta-catenin half-life in vivo have demonstrated a gradient in stability along the animal-vegetal axis. Dishevelled (Dsh), a protein that regulates beta-catenin turnover, is localized in the vegetal cortex, where it has an essential role in stabilizing beta-catenin and activating endomesodermal gene networks. Two motifs of Dsh are required for targeting to the vegetal cortex. Overexpression of Dsh in animal blastomeres does not alter their fate, which suggests that a localized activator of Dsh may be missing in these cells. Wnt signaling may be localized in the early sea urchin embryo, as it is in Xenopus, but findings point to possible differences in the initial polarizing signal in amphibians and echinoderms. Further studies will be required to determine the extent to which mechanisms that control beta-catenin nuclearization in early embryogenesis have been conserved during animal evolution.

  13. Spatio-temporal Model of Endogenous ROS and Raft-Dependent WNT/Beta-Catenin Signaling Driving Cell Fate Commitment in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Fiete; Lemcke, Heiko; Ewald, Roland; Rharass, Tareck; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M.

    2015-01-01

    Canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling is a central pathway in embryonic development, but it is also connected to a number of cancers and developmental disorders. Here we apply a combined in-vitro and in-silico approach to investigate the spatio-temporal regulation of WNT/β-catenin signaling during the early neural differentiation process of human neural progenitors cells (hNPCs), which form a new prospect for replacement therapies in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental measurements indicate a second signal mechanism, in addition to canonical WNT signaling, being involved in the regulation of nuclear β-catenin levels during the cell fate commitment phase of neural differentiation. We find that the biphasic activation of β-catenin signaling observed experimentally can only be explained through a model that combines Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and raft dependent WNT/β-catenin signaling. Accordingly after initiation of differentiation endogenous ROS activates DVL in a redox-dependent manner leading to a transient activation of down-stream β-catenin signaling, followed by continuous auto/paracrine WNT signaling, which crucially depends on lipid rafts. Our simulation studies further illustrate the elaborate spatio-temporal regulation of DVL, which, depending on its concentration and localization, may either act as direct inducer of the transient ROS/β-catenin signal or as amplifier during continuous auto-/parcrine WNT/β-catenin signaling. In addition we provide the first stochastic computational model of WNT/β-catenin signaling that combines membrane-related and intracellular processes, including lipid rafts/receptor dynamics as well as WNT- and ROS-dependent β-catenin activation. The model’s predictive ability is demonstrated under a wide range of varying conditions for in-vitro and in-silico reference data sets. Our in-silico approach is realized in a multi-level rule-based language, that facilitates the extension and modification of the

  14. Micro RNA-214 contributes to proteasome independent downregulation of beta catenin in Huntington's disease knock-in striatal cell model STHdhQ111/Q111.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Supratim; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2015-04-10

    Role of beta catenin in Huntington's disease (HD) is not clear. Previous studies on HD reported varied levels of beta catenin. In the present study we showed that beta catenin is post transcriptionally down-regulated in mutant huntingtin knock-in cell model STHdhQ111/Q111. This in turn leads to decreased level of wnt/beta catenin responsive genes. We observed that Gsk3beta or Gsk3beta (phospho Ser 9) is unaltered in HD and this down-regulation of beta catenin is independent of proteasomal degradation. Finally, we showed that the overexpression of miR-214 leads to the down-regulation of beta catenin at protein level only and reduces its transcriptional activity. We concluded that, miR-214 contributes to the processes that result in proteasome independent post transcriptional down-regulation of beta catenin in STHdhQ111/Q111, probably through inhibition of protein synthesis from beta catenin mRNA.

  15. Isoreserpine promotes {beta}-catenin degradation via Siah-1 up-regulation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Taeyun; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Jeong, Yongsu; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2009-09-25

    Aberrant accumulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells is a frequent early event during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that decrease the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, we performed cell-based chemical screening using genetically engineered HEK293 reporter cells to detect compounds that inhibit TOPFlash reporter activity, which was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium. We found that isoreserpine promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin by up-regulation of Siah-1 in HEK293 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, isoreserpine repressed the expression of {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, resulting in the suppression of HCT116 cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that isoreserpine can potentially be used as a chemotherapeutic agent against colon cancer.

  16. Bryostatin 1 modulates beta-catenin subcellular localization and transcription activity through protein kinase D1 activation.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C; Du, Cheng; Balaji, K C

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, the use of natural products for cancer prevention and treatment has received considerable attention. Bryostatin 1 is a natural macrocyclic lactone and a protein kinase D (PKD) modulator with potent antineoplastic properties that has been used to treat human cancers in clinical trials with limited success. Further understanding the mechanistic basis of Bryostatin 1 action may provide opportunities to improve clinical results of treatment with Bryostatin 1. We identified that PKD1, founding member of PKD family of serine/threonine kinases, modulates E-cadherin/beta-catenin activity, which plays an important role in cell integrity, polarity, growth, and morphogenesis. An aberrant expression and localization of E-cadherin/beta-catenin has been strongly associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined the effect of Bryostatin 1 treatment on PKD1 activation, beta-catenin translocation and transcription activity, and malignant phenotype of prostate cancer cells. Initial activation of PKD1 with Bryostatin 1 leads to colocalization of the cytoplasmic pool of beta-catenin with PKD1, trans-Golgi network markers, and proteins involved in vesicular trafficking. Activation of PKD1 by Bryostatin 1 decreases nuclear beta-catenin expression and beta-catenin/TCF transcription activity. Activation of PKD1 alters cellular aggregation and proliferation in prostate cancer cells associated with subcellular redistribution of E-cadherin and beta-catenin. For the first time, we have identified that Bryostatin 1 modulates beta-catenin signaling through PKD1, which identifies a novel mechanism to improve efficacy of Bryostatin 1 in clinical settings.

  17. Beta-catenin Forms Protein Aggregation at High Concentrations in HEK293TCells

    PubMed Central

    Jazi, Marie Saghaeian; Najafi, Seyed Mahmoud Arab

    2017-01-01

    Background: The canonical Wnt signal transduction (or the Wnt/β-catenin pathway) plays a crucial role in the development of animals and in carcinogenesis. Beta-catenin is the central component of this signaling pathway. The activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling results in the cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. In the nucleus, β-catenin interacts with the TCF/LEF transcription factors and, therefore, participates in the upregulation or downregulation of some important genes involved in diverse cellular activities. In addition, β-catenin is a critical component of the cadherin-mediated cell adherens junction. We had previously noticed that very high cellular concentrations of β-catenin had a negative effect on the transcriptional activity of this protein and, therefore, the aim of this study was to find a mechanism for this negative interaction. Methods: Cell fractionation, western blotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy experiments were performed to measure β-catenin protein levels and β-catenin cellular localization in HEK293Tcells transfected with various amounts of a β-catenin-encoding plasmid. Also, total RNA was extracted from the cells and used for reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments to measure the expression of the β-catenin target genes. SPSS, version 16, was used to analyze the results statistically. Results: We demonstrated that overexpression of β-catenin led to the formation of rod-shaped protein aggregates. The aggregate structures were mainly formed in the cell nucleus and were heavy enough to be isolated by centrifugation. Beta-catenin aggregate formation was accompanied by a decrease in the expression of the β-catenin target genes used in this study. Conclusion: Since deregulation of β-catenin function occurs in several human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders, the results of this paper further support the possible biological and clinical significance of β-catenin aggregate formation. PMID

  18. Lack of Muc1-regulated beta-catenin stability results in aberrant expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells from the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Tze Wei; Bradley, Judy M.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells that inhibit T cell activity and contribute to the immune suppression characteristic of most tumors. We discovered that bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells from the Muc1 knockout (KO) mice differentiated into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs in vitro under GM-CSF and IL-4 signaling. MUC1 is a tumor-associated mucin and its cytoplasmic tail (MUC1-CT) can regulate beta-catenin to promote oncogenesis. Given the importance of beta-catenin in hematopoiesis, we hypothesized that the MUC1 regulation of beta-catenin is important for MDSC development. Our current study shows that the aberrant development of BM progenitors into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs is dependent on the down regulation of beta-catenin levels that occurs in the absence of Muc1. In light of this, KO mice showed enhanced EL4 tumor growth and were able to better tolerate allogeneic BM185 tumor growth, with an accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells in the blood and tumor draining lymph nodes. WT mice were able to similarly tolerate allogeneic tumor growth when they were injected with CD11b+Gr1+ cells from tumor-bearing KO mice, suggesting that tolerance of allogeneic tumors is dependent on MDSC-mediated immune suppression. This further delineates the ability of Muc1 to control MDSC development which could directly impact tumorigenesis. Knowledge of the biology by which Muc1 regulates the development of myeloid progenitors into MDSCs would also be very useful in enhancing the efficacy of cancer vaccines in the face of tumor immune suppression. PMID:19351842

  19. Modulation of Wnt3a-mediated nuclear beta-catenin accumulation and activation by integrin-linked kinase in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, A; Syam, S; Dedhar, S

    2006-12-14

    The Wnt gene family encodes secreted signaling molecules that play important roles in tumorgenesis and embryogenesis. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway regulates target gene expression via the stabilization and nuclear translocation of the cytoplasmic pool of beta-catenin. The activation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is also known to regulate the stabilization and subsequent nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in several epithelial cell models. We now report that molecular and pharmacological inhibition of ILK activity in mammalian cells directly modulates Wnt signaling by suppressing the stabilization and nuclear translocation of beta-catenin, as well as beta-catenin/Lef-mediated transcription. Inhibition of ILK activity, but not phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) or MEK activities suppresses nuclear beta-catenin stabilization in cells stably expressing Wnt3a as well as in cells exposed to either Wnt3a conditioned media or purified Wnt3a. Furthermore, ILK inhibition reverses the Wnt3a-induced suppression of beta-catenin phosphorylation that accompanies beta-catenin stabilization. In addition, we show that ILK can be identified in a complex with Wnt pathway components such as adenomatous polyposis coli and GSK-3. Upon treatment of L cells with Wnt3a-CM, glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3beta) becomes highly phosphorylated on Ser 9, which is completely abolished upon inhibition of ILK activity. However, acute exposure of L cells to purified Wnt3a does not result in the stimulation of GSK-3beta Ser 9 phosphorylation, despite beta-catenin stabilization. Together our data demonstrate that ILK activity can modulate acute Wnt3a mediated beta-catenin phosphorylation, stabilization and nuclear activation in a PI3K-independent manner, as well as the more prolonged PI3K-dependent secondary effects of Wnt signaling on GSK-3 phosphorylation. Finally, we suggest that a novel small molecule inhibitor of ILK, QLT-0267, may be a useful tool in the regulation of pathological

  20. Beta-catenin deficiency causes DiGeorge syndrome-like phenotypes through regulation of Tbx1.

    PubMed

    Huh, Sung-Ho; Ornitz, David M

    2010-04-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a common genetic disease characterized by pharyngeal apparatus malformations and defects in cardiovascular, craniofacial and glandular development. TBX1 is the most likely candidate disease-causing gene and is located within a 22q11.2 chromosomal deletion that is associated with most cases of DGS. Here, we show that canonical Wnt-beta-catenin signaling negatively regulates Tbx1 expression and that mesenchymal inactivation of beta-catenin (Ctnnb1) in mice caused abnormalities within the DGS phenotypic spectrum, including great vessel malformations, hypoplastic pulmonary and aortic arch arteries, cardiac malformations, micrognathia, thymus hypoplasia and mislocalization of the parathyroid gland. In a heterozygous Fgf8 or Tbx1 genetic background, ectopic activation of Wnt-beta-catenin signaling caused an increased incidence and severity of DGS-like phenotypes. Additionally, reducing the gene dosage of Fgf8 rescued pharyngeal arch artery defects caused by loss of Ctnnb1. These findings identify Wnt-beta-catenin signaling as a crucial upstream regulator of a Tbx1-Fgf8 signaling pathway and suggest that factors that affect Wnt-beta-catenin signaling could modify the incidence and severity of DGS.

  1. Aerobic Glycolysis Hypothesis Through WNT/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Alexandre; Lecarpentier, Yves; Guillevin, Rémy; Vallée, Jean-Noël

    2017-08-01

    Exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by molecular mechanisms responsible for the initiation of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Inflammatory processes are associated with upregulation of the canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway in exudative AMD. We focus this review on the link between WNT/beta-catenin pathway activation and neovascular progression in exudative AMD through activation of aerobic glycolysis for production of angiogenic factors. Increased WNT/beta-catenin pathway involves hexokinase 2 (HK2) and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2). WNT/beta-catenin pathway stimulates PI3K/Akt pathway and then HIF-1alpha which activates glycolytic enzymes: glucose transporter (Glut), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A), and monocarboxylate lactate transporter (MCT-1). This phenomenon is called aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. Consequently, phosphorylation of PDK-1 inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). Thus, a large part of pyruvate cannot be converted into acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and only a part of acetyl-CoA can enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Cytosolic pyruvate is converted into lactate through the action of LDH-A. In exudative AMD, high level of cytosolic lactate is correlated with increase of VEGF expression, the angiogenic factor of CNV. Photoreceptors in retina cells can metabolize glucose through aerobic glycolysis to protect them against oxidative damage, as cancer cells do.

  2. Upregulation of TCF4 expression as a transcriptional target of beta-catenin/p300 complexes during trans-differentiation of endometrial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Makoto; Hashimura, Miki; Kuwata, Takeshi; Hamano, Mieko; Okayasu, Isao

    2005-06-01

    Nuclear stabilization of beta-catenin and its interaction with TCF/LEF factors are key events in transduction of the Wnt/beta-catenin signal pathway. Our previous study indicated that nuclear beta-catenin accumulation provides an initial signal for trans-differentiation toward the squamoid phenotype of endometrial carcinoma (Em Ca) cells in a TCF4-dependent manner, which makes this a possible factor for a positive prognosis. However, little is known about regulation of TCF4 expression in Em Cas. We show here that beta-catenin can directly induce transcription from the TCF4 promoter, the effect being enhanced by the p300 coactivator. In clinical cases, nuclear beta-catenin accumulation was found to frequently overlap with TCF4 immunoreactivity in morules and surrounding glandular carcinoma lesions, showing a significant positive correlation (r = 0.82, P < 0.0001), in contrast to areas of squamous metaplasia (SqM) within Em Cas. In cases with coexistence of two squamoid features in trans-differentiated areas, loss of nuclear beta-catenin and TCF4 immunoreactivity was closely related to change in the morphology from the morular to the SqM phenotype. The TCF4 promoter contains a single consensus TCF-binding site that is critical for activation by beta-catenin. The p300 coactivator, in particular N-terminal residues 1 to 670, appears sufficient to enhance beta-catenin-dependent transcription, again with TCF4-dependence. These findings indicate that a positive feedback loop of TCF4 expression mediated by beta-catenin/p300 may be important for initial steps during trans-differentiation of Em Ca cells. In addition, its downregulation is associated with induction of a more-differentiated squamoid phenotype.

  3. Jagged 1 is a beta-catenin target gene required for ectopic hair follicle formation in adult epidermis.

    PubMed

    Estrach, Soline; Ambler, Carrie A; Lo Celso, Cristina; Hozumi, Katsuto; Watt, Fiona M

    2006-11-01

    The Wnt and Notch signalling pathways regulate hair follicle maintenance, but how they intersect is unknown. We show that Notch signalling is active in the hair follicle pre-cortex, a region of high Wnt activity, where commitment to hair lineages occurs. Deletion of jagged 1 (Jag1) results in inhibition of the hair growth cycle and conversion of hair follicles into cysts of cells undergoing interfollicular epidermal differentiation. Conversely, activation of Notch in adult epidermis triggers expansion of the base of the hair follicle, sebaceous gland enlargement and abnormal clumping of the follicles. In adult epidermis, the induction of new hair follicle formation by beta-catenin is prevented by blocking Notch signalling pharmacologically or through Jag1 deletion. Conversely, activation of both pathways accelerates growth and differentiation of ectopic follicles. beta-catenin stimulates Notch signalling by inducing Jag1 transcription. We conclude that the Notch pathway acts downstream of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway to determine epidermal cell fate.

  4. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Chun, Hong Sung; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Do Kyung

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  5. Beta-catenin expression in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    El-wahed Gaber, Mohamed Abd; El-Halim Kandil, Mona Abd; El-Farargy, Shawki Mahmoud; Galbet, Doaa Abd Elmoniem

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease characterized by abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Beta-catenin participates in intercellular adhesion. Catenins are proteins found in complexes with cadherin cell adhesion molecules of cells. The role of catenin in regulating keratinocyte stem cell differentiation and hair follicle morphogenesis has been extensively reported. Aims and Objectives: is to study β-catenin expression in lesional and non-lesional psoriatic skin to throw light upon its possible role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Materials and Methods: Biopsies were taken from 20 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and from 10 normal controls. The distribution of Beta catenin was investigated using polycolonal rabbits B-catenin antibody-1 by immunohistochemical method. Results: In this study membranous β-catenin expression was significantly demonstrated in the control group then the non-lesional areas in comparison to the lesional areas (P < 0.001). Nuclear β-catenin staining expression was significantly more demonstrated in lesional and non-lesional areas in comparison to the control cases (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The down regulation of membranous β-catenin expression in lesional psoriatic skin might reflect a useful phenotypic marker of hyperprolifration of keratinocytes in psoriasis. Moreover, the mild down regulation of membranous β-catenin expression in non lesional psoriatic skin may provide clues about incipient structural abnormalities in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, providing an early diagnostic indicator for evolution to a generalized form of the disease. Nuclear β-catenin expression was not found in the control group but was demonstrated in lesional and moderately in non-lesional reflecting its role in kerationcyte proliferation. PMID:25657910

  6. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling down-regulates N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III expression: the implications of two mutually exclusive pathways for regulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingsong; Akama, Ryota; Isaji, Tomoya; Lu, Yingying; Hashimoto, Hirokazu; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Du, Yuguang; Gu, Jianguo

    2011-02-11

    In previous studies, we reported that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III) activity and the enzyme product, bisected N-glycans, both were induced in cells cultured under dense conditions in an E-cadherin-dependent manner (Iijima, J., Zhao, Y., Isaji, T., Kameyama, A., Nakaya, S., Wang, X., Ihara, H., Cheng, X., Nakagawa, T., Miyoshi, E., Kondo, A., Narimatsu, H., Taniguchi, N., and Gu, J. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 13038-13046). Furthermore, we found that α-catenin, a component of the E-cadherin-catenin complex, was also required for this induction (Akama, R., Sato, Y., Kariya, Y., Isaji, T., Fukuda, T., Lu, L., Taniguchi, N., Ozawa, M., and Gu, J. (2008) Proteomics 8, 3221-3228). To further explore the molecular mechanism of this regulation, the roles of β-catenin, an essential molecule in both cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and canonical Wnt signaling, were investigated. Unexpectedly, shRNA knockdown of β-catenin resulted in a dramatic increase in GnT-III expression and its product, the bisected N-glycans, which was confirmed by RT-PCR and GnT-III activity and by E4-PHA lectin blot analysis. The induction of GnT-III expression increased bisecting GlcNAc residues on β1 integrin, which led to down-regulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion and cell migration. Immunostaining showed that nuclear localization of β-catenin was greatly suppressed; intriguingly, the knockdown of β-catenin in the nuclei was more effective than that in cell-cell contacts in the knockdown cells, which was also confirmed by Western blot analysis. Stimulation of the Wnt signaling pathway by the addition of exogenous Wnt3a or BIO, a GSK-3β inhibitor, consistently and significantly inhibited GnT-III expression and its products. Conversely, the inhibition of β-catenin translocation into the nuclei increased GnT-III activation. Taken together, the results of the present study are the first to clearly demonstrate that GnT-III expression may be precisely regulated by the

  7. Targeting beta-Catenin signaling to induce apoptosis in human breast cancer cells by z-Guggulsterone and Gugulipid extract of Ayurvedic medicine plant Commiphora mukul

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background z-Guggulsterone (z-Gug) and Gugulipid (GL) have been used to treat a variety of ailments. We now report their anti-cancer effect and mechanism against human breast cancer. Methods Using the human estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and triple-negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells as well as the normal human mammary epithelial cell line (HMEC), we evaluated the anti-breast-cancer efficacy and apoptosis inducing activity of GL. We determined the cellular and molecular mechanism of GL-inhibited breast cancer cell growth. Results GL significantly inhibited growth of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells with an IC50~2 μM at pharmacologically relevant concentrations standardized to its major active constituent z-Gug. The GL-induced growth inhibition correlated with apoptosis induction as evidenced by an increase in cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and caspase 3 activity. The GL-induced apoptosis was associated with down-regulation of the β-Catenin signaling pathway. The decreased expression of Wnt/β-Catenin targeting genes, such as cyclin D1, C-myc and survivin, and the inhibition of the activity of the transcription factor (T-cell factor 4, TCF-4) were observed in GL-treated breast cancer cells. The GL treatment resulted in a significant reduction of β-Catenin /TCF-4 complex in both of the cancer cells. The GL-induced apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced by RNA Interference of β-Catenin and TCF-4. On the other hand, the normal human mammary epithelial cell HMEC, compared with the human breast cancer cells, is significantly more resistant to growth inhibition and apoptosis induction by GL. Conclusion The present study indicates that the β-Catenin signaling pathway is the target for GL-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in human breast cancer. PMID:23914993

  8. N-cadherin regulates beta-catenin signal and its misexpression perturbs commissural axon projection in the developing chicken spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ciqing; Li, Xiaoying; Wang, Congrui; Fu, Sulei; Li, Han; Guo, Zhikun; Zhao, Shanting; Lin, Juntang

    2016-12-01

    N-cadherin is a calcium-sensitive cell adhesion molecule that plays an important role in the formation of the neural circuit and the development of the nervous system. In the present study, we investigated the function of N-cadherin in cell-cell connection in vitro with HEK293T cells, and in commissural axon projections in the developing chicken spinal cord using in ovo electroporation. Cell-cell connections increased with N-cadherin overexpression in HEK293T cells, while cell contacts disappeared after co-transfection with an N-cadherin-shRNA plasmid. The knockdown of N-cadherin caused the accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus, supporting the notion that N-cadherin regulates β-catenin signaling in vitro. Furthermore, N-cadherin misexpression perturbed commissural axon projections in the spinal cord. The overexpression of N-cadherin reduced the number of axons that projected alongside the contralateral margin of the floor plate, and formed intermediate longitudinal commissural axons. In contrast, the knockdown of N-cadherin perturbed commissural axon projections significantly, affecting the projections alongside the contralateral margin of the floor plate, but did not affect intermediate longitudinal commissural axons. Taken together, these findings suggest that N-cadherin regulates commissural axon projections in the developing chicken spinal cord.

  9. Effects of short-hairpin RNA-inhibited {beta}-catenin expression on the growth of human multiple myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Wenqing; Yang, Chengwei; Qian, Yu; Fu, Qiang

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CTNNB1 shRNA could inhibit the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significantly profound apoptotic cell death in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo, CTNNB1 silence led to a growth inhibition of myeloma growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc and {beta}-catenin in the expression cells of cleaved caspase-3 were increased. -- Abstract: Multiple myeloma (MM) is thrombogenic as a consequence of multiple hemostatic effects. Overexpression of {beta}-catenin has been observed in several types of malignant tumors, including MM. However, the relationship between {beta}-catenin expression and MM remains unclear. In the present study, RNA interference was used to inhibit {beta}-catenin expression in RPMI8226 cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses showed that {beta}-catenin mRNA and protein expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Western blotting showed that the protein levels of cyclin D1 and glutamine synthetase were downregulated and supported the transcriptional regulatory function of {beta}-catenin. The MTT assay showed that CTNNB1 shRNA could have significant inhibitory effects on the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. The TOPflash reporter assay demonstrated significant downregulation after CTNNB1 shRNA transfection in RPMI8226 cells. Flow cytometric analyses also showed significantly profound apoptosis in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. We found CTNNB1 silence led to growth inhibition of MM growth in vivo. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that c-myc and {beta}-catenin were reduced in CTNNB1 shRNA tumor tissues, but that expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased. These results show that {beta}-catenin could be a new therapeutic agent that targets the biology of MM cells.

  10. Brn-2 expression controls melanoma proliferation and is directly regulated by beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Jane; Martinozzi, Silvia; Dexter, Timothy J; Champeval, Delphine; Carreira, Suzanne; Larue, Lionel; Goding, Colin R

    2004-04-01

    Constitutive activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway is a notable feature of a large minority of cases of malignant melanoma, an aggressive and increasingly common cancer. The identification of target genes downstream from this pathway is therefore crucial to our understanding of the disease. The POU domain transcription factor Brn-2 has been implicated in control of proliferation and melanoma survival, and its expression is strongly upregulated in melanoma. We show here that in vivo Brn-2 is expressed in melanocytes but not in embryonic day 11.5 melanoblasts and that its expression is directly controlled by the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway in melanoma cell lines and in transgenic mice. Moreover, silent interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of Brn-2 expression in melanoma cells overexpressing beta-catenin results in significantly decreased proliferation. These results, together with the observation that BRAF signaling also induces Brn-2 expression, reveal that Brn-2 is a focus for the convergence of two key melanoma-associated signaling pathways that are linked to cell proliferation.

  11. Alzheimer Disease: Crosstalk between the Canonical Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway and PPARs Alpha and Gamma

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Alexandre; Lecarpentier, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still not fully understood. In AD, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been shown to be downregulated while the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma (mARN and protein) is upregulated. Certain neurodegenerative diseases share the same Wnt/beta-catenin/PPAR gamma profile, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Conversely, other NDs share an opposite profile, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, and Friedreich's ataxia. AD is characterized by the deposition of extracellular Abeta plaques and the formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles in the central nervous system (CNS). Activation of Wnt signaling or inhibition of both glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and Dickkopf 1, two key negative regulators of the canonical Wnt pathway, are able to protect against Abeta neurotoxicity and to ameliorate cognitive performance in AD patients. Although PPAR gamma is upregulated in AD patients, and despite the fact that it has been shown that the PPAR gamma and Wnt/beta catenin pathway systems work in an opposite manner, PPAR gamma agonists diminish learning and memory deficits, decrease Abeta activation of microglia, and prevent hippocampal and cortical neurons from dying. These beneficial effects observed in AD transgenic mice and patients might be partially due to the anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR gamma agonists. Moreover, activation of PPAR alpha upregulates transcription of the alpha-secretase gene and represents a new therapeutic treatment for AD. This review focuses largely on the behavior of two opposing pathways in AD, namely Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and PPAR gamma. It is hoped that this approach may help to develop novel AD therapeutic strategies integrating PPAR alpha signaling. PMID:27807401

  12. Gene expression of beta-catenin is up-regulated in inner dental epithelium and enamel knots during molar tooth morphogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Obara, Nobuko; Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Masako

    2006-07-01

    Beta-catenin is a multi-functional molecule that is involved in both cell-cell adhesion and signaling. We analyzed changes in beta-catenin gene expression during mouse molar tooth development by in situ hybridization. Prominent up-regulation of the expression of this gene was evident exclusively in the enamel knot at the early cap stage. During the cap and bell stages, the enamel knot, inner dental epithelium, and differentiating stratum intermedium expressed the beta-catenin gene more strongly than other parts of the enamel organ. During these stages, the strength of the gene expression changed heterogeneously within the inner dental epithelium and stratum intermedium. However, the heterogeneity was not evident at the late bell stage, when the cells in the inner dental epithelium had differentiated into ameloblasts at the cusp tip. No spatiotemporal change in beta-catenin gene expression was apparent in the dental papilla except for the cells that differentiated into odontoblasts, which became negative for the expression of the gene after their differentiation. Thus, the up-regulated expression of the beta-catenin gene was strongly associated with epithelial morphogenesis. These findings raise the possibility that the up-regulation of the gene expression and the stabilization of the protein by Wnt signaling play a role in the regulation of the activities of beta-catenin in tooth morphogenesis.

  13. {beta}-Catenin stabilization imparts crypt progenitor phenotype to hyperproliferating colonic epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, Joseph H.; Wang Yu; Singh, Pomila; Umar, Shahid

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing the Citrobacter rodentium (CR)-induced transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia (TMCH) model, we provide mechanistic basis of changes in {beta}-catenin/APC/CKI{epsilon} leading to progression and/or regression of hyperplasia in vivo. In response to CR-induced TMCH, crypt lengths increased significantly between days 6-27 post-infection, followed by a steep decline by day 34. {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/total {beta}-catenin were elevated on day 1 post-infection, preceding changes in crypt length, and persisted for 27 days before declining by day 34. Importantly, cellular CKI{epsilon} and {beta}-catenin co-immunoprecipitated and exhibited remarkable parallel changes in kinetics during hyperplasia/regression phases. {beta}-catenin, phosphorylated at Ser33,37 and Thr41 ({beta}-cat{sup 33,37/41}), was low till day 12, followed by gradual increase until day 27 before declining by day 34. GSK-3{beta} exhibited significant Ser{sup 9}-phosphorylation/inactivation at days 6-12 with partial recovery at days 27-34. Wild type (wt) APC (p312) levels increased at day 6 with transient proteolysis/truncation to p130 form between days 12 and 15; p312 reappeared by day 19 and returned to baseline by day 34. The kinetics of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin nuclear accumulation and acetylation (Ac-{beta}-Cat{sup Lys49}) from days 6 to 27, followed by loss of phosphorylation/acetylation by day 34 was almost identical; Tcf-4 co-immunoprecipitated with {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin and localized immunohistochemically to {beta}-Cat{sup 41/45}-positive regions leading to elevated cyclin D1 expression, during the hyperproliferative, but not regression phases of TMCH. CKI{epsilon} mediated phosphorylation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}, resulting in stabilization/nuclear translocation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45} may be critical for maintaining proliferation at days 6-27. Reversal of GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation and APC changes may be equally critical during the regression phase from days 27 to 34.

  14. Calcium fluxes in dorsal forerunner cells antagonize beta-catenin and alter left-right patterning.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Igor; Houston, Douglas W; Rebagliati, Michael R; Slusarski, Diane C

    2008-01-01

    Establishment of the left-right axis is essential for normal organ morphogenesis and function. Ca(2+) signaling and cilia function in the zebrafish Kuppfer's Vesicle (KV) have been implicated in laterality. Here we describe an endogenous Ca(2+) release event in the region of the KV precursors (dorsal forerunner cells, DFCs), prior to KV and cilia formation. Manipulation of Ca(2+) release to disrupt this early flux does not impact early DFC specification, but results in altered DFC migration or cohesion in the tailbud at somite stages. This leads to disruption of KV formation followed by bilateral expression of asymmetrical genes, and randomized organ laterality. We identify beta-catenin inhibition as a Ca(2+)-signaling target and demonstrate that localized loss of Ca(2+) within the DFC region or DFC-specific activation of beta-catenin is sufficient to alter laterality in zebrafish. We identify a previously unknown DFC-like cell population in Xenopus and demonstrate a similar Ca(2+)-sensitive stage. As in zebrafish, manipulation of Ca(2+) release results in ectopic nuclear beta-catenin and altered laterality. Overall, our data support a conserved early Ca(2+) requirement in DFC-like cell function in zebrafish and Xenopus.

  15. Concurrent Transient Activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin Pathway Prevents Radiation Damage to Salivary Glands

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Bo; Yang Zhenhua; Shangguan Lei; Zhao Yanqiu; Boyer, Arthur; Liu, Fei

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Many head and neck cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy suffer from permanent impairment of their salivary gland function, for which few effective prevention or treatment options are available. This study explored the potential of transient activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in preventing radiation damage to salivary glands in a preclinical model. Methods and Materials: Wnt reporter transgenic mice were exposed to 15 Gy single-dose radiation in the head and neck area to evaluate the effects of radiation on Wnt activity in salivary glands. Transient Wnt1 overexpression in basal epithelia was induced in inducible Wnt1 transgenic mice before together with, after, or without local radiation, and then saliva flow rate, histology, apoptosis, proliferation, stem cell activity, and mRNA expression were evaluated. Results: Radiation damage did not significantly affect activity of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway as physical damage did. Transient expression of Wnt1 in basal epithelia significantly activated the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in submandibular glands of male mice but not in those of females. Concurrent transient activation of the Wnt pathway prevented chronic salivary gland dysfunction following radiation by suppressing apoptosis and preserving functional salivary stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, Wnt activation 3 days before or after irradiation did not show significant beneficial effects, mainly due to failure to inhibit acute apoptosis after radiation. Excessive Wnt activation before radiation failed to inhibit apoptosis, likely due to extensive induction of mitosis and up-regulation of proapoptosis gene PUMA while that after radiation might miss the critical treatment window. Conclusion: These results suggest that concurrent transient activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway could prevent radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction.

  16. Involvement of PPAR gamma and E-cadherin/beta-catenin pathway in the antiproliferative effect of conjugated linoleic acid in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Bocca, Claudia; Bozzo, Francesca; Francica, Simona; Colombatto, Sebastiano; Miglietta, Antonella

    2007-07-15

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a naturally occurring fatty acid, which has been shown to exert beneficial effects against breast carcinogenesis. It has been reported that CLA could modulate cellular proliferation and differentiation through the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Among different PPAR isotypes, PPAR gamma is involved in growth inhibition of transformed cells. Ligands of PPAR gamma are considered as potential anticancer drugs, so CLA was tested for its ability to induce PPAR gamma expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The effects of CLA and of a specific synthetic PPAR gamma antagonist were evaluated on cell growth as well as on parameters responsible for cell growth regulation. We demonstrated here that CLA stimulated the expression of PPAR gamma to levels up to control and caused PPAR gamma translocation into the nucleus. Furthermore, the overexpression of PPAR gamma positively correlates with the inhibition of cell proliferation and with the modulation of ERK signaling induced by CLA; in all cases the administration of the antagonist reverted CLA effects. The PPAR-signaling pathway is connected with the beta-catenin/E-cadherin pathway, thus we evaluated CLA effects on the expression and cellular distribution of these proteins, which are involved in cell adhesion and responsible for invasive behavior. The treatment with CLA determined the up-regulation and the redistribution of beta-catenin and E-cadherin and the antagonist reverted only the effect on beta-catenin. These studies indicate that CLA regulates PPAR gamma expression by selectively acting as an agonist and may influence cell-cell adhesion and invasiveness of MCF-7 cells. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Natural derivatives of curcumin attenuate the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway through down-regulation of the transcriptional coactivator p300

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Min-Jung; Cho, Munju; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Dong-Eun; Park, Byeoung-Soo; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-12-26

    Curcumin, a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress {beta}-catenin response transcription (CRT), which is aberrantly activated in colorectal cancer. However, the effects of its natural analogs (demethoxycurcumin [DMC] and bisdemethoxycurcumin [BDMC]) and metabolite (tetrahydrocurcumin [THC]) on the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway have not been investigated. Here, we show that DMC and BDMC suppressed CRT that was activated by Wnt3a conditioned-medium (Wnt3a-CM) without altering the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, and inhibited the growth of various colon cancer cells, with comparable potency to curcumin. Additionally, DMC and BDMC down-regulated p300, which is a positive regulator of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Notably, THC also inhibited CRT and cell proliferation, but to a much lesser degree than curcumin, DMC, or BDMC, indicating that the conjugated bonds in the central seven-carbon chain of curcuminoids are essential for the inhibition of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway and the anti-proliferative activity of curcuminoids. Thus, our findings suggest that curcumin derivatives inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway by decreasing the amount of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

  18. Polarity of response to transforming growth factor-beta1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells is regulated by beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Lee, Chien-Hung; Luo, Dong Dong; Krupa, Aleksandra; Fraser, Donald; Phillips, Aled

    2007-09-28

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1)-mediated loss of proximal tubular epithelial cell-cell interaction is regulated in a polarized fashion. The aim of this study was to further explore the polarity of the TGF-beta1 response and to determine the significance of R-Smad-beta-catenin association previously demonstrated to accompany adherens junction disassembly. Smad3 signaling response to TGF-beta1 was assessed by activity of the Smad3-responsive reporter gene construct (SBE)(4)-Lux and by immunoblotting for phospho-Smad proteins. Similar results were obtained with both methods. Apical application of TGF-beta1 led to increased Smad3 signaling compared with basolateral stimulation. Association of Smad proteins with beta-catenin was greater following basolateral TGFbeta-1 stimulation, as was the expression of cytoplasmic Triton-soluble beta-catenin. Inhibition of beta-catenin expression by small interfering RNA augmented Smad3 signaling. Lithium chloride, a GSK-3 inhibitor, increased expression of beta-catenin and attenuated TGF-beta1-dependent Smad3 signaling. Lithium chloride did not influence degradation of Smad3 but resulted in decreased nuclear translocation. Smad2 activation as assessed by Western blot analysis and activity of the Smad2-responsive reporter constructs ARE/MF1 was also greater following apical as compared with basolateral TGFbeta-1 stimulation, suggesting that this is a generally applicable mechanism for the regulation of TGF-beta1-dependent R-Smads. Caco-2 cells are a colonic carcinoma cell line, with known resistance to the anti-proliferative effects of TGF-beta1 and increased expression of beta-catenin. We used this cell line to address the general applicability of our observations. Inhibition of beta-catenin in this cell line by small interfering RNA resulted in increased TGF-beta1-dependent Smad3 phosphorylation and restoration of TGF-beta1 anti-proliferative effects.

  19. Pleiotrophin regulates lung epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation during fetal lung development via beta-catenin and Dlk1.

    PubMed

    Weng, Tingting; Gao, Li; Bhaskaran, Manoj; Guo, Yujie; Gou, Deming; Narayanaperumal, Jeyaparthasarathy; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Zhang, Kexiong; Liu, Lin

    2009-10-09

    The role of pleiotrophin in fetal lung development was investigated. We found that pleiotrophin and its receptor, protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor beta/zeta, were highly expressed in mesenchymal and epithelial cells of the fetal lungs, respectively. Using isolated fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells, we demonstrated that pleiotrophin promoted fetal type II cell proliferation and arrested type II cell trans-differentiation into alveolar epithelial type I cells. Pleiotrophin also increased wound healing of injured type II cell monolayer. Knockdown of pleiotrophin influenced lung branching morphogenesis in a fetal lung organ culture model. Pleiotrophin increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin, promoted beta-catenin translocation into the nucleus, and activated T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor transcription factors. Dlk1, a membrane ligand that initiates the Notch signaling pathway, was identified as a downstream target of the pleiotrophin/beta-catenin pathway by endogenous dlk1 expression, promoter assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation. These results provide evidence that pleiotrophin regulates fetal type II cell proliferation and differentiation via integration of multiple signaling pathways including pleiotrophin, beta-catenin, and Notch pathways.

  20. Thiazolidinediones modulate the expression of beta-catenin and other cell-cycle regulatory proteins by targeting the F-box proteins of Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase independently of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuo; Lin, Li-Fang; Yang, Chih-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Geen-Dong; Chen, Hungwen; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2007-09-01

    Considering the role of aberrant beta-catenin signaling in tumorigenesis, we investigated the mechanism by which the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonist troglitazone facilitated beta-catenin down-regulation. We demonstrate that troglitazone and its more potent PPARgamma-inactive analogs Delta2TG and STG28 mediated the proteasomal degradation of beta-catenin in prostate cancer cells by up-regulating the expression of beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (beta-TrCP), an F-box component of the Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase. Evidence indicates that although small interfering RNA-mediated beta-TrCP knockdown protected cells against STG28-facilitated beta-catenin ablation, ectopic beta-TrCP expression enhanced the degradation. The involvement of beta-TrCP in beta-catenin degradation was also corroborated by the pull-down analysis and the concurrent down-regulation of known beta-TrCP substrates examined, including Wee1, Ikappabetaalpha, cdc25A, and nuclear factor-kappaB/p105. Furthermore, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta represented a key regulator in the effect of these thiazolidinedione derivatives on beta-catenin proteolysis even though these agents increased its phosphorylation level. It is noteworthy that this drug-induced beta-TrCP up-regulation was accompanied by the concomitant down-regulation of Skp2 and Fbw7, thereby affecting many of the target proteins of these two F-box proteins (such as p27 and cyclin E). As a consequence, the ability of troglitazone to target these F-box proteins provides a molecular basis to account for its reported effect on modulating the expression of aforementioned cell-cycle regulatory proteins. Despite this complicated mode of pharmacological actions, normal prostate epithelial cells, relative to LNCaP cells, were less susceptible to the effects of STG28 on modulating the expression of beta-catenin and beta-TrCP, suggesting the translation potential of using STG28 as a scaffold to

  1. Retinoic acid and Wnt/beta-catenin have complementary roles in anterior/posterior patterning embryos of the basal chordate amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Onai, Takayuki; Lin, Hsiu-Chin; Schubert, Michael; Koop, Demian; Osborne, Peter W; Alvarez, Susana; Alvarez, Rosana; Holland, Nicholas D; Holland, Linda Z

    2009-08-15

    A role for Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in axial patterning has been demonstrated in animals as basal as cnidarians, while roles in axial patterning for retinoic acid (RA) probably evolved in the deuterostomes and may be chordate-specific. In vertebrates, these two pathways interact both directly and indirectly. To investigate the evolutionary origins of interactions between these two pathways, we manipulated Wnt/beta-catenin and RA signaling in the basal chordate amphioxus during the gastrula stage, which is the RA-sensitive period for anterior/posterior (A/P) patterning. The results show that Wnt/beta-catenin and RA signaling have distinctly different roles in patterning the A/P axis of the amphioxus gastrula. Wnt/beta-catenin specifies the identity of the ends of the embryo (high Wnt = posterior; low Wnt = anterior) but not intervening positions. Thus, upregulation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling induces ectopic expression of posterior markers at the anterior tip of the embryo. In contrast, RA specifies position along the A/P axis, but not the identity of the ends of the embryo-increased RA signaling strongly affects the domains of Hox expression along the A/P axis but has little or no effect on the expression of either anterior or posterior markers. Although the two pathways may both influence such things as specification of neuronal identity, interactions between them in A/P patterning appear to be minimal.

  2. Growth inhibition of human colon cancer cells by nitric oxide (NO)-donating aspirin is associated with cyclooxygenase-2 induction and beta-catenin/T-cell factor signaling, nuclear factor-kappaB, and NO synthase 2 inhibition: implications for chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennie L; Nath, Niharika; Chen, Jie; Hundley, Thomas R; Gao, Jianjun; Kopelovich, Levy; Kashfi, Khosrow; Rigas, Basil

    2003-11-15

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing aspirin (ASA), consisting of a traditional ASA molecule to which a NO-donating moiety is covalently bound, is a promising colon cancer chemopreventive agent. NO-ASA inhibits colon cancer cell growth more potently than ASA by inhibiting cell proliferation and enhancing cell killing. We examined in cultured human colon cancer cells the effect of NO-ASA on the beta-catenin/T-cell factor signaling pathway, nuclear factor-kappaB, and NO synthase 2 and on cyclooxygenase (COX) expression, all presumed to participate in colon carcinogenesis. Besides inhibiting cell growth, NO-ASA inhibited the beta-catenin/T-cell factor signaling pathway (IC(50), 1.1 microM), nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding (IC(50), 7.5 microM), and NO synthase 2 expression (IC(50), 2 microM). Interestingly, NO-ASA induced COX-2 expression, although it had no effect on COX-1. COX-2 induction was accompanied by increased prostaglandin E(2) production. These effects occurred at NO-ASA concentrations below or near its IC(50) for cell growth (IC(50), 2-50 microM). The metabolism of NO-ASA by these cells is characterized by a rapid deacetylation step and the formation of a conjugate with glutathione. NO-ASA had no effect on intracellular cyclic GMP concentrations. We propose a model incorporating the pleiotropic effects of NO-ASA on cell signaling and postulate that collectively these effects may contribute to its strong chemopreventive effect.

  3. Detection of beta-catenin mutations in paraffin-embedded sporadic desmoid-type fibromatosis by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion (MSRED): an ancillary diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Amary, Maria Fernanda C; Pauwels, Patrick; Meulemans, Els; Roemen, Guido M; Islam, Lily; Idowu, Bernadine; Bousdras, Konstantinos; Diss, Timothy C; O'Donnell, Paul; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2007-09-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a locally aggressive deep soft tissue tumor. Some cases are associated with adenosis polyposis coli germline mutations whereas others harbor somatic beta-catenin point mutations mainly in exon 3, codons 41 and 45. These mutations result in stabilization of beta-catenin, and activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. The aim of this study was to determine the specificity and sensitivity of these 3 most common beta-catenin mutations in the diagnosis of desmoid-type fibromatosis using paraffin-embedded material. The results were compared with nuclear expression of beta-catenin. Mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion methodology was employed to detect the 3 mutations. One hundred and thirty-three cases were analyzed, including 76 desmoid-type, and 18 superficial fibromatosis, in addition to a further 39 fibromatosis mimics. A restriction site was present for analysis of the codon 41 mutation. Mismatch primers were designed for the codon 45 mutations. Mutations were detected in 66 cases (87%) of 76 desmoid-type fibromatosis (71 extra-abdominal). Of these, 34 (45%) were in codon 45 (TCT>TTT), 27 (35%) in codon 41 (ACC>GCC), and 5 (7%) in codon 45 (TCT>CCT). No mutations were detected in the other lesions studied. All desmoid-type fibromatosis cases and 72% of the mimics tested showed nuclear positivity for beta-catenin indicating immunohistochemistry is a sensitive but not a specific test for desmoid-type fibromatosis. In contrast, to date, beta-catenin mutations have not been detected in any lesions which mimic desmoid-type fibromatosis. Mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion, a simple and efficient means of detecting the common beta-catenin mutations in desmoid-type fibromatosis, complements light microscopy in reaching a diagnosis.

  4. Resveratrol augments the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in promoting osteoblastic differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Haibin; Shang, Linshan; Li, Xi; Zhang, Xiyu; Gao, Guimin; Guo, Chenhong; Chen, Bingxi; Liu, Qiji; Gong, Yaoqin; Shao, Changshun

    2009-10-15

    Resveratrol has been shown to possess many health-benefiting effects, including the promotion of bone formation. In this report we investigated the mechanism by which resveratrol promotes osteoblastic differentiation from pluripotent mesenchymal cells. Since Wnt signaling is well documented to induce osteoblastogenesis and bone formation, we characterized the factors involved in Wnt signaling in response to resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol treatment of mesenchymal cells led to an increase in stabilization and nuclear accumulation of {beta}-catenin dose-dependently and time-dependently. As a consequence of the increased nuclear accumulation of {beta}-catenin, the ability to activate transcription of {beta}-catenin-TCF/LEF target genes that are required for osteoblastic differentiation was upregulated. However, resveratrol did not affect the initial step of the Wnt signaling pathway, as resveratrol was as effective in upregulating the activity of {beta}-catenin in cells in which Lrp5 was knocked down as in control cells. In addition, while conditioned medium enriched in Wnt signaling antagonist Dkk1 was able to inhibit Wnt3a-induced {beta}-catenin upregulation, this inhibitory effect can be abolished in resveratrol-treated cells. Furthermore, we showed that the level of glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}), which phosphorylates and destabilizes {beta}-catenin, was reduced in response to resveratrol treatment. The phosphorylation of GSK-3{beta} requires extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. Together, our data indicate that resveratrol promotes osteoblastogenesis and bone formation by augmenting Wnt signaling.

  5. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian-Yong; Huang, Yi; Li, Ji-Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei; Meng, Yan-Ling; Yan, Bo; Bian, Yong-Qian; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Wei-Zhong; and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  6. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and E-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Denise L; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim V; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E; Cotsarelis, George

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode "budding" is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions (AJs) is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of AJ component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another AJ component, has been more difficult to study owing to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes, and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent AJ dissolution.

  7. Overexpression of EB1 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) may promote cellular growth by activating beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihua; Zhou, Xiaobo; Zhu, Hongxia; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Cuiqi; Zhang, Guo; Xue, Liyan; Lu, Ning; Quan, Lanping; Bai, Jinfeng; Zhan, Qimin; Xu, Ningzhi

    2005-10-06

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has a multifactorial etiology involving environmental and/or genetic factors. End-binding protein 1 (EB1), which was cloned as an interacting partner of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor protein, was previously found overexpressed in ESCC. However, the precise role of EB1 in the development of this malignancy has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we analysed freshly resected ESCC specimens and demonstrated that EB1 was overexpressed in approximately 63% of tumor samples compared to matched normal tissue. We report that overexpression of EB1 in the ESCC line EC9706 significantly promotes cell growth, whereas suppression of EB1 protein level by RNA interference significantly inhibited growth of esophageal tumor cells. In addition, EB1 overexpression induced nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin and promoted the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF). These effects were partially or completely abolished by coexpression of APC or DeltaN TCF4, respectively. Also, we found that EB1 affected the interaction between beta-catenin and APC. Furthermore, EB1 overexpression was correlated with cytoplasmic/nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin in primary human ESCC. Taken together, these results support the novel hypothesis that EB1 overexpression may play a role in the development of ESCC by affecting APC function and activating the beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

  8. Identification of a Wnt/Dvl/beta-Catenin --> Pitx2 pathway mediating cell-type-specific proliferation during development.

    PubMed

    Kioussi, Chrissa; Briata, Paola; Baek, Sung Hee; Rose, David W; Hamblet, Natasha S; Herman, Thomas; Ohgi, Kenneth A; Lin, Chijen; Gleiberman, Anatoli; Wang, Jianbo; Brault, Veronique; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Nguyen, H D; Kemler, Rolf; Glass, Christopher K; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2002-11-27

    Understanding the cell type-specific molecular mechanisms by which distinct signaling pathways combinatorially control proliferation during organogenesis is a central issue in development and disease. Here, we report that the bicoid-related transcription factor Pitx2 is rapidly induced by the Wnt/Dvl/beta-catenin pathway and is required for effective cell-type-specific proliferation by directly activating specific growth-regulating genes. Regulated exchange of HDAC1/beta-catenin converts Pitx2 from repressor to activator, analogous to control of TCF/LEF1. Pitx2 then serves as a competence factor required for the temporally ordered and growth factor-dependent recruitment of a series of specific coactivator complexes that prove necessary for Cyclin D2 gene induction. The molecular strategy underlying interactions between the Wnt and growth factor-dependent signaling pathways in cardiac outflow tract and pituitary proliferation is likely to be prototypic of cell-specific proliferation strategies in other tissues.

  9. Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Show Increased Expression of DVL1, DVL3 and Beta-Catenin and Down-Regulation of E-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-01-01

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p = 0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p = 0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain. PMID:24933634

  10. Brain metastases from lung cancer show increased expression of DVL1, DVL3 and beta-catenin and down-regulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-06-13

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p=0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p=0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain.

  11. Downregulation of E-cadherin is an essential event in activating beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription and expression of its target genes in Pdcd4 knockdown cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Sun, Z-X; Allgayer, H; Yang, H-S

    2010-01-07

    We reported earlier that knockdown of tumor suppressor Pdcd4 (programed cell death 4) downregulates E-cadherin expression and activates beta-catenin/Tcf (T-cell factor)-dependent transcription in colon tumor cells. However, the underlying mechanism of these observations remains unknown. In this study, we showed that knockdown of Pdcd4 downregulates E-cadherin expression through elevated protein level of Snail. Over-expression of Pdcd4 upregulates E-cadherin expression and inhibits beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. We then showed that knockdown of E-cadherin activates beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. Conversely, over-expression of E-cadherin in Pdcd4 knockdown cells inhibits beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. In addition, Pdcd4 knockdown stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) and c-Myc expression, whereas u-PAR and c-Myc expression can be reversed by over-expressing E-cadherin in Pdcd4 knockdown cells. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed that beta-catenin/Tcf4 directly binds to the promoters of u-PAR and c-myc in Pdcd4 knockdown cells. Futhermore, knockdown of u-PAR or c-Myc inhibits invasion in Pdcd4 knockdown cells, suggesting that both u-PAR and c-Myc contribute to invasion induced by Pdcd4 knockdown. Taken together, our data showed that elevated Snail expression by Pdcd4 knockdown leads to downregulation of E-cadherin resulting in activating beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription and stimulating the expression of c-Myc and u-PAR, thus providing molecular explanation of how Pdcd4 suppresses tumor invasion.

  12. Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok; Yao Hua; Li Wenqi; Budhraja, Amit; Li Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shi Xianglin

    2011-10-15

    Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

  13. Smed-Evi/Wntless is required for beta-catenin-dependent and -independent processes during planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Adell, Teresa; Salò, Emili; Boutros, Michael; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2009-03-01

    Planarians can regenerate a whole animal from only a small piece of their body, and have become an important model for stem cell biology. To identify regenerative processes dependent on Wnt growth factors in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (Smed), we analyzed RNAi phenotypes of Evi, a transmembrane protein specifically required for the secretion of Wnt ligands. We show that, during regeneration, Smed-evi loss-of-function prevents posterior identity, leading to two-headed planarians that resemble Smed-beta-catenin1 RNAi animals. In addition, we observe regeneration defects of the nervous system that are not found after Smed-beta-catenin1 RNAi. By systematic knockdown of all putative Smed Wnts in regenerating planarians, we identify Smed-WntP-1 and Smed-Wnt11-2 as the putative posterior organizers, and demonstrate that Smed-Wnt5 is a regulator of neuronal organization and growth. Thus, our study provides evidence that planarian Wnts are major regulators of regeneration, and that they signal through beta-catenin-dependent and -independent pathways.

  14. Overexpression of orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, Gpr49, in human hepatocellular carcinomas with beta-catenin mutations.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Sakamoto, Michiie; Fujii, Gen; Tsuiji, Hitomi; Kenetaka, Kengo; Asaka, Masahiro; Hirohashi, Setsuo

    2003-03-01

    To identify the genes responsible for carcinogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we screened differentially expressed genes in several human HCC cell lines. Among these genes, Gpr49 was up-regulated in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2. Gpr49 is a member of the glycoprotein hormone receptor subfamily, which includes the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). However, Gpr49 remains to be an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor. By real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, overexpression (>3-fold increase compared with the corresponding noncancerous liver tissue) of Gpr49 mRNA was observed in 18 of 38 (47%) HCCs compared with corresponding noncancerous livers. Clinicopathologically, overexpression of Gpr49 was frequently observed in HCC with mutation in beta-catenin exon 3 (14 of 16 cases, 87.5%). Moreover, introduction of mutant beta-catenin into mouse hepatocytes in culture caused up-regulation of the Gpr49 mouse homologue. Therefore, Gpr49 is likely to be a target gene activated by Wnt-signaling in HCC. In conclusion, although much is still unknown, Gpr49 may be critically involved in the development of HCCs with beta-catenin mutations and has the potential to be a new therapeutic target in the treatment of HCC.

  15. Stabilized beta-catenin in thymic epithelial cells blocks thymus development and function.

    PubMed

    Zuklys, Saulius; Gill, Jason; Keller, Marcel P; Hauri-Hohl, Mathias; Zhanybekova, Saule; Balciunaite, Gina; Na, Kyung-Jae; Jeker, Lukas T; Hafen, Katrin; Tsukamoto, Noriyuki; Amagai, Takashi; Taketo, Makoto M; Krenger, Werner; Holländer, Georg A

    2009-03-01

    Thymic T cell development is dependent on a specialized epithelial microenvironment mainly composed of cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (TECs). The molecular programs governing the differentiation and maintenance of TECs remain largely unknown. Wnt signaling is central to the development and maintenance of several organ systems but a specific role of this pathway for thymus organogenesis has not yet been ascertained. In this report, we demonstrate that activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by a stabilizing mutation of beta-catenin targeted exclusively to TECs changes the initial commitment of endodermal epithelia to a thymic cell fate. Consequently, the formation of a correctly composed and organized thymic microenvironment is prevented, thymic immigration of hematopoietic precursors is restricted, and intrathymic T cell differentiation is arrested at a very early developmental stage causing severe immunodeficiency. These results suggest that a precise regulation of canonical Wnt signaling in thymic epithelia is essential for normal thymus development and function.

  16. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor IX (GSI) Impairs Concomitant Activation of Notch and wnt-beta-catenin Pathways in CD44(+) Gastric Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Barat, Samarpita; Chen, Xi; Cuong Bui, Khac; Bozko, Przemyslaw; Götze, Julian; Christgen, Matthias; Krech, Till; Malek, Nisar P; Plentz, Ruben R

    2017-02-03

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are associated with tumor resistance and are characterized in gastric cancer (GC). Studies have indicated that Notch and wnt-beta-catenin pathways are crucial for CSC development. Using CD44(+) CSCs, we investigated the role of these pathways in GC carcinogenesis. We performed cell proliferation, wound healing, invasion, tumorsphere, and apoptosis assays. Immunoblot analysis of downstream signaling targets of Notch and wnt-beta-catenin were tested after gamma-secretase inhibitor IX (GSI) treatment. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) were used to determine CD44 and Hairy enhancer of split-1 (Hes1) expression in human GC tissues. CD44(+) CSCs were subcutaneously injected into NMR-nu/nu mice and treated with vehicle or GSI. GC patients with expression of CD44 and Hes1 showed overall reduced survival. CD44(+) CSCs showed high expression of Hes1. GSI treatment showed effective inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, invasion, tumor sphere formation of CD44(+) CSCs, and induced apoptosis. Importanly, Notch1 was found to be important in mediating a crosstalk between Notch and wnt-beta-catenin in CD44(+) CSCs. Our study highlights a crosstalk between Notch and wnt-beta-catenin in gastric CD44(+) CSCs. Expression of CD44 and Hes1 is associated with patient overall survival. GSI could be an alternative drug to treat GC. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  17. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) regulates expression of paneth cell lineage-specific genes in intestinal epithelial cells through both TCF4/beta-catenin-dependent and -independent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Brodrick, Brooks; Vidrich, Alda; Porter, Edith; Bradley, Leigh; Buzan, Jenny M; Cohn, Steven M

    2011-05-27

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) expression in the developing intestine is restricted to the undifferentiated epithelial cells within the lower portion of the crypt. We previously showed that mice lacking functional FGFR-3 have a significant decrease in the number of Paneth cells in the small intestine. Here, we used Caco2 cells to investigate whether FGFR-3 signaling can directly modulate expression of Paneth cell differentiation markers through its effects on TCF4/β-catenin or through other signaling pathways downstream of this receptor. Caco2 cells treated with FGFR-3 ligands or expressing FGFR-3(K650E), a constitutively active mutant, resulted in a significantly increased expression of genes characteristic of mature Paneth cells, including human α-defensins 5 and 6 (HD5 and HD6) and Paneth cell lysozyme, whereas enterocytic differentiation markers were reduced. Activation of FGFR-3 signaling sustained high levels of β-catenin mRNA expression, leading to increased TCF4/β-catenin-regulated transcriptional activity in Caco2 cells. Sustained activity of the TCF4/β-catenin pathway was required for the induction of Paneth cell markers. Activation of the MAPK pathway by FGFR-3 is also required for the induction of Paneth cell markers in addition to and independent of the effect of FGFR-3 on TCF4/β-catenin activity. These studies suggest that coordinate activation of multiple independent signaling pathways downstream of FGFR-3 is involved in regulation of Paneth cell differentiation.

  18. Wnt5a is required for endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells and vascularization via pathways involving both Wnt/beta-catenin and protein kinase Calpha.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Hwa; Yoon, Ju-Young; Lee, Soung-Hoon; Bryja, Vitezslav; Andersson, Emma R; Arenas, Ernest; Kwon, Young-Guen; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2009-02-13

    In this study, we examined the signaling pathways activated by Wnt5a in endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and the function of Wnt5a during vascular development. We first found that Wnt5a(-/-) mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells exhibited a defect in endothelial differentiation, which was rescued by addition of Wnt5a, suggesting that Wnt5a is required for endothelial differentiation of ES cells. Involvement of both beta-catenin and protein kinase (PK)Calpha pathways in endothelial differentiation of mES cells requiring Wnt5a was indicated by activation of both beta-catenin and PKCalpha in Wnt5a(+/-) but not in Wnt5a(-/-) mES cells. We also found that beta-catenin or PKCalpha knockdowns inhibited the Wnt5a-induced endothelial differentiation of ES cells. Moreover, the lack of endothelial differentiation of Wnt5a(-/-) mES cells was rescued only by transfection of both beta-catenin and PKCalpha, indicating that both genes are required for Wnt5a-mediated endothelial differentiation. Wnt5a was also found to be essential for the differentiation of mES cells into immature endothelial progenitor cells, which are known to play a role in repair of damaged endothelium. Furthermore, a defect in the vascularization of the neural tissue was detected at embryonic day 14.5 in Wnt5a(-/-) mice, implicating Wnt5a in vascular development in vivo. Thus, we conclude that Wnt5a is involved in the endothelial differentiation of ES cells via both Wnt/beta-catenin and PKC signaling pathways and regulates embryonic vascular development.

  19. Benzo(a)pyrene induces oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokines, expression of nuclear factor-kappa B and deregulation of wnt/beta-catenin signaling in colons of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Babajide O; Adedara, Isaac A; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of colonic toxicity has been epidemiologically linked to the consumption of foods contaminated with benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P). The present study investigated the effects of B[a]P on biomarkers of oxidative stress, inflammation and wnt-signaling in colon of BALB/c mice following exposure to 62.5, 125 and 250 mg/kg of B[a]P for 7 days by oral gavage. Exposure to B[a]P significantly decreased the colonic antioxidant enzymes activities and glutathione level with concomitant significant increase in myeloperoxidase activity, nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation levels. Colon histopathology results showed treatment-related lesions characterized by atrophy, mucosal ulceration and gland erosion in the B[a]P-treated mice. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that B[a]P treatment increased the protein expression of nuclear factor kappa B, pro-inflammatory cytokines namely tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1β, as well as cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the mice colon. Altered canonical wnt-signaling was confirmed by strong diaminobenzidine staining for p38 mitogen activated protein kinase, β-catenin expression and absence of adenomatous polyposis coli following B[a]P administration. The present data highlight that exposure to B[a]P induces colon injury via induction of oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammatory biomarkers and dsyregulation wnt/β-catenin signaling, thus confirming the role of B[a]P in the pathogenesis of colonic toxicity.

  20. Genomic organization of the human {beta}-catenin gene (CTNNB1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nollet, F.; Berx, G.; Molemans, F.; Roy, F. van

    1996-03-05

    The cytoplasmic {beta}-catenin protein is implicated in signal transduction and associates with both the cell-cell adhesion protein E-cadherin and the tumor suppressor gene product APC. We determined the primary structure of the human {beta}-catenin gene (CTNNB1) by analysis cDNA and genomic clones. The size of the complete gene was determined to be 23.2 kb. Restriction mapping and partial sequence analysis revealed 16 exons. All splice donor and acceptor sites were conformable to the GT/AG rule. The exon size ranged from 61 to 790 bp. Half of the introns were smaller than 550 bp, with the smallest being 84 pb and the longest being 6700 bp. The intron-exon boundaries did not coincide either with conserved sites in the 12 armadillo repeat sequences of {beta}-catenin or with intron-exon boundaries in the armadillo gene of Drosophila. A major site for transcription initiation was identified as an A residue 214 nucleotides upstream of the ATG initiation codon. The resulting transcript is 3362 nucleotides long. Compared to the previously published mRNA sequence, additional residues were identified, 16 at the 5{prime} end and 766 at the 3{prime} end of the mRNA. An alternative splice acceptor site within exon 16 reduced the 3{prime} UTR sequence by 159 bp. Polymerase chain reaction on cDNA from 14 human cell lines demonstrated the general occurrence of both splice variants. The 5{prime}-flanking region is highly GC-rich and lacks a CCAAT box, but contains a TATA box and potential binding sites for several transcription factors, such as NFkB, SP1, AP2, and EGR1. Both a 437-bp fragment and a 6-kb fragment, containing about 4.7 kb of the 5{prime}-flanking region in addition to the noncoding exon 1 and 1 kb of intron 1, showed clear promoter activity when these fragments were linked to a secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter gene and transfected into a mouse epithelial cell line. 53 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The role of Wnt signaling in neuronal dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Toledo, Enrique M

    2008-07-24

    Recent evidence supports a neuroprotective role for Wnt signaling in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In fact, a relationship between amyloid-beta-peptide (Abeta)-induced neurotoxicity and a decrease in the cytoplasmic levels of beta-catenin has been observed. Apparently Abeta binds to the extracellular cysteine-rich domain of the Frizzled receptor (Fz) inhibiting Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Cross-talk with other signaling cascades that regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, including the activation of M1 muscarinic receptor and PKC, the use of Ibuprofen-ChE bi-functional compounds, PPAR alpha, gamma agonists, nicotine and some antioxidants, results in neuroprotection against Abeta. These studies indicate that a sustained loss of Wnt signaling function may be involved in the Abeta-dependent neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer's brain. In conclusion the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway could be proposed as a therapeutic target for the treatment of AD.

  2. Rac1 GTPase and the Rac1 exchange factor Tiam1 associate with Wnt-responsive promoters to enhance beta-catenin/TCF-dependent transcription in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Buongiorno, Pinella; Pethe, Vaijayanti V; Charames, George S; Esufali, Susmita; Bapat, Bharati

    2008-09-30

    beta-catenin is a key mediator of the canonical Wnt pathway as it associates with members of the T-cell factor (TCF) family at Wnt-responsive promoters to drive the transcription of Wnt target genes. Recently, we showed that Rac1 GTPase synergizes with beta-catenin to increase the activity of a TCF-responsive reporter. This synergy was dependent on the nuclear presence of Rac1, since inhibition of its nuclear localization effectively abolished the stimulatory effect of Rac1 on TCF-responsive reporter activity. We hypothesised that Rac1 plays a direct role in enhancing the transcription of endogenous Wnt target genes by modulating the beta-catenin/TCF transcription factor complex. We employed chromatin immunoprecipitation studies to demonstrate that Rac1 associates with the beta-catenin/TCF complex at Wnt-responsive promoters of target genes. This association served to facilitate transcription, since overexpression of active Rac1 augmented Wnt target gene activation, whereas depletion of endogenous Rac1 by RNA interference abrogated this effect. In addition, the Rac1-specific exchange factor, Tiam1, potentiated the stimulatory effects of Rac1 on the canonical Wnt pathway. Tiam1 promoted the formation of a complex containing Rac1 and beta-catenin. Furthermore, endogenous Tiam1 associated with endogenous beta-catenin, and this interaction was enhanced in response to Wnt3a stimulation. Intriguingly, Tiam1 was recruited to Wnt-responsive promoters upon Wnt3a stimulation, whereas Rac1 was tethered to TCF binding elements in a Wnt-independent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that Rac1 and the Rac1-specific activator Tiam1 are components of transcriptionally active beta-catenin/TCF complexes at Wnt-responsive promoters, and the presence of Rac1 and Tiam1 within these complexes serves to enhance target gene transcription. Our results demonstrate a novel functional mechanism underlying the cross-talk between Rac1 and the canonical Wnt signalling pathway.

  3. DOCK4 promotes loss of proliferation in glioblastoma progenitor cells through nuclear beta-catenin accumulation and subsequent miR-302-367 cluster expression.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D N; Turchi, L; Burel-Vandenbos, F; Fareh, M; Almairac, F; Virolle, V; Figarella-Branger, D; Baeza-Kallee, N; Lagadec, P; Kubiniek, V; Paquis, P; Fontaine, D; Junier, M-P; Chneiweiss, H; Virolle, T

    2017-09-18

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are lethal primitive brain tumours characterized by a strong intra-tumour heterogeneity. We observed in GBM tissues the coexistence of functionally divergent micro-territories either enriched in more differentiated and non-mitotic cells or in mitotic undifferentiated OLIG2 positive cells while sharing similar genomic abnormalities. Understanding the formation of such functionally divergent micro-territories in glioblastomas (GBM) is essential to comprehend GBM biogenesis, plasticity and to develop therapies. Here we report an unexpected anti-proliferative role of beta-catenin in non-mitotic differentiated GBM cells. By cell type specific stimulation of miR-302, which directly represses cyclin D1 and stemness features, beta-catenin is capable to change its known proliferative function. Nuclear beta-catenin accumulation in non-mitotic cells is due to a feed forward mechanism between DOCK4 and beta-catenin, allowed by increased GSK3-beta activity. DOCK4 over expression suppresses selfrenewal and tumorigenicity of GBM stem-like cells. Accordingly in the frame of GBM median of survival, increased level of DOCK4 predicts improved patient survival.Oncogene advance online publication, 18 September 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.323.

  4. E-cadherin is required for caveolin-1-mediated down-regulation of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin via reduced beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente A; Tapia, Julio C; Rodriguez, Diego A; Lladser, Alvaro; Arredondo, Cristian; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2007-11-01

    Caveolin-1 reportedly acts as a tumor suppressor and promotes events associated with tumor progression, including metastasis. The molecular mechanisms underlying such radical differences in function are not understood. Recently, we showed that caveolin-1 inhibits expression of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin via a transcriptional mechanism involving the beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef pathway. Surprisingly, while caveolin-1 expression decreased survivin mRNA and protein levels in HT29(ATCC) human colon cancer cells, this was not the case in metastatic HT29(US) cells. Survivin down-regulation was paralleled by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of caveolin-1 with beta-catenin in HT29(ATCC) but not HT29(US) cells. Unlike HT29(ATCC) cells, HT29(US) cells expressed small amounts of E-cadherin that accumulated in intracellular patches rather than at the cell surface. Re-expression of E-cadherin in HT29(US) cells restored the ability of caveolin-1 to down-regulate beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription and survivin expression, as seen in HT29(ATCC) cells. In addition, coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization between caveolin-1 and beta-catenin increased upon E-cadherin expression in HT29(US) cells. In human embryonic kidney HEK293T and HT29(US) cells, caveolin-1 and E-cadherin cooperated in suppressing beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription as well as survivin expression. Finally, mouse melanoma B16-F10 cells, another metastatic cell model with low endogenous caveolin-1 and E-cadherin levels, were characterized. In these cells, caveolin-1-mediated down-regulation of survivin in the presence of E-cadherin coincided with increased apoptosis. Thus, the absence of E-cadherin severely compromises the ability of caveolin-1 to develop activities potentially relevant to its role as a tumor suppressor.

  5. beta-catenin is strongly elevated in rat colonic epithelium following short-term intermittent treatment with 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Dashwood, W Mohaiza; Löhr, Christiane V; Fischer, Kay A; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2008-09-01

    Colon tumors expressing high levels of beta-catenin and c-myc have been reported in male F344 rats given three short cycles of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) alternating with a high-fat (HF) diet. Using the same experimental protocol, rats were euthanized 24 h after the last dose of PhIP so as to examine early changes in colonic crypt homeostasis and beta-catenin expression, before the onset of frank tumors. PhIP/HF dosing caused a significant increase in the bromodeoxyuridine labeling index throughout the entire colon, and within the colonic crypt column cleaved caspase-3 was elevated in the basal and central zones, but reduced in the luminal region. In vehicle/HF controls, beta-catenin was immunolocalized primarily at the border between cells at the top of the crypt, whereas in rats given PhIP/HF diet there was strong cytoplasmic staining, which appeared as a gradient of increased beta-catenin extending from the base of the crypt column to the luminal region. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses confirmed that beta-catenin and c-myc were increased significantly in the colonic mucosa of rats given PhIP/HF diet. Collectively, these findings suggest that PhIP/HF cycling alters beta-catenin and c-myc expression in the colonic mucosa, resulting in expansion of the proliferative zone and redistribution of apoptotic cells from the lumen to the central and basal regions of the colonic crypt. Thus, during the early stages of colon carcinogenesis, alternating exposure to heterocyclic amines and a high-fat diet might facilitate molecular changes resulting in dysregulated beta-catenin and c-myc expression.

  6. Regulation of E-cadherin expression and beta-catenin/Tcf transcriptional activity by the integrin-linked kinase.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, Arusha; McPhee, Timothy; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2004-04-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase which interacts with the cytoplasmic domains of beta1 and beta3 integrins. ILK structure and its localization at the focal adhesion allows it not only to interact with different structural proteins, but also to mediate many different signalling pathways. Extracellular matrices (ECM) and growth factors each stimulate ILK signalling. Constitutive activation of ILK in epithelial cells results in oncogenic phenotypes such as disruption of cell extracellular matrix and cell to cell interactions, suppression of suspension-induced apoptosis, and induction of anchorage independent cell growth and cell cycle progression. More specifically, pathological overexpression of ILK results in down-regulation of E-cadherin expression, and nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin, leading to the subsequent activation of the beta-catenin/Tcf transcription complex, the downstream components of the Wnt signalling pathway. Here we review the data implicating ILK in the regulation of these two signalling pathways, and discuss recent novel insights into the molecular basis and requirement of ILK in the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT).

  7. Heterocellular interaction enhances recruitment of {alpha} and {beta}-catenins and ZO-2 into functional gap-junction complexes and induces gap junction-dependant differentiation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Talhouk, Rabih S. Mroue, Rana; Mokalled, Mayssa; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Nehme, Ralda; Ismail, Ayman; Khalil, Antoine; Zaatari, Mira; El-Sabban, Marwan E.

    2008-11-01

    Gap junctions (GJ) are required for mammary epithelial differentiation. Using epithelial (SCp2) and myoepithelial-like (SCg6) mouse-derived mammary cells, the role of heterocellular interaction in assembly of GJ complexes and functional differentiation ({beta}-casein expression) was evaluated. Heterocellular interaction is critical for {beta}-casein expression, independent of exogenous basement membrane or cell anchoring substrata. Functional differentiation of SCp2, co-cultured with SCg6, is more sensitive to GJ inhibition relative to homocellular SCp2 cultures differentiated by exogenous basement membrane. Connexin (Cx)32 and Cx43 levels were not regulated across culture conditions; however, GJ functionality was enhanced under differentiation-permissive conditions. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated association of junctional complex components ({alpha}-catenin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-2) with Cx32 and Cx43, in differentiation conditions, and additionally with Cx30 in heterocellular cultures. Although {beta}-catenin did not shuttle between cadherin and GJ complexes, increased association between connexins and {beta}-catenin in heterocellular cultures was observed. This was concomitant with reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin, suggesting that differentiation in heterocellular cultures involves sequestration of {beta}-catenin in GJ complexes.

  8. Wnt/beta-Catenin, Foxa2, and CXCR4 Axis Controls Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Axis Controls Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Xiuping Yu CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Vanderbilt University...COVERED 01 July 2013 - 30 June 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Wnt/beta-Catenin, Foxa2, and CXCR4 axis controls prostate cancer ...development of castration resistant prostate cancer . Our previous studies have shown that Foxa2 is a Wnt/beta-catenin target gene in prostates. Our

  9. Bioinformatics Knowledge Map for Analysis of Beta-Catenin Function in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arighi, Cecilia N.; Wu, Cathy H.

    2015-01-01

    Given the wealth of bioinformatics resources and the growing complexity of biological information, it is valuable to integrate data from disparate sources to gain insight into the role of genes/proteins in health and disease. We have developed a bioinformatics framework that combines literature mining with information from biomedical ontologies and curated databases to create knowledge “maps” of genes/proteins of interest. We applied this approach to the study of beta-catenin, a cell adhesion molecule and transcriptional regulator implicated in cancer. The knowledge map includes post-translational modifications (PTMs), protein-protein interactions, disease-associated mutations, and transcription factors co-activated by beta-catenin and their targets and captures the major processes in which beta-catenin is known to participate. Using the map, we generated testable hypotheses about beta-catenin biology in normal and cancer cells. By focusing on proteins participating in multiple relation types, we identified proteins that may participate in feedback loops regulating beta-catenin transcriptional activity. By combining multiple network relations with PTM proteoform-specific functional information, we proposed a mechanism to explain the observation that the cyclin dependent kinase CDK5 positively regulates beta-catenin co-activator activity. Finally, by overlaying cancer-associated mutation data with sequence features, we observed mutation patterns in several beta-catenin PTM sites and PTM enzyme binding sites that varied by tissue type, suggesting multiple mechanisms by which beta-catenin mutations can contribute to cancer. The approach described, which captures rich information for molecular species from genes and proteins to PTM proteoforms, is extensible to other proteins and their involvement in disease. PMID:26509276

  10. Tyrosine residues 654 and 670 in {beta}-cat enin are crucial in regulation of Met-{beta}-catenin interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Gang; Apte, Udayan; Micsenyi, Amanda; Bell, Aaron; Monga, Satdarshan P.S. . E-mail: smonga@pitt.edu

    2006-11-01

    {beta}-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt pathway, is also regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation that regulates its association to E-cadherin. Previously, we reported its association with the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor Met at the membrane. HGF induced Met-{beta}-catenin dissociation and nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin, which was tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent. Here, we further investigate the Met-{beta}-catenin interaction by selectively mutating several tyrosine residues, alone or in combination, in {beta}-catenin. The mutants were subcloned into FLAG-CMV vector and stably transfected into rat hepatoma cells, which were treated with HGF. All single or double-mutant-transfected cells continued to show HGF-induced nuclear translocation of FLAG-{beta}-catenin except the mutations affecting 654 and 670 simultaneously (Y654/670F), which coincided with the lack of formation of {beta}-catenin-TCF complex and DNA synthesis, in response to the HGF treatment. In addition, the Y654/670F-transfected cells also showed no phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin or dissociation from Met in response to HGF. Thus, intact 654 and 670 tyrosine residues in {beta}-catenin are crucial in HGF-mediated {beta}-catenin translocation, activation and mitogenesis.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in ameloblastomas and tooth germs.

    PubMed

    Alves Pereira, Karuza Maria; do Amaral, Bruna Aguiar; dos Santos, Bruna Rafaela Martins; Galvão, Hébel Cavalcanti; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida; de Souza, Lélia Batista

    2010-03-01

    The aim was to analyze the expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in ameloblastomas and tooth germs to determine their roles in cell differentiation processes and invasiveness compared with odontogenesis. Twenty-one ameloblastoma cases (16 solid and 5 unicystic tumors) and 5 tooth germs were submitted to the immunohistochemical detection of E-cadherin and beta-catenin. Immunoreactivity was evaluated using descriptive and semiquantitative analysis, investigating the location and intensity of staining. The Fisher exact test was performed, and P values of <.05 were considered to indicate statistical significance. There was no statistically significant difference in the expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin between solid and unicystic ameloblastomas (P = .59; P = .63; respectively). The same was found when comparing solid and unicystic ameloblastomas with the tooth germs for both E-cadherin (P = .53; P = .44; respectively) and beta-catenin (P = .12; P = .16; respectively). Nuclear staining of beta-catenin was observed in only 4 cases (3 solid and 1 unicystic tumor). The results showed no differences in the expression of E-cadherin or beta-catenin between tooth germs and solid and unicystic ameloblastomas. The expression of these molecules seems mainly to be related to the process of cell differentiation. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of bipotential epidermal progenitors derived from human sebaceous gland: contrasting roles of c-Myc and beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Lo Celso, Cristina; Berta, Melanie A; Braun, Kristin M; Frye, Michaela; Lyle, Stephen; Zouboulis, Christos C; Watt, Fiona M

    2008-05-01

    The current belief is that the epidermal sebaceous gland (SG) is maintained by unipotent stem cells that are replenished by multipotent stem cells in the hair follicle (HF) bulge. However, sebocytes can be induced by c-Myc (Myc) activation in interfollicular epidermis (IFE), suggesting the existence of bipotential stem cells. We found that every SZ95 immortalized human sebocyte that underwent clonal growth in culture generated progeny that differentiated into both sebocytes and cells expressing involucrin and cornifin, markers of IFE and HF inner root sheath differentiation. The ability to generate involucrin positive cells was also observed in a new human sebocyte line, Seb-E6E7. SZ95 xenografts differentiated into SG and IFE but not HF. SZ95 cells that expressed involucrin had reduced Myc levels; however, this did not correlate with increased expression of the Myc repressor Blimp1, and Blimp1 expression did not distinguish cells undergoing SG, IFE, or HF differentiation in vivo. Overexpression of Myc stimulated sebocyte differentiation, whereas overexpression of beta-catenin stimulated involucrin and cornifin expression. In transgenic mice simultaneous activation of Myc and beta-catenin revealed mutual antagonism: Myc blocked ectopic HF formation and beta-catenin reduced SG differentiation. Overexpression of the Myc target gene Indian hedgehog did not promote sebocyte differentiation in culture and cyclopamine treatment, while reducing proliferation, did not block Myc induced sebocyte differentiation in vivo. Our studies provide evidence for a bipotential epidermal stem cell population in an in vitro model of human epidermal lineage selection and highlight the importance of Myc as a regulator of sebocyte differentiation.

  13. Mutational analysis of WTX gene in Wnt/ beta-catenin pathway in gastric, colorectal, and hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Nam J; Kim, S; Lee, Sug H

    2009-05-01

    A recent study of Wilms' tumors discovered a new X chromosome gene, Wilms' tumor gene on the X chromosome (WTX), which was found to harbor small deletions and point mutations. WTX protein negatively regulates Wnt/ beta-catenin signaling, and is considered a tumor-suppressor gene. One of the questions about the WTX gene is whether the genetic alterations of the WTX gene are specific to only Wilms' tumors. To see whether somatic point mutations of WTX occur in other malignancies, we analyzed the WTX gene for the detection of mutations in 141 cancer tissues by a single-strand conformation polymorphism assay. The cancer tissues consisted of 47 gastric adenocarcinomas, 47 colorectal adenocarcinomas, and 47 hepatocellular carcinomas. Overall, we detected one WTX mutation in the colorectal carcinomas (1/47; 2.1%), but there was no WTX mutation in other cancers analyzed. The detected mutation was a missense mutation (c. 1117G > A (p.Ala373Thr)). Although the WTX mutation is common in Wilms' tumors, our data indicate that it is rare in colorectal, gastric, and hepatocellular carcinomas. The data also suggest that deregulation of Wnt/ beta-catenin signaling by WTX gene mutation may be a rare event in the pathogenesis of colorectal, gastric, and hepatocellular carcinomas.

  14. Nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin occurs commonly in the epithelial cells of juvenile polyps.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Michiko; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Carethers, John M; Doctolero, Ryan; Tajima, Akihiro; Sugano, Kentaro; Franklin, Wilbur A; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2005-01-01

    In the two conditions juvenile polyps (JPs) and juvenile polyposis coli (JPC), colonic polyps may have overlapping histologic and phenotypic appearance, but JPC confers a significant risk for colon adenocarcinoma. Although not thought to contain adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations, the status of beta-catenin and full-length APC protein expression in JPs is not known. We evaluated beta-catenin and full-length APC protein expression in JPs from children with JPs and JPC. Cases were identified through endoscopic procedure records. Immunohistochemistry was performed for beta-catenin and full-length APC protein. Loss of heterozygosity at the APC gene locus on chromosome 5 was assessed using two APC-linked microsatellite markers. Polyp and normal colonic tissue were analyzed from 36 children with JPs and 9 with JPC. Both APC and beta-catenin immunoreactivity were present in epithelial cells from all samples but in different patterns. In all normal colon and polyp samples, APC expression was cytoplasmic with maximal immunoreactivity in the goblet cells. In contrast, beta-catenin immunoreactivity in epithelial cells was limited to the plasma membrane in normal colon but was both cytoplasmic and nuclear in all 45 JPs. No evidence of APC gene loss of heterozygosity was found. In polyps from children with JPs and JPC, nuclear beta-catenin accumulation is a consistent feature, and it is not due to APC gene mutation or loss of full-length APC protein expression. Thus, beta-catenin accumulation may be intrinsic to the formation of juvenile-type polyps through an as-yet-undefined mechanism.

  15. Evaluation of myosin VI, E-cadherin and beta-catenin immunostaining in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a cancer of increasing incidence and mortality. Currently, there are no immunohistochemical prognostic markers for RCCs in routine use. The aim of this study was to examine for the first time the immunostaining of myosin VI in RCCs as well as its association with E-cadherin and beta-catenin immunostaining and the prognostic significance of these markers in RCCs. Methods Our study population consisted of 152 patients who underwent surgery for RCCs between 1990 and 1999. The tumours were examined with three immunohistochemical markers: myosin VI, E-cadherin and beta-catenin. Results The immunostaining for cytoplasmic myosin VI was common (72%). One-third of the tumours were immunopositive for nuclear myosin VI. Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunopositivity and nuclear beta-catenin immunostaining were associated with lower Fuhrman grades (p = 0.04 and p = 0.005, respectively), but not stages. There was no significant association between myosin VI immunostaining and the histological subtype of RCC. Nuclear myosin VI was associated with the nuclear expression of beta-catenin. A direct association could also be proven between membranous E-cadherin and cytoplasmic beta-catenin. Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunostaining was a marker of poorer prognosis in multivariate Cox regression model adjusted with stage and Fuhrman grade with hazard ratio 2.4 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 5.0 with p = 0.024). Conclusions Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunopositivity and nuclear beta-catenin immunostaining were associated with lower Fuhrman grades, and there was a strong positive relationship between E-cadherin immunostaining and beta-catenin immunostaining in RCCs. Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunostaining was associated with poorer prognosis in RCCs. PMID:20074327

  16. Mucin-depleted foci have beta-catenin gene mutations, altered expression of its protein, and are dose- and time-dependent in the colon of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Giannini, Augusto; Salvadori, Maddalena; Pinzani, Pamela; Dolara, Piero; Caderni, Giovanna

    2005-08-10

    Mucin-depleted foci (MDF) are purported preneoplastic lesions that can be easily visualized in the unsectioned colon of carcinogen-treated rats stained with high-iron diamine alcian blue (HID-AB). In F344 rats treated twice with 150 mg/kg of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and sacrificed after 5, 9, 13 and 28 weeks, MDF increased over time from 5 to 13 weeks, whereas they decreased at 28 weeks, when tumors appear. MDF multiplicity (crypts/MDF) linearly increased with time. Increasing doses of DMH (100, 150 and 200 mg/kg x 2 times) caused a dose-related increase in MDF. Mutations in Ctnnb1 gene codifying for beta-catenin were identified with PCR amplification and direct sequencing in 6/15 tumors (40%), 7/28 MDF (25%) and 2/27 (7%) aberrant crypt foci (ACF) identified in HID-AB-stained colon. All mutations in tumors and MDF caused amino acid substitution, while one mutation in ACF was silent. Beta-catenin detected at membrane level by immunohistochemistry was markedly reduced in MDF and tumors and, to a lesser extent, in ACF identified with HID-AB. By contrast, nuclear localization of beta-catenin was significantly increased in MDF and tumors, while no variation was observed in ACF. Beta-catenin cytoplasmic expression was also significantly increased in MDF and tumors but to a lesser extent in ACF. In conclusion, MDF are induced dose-dependently by DMH, increase in size with time, have mutations in the beta-catenin gene and marked alterations in beta-catenin cellular localization. Since all these phenomena are considered specific steps for colon tumorigenesis, these results further support the hypothesis that MDF are cancer precursors and can be proposed as endpoints in short-term carcinogenesis experiments.

  17. beta-Catenin in early development of the lancelet embryo indicates specific determination of embryonic polarity.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kinya; Li, Guorong; Wang, Yong; Saiga, Hidetoshi; Zhang, Peijun; Aizawa, Shinichi

    2002-12-01

    The lancelet (amphioxus) embryo develops from a miolecithal egg and starts gastrulation when it is approximately 400 cells in size, in a fashion similar to that of some non-chordate deuterostomes. Throughout this type of gastrulation, the embryo develops characteristics such as the notochord and hollow nerve cord that commonly appear in chordates. beta-Catenin is an important factor in initiating body patterning. The behavior and developmental pattern of this protein in early lancelet development was examined in this study. Cytoplasmic beta-catenin was localized to the animal pole after fertilization and then was incorporated asymmetrically into the blastomeres during the first cleavage. Asymmetric distribution was observed at least until the 32-cell stage. The first nuclear localization was at the 64-cell stage, and involved all of the cells. At the initial gastrula stage, however, concentrated beta-catenin was found on the dorsal side. LiCl treatment affected the asymmetric pattern of beta-catenin during the first cleavage. LiCl also changed distribution of nuclear beta-catenin at the initial gastrula stage: distribution extended to cells on the animal side. Apparently associated with this change, expression domains of goosecoid, lhx3 and otx also changed to a radially symmetric pattern centered at the animal pole. However, LiCl-treated embryos were able to establish embryonic polarity. The present study suggests that in the lancelet embryo, polarity determination is independent of dorsal morphogenesis.

  18. Polymeric black tea polyphenols inhibit 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colorectal carcinogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish B.

    2008-02-15

    Tea polyphenols like epigallocatechin gallate and theaflavins are established chemopreventive agents for colorectal carcinogenesis. However, studies on evaluating similar chemopreventive properties of thearubigins or polymeric black tea polyphenols (PBPs), the most abundant polyphenols in black tea, are limited. Hence, in the present study we aim to investigate chemopreventive effects along with probable mechanisms of action of PBP extract employing 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats as experimental model. The present study suggests that PBPs, like other tea polyphenols, also inhibit DMH-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by decreasing tumor volume and multiplicity. This study also shows that although the pretreatment with PBP extract could induce detoxifying enzymes in hepatic and colorectal tissue, it did not show any additional chemopreventive effects when compared to treatments with PBP extract after initiation with DMH. Mechanistically, PBP extract may inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis by decreasing DMH-induced cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Treatments with PBP extract showed decreased levels of COX-2, c-MYC and cyclin D1 proteins which aid cell proliferation probably by regulating {beta}-catenin by maintaining expression of APC and decreasing inactivation of GSK3{beta}. DMH-induced activation of MAP kinases such as ERK and JNK was also found to be inhibited by treatments with PBP extract. In conclusion, the protective effects of PBP extract could be attributed to inhibition of DMH-induced cellular proliferation probably through {beta}-catenin regulation.

  19. The destruction complex of beta-catenin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Bourroul, Guilherme Muniz; Fragoso, Hélio José; Gomes, José Walter Feitosa; Bourroul, Vivian Sati Oba; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Palma, Rogério Tadeu; Waisberg, Jaques

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the destruction complex of beta-catenin by the expression of the proteins beta-catetenin, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axin and ubiquitin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma. Methods Tissue samples from 64 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 53 patients with colonic adenoma were analyzed. Tissue microarray blocks and slides were prepared and subjected to immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies in carcinoma, adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa, and adenoma tissues. The immunoreactivity was evaluated by the percentage of positive stained cells and by the intensity assessed through of the stained grade of proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. In the statistical analysis, the Spearman correlation coefficient, Student’s t, χ2, Mann-Whitney, and McNemar tests, and univariate logistic regression analysis were used. Results In colorectal carcinoma, the expressions of beta-catenin and adenomatous polyposis coli proteins were significantly higher than in colonic adenomas (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). The immunoreactivity of GSK3β, axin 1 and ubiquitin proteins was significantly higher (p=0.03, p=0.039 and p=0.03, respectively) in colorectal carcinoma than in the colonic adenoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa. The immunohistochemistry staining of these proteins did not show significant differences with the clinical and pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer and colonic adenoma. Conclusions These results suggest that, in adenomas, the lower expression of the beta-catenin, axin 1 and GSK3β proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was maintained, while in colorectal carcinoma, the increased expression of beta-catenin, GSK3β, axin 1, and ubiquitin proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was disrupted. PMID:27462886

  20. Wnt/beta-Catenin, Foxa2, and CXCR4 Axis Controls Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0212 TITLE: Wnt/beta-Catenin, Foxa2, and CXCR4 Axis Controls Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0212 Wnt/beta-Catenin, Foxa2, and CXCR4 axis controls prostate cancer progression 5b. GRANT NUMBER PC111074 5c...target gene in prostates. Our preliminary study suggests a Wnt−Foxa2− CXCR4 axis that is involved in PCa bone metastasis, and activation of this axis

  1. Beta-catenin/TCF Pathway and Castrate Resistant Progression in Osteoblastic Bone Metastases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    beta-catenin complex (1)); fibroblast growth factor 19 ( FGF19 , a high-affinity ligand for FGFR4 (2)); NOTUM, WNT11, WISP1 (regulator [NOTUM (3)] and...we initially selected FGF19 , NOTUM, WNT11, HA synthase 3, and HA synthase 2 and assessed their expression in MDA PCa 118 cells transfected with beta...regulation of cells or are components of the ECM (Table 1). We confirmed that both beta-catenin and FGF19 were reduced by about 3.8 times. Table 1. Gene

  2. SpKrl: a direct target of beta-catenin regulation required for endoderm differentiation in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Howard, E W; Newman, L A; Oleksyn, D W; Angerer, R C; Angerer, L M

    2001-02-01

    Localization of nuclear beta-catenin initiates specification of vegetal fates in sea urchin embryos. We have identified SpKrl, a gene that is activated upon nuclear entry of beta-catenin. SpKrl is upregulated when nuclear beta-catenin activity is increased with LiCl and downregulated in embryos injected with molecules that inhibit beta-catenin nuclear function. LiCl-mediated SpKrl activation is independent of protein synthesis, indicating that SpKrl is a direct target of beat-catenin and TCF. Embryos in which SpKrl translation is inhibited with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides lack endoderm. Conversely, SpKrl mRNA injection rescues some vegetal structures in beta-catenin-deficient embryos. SpKrl negatively regulates expression of the animalizing transcription factor, SpSoxB1. We propose that SpKrl functions in patterning the vegetal domain by suppressing animal regulatory activities.

  3. Promoter swapping between the genes for a novel zinc finger protein and beta-catenin in pleiomorphic adenomas with t(3;8)(p21;q12) translocations.

    PubMed

    Kas, K; Voz, M L; Röijer, E; Aström, A K; Meyen, E; Stenman, G; Van de Ven, W J

    1997-02-01

    Pleiomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands is a benign epithelial tumour occurring primarily in the major and minor salivary glands. It is by far the most common type of salivary gland tumour. Microscopically, pleiomorphic adenomas show a marked histological diversity with epithelial, myoepithelial and mesenchymal components in a variety of patterns. In addition to a cytogenetic subgroup with normal karyotypes, pleiomorphic adenomas are characterized by recurrent chromosome rearrangements, particularly reciprocal translocations, with breakpoints at 8q12, 3p21, and 12q13-15, in that order of frequency. The most common abnormality is a reciprocal t(3;8)(p21;q12). We here demonstrate that the t(3;8)(p21;q12) results in promoter swapping between PLAG1, a novel, developmentally regulated zinc finger gene at 8q12, and the constitutively expressed gene for beta-catenin (CTNNB1), a protein interface functioning in the WG/WNT signalling pathway and specification of cell fate during embryogenesis. Fusions occur in the 5'-non-coding regions of both genes, exchanging regulatory control elements while preserving the coding sequences. Due to the t(3;8)(p21;q12), PLAG1 is activated and expression levels of CTNNB1 are reduced. Activation of PLAG1 was also observed in an adenoma with a variant translocation t(8;15)(q12;q14). Our results indicate that PLAG1 activation due to promoter swapping is a crucial event in salivary gland tumourigenesis.

  4. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Transdisciplinary Research in Epigenetics and Cancer Journal Clubs and Transdisciplinary Science Meetings, biweekly and monthly 3. To gain expertise...Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Lamb CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Washington University...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genes in

  5. BDNF mobilizes synaptic vesicles and enhances synapse formation by disrupting cadherin-beta-catenin interactions.

    PubMed

    Bamji, Shernaz X; Rico, Beatriz; Kimes, Nikole; Reichardt, Louis F

    2006-07-17

    Neurons of the vertebrate central nervous system have the capacity to modify synapse number, morphology, and efficacy in response to activity. Some of these functions can be attributed to activity-induced synthesis and secretion of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); however, the molecular mechanisms by which BDNF mediates these events are still not well understood. Using time-lapse confocal analysis, we show that BDNF mobilizes synaptic vesicles at existing synapses, resulting in small clusters of synaptic vesicles "splitting" away from synaptic sites. We demonstrate that BDNF's ability to mobilize synaptic vesicle clusters depends on the dissociation of cadherin-beta-catenin adhesion complexes that occurs after tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin. Artificially maintaining cadherin-beta-catenin complexes in the presence of BDNF abolishes the BDNF-mediated enhancement of synaptic vesicle mobility, as well as the longer-term BDNF-mediated increase in synapse number. Together, this data demonstrates that the disruption of cadherin-beta-catenin complexes is an important molecular event through which BDNF increases synapse density in cultured hippocampal neurons.

  6. Localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Hayley; Patel, Shyam; Wong, Janelle; Chu, Julia; Li, Adrian; Li, Song

    2008-08-08

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are pluripotent, and can be directed to differentiate into different cell types for therapeutic applications. To expand hESCs, it is desirable to maintain hESC growth without differentiation. As hESC colonies grow, differentiated cells are often found at the periphery of the colonies, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we utilized micropatterning techniques to pattern circular islands or strips of matrix proteins, and examined the spatial pattern of hESC renewal and differentiation. We found that micropatterned matrix restricted hESC differentiation at colony periphery but allowed hESC growth into multiple layers in the central region, which decreased hESC proliferation and induced hESC differentiation. In undifferentiated hESCs, {beta}-catenin primarily localized at cell-cell junctions but not in the nucleus. The amount of {beta}-catenin in differentiating hESCs at the periphery of colonies or in multiple layers decreased significantly at cell-cell junctions. Consistently, knocking down {beta}-catenin decreased Oct-4 expression in hESCs. These results indicate that localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the spatial pattern of differentiation in hESC colonies.

  7. Participation of OCT3/4 and beta-catenin during dysgenetic gonadal malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Palma, Icela; Peña, Rocio-Yolanda; Contreras, Alejandra; Ceballos-Reyes, Guillermo; Coyote, Ninel; Eraña, Luis; Kofman-Alfaro, Susana; Queipo, Gloria

    2008-05-18

    Gonadoblastoma (GB) is an in situ tumor consisting of a heterogeneous population of mature and immature germ cells, other cells resembling immature Sertoli/granulosa cells, and Leydig/lutein-like cells, may also be present. GB almost exclusively affects a subset of patients with intersex disorders and in 30% of them overgrowth of the germinal component of the tumor is observed and the lesion is term dysgerminoma/seminoma. Several pathways have been proposed to explain the malignant process, and abnormal OCT3/4 expression is the most robust risk factor for malignant transformation. Some authors have suggested that OCT3/4 and beta-catenin might both be involved in the same oncogenic pathway, as both genes are master regulators of cell differentiation and, overexpression of either gene may result in cancer development. The mechanism by which beta-catenin participates in GB transformation is not completely clear and exploration of the E-cadherin pathway did not conclusively show that this pathway participated in the molecular pathogenesis of GB. Here we analyze seven patients with mixed gonadal dysgenesis and GB, in an effort to elucidate the participation of beta-catenin and E-cadherin, as well as OCT3/4, in the oncogenic pathways involved in the transformation of GB into seminoma/dysgerminoma. We conclude that the proliferation of immature germ cells in GB may be due to an interaction between OCT3/4 and accumulated beta-catenin in the nuclei of the immature germ cells.

  8. Role of Akt/GSK-3beta/beta-catenin transduction pathway in the muscle anti-atrophy action of insulin-like growth factor-I in glucocorticoid-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Schakman, O; Kalista, S; Bertrand, L; Lause, P; Verniers, J; Ketelslegers, J M; Thissen, J P

    2008-08-01

    Decrease of muscle IGF-I plays a critical role in muscle atrophy caused by glucocorticoids (GCs) because IGF-I gene electrotransfer prevents muscle atrophy caused by GCs. The goal of the present study was to identify the intracellular mediators responsible for the IGF-I anti-atrophic action in GC-induced muscle atrophy. We first assessed the IGF-I transduction pathway alterations caused by GC administration and their reversibility by local IGF-I overexpression performed by electrotransfer. Muscle atrophy induced by dexamethasone (dexa) administration occurred with a decrease in Akt (-53%; P<0.01) phosphorylation together with a decrease in beta-catenin protein levels (-40%; P<0.001). Prevention of atrophy by IGF-I was associated with restoration of Akt phosphorylation and beta-catenin levels. We then investigated whether muscle overexpression of these intracellular mediators could mimic the IGF-I anti-atrophic effects. Overexpression of a constitutively active form of Akt induced a marked fiber hypertrophy in dexa-treated animals (+175% of cross-sectional area; P<0.001) and prevented dexa-induced atrophy. This hypertrophy was associated with an increase in phosphorylated GSK-3beta (+17%; P<0.05) and in beta-catenin content (+35%; P<0.05). Furthermore, overexpression of a dominant-negative GSK-3beta or a stable form of beta-catenin increased fiber cross-sectional area by, respectively, 23% (P<0.001) and 29% (P<0.001) in dexa-treated rats, preventing completely the atrophic effect of GC. In conclusion, this work indicates that Akt, GSK-3beta, and beta-catenin probably contribute together to the IGF-I anti-atrophic effect in GC-induced muscle atrophy.

  9. [CELL CONTACT PROTEIN BETA-CATENIN IN EPENDYMAL AND EPITHELIAL CELLS OF THE CHOROID PLEXUS OF THE CEREBRAL LATERAL VENTRICLES].

    PubMed

    Kirik, O V; Sufieyva, D A; Nazarenkova, A V; Korzhevskiy, D E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution pattern of cellular contacts protein beta-catenin in the choroid plexus and ependyma of lateral ventricles of the brain. The study was conducted on frontal sections of the brain of Wistar rats (n = 10) using polyclonal antibodies against beta-catenin. The obtained preparations were analyzed by microscopy in transmitted light and using confocal laser microscopy. To study the distribution of beta-catenin in different projections, three-dimensional reconstruction was performed. The study demonstrated different distribution patterns of this protein in ependyma and choroid plexus. Unlike ependyma, in the cells of the choroid plexus beta-catenin was distributed in the same way as in simple epithelial tissues (on the basal and lateral borders of the cells). This may indicate different tissue attribution of the ependyma and the choroid plexus epithelium, despite their common origin.

  10. Chondroitin Sulfate-E Is a Negative Regulator of a Pro-Tumorigenic Wnt/Beta-Catenin-Collagen 1 Axis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Catherine M.; Klüppel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate-E (CS-E) is misregulated in many human cancers, including breast cancer. Cell-surface associated CS-E has been shown to have pro-tumorigenic functions, and pharmacological treatment with exogenous CS-E has been proposed to interfere with tumor progression mediated by endogenous CS-E. However, the effects of exogenous CS-E on breast cancer cell behavior, and the molecular mechanisms deployed by CS-E are not well understood. We show here that treatment with CS-E, but not other chondroitin forms, could interfere with the invasive protrusion formation and migration of breast cancer cells in three-dimensional organotypic cultures. Microarray analysis identified transcriptional programs controlled by CS-E in these cells. Importantly, negative regulation of the pro-metastatic extracellular matrix gene Col1a1 was required for the anti-migratory effects of exogenous CS-E. Knock-down of Col1a1 gene expression mimics the effects of CS-E treatment, while exposing cells to a preformed collagen I matrix interfered with the anti-migratory effects of CS-E. In addition, CS-E specifically interfered with Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, a known pro-tumorigenic pathway. Lastly, we demonstrate that Col1a1 is a positively regulated target gene of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. Together, our data identify treatment with exogenous CS-E as negative regulatory mechanism of breast cancer cell motility through interference with a pro-tumorigenic Wnt/beta-catenin - Collagen I axis. PMID:25090092

  11. p53 and beta-catenin expression in gallbladder tissues and correlation with tumor progression in gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mila; Sakhuja, Puja; Singh, Shivendra; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    The inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene and activation of the proto-oncogene are key steps in the development of human cancer. p53 and beta-catenin are examples of such genes, respectively. In the present study, our aim was to determine the role of these genes in the carcinogenesis of the gallbladder by immunohistochemistry. Sections from paraffin-embedded blocks of surgically resected specimens of gallbladder cancer (GBC) (80 cases), chronic cholecystitis (60 cases), and control gallbladders (10 cases) were stained with the monoclonal antibody p53, and polyclonal antibody beta-catenin. Results were scored semiquantitatively and statistical analysis performed. p53 expression was scored as percentage of the nuclei stained. Beta-catenin expression was scored as type of expression-membranous, cytoplasmic, and nuclear staining. Beta-catenin expression was correlated with tumor invasiveness, differentiation, and stage. Over-expression of p53 was seen in 56.25% of GBC cases and was not seen in chronic cholecystitis or in control gallbladders. p53 expression in gallbladder cancer was significantly higher than in inflammatory or control gallbladders (P < 0.0001). p53 expression increased with increasing tumor grade (P = 0.039). Beta-catenin nuclear expression was seen in 75% cases of gallbladder cancer and in no case of chronic cholecystitis and control gallbladder. Beta-catenin nuclear expression increased with tumor depth invasiveness, and grade (P = 0.028 and P = 0.0152, respectively). p53 and beta-catenin nuclear expression is significantly higher in GBC. p53 expression correlates with increasing tumor grade while beta-catenin nuclear expression correlates with tumor grade and depth of invasion, thus suggesting a role for these genes in tumor progression of GBC.

  12. p53 and Beta-Catenin Expression in Gallbladder Tissues and Correlation with Tumor Progression in Gallbladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mila; Sakhuja, Puja; Singh, Shivendra; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: The inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene and activation of the proto-oncogene are key steps in the development of human cancer. p53 and beta-catenin are examples of such genes, respectively. In the present study, our aim was to determine the role of these genes in the carcinogenesis of the gallbladder by immunohistochemistry. Patients and Methods: Sections from paraffin-embedded blocks of surgically resected specimens of gallbladder cancer (GBC) (80 cases), chronic cholecystitis (60 cases), and control gallbladders (10 cases) were stained with the monoclonal antibody p53, and polyclonal antibody beta-catenin. Results were scored semiquantitatively and statistical analysis performed. p53 expression was scored as percentage of the nuclei stained. Beta-catenin expression was scored as type of expression–membranous, cytoplasmic, and nuclear staining. Beta-catenin expression was correlated with tumor invasiveness, differentiation, and stage. Results: Over-expression of p53 was seen in 56.25% of GBC cases and was not seen in chronic cholecystitis or in control gallbladders. p53 expression in gallbladder cancer was significantly higher than in inflammatory or control gallbladders (P < 0.0001). p53 expression increased with increasing tumor grade (P = 0.039). Beta-catenin nuclear expression was seen in 75% cases of gallbladder cancer and in no case of chronic cholecystitis and control gallbladder. Beta-catenin nuclear expression increased with tumor depth invasiveness, and grade (P = 0.028 and P = 0.0152, respectively). Conclusion: p53 and beta-catenin nuclear expression is significantly higher in GBC. p53 expression correlates with increasing tumor grade while beta-catenin nuclear expression correlates with tumor grade and depth of invasion, thus suggesting a role for these genes in tumor progression of GBC. PMID:23319036

  13. Stimulation of Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase activity and Na{sup +} coupled glucose transport by {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Wilmes, Jan; Dermaku-Sopjani, Miribane; Lam, Rebecca S.; Jakupi, Muharrem; Foeller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} The oncogenic transcription factor {beta}-catenin stimulates the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. {yields} {beta}-Catenin stimulates SGLT1 dependent Na{sup +}, glucose cotransport. {yields} The effects are independent of transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin sensitive transport may contribute to properties of proliferating cells. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin is a multifunctional protein stimulating as oncogenic transcription factor several genes important for cell proliferation. {beta}-Catenin-regulated genes include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, which is known to stimulate a variety of transport systems. The present study explored the possibility that {beta}-catenin influences membrane transport. To this end, {beta}-catenin was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without SGLT1 and electrogenic transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. As a result, expression of {beta}-catenin significantly enhanced the ouabain-sensitive current of the endogeneous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. Inhibition of vesicle trafficking by brefeldin A revealed that the stimulatory effect of {beta}-catenin on the endogenous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase was not due to enhanced stability of the pump protein in the cell membrane. Expression of {beta}-catenin further enhanced glucose-induced current (Ig) in SGLT1-expressing oocytes. In the absence of SGLT1 Ig was negligible irrespective of {beta}-catenin expression. The stimulating effect of {beta}-catenin on both Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase and SGLT1 activity was observed even in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. The experiments disclose a completely novel function of {beta}-catenin, i.e. the regulation of transport.

  14. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inactivation and stabilization of beta-catenin induce nephron differentiation in isolated mouse and rat kidney mesenchymes.

    PubMed

    Kuure, Satu; Popsueva, Anna; Jakobson, Madis; Sainio, Kirsi; Sariola, Hannu

    2007-04-01

    Wnt proteins are required for induction of nephrons in mouse metanephric kidneys, but the downstream pathways that mediate tubule induction and epithelial differentiation have remained obscure. The intracellular mechanisms by which Wnt signaling mediates nephron induction in embryonic kidney mesenchymes were studied. First is shown that transient exposure of isolated kidney mesenchymes to structurally different glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitors lithium or 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime results in abundant epithelial differentiation and full segregation of nephrons. Shown further by mice with genetically disrupted ureteric bud or Wolffian duct development is that this nephrogenic competence arises independent of the influence of Wolffian duct-derived epithelia. Analysis of the intracellular signaling cascades downstream of GSK3 inhibition revealed stabilization of beta-catenin and upregulation of Lef1 and Tcf1, both events that are associated with the active canonical Wnt signaling. Last, genetic evidence that metanephric mesenchyme-specific stabilization of beta-catenin is sufficient to induce nephron differentiation in isolated kidney mesenchymes, similar to that induced by GSK3 inhibitors, is provided. These data show that activation of canonical Wnt pathway is sufficient to induce nephrogenesis and suggest that this pathway mediates the nephron induction in murine kidney mesenchymes.

  15. Modulation of Beta-catenin Activity With PKD1 Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    remaining specific aims and to have couple more publications. In brief, in 2008-09 funding period we have investigated the effect of bryostatin on PKD1...expression, beta-catenin transcription, cell proliferation, and cellular aggregation. In this study we examined the effect of Bryostatin 1 treatment...with Bryostatin 1 leads to colocalization of the cytoplasmic pool of β-catenin with PKD1, trans-Golgi network markers and proteins involved in

  16. Glioblastoma microvesicles promote endothelial cell proliferation through Akt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihai; Sun, Junfeng; Lan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma tumor cells release microvesicles, which contain mRNA, miRNA and angiogenic proteins. These tumor-derived microvesicles transfer genetic information and proteins to normal cells. Previous reports demonstrated that the increased microvesicles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with glioblastoma up-regulate procoagulant activity. The concentration of microvesicles was closely related to thromboembolism incidence and clinical therapeutic effects of glioblastoma patients. However, it is still not clear how CSF microvesicles and what factors affect glioblastoma development. In this study, we collected the plasma and CSF from glioblastoma patients and healthy volunteers. Microvesicles acquired from serum or CSF were added to cultured endothelial cells. And the effects of these microvesicles on endothelial cells were examined. Our results showed that microvesicles from CSF of patients, but not from circulating blood, promoted endothelial cells migration and proliferation in vitro. In addition, the degree of endothelial cell proliferation triggered by microvesicles from CSF was reduced when treated with siRNA targeting Akt/beta-catenin, suggesting that the Akt/beta-catenin pathway is involved in the microvesicle-initiated endothelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, glioblastoma mainly affects microvesicles within CSF without showing significant impact on microvesicles in circulating blood. Microvesicles from the CSF of glioblastoma patients may initiate endothelial cell growth and thus promote cell invasion. This effect may be directly exerted by activated Akt/beta-catenin pathway.

  17. Neurofilament heavy polypeptide regulates the Akt-beta-catenin pathway in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Sook; Chang, Xiaofei; LeBron, Cynthia; Nagpal, Jatin K; Lee, Juna; Huang, Yiping; Yamashita, Keishi; Trink, Barry; Ratovitski, Edward A; Sidransky, David

    2010-02-03

    Aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction are common features of aggressive cancer growth. We observed promoter methylation and loss of expression in neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH) in a significant proportion of primary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) samples that were of a high tumor grade and advanced stage. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NEFH accelerated ESCC cell growth in culture and increased tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas forced expression of NEFH significantly inhibited cell growth and colony formation. Loss of NEFH caused up-regulation of pyruvate kinase-M2 type and down-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, via activation of the Akt/beta-catenin pathway, resulting in enhanced aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. The acceleration of glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction in NEFH-knockdown cells was suppressed in the absence of beta-catenin expression, and was decreased by the treatment of 2-Deoxyglucose, a glycolytic inhibitor, or API-2, an Akt inhibitor. Loss of NEFH activates the Akt/beta-catenin pathway and increases glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cancer cells with methylated NEFH can be targeted for destruction with specific inhibitors of deregulated downstream pathways.

  18. [Effects of K-ras gene mutation on colon cancer cell line Caco-2 metastasis by regulating E-cadherin/beta-catenin/p120 protein complex formation and RhoA protein activity].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-nan; Li, Xiao; Qian, Jia-ming; Lu, Xin-qing; Yang, Hong

    2010-02-01

    To explore the effects of K-ras gene mutation on colon cancer cell line Caco-2 metastasis by regulating E-cadherin/beta-catenin/p120 protein complex formation and RhoA protein activity. K-ras wild-type colon cancer cell line Caco-2 was transiently transfected by phr-GFP vector (control group), transfected by mutant K-ras gene phr-K-ras (Val12) vector (transfection group), transfected by mutant K-ras gene phr-K-ras (Val12) vector and treated by specific MAPK pathway inhibitor PD98059 (MAPK inhibition group), or transfected by mutant K-ras gene phr-K-ras (Val12) vector and treated by specific PI-3K pathway inhibitor LY294002 (PI-3K inhibition group), respectively. Cell migration was tested by Transwell experiment. E-cadherin and beta-catenin protein expression and intracellular location were detected by cell immunofluorescence method. Intracellular p120 protein expression was detected by Western blot. beta-catenin protein level which combined with E-cadherin was detected by immunoprecipitation. RhoA activity was analyzed by Pull-down assay. The Caco-2 cell migration rate was (19.8 +/- 5.6) % in transfection group, which was significantly higher than that in control group [(14.0 +/- 4.2) %] (P = 0.001) and in MAPK inhibition group [(15.8 +/- 1.2) %] (P = 0.044), but was not significantly different from that in PI-3K inhibition group [(17.5 +/- 2.8) %] (P = 0.095). Immunofluorescence method showed that the E-cadherin and beta-catenin stain located in the cell membrane decreased in transfection group. Western blot showed that the total intracellular p120 protein decreased in transfection group and PI-3K inhibition group. Immunoprecipitation data showed that beta-catenin protein level combined with E-cadherin decreased in transfection group and PI-3K group. Pull-down test showed that RhoA protein activity was up-regulated in transfection group. K-ras gene mutation stimulates the migration of colon cancer cell Caco-2, which may be achieved by decreasing the E-cadherin/beta-catenin

  19. Aberrant distributions and relationships among E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and connexin 26 and 43 in endometrioid adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wincewicz, Andrzej; Baltaziak, Marek; Kanczuga-Koda, Luiza; Lesniewicz, Tomasz; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria; Sulkowski, Stanislaw; Koda, Mariusz; Sulkowska, Mariola

    2010-07-01

    During carcinogenesis, loss of intracellular cohesion is observed among cancer cells with altered expression of such adhesion molecules as E-cadherin and beta-catenin, and aberrant expression and cellular location of intercellular gap junction proteins-connexins. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunohistochemically the expression and relationship between E-cadherin and beta-catenin, and the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in 86 endometrioid adenocarcinomas. The aberrant cytoplasmic translocation of the studied proteins was a predominant finding, whereas only a minority of cases showed normal, nuclear beta-catenin labeling or membranous distribution of the remaining molecules. E-cadherin was positively and significantly associated with beta-catenin (P=0.001, r=0.366), as was Cx26 with Cx43 (P<0.001, r=0.719), E-cadherin with Cx26 (P<0.001, r=0.413), and E-cadherin and Cx43 (P<0.001, r=0.434) in all cancers. A subgroup of endometrioid adenocarcinomas (FIGO IB+II) exclusively showed a positive significant association between the expression of beta-catenin and Cx26 (P=0.038, r=0.339). In addition, there were significantly more beta-catenin-positive carcinomas among superficially spreading cancers (FIGO IA) than among deeper invading neoplasms (FIGO IB+II) (P=0.056). The altered location of the studied proteins indicates impairment of their physiological functions. In particular, normal membranous distribution of E-cadherin and connexins is lost and replaced by abnormal cytoplasmic accumulation in most cancers, and thus intercellular ties are expected to be weakened and loosened as a consequence. In contrast, the lack of relationship between beta-catenin and connexins, E-cadherin seems to be closely associated with the expression of Cx26 and Cx43 in endometrioid adenocarcinomas.

  20. Beta-catenin inhibits melanocyte migration but induces melanoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Stuart J.; Rambow, Florian; Kumasaka, Mayuko; Champeval, Delphine; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Delmas, Véronique; Larue, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    The canonical Wnt signalling pathway induces the β-catenin/LEF transcription factors. It is activated in various cancers, most characteristically carcinomas, in which it promotes metastatic spread by increasing migration and/or invasion. The Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway is frequently activated in melanoma, but the presence of β-catenin in the nucleus does not seem to be a sign of aggressiveness in these tumours. We found that, unlike its positive role in stimulating migration and invasion of carcinoma cells, β-catenin signalling decreased the migration of melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. In vivo, β-catenin signalling in melanoblasts reduced the migration of these cells, causing a white belly-spot phenotype. The inhibition, by β-catenin of migration was dependent on MITF-M, a key transcription factor of the melanocyte lineage, and CSK, a Src-inhibitor. Despite reducing migration, β-catenin signalling promoted lung metastasis in the Nras-driven melanoma murine model. Thus, β-catenin may play conflicting roles in the metastatic spread of melanoma, repressing migration while promoting metastasis. These results highlight that metastasis formation requires a series of successful cellular processes, any one of which may not be optimally efficient. PMID:22665063

  1. Combined E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin expression is a favorable prognostic factor in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Scholten, A N; Aliredjo, R; Creutzberg, C L; Smit, V T H B M

    2006-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules, such as epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), might be involved in the processes of tumor invasion and differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin in endometrial carcinoma and to determine the prognostic value of these factors. We have investigated the expression of E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin by immunohistochemistry in 225 endometrial carcinomas. The correlation between the E-cadherin and the catenins and their correlation with several histologic and clinical parameters were analyzed. Negative E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin expression was observed in 44%, 47%, and 33% of endometrial carcinomas, respectively, and was correlated with histologic FIGO grade 3 (P < 0.001). Negative E-cadherin expression was more often observed in nonendometrioid endometrial carcinomas (NEECs) than in endometrioid carcinomas (75% versus 43%; P= 0.04). Combined positive E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin expression was an independent positive prognostic factor for survival in patients with grade 1-2 carcinomas (P= 0.02). Negative E-cadherin expression was found to be associated with histologic grade 3 and with NEEC. Combined positive E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin expression was a significant prognostic factor.

  2. Correlation of beta-catenin localization with cyclooxygenase-2 expression and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takako; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Ohnishi, Mutsuko; Suemoto, Yuko; Kirkner, Gregory J; Dehari, Reiko; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji

    2007-07-01

    The WNT/beta-catenin (CTNNB1) pathway is commonly activated in the carcinogenic process. Cross-talks between the WNT and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 or PTGS2)/prostaglandin pathways have been suggested. The relationship between beta-catenin activation and microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal cancer has been controversial. The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP or CIMP-high) with widespread promoter methylation is a distinct epigenetic phenotype in colorectal cancer, which is associated with MSI-high. However, no study has examined the relationship between beta-catenin activation and CIMP status. Using 832 population-based colorectal cancer specimens, we assessed beta-catenin localization by immunohistochemistry. We quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters [CACNA1G, CDKN2A(p16), CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1] by real-time polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight). MSI-high, CIMP-high, and BRAF mutation were associated inversely with cytoplasmic and nuclear beta-catenin expressions (i.e., beta-catenin activation) and associated positively with membrane expression. The inverse relation between beta-catenin activation and CIMP was independent of MSI. COX-2 overexpression correlated with cytoplasmic beta-catenin expression (even after tumors were stratified by CIMP status), but did not correlate significantly with nuclear or membrane expression. In conclusion, beta-catenin activation is inversely associated with CIMP-high independent of MSI status. Cytoplasmic beta-catenin is associated with COX-2 overexpression, supporting the role of cytoplasmic beta-catenin in stabilizing PTGS2 (COX-2) mRNA.

  3. Somatic FGF9 mutations in colorectal and endometrial carcinomas associated with membranous beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Kalinina, Juliya; Shoman, Soheir; Eissa, Saad; Ollikainen, Miina; Elomaa, Outi; Eliseenkova, Anna V; Bützow, Ralf; Mohammadi, Moosa; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2008-03-01

    We previously described striking molecular features including high frequency of membranous beta-catenin in subsets of familial colon cancers with as yet unknown predisposition. We hypothesized that such tumors might carry mutations in Wnt/beta-catenin target genes. Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) was an attractive target, as it maps to a common area of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in colorectal carcinomas on 13q12.11. Here, we report, for the first time, the occurrence of FGF9 mutations in human cancers. We found a total of six distinct FGF9 mutations including one frameshift, four missense, and one nonsense, in 10 (six colorectal and four endometrial) out of 203 tumors and cell lines. The frameshift mutation was detected in five different tumors. Mapping of these mutations onto the crystal structure of FGF9 predicted that they should all lead to loss of function albeit through variable mechanisms. The p.R173K mutation should diminish ligand affinity for heparin/heparan sulfate, the p.V192M, p.D203G, and p.L188YfsX18 (FGF9(Delta205-208)) mutations should negatively impact ligand's interaction with receptor, while p.G84E and p.E142X (FGF9(Delta142-208)) mutations should interfere with ligand folding. Consistent with these structural predictions, the p.V192M, p.D203G, and p.L188YfsX18 (FGF9(Delta205-208)) mutations impaired the ability of ligand to activate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in cultured cells expressing FGF receptors. LOH was observed in seven out of nine FGF9 mutant tumors, supporting the predicted loss of function. Interestingly, eight out of 10 (80%) of the FGF9 mutant tumors showed normal membranous beta-catenin expression and the absence of mutation in the beta-catenin gene (CTNNB1). These data suggest that FGF9 plays a role in colorectal and endometrial carcinogenesis.

  4. The Wnt signaling pathway in cellular proliferation and differentiation: A tale of two coactivators.

    PubMed

    Teo, Jia-Ling; Kahn, Michael

    2010-09-30

    Wnt signaling pathways play divergent roles during development, normal homeostasis and disease. The responses that result from the activation of the pathway control both proliferation and differentiation. Tight regulation and controlled coordination of the Wnt signaling cascade is required to maintain the balance between proliferation and differentiation. The non-redundant roles of the coactivator proteins CBP and p300, within the context of Wnt signaling are discussed. We highlight their roles as integrators of the various inputs that a cell receives to elicit the correct and coordinated response. We propose that essentially all cellular information - i.e. from other signaling pathways, nutrient levels, etc. - is funneled down into a choice of coactivators usage, either CBP or p300, by their interacting partner beta-catenin (or catenin-like molecules in the absence of beta-catenin) to make the critical decision to either remain quiescent, or once entering cycle to proliferate without differentiation or to initiate the differentiation process.

  5. Associations of beta-catenin alterations and MSI screening status with expression of key cell cycle regulating proteins and survival from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wangefjord, Sakarias; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lindquist, Kajsa Ericson; Nodin, Björn; Jirström, Karin; Eberhard, Jakob

    2013-01-21

    Despite their pivotal roles in colorectal carcinogenesis, the interrelationship and prognostic significance of beta-catenin alterations and microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal cancer (CRC) needs to be further clarified. In this paper, we studied the associations between beta-catenin overexpression and MSI status with survival from CRC, and with expression of p21, p27, cyclin D1 and p53, in a large, prospective cohort study. Immunohistochemical MSI-screening status and expression of p21, p27 and p53 was assessed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 557 cases of incident CRC in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Chi Square and Spearman's correlation tests were used to explore the associations between beta-catenin expression, MSI status, clinicopathological characteristics and investigative parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to assess the relationship between beta-catenin overexpression, MSI status and cancer specific survival (CSS). Positive MSI screening status was significantly associated with older age, female sex, proximal tumour location, non-metastatic disease, and poor differentiation, and inversely associated with beta-catenin overexpression. Beta-catenin overexpression was significantly associated with distal tumour location, low T-stage and well-differentiated tumours. Patients with MSI tumours had a significantly prolonged CSS in the whole cohort, and in stage III-IV disease, also in multivariable analysis, but not in stage I-II disease. Beta-catenin overexpression was associated with a favourable prognosis in the full cohort and in patients with stage III-IV disease. Neither MSI nor beta-catenin status were predictive for response to adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively treated stage III patients. P53 and p27 expression was positively associated with beta-catenin overexpression and inversely associated with MSI. Cyclin D1 expression was positively associated with MSI and beta-catenin

  6. WNT10B functional dualism: beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent growth promotion or independent suppression with deregulated expression in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hirohide; Matsubara, Kenichi; Zhou, Xiaoling; Okamura, Shu; Kubo, Takahiko; Murase, Yaeko; Shikauchi, Yuko; Esteller, Manel; Herman, James G; Wei Wang, Xin; Harris, Curtis C

    2007-11-01

    We found aberrant DNA methylation of the WNT10B promoter region in 46% of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 15% of colon cancer samples. Three of 10 HCC and one of two colon cancer cell lines demonstrated low or no expression, and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine reactivated WNT10B expression with the induction of demethylation, indicating that WNT10B is silenced by DNA methylation in some cancers, whereas WNT10B expression is up-regulated in seven of the 10 HCC cell lines and a colon cancer cell line. These results indicate that WNT10B can be deregulated by either overexpression or silencing in cancer. We found that WNT10B up-regulated beta-catenin/Tcf activity. However, WNT10B-overexpressing cells demonstrated a reduced growth rate and anchorage-independent growth that is independent of the beta-catenin/Tcf activation, because mutant beta-catenin-transduced cells did not suppress growth, and dominant-negative hTcf-4 failed to alleviate the growth suppression by WNT10B. Although WNT10B expression alone inhibits cell growth, it acts synergistically with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) to stimulate cell growth. WNT10B is bifunctional, one function of which is involved in beta-catenin/Tcf activation, and the other function is related to the down-regulation of cell growth through a different mechanism. We suggest that FGF switches WNT10B from a negative to a positive cell growth regulator.

  7. Exploration of the APC/beta-catenin (WNT) pathway and a histologic classification system for pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma. A study of 18 cases.

    PubMed

    Gaumann, A; Bode-Lesniewska, B; Zimmermann, D R; Fanburg-Smith, J C; Kirkpatrick, C J; Hofstädter, F; Woenckhaus, M; Stoehr, R; Obermann, E C; Dietmaier, W; Hartmann, A

    2008-11-01

    APC, a tumor suppressor gene in the Wnt pathway, stabilizes beta-catenin and controls cell growth. Mutation of APC or beta-catenin leads to nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin and transcription of cyclin D1/cyclin A. Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) were studied by morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic methods of the Wnt pathway. Eighteen cases were included: mean age 52 years, primary intraluminal location with typical clinical presentation. PAS were classified as epithelioid (n = 4) or malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH; spindled/pleomorphic, n = 4), myxofibrosarcoma (n = 8), and one each hemangiopericytoma-like or malignant inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor-like. The tumor cells demonstrated vimentin, focal actins, and rare focal desmin positivity. All but one were grade 2 or 3 by FNCLCC grading. Alteration in chromosome 5q21 (APC) was found in 4/14 PAS by LOH, mostly epithelioid-type; an MFH-type case demonstrated microsatellite instability (MSI) and nuclear beta-catenin. Cyclin D1 was expressed in seven tumors, all myxofibrosarcoma-type. No mutations were detected in APC or beta-catenin. In summary, PAS are predominantly intermediate grade myxofibrosarcoma in middle-aged males, and fatal in two-thirds of patients. Despite myofibroblastic phenotype, APC/beta-catenin pathway changes are rare. Cyclin D1, only expressed in the myxofibrosarcoma-type, is likely transcribed via factors other than beta-catenin.

  8. MicroRNA-1826 targets VEGFC, beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and MEK1 (MAP2K1) in human bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Ueno, Koji; Shahryari, Varahram; Tabatabai, Z.Laura; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt/beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling pathway play an important role in bladder cancer (BC) progression. Tumor-suppressive microRNAs (miRNAs) targeting these cancer pathways may provide a new therapeutic approach for BC. We initially identified miRNA-1826 potentially targeting CTNNB1, VEGFC and MEK1 using several target scan algorithms. Also 3′ untranslated region luciferase activity and protein expression of these target genes were significantly downregulated in miR-1826-transfected BC cells (J82 and T24). The expression of miR-1826 was lower in BC tissues and inverse correlation of miR-1826 with several clinical parameters (pT, grade) was observed. Also the expression of miR-1826 was much lower in three BC cell lines (J82, T24 and TCCSUP) compared with a normal bladder cell line (SV-HUC-1). We then performed analyses to look at miR-1826 function and found that miR-1826 inhibited BC cell viability, invasion and migration. We also found increased apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest in miR-1826-transfected BC cells. To examine whether the effect of miR-1826 was through CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) or MEK1 knockdown, we knocked down CTNNB1/MEK1 messenger RNA using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique. We observed that CTNNB1 or MEK1 siRNA knockdown resulted in effects similar to those with miR-1826 in BC cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the miR-1826 plays an important role as tumor suppressor via CTNNB1/MEK1/VEGFC downregulation in BC. PMID:22049531

  9. MicroRNA-1826 targets VEGFC, beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and MEK1 (MAP2K1) in human bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Ueno, Koji; Shahryari, Varahram; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt/beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling pathway play an important role in bladder cancer (BC) progression. Tumor-suppressive microRNAs (miRNAs) targeting these cancer pathways may provide a new therapeutic approach for BC. We initially identified miRNA-1826 potentially targeting CTNNB1, VEGFC and MEK1 using several target scan algorithms. Also 3' untranslated region luciferase activity and protein expression of these target genes were significantly downregulated in miR-1826-transfected BC cells (J82 and T24). The expression of miR-1826 was lower in BC tissues and inverse correlation of miR-1826 with several clinical parameters (pT, grade) was observed. Also the expression of miR-1826 was much lower in three BC cell lines (J82, T24 and TCCSUP) compared with a normal bladder cell line (SV-HUC-1). We then performed analyses to look at miR-1826 function and found that miR-1826 inhibited BC cell viability, invasion and migration. We also found increased apoptosis and G(1) cell cycle arrest in miR-1826-transfected BC cells. To examine whether the effect of miR-1826 was through CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) or MEK1 knockdown, we knocked down CTNNB1/MEK1 messenger RNA using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique. We observed that CTNNB1 or MEK1 siRNA knockdown resulted in effects similar to those with miR-1826 in BC cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the miR-1826 plays an important role as tumor suppressor via CTNNB1/MEK1/VEGFC downregulation in BC.

  10. Frequent deletions and mutations of the beta-catenin gene are associated with overexpression of cyclin D1 and fibronectin and poorly differentiated histology in childhood hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, H; Horie, H; Hiyama, E; Matsunaga, T; Hayashi, Y; Watanabe, Y; Suita, S; Kaneko, M; Sasaki, F; Hashizume, K; Ozaki, T; Furuuchi, K; Tada, M; Ohnuma, N; Nakagawara, A

    2001-04-01

    Hepatoblastoma (HBL) is the most common malignant liver tumor in young children. Recent reports have shown that the beta-catenin gene was frequently mutated or deleted in HBLS: To elucidate the role of beta-catenin abnormalities in HBLs, we searched for mutations of beta-catenin and APC as well as expression of the target genes, cyclin D1, c-myc, and fibronectin, in 68 primary HBLS: The mutation analysis revealed that 44 (65%) tumors carried missense mutations or deletions of beta-catenin, all of which were somatic and targeted to the exon 3 encoding the amino acid residues involved in its degradation. However, no loss of function mutation of the APC gene was detected by the yeast functional assay. Of interest, beta-catenin mutation was significantly correlated with overexpression of the target genes, cyclin D1 and fibronectin, but not with that of c-myc in HBLs as measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. The immunohistochemical studies in 15 HBLs demonstrated that the nuclear/cytoplasmic accumulation of beta-catenin was positive in 13 tumors, 9 of which had the deletion or mutation of the gene. The significant correlation between the beta-catenin gene abnormality and the positive staining of cyclin D1 was also confirmed. Furthermore, the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin was strongly associated with the poorly differentiated tumor cell components as well as with the positive staining of cyclin D1 within the tumor. Thus, our present results suggested that the gain of function mutation of beta-catenin played a crucial role in the malignant progression of HBL in vivo.

  11. The destruction complex of beta-catenin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Bourroul, Guilherme Muniz; Fragoso, Hélio José; Gomes, José Walter Feitosa; Bourroul, Vivian Sati Oba; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Palma, Rogério Tadeu; Waisberg, Jaques

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the destruction complex of beta-catenin by the expression of the proteins beta-catetenin, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axin and ubiquitin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma. Tissue samples from 64 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 53 patients with colonic adenoma were analyzed. Tissue microarray blocks and slides were prepared and subjected to immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies in carcinoma, adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa, and adenoma tissues. The immunoreactivity was evaluated by the percentage of positive stained cells and by the intensity assessed through of the stained grade of proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. In the statistical analysis, the Spearman correlation coefficient, Student's t, χ2, Mann-Whitney, and McNemar tests, and univariate logistic regression analysis were used. In colorectal carcinoma, the expressions of beta-catenin and adenomatous polyposis coli proteins were significantly higher than in colonic adenomas (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). The immunoreactivity of GSK3β, axin 1 and ubiquitin proteins was significantly higher (p=0.03, p=0.039 and p=0.03, respectively) in colorectal carcinoma than in the colonic adenoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa. The immunohistochemistry staining of these proteins did not show significant differences with the clinical and pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer and colonic adenoma. These results suggest that, in adenomas, the lower expression of the beta-catenin, axin 1 and GSK3β proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was maintained, while in colorectal carcinoma, the increased expression of beta-catenin, GSK3β, axin 1, and ubiquitin proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was disrupted. Avaliar o complexo de destruição da betacatenina no carcinoma colorretal e no adenoma do colo pela expressão das proteínas betacatenina, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axina e

  12. Distinct Wnt signaling pathways have opposing roles in appendage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stoick-Cooper, Cristi L; Weidinger, Gilbert; Riehle, Kimberly J; Hubbert, Charlotte; Major, Michael B; Fausto, Nelson; Moon, Randall T

    2007-02-01

    In contrast to mammals, lower vertebrates have a remarkable capacity to regenerate complex structures damaged by injury or disease. This process, termed epimorphic regeneration, involves progenitor cells created through the reprogramming of differentiated cells or through the activation of resident stem cells. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling regulates progenitor cell fate and proliferation during embryonic development and stem cell function in adults, but its functional involvement in epimorphic regeneration has not been addressed. Using transgenic fish lines, we show that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is activated in the regenerating zebrafish tail fin and is required for formation and subsequent proliferation of the progenitor cells of the blastema. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling appears to act upstream of FGF signaling, which has recently been found to be essential for fin regeneration. Intriguingly, increased Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is sufficient to augment regeneration, as tail fins regenerate faster in fish heterozygous for a loss-of-function mutation in axin1, a negative regulator of the pathway. Likewise, activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling by overexpression of wnt8 increases proliferation of progenitor cells in the regenerating fin. By contrast, overexpression of wnt5b (pipetail) reduces expression of Wnt/beta-catenin target genes, impairs proliferation of progenitors and inhibits fin regeneration. Importantly, fin regeneration is accelerated in wnt5b mutant fish. These data suggest that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling promotes regeneration, whereas a distinct pathway activated by wnt5b acts in a negative-feedback loop to limit regeneration.

  13. Secreted Frizzled-related protein-2 (sFRP2) augments canonical Wnt3a-induced signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Marschall, Zofia von; Fisher, Larry W.

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} sFRP2 enhances the Wnt3a-induced {beta}-catenin stabilization and its nuclear translocation. {yields} sFRP2 enhances LRP6 phosphorylation and Wnt3a/{beta}-catenin transcriptional reporter activity. {yields} Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) fully antagonizes both Wnt3a/sFRP2-induced LRP6 phosphorylation and transcriptional activity. {yields} sFRP2 enhances expression of genes known to be regulated by Wnt3a signaling. -- Abstract: Secreted Frizzled-related proteins (sFRP) are involved in embryonic development as well as pathological conditions including bone and myocardial disorders and cancer. Because of their sequence homology with the Wnt-binding domain of Frizzled, they have generally been considered antagonists of canonical Wnt signaling. However, additional activities of various sFRPs including both synergism and mimicry of Wnt signaling as well as functions other than modulation of Wnt signaling have been reported. Using human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293A), we found that sFRP2 enhanced Wnt3a-dependent phosphorylation of LRP6 as well as both cytosolic {beta}-catenin levels and its nuclear translocation. While addition of recombinant sFRP2 had no activity by itself, Top/Fop luciferase reporter assays showed a dose-dependent increase of Wnt3a-mediated transcriptional activity. sFRP2 enhancement of Wnt3a signaling was abolished by treatment with the Wnt antagonist, Dickkopf-1 (DKK1). Wnt-signaling pathway qPCR arrays showed that sFRP2 enhanced the Wnt3a-mediated transcriptional up-regulation of several genes regulated by Wnt3a including its antagonists, DKK1, and Naked cuticle-1 homolog (NKD1). These results support sFRP2's role as an enhancer of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling, a result with biological impact for both normal development and diverse pathologies such as tumorigenesis.

  14. E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression in breast medullary carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Charpin, C; Bonnier, P; Garcia, S; Andrac, L; Crebassa, B; Dorel, M; Lavaut, M N; Allasia, C

    1999-08-01

    The initial step of cancer invasion and metastasis is the escape of tumour cells from the primary site, involving disruption of normal cell-cell adhesion and E-cadherin (E-cad) and beta-catenin (beta-cat) down-regulation, as shown in various types of human malignancies including breast carcinomas. Medullary carcinomas are high grade and poorly differentiated tumours with syncytial typical pattern, and prognosis unexpectedly better than that in high grade breast carcinomas. In a series of 55 breast typical medullary carcinomas diagnosed according to the strict use of Ridolfi et al (Cancer 40: 1365-1385, 1977) criteria, E-cad and beta-cat were investigated using quantitative (SAMBA 2005 system) immunocytochemical assays on frozen sections. Results were compared to that obtained on paraffin sections and in a series (n=55) of grade 3 ductal carcinomas. It was shown that medullary carcinomas significantly (p<0.001) expressed more E-cad and beta-cat than grade 3 ductal carcinomas. E-cad and beta-cat correlated with high expression of P53, of c-erbB, and of Ki-67 antigens, and with lack of hormone receptors antigenic sites (p<0.001). It was concluded that favourable prognosis and syncytial pattern of typical breast medullary carcinomas likely results, at least partly, from a particular expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules, significantly limiting tumour growth and efficiently mastering the tumour cell dissemination, opposing to high proliferative activity (grade 3).

  15. Solid-pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas are genetically distinct from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and almost always harbor beta-catenin mutations.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Susan C; Klimstra, David S; Wilentz, Robb E; Yeo, Charles J; Conlon, Kevin; Brennan, Murray; Cameron, John L; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Hruban, Ralph H

    2002-04-01

    Solid-pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs) are unusual pancreatic neoplasms of low malignant potential that most frequently affect young women. Genetic events contributing to the development of SPTs are unknown. Whereas the more common ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas essentially never harbor beta-catenin or APC gene mutations, we have recently identified alterations of the APC/beta-catenin pathway in other nonductal pancreatic neoplasms including pancreatoblastomas and acinar cell carcinomas. We analyzed a series of 20 SPTs for somatic alterations of the APC/beta-catenin pathway using immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin protein accumulation, direct DNA sequencing of beta-catenin exon 3, and direct DNA sequencing of the mutation cluster region in exon 15 of the APC gene in those SPTs that did not harbor beta-catenin mutations. Immunohistochemical labeling for cyclin D1 was performed to evaluate the overexpression of this cell-cycle protein as one of the putative downstream effectors of beta-catenin dysregulation. In addition, we analyzed the SPTs for genetic alterations commonly found in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, including mutations in the K-ras oncogene and p53 and DPC4 tumor suppressor genes, using direct DNA sequencing of K-ras and immunostaining for p53 and Dpc4. Almost all SPTs harbored alterations in the APC/beta-catenin pathway. Nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin protein was present in 95% (19 of 20), and activating beta-catenin oncogene mutations were identified in 90% (18 of 20) of the SPTs. Seventy-four percent (14 of 19) showed overexpression of cyclin D1, ranging from 10 to 70% of tumor nuclei. In contrast, no K-ras mutations were present in any of the 20 SPTs, and Dpc4 expression was intact in all 16 SPTs for which immunohistochemical labeling was successful. Overexpression of p53 was limited to only 3 of 19 (15.8%) SPTs. These results emphasize the two distinct, divergent genetic pathways of neoplastic progression in pancreatic ductal and

  16. A subset of high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas shows up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-7 associated with nuclear beta-catenin immunoreactivity, independent of EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Scarpa, Aldo; Veronesi, Giulia; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Del Curto, Barbara; Moore, Patrick S; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Sonzogni, Angelica; Masullo, Michele; Viale, Giuseppe

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear translocation of beta-catenin has been correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression/activation in non-small cell lung cancer. Less is known on beta-catenin transactivation in high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors and on the status of beta-catenin activating EGFR and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) or beta-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7). beta-catenin immunoreactivity was evaluated in 51 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (LCNEC) and 45 small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLC). Nineteen cases were assessed for beta-catenin gene exon 3 mutations, expression of MMP-7, and expression/gene amplification of EGFR, HER-2, and cyclin D1. beta-catenin was expressed in all 96 high-grade neuroendocrine tumors, the vast majority (94%) showing >50% immunopositive cells. A disarrayed immunoreactivity, however, was commonly encountered consisting in variably altered membrane-associated patterns of staining along with progressive accumulation of cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In LCNEC, but not in SCLC, the disarrayed patterns correlated with EGFR and HER-2 protein expression. beta-catenin nuclear accumulation was found in nine tumors, including seven LCNEC and two SCLC, and was always associated with disarrayed immunoreactivity and increased MMP-7, but not cyclin D1 expression. These cases, however, did not show beta-catenin gene mutations or EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression. No association was found between nuclear beta-catenin and any clinicopathological variable including patients' survival. The subcellular compartmentalization of beta-catenin is profoundly altered in high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors. A minor subset of these tumors shows beta-catenin nuclear accumulation in association with increased expression of MMP-7, but not of cyclin D1, independent of EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression.

  17. Gonadal Identity in the Absence of Pro-Testis Factor SOX9 and Pro-Ovary Factor Beta-Catenin in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Barbara; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2015-08-01

    Sex-reversal cases in humans and genetic models in mice have revealed that the fate of the bipotential gonad hinges upon the balance between pro-testis SOX9 and pro-ovary beta-catenin pathways. Our central query was: if SOX9 and beta-catenin define the gonad's identity, then what do the gonads become when both factors are absent? To answer this question, we developed mouse models that lack either Sox9, beta-catenin, or both in the somatic cells of the fetal gonads and examined the morphological outcomes and transcriptome profiles. In the absence of Sox9 and beta-catenin, both XX and XY gonads progressively lean toward the testis fate, indicating that expression of certain pro-testis genes requires the repression of the beta-catenin pathway, rather than a direct activation by SOX9. We also observed that XY double knockout gonads were more masculinized than their XX counterpart. To identify the genes responsible for the initial events of masculinization and to determine how the genetic context (XX vs. XY) affects this process, we compared the transcriptomes of Sox9/beta-catenin mutant gonads and found that early molecular changes underlying the XY-specific masculinization involve the expression of Sry and 21 SRY direct target genes, such as Sox8 and Cyp26b1. These results imply that when both Sox9 and beta-catenin are absent, Sry is capable of activating other pro-testis genes and drive testis differentiation. Our findings not only provide insight into the mechanism of sex determination, but also identify candidate genes that are potentially involved in disorders of sex development.

  18. Gonadal Identity in the Absence of Pro-Testis Factor SOX9 and Pro-Ovary Factor Beta-Catenin in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Barbara; Yao, Humphrey H.-C.

    2015-01-01

    Sex-reversal cases in humans and genetic models in mice have revealed that the fate of the bipotential gonad hinges upon the balance between pro-testis SOX9 and pro-ovary beta-catenin pathways. Our central query was: if SOX9 and beta-catenin define the gonad's identity, then what do the gonads become when both factors are absent? To answer this question, we developed mouse models that lack either Sox9, beta-catenin, or both in the somatic cells of the fetal gonads and examined the morphological outcomes and transcriptome profiles. In the absence of Sox9 and beta-catenin, both XX and XY gonads progressively lean toward the testis fate, indicating that expression of certain pro-testis genes requires the repression of the beta-catenin pathway, rather than a direct activation by SOX9. We also observed that XY double knockout gonads were more masculinized than their XX counterpart. To identify the genes responsible for the initial events of masculinization and to determine how the genetic context (XX vs. XY) affects this process, we compared the transcriptomes of Sox9/beta-catenin mutant gonads and found that early molecular changes underlying the XY-specific masculinization involve the expression of Sry and 21 SRY direct target genes, such as Sox8 and Cyp26b1. These results imply that when both Sox9 and beta-catenin are absent, Sry is capable of activating other pro-testis genes and drive testis differentiation. Our findings not only provide insight into the mechanism of sex determination, but also identify candidate genes that are potentially involved in disorders of sex development. PMID:26108792

  19. Urotensin II induction of adult cardiomyocytes hypertrophy involves the Akt/GSK-3beta signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Gruson, D; Ginion, A; Decroly, N; Lause, P; Vanoverschelde, J L; Ketelslegers, J M; Bertrand, L; Thissen, J P

    2010-07-01

    Urotensin II (UII) a potent vasoactive peptide is upregulated in the failing heart and promotes cardiomyocytes hypertrophy, in particular through mitogen-activated protein kinases. However, the regulation by UII of GSK-3beta, a recognized pivotal signaling element of cardiac hypertrophy has not yet been documented. We therefore investigated in adult cardiomyocytes, if UII phosphorylates GSK-3beta and Akt, one of its upstream regulators and stabilizes beta-catenin, a GSK-3beta dependent nuclear transcriptional co-activator. Primary cultures of adult rat cardiomyocytes were stimulated for 48h with UII. Cell size and protein/DNA contents were determined. Phosphorylated and total forms of Akt, GSK-3beta and the total amount of beta-catenin were quantified by western blot. The responses of cardiomyocytes to UII were also evaluated after pretreatment with the chemical phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, and urantide, a competitive UII receptor antagonist. UII increased cell size and the protein/DNA ratio, consistent with a hypertrophic response. UII also increased phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream target GSK-3beta. beta-Catenin protein levels were increased. All of these effects of UII were prevented by LY294002, and urantide. The UII-induced adult cardiomyocytes hypertrophy involves the Akt/GSK-3beta signaling pathways and is accompanied by the stabilization of the beta-catenin. All these effects are abolished by competitive inhibition of the UII receptor, consistent with new therapeutic perspectives for heart failure treatment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A mutated beta-catenin gene encodes a melanoma-specific antigen recognized by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A number of antigens recognized by tumor-reactive T cells have recently been identified. The antigens identified in mouse model systems appear, with one exception, to represent the products of mutated genes. In contrast, most of the antigens recognized by human tumor-reactive T cells reported to date appear to represent the products of non-mutated genes. Here we report the isolation of a cDNA clone encoding beta- catenin, which was shown to be recognized by the tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) 1290, a HLA-A24 restricted melanoma-specific CTL line from patient 888. The cDNA clone, which was isolated from the autologous melanoma cDNA library, differed by a single base pair from the published beta-catenin sequence, resulting in a change from a serine to a phenylalanine residue at position 37. Normal tissues from this patient did not express the altered sequence, nor did 12 allogeneic melanomas, indicating that this represented a unique mutation in this patient's melanoma. A peptide corresponding to the sequence between amino acids 29 and 37 of the mutant gene product was identified as the T cell epitope recognized by TIL 1290. The observation that HLA-A24 binding peptides contain an aromatic or hydrophobic residue at position 9 suggested that the change at position 37 may have generated a peptide (SYLDSGIHF) which was capable of binding to HLA-A24, and a competitive binding assay confirmed this hypothesis. The beta-catenin protein has been shown previously to be involved in cell adhesion mediated through the cadherin family of cell surface adhesion molecules. The high frequency of mutations found in members of cellular adhesion complexes in a variety of cancers suggests that these molecules may play a role in development of the malignant phenotype. PMID:8642260

  1. Genomic and immunohistochemical analysis in human adrenal cortical neoplasia reveal beta-catenin mutations as potential prognostic biomarker.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Alexandra E; Nucera, Carmelo; Lam, Quynh T; Nguyen, Ahnthu; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Sadow, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation for malignancy of the adrenal cortex, adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC), is a challenge in surgical pathology due to its relative rarity and histologic overlap with its benign counterpart, adrenocortical adenoma (ACA). We characterized a cohort of human ACC and ACA, including a molecular screen, with a goal of identifying potential diagnostic adjuncts. Thirty-six cases of ACC underwent histologic and clinical review. In the 31 ACC cases with available material and a cohort of 10 ACA cases, a multiplex nucleotide amplification molecular screen from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue was peformed. ACCs demonstrated a wide variety of clinical and histologic characteristics with overall poor but unpredictable survival for subjects with ACC. By mutational screen, 12/31 (38.7%) carcinomas harbored CTNNB1 mutations, 1 with an additional TP53 mutation; 1 case each had isolated APC and TP53 mutations; 16 were wild-type for all tested loci; and 1 case demonstrated repeated assay failures. Two of the 10 ACA (20%) demonstrated CTNNB1 mutations by mutational screen, with no additional mutations. Immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin was performed and compared with the results of the molecular screen. Strong nuclear beta-catenin immunopositivity corresponded to the presence of CTNNB1 mutation by genotyping in 10 of 12 cases (83% sensitivity); the mismatched case(s) demonstrated strong membranous staining by immunohistochemistry. Seventeen of the 18 cases without CTNNB1 mutation showed membranous staining or did not stain (94% specificity); the mismatched case demonstrated scattered (<10%) positive nuclei. Both mutations in ACA were corroborated with immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin. No histomorphologic parameter appeared dominant in lesions with a particular mutational status. Based on these results, mutational status of CTNNB1 in adrenal cortical neoplasms can be predicted with reasonable accuracy by immunohistochemical cellular localization. Nuclear

  2. Regulation of AR and (Beta)-Catenin Signaling by Pin 1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    function. Nature 406:1009-1012. 41. Rubinfeld, B., I. Albert , E. Porfiri, C. Fiol, S. Munemitsu, and P. Polakis. 1996. Binding of GSK3beta to the APC...Hurlstone, H. K. van der, E. Batlle , D. Coudreuse, A. P. Haramis, M. Tjon-Pon-Fong, P. Moerer, B. M. van den, G Soete, S. Pals, M. Eilers, R. Medema

  3. Palmitate Antagonizes Wnt/Beta-catenin Signaling in 3T3-L1 Pre-adipocytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long chain saturated free fatty acids such as palmitate (PA) produce insulin resistance, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in mature adipocytes and pre-adipocytes. In pre-adipocytes, saturated free fatty acids also promote adipogenic induction in the presence of adipogenic hormones. Wnt/be...

  4. P38 MAPK / beta-catenin canonical wnt signaling mediated bone formation effects of blueberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Appropriate nutrition is one of the critical factors that influences bone development. We studied the effects of dietary blueberry supplementation on bone growth in weanling rats. Weanling male and female rats were fed AIN-93G semi-purified diets supplemented with 10% whole blueberry powder for 14 a...

  5. PTEN Regulates Beta-Catenin in Androgen Signaling: Implication in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    catenin, suggesting that these antagonists may modulate AR activity through different pathways. Mifepristone , an antagonist of steroid receptors, was...53] L.N. Song, M. Coghlan, E.P. Gelmann, Antiandrogen effects of mifepristone on coactivator and corepressor interactions with the androgen receptor

  6. PTEN Regulates Beta-Catenin in Androgen Signaling: Implication in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    tested for their abilities to modulate transcription from a minimal promoter, derived from the chicken myelomonocytic growth factor gene (41 to 61...constructs, luciferase reporter constructs containing the chicken myelomonocytic growth factor gene minimal promoter (41 to 61) containing GAL4...Biochemistry 29:5145–5152 19. Sullivan WP, Vroman BT, Bauer VJ 1992 Isolation of steroid receptor binding protein from chicken oviduct and

  7. The Role of Siah1-Induced Degradation of beta-Catenin in Androgen Receptor Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Table of Contents Introduction…………………………………………………………….…………....4 Body ...β- Catenin? The aims have not changed from the original proposal. 5 Body : We have made excellent progress over the entire research period...function in drug-resistant tumor cells. Cancer Res. (1996) 56:1374-1381. 2. Sanchez-Prieto, R., Lleonart, M., Ramon, Y., and Cajal , S. Lack of

  8. Wnt signaling and colon tumorigenesis - A view from the periphery

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Antony W.; Faux, Maree C.; Layton, Meredith J.; Ramsay, Robert G.

    2011-11-15

    In this brief overview we discuss the association between Wnt signaling and colon cell biology and tumorigenesis. Our current understanding of the role of Apc in the {beta}-catenin destruction complex is compared with potential roles for Apc in cell adhesion and migration. The requirement for phosphorylation in the proteasomal-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is contrasted with roles for phospho-{beta}-catenin in the activation of transcription, cell adhesion and migration. The synergy between Myb and {beta}-catenin regulation of transcription in crypt stem cells during Wnt signaling is discussed. Finally, potential effects of growth factor regulatory systems, Apc or truncated-Apc on crypt morphogenesis, stem cell localization and crypt fission are considered.

  9. Cables links Robo-bound Abl kinase to N-cadherin-bound beta-catenin to mediate Slit-induced modulation of adhesion and transcription.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jinseol; Buchan, Tim; Zukerberg, Lawrence; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne

    2007-08-01

    Binding of the secreted axon guidance cue Slit to its Robo receptor results in inactivation of the neural, calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin, providing a rapid epigenetic mechanism for integrating guidance and adhesion information. This requires the formation of a multimolecular complex containing Robo, Abl tyrosine kinase and N-cadherin. Here we show that on binding of Slit to Robo, the adaptor protein Cables is recruited to Robo-associated Abl and forms a multimeric complex by binding directly to N-cadherin-associated beta-catenin. Complex formation results in Abl-mediated phosphorylation of beta-catenin on tyrosine 489, leading to a decrease in its affinity for N-cadherin, loss of N-cadherin function, and targeting of phospho-Y489-beta-catenin to the nucleus. Nuclear beta-catenin combines with the transcription factor Tcf/Lef and activates transcription. Thus, Slit-induced formation of the Robo-N-cadherin complex results in a rapid loss of cadherin-mediated adhesion and has more lasting effects on gene transcription.

  10. Attenuated Response to Methamphetamine Sensitization and Deficits in Motor Learning and Memory after Selective Deletion of [beta]-Catenin in Dopamine Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Ruiz, Oscar; Zhang, YaJun; Shan, Lufei; Malik, Nasir; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Cadet, Jean Lud; Lupica, Carl R.; Tagliaferro, Adriana; Brusco, Alicia; Backman, Cristina M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed mice with a targeted deletion of [beta]-catenin in DA neurons (DA-[beta]cat KO mice) to address the functional significance of this molecule in the shaping of synaptic responses associated with motor learning and following exposure to drugs of abuse. Relative to controls, DA-[beta]cat KO mice showed significant…

  11. Attenuated Response to Methamphetamine Sensitization and Deficits in Motor Learning and Memory after Selective Deletion of [beta]-Catenin in Dopamine Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Ruiz, Oscar; Zhang, YaJun; Shan, Lufei; Malik, Nasir; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Cadet, Jean Lud; Lupica, Carl R.; Tagliaferro, Adriana; Brusco, Alicia; Backman, Cristina M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed mice with a targeted deletion of [beta]-catenin in DA neurons (DA-[beta]cat KO mice) to address the functional significance of this molecule in the shaping of synaptic responses associated with motor learning and following exposure to drugs of abuse. Relative to controls, DA-[beta]cat KO mice showed significant…

  12. Circadian rhythms, Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPAR alpha/gamma profiles in diseases with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Duthoit, Guillaume; Hébert, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clock mechanisms are far-from-equilibrium dissipative structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha, beta/delta, and gamma) play a key role in metabolic regulatory processes, particularly in heart muscle. Links between circadian rhythms (CRs) and PPARs have been established. Mammalian CRs involve at least two critical transcription factors, CLOCK and BMAL1 (Gekakis et al., 1998; Hogenesch et al., 1998). PPAR gamma plays a major role in both glucose and lipid metabolisms and presents circadian properties which coordinate the interplay between metabolism and CRs. PPAR gamma is a major component of the vascular clock. Vascular PPAR gamma is a peripheral regulator of cardiovascular rhythms controlling circadian variations in blood pressure and heart rate through BMAL1. We focused our review on diseases with abnormalities of CRs and with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction. Moreover, these diseases presented changes in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPARs, according to two opposed profiles. Profile 1 was defined as follows: inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with increased expression of PPAR gamma. Profile 2 was defined as follows: activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with decreased expression of PPAR gamma. A typical profile 1 disease is arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a genetic cardiac disease which presents mutations of the desmosomal proteins and is mainly characterized by fatty acid accumulation in adult cardiomyocytes mainly in the right ventricle. The link between PPAR gamma dysfunction and desmosomal genetic mutations occurs via inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway presenting oscillatory properties. A typical profile 2 disease is type 2 diabetes, with activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and decreased expression of PPAR gamma. CRs abnormalities are present in numerous pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases, sympathetic/parasympathetic dysfunction, hypertension, diabetes

  13. A screen for identifying genes interacting with armadillo, the Drosophila homolog of beta-catenin.

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, S; Sanson, B; White, P; Vincent, J P

    1999-01-01

    Drosophila Armadillo is a multifunctional protein implicated in both cell adhesion, as a catenin, and cell signaling, as part of the Wingless signal transduction pathway. We have generated viable fly stocks with alterations in the level of Armadillo available for signaling. Flies from one stock overexpress Armadillo and, as a result, have increased vein material and bristles in the wings. Flies from the other stock have reduced cytoplasmic Armadillo following overexpression of the intracellular domain of DE-cadherin. These flies display a wing-notching phenotype typical of wingless mutations. Both misexpression phenotypes can be dominantly modified by removing one copy of genes known to encode members of the wingless pathway. Here we describe the identification of further mutations that dominantly modify the Armadillo misexpression phenotypes. These mutations are in genes encoding three different functions: establishment and maintenance of adherens junctions, cell cycle control, and Egfr signaling. PMID:10581282

  14. The structure of phosphorylated GSK-3beta complexed with a peptide, FRATtide, that inhibits beta-catenin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Bax, B; Carter, P S; Lewis, C; Guy, A R; Bridges, A; Tanner, R; Pettman, G; Mannix, C; Culbert, A A; Brown, M J; Smith, D G; Reith, A D

    2001-12-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) sequentially phosphorylates four serine residues on glycogen synthase (GS), in the sequence SxxxSxxxSxxx-SxxxS(p), by recognizing and phosphorylating the first serine in the sequence motif SxxxS(P) (where S(p) represents a phosphoserine). FRATtide (a peptide derived from a GSK-3 binding protein) binds to GSK-3 and blocks GSK-3 from interacting with Axin. This inhibits the Axin-dependent phosphorylation of beta-catenin by GSK-3. Structures of uncomplexed Tyr216 phosphorylated GSK-3beta and of its complex with a peptide and a sulfate ion both show the activation loop adopting a conformation similar to that in the phosphorylated and active forms of the related kinases CDK2 and ERK2. The sulfate ion, adjacent to Val214 on the activation loop, represents the binding site for the phosphoserine residue on 'primed' substrates. The peptide FRATtide forms a helix-turn-helix motif in binding to the C-terminal lobe of the kinase domain; the FRATtide binding site is close to, but does not obstruct, the substrate binding channel of GSK-3. FRATtide (and FRAT1) does not inhibit the activity of GSK-3 toward GS. The Axin binding site on GSK-3 presumably overlaps with that for FRATtide; its proximity to the active site explains how Axin may act as a scaffold protein promoting beta-catenin phosphorylation. Tyrosine 216 phosphorylation can induce an active conformation in the activation loop. Pre-phosphorylated substrate peptides can be modeled into the active site of the enzyme, with the P1 residue occupying a pocket partially formed by phosphotyrosine 216 and the P4 phosphoserine occupying the 'primed' binding site.

  15. E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression in Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma and their prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Koriyama, Chihaya; Akiba, Suminori; Itoh, Tetsuhiko; Sueyoshi, Kazunobu; Minakami, Yoshie; Corvalan, Alejandro; Yonezawa, Suguru; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine the role of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in carcinogenesis and to assess their prognostic implication in Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinomas (EBV-GCs). METHODS: We compared the frequency of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression in 59 EBV-GCs and 120 non-EBV-GCs, and examined the association between patients' prognosis and the expressions of these proteins. RESULTS: Neither the cellular-membranous nor the cytoplasmic E-cadherin expression showed any difference between EBV-GCs and non-EBV-GCs. On the other hand, loss of membranous expression of beta-catenin occurred more frequently in non-EBV-GCs than EBV-GCs [odds ratio = 0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.19-0.90]. Furthermore, the nuclear and/or cytoplosmic expression of beta-catenin was seen more frequently in EBV-GCs than non-EBV-GCs (odds ratio = 2.23; 95% CI, 0.97-5.09), and was observed in a larger proportion of carcinoma cells of EBV-GCs than non-EBV-GCs (P = 0.024). Survival analysis for non-EBV-GC revealed that lymph node metastasis was significantly associated with poor prognosis (P < 0.001). Among EBV-GCs, the depth of invasion (P = 0.005), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.004) and an intestinal type by Lauren classification (hazard ratio = 9.47; 95% CI, 2.67-33.6) were significantly associated with poor prognosis. On the other hand, nuclear and/or cytoplasmic expression of beta-catenin was associated with a better prognosis in patients with EBV-GC (hazard ratio = 0.32; 95% CI, 0.11-0.93). CONCLUSION: We observed more frequent preservation of beta-catenin in cell membrane and accumulation in nuclei and/or cytoplasm in EBV-GCs than in non-EBV-GCs. Factors involved in the prognosis of EBV-GCs and non-EBV-GCs are different in the two conditions. PMID:17663505

  16. Expression/activation of α5β1 integrin is linked to the β-catenin signaling pathway to drive migration in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Guillaume; Noulet, Fanny; Mercier, Marie-Cécile; Choulier, Laurence; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Gies, Jean-Pierre; Lehmann, Maxime; Lelong-Rebel, Isabelle; Martin, Sophie; Dontenwill, Monique

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/beta catenin pathway has been highlighted as an important player of brain tumors aggressiveness and resistance to therapies. Increasing knowledges of the regulation of beta-catenin transactivation point out its hub position in different pathophysiological outcomes in glioma such as survival and migration. Crosstalks between integrins and beta-catenin pathways have been suggested in several tumor tissues. As we demonstrated earlier that α5β1 integrin may be considered as a therapeutic target in high grade glioma through its contribution to glioma cell migration and resistance to chemotherapy, we addressed here the potential relationship between α5β1 integrin and beta-catenin activation in glioma cells. We demonstrated that overexpression and activation by fibronectin of α5β1 integrin allowed the transactivation of beta-catenin gene targets included in an EMT-like program that induced an increase in cell migration. Hampering of beta catenin activation and cell migration could be similarly achieved by a specific integrin antagonist. In addition we showed that α5β1 integrin/AKT axis is mainly involved in these processes. However, blockade of beta-catenin by XAV939 (tankyrase inhibitor leading to beta-catenin degradation) did not synergize with p53 activation aiming to cell apoptosis as was the case with integrin antagonists. We therefore propose a dual implication of α5β1 integrin/AKT axis in glioma cell resistance to therapies and migration each supported by different signaling pathways. Our data thus suggest that α5β1 integrin may be added to the growing list of beta-catenin modulators and provide new evidences to assign this integrin as a valuable target to fight high grade glioma. PMID:27613837

  17. MENA is a transcriptional target of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Najafov, Ayaz; Seker, Tuncay; Even, Ipek; Hoxhaj, Gerta; Selvi, Osman; Ozel, Duygu Esen; Koman, Ahmet; Birgül-İyison, Necla

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway plays important roles in embryonic development and carcinogenesis. Overactivation of the pathway is one of the most common driving forces in major cancers such as colorectal and breast cancers. The downstream effectors of the pathway and its regulation of carcinogenesis and metastasis are still not very well understood. In this study, which was based on two genome-wide transcriptomics screens, we identify MENA (ENAH, Mammalian enabled homologue) as a novel transcriptional target of the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway. We show that the expression of MENA is upregulated upon overexpression of degradation-resistant β-catenin. Promoters of all mammalian MENA homologues contain putative binding sites for Tcf4 transcription factor--the primary effector of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and we demonstrate functionality of these Tcf4-binding sites using luciferase reporter assays and overexpression of β-catenin, Tcf4 and dominant-negative Tcf4. In addition, lithium chloride-mediated inhibition of GSK3β also resulted in increase in MENA mRNA levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction between β-catenin and MENA promoter in Huh7 and HEK293 cells and also in mouse brain and liver tissues. Moreover, overexpression of Wnt1 and Wnt3a ligands increased MENA mRNA levels. Additionally, knock-down of MENA ortholog in D. melanogaster eyeful and sensitized eye cancer fly models resulted in increased tumor and metastasis formations. In summary, our study identifies MENA as novel nexus for the Wnt/β-catenin and the Notch signalling cascades.

  18. Discovery of Novel Drugs To Improve Bone Health in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: The Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Fracture Repair and Pseudarthrosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Patients with Neurofibromatosis ( NF1 ) exhibit deficient...bone healing/ The cause of poor bone healing in NF1 is unclear, and pharmacologic approaches to improve bone repair are lacking. Beta-catenin is a...undifferentiated fibroblast-like cells persist at the fracture site, resulting in a pseudarthrosis. Genetically engineered mice in which the Nf1 gene can be

  19. Discovery of Novel Drugs to Improve Bone Health in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: The Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Fracture Repair and Pseudarthrosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Pathway in Fracture Repair and Pseudarthrosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin Alman CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Hospital for Sick Children Toronto, Canada...Discovery of Novel Drugs To Improve Bone Health in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: The Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Fracture Repair and Pseudarthrosis 5a...and undifferentiated fibroblast-like cells persist at the fracture site, resulting in a pseudarthrosis. Genetically engineered mice in which the Nf1

  20. Carboxypeptidase Z (CPZ) links thyroid hormone and Wnt signaling pathways in growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai; Shao, Yvonne Y; Ballock, R Tracy

    2009-02-01

    Carboxypeptidase Z (CPZ) removes carboxyl-terminal basic amino acid residues, particularly arginine residues, from proteins. CPZ contains a cysteine-rich domain (CRD) similar to the CRD found in the frizzled family of Wnt receptors. We have previously shown that thyroid hormone regulates terminal differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes through activation of Wnt-4 expression and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. The Wnt-4 protein contains a C-terminal arginine residue and binds to CPZ through the CRD. The objective of this study was to determine whether CPZ modulates Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and terminal differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes. Our results show that CPZ and Wnt-4 mRNA are co-expressed throughout growth plate cartilage. In primary pellet cultures of rat growth plate chondrocytes, thyroid hormone increases both Wnt-4 and CPZ expression, as well as CPZ enzymatic activity. Knockdown of either Wnt-4 or CPZ mRNA levels using an RNA interference technique or blocking CPZ enzymatic activity with the carboxypeptidase inhibitor GEMSA reduces the thyroid hormone effect on both alkaline phosphatase activity and Col10a1 mRNA expression. Adenoviral overexpression of CPZ activates Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and promotes the terminal differentiation of growth plate cells. Overexpression of CPZ in growth plate chondrocytes also removes the C-terminal arginine residue from a synthetic peptide consisting of the carboxyl-terminal 16 amino acids of the Wnt-4 protein. Removal of the C-terminal arginine residue of Wnt-4 by site-directed mutagenesis enhances the positive effect of Wnt-4 on terminal differentiation. These data indicate that thyroid hormone may regulate terminal differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes in part by modulating Wnt signaling pathways through the induction of CPZ and subsequent CPZ-enhanced activation of Wnt-4.

  1. Analysis of beta-catenin, Ki-ras, and microsatellite stability in azoxymethane-induced colon tumors of BDIX/Orl Ico rats.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Nanna Møller; Kobaek-Larsen, Morten; Bonne, Anita; van Zutphen, Bert; Fenger, Claus; Kristiansen, Karsten; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2003-12-01

    The aim of the study reported here was to investigate whether the azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer rat model mimics the human situation with regard to microsatellite stability, changes in expression of beta-catenin, and/or changes in the sequence of the proto-oncogene Ki-ras. Colon cancer was induced by administration of four weekly doses of AOM (15 mg/kg of body weight per week) separated by a one-week break between the second and third injections. As the histopathologic characteristics of this model resemble those of the human counterpart, further characterization of the genetic changes was undertaken. The animals were euthanized 28 to 29 weeks after the first AOM injection, and tumor specimens were taken for histologic and DNA analyses. Since microsatellite variation was found in only a few (< 2%) specimens, the model can be considered as having stable microsatellites. This result is in accordance with those of similar studies in other rat models and with most human colorectal cancers. Immunohistochemical analyses of beta-catenin did not reveal loss of gene activity, nor did the sequencing of Ki-ras reveal mutations. These results are in contrast to most findings in comparable rat studies. The deviations may be due to differences in exposure to the carcinogen or difference in strain and/or age. The lack of beta-catenin and Ki-ras alterations in this colon cancer model is unlike human sporadic colorectal cancers where these genetic changes are common findings.

  2. Pharmacologically targeting beta-catenin for NF1 associated deficiencies in fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Baht, Gurpreet S; Nadesan, Puviindran; Silkstone, David; Alman, Benjamin A

    2017-02-22

    Patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 display delayed fracture healing and the increased deposition of fibrous tissue at the fracture site. Severe cases can lead to non-union and even congenital pseudarthrosis. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is caused by a mutation in the NF1 gene and mice lacking the Nf1 gene show a fracture repair phenotype similar to that seen in patients. Tissue from the fracture site of patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 and from mice deficient in the Nf1 gene both show elevated levels of β-catenin protein and activation of β-catenin mediated signaling. Constitutively elevated β-catenin leads to a delayed and fibrous fracture repair process, and (RS)-5-methyl-1-phenyl-1,3,4,6-tetrahydro-2,5-benzoxazocine (Nefopam, a centrally-acting, non-narcotic analgesic agent) inhibits β-catenin mediated signaling during skin wound repair. Here we investigate Nefopam's potential as a modulator of bone repair in mice deficient in Nf1. Mice were treated with Nefopam and investigated for bone fracture repair. Bone marrow stromal cells flushed from the long bones of unfractured mice were treated with Nefopam and investigated for osteogenic potential. Treatment with Nefopam was able to lower the β-catenin level and the Axin2 transcript level in the fracture calluses of Nf1 deficient mice. Cultures from the bone marrow of Nf1(-/-) mice had significantly lower osteoblastic colonies and mineralized nodules, which was increased when cells were cultured in the presence of Nefopam. Fracture calluses were harvested and analyzed 14days and 21days after injury. Nf1(-/-) calluses had less bone, less cartilage, and higher fibrous tissue content than control calluses. Treatment with Nefopam increased the bone and cartilage content and decreased the fibrous tissue content in Nf1(-/-) calluses. These findings present a potential treatment for patients with Neurofibromatosis 1 in the context of bone repair. Since Nefopam is already in use in patient care, it could be

  3. Compromised E-cadherin adhesion and epithelial barrier function with activation of G protein-coupled receptors is rescued by Y-to-F mutations in beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Winter, Michael C; Shasby, Sandra; Shasby, D Michael

    2008-03-01

    Activation of the type 1 histamine (H1) or the type 2 protease-activated (PAR-2) G protein-coupled receptors interrupts E-cadherin adhesion and decreases the transepithelial resistance (TER) of epithelium. Several reports suggest that cadherin adhesive function depends on the association of cadherin with beta-catenin and that this association is regulated by phosphorylation of tyrosines in beta-catenin. We tested the hypothesis that loss of cadherin adhesion and compromise of TER on activation of the H1 or PAR-2 receptor is due to phosphorylation of tyrosines in beta-catenin. L cells were stably transfected to express E-cadherin (L-E-cad cells) and H1 (L-H1-E-cad cells). L cells and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells constitutively express PAR-2. Stably transfected L-E-cad, L-H1-E-cad, and MDCK cells were also stably transfected with FLAG-tagged wild-type (WT) or mutant beta-catenin, converting tyrosine 142, 489, or 654 to the nonphosphorylatable mimetic, phenylalanine (WT, Y142F, Y489F, or Y654F). Activation of H1 or PAR-2 interrupted adhesion to an immobilized E-cadherin-Fc fusion protein of L-H1-E-cad, L-E-cad, and MDCK cells expressing WT or Y142F beta-catenin but did not interrupt adhesion of L-H1-E-cad, L-E-cad, and MDCK cells expressing the Y489F or Y654F mutant beta-catenins. PAR-2 activation decreased the TER of monolayers of MDCK cells expressing WT or Y142F beta-catenin 40-45%. However, PAR-2 activation did not decrease the TER of monolayers of MDCK cells expressing Y489F or Y654F beta-catenin. The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B binds to the cadherin cytoplasmic domain and dephosphorylates beta-catenin. Inhibition of PTP1B interrupted adhesion to E-cadherin-Fc of MDCK cells expressing WT beta-catenin but did not affect the adhesion of MDCK cells expressing Y489F or Y654F beta-catenin. Similarly, inhibition of PTP1B compromised the TER of MDCK cells expressing WT beta-catenin but did not affect the TER of MDCK cells expressing Y489F or Y654F beta-catenin

  4. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho . E-mail: keesh@korea.ac.kr

    2005-08-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3{beta} activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death.

  5. Second hit in cervical carcinogenesis process: involvement of wnt/beta catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Plasencia, Carlos; Duenas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Alatorre-Tavera, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    The Human papillomavirus plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cervical cancer. However, it is a necessary but not sufficient cause to develop invasive carcinoma; hence, other factors are required in the pathogenesis of this malignancy. In this review we explore the hypothesis of the deregulation of wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway as a "second hit" required to develop cervical cancer. PMID:18606007

  6. The expression of syndecan-1 and -2 is associated with Gleason score and epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers, E-cadherin and beta-catenin, in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Hector R; Ledezma, Rodrigo A; Vergara, Jorge; Cifuentes, Federico; Barra, Cristina; Cabello, Pablo; Gallegos, Ivan; Morales, Bernardo; Huidobro, Christian; Castellón, Enrique A

    2010-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is considered a key step in tumor progression, where the invasive cancer cells change from epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype. During this process, a decrease or loss in adhesion molecules expression and an increase in migration molecules expression are observed. The aim of this work was to determine the expression and cellular distribution of syndecan-1 and -2 (migration molecules) and E-cadherin and beta-catenin (adhesion molecules) in different stages of prostate cancer progression. A quantitative immunohistochemical study of these molecules was carried out in tissue samples from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate carcinoma, with low and high Gleason score, obtained from biopsies archives of the Clinic Hospital of the University of Chile and Dipreca Hospital. Polyclonal specific antibodies and amplification system of estreptavidin-biotin peroxidase and diaminobenzidine were used. Syndecan-1 was uniformly expressed in basolateral membranes of normal epithelium, changing to a granular cytoplasmatic expression pattern in carcinomas. Syndecan-2 was observed mainly in a cytoplasmatic granular pattern, with high immunostaining intensity in areas of low Gleason score. E-cadherin was detected in basolateral membrane of normal epithelia showing decreased expression in high Gleason score samples. beta-Catenin was found in cell membranes of normal epithelia changing its distribution toward the nucleus and cytoplasm in carcinoma samples. We concluded that changes in expression and cell distribution of E-cadherin and beta-catenin correlated with the progression degree of prostate adenocarcinoma, suggesting a role of these molecules as markers of progression and prognosis. Furthermore, changes in the pattern expression of syndecan-1 and -2 indicate that both molecules may be involved in the EMT and tumor progression of prostate cancer.

  7. The balance of TCF7L2 variants with differential activities in Wnt-signaling is regulated by lithium in a GSK3{beta}-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Struewing, Ian; Boyechko, Tania; Barnett, Corey; Beildeck, Marcy; Byers, Stephen W.; Mao, Catherine D.

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Identification of a novel effect of lithium on the expression of TCF7L2 RNA isoforms and protein variants. {yields} The extent of lithium-induced TCF7L2 form switch mirrors cell responsiveness to Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. {yields} Demonstration that lithium has dual GSK3{beta}-dependent and -independent effects on TCF7L2 expression. {yields} Demonstration that TCF7L2 expression is repressed by the transcriptionally active TCF7L2E form. {yields} Evidence for a lithium-induced de-repression mechanism of TCF7L2 expression via TCF7L2 variant switch. -- Abstract: TCF7L2 transcription factor is a downstream effector of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling, which controls cell fate and homeostasis. However, the complexity of TCF7L2 expression with numerous mRNA isoforms coding for proteins with distinct N- and C-termini allows variability in TCF7L2 functions and regulations. Here, we show that although TCF7L2 mRNA isoforms distinguish fetal, immortalized and adult differentiated endothelial cells (EC), they cannot explain the lack of significant {beta}-catenin/TCF7 activities in ECs. Lithium, a Wnt-signaling activator, increases TCF7L2 mRNA levels and induces an RNA isoform switch favoring the expression of TCF7L2-short forms lacking the C-termini domains. Although the latter occurs in different cell types, its extent depends on the overall increase of TCF7L2 transcription, which correlates with cell responsiveness to Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. While GSK3{beta} down-regulation increases TCF7L2 expression, there is no concomitant change in TCF7L2 mRNA isoforms, which demonstrate the dual effects of lithium on TCF7L2 expression via a GSK3{beta}-dependent up-regulation and a GSK3{beta}-independent modulation of RNA splicing. TCF7L2E-long forms display a repressor activity on TCF7L2-promoter reporters and lithium induces a decrease of the endogenous TCF7L2 forms bound to native TCF7L2-promoter chromatin at two novel distal TCF7

  8. Monitoring Interactions and Dynamics of Endogenous Beta-catenin With Intracellular Nanobodies in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Traenkle, Bjoern; Emele, Felix; Anton, Roman; Poetz, Oliver; Haeussler, Ragna S.; Maier, Julia; Kaiser, Philipp D.; Scholz, Armin M.; Nueske, Stefan; Buchfellner, Andrea; Romer, Tina; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    β-catenin is the key component of the canonical Wnt pathway and plays a crucial role in a multitude of developmental and homeostatic processes. The different tasks of β-catenin are orchestrated by its subcellular localization and participation in multiprotein complexes. To gain a better understanding of β-catenin's role in living cells we have generated a new set of single domain antibodies, referred to as nanobodies, derived from heavy chain antibodies of camelids. We selected nanobodies recognizing the N-terminal, core or C-terminal domain of β-catenin and applied these new high-affinity binders as capture molecules in sandwich immunoassays and co-immunoprecipitations of endogenous β-catenin complexes. In addition, we engineered intracellularly functional anti-β-catenin chromobodies by combining the binding moieties of the nanobodies with fluorescent proteins. For the first time, we were able to visualize the subcellular localization and nuclear translocation of endogenous β-catenin in living cells using these chromobodies. Moreover, the chromobody signal allowed us to trace the accumulation of diffusible, hypo-phosphorylated β-catenin in response to compound treatment in real time using High Content Imaging. The anti-β-catenin nanobodies and chromobodies characterized in this study are versatile tools that enable a novel and unique approach to monitor the dynamics of subcellular β-catenin in biochemical and cell biological assays. PMID:25595278

  9. Beta-Catenin and Plakoglobin Expression during Zebrafish Tooth Development and Replacement.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Barbara; van Hengel, Jolanda; Huysseune, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the protein distribution of two cadherin-associated molecules, plakoglobin and β-catenin, during the different stages of tooth development and tooth replacement in zebrafish. Plakoglobin was detected at the plasma membrane already at the onset of tooth development in the epithelial cells of the tooth. This pattern remained unaltered during further tooth development. The mesenchymal cells only showed plakoglobin from cytodifferentiation onwards. Plakoglobin 1a morpholino-injected embryos showed normal tooth development with proper initiation and differentiation. Although plakoglobin is clearly present during normal odontogenesis, the loss of plakoglobin 1a does not influence tooth development. β-catenin was found at the cell borders of all cells of the successional lamina but also in the nuclei of surrounding mesenchymal cells. Only membranous, not nuclear, β-catenin, was found during morphogenesis stage. However, during cytodifferentiation stage, both nuclear and membrane-bound β-catenin was detected in the layers of the enamel organ as well as in the differentiating odontoblasts. Nuclear β-catenin is an indication of an activated Wnt pathway, therefore suggesting a possible role for Wnt signalling during zebrafish tooth development and replacement.

  10. Beta-Catenin and Plakoglobin Expression during Zebrafish Tooth Development and Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Barbara; van Hengel, Jolanda; Huysseune, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the protein distribution of two cadherin-associated molecules, plakoglobin and β-catenin, during the different stages of tooth development and tooth replacement in zebrafish. Plakoglobin was detected at the plasma membrane already at the onset of tooth development in the epithelial cells of the tooth. This pattern remained unaltered during further tooth development. The mesenchymal cells only showed plakoglobin from cytodifferentiation onwards. Plakoglobin 1a morpholino-injected embryos showed normal tooth development with proper initiation and differentiation. Although plakoglobin is clearly present during normal odontogenesis, the loss of plakoglobin 1a does not influence tooth development. β-catenin was found at the cell borders of all cells of the successional lamina but also in the nuclei of surrounding mesenchymal cells. Only membranous, not nuclear, β-catenin, was found during morphogenesis stage. However, during cytodifferentiation stage, both nuclear and membrane-bound β-catenin was detected in the layers of the enamel organ as well as in the differentiating odontoblasts. Nuclear β-catenin is an indication of an activated Wnt pathway, therefore suggesting a possible role for Wnt signalling during zebrafish tooth development and replacement. PMID:26938059

  11. Beta-catenin: A Potential Survival Marker of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    sustained low levels of ß-catenin results in mobilization of the stem cells of the bulge, followed by precocious entry into a new phase of hair follicle... bone marrow niche (24). K6 is expressed within the body cells of the developing mammary terminal end buds, and overexpressed in Wnt-1 murine mammary...hematopoietics field to identify bone marrow stem cells. We have observed that primary MECs express Sca1, but not cKIT (Figure 6b). The reason we are

  12. Probing the canonicity of the Wnt/Wingless signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Erich; Stark, Alexander; Basler, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    The hallmark of canonical Wnt signaling is the transcriptional induction of Wnt target genes by the beta-catenin/TCF complex. Several studies have proposed alternative interaction partners for beta-catenin or TCF, but the relevance of potential bifurcations in the distal Wnt pathway remains unclear. Here we study on a genome-wide scale the requirement for Armadillo (Arm, Drosophila beta-catenin) and Pangolin (Pan, Drosophila TCF) in the Wnt/Wingless(Wg)-induced transcriptional response of Drosophila Kc cells. Using somatic genetics, we demonstrate that both Arm and Pan are absolutely required for mediating activation and repression of target genes. Furthermore, by means of STARR-sequencing we identified Wnt/Wg-responsive enhancer elements and found that all responsive enhancers depend on Pan. Together, our results confirm the dogma of canonical Wnt/Wg signaling and argue against the existence of distal pathway branches in this system. PMID:28369070

  13. Probing the canonicity of the Wnt/Wingless signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Franz, Alexandra; Shlyueva, Daria; Brunner, Erich; Stark, Alexander; Basler, Konrad

    2017-04-01

    The hallmark of canonical Wnt signaling is the transcriptional induction of Wnt target genes by the beta-catenin/TCF complex. Several studies have proposed alternative interaction partners for beta-catenin or TCF, but the relevance of potential bifurcations in the distal Wnt pathway remains unclear. Here we study on a genome-wide scale the requirement for Armadillo (Arm, Drosophila beta-catenin) and Pangolin (Pan, Drosophila TCF) in the Wnt/Wingless(Wg)-induced transcriptional response of Drosophila Kc cells. Using somatic genetics, we demonstrate that both Arm and Pan are absolutely required for mediating activation and repression of target genes. Furthermore, by means of STARR-sequencing we identified Wnt/Wg-responsive enhancer elements and found that all responsive enhancers depend on Pan. Together, our results confirm the dogma of canonical Wnt/Wg signaling and argue against the existence of distal pathway branches in this system.

  14. Collagen type I may influence the expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Vera C; Demasi, Ana Paula Dias; Furuse, Cristiane; Altemani, Albina; Alves, Venâncio A; Freitas, Leandro L; Araújo, Ney S

    2009-07-01

    Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is an aggressive salivary gland malignancy, usually derived from a long-standing or a recurrent benign tumor, the pleomorphic adenoma (PA). In the context of dynamic reciprocity, changes in the composition and structure of extracellular matrix proteins and cell surface receptors have been frequently associated with dysfunctional adhesion and invasive behavior of tumor cells. It is not fully understood if these changes are involved in the conversion of PA to CXPA. In this study, different progression stages of CXPA were investigated regarding the expression of the major extracellular matrix proteins, collagen type I, and of E-cadherin and beta-catenin, the components of adherens junctions. By immunohistochemical analysis, we have demonstrated that direct contact of tumor cells with fibrillar type I collagen, particularly near the invasive front and in invasive areas prevailing small nests of CXPA cells, could be associated with reduced expression of the E-cadherin and beta-catenin adhesion molecules and with invasive behavior of epithelial, but not of CXPA with myoepithelial component. Our results also suggested that this association could depend on the organization of collagen molecules, being prevented by high-order polymeric structures. These findings could implicate the local microenvironment in the transition from the premalignant PA to invasive CXPA.

  15. MicroRNA-1826 directly targets beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and MEK1 (MAP2K1) in VHL-inactivated renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Ueno, Koji; Nakajima, Koichi; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this project is to identify new therapeutic microRNAs (miRNAs) for von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-inactivated renal cancer cells. We initially identified several potential miRNAs targeting CTNNB1 and MEK1 using several targets scan algorithms. Only miR-1826 was found to target CTNNB1 and MEK1. Therefore, we focused on miRNA-1826 and performed 3' untranslated region (UTR) luciferase assay, functional analyses and association study between miR-1826 expression and renal cancer patient outcomes. miR-1826 expression was significantly lower in renal cancer tissues compared with non-neoplastic areas and lower expression was significantly associated with overall shorter survival and earlier recurrence after radical nephrectomy. Following miR-1826 transfection, 3' UTR luciferase activity and protein expression of beta-catenin and MEK1 were significantly downregulated in renal cancer cells. Introduction of miR-1826 also inhibited renal cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Additionally, miR-1826 promoted apoptosis and G(1) arrest in VHL-inactivated renal cancer cells. Knockdowns of CTNNB1 and MEK1 by small interfering RNAs reproduced the tumor-suppressive effect of miR-1826. Our data suggest that the miR-1826 plays an important role as a tumor suppressor by downregulating beta-catenin and MEK1 in VHL-inactivated renal cancers.

  16. MicroRNA-1826 directly targets beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and MEK1 (MAP2K1) in VHL-inactivated renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Ueno, Koji; Nakajima, Koichi; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this project is to identify new therapeutic microRNAs (miRNAs) for von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-inactivated renal cancer cells. We initially identified several potential miRNAs targeting CTNNB1 and MEK1 using several targets scan algorithms. Only miR-1826 was found to target CTNNB1 and MEK1. Therefore, we focused on miRNA-1826 and performed 3′ untranslated region (UTR) luciferase assay, functional analyses and association study between miR-1826 expression and renal cancer patient outcomes. miR-1826 expression was significantly lower in renal cancer tissues compared with non-neoplastic areas and lower expression was significantly associated with overall shorter survival and earlier recurrence after radical nephrectomy. Following miR-1826 transfection, 3′ UTR luciferase activity and protein expression of beta-catenin and MEK1 were significantly downregulated in renal cancer cells. Introduction of miR-1826 also inhibited renal cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Additionally, miR-1826 promoted apoptosis and G1 arrest in VHL-inactivated renal cancer cells. Knockdowns of CTNNB1 and MEK1 by small interfering RNAs reproduced the tumor-suppressive effect of miR-1826. Our data suggest that the miR-1826 plays an important role as a tumor suppressor by downregulating beta-catenin and MEK1 in VHL-inactivated renal cancers. PMID:22180573

  17. Suppression of wnt /beta-catenin signaling in bone of female rats exposed to ethanol post-lactation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a major risk factor for development of osteoporosis. However, the mechanisms through which chronic alcohol intake induces bone loss remain unclear. Alcohol-induced oxidative stress might be the key event in tissue injury. In this report, we chronically infused EtOH (12g/kg/d...

  18. Dietary induced serum phenolic acids promote bone growth via p38 MAPK / Beta-Catenin Canonical Wnt signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diet and nutritional status are critical factors that influences bone development. In this report, we demonstrate that a mixture of phenolic acids found in the serum of young rats fed blueberries (BB), significantly stimulated osteoblast differentiation, resulting in significantly increased bone mas...

  19. SOSTDC1 differentially modulates Smad and beta-catenin activation and is down-regulated in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Kathryn A.; Blish, Kimberly R.; Birse, Charles E.; Triplette, Matthew A.; Kute, Timothy E.; Russell, Gregory B.; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Miller, Lance D.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Sclerostin domain containing 1 (SOSTDC1) protein regulates processes from development to cancer by modulating activity of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and wingless/int (Wnt) signaling pathways. As dysregulation of both BMP and Wnt signaling has been observed in breast cancer, we investigated whether disruption of SOSTDC1 signaling occurs in breast cancer. SOSTDC1 mRNA expression levels in breast tissue were examined using a dot blot. Affymetrix microarray data on SOSTDC1 levels were correlated with breast cancer patient survival using Kaplan–Meier plots. Correlations between SOSTDC1 protein levels and clinical parameters were assessed by immunohistochemistry of a breast cancer tissue microarray. SOSTDC1 secretion and BMP and Wnt signaling were investigated using immunoblotting. We found that SOSTDC1 is expressed in normal breast tissue and this expression is reduced in breast cancer. High levels of SOSTDC1 mRNA correlated with increased patient survival; conversely, SOSTDC1 protein levels decreased as tumor size and disease stage increased. Treatment of breast cancer cells with recombinant SOSTDC1 or Wise, a SOSTDC1 orthologue, demonstrated that SOSTDC1 selectively blocks BMP-7-induced Smad phosphorylation without diminishing BMP-2 or Wnt3a-induced signaling. In conclusion, SOSTDC1 mRNA and protein are reduced in breast cancer. High SOSTDC1 mRNA levels correlate with increased distant metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients. SOSTDC1 differentially affects Wnt3a, BMP-2, and BMP-7 signaling in breast cancer cells. These results identify SOSTDC1 as a clinically important extracellular regulator of multiple signaling pathways in breast cancer. PMID:21113658

  20. Reappraisal of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma: novel morphologic observations of the hyaline cartilage and endochondral ossification and beta-catenin, Sox9, and osteocalcin immunostaining of 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Fanburg-Smith, Julie C; Auerbach, Aaron; Marwaha, Jayson S; Wang, Zengfeng; Rushing, Elisabeth J

    2010-05-01

    Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, a rare malignant round cell and hyaline cartilage tumor, is most commonly intraosseous but can occur in extraskeletal sites. We intensively observed the morphology and applied Sox9 (master regulator of chondrogenesis), beta-catenin (involved in bone formation, thought to inhibit chondrogenesis in a Sox9-dependent manner), and osteocalcin (a marker for osteoblastic phenotype) to 22 central nervous system and musculoskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. Cases of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma were retrieved and reviewed from our files. Immunohistochemistry and follow-up were obtained on mesenchymal chondrosarcoma and tumor controls. Twenty-two mesenchymal chondrosarcomas included 5 central nervous system (all female; mean age, 30.2; mean size, 7.8 cm; in frontal lobe [n = 4] and spinal cord [n = 1]) and 17 musculoskeletal (female-male ratio, 11:6; mean age, 31.1; mean size, 6.2 cm; 3 each of humerus and vertebrae; 2 each of pelvis, rib, tibia, neck soft tissue; one each of femur, unspecified bone, and elbow soft tissue). The hyaline cartilage in most tumors revealed a consistent linear progression of chondrocyte morphology, from resting to proliferating to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Sixty-seven percent of cases demonstrated cell death and acquired osteoblastic phenotype, cells positive for osteocalcin at the site of endochondral ossification. Small round cells of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma were negative for osteocalcin. SOX9 was positive in both components of 21 of 22 cases of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. beta-Catenin highlighted rare nuclei at the interface between round cells and hyaline cartilage in 35% cases. Control skull and central nervous system cases were compared, including chondrosarcomas and small cell osteosarcoma, the latter positive for osteocalcin in small cells. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma demonstrates centrally located hyaline cartilage with a linear progression of chondrocytes from resting to proliferative to hypertrophic

  1. The upstream components of the Wnt signalling pathway in the dynamic EMT and MET associated with colorectal cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Vincan, Elizabeth; Barker, Nick

    2008-01-01

    The constitutive activation of beta-catenin-dependent ('canonical') Wnt signalling is a necessary initiating event in the genesis of most colorectal cancers. As this constitutive activation occurs through genetic mutation of one of the down-stream components of the signalling pathway, it was presumed that additional regulation of beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signalling would be inconsequential. However, it is now recognised that additional modulation of beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signalling is involved in tumour progression, and many of the genes associated with tumour invasion and metastasis are beta-catenin/TCF transcriptional target genes that are dynamically regulated during cancer progression. Intriguingly, the demonstration that naturally occurring inhibitors of Wnt-Frizzled (FZD) interaction are bona fide tumour suppressors in this cancer suggests that additional modulation of Wnt signalling is via the upstream components of the pathway. This is corroborated by recent studies that demonstrate tumour-promoting roles for Wnt and FZD per se. Moreover, both beta-catenin-dependent and beta-catenin-independent Wnt/FZD-mediated signalling is implicated during the dynamic and reversible EMT and MET that underscore colorectal cancer progression. Importantly, therapeutic targeting of the Wnt signalling pathway at the plasma membrane is clearly indicated by the profound anti-tumour activity of small molecule inhibitors and dominant-negative receptor constructs that target the receptor complex. The potential to effectively target EMT and MET processes at the plasma membrane via the upstream components of the Wnt signalling pathway offers new hope for anti-cancer therapy.

  2. Induction of p16INK4A mediated by beta-catenin in a TCF4-independent manner: implications for alterations in p16INK4A and pRb expression during trans-differentiation of endometrial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Makoto; Hashimura, Miki; Kuwata, Takeshi; Hamano, Mieko; Okayasu, Isao

    2006-11-15

    Excessive beta-catenin is considered to contribute to tumor progression by inducing transcription of cell cycle-related genes such as cyclin D1 and c-myc. In contrast, our recent studies demonstrated that beta-catenin could inhibit cell proliferation through activation of p14(ARF)/p53/p21(WAF1) pathway during trans-differentiation toward morular phenotype of endometrial carcinoma (Em Ca) cells. Here, we focused on associations with alterations in p16(INK4A) and pRb expression during this process. In clinical cases, p16(INK4A) immunoreactivity was found to frequently overlap with nuclear beta-catenin accumulation in small-sized morules and surrounding glandular carcinomas (Sur-Ca), demonstrating a significant positive correlation (r = 0.447, p < 0.0001) overall, while the immunoreactions showed stepwise decrease in enlarged morules, despite persistent accumulation of beta-catenin and p21(WAF1) in nuclei. Immunoreactivity for both total pRb and its phosphorylated form was apparently decreased in all morules as compared to Sur-Ca lesions, with a significantly positive correlation. In cell lines, transcriptional activation of p16(INK) (4A) promoter by active form beta-catenin, as well as p21(WAF1), occurred through the region from -385 to -280 bp relative to the translation start site, in a TCF4-independent manner. Moreover, cell proliferation was accompanied with phosphorylation of pRb and increased p16(INK4A) expression, while its inhibition by serum starvation caused decreased expression of total pRb but not p16(INK4A), resulting in high relative amounts of the latter. These findings indicate that induction of p16(INK4A) mediated by nuclear beta-catenin and p21(WAF1), along with loss of pRb expression, may be important for initial steps during trans-differentiation of Em Ca cells. In addition, its down-regulation is associated with progression of lesions.

  3. The vitamin D receptor is a Wnt effector that controls hair follicle differentiation and specifies tumor type in adult epidermis.

    PubMed

    Pálmer, Héctor G; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Carmeliet, Geert; Takeda, Hikaru; Watt, Fiona M

    2008-01-23

    We have investigated how Wnt and vitamin D receptor signals regulate epidermal differentiation. Many epidermal genes induced by beta-catenin, including the stem cell marker keratin 15, contain vitamin D response elements (VDREs) and several are induced independently of TCF/Lef. The VDR is required for beta-catenin induced hair follicle formation in adult epidermis, and the vitamin D analog EB1089 synergizes with beta-catenin to stimulate hair differentiation. Human trichofolliculomas (hair follicle tumours) are characterized by high nuclear beta-catenin and VDR, whereas infiltrative basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) have high beta-catenin and low VDR levels. In mice, EB1089 prevents beta-catenin induced trichofolliculomas, while in the absence of VDR beta-catenin induces tumours resembling BCCs. We conclude that VDR is a TCF/Lef-independent transcriptional effector of the Wnt pathway and that vitamin D analogues have therapeutic potential in tumors with inappropriate activation of Wnt signalling.

  4. A novel human gene (SARM) at chromosome 17q11 encodes a protein with a SAM motif and structural similarity to Armadillo/beta-catenin that is conserved in mouse, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Mink, M; Fogelgren, B; Olszewski, K; Maroy, P; Csiszar, K

    2001-06-01

    A novel human gene, SARM, encodes the orthologue of a Drosophila protein (CG7915) and contains a unique combination of the sterile alpha (SAM) and the HEAT/Armadillo motifs. The SARM gene was identified on chromosome 17q11, between markers D17S783 and D17S841 on BAC clone AC002094, which also included a HERV repeat and keratin-18-like, MAC30, TNFAIP1, HSPC017, and vitronectin genes in addition to three unknown genes. The mouse SARM gene was located on a mouse chromosome 11 BAC clone (AC002324). The SARM gene is 1.8 kb centromeric to the vitronectin gene, and the two genes share a promoter region that directs a high level of liver-specific expression of both the SARM and the vitronectin genes. In addition to the liver, the SARM gene was highly expressed in the kidney. A 0.4-kb antisense transcript was coordinately expressed with the SARM gene in the kidney and liver, while in the brain and malignant cell lines, it appeared independent of SARM gene transcription. The SARM gene encodes a protein of 690 amino acids. Based on amino acid sequence homology, we have identified a SAM motif within this derived protein. Structure modeling and protein folding recognition studies confirmed the presence of alpha-alpha right-handed superhelix-like folds consistent with the structure of the Armadillo and HEAT repeats of the beta-catenin and importin protein families. Both motifs are known to be involved in protein-protein interactions promoting the formation of diverse protein complexes. We have identified the same conserved SAM/Armadillo motif combination in the mouse, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans SARM proteins.

  5. The effects of dickkopf 1 on gene expression and Wnt signaling by melanocytes: mechanisms underlying its suppression of melanocyte function and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yuji; Passeron, Thierry; Watabe, Hidenori; Yasumoto, Ken-ichi; Rouzaud, Francois; Hoashi, Toshihiko; Hearing, Vincent J

    2007-05-01

    Dickkopf 1 (DKK1), which is expressed at high mRNA levels by fibroblasts in the dermis of human skin on the palms and soles, inhibits the function and proliferation of melanocytes in the epidermis of those areas via the suppression of beta-catenin and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). In this study, we investigated the protein expression levels of DKK1 between palmoplantar and non-palmoplantar areas and the effects of DKK1 on melanocyte gene expression profiles and on Wnt signaling pathways using DNA microarray technology, reverse transcriptase-PCR, Western blot, 3-dimensional reconstructed skin, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry. DKK1-responsive genes included those encoding proteins involved in the regulation of melanocyte development, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (including Kremen 1, G-coupled receptor 51, lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6, low-density lipoprotein receptor, tumor necrosis factor receptor super-family 10, growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible gene 45beta, and MITF). Of special interest was the rapid decrease in expression of MITF in melanocytes treated with DKK1, which is concurrent with the decreased activities of beta-catenin and of glucose-synthase kinase 3beta via phosphorylation at Ser9 and with the upregulated expression of protein kinase C alpha. These results further clarify the mechanism by which DKK1 suppresses melanocyte density and differentiation, and help explain why DKK1-rich palmoplantar epidermis is paler than non-palmoplantar epidermis via mesenchymal-epithelial interactions.

  6. Human I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with KSHV LANA and affect its regulation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Shuichi; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2010-06-04

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein has been reported to interact with glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and to negatively regulate its activity, leading to stimulation of GSK-3{beta}-dependent {beta}-catenin degradation. We show here that the I-mfa domain proteins, HIC (human I-mfa domain-containing protein) and I-mfa (inhibitor of MyoD family a), interacted in vivo with LANA through their C-terminal I-mfa domains. This interaction affected the intracellular localization of HIC, inhibited the LANA-dependent transactivation of a {beta}-catenin-regulated reporter construct, and decreased the level of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex. These data reveal for the first time that I-mfa domain proteins interact with LANA and negatively regulate LANA-mediated activation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription by inhibiting the formation of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex.

  7. Determination of Rate-Limiting Factor for Formation of Beta-Catenin Destruction Complexes Using Absolute Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Hatta, Tomohisa; Ogawa, Koji; Fukuda, Eriko; Goshima, Naoki; Natsume, Tohru

    2017-10-06

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in both ontogenesis and development. In the absence of a Wnt stimulus, β-catenin is degraded by a multiprotein "destruction complex" that includes Axin, APC, GSK3B, and FBXW11. Although the key molecules required for transducing Wnt signals have been identified, a quantitative understanding of this pathway has been lacking. Here, we calculated the absolute number of β-catenin destruction complexes by absolute protein quantification using LC-MS/MS. Similar amounts of destruction complex-constituting proteins and β-catenin interacted, and the number of destruction complexes was calculated to be about 1468 molecules/cell. We demonstrated that the calculated number of destruction complexes was valid for control of the β-catenin destruction rate under steady-state conditions. Interestingly, APC had the minimum expression level among the destruction complex components at about 2233 molecules/cell, and this number approximately corresponded to the calculated number of destruction complexes. Decreased APC expression by siRNA transfection decreased the number of destruction complexes, resulting in β-catenin accumulation and stimulation of the transcriptional activity of T-cell factor. Taken together, our results suggest that the amount of APC expression is the rate-limiting factor for the constitution of β-catenin destruction complexes.

  8. Kremen is required for neural crest induction in Xenopus and promotes LRP6-mediated Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Hassler, Christine; Cruciat, Cristina-Maria; Huang, Ya-Lin; Kuriyama, Sei; Mayor, Roberto; Niehrs, Christof

    2007-12-01

    Kremen 1 and 2 (Krm1/2) are transmembrane receptors for Wnt antagonists of the Dickkopf (Dkk) family and function by inhibiting the Wnt co-receptors LRP5/6. Here we show that Krm2 functions independently from Dkks during neural crest (NC) induction in Xenopus. Krm2 is co-expressed with, and regulated by, canonical Wnts. Krm2 is differentially expressed in the NC, and morpholino-mediated Krm2 knockdown inhibits NC induction, which is mimicked by LRP6 depletion. Conversely, krm2 overexpression induces ectopic NC. Kremens bind to LRP6, promote its cell-surface localization and stimulate LRP6 signaling. Furthermore, Krm2 knockdown specifically reduces LRP6 protein levels in NC explants. The results indicate that in the absence of Dkks, Kremens activate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling through LRP6.

  9. A Method for Serial Tissue Processing and Parallel Analysis of Aberrant Crypt Morphology, Mucin Depletion, and Beta-Catenin Staining in an Experimental Model of Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of architectural and morphological characteristics of cells for establishing prognostic indicators by which individual pathologies are assigned grade and stage is a well-accepted practice. Advances in automated micro- and macroscopic image acquisition and digital image analysis have created new opportunities in the field of prognostic assessment; but, one area in experimental pathology, animal models for colon cancer, has not taken advantage of these opportunities. This situation is primarily due to the methods available to evaluate the colon of the rodent for the presence of premalignant and malignant pathologies. We report a new method for the excision and processing of the entire colon of the rat and illustrate how this procedure permitted the quantitative assessment of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), a premalignant colon pathology, for characteristics consistent with progression to malignancy. ACF were detected by methylene blue staining and subjected to quantitative morphometric analysis. Colons were then restained with high iron diamine–alcian blue for assessment of mucin depletion using an image overlay to associate morphometric data with mucin depletion. The subsequent evaluation of ACF for beta-catenin staining is also demonstrated. The methods described are particularly relevant to the screening of compounds for cancer chemopreventive activity. PMID:21406072

  10. Ibuprofen inhibits activation of nuclear {beta}-catenin in human colon adenomas and induces the phosphorylation of GSK-3{beta}.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, Emily J; Madigan, James P; Boardman, Lisa A; Rosenberg, Daniel W

    2011-01-01

    Nonselective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors target many of the same cancer-associated molecular pathways as COX-2-specific inhibitors. Although these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often associated with gastrointestinal toxicity, there is renewed interest in their use as colorectal cancer (CRC) chemopreventive agents due to the adverse side effects associated with long-term use of selective COX-2 inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term use (up to 25 years) of NSAIDs (ibuprofen or aspirin) on adenoma pathology and β-catenin-mediated signaling in sporadic human colon adenomas. Although NSAID use did not impact overall adenoma size or degree of dysplasia, it did cause a significant inhibition of nuclear β-catenin localization, which correlated with suppression of cyclin D1 expression. To further elucidate the effect of these agents in regulating β-catenin, we treated SW480 colon cancer cells with a panel of NSAIDs and determined their effects on β-catenin levels and cellular localization. In agreement with our in vivo results, both S-ibuprofen and aspirin were found to decrease total levels of β-catenin while increasing its phosphorylation. In addition, S-ibuprofen induced both degradation of IκBα and nuclear localization of NF-κB. Despite its nuclear localization, however, the activation of the NF-κB target genes, Bcl-2, survivin, and cyclin D1, was suppressed. This reduction in NF-κB transcriptional activity may be due to increased phosphorylation of GSK-3β following S-ibuprofen treatment. These data suggest that ibuprofen can effectively target both the Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB pathways, and potentially uncovers a novel mechanism through which NSAIDS may exert their chemopreventive efficacy.

  11. Canonical Wnt signaling maintains the quiescent stage of hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kordes, Claus Sawitza, Iris; Haeussinger, Dieter

    2008-02-29

    It is well known that hepatic stellate cells (HSC) develop into cells, which are thought to contribute to liver fibrogenesis. Recent data suggest that HSC are progenitor cells with the capacity to differentiate into cells of endothelial and hepatocyte lineages. The present study shows that {beta}-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling is active in freshly isolated HSC of rats. Mimicking of the canonical Wnt pathway in cultured HSC by TWS119, an inhibitor of the glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta}, led to reduced {beta}-catenin phosphorylation, induced nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin, elevated glutamine synthetase production, impeded synthesis of {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and Wnt5a, but promoted the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, Wnt10b, and paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2c. In addition, canonical Wnt signaling lowered DNA synthesis and hindered HSC from entering the cell cycle. The findings demonstrate that {beta}-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling maintains the quiescent state of HSC and, similar to stem and progenitor cells, influences their developmental fate.

  12. Wnt signaling and CEH-22/tinman/Nkx2.5 specify a stem cell niche in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ngan; Chesney, Michael A; Kimble, Judith

    2006-02-07

    Wnt signaling regulates many aspects of metazoan development, including stem cells. In C. elegans, Wnt/MAPK signaling controls asymmetric divisions. A recent model proposed that the POP-1/TCF DNA binding protein works together with SYS-1/beta-catenin to activate transcription of target genes in response to Wnt/MAPK signaling. The somatic gonadal precursor (SGP) divides asymmetrically to generate distal and proximal daughters of distinct fates: only its distal daughter generates a distal tip cell (DTC), which is required for stem cell maintenance. No DTCs are produced in the absence of POP-1/TCF or SYS-1/beta-catenin, and extra DTCs are made upon overexpression of SYS-1/beta-catenin. Here we report that POP-1/TCF and SYS-1/beta-catenin directly activate transcription of ceh-22/nkx2.5 isoforms in SGP distal daughters, a finding that confirms the proposed model of Wnt/MAPK signaling. In addition, we demonstrate that the CEH-22/Nkx2.5 homeodomain transcription factor is a key regulator of DTC specification. We speculate that these conserved molecular regulators of the DTC niche in nematodes may provide insight into specification of stem cell niches more broadly.

  13. Preferred levels of auditory danger signals.

    PubMed

    Zera, J; Nagórski, A

    2000-01-01

    An important issue at the design stage of the auditory danger signal for a safety system is the signal audibility under various conditions of background noise. The auditory danger signal should be clearly audible but it should not be too loud to avoid fright, startling effects, and nuisance complaints. Criteria for designing auditory danger signals are the subject of the ISO 7731 (International Organization for Standardization [ISO], 1986) international standard and the EN 457 European standard (European Committee for Standardization [CEN], 1992). It is required that the A-weighted sound pressure level of the auditory danger signal is higher in level than the background noise by 15 dB. In this paper, the results of an experiment are reported, in which listeners adjusted most preferred levels of 3 danger signals (tone, sweep, complex sound) in the presence of a noise background (pink noise and industrial noise). The measurements were done for 60-, 70-, 80-, and 90-dB A-weighted levels of noise. Results show that for 60-dB level of noise the most preferred level of the danger signal is 10 to 20 dB above the noise level. However, for 90-dB level of noise, listeners selected a level of the danger signal that was equal to the noise level. Results imply that the criterion in the existing standards is conservative as it requires the level of the danger signal to be higher than the level of noise regardless of the noise level.

  14. Germinated brown rice (GBR) reduces the incidence of aberrant crypt foci with the involvement of beta-catenin and COX-2 in azoxymethane-induced colon cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Latifah, Saiful Yazan; Armania, Nurdin; Tze, Tan Hern; Azhar, Yaacob; Nordiana, Abdul Hadi; Norazalina, Saad; Hairuszah, Ithnin; Saidi, Moin; Maznah, Ismail

    2010-03-26

    Chemoprevention has become an important area in cancer research due to the failure of current therapeutic modalities. Epidemiological and preclinical studies have demonstrated that nutrition plays a vital role in the etiology of cancer. This study was conducted to determine the chemopreventive effects of germinated brown rice (GBR) in rats induced with colon cancer. GBR is brown rice that has been claimed to be richer in nutrients compared to the common white rice. The male Sprague Dawley rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups: (G1) positive control (with colon cancer, unfed with GBR), (G2) fed with 2.5 g/kg of GBR (GBR (g)/weight of rat (kg)), (G3) fed with 5 g/kg of GBR, (G4) fed with 10 g/kg of GBR and (G5) negative control (without colon cancer, unfed with GBR). GBR was administered orally once daily via gavage after injection of 15 mg/kg of body weight of azoxymethane (AOM) once a week for two weeks, intraperitonially. After 8 weeks of treatment, animals were sacrificed and colons were removed. Colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were evaluated histopathologically. Total number of ACF and AC, and multicrypt of ACF, and the expression of beta-catenin and COX-2 reduced significantly (p < 0.05) in all the groups treated with GBR (G2, G3 and G4) compared to the control group (G1). Spearman rank correlation test showed significant positive linear relationship between total beta-catenin and COX-2 score (Spearman's rho = 0.616, p = 0.0001). It is demonstrated that GBR inhibits the development of total number of ACF and AC, and multicrypt of ACF, reduces the expression of beta-catenin and COX-2, and thus can be a promising dietary supplement in prevention of colon cancer.

  15. Beta-catenin can induce hair follicle stem cell differentiation into transit-amplifying cells through c-myc activation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiong; Yu, Weirong; Fang, Yong; Yao, Min; Yang, Penggao

    2017-02-01

    Hair follicle stem cells play important roles in maintaining homeostasis and skin tissue self-renewal. Transit-amplifying cells represent the transition of cells from hair follicle stem cells into differentiated epidermal cells. Thus far, the signaling pathway and the molecular biological mechanism that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of hair follicle stem cells remain unclear. In this paper, we studied the relationship between β-catenin and c-myc during the process of the differentiation of hair follicle stem cells into transit-amplifying cells. Based on our results, the expression of β-catenin can activate the nuclear gene c-myc and regulate the expression of transit-amplifying cell markers K15, K19, a6-integrin and β1-integrin, indicating that β-catenin is involved in the transformation process from hair follicle stem cells to transit-amplifying cells and suggesting that β-catenin plays an important biological role in the induction of this differentiation process.

  16. Prognostic significance of WNT signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Mitsuhiro; Matsuyama, Atsuji; Shiba, Eisuke; Shibuya, Ryo; Kasai, Takahiko; Yamaguchi, Koji; Hisaoka, Masanori

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most lethal human malignancies and is associated with a variety of molecular abnormalities. Although WNT signaling through its canonical/non-canonical pathways is one of the major factors involved in oncogenesis or progression of PDA, the prognostic significance of WNT signaling still remains poorly investigated. In this study, the status of the WNT signaling pathways was immunohistochemically analyzed in 101 PDAs, and its potential association with patient postoperative survival was assessed. Nuclear expression of beta-catenin, a hallmark of the activated canonical pathway, was identified in 59 cases, and was associated with reduced survival compared to the patients lacking nuclear beta-catenin expression (P = 0.002). In contrast, activation of the non-canonical pathway (25 cases), as indicated by co-expression of WNT2/5a and nuclear NFATc1, was not correlated with reduced survival (P = 0.268). Co-activation of both pathways (16 cases) was associated with worse prognosis in comparison with cases with an activated non-canonical pathway (P = 0.034). In addition, nuclear beta-catenin expression was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor (P = 0.006). Our data indicate that activated WNT signaling through its canonical pathway has a significantly negative effect on the clinical course of PDA, and the canonical WNT pathway should be considered as a future therapeutic target for PDA.

  17. Genetic and Proteomic Interrogation of Lower Confidence Candidate Genes Reveals Signaling Networks in beta-Catenin-Active Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Genome-scale expression studies and comprehensive loss-of-function genetic screens have focused almost exclusively on the highest confidence candidate genes. Here, we describe a strategy for characterizing the lower confidence candidates identified by such approaches.

  18. Chronic alcohol intake promotes tumor growth in a diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis mouse model through increased Wnt/Beta-catenin signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ethanol (EtOH) metabolism is involved in both initiating and promoting mechanisms in hepatocellular carcinoma progression in chronic alcoholics. In this study, we developed a mouse model to test the hypothesis that chronic EtOH consumption promotes tumor growth irrespective of EtOH-related initiati...

  19. Colonic inflammation and enhanced-beta-catenin signaling accompany an increase of the Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae in the hind gut of high-fat diet-fed mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumption of an obesigenic / high-fat (HF) diet is associated with a high colon cancer risk, and may alter the gut microbiota. To test the hypothesis that a HF feeding accelerates inflammatory process and changes gut microbiome composition, C57BL/6 mice were fed a HF (45% energy) or low-fat (LF) (...

  20. Colonic inflammation and enhanced-beta-catenin signaling accompany an increase of the Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae in the hind gut of high-fat diet-fed mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumption of an obesigenic / high-fat (HF) diet is associated with an increase of inflammation-related colon cancer risk and may alter the gut microbiota. To test the hypothesis that a HF feeding accelerates inflammatory processes and changes gut microbiome composition, C57BL/6 mice were fed a HF ...

  1. High fat diet-induced obesity reduces bone formation through activation of ppar gamma to suppress wnt/beta-catenin signaling in prepubertal rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of a high fat diet (HFD) and of obesity on skeletal development, maturation and remodeling remain largely unclear particularly in children. In this report, we utilized a total enteral nutrition (TEN) model to examine the direct effect of HFD feeding on bone prior to puberty. We chronical...

  2. Alcohol consumption promotes diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in male mice through the activation of the Wnt/Beta-catenin signaling pathway

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although alcohol effects within the liver have been extensively studied, the complex mechanisms by which alcohol causes liver cancer are not well understood. It has been suggested that ethanol (EtOH) metabolism promotes tumor growth by increasing hepatocyte proliferation. In this study, we develop...

  3. Reduced bone mass in obese young rats through PPAR omega suppression of wnt/beta-catenin signaling and direct action of free fatty acids (NEFA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The relationship of obesity to skeletal development is unclear. We utilized total enteral nutrition to feed high and low fat diets (HFD and LFD) to rats for 4 wks to produce obesity. Weight gain was matched but fat mass, serum leptin and NEFA were increased by HFD (P < 0.05). HFD lowered total bone ...

  4. A crucial role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through Inhibition of Wnt / Beta-catenin Signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol intake induces bone loss remain largely unclear. Especially in females, skeletal response to ethanol may vary depending on the physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Nonetheless, ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be the key event le...

  5. A crucial role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through inhibition of wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Female skeletal responses to ethanol may vary depending on the physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Nonetheless, ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be the key event leading to skeletal toxicity. In the current study, we chronically infused EtOH-containing liquid diets ...

  6. A role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through inhibition of wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol intake induces bone loss remain unclear. In females, the skeletal response to ethanol varies depending on physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be a key event leading to skeletal toxicity. In the c...

  7. Roles of cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 expression and beta-catenin activation in gastric carcinogenesis in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-treated K19-C2mE transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Shinji; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Cao, Xue-Yuan; Toyoda, Takeshi; Hirata, Akihiro; Ban, Hisayo; Yamamoto, Masami; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma; Masegi, Toshiaki; Oshima, Masanobu; Tatematsu, Masae

    2008-12-01

    K19-C2mE transgenic (Tg) mice, simultaneously expressing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in the gastric mucosa under the cytokeratin 19 gene promoter, were here treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and inoculated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to investigate gastric carcinogenesis. Wild-type (WT) and Tg mice undergoing MNU treatment frequently developed tumors in the pyloric region (100% and 94.7%, respectively); multiplicity in Tg was higher than that in WT (P < 0.05) with H. pylori infection. Larger pyloric tumors were more frequently observed in Tg than in WT (P < 0.05). In addition, Tg developed fundic tumors, where WT did not. No gastric tumors were observed without MNU treatment. Transcripts of TNF-alpha, iNOS, IL-1beta, and CXCL14 were up-regulated with H. pylori infection in both genotypes and were also increased more in Tg than in WT within H. pylori-inoculated animals. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated significantly greater beta-catenin accumulation in pyloric tumors, compared with those in the fundus (P < 0.01) with mutations of exon 3; 18.2% and 31.6% in MNU-alone and MNU + H. pylori-treated WT, whereas 21.4% and 62.5% was observed in the Tg, respectively; the latter significantly higher (P < 0.05), suggesting the role of H. pylori in Wnt activation. In conclusion, K19-C2mE mice promoted gastric cancer in both fundic and pyloric regions. Furthermore beta-catenin activation may play the important role of pyloric carcinogenesis especially in H. pylori-infected Tg. Induction of various inflammatory cytokines in addition to overexpression of COX-2/mPGES-1 could be risk factors of gastric carcinogenesis and may serve as a better gastric carcinogenesis model.

  8. Antagonistic BMP–cWNT signaling in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis reveals insight into the evolution of mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Wijesena, Naveen; Simmons, David K.

    2017-01-01

    Gastrulation was arguably the key evolutionary innovation that enabled metazoan diversification, leading to the formation of distinct germ layers and specialized tissues. Differential gene expression specifying cell fate is governed by the inputs of intracellular and/or extracellular signals. Beta-catenin/Tcf and the TGF-beta bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) provide critical molecular signaling inputs during germ layer specification in bilaterian metazoans, but there has been no direct experimental evidence for a specific role for BMP signaling during endomesoderm specification in the early branching metazoan Nematostella vectensis (an anthozoan cnidarian). Using forward transcriptomics, we show that beta-catenin/Tcf signaling and BMP2/4 signaling provide differential inputs into the cnidarian endomesodermal gene regulatory network (GRN) at the onset of gastrulation (24 h postfertilization) in N. vectensis. Surprisingly, beta-catenin/Tcf signaling and BMP2/4 signaling regulate a subset of common downstream target genes in the GRN in opposite ways, leading to the spatial and temporal differentiation of fields of cells in the developing embryo. Thus, we show that regulatory interactions between beta-catenin/Tcf signaling and BMP2/4 signaling are required for the specification and determination of different embryonic regions and the patterning of the oral–aboral axis in Nematostella. We also show functionally that the conserved “kernel” of the bilaterian heart mesoderm GRN is operational in N. vectensis, which reinforces the hypothesis that the endoderm and mesoderm in triploblastic bilaterians evolved from the bifunctional endomesoderm (gastrodermis) of a diploblastic ancestor, and that slow rhythmic contractions might have been one of the earliest functions of mesodermal tissue. PMID:28652368

  9. Smad6 promotes neuronal differentiation in the intermediate zone of the dorsal neural tube by inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihui; Chen, Yongfeng; Li, Zhenfei; Bai, Ge; Zhu, Yue; Yan, Rui; Tan, Fangzhi; Chen, Ye-Guang; Guillemot, Francois; Li, Lin; Jing, Naihe

    2011-07-19

    Proliferation of the neural/neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) at the ventricular zone of the dorsal spinal cord requires the stimuli of Wnt and bone morphogenic protein (BMP). However, how these two signaling pathways are regulated to initiate differentiation in the NPCs as they enter the intermediate zone is not known. Here, we show that Smad6, a negative regulator of BMP signaling, is expressed in the intermediate zone of the chick dorsal spinal cord. Knockdown experiments show that Smad6 is required for promoting NPCs to exit the cell cycle and differentiate into neurons. Although we find that Smad6 inhibits BMP signaling, as expected, we also find that Smad6 unexpectedly inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by Smad6 is independent of its effect on the BMP pathway. Rather, Smad6 through its N-terminal domain and link region enhances the interaction of C-terminal binding protein with the β-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) complex and the TCF-binding element to inhibit β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activation. Our study provides evidence that transition of NPCs from a proliferative state to a differentiating state is controlled by the dual inhibitory role of Smad6 to both BMP and Wnt signaling at the level of transcription.

  10. WNT signaling controls expression of pro-apoptotic BOK and BAX in intestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zeilstra, Jurrit; Joosten, Sander P.J.; Wensveen, Felix M.; Dessing, Mark C.; Schuetze, Denise M.; Eldering, Eric; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T.

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Intestinal adenomas initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT pathway displayed an increased sensitivity to apoptosis. {yields} Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes in Apc{sup Min/+} mice revealed the differential expression of pro-apoptotic Bok and Bax. {yields} APC-mutant adenomatous crypts in FAP patients showed strongly increased BAX immunoreactivity. {yields} Blocking of {beta}-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in colon cancer cells reduced the expression of BOK and BAX. -- Abstract: In a majority of cases, colorectal cancer is initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT signaling pathway. Mutation of the genes encoding the WNT signaling components adenomatous polyposis coli or {beta}-catenin causes constitutively active {beta}-catenin/TCF-mediated transcription, driving the transformation of intestinal crypts to cancer precursor lesions, called dysplastic aberrant crypt foci. Deregulated apoptosis is a hallmark of adenomatous colon tissue. However, the contribution of WNT signaling to this process is not fully understood. We addressed this role by analyzing the rate of epithelial apoptosis in aberrant crypts and adenomas of the Apc{sup Min/+} mouse model. In comparison with normal crypts and adenomas, aberrant crypts displayed a dramatically increased rate of apoptotic cell death. Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes along the crypt-villus axis and in Apc mutant adenomas revealed increased expression of two pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in intestinal adenomas, Bok and Bax. Analysis of the colon of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients along the crypt-to-surface axis, and of dysplastic crypts, corroborated this expression pattern. Disruption of {beta}-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in the colorectal cancer cell line Ls174T significantly decreased BOK and BAX expression, confirming WNT-dependent regulation in intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a feedback mechanism by which

  11. Synaptotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease: the Wnt signaling pathway as a molecular target.

    PubMed

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Grabowski, Catalina P; Colombres, Marcela

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role of the Wnt pathway in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). A relationship between amyloid-beta-peptide (Abeta)-induced neurotoxicity and a decrease in the cytoplasmatic levels of beta-catenin has been proposed. Also, the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3beta), a central modulator of the pathway, protects rat hippocampal neurons from Abeta-induced damage. Interestingly, during the progression of AD, it has been described that active GSK-3beta is found in neuronal cell bodies and neurites, co-localizing with pre-neurofibrillary tangles observed in disease brains. Since Abeta oligomers are associated with the post-synaptic region and we have found that the non-canonical Wnt signaling modulates PSD-95 and glutamate receptors, we propose that the synaptic target for Abeta oligomers in AD is the postsynaptic region and at the molecular level is the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Altogether, our evidence suggests that a sustained loss of Wnt signaling function may be involved in the Abeta-dependent neurodegeneration observed in AD brains and that the activation of this signaling pathway could be of therapeutic interest in AD.

  12. Wnt signaling in axial patterning and regeneration: lessons from planaria.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, Edward M

    2010-06-22

    Wnt signal transduction plays a crucial role in stem cell proliferation and regeneration. When canonical Wnt signaling is low, heads develop, and when it is high, tails are formed. In planarians, Wnt transcription is activated by wounding in a beta-catenin-independent way. Hedgehog is one of the signals involved, because it induces regeneration of tails (instead of heads) through the activation of Wnt transcription. Depletion of Smad4 blocks regeneration entirely, which suggests that the bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway and the Wnt pathway are required for regeneration and body patterning.

  13. Effects of curcumin in pediatric epithelial liver tumors: inhibition of tumor growth and alpha-fetoprotein in vitro and in vivo involving the NFkappaB- and the beta-catenin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bortel, Nicola; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin; Schmid, Evi; Kirchner, Bettina; Frank, Jan; Kocher, Alexa; Schiborr, Christina; Warmann, Steven; Fuchs, Jörg; Ellerkamp, Verena

    2015-01-01

    In children with hepatocellular carcinoma (pHCC) the 5-year overall survival rate is poor. Effects of cytostatic therapies such as cisplatin and doxorubicin are limited due to chemoresistance and tumor relapse. In adult HCC, several antitumor properties are described for the use of curcumin. Curcumin is one of the best-investigated phytochemicals in complementary oncology without relevant side effects. Its use is limited by low bioavailability. Little is known about the influence of curcumin on pediatric epithelial hepatic malignancies. We investigated the effects of curcumin in combination with cisplatin on two pediatric epithelial liver tumor cell lines. As mechanisms of action inhibition of NFkappaB, beta-catenin, and decrease of cyclin D were identified. Using a mouse xenograft model we could show a significant decrease of alpha-fetoprotein after combination therapy of oral micellar curcumin and cisplatin. Significant concentrations of curcuminoids were found in blood samples, organ lysates, and tumor tissue after oral micellar curcumin administration. Micellar curcumin in combination with cisplatin can be a promising strategy for treatment of pediatric HCC. PMID:26515460

  14. FGF signaling inhibitor, SPRY4, is evolutionarily conserved target of WNT signaling pathway in progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-03-01

    WNT, FGF and Hedgehog signaling pathways network together during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and carcinogenesis. FGF16, FGF18, and FGF20 genes are targets of WNT-mediated TCF/LEF-beta-catenin-BCL9/BCL9L-PYGO transcriptional complex. SPROUTY (SPRY) and SPRED family genes encode inhibitors for receptor tyrosine kinase signaling cascades, such as those of FGF receptor family members and EGF receptor family members. Here, transcriptional regulation of SPRY1, SPRY2, SPRY3, SPRY4, SPRED1, SPRED2, and SPRED3 genes by WNT/beta-catenin signaling cascade was investigated by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (humint). Because double TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human SPRY4 gene, comparative genomics analyses on SPRY4 orthologs were further performed. SPRY4-FGF1 locus at human chromosome 5q31.3 and FGF2-NUDT6-SPATA5-SPRY1 locus at human chromosome 4q27-q28.1 were paralogous regions within the human genome. Chimpanzee SPRY4 gene was identified within NW_107083.1 genome sequence. Human, chimpanzee, rat and mouse SPRY4 orthologs, consisting of three exons, were well conserved. SPRY4 gene was identified as the evolutionarily conserved target of WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway based on the conservation of double TCF/LEF-binding sites within 5'-promoter region of mammalian SPRY4 orthologs. Human SPRY4 mRNA was expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, brain, pancreatic islet, colon cancer, head and neck tumor, melanoma, and pancreatic cancer. WNT signaling activation in progenitor cells leads to the growth regulation of progenitor cells themselves through SPRY4 induction, and also to the growth stimulation of proliferating cells through FGF secretion. Epigenetic silencing and loss-of-function mutations of SPRY4 gene in progenitor cells could lead to carcinogenesis. SPRY4 is the pharmacogenomics target in the fields of oncology and regenerative medicine.

  15. Sulfatase modifying factor 1-mediated fibroblast growth factor signaling primes hematopoietic multilineage development.

    PubMed

    Buono, Mario; Visigalli, Ilaria; Bergamasco, Roberta; Biffi, Alessandra; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2010-08-02

    Self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are balanced by the concerted activities of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Wnt, and Notch pathways, which are tuned by enzyme-mediated remodeling of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) activates the Sulf1 and Sulf2 sulfatases that remodel the HSPGs, and is mutated in patients with multiple sulfatase deficiency. Here, we show that the FGF signaling pathway is constitutively activated in Sumf1(-/-) HSCs and hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs). These cells show increased p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase levels, which in turn promote beta-catenin accumulation. Constitutive activation of FGF signaling results in a block in erythroid differentiation at the chromatophilic erythroblast stage, and of B lymphocyte differentiation at the pro-B cell stage. A reduction in mature myeloid cells and an aberrant development of T lymphocytes are also seen. These defects are rescued in vivo by blocking the FGF pathway in Sumf1(-/-) mice. Transplantation of Sumf1(-/-) HSPCs into wild-type mice reconstituted the phenotype of the donors, suggesting a cell autonomous defect. These data indicate that Sumf1 controls HSPC differentiation and hematopoietic lineage development through FGF and Wnt signaling.

  16. Dietary vitamin A regulates wingless-related MMTV integration site signaling to alter the hair cycle.

    PubMed

    Suo, Liye; Sundberg, John P; Everts, Helen B

    2015-05-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune hair loss disease caused by a cell-mediated immune attack of the lower portion of the cycling hair follicle. Feeding mice 3-7 times the recommended level of dietary vitamin A accelerated the progression of AA in the graft-induced C3H/HeJ mouse model of AA. In this study, we also found that dietary vitamin A, in a dose dependent manner, activated the hair follicle stem cells (SCs) to induce the development and growth phase of the hair cycle (anagen), which may have made the hair follicle more susceptible to autoimmune attack. Our purpose here is to determine the mechanism by which dietary vitamin A regulates the hair cycle. We found that vitamin A in a dose-dependent manner increased nuclear localized beta-catenin (CTNNB1; a marker of canonical wingless-type Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus integration site family (WNT) signaling) and levels of WNT7A within the hair follicle bulge in these C3H/HeJ mice. These findings suggest that feeding mice high levels of dietary vitamin A increases WNT signaling to activate hair follicle SCs. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  17. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E; Barlow, Linda A

    2015-05-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells.

  18. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells. PMID:26020789

  19. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE)--amyloid-beta-peptide complexes in Alzheimer's disease. the Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Urra, Soledad; Colombres, Marcela

    2004-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by selective neuronal cell death, which is probably caused by amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) oligomers and fibrils. We have found that acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a senile plaque component, increases amyloid fibril assembly with the formation of highly toxic complexes (Abeta-AChE). The neurotoxic effect induced by Abeta-AChE complexes was higher than that induced by the Abeta peptide alone as shown both in vitro (hippocampal neurons) and in vivo (rats injected with Abeta peptide in the dorsal hippocampus). Interestingly, treatment with Abeta-AChE complexes decreases the cytoplasmic beta-catenin level, a key component of Wnt signaling. Conversely, the activation of this signaling pathway by Wnt-3a promotes neuronal survival and rescues changes in Wnt components (activation or subcellular localization). Moreover Frzb-1, a Wnt antagonist reverses the Wnt-3a neuroprotection effect against Abeta neurotoxicity. Compounds that mimic the Wnt signaling or modulate the cross-talking with this pathway could be used as neuroprotective agents for therapeutic strategies in AD patients.

  20. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-23

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear {beta}-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  1. Heparin activates Wnt signaling for neuronal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Colombres, Marcela; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Reig, Germán F; Scheu, Jessica; Calderón, Rosario; Alvarez, Alejandra; Brandan, Enrique; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2008-09-01

    Wnt factors are secreted ligands that affect different aspects of the nervous system behavior like neurodevelopment, synaptogenesis and neurodegeneration. In different model systems, Wnt signaling has been demonstrated to be regulated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Whether HSPGs modulate Wnt signaling in the context of neuronal behavior is currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that activation of Wnt signaling with the endogenous ligand Wnt-7a results in an increased of neurite outgrowth in the neuroblastoma N2a cell line. Interestingly, heparin induces glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) inhibition, beta-catenin stabilization and morphological differentiation in both N2a cells and in rat primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. We also show that heparin modulates Wnt-3a-induced stabilization of beta-catenin. Several extracellular matrix and membrane-attached HSPGs were found to be expressed in both in vitro neuronal models. Changes in the expression of specific HSPGs were observed upon differentiation of N2a cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that HSPGs may modulate canonical Wnt signaling for neuronal morphogenesis.

  2. Statin's excitoprotection is mediated by sAPP and the subsequent attenuation of calpain-induced truncation events, likely via rho-ROCK signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tao; Zhao, YongBo; Kwak, Young-Don; Yang, Zhangmin; Thompson, Robert; Luo, Zhijun; Xu, Huaxi; Liao, Francesca-Fang

    2009-09-09

    The widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs, statins, were reported to reduce the incidence of stroke and the progression of Alzheimer's disease. However, little is known on how statins exert these beneficial effects. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective actions of statins in primary cultured cortical neurons. We found that chronic treatment of neurons with a low dosage of two CNS-permeable statins (lovastatin and simvastatin) selectively reduced NMDA-induced cell death but not the caspase-mediated apoptosis. The protective effects of stains were inhibited by mevalonate, a PI3K inhibitor, and tyrphostin AG538, suggesting roles for cholesterol and insulin/IGF-1 signaling in the neurotoxic response. We further demonstrate that statins block calcium-dependent calpain activation, resulting in complete suppression of protein truncation events on multiple calpain substrates that are involved in neuronal death including CDK5 coactivator p35 cleavage to p25, GSK3 and beta-catenin. This is followed by reduced and increased nuclear translocation of p25 and beta-catenin, respectively. Under excitotoxic conditions, the activities of CDK5 and beta-catenin are exclusively regulated by calpain-mediated cleavage while apoptosis modulates beta-catenin mainly through phosphorylation. Strikingly, our data demonstrate that the calpain-blocking effect of statins is largely mediated by stimulation of alpha-secretase cleavage of APP, resulting in increased secretion of its soluble form, sAPP. Finally, our data suggest that statin-regulated sAPP secretion occurs via activation of the PI3K pathway and inhibition of ROCK signaling. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into statin-mediated neuronal excitoprotection through both cholesterol-dependent and -independent mechanisms and links them to calpain-mediated neuronal death.

  3. The pan-PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 activates canonical WNT signaling to confer resistance in TNBC cells: resistance reversal with WNT inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-En; Yang, Lixin; Chen, Kemin; Wang, Yafan; Liu, Yun-Ru; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Gaur, Shikha; Hu, Shuya; Yen, Yun

    2015-05-10

    The pan-PI3K inhibitors are one treatment option for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, this treatment is ineffective for unknown reasons. Here, we report that aberrant expression of wingless-type MMTV integration site family (WNT) and activated WNT signals, which crosstalk with the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway through GSK3β, plays the most critical role in resistance to pan-PI3K inhibitors in TNBC cells. GDC-0941 is a pan-PI3K inhibitor that activates the WNT/beta-catenin pathway in TNBC cells through stimulation of WNT secretion. GDC-0941-triggered WNT/beta-catenin pathway activation was observed in MDA-MB-231 and HCC1937 cells, which are TNBC cell lines showing aberrant WNT/beta-catenin activation, and not in SKBR3 and MCF7 cells. This observation is further investigated in vivo. GDC-0941 exhibited minimal tumor inhibition in MDA-MB-231 cells, but it significantly suppressed tumor growth in HER-positive SK-BR3 cells. In vivo mechanism study revealed the activation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway by GDC-0941. A synergistic effect was observed when combined treatment with GDC-0941 and the WNT inhibitor LGK974 at low concentrations in MDA-MB-231 cells. These findings indicated that WNT pathway activation conferred resistance in TNBC cells treated with GDC-0941. This resistance may be further circumvented through combined treatment with pan-PI3K and WNT inhibitors. Future clinical trials of these two inhibitors are warranted.

  4. Negative regulation of the Wnt signal by MM-1 through inhibiting expression of the wnt4 gene.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Kitaura, Hirotake; Hagio, Yuko; Sato, Toshiya; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2008-04-01

    We have reported that a novel c-Myc-binding protein, MM-1, repressed the E-box-dependent transcription activity of c-Myc through TIF1beta/KAP1, a transcriptional corepressor, and that the c-fms gene was a target gene involved in this pathway. We have also reported that a mutation of A157R in MM-1, which is often observed in patients with leukemia or lymphoma, abrogated all of the repressive activities of MM-1 toward c-Myc, indicating that MM-1 is a novel tumor suppressor. In this study, to further identify target genes of MM-1, DNA microarray analysis was carried out by comparing expression levels of genes in MM-1 knockdown and parental cells, and the wnt4 gene, a member of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway, was identified as a target gene of MM-1. Increased expression level of the wnt4 gene, accumulation and translocation of beta-catenin to the cytoplasm and nucleus, and upregulation of TCF/Lef-1, a target protein of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway, were found in MM-1 knockdown cells. Reporter assays using various deletion constructs of the wnt4 gene promoter showed that MM-1 recognized the region spanning -286 to -229 from a transcription start site, and MM-1 complex was found to bind to this region by chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel mobility shift assays. Furthermore, it was found that Egr-1 and MM-1 were bound to this region and that both proteins mutually down-regulate promoter activity of the wnt4 gene. Since the c-myc gene is the target gene of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway, these findings suggest that MM-1 inhibits c-Myc by a dual mechanism.

  5. Beta-catenin directs the transformation of testis Sertoli cells to ovarian granulosa-like cells by inducing Foxl2 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Zhang, Lianjun; Hu, Yuqiong; Chen, Min; Han, Feng; Qin, Yan; Chen, Min; Cui, Xiuhong; Duo, Shuguang; Tang, Fuchou; Gao, Fei

    2017-09-12

    Sertoli and granulosa cells are two major types of somatic cells in the male and female gonads,respectively. Previous studies have shown that Sertoli and granulosa cells are derived from common progenitor cells and that differentiation of these two cell types is regulated by sex differentiation genes. The signaling pathway including the adhesion and transcription factor Ctnnb1 (cadherin-associated protein, beta 1, also known as β-catenin) regulates differentiation of granulosa cells in the absence of the transcription factor Sry, and over-activation of β-catenin in the presence of Sry leads to granulosa prior to sex determination. Surprisingly, our previous study found that β-catenin over-activation in Sertoli cells after sex determination can also cause disruption of the testicular cord and aberrant testis development. However, the underlying molecular mechanism was unclear. In this study, we found that constitutive activation of Ctnnb1 in Sertoli cells led to ectopic expression of the granulosa cell-specific marker FOXL2 in testes. Co-staining experiments revealed that FOXL2-positive cells were derived from Sertoli cells, and Sertoli cells were transformed into granulosa-like cells after Ctnnb1 over-activation. Further studies demonstrated that CTNNB1 induced Foxl2 expression by directly binding to transcription factor Tcf/Lef binding sites in the FOXL2 promoter region. We also found that directly over-expression of Foxl2 indecreased the expression of Sertoli cell-specific genes in primary Sertoli cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that repression of β-catenin (CTNNB1) signaling is required for lineage maintenance of Sertoli cells. Our study provides a new mechanism for Sertoli cell lineage maintenance during gonad development. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Enhancing Beta-Catenin Activity via GSK3beta Inhibition Protects PC12 Cells against Rotenone Toxicity through Nurr1 Induction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Cen, Luan; Qu, Shaogang; Wei, Lei; Mo, Mingshu; Feng, Junmin; Sun, Congcong; Xiao, Yousheng; Luo, Qin; Li, Shaomin; Yang, Xinling; Xu, Pingyi

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Increasing evidence showed that Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 play crucial roles in the survival and functional maintenance of DA neurons in the midbrain and GSK-3β antagonists LiCl and SB216763 were used to activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway experimentally. However, the detail mechanism underlying the neuroprotection against apoptosis on DA neuron is still unclear and the interaction between Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 remains undisclosed. In this study, using cell biological assay we investigated the function of Wnt/β-catenin and its crosstalk with Nurr1 on the course of PC12 cell degeneration in vitro. Our data showed that PC12 cell viability was inhibited by rotenone, but attenuated by GSK-3β antagonists LiCl or SB216763. The activity of Wnt/β-catenin pathway was deregulated on exposure of rotenone in a concentration-dependent manner. After the interference of β-catenin with siRNA, LiCl or SB216763 failed to protect PC12 cells from apoptosis by the rotenone toxicity. Our data confirmed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling activated by LiCl or SB216763 enhanced Nurr1 expression to 2.75 ± 0.55 and 4.06 ± 0.41 folds respectively compared with control detected by real-time PCR and the interaction of β-catenin with Nurr1 was identified by co-immunoprecipitate analysis. In conclusion, the data suggested that Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 are crucial factors in the survival of DA neurons, and the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway exerts protective effects on DA neurons partly by mean of a co-active pattern with Nurr1. This finding may shed a light on the potential treatment of Parkinson disease.

  7. Enhancing Beta-Catenin Activity via GSK3beta Inhibition Protects PC12 Cells against Rotenone Toxicity through Nurr1 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lei; Mo, Mingshu; Feng, Junmin; Sun, Congcong; Xiao, Yousheng; Luo, Qin; Li, Shaomin; Yang, Xinling; Xu, Pingyi

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Increasing evidence showed that Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 play crucial roles in the survival and functional maintenance of DA neurons in the midbrain and GSK-3β antagonists LiCl and SB216763 were used to activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway experimentally. However, the detail mechanism underlying the neuroprotection against apoptosis on DA neuron is still unclear and the interaction between Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 remains undisclosed. In this study, using cell biological assay we investigated the function of Wnt/β-catenin and its crosstalk with Nurr1 on the course of PC12 cell degeneration in vitro. Our data showed that PC12 cell viability was inhibited by rotenone, but attenuated by GSK-3β antagonists LiCl or SB216763. The activity of Wnt/β-catenin pathway was deregulated on exposure of rotenone in a concentration-dependent manner. After the interference of β-catenin with siRNA, LiCl or SB216763 failed to protect PC12 cells from apoptosis by the rotenone toxicity. Our data confirmed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling activated by LiCl or SB216763 enhanced Nurr1 expression to 2.75 ± 0.55 and 4.06 ± 0.41 folds respectively compared with control detected by real-time PCR and the interaction of β-catenin with Nurr1 was identified by co-immunoprecipitate analysis. In conclusion, the data suggested that Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 are crucial factors in the survival of DA neurons, and the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway exerts protective effects on DA neurons partly by mean of a co-active pattern with Nurr1. This finding may shed a light on the potential treatment of Parkinson disease. PMID:27045591

  8. TIMP-2 modulates cancer cell transcriptional profile and enhances E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex expression in A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bourboulia, Dimitra; Han, HuiYing; Isaac, Biju; Wei, Beiyang; Neckers, Len; Stetler-Stevenson, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) plays an essential role in regulating matrix remodeling, cell growth, differentiation, angiogenesis and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. We have recently shown that TIMP-2-mediated inhibition of tumor growth is independent of matrix metalloproteinase-mediated mechanisms, and is a consequence of modulating both the tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. In the current study we aim to identify the molecular pathways associated with these effects. We analyzed the transcriptional profile of the human lung cancer cell line A549 upon overexpression of TIMP-2 and Ala+TIMP-2 (mutant that does not inhibit MMP activity), and we found changes in gene expression predominantly related to decreased tumor development and metastasis. Increased E-cadherin expression in response to both TIMP-2 and Ala+TIMP-2 expression was confirmed by real time quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting. A549 cells treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF) displayed loss of cobblestone morphology and cell-cell contact, while cells overexpressing TIMP-2 or Ala+TIMP-2 were resistant to EGF-induced morphological changes. Moreover, exogenous treatment with recombinant Ala+TIMP-2 blocked EGF induced down-regulation of E-cadherin. In vivo, immunohistochemistry of A549 xenografts expressing either TIMP-2 or Ala+TIMP-2 demonstrated increased E-cadherin protein levels. More importantly, transcriptional profile analysis of tumor tissue revealed critical pathways associated with effects on tumor-host interaction and inhibition of tumor growth. In conclusion, we show that TIMP-2 promotes an anti-tumoral transcriptional profile in vitro and in vivo, including upregulation of E-cadherin, in A549 lung cancer cells. PMID:23371049

  9. The frizzled extracellular domain is a ligand for Van Gogh/Stbm during nonautonomous planar cell polarity signaling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Mlodzik, Marek

    2008-09-01

    The Frizzled (Fz) receptor is required cell autonomously in Wnt/beta-catenin and planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling. In addition to these requirements, Fz acts nonautonomously during PCP establishment: wild-type cells surrounding fz(-) patches reorient toward the fz(-) cells. The molecular mechanism(s) of nonautonomous Fz signaling are unknown. Our in vivo studies identify the extracellular domain (ECD) of Fz, in particular its CRD (cysteine rich domain), as critical for nonautonomous Fz-PCP activity. Importantly, we demonstrate biochemical and physical interactions between the FzECD and the transmembrane protein Van Gogh/Strabismus (Vang/Stbm). We show that this function precedes cell-autonomous interactions and visible asymmetric PCP factor localization. Our data suggest that Vang/Stbm can act as a FzECD receptor, allowing cells to sense Fz activity/levels of their neighbors. Thus, direct Fz-Vang/Stbm interactions represent an intriguing mechanism that may account for the global orientation of cells within the plane of their epithelial field.

  10. Inhibitory mechanisms of two Uncaria tomentosa extracts affecting the Wnt-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Gurrola-Díaz, Carmen Magdalena; García-López, Pedro Macedonio; Gulewicz, Krzysztof; Pilarski, Radoslaw; Dihlmann, Susanne

    2011-06-15

    Uncaria tomentosa ("uña de gato"; "cat's claw"), a woody vine native to the Amazon rainforest, is commonly used in South American traditional medicine to treat a broad spectrum of diseases. Although recent studies have reported anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties of different alkaloids extracted from this plant, the underlying molecular mechanisms of these effects have not been elucidated yet. Our study investigates the inhibitory mechanisms of Uncaria tomentosa extracts on the Wnt-signaling pathway, a central regulator of development and tissue homoeostasis. A modified cell-based luciferase assay for screening inhibitors of the Wnt-pathway was used for analysis. Three cancer cell lines displaying different levels of aberrant Wnt-signaling activity were transfected with Wnt-signaling responsive Tcf-reporter plasmids and treated with increasing concentrations of two Uncaria tomentosa bark extracts. Wnt-signaling activity was assessed by luciferase activity and by expression of Wnt-responsive target genes. We show that both, an aqueous and an alkaloid-enriched extract specifically inhibit Wnt-signaling activity in HeLa, HCT116 and SW480 cancer cells resulting in reduced expression of the Wnt-target gene: c-Myc. The alkaloid-enriched extract (B/S(rt)) was found to be more effective than the aqueous extract (B/W(37)). The strongest effect was observed in SW480 cells, displaying the highest endogenous Wnt-signaling activity. Downregulation of Wnt-signaling by a dominant negative-TCF-4 variant in non-cancer cells rendered the cells insensitive towards treatment with B/S(rt). B/Srt was less toxic in non-cancer cells than in cancer cells. Our data suggest that the broad spectrum of pharmacological action of Uncaria tomentosa involves inhibition of the Wnt-signaling pathway, downstream of beta-Catenin activity.

  11. Histone acetyltransferase p300 modulates gene expression in an epigenetic manner at high blood alcohol levels.

    PubMed

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; French, Barbara A; Joyce, Michael; Baires, Mercedes; Montgomery, Rosalyn O; Li, Jun; French, Samuel

    2007-04-01

    When rats are fed ethanol intragastrically at a constant rate for 1 month, the urinary alcohol level (UAL) cycles over 7-9 day intervals. At the peak UAL, the liver is hypoxic shifting the redox state to a reduced rate. Microarray analysis done on livers at the UAL peaks shows changes in approximately 1300 gene expression compared to the pair-fed controls. To determine the mechanism of the gene expression changes, histone acetylation regulation was investigated in liver nuclear extracts at the peaks and troughs of the UAL and their pair-fed controls. No change occurred in SirT-1. P300, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), which acetylates histone H3 on lysine 9, was increased at the peaks. Histone 3 acetylated at lysine 9 was also increased at the peaks. This indicates that the up regulated genes at the UAL peaks resulted from an increase in p300 transcription regulation, epigenetically. P300 activates transcription of numerous genes in response to signal transcription factors such as H1F 1alpha, increased in the nucleus at UAL peaks. Signal transduction pathways, such as NFkappaB, AP-1, ERK, JNK, and p38 were not increased at the peaks. beta-Catenin was increased in the nuclear extract at the UAL troughs, where increased gene expression was absent. The increase in gene expression at the peaks was due, in part, to increased acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 9.

  12. Beta Catenin in Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    to be injected with LNCaP prostate cancer cells and following approval from Loyola IACUC and ACURO, the xenograft studies were initiated. As...xenograft studies. 12. Obtained Loyola -IACUC and ACURO approval to utilize the C4-2 and C4-2B cells for in vivo studies. Reportable Outcomes: We had

  13. Beta Catenin in Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-03

    resistance (15). Studies by others have revealed that combinatorial treatment with TRAIL and ligands of PPAR  (Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor...prostate (LNCaP) and liver (Huh-7) cancer cells with a com bination of TRAIL and PPAR  ligand Troglitazone (TZD) reduced TR AIL resistance and sign...demonstrated that PPAR  activation via TZD can lead to a reduction of full length -catenin expression, which operates via a GS K3-independent non

  14. Beta Catenin in Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Cleaved PARP, however, was enriched in the nuclear/cytoskeletal compartment and was extracted in Sarkosyl and SDS fractions (lanes 15, 16). Caspase 3...retained strong interaction with E-Cadherin, as indicated by immunoprecipitation studies. Detergent fractionation of the cell extracts treated with the...LNCaP cells were treated with TRAIL and TZD alone or in combination for 16hrs and extracted sequentially as Fig 3: Effect of Caspase inhibitors

  15. [Regulating effect of anodonta glucan HBP-A on chondrocytes through Wnt pathway].

    PubMed

    Wei, Song-Pu; Ding, Dao-Fang; Wang, Xue-Zong; Pang, Jian; Zheng, Yu-Xin; Xu, Qin-Guang; Cao, Yue-Long; Zhan, Hong-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    To investigate regulation function of anodonta glucan HBP-A on chondrocytes through Wnt pathway in vitro. Rat chondrocytes were cultured and differentiated induced with IL-1beta (10 ng/ml) in vitro. Chondrocytes were divided into five groups:IL-13 group,IL-1beta + IWP-2 (5 microM,Wnt pathway inhibitor) group, IL-1beta + HBP-A (0.3 mg/ml) group and IL-1beta + IWP-2 + HBP-A group. Wnt-3a, beta-catenin (24 h,48 h,72 h) and MMP-13(72 h) genes expression were detected by Rt-PCR, while beta-catenin, MMP-13, Sox-9 and coll-II (48 h) protein expression were measured by Western-blot. After induction of IL-1beta, gene expression of Wnt-3a, beta-catenin and MMP-13 were increased,so were the protein expression of beta-catenin and MMP-13. In contrast,protein expression of Sox-9 and Coll-II were declined. Following addition of HBP-A, Wnt-3a, beta-catenin and MMP-13 were shown as induction of IL-1beta, but protein expression of Sox-9 and Coll-II were upgraded. Combining HBP-A with IWP-2 led to the lowest level in Wnt-3a, beta-catenin gene and beta-catenin protein expression and highest expression of Sox-9 protein. HBP-A could not only delay the differentiation of chondrocytes through downgrading the signal expression of Wnt/beta-catenin,but also adjust the expression of Wnt-3a, beta-catenin and Sox-9 when combinated with the Wnt inhibitor.

  16. Negative blood oxygen level dependent signals during speech comprehension.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Moreno, Diana; Schiff, Nicholas D; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-05-01

    Speech comprehension studies have generally focused on the isolation and function of regions with positive blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals with respect to a resting baseline. Although regions with negative BOLD signals in comparison to a resting baseline have been reported in language-related tasks, their relationship to regions of positive signals is not fully appreciated. Based on the emerging notion that the negative signals may represent an active function in language tasks, the authors test the hypothesis that negative BOLD signals during receptive language are more associated with comprehension than content-free versions of the same stimuli. Regions associated with comprehension of speech were isolated by comparing responses to passive listening to natural speech to two incomprehensible versions of the same speech: one that was digitally time reversed and one that was muffled by removal of high frequencies. The signal polarity was determined by comparing the BOLD signal during each speech condition to the BOLD signal during a resting baseline. As expected, stimulation-induced positive signals relative to resting baseline were observed in the canonical language areas with varying signal amplitudes for each condition. Negative BOLD responses relative to resting baseline were observed primarily in frontoparietal regions and were specific to the natural speech condition. However, the BOLD signal remained indistinguishable from baseline for the unintelligible speech conditions. Variations in connectivity between brain regions with positive and negative signals were also specifically related to the comprehension of natural speech. These observations of anticorrelated signals related to speech comprehension are consistent with emerging models of cooperative roles represented by BOLD signals of opposite polarity.

  17. Negative Blood Oxygen Level Dependent Signals During Speech Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Moreno, Diana; Schiff, Nicholas D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Speech comprehension studies have generally focused on the isolation and function of regions with positive blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals with respect to a resting baseline. Although regions with negative BOLD signals in comparison to a resting baseline have been reported in language-related tasks, their relationship to regions of positive signals is not fully appreciated. Based on the emerging notion that the negative signals may represent an active function in language tasks, the authors test the hypothesis that negative BOLD signals during receptive language are more associated with comprehension than content-free versions of the same stimuli. Regions associated with comprehension of speech were isolated by comparing responses to passive listening to natural speech to two incomprehensible versions of the same speech: one that was digitally time reversed and one that was muffled by removal of high frequencies. The signal polarity was determined by comparing the BOLD signal during each speech condition to the BOLD signal during a resting baseline. As expected, stimulation-induced positive signals relative to resting baseline were observed in the canonical language areas with varying signal amplitudes for each condition. Negative BOLD responses relative to resting baseline were observed primarily in frontoparietal regions and were specific to the natural speech condition. However, the BOLD signal remained indistinguishable from baseline for the unintelligible speech conditions. Variations in connectivity between brain regions with positive and negative signals were also specifically related to the comprehension of natural speech. These observations of anticorrelated signals related to speech comprehension are consistent with emerging models of cooperative roles represented by BOLD signals of opposite polarity. PMID:25412406

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} is expressed in hippocampal neurons and its activation prevents {beta}-amyloid neurodegeneration: role of Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C. . E-mail: ninestr@genes.bio.puc.cl; Godoy, Juan A.; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.; Koenig, Cecilia S.; Bronfman, Miguel

    2005-03-10

    The molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves the participation of the amyloid-{beta}-peptide (A{beta}), which plays a critical role in the neurodegeneration that triggers the disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors, which are members of the nuclear receptor family. We report here that (1) PPAR{gamma} is present in rat hippocampal neurons in culture. (2) Activation of PPAR{gamma} by troglitazone and rosiglitazone protects rat hippocampal neurons against A{beta}-induced neurodegeneration, as shown by the 3-[4,5 -2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay, immunofluorescence using an anti-heavy neurofilament antibody, and quantitative electron microscopy. (3) Hippocampal neurons treated with several PPAR{gamma} agonists, including troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and ciglitazone, prevent the excitotoxic A{beta}-induced rise in bulk-free Ca{sup 2+}. (4) PPAR{gamma} activation results in the modulation of Wnt signaling components, including the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and an increase of the cytoplasmic and nuclear {beta}-catenin levels. We conclude that the activation of PPAR{gamma} prevents A{beta}-induced neurodegeneration by a mechanism that may involve a cross talk between neuronal PPAR{gamma} and the Wnt signaling pathway. More important, the fact that the activation of PPAR{gamma} attenuated A{beta}-dependent neurodegeneration opens the possibility to fight AD from a new therapeutic perspective.

  19. In Hyperthermia Increased ERK and WNT Signaling Suppress Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bordonaro, Michael; Shirasawa, Senji; Lazarova, Darina L.

    2016-01-01

    Although neoplastic cells exhibit relatively higher sensitivity to hyperthermia than normal cells, hyperthermia has had variable success as an anti-cancer therapy. This variable outcome might be due to the fact that cancer cells themselves have differential degrees of sensitivity to high temperature. We hypothesized that the varying sensitivity of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells to hyperthermia depends upon the differential induction of survival pathways. Screening of such pathways revealed that Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) signaling is augmented by hyperthermia, and the extent of this modulation correlates with the mutation status of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS). Through clonal growth assays, apoptotic analyses and transcription reporter assays of CRC cells that differ only in KRAS mutation status we established that mutant KRAS cells are more sensitive to hyperthermia, as they exhibit sustained ERK signaling hyperactivation and increased Wingless/Integrated (WNT)/beta-catenin signaling. We propose that whereas increased levels of WNT and ERK signaling and a positive feedback between the two pathways is a major obstacle in anti-cancer therapy today, under hyperthermia the hyperinduction of the pathways and their positive crosstalk contribute to CRC cell death. Ascertaining the causative association between types of mutations and hyperthermia sensitivity may allow for a mutation profile-guided application of hyperthermia as an anti-cancer therapy. Since KRAS and WNT signaling mutations are prevalent in CRC, our results suggest that hyperthermia-based therapy might benefit a significant number, but not all, CRC patients. PMID:27187477

  20. Presenilin 1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor turnover and signaling in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Emanuela; Yoon, Il-Sang; Zheng, Hui; Kang, David E

    2007-10-26

    Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin 1 (PS1) cause the most aggressive form of early-onset familial Alzheimer disease. In addition to its well established role in Abeta production and Notch proteolysis, PS1 has been shown to mediate other physiological activities, such as regulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway, modulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling, and trafficking of select membrane proteins and/or intracellular vesicles. In this study, we present evidence that PS1 is a critical regulator of a key signaling receptor tyrosine kinase, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Specifically, EGFR levels were robustly increased in fibroblasts deficient in both PS1 and PS2 (PS(-/-)) due to delayed turnover of EGFR protein. Stable transfection of wild-type PS1 but not PS2 corrected EGFR to levels comparable to PS(+/+) cells, while FAD PS1 mutations showed partial loss of activity. The C-terminal fragment of PS1 was sufficient to fully reduce EGFR levels. In addition, the rapid ligand-induced degradation of EGFR was markedly delayed in PS(-/-) cells, resulting in prolonged signal activation. Despite the defective turnover of EGFR, ligand-induced autophosphorylation, ubiquitination, and endocytosis of EGFR were not affected by the lack of PS1. Instead, the trafficking of EGFR from early endosomes to lysosomes was severely delayed by PS1 deficiency. Elevation of EGFR was also seen in brains of adult mice conditionally ablated in PS1 and in skin tumors associated with the loss of PS1. These findings demonstrate a critical role of PS1 in the trafficking and turnover of EGFR and suggest potential pathogenic effects of elevated EGFR as well as perturbed endosomal-lysosomal trafficking in cell cycle control and Alzheimer disease.

  1. MicroRNA-449a Overexpression, Reduced NOTCH1 Signals and Scarce Goblet Cells Characterize the Small Intestine of Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tinto, Nadia; Montanaro, Donatella; Capobianco, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Giancarlo; Greco, Luigi; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    MiRNAs play a relevant role in regulating gene expression in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions including autoimmune disorders. MiRNAs are also important in the differentiation and function of the mouse intestinal epithelium. Our study was aimed to look for miRNA-based modulation of gene expression in celiac small intestine, and particularly for genes involved in cell intestinal differentiation/proliferation mechanisms. A cohort of 40 children (20 with active CD, 9 on a gluten-free diet (GFD), and 11 controls), were recruited at the Paediatrics Department (University of Naples Federico II). The expression of 365 human miRNAs was quantified by TaqMan low-density arrays. We used bioinformatics to predict putative target genes of miRNAs and to select biological pathways. The presence of NOTCH1, HES1, KLF4, MUC-2, Ki67 and beta-catenin proteins in the small intestine of CD and control children was tested by immunohistochemistry. The expression of about 20% of the miRNAs tested differed between CD and control children. We found that high miR-449a levels targeted and reduced both NOTCH1 and KLF4 in HEK-293 cells. NOTCH1, KLF4 signals and the number of goblet cells were lower in small intestine of children with active CD and in those on a GFD than in controls, whereas more nuclear beta-catenin staining, as a sign of the WNT pathway activation, and more Ki67 staining, as sign of proliferation, were present in crypts from CD patients than in controls. In conclusion we first demonstrate a miRNA mediated gene regulation in small intestine of CD patients. We also highlighted a reduced NOTCH1 pathway in our patients, irrespective of whether the disease was active or not. We suggest that NOTCH pathway could be constitutively altered in the celiac small intestine and could drive the increased proliferation and the decreased differentiation of intestinal cells towards the secretory goblet cell lineage. PMID:22194996

  2. MicroRNA-449a overexpression, reduced NOTCH1 signals and scarce goblet cells characterize the small intestine of celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Marina; Iaffaldano, Laura; Tinto, Nadia; Montanaro, Donatella; Capobianco, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Giancarlo; Greco, Luigi; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    MiRNAs play a relevant role in regulating gene expression in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions including autoimmune disorders. MiRNAs are also important in the differentiation and function of the mouse intestinal epithelium. Our study was aimed to look for miRNA-based modulation of gene expression in celiac small intestine, and particularly for genes involved in cell intestinal differentiation/proliferation mechanisms. A cohort of 40 children (20 with active CD, 9 on a gluten-free diet (GFD), and 11 controls), were recruited at the Paediatrics Department (University of Naples Federico II). The expression of 365 human miRNAs was quantified by TaqMan low-density arrays. We used bioinformatics to predict putative target genes of miRNAs and to select biological pathways. The presence of NOTCH1, HES1, KLF4, MUC-2, Ki67 and beta-catenin proteins in the small intestine of CD and control children was tested by immunohistochemistry. The expression of about 20% of the miRNAs tested differed between CD and control children. We found that high miR-449a levels targeted and reduced both NOTCH1 and KLF4 in HEK-293 cells. NOTCH1, KLF4 signals and the number of goblet cells were lower in small intestine of children with active CD and in those on a GFD than in controls, whereas more nuclear beta-catenin staining, as a sign of the WNT pathway activation, and more Ki67 staining, as sign of proliferation, were present in crypts from CD patients than in controls. In conclusion we first demonstrate a miRNA mediated gene regulation in small intestine of CD patients. We also highlighted a reduced NOTCH1 pathway in our patients, irrespective of whether the disease was active or not. We suggest that NOTCH pathway could be constitutively altered in the celiac small intestine and could drive the increased proliferation and the decreased differentiation of intestinal cells towards the secretory goblet cell lineage.

  3. Casein kinase 1 gamma couples Wnt receptor activation to cytoplasmic signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Gary; Wu, Wei; Shen, Jinlong; Bilic, Josipa; Fenger, Ursula; Stannek, Peter; Glinka, Andrei; Niehrs, Christof

    2005-12-08

    Signalling by Wnt proteins (Wingless in Drosophila) has diverse roles during embryonic development and in adults, and is implicated in human diseases, including cancer. LDL-receptor-related proteins 5 and 6 (LRP5 and LRP6; Arrow in Drosophila) are key receptors required for transmission of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling in metazoa. Although the role of these receptors in Wnt signalling is well established, their coupling with the cytoplasmic signalling apparatus remains poorly defined. Using a protein modification screen for regulators of LRP6, we describe the identification of Xenopus Casein kinase 1 gamma (CK1gamma), a membrane-bound member of the CK1 family. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments show that CK1gamma is both necessary and sufficient to transduce LRP6 signalling in vertebrates and Drosophila cells. In Xenopus embryos, CK1gamma is required during anterio-posterior patterning to promote posteriorizing Wnt/beta-catenin signalling. CK1gamma is associated with LRP6, which has multiple, modular CK1 phosphorylation sites. Wnt treatment induces the rapid CK1gamma-mediated phosphorylation of these sites within LRP6, which, in turn, promotes the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin. Our results reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that couples Wnt receptor activation to the cytoplasmic signal transduction apparatus.

  4. Quadrupole mass spectrometer driver with higher signal levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Aalami, Dean (Inventor); Darrach, Murray (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Driving a quadrapole mass spectrometer includes obtaining an air core transformer with a primary and a secondary, matching the secondary to the mass spectrometer, and driving the primary based on first and second voltage levels. Driving of the primary is via an isolating stage that minimizes low level drive signal coupling.

  5. SNS LINAC Wire Scanner System : Signal Levels and Accuracy.

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. A.; Christensen, W.; Myer, R. E.; Rose, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The linac wire scanner system for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, TN, USA, calls for 5 units in the medium energy beam transport (MEBT), 5 in the drift tube linac (DTL), and 10 in the coupled cavity linac (CCL). In this paper we present expected signal levels and an analysis of the error in the beam size measurement as functions of wire position and electrical signal errors.

  6. Effects of age, signal level, and signal rate on the auditory middle latency response.

    PubMed

    Tucker, D A; Ruth, R A

    1996-04-01

    The effects of age, signal rate, and signal level on the maturing auditory middle latency response (AMLR) were evaluated in 50 normal-hearing subjects ranging in age from 2 days to 35 years. Ipsilateral and contralateral AMLR waveforms were recorded in newborns (n = 10), children (n = 10), preteens (n = 10), teens (n = 10), and adults (n = 10). The AMLR Pa waveform was obtained in 70 to 100 percent of all subjects. The variables of age, signal level, and site of recording significantly affected Pa peak amplitude and absolute latency. However, stimulus rate did not significantly affect the response.

  7. Canonical Wnt signaling transiently stimulates proliferation and enhances neurogenesis in neonatal neural progenitor cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Cordula; Campano, Louise M.; Woehrle, Simon; Hecht, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.hecht@mol-med.uni-freiburg.de

    2007-02-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling triggers the formation of heterodimeric transcription factor complexes consisting of {beta}-catenin and T cell factors, and thereby controls the execution of specific genetic programs. During the expansion and neurogenic phases of embryonic neural development canonical Wnt signaling initially controls proliferation of neural progenitor cells, and later neuronal differentiation. Whether Wnt growth factors affect neural progenitor cells postnatally is not known. Therefore, we have analyzed the impact of Wnt signaling on neural progenitors isolated from cerebral cortices of newborn mice. Expression profiling of pathway components revealed that these cells are fully equipped to respond to Wnt signals. However, Wnt pathway activation affected only a subset of neonatal progenitors and elicited a limited increase in proliferation and neuronal differentiation in distinct subsets of cells. Moreover, Wnt pathway activation only transiently stimulated S-phase entry but did not support long-term proliferation of progenitor cultures. The dampened nature of the Wnt response correlates with the predominant expression of inhibitory pathway components and the rapid actuation of negative feedback mechanisms. Interestingly, in differentiating cell cultures activation of canonical Wnt signaling reduced Hes1 and Hes5 expression suggesting that during postnatal neural development, Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling enhances neurogenesis from progenitor cells by interfering with Notch pathway activity.

  8. Glucocorticoid suppresses the canonical Wnt signal in cultured human osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnaka, Keizo . E-mail: oonaka@geriat.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Tanabe, Mizuho; Kawate, Hisaya; Nawata, Hajime; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2005-04-01

    To explore the mechanism of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, we investigated the effect of glucocorticoid on canonical Wnt signaling that emerged as a novel key pathway for promoting bone formation. Wnt3a increased the T-cell factor (Tcf)/lymphoid enhancer factor (Lef)-dependent transcriptional activity in primary cultured human osteoblasts. Dexamethasone suppressed this transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner, while 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 increased this transcriptional activity. LiCl, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta}, also enhanced the Tcf/Lef-dependent transcriptional activity, which was, however, not inhibited by dexamethasone. The addition of anti-dickkopf-1 antibody partially restored the transcriptional activity suppressed by dexamethasone. Dexamethasone decreased the cytosolic amount of {beta}-catenin accumulated by Wnt3a and also inhibited the nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin induced by Wnt3a. These data suggest that glucocorticoid suppresses the canonical Wnt signal in cultured human osteoblasts, partially through the enhancement of the dickkopf-1 production.

  9. Wnt signaling in heart valve development and osteogenic gene induction

    PubMed Central

    Alfieri, Christina M.; Cheek, Jonathan; Chakraborty, Santanu; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2009-01-01

    Wnt signaling mediated by beta-catenin has been implicated in early endocardial cushion development, but its roles in later stages of heart valve maturation and homeostasis have not been identified. Multiple Wnt ligands and pathway genes are differentially expressed during heart valve development. At E12.5, Wnt2 is expressed in cushion mesenchyme, whereas Wnt4 and Wnt9b are predominant in overlying endothelial cells. At E17.5, both Wnt3a and Wnt7b are expressed in the remodeling atrioventricular (AV) and semilunar valves. In addition, the TOPGAL Wnt reporter transgene is active throughout the developing AV and semilunar valves at E16.5, with more localized expression in the stratified valve leaflets after birth. In chicken embryo aortic valves, genes characteristic of osteogenic cell lineages including periostin, osteonectin, and Id2 are expressed specifically in the collagen-rich fibrosa layer at E14. Treatment of E14 aortic valve interstitial cells (VIC) in culture with osteogenic media results in increased expression of multiple genes associated with bone formation. Treatment of VIC with Wnt3a leads to nuclear localization of beta-catenin and induction of periostin and matrix gla-protein, but does not induce genes associated with later stages of osteogenesis. Together, these studies provide evidence for Wnt signaling as a regulator of endocardial cushion maturation as well as valve leaflet stratification, homeostasis and pathogenesis. PMID:19961844

  10. Acoustical positioning method using transponders with adaptive signal level normalizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaya, Hirokazu; Mizutani, Koichi; Ebihara, Tadashi; Wakatsuki, Naoto

    2017-07-01

    Acoustical indoor positioning — a technology to locate objects or people inside a building using acoustical signals — is a key technology for contextual awareness and ubiquitous computing. To achieve simple localization, in this paper, we propose a transponder-based indoor positioning method. The proposed method does not require clock synchronization for accurate positioning. Furthermore, by using an adaptive signal level normalizer, the terminal can receive acoustic signals with appropriate levels resulting in accurate positioning. We designed a transponder-based indoor positioning method using audible sound and evaluated its performance in experiments. In experiments, three anchors (transponders) of known position are installed on a ceiling of an anechoic chamber, and positioning is performed by setting a terminal in various points. Positioning experiment results showed that the proposed method can achieve on the order of 0.08 ± 0.02 m positioning.

  11. Inhibition of adipocytogenesis by canonical WNT signaling in human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Longxiang; Glowacki, Julie; Zhou, Shuanhu

    2011-08-01

    The WNT signaling pathway plays important roles in the self-renewal and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Little is known about WNT signaling in adipocyte differentiation of human MSCs. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that canonical and non-canonical WNTs differentially regulate in vitro adipocytogenesis in human MSCs. The expression of adipocyte gene PPAR{gamma}2, lipoprotein lipase, and adipsin increased during adipocytogenesis of hMSCs. Simultaneously, the expression of canonical WNT2, 10B, 13, and 14 decreased, whereas non-canonical WNT4 and 11 increased, and WNT5A was unchanged. A small molecule WNT mimetic, SB-216763, increased accumulation of {beta}-catenin protein, inhibited induction of WNT4 and 11 and inhibited adipocytogenesis. In contrast, knockdown of {beta}-catenin with siRNA resulted in spontaneous adipocytogenesis. These findings support the view that canonical WNT signaling inhibits and non-canonical WNT signaling promotes adipocytogenesis in adult human marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  12. Dpr Acts as a molecular switch, inhibiting Wnt signaling when unphosphorylated, but promoting Wnt signaling when phosphorylated by casein kinase Idelta/epsilon.

    PubMed

    Teran, Evelyn; Branscomb, Aron D; Seeling, Joni M

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt pathway is a key regulator of development and tumorigenesis. Dpr (Dact/Frodo) influences Wnt signaling in part through the interaction of its PDZ-B domain with Dsh's PDZ domain. Studies have shown that XDpr1a and its close relative, Frodo, are involved in multiple steps of the Wnt pathway in either inhibitory or activating roles. We found that XDpr1a is phosphorylated by casein kinase Idelta/epsilon (CKIdelta/epsilon), an activator of Wnt signaling, in the presence of XDsh. Abrogating XDpr1a's ability to bind XDsh through mutation of XDpr1a's PDZ-B domain blocks CK1delta/epsilon's phosphorylation of XDpr1a. Conversely, XDsh possessing a mutation in its PDZ domain that is unable to bind XDpr1a does not promote XDpr1a phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of XDpr1a and XDsh by CKIdelta/epsilon decreases their interaction. Moreover, the phosphorylation of XDpr1a by CKIdelta/epsilon not only abrogates XDpr1a's promotion of beta-catenin degradation but blocks beta-catenin degradation. Our data suggest that XDpr1a phosphorylation by CKIdelta/epsilon is dependent on the interaction of XDpr1a's PDZ-B domain with XDsh's PDZ domain, and that the phosphorylation state of XDpr1a determines whether it inhibits or activates Wnt signaling.

  13. pangolin encodes a Lef-1 homologue that acts downstream of Armadillo to transduce the Wingless signal in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Brunner, E; Peter, O; Schweizer, L; Basler, K

    1997-02-27

    Members of the Wnt/Wingless (Wg) family of signalling proteins organize many aspects of animal development by regulating the expression of particular target genes in responding cells. Recent biochemical studies indicate that the vertebrate HMG-domain proteins Lef-1 and XTcf-3 can physically interact with beta-catenin, a homologue of Drosophila Armadillo (Arm), the most downstream component known in the Wnt signal transduction pathway. However, these studies do not address whether the endogenous Lef/Tcf family members are required in vivo to transduce Wnt signals. Using genetic methods in Drosophila, we define a new segment polarity gene, pangolin (pan), and show that its product is required in vivo for Wg signal transduction in embryos and in developing adult tissues. In addition, we show that pan encodes a Lef/Tcf homologue and provide evidence that its protein product binds to the beta-catenin homologue Armadillo in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that Pan functions downstream of Arm to transduce the Wg signal. Thus, our results indicate that Pan is an essential component of the Wg transduction pathway and suggest that it acts directly to regulate gene transcription in response to Wg signalling.

  14. Dubble or nothing? Is HAUSP deubiquitylating enzyme the final arbiter of p53 levels?

    PubMed

    Wood, Stephen A

    2002-07-30

    Signal transduction processes can be regulated by biochemical modifications that affect protein activity or localization and by protein stability. Proteins implicated in cancer, such as beta-catenin and p53, are regulated by a combination of posttranslational modifications and protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Wood explores how ubiquitylation of these proteins may not be as unidirectional as previously thought. With the identification of substrate-specific deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitylation may not always lead to protein destruction, but may provide another finely tunable step for controlling protein activity.

  15. Pseudo Asynchronous Level Crossing adc for ecg Signal Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Marisa, T; Niederhauser, T; Haeberlin, A; Wildhaber, R A; Vogel, R; Goette, J; Jacomet, M

    2017-02-07

    A new pseudo asynchronous level crossing analogue-to-digital converter (adc) architecture targeted for low-power, implantable, long-term biomedical sensing applications is presented. In contrast to most of the existing asynchronous level crossing adc designs, the proposed design has no digital-to-analogue converter (dac) and no continuous time comparators. Instead, the proposed architecture uses an analogue memory cell and dynamic comparators. The architecture retains the signal activity dependent sampling operation by generating events only when the input signal is changing. The architecture offers the advantages of smaller chip area, energy saving and fewer analogue system components. Beside lower energy consumption the use of dynamic comparators results in a more robust performance in noise conditions. Moreover, dynamic comparators make interfacing the asynchronous level crossing system to synchronous processing blocks simpler. The proposed adc was implemented in [Formula: see text] complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (cmos) technology, the hardware occupies a chip area of 0.0372 mm(2) and operates from a supply voltage of [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]. The adc's power consumption is as low as 0.6 μW with signal bandwidth from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] and achieves an equivalent number of bits (enob) of up to 8 bits.

  16. Notch signaling promotes the generation of EphrinB1-positive intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Lim, Hyoung-Soo; Chang, Hee Jin; Yoon, Mi-Jeong; Choi, Yongwook; Kong, Myung-Phil; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Jin-Man; Park, Jae-Gahb; Kong, Young-Yun

    2009-07-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of EphB2-positive proliferative basal cryptic cells and EphrinB1-positive, postmitotic differentiated cells. We investigated the effects of Notch signaling on formation of the EphB2-EphrinB1 boundary using mouse and tissue culture models. We created mice in which Mind bomb-1 (Mib1), an essential E3 ubiquitin ligase that activates Notch ligands, was inactivated specifically in the intestinal epithelia (Vil-Cre;Mib1(f/f)); Notch is, therefore, inactivated in this tissue. We also studied the effects of different inhibitors on intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) that express activated Notch. Tissues and cells were analyzed by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. The intestinal epithelia of Vil-Cre;Mib1(f/f) mice had reduced numbers of EphrinB1-positive cells, compared with controls, but increases in EphB2-positive cells; beta-catenin was activated in these cells. These phenotypes were reversed by expression of a constitutively active form of Notch1. In the IEC-6 cells, Notch signaling activated the expression of EphrinB1 in an Hes1-independent manner, but down-regulated the expression of EphB2 through the GSK3beta-mediated inhibition of beta-catenin. Notch signaling regulates formation of the EphB2-EphrinB1 boundary in the mouse intestinal epithelium.

  17. Mean level signal crossing rate for an arbitrary stochastic process.

    PubMed

    Yura, Harold T; Hanson, Steen G

    2010-04-01

    The issue of the mean signal level crossing rate for various probability density functions with primary relevance for optics is discussed based on a new analytical method. This method relies on a unique transformation that transforms the probability distribution under investigation into a normal probability distribution, for which the distribution of mean level crossings is known. In general, the analytical results for the mean level crossing rate are supported and confirmed by numerical simulations. In particular, we illustrate the present method by presenting analytic expressions for the mean level crossing rate for various probability distributions, including ones that previously were unavailable, such as the uniform, the so-called gamma-gamma, and the Rice-Nakagami distribution. However, in a limited number of cases the present results differ somewhat from the result reported in the literature. At present, this discrepancy remains unexplained and is laid open for future discussion.

  18. Medicarpin, a Natural Pterocarpan, Heals Cortical Bone Defect by Activation of Notch and Wnt Canonical Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Chandra Prakash; Kureel, Jyoti; Mansoori, Mohd Nizam; Shukla, Priyanka; John, Aijaz A.; Singh, Kavita; Purohit, Dipak; Awasthi, Pallavi; Singh, Divya; Goel, Atul

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the bone regeneration and healing effect of Medicarpin (med) in cortical bone defect model that heals by intramembranous ossification. For the study, female Sprague–Dawley rats were ovariectomized and rendered osteopenic. A drill hole injury was generated in mid femoral bones of all the animals. Med treatment was commenced the day after and continued for 15 days. PTH was taken as a reference standard. Fifteen days post-treatment, animals were sacrificed. Bones were collected for histomorphometry studies at the injury site by micro-computed tomography (μCT) and confocal microscopy. RNA and protein was harvested from newly generated bone. For immunohistochemistry, 5μm sections of decalcified femur bone adjoining the drill hole site were cut. By μCT analysis and calcein labeling of newly generated bone it was found that med promotes bone healing and new bone formation at the injury site and was comparable to PTH in many aspects. Med treatment led to increase in the Runx-2 and osteocalcin signals indicating expansion of osteoprogenitors at the injury site as evaluated by qPCR and immunohistochemical localization. It was observed that med promoted bone regeneration by activating canonical Wnt and notch signaling pathway. This was evident by increased transcript and protein levels of Wnt and notch signaling components in the defect region. Finally, we confirmed that med treatment leads to elevated bone healing in pre-osteoblasts by co localization of beta catenin with osteoblast marker alkaline phosphatase. In conclusion, med treatment promotes new bone regeneration and healing at the injury site by activating Wnt/canonical and notch signaling pathways. This study also forms a strong case for evaluation of med in delayed union and non-union fracture cases. PMID:26657206

  19. Dissecting nuclear Wingless signalling: recruitment of the transcriptional co-activator Pygopus by a chain of adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Städeli, Reto; Basler, Konrad

    2005-11-01

    Members of the Wingless (Wg)/Wnt family of secreted glycoproteins control cell fate during embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Wnt signals regulate the expression of target genes by activating a conserved signal transduction pathway. Upon receptor activation, the signal is transmitted intracellularly by stabilization of Armadillo (Arm)/beta-catenin. Arm/beta-catenin translocates to the nucleus, interacts with DNA-binding factors of the Pangolin (Pan)/TCF/LEF class and activates transcription of target genes in cooperation with the recently identified proteins Legless/BCL9 (Lgs) and Pygopus (Pygo). Here, we analyse the mode of action of Pan, Arm, Lgs, and Pygo in Drosophila cultured cells. We provide evidence that together these four proteins form a 'chain of adaptors' linking the NH2-terminal homology domain (NHD) of Pygo to the DNA-binding domain of Pan. We show that the NHD has potent transcriptional activation capacity, which differs from that of acidic activator domains and depends on a conserved NPF tripeptide. A single point mutation within this NPF motif abolishes the transcriptional activity of the Pygo NHD in vitro and strongly reduces Wg signalling in vivo. Together, our results suggest that the transcriptional output of Wg pathway activity largely relies on a 'chain of adaptors' design to direct the Pygo NHD to Wg target promoters in an Arm-dependent manner.

  20. Enhanced BMP signaling results in supernumerary tooth formation in USAG-1 deficient mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Murashima-Suginami, Akiko; Takahashi, Katsu Sakata, Tomoko; Tsukamoto, Hiroko; Sugai, Manabu; Yanagita, Motoko; Shimizu, Akira; Sakurai, Takeshi; Slavkin, Harold C.; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2008-05-16

    Uterine sensitization associated gene-1 (USAG-1) is a BMP antagonist, and also modulates Wnt signaling. We previously reported that USAG-1 deficient mice have supernumerary teeth. The supernumerary maxillary incisor appears to form as a result of the successive development of the rudimentary upper incisor. USAG-1 abrogation rescued apoptotic elimination of odontogenic mesenchymal cells. We confirmed that BMPs were expressed in both the epithelium and mesenchyme of the rudimentary incisor at E14 and E15. BMP signaling in the rudimentary maxillary incisor, assessed by expressions of Msx1 and Dlx2 and the phosphorylation of Smad protein, was significantly enhanced. Wnt signaling as demonstrated by the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin was also up-regulated. Inhibition of BMP signaling rescues supernumerary tooth formation in E15 incisor explant culture. Based upon these results, we conclude that enhanced BMP signaling results in supernumerary teeth and BMP signaling was modulated by Wnt signaling in the USAG-1 deficient mouse model.

  1. Signal Transduction at the Single-Cell Level: Approaches to Study the Dynamic Nature of Signaling Networks.

    PubMed

    Handly, L Naomi; Yao, Jason; Wollman, Roy

    2016-09-25

    Signal transduction, or how cells interpret and react to external events, is a fundamental aspect of cellular function. Traditional study of signal transduction pathways involves mapping cellular signaling pathways at the population level. However, population-averaged readouts do not adequately illuminate the complex dynamics and heterogeneous responses found at the single-cell level. Recent technological advances that observe cellular response, computationally model signaling pathways, and experimentally manipulate cells now enable studying signal transduction at the single-cell level. These studies will enable deeper insights into the dynamic nature of signaling networks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Origin matters: differences in embryonic tissue origin and Wnt signaling determine the osteogenic potential and healing capacity of frontal and parietal calvarial bones.

    PubMed

    Quarto, Natalina; Wan, Derrick C; Kwan, Matt D; Panetta, Nicholas J; Li, Shuli; Longaker, Michael T

    2010-07-01

    Calvarial bones arise from two embryonic tissues, namely, the neural crest and the mesoderm. In this study we have addressed the important question of whether disparate embryonic tissue origins impart variable osteogenic potential and regenerative capacity to calvarial bones, as well as what the underlying molecular mechanism(s). Thus, by performing in vitro and in vivo studies, we have investigated whether differences exist between neural crest-derived frontal and paraxial mesodermal-derived parietal bone. Of interest, our data indicate that calvarial bone osteoblasts of neural crest origin have superior potential for osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, neural crest-derived frontal bone displays a superior capacity to undergo osseous healing compared with calvarial bone of paraxial mesoderm origin. Our study identified both in vitro and in vivo enhanced endogenous canonical Wnt signaling in frontal bone compared with parietal bone. In addition, we demonstrate that constitutive activation of canonical Wnt signaling in paraxial mesodermal-derived parietal osteoblasts mimics the osteogenic potential of frontal osteoblasts, whereas knockdown of canonical Wnt signaling dramatically impairs the greater osteogenic potential of neural crest-derived frontal osteoblasts. Moreover, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) treatment induces phosphorylation of GSK-3beta and increases the nuclear levels of beta-catenin in osteoblasts, suggesting that enhanced activation of Wnt signaling might be mediated by FGF. Taken together, our data provide compelling evidence that indeed embryonic tissue origin makes a difference and that active canonical Wnt signaling plays a major role in contributing to the superior intrinsic osteogenic potential and tissue regeneration observed in neural crest-derived frontal bone.

  3. Photonic microwave signals with zeptosecond-level absolute timing noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaopeng; Bouchand, Romain; Nicolodi, Daniele; Giunta, Michele; Hänsel, Wolfgang; Lezius, Matthias; Joshi, Abhay; Datta, Shubhashish; Alexandre, Christophe; Lours, Michel; Tremblin, Pierre-Alain; Santarelli, Giorgio; Holzwarth, Ronald; Le Coq, Yann

    2017-01-01

    Photonic synthesis of radiofrequency (RF) waveforms revived the quest for unrivalled microwave purity because of its ability to convey the benefits of optics to the microwave world. In this work, we perform a high-fidelity transfer of frequency stability between an optical reference and a microwave signal via a low-noise fibre-based frequency comb and cutting-edge photodetection techniques. We demonstrate the generation of the purest microwave signal with a fractional frequency stability below 6.5 × 10-16 at 1 s and a timing noise floor below 41 zs Hz-1/2 (phase noise below -173 dBc Hz-1 for a 12 GHz carrier). This outperforms existing sources and promises a new era for state-of-the-art microwave generation. The characterization is achieved through a heterodyne cross-correlation scheme with the lowermost detection noise. This unprecedented level of purity can impact domains such as radar systems, telecommunications and time-frequency metrology. The measurement methods developed here can benefit the characterization of a broad range of signals.

  4. Local Sea Level Derived from Reflected GNSS Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfgren, J. S.; Haas, R.; Scherneck, H.; Bos, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    The traditional way to observe sea level is to use tide gauges, resulting in measurements relative to the Earth's crust. However, in order to measure the sea-level change due to changes in ocean water volume and/or other oceanographic phenomena, all types of crustal motion at the measurement site need to be known. We present a remote sensing technique for measuring local sea level using standard geodetic-type Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. The installation consists of a zenith-looking Right Hand Circular Polarized (RHCP) antenna, receiving the direct signals, and a nadir-looking Left Hand Circular Polarized antenna, receiving the signals reflected of the sea surface. Each antenna is connected to a receiver and the antenna pair is deployed back-to-back at a coastal site. Estimating the vertical baseline between the two antennas, using standard geodetic analysis, the local sea level and its temporal variations can be determined. The advantage of this technique is that it allows to measure both sea surface height changes with relative positioning and land surface height changes, e.g., by precise point positioning of the RHCP antenna. Furthermore, the combined measurements of local sea level are automatically corrected for land motion, meaning that this installation could provide continuously reliable sea-level estimates in tectonic active regions. This GNSS-based tide gauge has been operating continuously at the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO) on the west coast of Sweden since September 2010. We present results from several months of operations and compare them to sea-level measurements from two stilling well gauges about 18 km south and 33 km north of OSO. We find a high degree of agreement between the time series with correlation coefficients of larger than 0.95. The root-mean-square differences between the GNSS-derived sea level and the stilling well gauge measurements are 5.9 cm and 5.5 cm, which is lower than between the two stilling well (6

  5. Levels of complexity in scale-invariant neural signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.; Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Stanley, H. Eugene; Yoneyama, Mitsuru

    2009-04-01

    Many physical and physiological signals exhibit complex scale-invariant features characterized by 1/f scaling and long-range power-law correlations, indicating a possibly common control mechanism. Specifically, it has been suggested that dynamical processes, influenced by inputs and feedback on multiple time scales, may be sufficient to give rise to 1/f scaling and scale invariance. Two examples of physiologic signals that are the output of hierarchical multiscale physiologic systems under neural control are the human heartbeat and human gait. Here we show that while both cardiac interbeat interval and gait interstride interval time series under healthy conditions have comparable 1/f scaling, they still may belong to different complexity classes. Our analysis of the multifractal scaling exponents of the fluctuations in these two signals demonstrates that in contrast to the multifractal behavior found in healthy heartbeat dynamics, gait time series exhibit less complex, close to monofractal behavior. Further, we find strong anticorrelations in the sign and close to random behavior for the magnitude of gait fluctuations at short and intermediate time scales, in contrast to weak anticorrelations in the sign and strong positive correlation for the magnitude of heartbeat interval fluctuations—suggesting that the neural mechanisms of cardiac and gait control exhibit different linear and nonlinear features. These findings are of interest because they underscore the limitations of traditional two-point correlation methods in fully characterizing physiological and physical dynamics. In addition, these results suggest that different mechanisms of control may be responsible for varying levels of complexity observed in physiological systems under neural regulation and in physical systems that possess similar 1/f scaling.

  6. Levels of complexity in scale-invariant neural signals.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Ma, Qianli D Y; Bartsch, Ronny P; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Nunes Amaral, Luís A; Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Stanley, H Eugene; Yoneyama, Mitsuru

    2009-04-01

    Many physical and physiological signals exhibit complex scale-invariant features characterized by 1/f scaling and long-range power-law correlations, indicating a possibly common control mechanism. Specifically, it has been suggested that dynamical processes, influenced by inputs and feedback on multiple time scales, may be sufficient to give rise to 1/f scaling and scale invariance. Two examples of physiologic signals that are the output of hierarchical multiscale physiologic systems under neural control are the human heartbeat and human gait. Here we show that while both cardiac interbeat interval and gait interstride interval time series under healthy conditions have comparable 1/f scaling, they still may belong to different complexity classes. Our analysis of the multifractal scaling exponents of the fluctuations in these two signals demonstrates that in contrast to the multifractal behavior found in healthy heartbeat dynamics, gait time series exhibit less complex, close to monofractal behavior. Further, we find strong anticorrelations in the sign and close to random behavior for the magnitude of gait fluctuations at short and intermediate time scales, in contrast to weak anticorrelations in the sign and strong positive correlation for the magnitude of heartbeat interval fluctuations-suggesting that the neural mechanisms of cardiac and gait control exhibit different linear and nonlinear features. These findings are of interest because they underscore the limitations of traditional two-point correlation methods in fully characterizing physiological and physical dynamics. In addition, these results suggest that different mechanisms of control may be responsible for varying levels of complexity observed in physiological systems under neural regulation and in physical systems that possess similar 1/f scaling.

  7. Cellular chromophores and signaling in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.

    2007-02-01

    particular, signaling cascades are initiated via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). These signal transduction pathways in turn lead to increased cell proliferation and migration (particularly by fibroblasts), modulation in levels of cytokines, growth factors and inflammatory mediators, and increases in anti-apoptotic proteins. The results of these biochemical and cellular changes in animals and patients include such benefits as increased healing in chronic wounds, improvements in sports injuries and carpal tunnel syndrome, pain reduction in arthritis and neuropathies, and amelioration of damage after heart attacks, stroke, nerve injury and retinal toxicity.

  8. Noncanonical Wnt signaling promotes osteoclast differentiation and is facilitated by the human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago, Francisco; Oguma, Junya; Brown, Anthony M.C.; Laurence, Jeffrey

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First demonstration of direct role for noncanonical Wnt in osteoclast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstration of Ryk as a Wnt5a/b receptor in inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modulation of noncanonical Wnt signaling by a clinically important drug, ritonavir. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Establishes a mechanism for an important clinical problem: HIV-associated bone loss. -- Abstract: Wnt proteins that signal via the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway directly regulate osteoblast differentiation. In contrast, most studies of Wnt-related effects on osteoclasts involve indirect changes. While investigating bone mineral density loss in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and its treatment with the protease inhibitor ritonavir (RTV), we observed that RTV decreased nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin, critical to canonical Wnt signaling, in primary human and murine osteoclast precursors. This occurred in parallel with upregulation of Wnt5a and Wnt5b transcripts. These Wnts typically stimulate noncanonical Wnt signaling, and this can antagonize the canonical Wnt pathway in many cell types, dependent upon Wnt receptor usage. We now document RTV-mediated upregulation of Wnt5a/b protein in osteoclast precursors. Recombinant Wnt5b and retrovirus-mediated expression of Wnt5a enhanced osteoclast differentiation from human and murine monocytic precursors, processes facilitated by RTV. In contrast, canonical Wnt signaling mediated by Wnt3a suppressed osteoclastogenesis. Both RTV and Wnt5b inhibited canonical, {beta}-catenin/T cell factor-based Wnt reporter activation in osteoclast precursors. RTV- and Wnt5-induced osteoclast differentiation were dependent upon the receptor-like tyrosine kinase Ryk, suggesting that Ryk may act as a Wnt5a/b receptor in this context. This is the first demonstration of a direct role for Wnt signaling pathways and Ryk in

  9. Overexpression of {alpha}-catenin increases osteoblastic differentiation in mouse mesenchymal C3H10T1/2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dohee; Yang, Jae-Yeon; Shin, Chan Soo

    2009-05-15

    {alpha}- and {beta}-Catenin link cadherins to the actin-based cytoskeleton at adherens junctions and regulate cell-cell adhesion. Although roles of cadherins and canonical Wnt-/{beta}-catenin-signaling in osteoblastic differentiation have been extensively studied, the role of {alpha}-catenin is not known. Murine embryonic mesenchymal stem cells, C3H10T1/2 cells, were transduced with retrovirus encoding {alpha}-catenin (MSCV-{alpha}-catenin-HA-GFP). In the presence of Wnt-3A conditioned medium or osteogenic medium ({beta}-glycerol phosphate and ascorbic acid), cells overexpressing {alpha}-catenin showed enhanced osteoblastic differentiation as measured by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and ALP activity assay compared to cells transduced with empty virus (MSCV-GFP). In addition, mRNA expression of osteocalcin and Runx2 was significantly increased compared to control. Cell aggregation assay revealed that {alpha}-catenin overexpression has significantly increased cell-cell aggregation. However, cellular {beta}-catenin levels (total, cytoplasmic-nuclear ratio) and {beta}-catenin-TCF/LEF transcriptional activity did not change by overexpression of {alpha}-catenin. Knock-down of {alpha}-catenin using siRNA decreased osteoblastic differentiation as measured by ALP assay. These results suggest that {alpha}-catenin overexpression increases osteoblastic differentiation by increasing cell-cell adhesion rather than Wnt-/{beta}-catenin-signaling.

  10. Vital elements of the Wnt-Frizzled signaling pathway in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Li, Faqi; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Maiese, Kenneth

    2005-10-01

    Wnt proteins are cysteine-rich glycosylated proteins named after the Drosophilia Wingless (Wg) and the mouse Int-1 genes that play a role in embryonic cell patterning, proliferation, differentiation, orientation, adhesion, survival, and programmed cell death (PCD). Wnt proteins involve at least two intracellular signaling pathways. One pathway controls target gene transcription through beta-catenin, generally referred to as the canonical pathway and a second pathway pertains to intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) release which is termed the non-canonical or Wnt/ Ca(2+) pathway. The majority of Wnt proteins activate gene transcription through the canonical signaling pathway regulated by pathways that include the Frizzled transmembrane receptor and the co-receptor LRP-5/6, Dishevelled, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), and beta-catenin. In contrast, the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway has two intracellular signaling cascades that consist of the Wnt/ Ca(2+) pathway with protein kinase C (PKC) and the Wnt/PCP pathway involving Rho/Rac small GTPase and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Through a series of signaling pathways, Wnt proteins modulate cell development, proliferation, and cell fate. In regards to cell survival and fate through PCD, Wnt may be critical for the prevention of tissue pathology that involves cytokine and growth factor control during disorders such as neuropsychiatric disease, retinal disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Elucidation of the vital elements that shape and control the Wnt-Frizzled signaling pathway may provide significant prospects for the treatment of disorders of the nervous system.

  11. Trade Electricity. Signal Wiring--Level 1. Standardized Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Occupational and Career Education.

    This curriculum guide consists of nine modules on signal wiring, one of the three divisions of the standardized trade electricity curriculum in high schools in New York City. The modules cover the following subjects: bells, double contact pushbuttons, annunciator circuits, open circuit burglar alarms, closed circuit burglar alarms, fire alarms,…

  12. Trade Electricity. Signal Wiring--Level 1. Standardized Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Occupational and Career Education.

    This curriculum guide consists of nine modules on signal wiring, one of the three divisions of the standardized trade electricity curriculum in high schools in New York City. The modules cover the following subjects: bells, double contact pushbuttons, annunciator circuits, open circuit burglar alarms, closed circuit burglar alarms, fire alarms,…

  13. High-level expression of nattokinase in Bacillus licheniformis by manipulating signal peptide and signal peptidase.

    PubMed

    Cai, D; Wei, X; Qiu, Y; Chen, Y; Chen, J; Wen, Z; Chen, S

    2016-09-01

    Nattokinase is an enzyme produced by Bacillus licheniformis and has potential to be used as a drug for treating cardiovascular disease due to its beneficial effects of preventing fibrin clots etc. However, the low activity and titre of this protein produced by B. licheniformis often hinders its application of commercial production. The aim of this work is to improve the nattokinase production by manipulating signal peptides and signal peptidases in B. licheniformis. The P43 promoter, amyL terminator and AprN target gene were used to form the nattokinase expression vector, pHY-SP-NK, which was transformed into B. licheniformis and nattokinase was expressed successfully. A library containing 81 predicted signal peptides was constructed for nattokinase expression in B. licheniformis, with the maximum activity being obtained under the signal peptide of AprE. Among four type I signal peptidases genes (sipS, sipT, sipV, sipW) in B. licheniformis, the deletion of sipV resulted in a highest decrease in nattokinase activity. Overexpression of sipV in B. licheniformis led to a nattokinase activity of 35·60 FU ml(-1) , a 4·68-fold improvement over activity produced by the initial strain. This work demonstrates the potential of B. licheniformis for industrial production of nattokinase through manipulation of signal peptides and signal peptidases expression. This study has screened the signal peptides of extracellular proteins of B. licheniformis for nattokinase production. Four kinds of Type I signal peptidases genes have been detected respectively in B. licheniformis to identify which one played the vital role for nattokinase production. This study provided a promising strain for industry production of nattokinase. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Detection of Temporally Coherent Light at Low Signal Levels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    In writing this expression we assume normal incidence upon a planar cathode. For our analysis we make the simplifying assumption that I is...following analysis for simplicity in interpreting certain results. The objective of this investigation has been to find means of detecting coherent... analysis to consider the process. 6.1 Definition of Signal In attempting to detect temporally coherent light in a noncoherent background from the photon

  15. Reconstruction of Multidimensional Signals from Multiple Level Threshold Crossings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    New York: Springer-Verlag, 1978. [38] A. Mostowski and M. Stark. Introducion to Higher Algebra . New York: Mac-Millan Co., 1964. 139] A. Zakhor and D...thresholds. I- orde-’ to circumvent this difficulty, we-pepeeea second approach which is implicit, ~aauses algebraic geometric concepts to find conditions...approach which is implicit, and uses algebraic geometric con- cepts to find conditions under which a signal is almost always reconstructible from its

  16. The Wnt Blows: On the Functional Role of Wnt Signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Julius; Reiling, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that the Wnt signaling pathway, known for its essential functions in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis, exerts immunomodulatory functions during inflammation and infection. Most functional studies indicate that Wnt5a exerts pro-inflammatory functions on its cellular targets, which include various types of immune and non-immune cells. Wnt5a expression has also been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. Activation of beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling, e.g., by Wnt3a, has however been shown to limit inflammation by interfering with the nuclear factor kappa-light chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-kappaB) pathway. This review focuses on the regulation of Wnt5a, Wnt3a, and the recently identified Wnt6 and their functional role in bacterial infections with a primary focus on pulmonary tuberculosis, a leading infectious cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide.

  17. The Wnt Blows: On the Functional Role of Wnt Signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Julius; Reiling, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that the Wnt signaling pathway, known for its essential functions in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis, exerts immunomodulatory functions during inflammation and infection. Most functional studies indicate that Wnt5a exerts pro-inflammatory functions on its cellular targets, which include various types of immune and non-immune cells. Wnt5a expression has also been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. Activation of beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling, e.g., by Wnt3a, has however been shown to limit inflammation by interfering with the nuclear factor kappa-light chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-kappaB) pathway. This review focuses on the regulation of Wnt5a, Wnt3a, and the recently identified Wnt6 and their functional role in bacterial infections with a primary focus on pulmonary tuberculosis, a leading infectious cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. PMID:28082976

  18. Different levels of Notch signaling regulate quiescence, renewal and differentiation in pancreatic endocrine progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Ninov, Nikolay; Borius, Maxim; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic studies have implicated Notch signaling in the maintenance of pancreatic progenitors. However, how Notch signaling regulates the quiescent, proliferative or differentiation behaviors of pancreatic progenitors at the single-cell level remains unclear. Here, using single-cell genetic analyses and a new transgenic system that allows dynamic assessment of Notch signaling, we address how discrete levels of Notch signaling regulate the behavior of endocrine progenitors in the zebrafish intrapancreatic duct. We find that these progenitors experience different levels of Notch signaling, which in turn regulate distinct cellular outcomes. High levels of Notch signaling induce quiescence, whereas lower levels promote progenitor amplification. The sustained downregulation of Notch signaling triggers a multistep process that includes cell cycle entry and progenitor amplification prior to endocrine differentiation. Importantly, progenitor amplification and differentiation can be uncoupled by modulating the duration and/or extent of Notch signaling downregulation, indicating that these processes are triggered by distinct levels of Notch signaling. These data show that different levels of Notch signaling drive distinct behaviors in a progenitor population. PMID:22492351

  19. Low level signal data acquisition for the MFTF-B superconducting magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, C.R.

    1984-03-28

    Acquisition of low level signals from sensors mounted on the superconducting magnets in the Tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) impose very strict requirements on the magnet signal conditioning and data acquisition system. Of the various types of sensors required, thermocouples and strain gages produce very low level outputs. These low level outputs must be accurately measured in the harsh environment of slowly varying magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures, high vacuum, 80 kV pulse power, 60 Hz, 17 MHz and 28, 35, and 56 GHz electrical noise and possible neutron radiation. Successful measurements require careful attention to grounding, shielding, signal handling and processing in the data acquisition system. The magnet instrumentation system provides a means of effectively measuring both low level signals and high level signals from all types of sensors. Various methods involved in the design and implementation of the system for signal conditioning and data gathering will be presented.

  20. Low-level-signal data acquisition for the MFTF superconducting-magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, C.R.

    1981-10-08

    Acquisition of low level signals from sensors mounted on the superconducting yin-yang magnet in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) imposes very strict requirements on the magnet signal conditioning and data acquisition system. Of the various types of sensors required, thermocouples, strain gages, and voltage taps produce very low level outputs. These low level outputs must be accurately measured in the harsh environment of slowly varying magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures, high vacuum, pulse power and 60 Hz electrical noise, possible neutron radiation, and high common mode voltage resulting from superconducting magnet quench. Successful measurements require careful attention to grounding, shielding, signal handling and processing in the data acquisition system. The magnet instrumentation system provides a means of effectively measuring both low level signals and high level signals from all types of sensors.

  1. Moesin signalling induces F9 teratocarcinoma cells to differentiate into primitive extraembryonic endoderm.

    PubMed

    Krawetz, Roman; Kelly, Gregory M

    2008-01-01

    The mouse F9 teratocarcinoma cell line is a model that can be manipulated to imitate one of the earliest epithelial-mesenchymal transitions in mouse development. When cells are treated with Retinoic Acid they differentiate into primitive endoderm and into parietal endoderm with the addition of dibutyryl cAMP. Parietal endoderm also develops when undifferentiated cells express a constitutively active (CA) form of Galpha13(Q226L). Differentiation is accompanied by a translocation of beta-catenin to the nucleus and considerable changes to the cytoskeleton and cell morphology. ERM proteins facilitate rearrangements to the F-actin cytoskeleton, and at least one, moesin, is essential for cell survival. In this study we found that moesin translocated to the nucleus during RA-induced differentiation, and sequence analysis identified putative nuclear localization signals in the protein. In the absence of RA, transient over-expression of rat moesin or the distantly related zebrafish homologue in F9 cells induced primitive endoderm. Furthermore, no apparent beta-catenin was seen in the nucleus of cells over-expressing zebrafish moesin. Our previous results have shown that depleting F9 cells of moesin using an antisense morpholino strategy caused them to detach from the substrate unless they expressed CA-Galpha13(Q226L). This CA-Galpha13 signalling maintained cell survival, but at the expense of differentiation. We now report that over-expressing zebrafish moesin in mouse moesin-depleted F9 cells not only ensured cell survival, but also induced differentiation to primitive endoderm. Together, the results suggest a new role for moesin, acting in a signalling pathway facilitating the differentiation of extraembryonic endoderm.

  2. Social competition affects electric signal plasticity and steroid levels in the gymnotiform fish Brachyhypopomus gauderio.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Vielka L; Stoddard, Philip K

    2009-10-01

    Sexually-selected communication signals can be used by competing males to settle contests without incurring the costs of fighting. Steroid regulation of these signals can render them as reliable indicators of a male's physiological state. We investigated how plasticity in electrocommunication signals is driven by social competition for mates, mediated by steroid hormones, and subject to the effects of past social experience. We measured the electric waveform's amplitude and duration and steroid hormone levels of male gymnotiform electric fish (Brachyhypopomus gauderio) following week-long periods of social isolation, and low or high social competition. To quantify the effect of social history on the modulation of the electric signal, six groups of six males experienced all three social conditions but in different order. We found that males differentially modulate their electric signals depending on the order they experienced these conditions. Thus, past social interactions affect both present and future social electric signals. Cortisol levels and the amplitude of the electric signal appeared to track the intensity of competition, while androgen levels and the duration of the electric signal only responded to the presence (low and high competition) or absence (isolation) of a social environment (low and high androgens respectively). In addition, cortisol levels were related to the body size of the males at high social competition. Taken together, these findings suggest that the capacity of males to modulate their signals in response to social competition is regulated by steroids.

  3. The inhibitory effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (Ferucarbotran) on osteogenic differentiation and its signaling mechanism in human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying-Chun; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Liu, Hon-Man; Lai, I-Yin; Yao, Ming; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Chen, Yao-Chang; Yang, Chung-Shi; Huang, Dong-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are very useful for monitoring cell trafficking in vivo and distinguish whether cellular regeneration originated from an exogenous cell source, which is a key issue for developing successful stem cell therapies. However, the impact of SPIO labeling on stem cell behavior remains uncertain. Here, we show the inhibitory effect of Ferucarbotran, an ionic SPIO, on osteogenic differentiation and its signaling mechanism in human mesenchymal stem cells. Ferucarbotran caused a dose-dependent inhibition of osteogenic differentiation, abolished the differentiation at high concentration, promoted cell migration, and activated the signaling molecules, {beta}-catenin, a cancer/testis antigen, SSX, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). An iron chelator, desferrioxamine, suppressed all the above Ferucarbotran-induced actions, demonstrating an important role of free iron in the inhibition of osteogenic differentiation that is mediated by the promotion of cell mobilization, involving the activation of a specific signaling pathway.

  4. Atorvastatin inhibits hypercholesterolemia-induced calcification in the aortic valves via the Lrp5 receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Rajamannan, Nalini M; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Caira, Frank; Stock, Stuart R; Spelsberg, Thomas C

    2005-08-30

    Calcific aortic valve disease is the most common indication for surgical valve replacement in the United States. The cellular mechanisms of valve calcification are not well understood. We have previously shown that cellular proliferation and osteoblastogenesis are important in the development of valvular heart disease. Lrp5, a known low-density receptor-related protein, plays an essential role in cellular proliferation and osteoblastogenesis via the beta-catenin signaling pathway. We hypothesize that Lrp5 also plays a role in aortic valve (AV) calcification in experimental hypercholesterolemia. We examined the effects of cholesterol and atorvastatin in Watanabe rabbits (n=54). Group I (n=18) received a normal diet, group II (n=18) a 0.25% cholesterol diet, and group III (n=18) a 0.25% (w/w) cholesterol diet with atorvastatin for the development of calcification. The AVs were examined for cellular proliferation, Lrp5/beta-catenin, and bone matrix markers. Bone formation was assessed by micro-computed tomography, calcein injection, and osteopontin expression. Low-density lipoprotein with and without atorvastatin was also tested in AV myofibroblasts for cellular proliferation and regulation of the Lrp5/beta-catenin pathway. Our results demonstrate that the cholesterol diet induced complex bone formations in the calcified AVs with an increase in the Lrp5 receptors, osteopontin, and p42/44 expression. Atorvastatin reduced bone formation, cellular proliferation, and Lrp5/beta-catenin protein levels in the AVs. In vitro analysis confirmed the Lrp5/beta-catenin expression in myofibroblast cell proliferation. Hypercholesterolemic AV calcification is attenuated by atorvastatin and is mediated in part by the Lrp5/beta-catenin pathway. This developmental pathway may be important in the signaling pathway of this disease.

  5. Integrated Strategies to Gain a Systems-Level View of Dynamic Signaling Networks.

    PubMed

    Newman, Robert H; Zhang, Jin

    2017-01-01

    In order to survive and function properly in the face of an ever changing environment, cells must be able to sense changes in their surroundings and respond accordingly. Cells process information about their environment through complex signaling networks composed of many discrete signaling molecules. Individual pathways within these networks are often tightly integrated and highly dynamic, allowing cells to respond to a given stimulus (or, as is typically the case under physiological conditions, a combination of stimuli) in a specific and appropriate manner. However, due to the size and complexity of many cellular signaling networks, it is often difficult to predict how cellular signaling networks will respond under a particular set of conditions. Indeed, crosstalk between individual signaling pathways may lead to responses that are nonintuitive (or even counterintuitive) based on examination of the individual pathways in isolation. Therefore, to gain a more comprehensive view of cell signaling processes, it is important to understand how signaling networks behave at the systems level. This requires integrated strategies that combine quantitative experimental data with computational models. In this chapter, we first examine some of the progress that has recently been made toward understanding the systems-level regulation of cellular signaling networks, with a particular emphasis on phosphorylation-dependent signaling networks. We then discuss how genetically targetable fluorescent biosensors are being used together with computational models to gain unique insights into the spatiotemporal regulation of signaling networks within single, living cells.

  6. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  7. Empirical prediction of peak pressure levels in anthropogenic impulsive noise. Part I: Airgun arrays signals.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Romero, Marta; Lippert, Tristan; Gavrilov, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an empirical linear equation to predict peak pressure level of anthropogenic impulsive signals based on its correlation with the sound exposure level. The regression coefficients are shown to be weakly dependent on the environmental characteristics but governed by the source type and parameters. The equation can be applied to values of the sound exposure level predicted with a numerical model, which provides a significant improvement in the prediction of the peak pressure level. Part I presents the analysis for airgun arrays signals, and Part II considers the application of the empirical equation to offshore impact piling noise.

  8. Multi-level recordable disc using signal waveform modulation recording method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Jing; Pan, Longfa; Yang, Bo; Hu, Junhua

    A new kind of multi-level recordable disc is presented in this paper. By improving the recording control signal in DVD-R/RW burning process, a Multi-level disc with signal waveform modulation can be achieved. The multi-level recording method increases the recording density but also the channel noise. The optimally designed partial response maximum likelihood (PRML) equalizer is effective in recovering channel symbol, and the original error rate reach 10E-4. This kind of multi-level method can be used for the purpose such as increasing the capacity of disc, hiding data and burning disc identification information etc.

  9. GSK-3Beta-Dependent Activation of GEF-H1/ROCK Signaling Promotes LPS-Induced Lung Vascular Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Guo, Feng; Zhou, Zengding; Chang, Mengling; Huan, Jingning

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) leads to the extensive vascular endothelial cells (EC) injury under septic conditions. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor-H1 (GEF-H1)/ROCK signaling not only involved in LPS-induced overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediator in ECs but also implicated in LPS-induced endothelial hyper-permeability. However, the mechanisms behind LPS-induced GEF-H1/ROCK signaling activation in the progress of EC injury remain incompletely understood. GEF-H1 localized on microtubules (MT) and is suppressed in its MT-bound state. MT disassembly promotes GEF-H1 release from MT and stimulates downstream ROCK-specific GEF activity. Since glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3beta) participates in regulating MT dynamics under pathologic conditions, we examined the pivotal roles for GSK-3beta in modulating LPS-induced activation of GEF-H1/ROCK, increase of vascular endothelial permeability and severity of acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, we found that LPS induced human pulmonary endothelial cell (HPMEC) monolayers disruption accompanied by increase in GSK-3beta activity, activation of GEF-H1/ROCK signaling and decrease in beta-catenin and ZO-1 expression. Inhibition of GSK-3beta reduced HPMEC monolayers hyper-permeability and GEF-H1/ROCK activity in response to LPS. GSK-3beta/GEF-H1/ROCK signaling is implicated in regulating the expression of beta-catenin and ZO-1. In vivo, GSK-3beta inhibition attenuated LPS-induced activation of GEF-H1/ROCK pathway, lung edema and subsequent ALI. These findings present a new mechanism of GSK-3beta-dependent exacerbation of lung micro-vascular hyper-permeability and escalation of ALI via activation of GEF-H1/ROCK signaling and disruption of intracellular junctional proteins under septic condition.

  10. Method for leveling the signal-to-noise ratio in multichannel functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toru; Umeyama, Shinji; Kamoshida, Atsushi

    2017-02-01

    The difference in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) within functional near-infrared spectroscopic (fNIRS)-measurement channels makes it difficult to compare the significance of the signal amplitude in an individual channel against the baseline or against signals in other channels. The difference in SNR mainly originates from the difference in light loss due to the hair coverage or the optode-scalp contact. During the initial calibration of most commercial fNIRS equipment, the detected signals in different channels are differently amplified such that the system effectively utilizes a dynamic range for measurement. While different amplification rates among the channels realize almost equal signal intensities, they also differently amplify the detection noises. This results in different apparent noises in the fNIRS signals between channels. In order to level the SNRs in all the measurement channels, the system needs to equalize the light intensities received by the detectors instead of changing the signal amplification rates. To realize this novel procedure for leveling the SNR among the channels, we developed an fNIRS system equipped with an optical attenuator at each source and detector. A systematic procedure for modulating the attenuators to level SNR over all channels was mathematically formulated, and the procedure was examined using an optical phantom with a surface covered with air.

  11. Measurement of Voltage Level Output by Magnetic Tunneling Junction by Rectification of RF Signals (ADDENDUM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-29

    29/2011 Abstract In this experiment, the DC voltage output of a magnetic tunneling junction ( MTJ ) was measured. This was accomplished...to 20 dBm. The signal was received by a coplanar waveguide antenna. A MTJ rectified the RF signal to a DC voltage. Resonance was found at frequencies...of 2.1 GHz and 5.6 GHz due to two different MTJ wafers used in manufacturing the detectors. At resonance, rectified voltages levels were

  12. The neural basis of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal.

    PubMed Central

    Logothetis, Nikos K

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has rapidly become an important tool in clinical medicine and biological research. Its functional variant (functional magnetic resonance imaging; fMRI) is currently the most widely used method for brain mapping and studying the neural basis of human cognition. While the method is widespread, there is insufficient knowledge of the physiological basis of the fMRI signal to interpret the data confidently with respect to neural activity. This paper reviews the basic principles of MRI and fMRI, and subsequently discusses in some detail the relationship between the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal and the neural activity elicited during sensory stimulation. To examine this relationship, we conducted the first simultaneous intracortical recordings of neural signals and BOLD responses. Depending on the temporal characteristics of the stimulus, a moderate to strong correlation was found between the neural activity measured with microelectrodes and the BOLD signal averaged over a small area around the microelectrode tips. However, the BOLD signal had significantly higher variability than the neural activity, indicating that human fMRI combined with traditional statistical methods underestimates the reliability of the neuronal activity. To understand the relative contribution of several types of neuronal signals to the haemodynamic response, we compared local field potentials (LFPs), single- and multi-unit activity (MUA) with high spatio-temporal fMRI responses recorded simultaneously in monkey visual cortex. At recording sites characterized by transient responses, only the LFP signal was significantly correlated with the haemodynamic response. Furthermore, the LFPs had the largest magnitude signal and linear systems analysis showed that the LFPs were better than the MUAs at predicting the fMRI responses. These findings, together with an analysis of the neural signals, indicate that the BOLD signal primarily measures the input

  13. Role of PI3K/Akt signaling in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) skin tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Wilker, Erik; Lu, Jerry; Rho, Okkyung; Carbajal, Steve; Beltrán, Linda; DiGiovanni, John

    2005-10-01

    Overexpression of human IGF-1 with the bovine keratin 5 (BK5) promoter (BK5.IGF-1 transgenic mice) induces persistent epidermal hyperplasia and leads to spontaneous skin tumor formation. In previous work, PI3K and Akt activities were found to be elevated in the epidermis of BK5.IGF-1 transgenic mice compared to nontransgenic littermates. In the present study, we examined the importance of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in mediating the skin phenotype and the skin tumor promoting action of IGF-1 in these mice. Western blot analyses with epidermal lysates showed that signaling components downstream of PI3K/Akt were altered in epidermis of BK5.IGF-1 mice. Increased phosphorylation of GSK-3 (Ser(9/21)), TSC2(Thr(1462)), and mTOR(Ser(2448)) was observed. In addition, hypophosphorylation and increased protein levels of beta-catenin were observed in the epidermis of BK5.IGF-1 mice. These data suggested that components downstream of Akt might be affected, including cell cycle machinery in the epidermis of BK5.IGF-1 mice. Protein levels of cyclins (D1, E, A), E2F1, and E2F4 were all elevated in the epidermis of BK5.IGF-1 mice. Also, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated an increase in cdk4/cyclin D1 and cdk2/cyclin E complex formation, suggesting increased cdk activity in the epidermis of transgenic mice. In further studies, the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, significantly blocked IGF-1-mediated epidermal proliferation and skin tumor promotion in DMBA-initiated BK5.IGF-1 mice. In addition, inhibition of PI3K/Akt with LY294002 reversed many of the cell cycle related changes observed in untreated transgenic animals. Collectively, the current results supported the hypothesis that elevated PI3K/Akt activity and subsequent activation of one or more downstream effector pathways contributed significantly to the tumor promoting action of IGF-1 in the epidermis of BK5.IGF-1 mice.

  14. Equalizer design for clock recovery based on multi-level optical disk using signal waveform modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Meng; Pei, Jing; Yang, Bo

    2013-12-01

    With smaller pits and lands in multi-level optical disks using signal waveform modulation than those in DVD disks, the ISI and nonlinear attenuation of the read-out signal become more serious. One ordinary way is using an equalizer at sample rate 1/T, we proposed one method of designing the equalizer in fixed sample rate with digital interpolation. According to the analysis of the multi-level optical disk channel, we get the target frequency-response cure and implement it with seven order FIR filter. From the result of the read out experiment with multi-level optical disk, the clock of the RF signal could be recovered with the proposed equalizer.

  15. Delayed dopamine signaling of energy level builds appetitive long-term memory in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Musso, Pierre-Yves; Tchenio, Paul; Preat, Thomas

    2015-02-24

    Sensory cues relevant to a food source, such as odors, can be associated with post-ingestion signals related either to food energetic value or toxicity. Despite numerous behavioral studies, a global understanding of the mechanisms underlying these long delay associations remains out of reach. Here, we demonstrate in Drosophila that the long-term association between an odor and a nutritious sugar depends on delayed post-ingestion signaling of energy level. We show at the neural circuit level that the activity of two pairs of dopaminergic neurons is necessary and sufficient to signal energy level to the olfactory memory center. Accordingly, we have identified in these dopaminergic neurons a delayed calcium trace that correlates with appetitive long-term memory formation. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the Drosophila brain remembers food quality through a two-step mechanism that consists of the integration of olfactory and gustatory sensory information and then post-ingestion energetic value.

  16. Specific regions within the embryonic midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling during development

    PubMed Central

    Basson, M. Albert; Echevarria, Diego; Ahn, Christina Petersen; Sudarov, Anamaria; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Mason, Ivor J.; Martinez, Salvador; Martin, Gail R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Development of the prospective midbrain and cerebellum are coordinated by FGF ligands produced by the isthmic organizer. Previous studies have suggested that the midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling for their development. However, little is known about the extent to which specific regions within these two parts of the brain differ in their requirement for FGF signaling during embryogenesis. In this study, we have explored the effects of inhibiting FGF signaling within the embryonic midbrain (mesencephalon) and cerebellum (rhombomere 1) by misexpressing Sprouty2 (Spry2) specifically in the mouse mesencephalon and rhombomere 1 from an early stage. We show that such Spry2 misexpression moderately reduces FGF signaling, and that this reduction causes the death of cells in the anterior mesencephalon, the region furthest from the source of FGF ligands. Interestingly, the remaining cells in the posterior mesencephalon develop into anterior midbrain, indicating that a low level of FGF signaling is sufficient to promote only anterior midbrain development. Spry2 misexpression also affects development of the vermis, the medial part of the cerebellum that spans the midline. We found that whereas misexpression of Spry2 alone caused loss of the anterior vermis, reducing FGF signaling further, by decreasing Fgf8 gene dosage, resulted in loss of the entire vermis. We provide evidence that cell death is not responsible for this tissue loss. Instead, our data suggest that the vermis fails to develop because reducing FGF signaling perturbs the balance between vermis and roof plate development in rhombomere 1. We suggest a molecular explanation for this phenomenon by providing evidence that FGF signaling functions to inhibit the BMP signaling that promotes roof plate development. PMID:18216176

  17. Internal curvature signal and noise in low- and high-level vision

    PubMed Central

    Grabowecky, Marcia; Kim, Yee Joon; Suzuki, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    How does internal processing contribute to visual pattern perception? By modeling visual search performance, we estimated internal signal and noise relevant to perception of curvature, a basic feature important for encoding of three-dimensional surfaces and objects. We used isolated, sparse, crowded, and face contexts to determine how internal curvature signal and noise depended on image crowding, lateral feature interactions, and level of pattern processing. Observers reported the curvature of a briefly flashed segment, which was presented alone (without lateral interaction) or among multiple straight segments (with lateral interaction). Each segment was presented with no context (engaging low-to-intermediate-level curvature processing), embedded within a face context as the mouth (engaging high-level face processing), or embedded within an inverted-scrambled-face context as a control for crowding. Using a simple, biologically plausible model of curvature perception, we estimated internal curvature signal and noise as the mean and standard deviation, respectively, of the Gaussian-distributed population activity of local curvature-tuned channels that best simulated behavioral curvature responses. Internal noise was increased by crowding but not by face context (irrespective of lateral interactions), suggesting prevention of noise accumulation in high-level pattern processing. In contrast, internal curvature signal was unaffected by crowding but modulated by lateral interactions. Lateral interactions (with straight segments) increased curvature signal when no contextual elements were added, but equivalent interactions reduced curvature signal when each segment was presented within a face. These opposing effects of lateral interactions are consistent with the phenomena of local-feature contrast in low-level processing and global-feature averaging in high-level processing. PMID:21209356

  18. High-Level Prediction Signals in a Low-Level Area of the Macaque Face-Processing Hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Schwiedrzik, Caspar M; Freiwald, Winrich A

    2017-09-27

    Theories like predictive coding propose that lower-order brain areas compare their inputs to predictions derived from higher-order representations and signal their deviation as a prediction error. Here, we investigate whether the macaque face-processing system, a three-level hierarchy in the ventral stream, employs such a coding strategy. We show that after statistical learning of specific face sequences, the lower-level face area ML computes the deviation of actual from predicted stimuli. But these signals do not reflect the tuning characteristic of ML. Rather, they exhibit identity specificity and view invariance, the tuning properties of higher-level face areas AL and AM. Thus, learning appears to endow lower-level areas with the capability to test predictions at a higher level of abstraction than what is afforded by the feedforward sweep. These results provide evidence for computational architectures like predictive coding and suggest a new quality of functional organization of information-processing hierarchies beyond pure feedforward schemes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Erosion of phylogenetic signal in tunicate mitochondrial genomes on different levels of analysis.

    PubMed

    Stach, Thomas; Braband, Anke; Podsiadlowski, Lars

    2010-06-01

    The molecular phylogenetic position of Tunicata and internal interrelationship of higher tunicate taxa is controversial. High substitution rates and extreme gene order variability hamper phylogenetic analyses. We describe the sequence and organization of the mitochondrial genome of the aplousobranch ascidian Clavelina lepadiformis and use mitochondrial genomes to investigate phylogenetic information content on different molecular levels of comparison. Despite agreement in phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences, split analyses revealed little phylogenetic signal. Split analyses on molecular data sets deemed increasingly conservative, demonstrated that the lack of signal pervades all levels and that it is Tunicata the taxon of interest that introduces noise in the data sets. The strongest signal present in our molecular data sets as revealed by split analyses is not present in the optimal cladograms and supports a sister group relationship between cephalochordates and craniates. Phylogenetic analysis of gene order using common interval algorithms shows that phylogenetic signal is also eroded in respect of gene positions. Even functional constraints, such as partial gene overlap as exemplified in the case of the commonly observed adjacency between cox2 and cytb are subjected to homoplasy. However, rare phylogenetic events like this hold some promise to retain phylogenetic information even in such cases of extreme variability. We therefore caution to rely on sequence analysis alone and recommend investigation into the signal content of molecular data sets in order to assess the strength of phylogenetic signal.

  20. Biophysical and physiological origins of blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI signals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Ogawa, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    After its discovery in 1990, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to map brain activation in humans and animals. Since fMRI relies on signal changes induced by neural activity, its signal source can be complex and is also dependent on imaging parameters and techniques. In this review, we identify and describe the origins of BOLD fMRI signals, including the topics of (1) effects of spin density, volume fraction, inflow, perfusion, and susceptibility as potential contributors to BOLD fMRI, (2) intravascular and extravascular contributions to conventional gradient-echo and spin-echo BOLD fMRI, (3) spatial specificity of hemodynamic-based fMRI related to vascular architecture and intrinsic hemodynamic responses, (4) BOLD signal contributions from functional changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and cerebral metabolic rate of O2 utilization (CMRO2), (5) dynamic responses of BOLD, CBF, CMRO2, and arterial and venous CBV, (6) potential sources of initial BOLD dips, poststimulus BOLD undershoots, and prolonged negative BOLD fMRI signals, (7) dependence of stimulus-evoked BOLD signals on baseline physiology, and (8) basis of resting-state BOLD fluctuations. These discussions are highly relevant to interpreting BOLD fMRI signals as physiological means. PMID:22395207

  1. Controlled levels of canonical Wnt signaling are required for neural crest migration.

    PubMed

    Maj, Ewa; Künneke, Lutz; Loresch, Elisabeth; Grund, Anita; Melchert, Juliane; Pieler, Tomas; Aspelmeier, Timo; Borchers, Annette

    2016-09-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays a dominant role in the development of the neural crest (NC), a highly migratory cell population that generates a vast array of cell types. Canonical Wnt signaling is required for NC induction as well as differentiation, however its role in NC migration remains largely unknown. Analyzing nuclear localization of β-catenin as readout for canonical Wnt activity, we detect nuclear β-catenin in premigratory but not migratory Xenopus NC cells suggesting that canonical Wnt activity has to decrease to basal levels to enable NC migration. To define a possible function of canonical Wnt signaling in Xenopus NC migration, canonical Wnt signaling was modulated at different time points after NC induction. This was accomplished using either chemical modulators affecting β-catenin stability or inducible glucocorticoid fusion constructs of Lef/Tcf transcription factors. In vivo analysis of NC migration by whole mount in situ hybridization demonstrates that ectopic activation of canonical Wnt signaling inhibits cranial NC migration. Further, NC transplantation experiments confirm that this effect is tissue-autonomous. In addition, live-cell imaging in combination with biophysical data analysis of explanted NC cells confirms the in vivo findings and demonstrates that modulation of canonical Wnt signaling affects the ability of NC cells to perform single cell migration. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that canonical Wnt signaling needs to be tightly controlled to enable migration of NC cells.

  2. Study of Signal Detection, Integration, and Propagation in Quorum Sensing at the Single Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tao; Bassler, Bonnie; Wingreen, Ned

    2007-03-01

    Bacteria respond to their environment and to each other and accordingly adjust their gene-expression levels. Accurate signal detection, appropriate signal integration, and faithful signal propagation are essential for a cell to make correct adjustments in response to various extracellular cues. To better understand this information processing by living cells, we studied a model system -- the quorum-sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi. Quorum sensing is a process in which bacteria communicate with each other by diffusible chemical molecules, termed ``autoinducers'', to commit to coordinated developmental decisions. Three types of autoinducers are detected coincidently by three parallel receptors. The signals are then integrated into the same signaling pathway and propagated by phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of the pathway components. To quantitatively measure the intracellular response, we applied a fluorescent protein reporter, whose production is regulated by a phosphorylated protein in the pathway. By single-cell microscopy, we can explore features of this information-processing circuit such as coincidence detection, signal integration, noise reduction or filtering, and especially the fidelity in signal processing achieved in the presence of inevitable fluctuations.

  3. Canonical Wnt signalling regulates epithelial patterning by modulating levels of laminins in zebrafish appendages.

    PubMed

    Nagendran, Monica; Arora, Prateek; Gori, Payal; Mulay, Aditya; Ray, Shinjini; Jacob, Tressa; Sonawane, Mahendra

    2015-01-15

    The patterning and morphogenesis of body appendages - such as limbs and fins - is orchestrated by the activities of several developmental pathways. Wnt signalling is essential for the induction of limbs. However, it is unclear whether a canonical Wnt signalling gradient exists and regulates the patterning of epithelium in vertebrate appendages. Using an evolutionarily old appendage - the median fin in zebrafish - as a model, we show that the fin epithelium exhibits graded changes in cellular morphology along the proximo-distal axis. This epithelial pattern is strictly correlated with the gradient of canonical Wnt signalling activity. By combining genetic analyses with cellular imaging, we show that canonical Wnt signalling regulates epithelial cell morphology by modulating the levels of laminins, which are extracellular matrix components. We have unravelled a hitherto unknown mechanism involved in epithelial patterning, which is also conserved in the pectoral fins - evolutionarily recent appendages that are homologous to tetrapod limbs.

  4. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown. PMID:26340633

  5. Both the RGS domain and the six C-terminal amino acids of mouse Axin are required for normal embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chia, Ian V; Kim, Min Jung; Itoh, Keiji; Sokol, Sergei Y; Costantini, Frank

    2009-04-01

    Axin is a negative regulator of canonical Wnt signaling, which promotes the degradation of beta-catenin, the major effector in this signaling cascade. While many protein-binding domains of Axin have been identified, their significance has not been evaluated in vivo. Here, we report the generation and analysis of mice carrying modified Axin alleles in which either the RGS domain or the six C-terminal amino acids (C6 motif) were deleted. The RGS domain is required for APC-binding, while the C6 motif has been implicated in the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but is not required for the effects of Axin on the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway, in vitro. Both mutant Axin alleles caused recessive embryonic lethality at E9.5-E10.5, with defects indistinguishable from those caused by a null allele. As Axin-DeltaRGS protein was produced at normal levels, its inability to support embryogenesis confirms the importance of interactions between Axin and APC. In contrast, Axin-DeltaC6 protein was expressed at only 25-30% of the normal level, which may account for the recessive lethality of this allele. Furthermore, many Axin(DeltaC6/DeltaC6) embryos that were heterozygous for a beta-catenin null mutation survived to term, demonstrating that early lethality was due to failure to negatively regulate beta-catenin.

  6. Spenito and Split ends act redundantly to promote Wingless signaling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jinhee L; Lin, Hua V; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Cadigan, Ken M

    2008-02-01

    Wingless (Wg)/Wnt signaling directs a variety of cellular processes during animal development by promoting the association of Armadillo/beta-catenin with TCFs on Wg-regulated enhancers (WREs). Split ends (Spen), a nuclear protein containing RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a SPOC domain, is required for optimal Wg signaling in several fly tissues. In this report, we demonstrate that Spenito (Nito), the only other fly protein containing RRMs and a SPOC domain, acts together with Spen to positively regulate Wg signaling. The partial defect in Wg signaling observed with spen RNAi was enhanced by simultaneous knockdown of nito while it was rescued by expression of nito in wing imaginal discs. In cell culture, depletion of both factors causes a greater defect in the activation of several Wg targets than RNAi of either spen or nito alone. These nuclear proteins are not required for Armadillo stabilization or the recruitment of TCF and Armadillo to a WRE. Loss of Wg target gene activation in cells depleted for spen and nito was not dependent on the transcriptional repressor Yan or Suppressor of Hairless, two previously identified targets of Spen. We propose that Spen and Nito act redundantly downstream of TCF/Armadillo to activate many Wg transcriptional targets.

  7. Mesodermal Wnt signaling organizes the neural plate via Meis3.

    PubMed

    Elkouby, Yaniv M; Elias, Sarah; Casey, Elena S; Blythe, Shelby A; Tsabar, Nir; Klein, Peter S; Root, Heather; Liu, Karen J; Frank, Dale

    2010-05-01

    In vertebrates, canonical Wnt signaling controls posterior neural cell lineage specification. Although Wnt signaling to the neural plate is sufficient for posterior identity, the source and timing of this activity remain uncertain. Furthermore, crucial molecular targets of this activity have not been defined. Here, we identify the endogenous Wnt activity and its role in controlling an essential downstream transcription factor, Meis3. Wnt3a is expressed in a specialized mesodermal domain, the paraxial dorsolateral mesoderm, which signals to overlying neuroectoderm. Loss of zygotic Wnt3a in this region does not alter mesoderm cell fates, but blocks Meis3 expression in the neuroectoderm, triggering the loss of posterior neural fates. Ectopic Meis3 protein expression is sufficient to rescue this phenotype. Moreover, Wnt3a induction of the posterior nervous system requires functional Meis3 in the neural plate. Using ChIP and promoter analysis, we show that Meis3 is a direct target of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. This suggests a new model for neural anteroposterior patterning, in which Wnt3a from the paraxial mesoderm induces posterior cell fates via direct activation of a crucial transcription factor in the overlying neural plate.

  8. Comparing Infants' Preference for Correlated Audiovisual Speech with Signal-Level Computational Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollich, George; Prince, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    How much of infant behaviour can be accounted for by signal-level analyses of stimuli? The current paper directly compares the moment-by-moment behaviour of 8-month-old infants in an audiovisual preferential looking task with that of several computational models that use the same video stimuli as presented to the infants. One type of model…

  9. Acceptance Noise Level: Effects of the Speech Signal, Babble, and Listener Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Lu-Feng; Azcona, Gabrielly; Buten, Lupe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The acceptable noise level (ANL) measure has gained much research/clinical interest in recent years. The present study examined how the characteristics of the speech signal and the babble used in the measure may affect the ANL in listeners with different native languages. Method: Fifteen English monolingual, 16 Russian-English bilingual,…

  10. Acceptance Noise Level: Effects of the Speech Signal, Babble, and Listener Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Lu-Feng; Azcona, Gabrielly; Buten, Lupe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The acceptable noise level (ANL) measure has gained much research/clinical interest in recent years. The present study examined how the characteristics of the speech signal and the babble used in the measure may affect the ANL in listeners with different native languages. Method: Fifteen English monolingual, 16 Russian-English bilingual,…

  11. Structural coloration signals condition, parental investment, and circulating hormone levels in Eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis).

    PubMed

    Grindstaff, Jennifer L; Lovern, Matthew B; Burtka, Jennifer L; Hallmark-Sharber, Alesia

    2012-08-01

    Many of the brilliant plumage coloration displays of birds function as signals to conspecifics. One species in which the function of plumage ornaments has been assessed is the Eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis). Studies of a population breeding in Alabama (USA) have established that plumage ornaments signal quality, parental investment, and competitive ability in both sexes. Here we tested the additional hypotheses that (1) Eastern bluebird plumage ornamentation signals nest defense behavior in heterospecific competitive interactions and (2) individual variation in plumage ornamentation reflects underlying differences in circulating hormone levels. We also tested the potential for plumage ornaments to signal individual quality and parental investment in a population breeding in Oklahoma (USA). We found that Eastern bluebirds with more ornamented plumage are in better condition, initiate breeding earlier in the season, produce larger clutches, have higher circulating levels of the stress hormone corticosterone, and more ornamented males have lower circulating androgen levels. Plumage coloration was not related to nest defense behavior. Thus, plumage ornamentation may be used by both sexes to assess the physiological condition and parental investment of prospective mates. Experimental manipulations of circulating hormone levels during molt are needed to define the role of hormones in plumage ornamentation.

  12. A machine learning approach to multi-level ECG signal quality classification.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiao; Rajagopalan, Cadathur; Clifford, Gari D

    2014-12-01

    Current electrocardiogram (ECG) signal quality assessment studies have aimed to provide a two-level classification: clean or noisy. However, clinical usage demands more specific noise level classification for varying applications. This work outlines a five-level ECG signal quality classification algorithm. A total of 13 signal quality metrics were derived from segments of ECG waveforms, which were labeled by experts. A support vector machine (SVM) was trained to perform the classification and tested on a simulated dataset and was validated using data from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database (MITDB). The simulated training and test datasets were created by selecting clean segments of the ECG in the 2011 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge database, and adding three types of real ECG noise at different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels from the MIT-BIH Noise Stress Test Database (NSTDB). The MITDB was re-annotated for five levels of signal quality. Different combinations of the 13 metrics were trained and tested on the simulated datasets and the best combination that produced the highest classification accuracy was selected and validated on the MITDB. Performance was assessed using classification accuracy (Ac), and a single class overlap accuracy (OAc), which assumes that an individual type classified into an adjacent class is acceptable. An Ac of 80.26% and an OAc of 98.60% on the test set were obtained by selecting 10 metrics while 57.26% (Ac) and 94.23% (OAc) were the numbers for the unseen MITDB validation data without retraining. By performing the fivefold cross validation, an Ac of 88.07±0.32% and OAc of 99.34±0.07% were gained on the validation fold of MITDB.

  13. Ultrasensitive electrochemical aptasensor for ochratoxin A based on two-level cascaded signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwang; Qian, Jing; Jiang, Ling; Yan, Yuting; Wang, Kan; Liu, Qian; Wang, Kun

    2014-04-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) has a number of toxic effects to both humans and animals, so developing sensitive detection method is of great importance. Herein, we describe an ultrasensitive electrochemical aptasensor for OTA based on the two-level cascaded signal amplification strategy with methylene blue (MB) as a redox indicator. In this method, capture DNA, aptamers, and reporter DNA functionalized-gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were immobilized on the electrode accordingly, where GNPs were used as the first-level signal enhancer. To receive the more sensitive response, a larger number of guanine (G)-rich DNA was bound to the GNPs' surface to provide abundant anchoring sites for MB to achieve the second-level signal amplification. By employing this novel strategy, an ~8.5 (±0.3) fold amplification in signal intensity was obtained. Afterward, OTA was added to force partial GNPs/G-rich DNA to release from the sensing interface and thus decreased the electrochemical response. An effective sensing range from 2.5pM to 2.5nM was received with an extremely low detection limit of 0.75 (±0.12) pM. This amplification strategy has the potential to be the main technology for aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor in a variety of fields.

  14. Nerves Control Redox Levels in Mature Tissues Through Schwann Cells and Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Francesca; Gauron, Carole; Rampon, Christine; Teillon, Jérémie; Volovitch, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Recent advances in redox biology have emphasized the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the modulation of signaling pathways and revealed that H2O2 plays a role in cellular remodeling in adults. Thus, an understanding of the mechanisms that control H2O2 levels in mature tissue would be of great interest. Results: We used a denervation strategy to demonstrate that sensory neurons are responsible for controlling H2O2 levels under normal conditions and after being lesioned. Moreover, we demonstrate that severed nerves respond to appendage amputation via the induction of Hedgehog signaling and that this signaling is responsible for H2O2 production in the wounded epidermis. Finally, we show that H2O2 and nerve growth are regulated via reciprocal action in adults. Innovation and Conclusion: These data support a new paradigm for the regulation of tissue homeostasis: H2O2 attracts nerves and nerves control H2O2 levels in a positive feedback loop. This finding suggests that the peripheral nerve redox environment could be a target for manipulating cell plasticity in adults. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 299–311. PMID:26442784

  15. Vital analysis: annotating sensed physiological signals with the stress levels of first responders in action.

    PubMed

    Gomes, P; Kaiseler, M; Queirós, C; Oliveira, M; Lopes, B; Coimbra, M

    2012-01-01

    First responders such as firefighters are exposed to extreme stress and fatigue situations during their work routines. It is thus desirable to monitor their health using wearable sensing but this is a complex and still unsolved research challenge that requires large amounts of properly annotated physiological signals data. In this paper we show that the information gathered by our Vital Analysis Framework can support the annotation of these vital signals with the stress levels perceived by the target user, confirmed by the analysis of more than 4600 hours of data collected from real firefighters in action, including 717 answers to event questionnaires from a total of 454 different events.

  16. NMR study of seed hydration with deuterated water: Dependence of proton signals on hydration level

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nola, A.; D'Ubaldo, A.; Fracassi, M.; Brosio, E. )

    1991-01-01

    Proton NMR signals in seeds are shown to depend on hydration level. In fact at low water amount, as it occurs in many native seeds, protons can have a restricted mobility and are not detectable. A NMR method for measuring the dependence of proton signals on hydration is reported. The method also allows the separation of the contributions of water and non-water protons in a low-resolution NMR experiment. It is based on successive hydrations (with deuterated water) - desiccation steps and on the analysis of the transverse magnetization decay curves.

  17. Large-signal model of a resonating cantilever-based transducer for system level electrical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verd, Jaume; Teva, Jordi; Abadal, Gabriel; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Esteve, Jaume; Barniol, Nuria

    2005-07-01

    In this work, we present a non-linear electromechanical model of an electrostatically excited cantilever that can be used to perform system level electrical simulations. This model is implemented by using an analog hardware description language (VHDL-AMS) that allows its use in a common IC CAD environment like CADENCE. Small-signal and large-signal simulations are performed and the results are compared with a simple linear model (RLC//C) showing the benefits of this model. This model is validated by its fit with the experimental results obtained from a monolithic sub-micrometer cantilever based sensor

  18. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation.

  19. Receptor for advanced glycation end products inhibits proliferation in osteoblast through suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guofeng; Xu, Jingren; Li, Zengchun

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression suppresses cell proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases ERK and PI3K signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes PI3K signaling restored by RAGE blockade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes ERK signaling restored by RAGE blockade. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a crucial role in bone metabolism. However, the role of RAGE in the control of osteoblast proliferation is not yet evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrate that RAGE overexpression inhibits osteoblast proliferation in vitro. The negative regulation of RAGE on cell proliferation results from suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, and is restored by RAGE neutralizing antibody. Prevention of Wnt signaling using Sfrp1 or DKK1 rescues RAGE-decreased PI3K and ERK signaling and cell proliferation, indicating that the altered cell growth in RAGE overexpressing cells is in part secondary to alterations in Wnt signaling. Consistently, RAGE overexpression inhibits the expression of Wnt targets cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is partially reversed by RAGE blockade. Overall, these results suggest that RAGE inhibits osteoblast proliferation via suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, which provides novel mechanisms by which RAGE regulates osteoblast growth.

  20. Detection of a dynamic topography signal in last interglacial sea level records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austermann, Jacqueline; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Huybers, Peter; Rovere, Alessio

    2017-04-01

    Mantle convection driven changes in topography have been shown to warp Earth's surface on long (million year) timescales, causing flooding and widespread sea level change. We argue that changes in dynamic topography also play a role in sea level changes on the shorter timescale of glacial cycles. The Last Interglacial (LIG, 125 ka) serves as a testing ground for understanding ice sheet stability and sea level rise in a warmer world. Global mean sea level during this time is generally obtained by correcting the observed elevation of sea level indicators for glacial isostatic adjustment. Here we investigate the extent to which mantle convection has additionally impacted the elevation of interglacial sea level markers. We consider the full effect of mantle flow driven changes in topography, including the thermal subsidence of ocean lithosphere and conduct twelve mantle convection calculations to estimate the magnitude and uncertainty of dynamic topography change. We find coherent trends but also large variability among the different models, reflecting uncertainties in mantle density and viscosity structure, and in the appropriate coupling between mantle flow and surface plates. We make predictions for key sea level sites as well as discuss the effect of the dynamic topography correction on the observed elevation of a global database of 280 LIG sea level indicators. We find that (1) predicted deflections are significantly correlated (> 95% probability) with the elevation of sea level markers, (2) they are consistent with construction and preservation attributes across different sea level marker types, and (3) correcting for the effects of dynamic topography reduces the variability among marker elevations. We conclude that a dynamic topography signal is present in the elevation of LIG sea level records, and that the signal must be accounted for in any effort to determine peak global mean sea level during this time to within an accuracy of several meters.

  1. Phylogenetic diversity and co-evolutionary signals among trophic levels change across a habitat edge.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guadalupe; Frost, Carol M; Didham, Raphael K; Varsani, Arvind; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2015-03-01

    Incorporating the evolutionary history of species into community ecology enhances understanding of community composition, ecosystem functioning and responses to environmental changes. Phylogenetic history might partly explain the impact of fragmentation and land-use change on assemblages of interacting organisms and even determine potential cascading effects across trophic levels. However, it remains unclear whether phylogenetic diversity of basal resources is reflected at higher trophic levels in the food web. In particular, phylogenetic determinants of community structure have never been incorporated into habitat edge studies, even though edges are recognized as key factors affecting communities in fragmented landscapes. Here, we test whether phylogenetic diversity at different trophic levels (plants, herbivores and parasitoids) and signals of co-evolution (i.e. phylogenetic congruence) among interacting trophic levels change across an edge gradient between native and plantation forests. To ascertain whether there is a signal of co-evolution across trophic levels, we test whether related consumer species generally feed on related resource species. We found differences across trophic levels in how their phylogenetic diversity responded to the habitat edge gradient. Plant and native parasitoid phylogenetic diversity changed markedly across habitats, while phylogenetic variability of herbivores (which were predominantly native) did not change across habitats, though phylogenetic evenness declined in plantation interiors. Related herbivore species did not appear to feed disproportionately on related plant species (i.e. there was no signal of co-evolution) even when considering only native species, potentially due to the high trophic generality of herbivores. However, related native parasitoid species tended to feed on related herbivore species, suggesting the presence of a co-evolutionary signal at higher trophic levels. Moreover, this signal was stronger in

  2. Carotenoid-dependent signals and the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels in birds.

    PubMed

    Simons, Mirre J P; Maia, Rafael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-12-01

    Sexual selection has resulted in a wide array of ornaments used in mate choice, and such indicator traits signal quality honestly when they bear costs, precluding cheating. Carotenoid-dependent coloration has attracted considerable attention in this context, because investing carotenoids in coloration has to be traded off against its physiological functions; carotenoids are antioxidants and increase immunocompetence. This trade-off is hypothesized to underlie the honesty of carotenoid-dependent coloration, signaling the "handicap" of allocating carotenoids away from somatic maintenance toward sexual display. Utilizing recent advances in modeling adaptive evolution, we used a comparative approach to investigate the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels using a species-level phylogeny of 178 bird species. We find that the evolutionary optimum for carotenoid levels is higher in lineages that evolved carotenoid-dependent coloration, with strong attraction toward this optimum. Hence, carotenoids do not appear to be limiting, given that higher carotenoid levels readily evolve in response to the evolution of carotenoid-dependent coloration. These findings challenge the assumption that carotenoids are a scarce resource and thus also challenge the hypothesis that physiological resource value of carotenoids underlies honesty of carotenoid-dependent traits. Therefore, the comparative evidence suggests that other factors, such as the acquisition and incorporation of carotenoids, are involved in maintaining signal honesty.

  3. Cardiotonic steroids stabilize regulator of G protein signaling 2 protein levels.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Benita; Parra, Sergio; Heath, Lauren J; Atkins, Kevin B; Xie, Zie-Jian; Neubig, Richard R

    2012-09-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2), a G(q)-specific GTPase-activating protein, is strongly implicated in cardiovascular function. RGS2(-/-) mice are hypertensive and prone to heart failure, and several rare human mutations that accelerate RGS2 degradation have been identified among patients with hypertension. Therefore, pharmacological up-regulation of RGS2 protein levels might be beneficial. We used a β-galactosidase complementation method to screen several thousand compounds with known pharmacological functions for those that increased RGS2 protein levels. Several cardiotonic steroids (CTSs), including ouabain and digoxin, increased RGS2 but not RGS4 protein levels. CTSs increased RGS2 protein levels through a post-transcriptional mechanism, by slowing protein degradation. RGS2 mRNA levels in primary vascular smooth muscle cells were unaffected by CTS treatment, whereas protein levels were increased 2- to 3-fold. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase was required for the increase in RGS2 protein levels, because the effect was lost in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-knockdown cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CTS-induced increases in RGS2 levels were functional and reduced receptor-stimulated, G(q)-dependent, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that in vivo treatment with digoxin led to increased RGS2 protein levels in heart and kidney. CTS-induced increases in RGS2 protein levels and function might modify several deleterious mechanisms in hypertension and heart failure. This novel CTS mechanism might contribute to the beneficial actions of low-dose digoxin treatment in heart failure. Our results support the concept of small-molecule modulation of RGS2 protein levels as a new strategy for cardiovascular therapy.

  4. Cardiotonic Steroids Stabilize Regulator of G Protein Signaling 2 Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, Benita; Parra, Sergio; Heath, Lauren J.; Atkins, Kevin B.; Xie, Zie-Jian

    2012-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2), a Gq-specific GTPase-activating protein, is strongly implicated in cardiovascular function. RGS2(−/−) mice are hypertensive and prone to heart failure, and several rare human mutations that accelerate RGS2 degradation have been identified among patients with hypertension. Therefore, pharmacological up-regulation of RGS2 protein levels might be beneficial. We used a β-galactosidase complementation method to screen several thousand compounds with known pharmacological functions for those that increased RGS2 protein levels. Several cardiotonic steroids (CTSs), including ouabain and digoxin, increased RGS2 but not RGS4 protein levels. CTSs increased RGS2 protein levels through a post-transcriptional mechanism, by slowing protein degradation. RGS2 mRNA levels in primary vascular smooth muscle cells were unaffected by CTS treatment, whereas protein levels were increased 2- to 3-fold. Na+/K+-ATPase was required for the increase in RGS2 protein levels, because the effect was lost in Na+/K+-ATPase-knockdown cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CTS-induced increases in RGS2 levels were functional and reduced receptor-stimulated, Gq-dependent, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that in vivo treatment with digoxin led to increased RGS2 protein levels in heart and kidney. CTS-induced increases in RGS2 protein levels and function might modify several deleterious mechanisms in hypertension and heart failure. This novel CTS mechanism might contribute to the beneficial actions of low-dose digoxin treatment in heart failure. Our results support the concept of small-molecule modulation of RGS2 protein levels as a new strategy for cardiovascular therapy. PMID:22695717

  5. Insulin Signaling Regulates Fatty Acid Catabolism at the Level of CoA Activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Ruskeepää, Anna-Liisa; Aye, Cho Cho; Carson, Brian P.; Mora, Silvia; Orešič, Matej; Teleman, Aurelio A.

    2012-01-01

    The insulin/IGF signaling pathway is a highly conserved regulator of metabolism in flies and mammals, regulating multiple physiological functions including lipid metabolism. Although insulin signaling is known to regulate the activity of a number of enzymes in metabolic pathways, a comprehensive understanding of how the insulin signaling pathway regulates metabolic pathways is still lacking. Accepted knowledge suggests the key regulated step in triglyceride (TAG) catabolism is the release of fatty acids from TAG via the action of lipases. We show here that an additional, important regulated step is the activation of fatty acids for beta-oxidation via Acyl Co-A synthetases (ACS). We identify pudgy as an ACS that is transcriptionally regulated by direct FOXO action in Drosophila. Increasing or reducing pudgy expression in vivo causes a decrease or increase in organismal TAG levels respectively, indicating that pudgy expression levels are important for proper lipid homeostasis. We show that multiple ACSs are also transcriptionally regulated by insulin signaling in mammalian cells. In sum, we identify fatty acid activation onto CoA as an important, regulated step in triglyceride catabolism, and we identify a mechanistic link through which insulin regulates lipid homeostasis. PMID:22275878

  6. Crack Level Estimation Approach for Planetary Gear Sets Based on Simulation Signal and GRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhe; Hu, Niaoqing; Zuo, Mingjian; Fan, Bin

    2012-05-01

    The planetary gearbox is a critical mechanism in helicopter transmission systems. Tooth failures in planetary gear sets will cause great risk to helicopter operations. A crack level estimation methodology has been devised in this paper by integrating a physical model for simulation signal generation and a grey relational analysis (GRA) algorithm for damage level estimation. The proposed method was calibrated firstly with fault seeded test data and then validated with the data of other tests from a helicopter transmission test rig. The estimation results of test data coincide with the actual test records, showing the effectiveness and accuracy of the method in providing a novel way to hybrid model based methods and signal analysis methods for more accurate health monitoring and condition prediction.

  7. The Safety Related Software for Railway Control with Respect to Automatic Level Crossing Signaling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewiński, Andrzej; Trzaska-Rycaj, Katarzyna

    The paper deals with design problems of correct and high reliable software for railway traffic control systems. The correct software (corresponding to formal or semi-formal criteria) has an important part in safety related (SIL4) railway control systems. The paper treats about actual state of art in design of safety related software for railway application. The proposed methods, recommended by CENELEC and UIC are introduced to example of automatic level crossing signaling system.

  8. Measurement of Voltage Level Output by Magnetic Tunneling Junction by Rectification of RF Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-13

    MTJ ) was measured. This was accomplished using both a broadband log periodic antenna and broadband ridge horn antenna as a radio frequency (RF) source...Transmission frequencies ranged from 1 to 6 GHz at varied power levels of 0 to 20 dBm. The signal was received by a coplanar waveguide antenna. A MTJ ...Slavin Steven Zielinski 4/13/2011 Abstract In this experiment, the DC voltage output of a magnetic tunneling junction ( MTJ ) was measured. This

  9. Increasing 14N NQR signal by 1H-14N level crossing with small magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Sauer, Karen L; Buess, Michael L; Klug, Christopher A; Miller, Joel B

    2005-11-01

    NQR detection of materials, such as TNT, is hindered by the low signal-to-noise ratio at low NQR frequencies. Sweeping small (0-26 mT) magnetic fields to shift the (1)H NMR frequency relative to the (14)N NQR frequencies can provide a significant increase of the (14)N NQR signal-to-noise ratio. Three effects of (1)H-(14)N level crossing are demonstrated in diglycine hydrochloride and TNT. These effects are (1) transferring (1)H polarization to one or more of the (14)N transitions, including the use of an adiabatic flip of the (1)H polarization during the field sweep, (2) shortening the effective (14)N T(1) by the interaction of (1)H with the (14)N transitions, (3) "level transfer" effect where the third (14)N (spin 1) energy level or other (14)N sites with different NQR frequency are used as a reservoir of polarization which is transferred to the measured (14)N transition by the (1)H. The (14)N NQR signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by a factor of 2.5 for one (14)N site in diglycine hydrochloride (and 2.2 in TNT), even though the maximum (1)H frequency used in this work, 111 6 kHz, is only 30% larger than the measured (14)N frequencies (834 kHz for diglycine hydrochloride and 843 kHz for TNT).

  10. Alterations in brain leptin signalling in spite of unchanged CSF leptin levels in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Maioli, Silvia; Lodeiro, Maria; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Falahati, Farshad; Khan, Wasim; Puerta, Elena; Codita, Alina; Rimondini, Roberto; Ramirez, Maria J; Simmons, Andrew; Gil-Bea, Francisco; Westman, Eric; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel

    2015-02-01

    Several studies support the relation between leptin and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We show that leptin levels in CSF are unchanged as subjects progress to AD. However, in AD hippocampus, leptin signalling was decreased and leptin localization was shifted, being more abundant in reactive astrocytes and less in neurons. Similar translocation of leptin was found in brains from Tg2576 and apoE4 mice. Moreover, an enhancement of leptin receptors was found in hippocampus of young Tg2576 mice and in primary astrocytes and neurons treated with Aβ₁₋₄₂. In contrast, old Tg2576 mice showed decreased leptin receptors levels. Similar findings to those seen in Tg2576 mice were found in apoE4, but not in apoE3 mice. These results suggest that leptin levels are intact, but leptin signalling is impaired in AD. Thus, Aβ accumulation and apoE4 genotype result in a transient enhancement of leptin signalling that might lead to a leptin resistance state over time. © 2014 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Decreased Serotonin Levels and Serotonin-Mediated Osteoblastic Inhibitory Signaling in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Klavdianou, Kalliopi; Liossis, Stamatis-Nick; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Theocharis, Georgios; Sirinian, Chaido; Kottorou, Anastasia; Filippopoulou, Alexandra; Andonopoulos, Andrew P; Daoussis, Dimitrios

    2016-03-01

    Evidence suggests that serotonin is an inhibitor of bone formation. We aimed to assess: 1) serum serotonin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a prototype bone-forming disease, compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects; 2) the effect(s) of TNFα blockers on serum serotonin levels in patients with AS and RA; and 3) the effect(s) of serum of AS patients on serotonin signaling. Serum serotonin levels were measured in 47 patients with AS, 28 patients with RA, and 40 healthy subjects by radioimmunoassay; t test was used to assess differences between groups. The effect of serum on serotonin signaling was assessed using the human osteoblastic cell line Saos2, evaluating levels of phospho-CREB by Western immunoblots. Serotonin serum levels were significantly lower in patients with AS compared with healthy subjects (mean ± SEM ng/mL 122.9 ± 11.6 versus 177.4 ± 24.58, p = 0.038) and patients with RA (mean ± SEM ng/mL 244.8 ± 37.5, p = 0.0004). Patients with AS receiving TNFα blockers had significantly lower serotonin levels compared with patients with AS not on such treatment (mean ± SEM ng/mL 95.8 ± 14.9 versus 149.2 ± 16.0, p = 0.019). Serotonin serum levels were inversely correlated with pCREB induction in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Serotonin levels are low in patients with AS and decrease even further during anti-TNFα treatment. Differences in serotonin levels are shown to have a functional impact on osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Therefore, serotonin may be involved in new bone formation in AS.

  12. Detection of a dynamic topography signal in last interglacial sea-level records

    PubMed Central

    Austermann, Jacqueline; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Huybers, Peter; Rovere, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Estimating minimum ice volume during the last interglacial based on local sea-level indicators requires that these indicators are corrected for processes that alter local sea level relative to the global average. Although glacial isostatic adjustment is generally accounted for, global scale dynamic changes in topography driven by convective mantle flow are generally not considered. We use numerical models of mantle flow to quantify vertical deflections caused by dynamic topography and compare predictions at passive margins to a globally distributed set of last interglacial sea-level markers. The deflections predicted as a result of dynamic topography are significantly correlated with marker elevations (>95% probability) and are consistent with construction and preservation attributes across marker types. We conclude that a dynamic topography signal is present in the elevation of last interglacial sea-level records and that the signal must be accounted for in any effort to determine peak global mean sea level during the last interglacial to within an accuracy of several meters. PMID:28695210

  13. Detection of a dynamic topography signal in last interglacial sea-level records.

    PubMed

    Austermann, Jacqueline; Mitrovica, Jerry X; Huybers, Peter; Rovere, Alessio

    2017-07-01

    Estimating minimum ice volume during the last interglacial based on local sea-level indicators requires that these indicators are corrected for processes that alter local sea level relative to the global average. Although glacial isostatic adjustment is generally accounted for, global scale dynamic changes in topography driven by convective mantle flow are generally not considered. We use numerical models of mantle flow to quantify vertical deflections caused by dynamic topography and compare predictions at passive margins to a globally distributed set of last interglacial sea-level markers. The deflections predicted as a result of dynamic topography are significantly correlated with marker elevations (>95% probability) and are consistent with construction and preservation attributes across marker types. We conclude that a dynamic topography signal is present in the elevation of last interglacial sea-level records and that the signal must be accounted for in any effort to determine peak global mean sea level during the last interglacial to within an accuracy of several meters.

  14. Electroencephalograph (EEG) signal processing method of motor imaginary potential for attention level classification.

    PubMed

    Ming, Dong; Xi, Youyuan; Zhang, Mingming; Qi, Hongzhi; Cheng, Longlong; Wan, Baikun; Li, Liyong

    2009-01-01

    Research of visual attention is one of the important domains of psychology and neurophysiology. In this study, an attention related electroencephalograph (EEG) signal processing method was proposed to distinguish the different levels of people's attention during the imaginary limbs motor. There were two EEG feedback experiments (playing tennis and walking) to measure the different levels of visual attention. Three imaginary motor tasks (attention, inattention, and rest task) were performed with the flash stimulus displayed on the screen in the experiments. A nonlinear dynamics parameter of multi-scale entropy (MSE) was extracted from those EEG data recorded. According to the statistics analysis of 14 subjects, there was an obvious declining tendency of MSE with the level of attention declining, which validated the effectiveness of the proposed method to classify the visual attention level.

  15. Educational level signals unobserved abilities of people with high functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Yokotani, Kenji

    2010-08-01

    The effect of educational level on employment of people with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD) was examined. If education augments natural abilities to accomplish tasks in people with HFASD, then those with more education would have comparative advantages in both obtaining and retaining jobs. In contrast, if education did not augment natural abilities and only signaled unobservable abilities, one would expect an advantage only in obtaining a job, but not in retention. 22 people with HFASD replied to questionnaires regarding their history of education and employment. Those with job experience had higher educational levels than those with no job experience, but educational level was not significantly different between groups with and without more than one year of job experience. Educational level seems to be associated with abilities, but probably the unobserved abilities underlie both educational attainment and employment history.

  16. Acute disruption of leptin signaling in vivo leads to increased insulin levels and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Levi, Jasna; Gray, Sarah L; Speck, Madeleine; Huynh, Frank K; Babich, Sandra L; Gibson, William T; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, plays an essential role in the maintenance of normal body weight and energy expenditure, as well as glucose homeostasis. Indeed, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice are obese with profound hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and often hyperglycemia. Interestingly, low doses of exogenous leptin can reverse the hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia in these animals without altering body weight. The hyperinsulinemia in ob/ob mice may result directly from the absence of leptin signaling in pancreatic β-cells and, in turn, contribute to both obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we acutely attenuated endogenous leptin signaling in normal mice with a polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated mouse leptin antagonist (PEG-MLA) to determine the contribution of leptin signaling in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. PEG-MLA was either injected or continuously administered via osmotic minipumps for several days, and various metabolic parameters were assessed. PEG-MLA-treated mice had increased fasting and glucose-stimulated plasma insulin levels, decreased whole-body insulin sensitivity, elevated hepatic glucose production, and impaired insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production. Moreover, PEG-MLA treatment resulted in increased food intake and increased respiratory quotient without significantly altering energy expenditure or body composition as assessed by the lean:lipid ratio. Our findings indicate that alterations in insulin sensitivity occur before changes in the lean:lipid ratio and energy expenditure during the acute disruption of endogenous leptin signaling.

  17. Low-level RF signal processing for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.; Ziomek, C.; Adolphsen, C.

    1997-05-12

    In the X-band accelerator system for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA), the Low Level RF (LLRF) drive system must be very phase stable, but concurrently, be very phase agile. Phase agility is needed to make the Stanford Linear Doubler (SLED) power multiplier systems Energy work and to shape the RF waveforms to compensate beam loading in the accelerator sections. Similarly, precision fast phase and amplitude monitors are required to view, track, and feed back on RF signals at various locations throughout the system. The LLRF is composed of several subsystems: the RF Reference System generates and distributes a reference 11.424 GHz signal to all of the RF stations, the Signal Processing Chassis creates the RF waveforms with the appropriate phase modulation, and the Phase Detector Assembly measures the amplitude and phase of monitor3ed RF signals. The LLRF is run via VXI instrumentation. These instruments are controlled using HP VEE graphical programming software. Programs have been developed to shape the RF waveform, calibrate the phase modulators and demodulators, and display the measured waveforms. This paper describes these and other components of the LLRF system.

  18. Multi-system, multi-signal GNSS-reflectometry for sea level observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfgren, Johan; Haas, Rüdiger

    2014-05-01

    Information on sea level and its changes are important in connection to global change processes. For centuries sea level has been observed with coastal tide gauges and since some decades with satellite altimetry. Furthermore, during recent years also the application of GNSS-reflectometry for sea level observations has been developed. Various methods exist, using ground-based, airborne and space-borne systems, and using different analysis methods. We present results from a dedicated GNSS-based tide gauge installed at the Onsala Space Observatory at the Swedish west coast. This installation consists of two sets of commercially-off-the-shelf GNSS equipment, including geodetic-type choke-ring antennae and geodetic-type receivers. The two antennae are mounted on a beam extending in southward direction over the coastline. The antennae are aligned along the local vertical with one antenna facing toward zenith direction and the other facing toward nadir. The zenith-looking antenna is Right-Hand-Circular-Polarised (RHCP) while the nadir-looking antenna is Left-Hand-Circular-Polarised (LHCP). The zenith-looking antenna receives predominantly the direct RHCP satellite signals, while the nadir-looking antenna receives predominantly signals that are reflected off the sea surface and thus have changed polarisation to LHCP in the reflection process. The GNSS-receivers are connected to one antenna each and individually record multi-frequency signals of several GNSS. The recorded data can be analysed in different ways to derive information on the sea level and its variation. For example, data from both receivers can be analysed together applying geodetic-type phase-delay analysis with a single-difference and/or double-difference strategy. These analysis methods determine the baseline between the two antennae, which is proportional to the height of the installation above the sea surface. Another analysis method exploits the multipath oscillations in the recorded Signal

  19. Epicardial function of canonical Wnt-, Hedgehog-, Fgfr1/2-, and Pdgfra-signalling.

    PubMed

    Rudat, Carsten; Norden, Julia; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Kispert, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The embryonic epicardium is a source of smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts of the coronary vasculature and of the myocardium, but the signalling pathways that control mobilization and differentiation of epicardial cells are only partly known. We aimed to (re-)evaluate the relevance of canonical Wnt-, Hedgehog (Hh)-, Fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr)1/2-, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (Pdgfra)-signalling in murine epicardial development. We used a T-box 18 (Tbx18)(cre)-mediated conditional approach to delete and to stabilize, respectively, the downstream mediator of canonical Wnt-signalling, beta-catenin (Ctnnb1), to delete and activate the mediator of Hh-signalling, smoothened (Smo), and to delete Fgfr1/Fgfr2 and Pdgfra in murine epicardial development. We show that epicardial loss of Ctnnb1, Smo, or Fgfr1/Fgfr2 does not affect cardiac development, whereas the loss of Pdgfra prevents the differentiation of epicardium-derived cells into mature fibroblasts. Epicardial expression of a stabilized version of Ctnnb1 results in the formation of hyperproliferative epicardial cell clusters; epicardial expression of a constitutively active version of Smo leads to epicardial thickening and loss of epicardial mobilization. Canonical Wnt-, Hh-, and Fgfr1/Fgfr2-signalling are dispensable for epicardial development, but Pdgfra-signalling is crucial for the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts from epicardium-derived cells.

  20. FIPSER: Performance study of a readout concept with few digitization levels for fast signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limyansky, B.; Reese, R.; Cressler, J. D.; Otte, A. N.; Taboada, I.; Ulusoy, C.

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the performance of a readout system, Fixed Pulse Shape Efficient Readout (FIPSER), to digitize signals from detectors with a fixed pulse shape. In this study we are mainly interested in the readout of fast photon detectors like photomultipliers or Silicon photomultipliers. But the concept can be equally applied to the digitization of other detector signals. FIPSER is based on the flash analog to digital converter (FADC) concept, but has the potential to lower costs and power consumption by using an order of magnitude fewer discrete voltage levels. Performance is bolstered by combining the discretized signal with the knowledge of the underlying pulse shape. Simulated FIPSER data was reconstructed with two independent methods. One using a maximum likelihood method and the other using a modified χ2 test. Both methods show that utilizing 12 discrete voltage levels with a sampling rate of 4 samples per full width half maximum (FWHM) of the pulse achieves an amplitude resolution that is better than the Poisson limit for photon-counting experiments. The time resolution achieved in this configuration ranges between 0.02 and 0.16 FWHM and depends on the pulse amplitude. In a situation where the waveform is composed of two consecutive pulses the pulses can be separated if they are at least 0.05-0.30 FWHM apart with an amplitude resolution that is better than 20%.

  1. Ethylene Regulates Levels of Ethylene Receptor/CTR1 Signaling Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGES

    Shakeel, Samina N.; Gao, Zhiyong; Amir, Madiha; ...

    2015-03-26

    The plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a five-member family of receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The receptors function in conjunction with the Raf-like kinase CTR1 to negatively regulate ethylene signal transduction. CTR1 interacts with multiple members of the receptor family based on co-purification analysis, interacting more strongly with receptors containing a receiver domain. Levels of membrane-associated CTR1 vary in response to ethylene, doing so in a post-transcriptional manner that correlates with ethylene-mediated changes in levels of the ethylene receptors ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, and ETR2. Interactions between CTR1 and the receptor ETR1 protect ETR1 from ethylene-induced turnover. Kinetic and dose-response analysesmore » support a model in which two opposing factors control levels of the ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes. Ethylene stimulates the production of new complexes largely through transcriptional induction of the receptors. However, ethylene also induces turnover of receptors, such that levels of ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes decrease at higher ethylene concentrations. Lastly, we discuss implications of this model for ethylene signaling.« less

  2. Ethylene Regulates Levels of Ethylene Receptor/CTR1 Signaling Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Samina N; Gao, Zhiyong; Amir, Madiha; Chen, Yi-Feng; Rai, Muneeza Iqbal; Haq, Noor Ul; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-05-08

    The plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a five-member family of receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The receptors function in conjunction with the Raf-like kinase CTR1 to negatively regulate ethylene signal transduction. CTR1 interacts with multiple members of the receptor family based on co-purification analysis, interacting more strongly with receptors containing a receiver domain. Levels of membrane-associated CTR1 vary in response to ethylene, doing so in a post-transcriptional manner that correlates with ethylene-mediated changes in levels of the ethylene receptors ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, and ETR2. Interactions between CTR1 and the receptor ETR1 protect ETR1 from ethylene-induced turnover. Kinetic and dose-response analyses support a model in which two opposing factors control levels of the ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes. Ethylene stimulates the production of new complexes largely through transcriptional induction of the receptors. However, ethylene also induces turnover of receptors, such that levels of ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes decrease at higher ethylene concentrations. Implications of this model for ethylene signaling are discussed.

  3. Evidence that fold-change, and not absolute level, of β-catenin dictates Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Goentoro, Lea; Kirschner, Marc W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In the canonical Wnt pathway, binding of the Wnt ligand to its transmembrane receptors leads to an inhibition of the degradation of β-catenin; as a result, β-catenin accumulates to a point where it activates target genes. Using mathematical modeling and experiments in mammalian cells, we examined the robustness of the β-catenin response to Wnt stimulation. We found that the final (post-Wnt) level of β-catenin is very sensitive to all perturbations in the Wnt signaling pathway, such that mild genetic or environmental variation would be expected to change the final level of β-catenin, and alter the output of the pathway. By contrast, one unusual parameter was robust: the fold-change in β-catenin (post- Wnt level / pre-Wnt level). Furthermore, in Xenopus embryos, dorsal-anterior development and the corresponding target gene expression are robust to the same perturbations that alter the final level but leave the fold-change intact. These results suggest: First, despite noise and variation, within a range the cell maintains a constant fold-change in β-catenin for a given Wnt stimulation. Second, the transcriptional machinery downstream of the Wnt pathway is constructed to read the robust fold-change and not simply the final level of β-catenin. In analogy to Weber’s law in sensory physiology, some gene transcription networks may be tuned to respond to fold-changes, rather than absolute levels of signals, as a way to reduce the consequences of stochastic, genetic and environmental variation. PMID:20005849

  4. Physiological signal analysis for fatigue level of experienced and inexperienced drivers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Su, Wencheng; Lu, Zhangping

    2017-02-17

    We studied the changes in driving fatigue levels of experienced and inexperienced drivers at 3 periods of the day: 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m., 12:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m., and 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. Thirty drivers were involved in 120-min real-car driving, and sleepiness ratings (Stanford Sleepiness Scale, SSS; Hoddes et al. 1973 ), electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, and heart rates (HRs) were recorded. Together with principal component analysis, the relationship between EEG signals and HR was explored and used to determine a comprehensive indicator of driving fatigue. Then the comprehensive indicator was assessed via paired t test. Experienced and inexperienced drivers behaved significantly differently in terms of subjective fatigue during preliminary trials. At the beginning of trials and after termination, subjective fatigue level was aggravated with prolonged continuous driving. Moreover, we discussed the changing rules of EEG signals and HR and found that with prolonged time, the ratios of δ and β waves significantly declined, whereas that of the θ wave significantly rose. The ratio of (α + θ)/β significantly rose both before trials and after termination, but HR dropped significantly. However, one-factor analysis of variance shows that driving experience significantly affects the θ wave, (α + θ)/β ratio, and HR. We found that in a monotonous road environment, fatigue symptoms occurred in inexperienced drivers and experienced drivers after about 60 and 80 min of continuous driving, respectively. Therefore, as for drivers with different experiences, restriction on continuous driving time would avoid fatigued driving and thereby eliminate traffic accidents. We find that the comprehensive indicator changes significantly with fatigue level. The integration of different indicators improves the recognition accuracy of different driving fatigue levels.

  5. Frequency response testing at Experimental Breeder Reactor II using discrete-level periodic signals

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, W.D.; Larson, H.A. . Coll. of Engineering); Dean, E.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) reactivity-to-power frequency-response function was measured with pseudo-random, discrete-level, periodic signals. The reactor power deviation was small with insignificant perturbation of normal operation and in-place irradiation experiments. Comparison of results with measured rod oscillator data and with theoretical predictions show good agreement. Moreover, measures of input signal quality (autocorrelation function and energy spectra) confirm the ability to enable this type of frequency response determination at EBR-2. Measurements were made with the pseudo-random binary sequence, quadratic residue binary sequence, pseudo-random ternary sequence, and the multifrequency binary sequence. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Human Metapneumovirus Inhibits IFN-β Signaling by Downregulating Jak1 and Tyk2 Cellular Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Junping; Kolli, Deepthi; Liu, Tianshuang; Xu, Renling; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella; Bao, Xiaoyong

    2011-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV), a leading cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, inhibits type I interferon (IFN) signaling by an unidentified mechanism. In this study, we showed that infection of airway epithelial cells with hMPV decreased cellular level of Janus tyrosine kinase (Jak1) and tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2), due to enhanced proteosomal degradation and reduced gene transcription. In addition, hMPV infection also reduced the surface expression of type I IFN receptor (IFNAR). These inhibitory mechanisms are different from the ones employed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which does not affect Jak1, Tyk2 or IFNAR expression, but degrades downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins 2 (STAT2), although both viruses are pneumoviruses belonging to the Paramyxoviridae family. Our study identifies a novel mechanism by which hMPV inhibits STAT1 and 2 activation, ultimately leading to viral evasion of host IFN responses. PMID:21949722

  7. Just noticeable difference level estimation in real-time digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Zbigniew; Rudkowski, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    Modern state-of-the art watermarking systems use precise algorithms for ensure perceptual transparency of the additional signal in the host signal presence. Various Human Auditory System (HAS) models are implemented but only few of them are computationally effective giving reliable acoustic masking effect. This paper presents efficient algorithm and its implementation for Just Noticeable Difference level estimation using HAS for data hiding application. Implementation is based on effective Johnston [1] HAS model and real-time processing using TMS 320C6713 DSK board. The results of implementation as well as subjective fidelity test using standard ITU-R BS 1116.1 are described and illustrated. Numerical results of DSP real-time implementation are compared with the Matlab off-line HAS computational model.

  8. Preservation and Shredding of Relative Sea-level Signals in Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Straub, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Recently studies present quantitative theory, tested with experiments, that signals of allogenic forcings can be shredded by autogenic processes in transport systems. However, we currently lack theory for predicting the properties external forcing must have to be stored in the stratigraphic record. One of the most important boundary conditions influencing dynamics of sediment transport systems and their resulting stratigraphy is Relative Sea-Level (RSL). In this study, we use physical experiments to explore the capacity of autogenic processes to shred perturbations of RSL prior to transfer to the stratigraphic record. We are currently testing the hypothesis that RSL cycles with amplitudes greater than one channel depth (Hc) and/or periodicities longer than the time necessary to deposit, on average, one channel depth of thickness over an entire basin (Tc) will be preserved in stratigraphy. RSL cycles with magnitudes less than Hc and periods less than Tc, though, should be prone to signal shredding prior to transfer to the immobile stratigraphic record. We are conducting a series of physical experiments subject to cycles of RSL with amplitudes and periodicities on either side of our hypothesized shredding thresholds. Initial time series analysis of deposition rates from an experiment with RSL cycles characterized by amplitudes and periods a factor of 2 greater than Hc and Tc, respectively, show signal preservation. Specifically, auto-correlation analysis reveals periodicity in deposition rates equal to the imposed periodicity of RSL cycles. This study improves our ability to predict and interpret allogenic signals in the stratigraphic record and separate these signals from the products of autogenic processes.

  9. Sox11 Is Required to Maintain Proper Levels of Hedgehog Signaling during Vertebrate Ocular Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pillai-Kastoori, Lakshmi; Wen, Wen; Wilson, Stephen G.; Strachan, Erin; Lo-Castro, Adriana; Fichera, Marco; Musumeci, Sebastiano A.; Lehmann, Ordan J.; Morris, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular coloboma is a sight-threatening malformation caused by failure of the choroid fissure to close during morphogenesis of the eye, and is frequently associated with additional anomalies, including microphthalmia and cataracts. Although Hedgehog signaling is known to play a critical role in choroid fissure closure, genetic regulation of this pathway remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the transcription factor Sox11 is required to maintain specific levels of Hedgehog signaling during ocular development. Sox11-deficient zebrafish embryos displayed delayed and abnormal lens formation, coloboma, and a specific reduction in rod photoreceptors, all of which could be rescued by treatment with the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor cyclopamine. We further demonstrate that the elevated Hedgehog signaling in Sox11-deficient zebrafish was caused by a large increase in shha transcription; indeed, suppressing Shha expression rescued the ocular phenotypes of sox11 morphants. Conversely, over-expression of sox11 induced cyclopia, a phenotype consistent with reduced levels of Sonic hedgehog. We screened DNA samples from 79 patients with microphthalmia, anophthalmia, or coloboma (MAC) and identified two novel heterozygous SOX11 variants in individuals with coloboma. In contrast to wild type human SOX11 mRNA, mRNA containing either variant failed to rescue the lens and coloboma phenotypes of Sox11-deficient zebrafish, and both exhibited significantly reduced transactivation ability in a luciferase reporter assay. Moreover, decreased gene dosage from a segmental deletion encompassing the SOX11 locus resulted in microphthalmia and related ocular phenotypes. Therefore, our study reveals a novel role for Sox11 in controlling Hedgehog signaling, and suggests that SOX11 variants contribute to pediatric eye disorders. PMID:25010521

  10. Wnt5a signaling is a substantial constituent in bone morphogenetic protein-2-mediated osteoblastogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Eiji; Ebe, Yukari; Kanaya, Sousuke; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Tamura, Masato; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt5a is identified in osteoblasts in tibial growth plate and bone marrow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteoblastic differentiation is associated with increased expression of Wnt5a/Ror2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt5a/Ror2 signaling is important for BMP-2-mediated osteoblastic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt5a/Ror2 operates independently of BMP-Smad pathway. -- Abstract: Wnts are secreted glycoproteins that mediate developmental and post-developmental physiology by regulating cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis through {beta}-catenin-dependent canonical and {beta}-catenin-independent noncanonical pathway. It has been reported that Wnt5a activates noncanonical Wnt signaling through receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2 (Ror2). Although it appears that Wnt5a/Ror2 signaling supports normal bone physiology, the biological significance of noncanonical Wnts in osteogenesis is essentially unknown. In this study, we identified expression of Wnt5a in osteoblasts in the ossification zone of the tibial growth plate as well as bone marrow of the rat tibia as assessed by immunohistochemistry. In addition, w