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Sample records for beta-delayed charged-particle emission

  1. Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, Theodore Joseph

    1996-03-01

    To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of 31Cl, 27P and 28P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas ΔE-gas ΔE-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in 31Cl and 27P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of 31Cl were shown to be from the decay of 25Si. In 27P, two proton groups at 459 ± 14 keV and 610 ± 11 keV, with intensities of 7 ± 3% and 92 ± 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the β-decay of 28P, at 1,444 ± 12 keV with a 1.7 ± 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, 17Ne and 33Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 ± 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of 17Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from 17Ne and 33Ar were resolved.

  2. Beta-delayed proton emission from 20Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, M. V.; Andreyev, A.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cederkäll, J.; De Witte, H.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Greenlees, P. T.; Harkness-Brennan, L. J.; Howard, A. M.; Huyse, M.; Jonson, B.; Judson, D. S.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Konki, J.; Kurcewicz, J.; Lazarus, I.; Lica, R.; Lindberg, S.; Madurga, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Marroquin, I.; Mihai, C.; Munch, M.; Nacher, E.; Negret, A.; Nilsson, T.; Page, R. D.; Pascu, S.; Perea, A.; Pucknell, V.; Rahkila, P.; Rapisarda, E.; Riisager, K.; Rotaru, F.; Sotty, C.; Stanoiu, M.; Tengblad, O.; Turturica, A.; Van Duppen, P.; Vedia, V.; Wadsworth, R.; Warr, N.

    2016-10-01

    Beta-delayed proton emission from 20 Mg has been measured at ISOLDE, CERN, with the ISOLDE Decay Station (IDS) setup including both charged-particle and gamma-ray detection capabilities. A total of 27 delayed proton branches were measured including seven so far unobserved. An updated decay scheme, including three new resonances above the proton separation energy in 20 Na and more precise resonance energies, is presented. Beta-decay feeding to two resonances above the Isobaric Analogue State (IAS) in 20 Na is observed. This may allow studies of the 4032.9(2.4)keV resonance in 19 Ne through the beta decay of 20 Mg, which is important for the astrophysically relevant reaction 15O( α, γ)19Ne . Beta-delayed protons were used to obtain a more precise value for the half-life of 20 Mg, 91.4(1.0)ms.

  3. Charged-particle emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yijun; Caucci, Luca; Barrett, Harrison H

    2017-06-01

    Conventional charged-particle imaging techniques - such as autoradiography - provide only two-dimensional (2D) black ex vivo images of thin tissue slices. In order to get volumetric information, images of multiple thin slices are stacked. This process is time consuming and prone to distortions, as registration of 2D images is required. We propose a direct three-dimensional (3D) autoradiography technique, which we call charged-particle emission tomography (CPET). This 3D imaging technique enables imaging of thick tissue sections, thus increasing laboratory throughput and eliminating distortions due to registration. CPET also has the potential to enable in vivo charged-particle imaging with a window chamber or an endoscope. Our approach to charged-particle emission tomography uses particle-processing detectors (PPDs) to estimate attributes of each detected particle. The attributes we estimate include location, direction of propagation, and/or the energy deposited in the detector. Estimated attributes are then fed into a reconstruction algorithm to reconstruct the 3D distribution of charged-particle-emitting radionuclides. Several setups to realize PPDs are designed. Reconstruction algorithms for CPET are developed. Reconstruction results from simulated data showed that a PPD enables CPET if the PPD measures more attributes than just the position from each detected particle. Experiments showed that a two-foil charged-particle detector is able to measure the position and direction of incident alpha particles. We proposed a new volumetric imaging technique for charged-particle-emitting radionuclides, which we have called charged-particle emission tomography (CPET). We also proposed a new class of charged-particle detectors, which we have called particle-processing detectors (PPDs). When a PPD is used to measure the direction and/or energy attributes along with the position attributes, CPET is feasible. © 2017 The Authors. Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals

  4. Studies of Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission using Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegl, Kevin; Aprahamian, A.; Scielzo, N. D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Burkey, M.; Caldwell, S.; Czeszumska, A.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Kolos, K.; Marley, S. T.; Morgan, G. E.; Norman, E. B.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Pérez Galván, A.; Sh, K. S.; Strauss, S. Y.; Wang, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    Using a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap to confine radioactive ions allows indirect measurements of beta-delayed neutron (BDN) emission. By determining the recoil energy of the beta-decay daughter ions it is possible to study BDN emission, as the neutron emission can impart a significantly larger nuclear recoil than from beta-decay alone. This method avoids most of the systematic uncertainties associated with direct neutron detection but introduces dependencies on the specifics of the decay and interactions of the ion with the RF fields. The decays of seven BDN precursors were studied using the Beta-decay Paul Trap (BPT) to confine fission fragments from the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The analysis of these measurements and results for the branching ratios and neutron energy spectra will be presented. Supported by the NSF under grant PHY-1419765, and the U.S. DOE under the NEUP project 13-5485, contracts DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL) and DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and award DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  5. Beta-delayed two-proton emission as a nuclear probe

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D.M.; Reiff, J.E.; Robertson, J.D.; Lang, T.F.; Cerny, J.

    1987-09-01

    A brief history of beta-delayed two-proton emission is given. Speculations about future experiments which would enhance our knowledge about both nuclear spectroscopy and this relatively unique decay mode are presented. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission in Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketin, Tomislav; Sieverding, André; Wu, Meng-Ru; Paar, Nils; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    β-delayed neutron emission is the process of emission of one or more neutrons, after β-decay, from the excited daughter nucleus. The probabilities of emission are an important physical quantity in a variety of nuclear physics applications, from the simulations of heavy element nucleosynthesis to control of reactor power levels and nuclear waste management. However, it is relatively difficult to measure and much less data is available than for β-decay, particularly for nuclei that are expected to take part in the r-process. In this work we will present a calculation of β-decay half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission probabilities in neutron-rich nuclei using the transition strength obtained with a microscopic model combined with a statistical calculation of level densities. We explore the effect of altered emission probabilities, with respect to the simple calculation, on the r-process.

  7. Beta delayed alpha emission from the neutron deficient rare earth isotopes {sup 152}Tm and {sup 150}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Nacher, E.; Tain, J. L.; Rubio, B.; Algora, A.; Estevez Aguado, M. E.; Gadea, A.; Batist, L.; Briz, J. A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Doering, J.; Mukha, I.; Plettner, C.; Roeckl, E.; Gierlik, M.; Janas, Z.

    2011-11-30

    The study of beta-delayed proton emission is a well known method to aid the determination of the beta strength distribution in nuclei far from the stability line. At the neutron deficient side of the nuclear chart the process of proton or alpha emission from excited states is energetically allowed when one goes far enough from stability. However, beta-delayed alphas have seldom been measured for nuclei heavier than A = 20. Here we present a study of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission from {sup 152}Tm and {sup 150}Ho and their importance in the full B(GT) distribution.

  8. Further measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N

    SciTech Connect

    France III, R. H.; Wilds, E. L.; McDonald, J. E.; Gai, M.

    2007-06-15

    We measured the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission spectrum of {sup 16}N with a sensitivity for {beta}-decay branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -10}. The {sup 16}N nuclei were produced using the d({sup 15}N,{sup 16}N)p reaction with 70 MeV {sup 15}N beams and a deuterium gas target 7.5 cm long at a pressure of 1250 torr. The {sup 16}N nuclei were collected (over 10 s) using a thin aluminum foil with an areal density of 180 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} tilted at 7 deg. with respect to the beam. The activity was transferred to the counting area by means of a stepping motor in less than 3 s with the counting carried out over 8 s. The {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particles were measured using a time-of-flight method to achieve a sufficiently low background. Standard calibration sources ({sup 148}Gd, {sup 241}Am, {sup 208,209}Po, and {sup 227}Ac) as well as {alpha} particles and {sup 7}Li from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction were used for an accurate energy calibration. The energy resolution of the catcher foil (180-220 keV) was calculated and the time-of-flight resolution (3-10 nsec) was measured using the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission from {sup 8}Li that was produced using the d({sup 7}Li,{sup 8}Li)p reaction with the same setup. The line shape was corrected to account for the variation in the energy and time resolution and a high statistics spectrum of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N is reported. However, our data (as well as earlier Mainz data and unpublished Seattle data) do not agree with an earlier measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N taken at TRIUMF after averaging over the energy resolution of our collection system. This disagreement, among other issues, prohibits accurate inclusion of the f-wave component in the R-matrix analysis.

  9. r-Process Sensitivity Studies of Beta-Delayed Neutron Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giso, Mathew

    2014-09-01

    The r-process is a nucleosynthesis mechanism responsible for the formation of elements heavier than iron. It is unclear where in the galaxy the r-process occurs, but the two most likely locations are supernovae and neutron star mergers. This process is complex, and different initial conditions have a large affect on the resulting abundances of the elements produced. Using an r-process nuclear network code, we examined influence of beta-delayed neutron emissions (BDNE) probabilities. We tested single isotopes of every element with BDNE either maximized or turned off, while all other nuclei were held at their normal theoretical BDNE probability. The results were compared with a baseline, and we looked for local and global changes to the final abundance patterns. BDNE probabilities for nuclei 5-15 neutrons from stability were found to have the most substantial effects. Results with BDNE maximized had the most drastic changes from baselines. The r-process is a nucleosynthesis mechanism responsible for the formation of elements heavier than iron. It is unclear where in the galaxy the r-process occurs, but the two most likely locations are supernovae and neutron star mergers. This process is complex, and different initial conditions have a large affect on the resulting abundances of the elements produced. Using an r-process nuclear network code, we examined influence of beta-delayed neutron emissions (BDNE) probabilities. We tested single isotopes of every element with BDNE either maximized or turned off, while all other nuclei were held at their normal theoretical BDNE probability. The results were compared with a baseline, and we looked for local and global changes to the final abundance patterns. BDNE probabilities for nuclei 5-15 neutrons from stability were found to have the most substantial effects. Results with BDNE maximized had the most drastic changes from baselines. Union College, Davenport Scholarship, Dept. of Energy Grant: DE-FG02-05ER41398.

  10. Beta-delayed neutron emission studies with a C7LYC array at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Gemma; Chowdhury, Partha; Lister, Christopher; Brown, Tristan; Carpenter, Michael; Chillery, Thomas; Copp, Patrick; Doucet, Emery; Mitchell, Alan; Savard, Guy; Zhu, Shaofei

    2016-09-01

    This work is a study of β-delayed neutron and γ emission from 94Rb at CARIBU. Beta-delayed neutron emission studies are important in the astrophysical r-process, nuclear structure and for nuclear reactor safety and design. Approximately 150 γ rays are known in the daughter 94Sr, many of which are unplaced. An estimated 26% of γ rays are thought to be missing. The probability of β-delayed neutron emission in 94Sr is 10.2(2)%. Recently, substantial γ-decay from above the neutron separation energy in 94Rb has been reported. This research is aimed at understanding this high-lying γ-strength. The experiment employed the X-Array (a high efficiency HPGe clover array), SCANS (Small CLYC Array for Neutron Scattering) and the SATURN decay station (Scintillator And Tape Using Radioactive Nuclei) for γ, fast neutron and β-particle detection, respectively. Data were collected in a triggerless digital data acquisition system, with detected β , n , and γ events correlated offline. Techniques, analysis and first results will be discussed. Supported by the NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance Program under Grant DE-NA00013008, and by US DoE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  11. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  12. Beta-delayed proton emission in neutron-deficient lanthanide isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, P.A.

    1988-09-30

    Forty-two ..beta..-delayed proton precursors with 56less than or equal toZless than or equal to71 and 63less than or equal toNless than or equal to83 were produced in heavy-ion reactions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC and their radioactive decay properties studied at the on-line mass separation facility OASIS. Twenty-five isotopes and eight delayed proton branches were identified for the first time. Delayed proton energy spectra and proton coincident ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectra were measured for all precursors. In a few cases, proton branching ratios were also determined. The precursor mass numbers were determined by the separator, while the proton coincident x-ray energies provided unambiguous Z identifications. The proton coincident ..gamma..-ray intensities were used to extract final state branching ratios. Proton emission from ground and isomeric states was observed in many cases. The majority of the delayed proton spectra exhibited the smooth bell-shaped distribution expected for heavy mass precursors. The experimental results were compared to statistical model calculations using standard parameter sets. Calculations using Nilsson model/RPA ..beta..-strength functions were found to reproduce the spectral shapes and branching ratios better than calculations using either constant or gross theory ..beta..-strength functions. Precursor half-life predictions from the Nilsson model/RPA ..beta..-strength functions were also in better agreement with the measured half-lives than were gross theory predictions. The ratios of positron coincident proton intensities to total proton intensities were used to determine Q/sub EC/-B/sub p/ values for several precursors near N=82. The statistical model calculations were not able to reproduce the experimental results for N=81 precursors. 154 refs., 82 figs., 19 tabs.

  13. Emission of charged particles from excited compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2010-11-24

    The formation and decay of excited compound nucleus are studied within the dinuclear system model[1]. The cross sections of complex fragment emission are calculated and compared with experimental data for the reactions {sup 3}He+{sup 108}Ag, {sup 78,82}Kr+{sup 12}C. Angular momentum dependence of cluster emission in {sup 78}Kr+{sup 12}C and {sup 40}Ca+{sup 78}Kr reactions is demonstrated.

  14. Emission of charged particles from excited compound nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2010-10-15

    The process of complex fragment emission is studied within the dinuclear system model. Cross sections of complex fragment emission are calculated and compared with experimental data for the reactions {sup 3}He+{sup nat}Ag, {sup 78,86}Kr+{sup 12}C, and {sup 63}Cu+{sup 12}C. The mass distributions of the products of these reactions, isotopic distributions for the {sup 3}He+{sup nat}Ag and {sup 78}Kr+{sup 12}C reactions, and average total kinetic energies of the products of the {sup 78}Kr+{sup 12}C reaction are predicted.

  15. Universal decay law in charged-particle emission and exotic cluster radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Qi, C; Xu, F R; Liotta, R J; Wyss, R

    2009-08-14

    A linear universal decay formula is presented starting from the microscopic mechanism of the charged-particle emission. It relates the half-lives of monopole radioactive decays with the Q values of the outgoing particles as well as the masses and charges of the nuclei involved in the decay. This relation is found to be a generalization of the Geiger-Nuttall law in alpha radioactivity and explains well all known cluster decays. Predictions on the most likely emissions of various clusters are presented.

  16. Kinetic modeling of charged particle cloud expansion and emission in magnetic and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarjov, Maxim G.; Gunko, Yuri F.

    1995-02-01

    The kinetic theory of unsteady charged-partitle fluxes in electric and magnetic fields is dealt with. An attempt is made to extend the results of Narasimha ( J. Fluid Meth.12, 294-305, 1962) and Burgan et al. ( J. Plasma Phys.29, 139-142. 1983). These authors studied the neutral and electron gas expansion into a vacuum, respectively. Burgan et al. ( J. Plasma Phys.29, 139-142. 1953) considered the Vlasov equation, coupled self-consistently with the Poisson equation. The magnetic field effects were omitted. Gunko and Ponomarjov ( Vestnik St-Petersburg State Univ. Ser. 1, No. 2. 89-94, 1993; Astron. Nachr.316(1), 17-21, 1995) carried out an analysis of the magnetic field effect for a special case of particle emission. A general method is proposed for simulating the charged-particle cloud expansion and the emission from sources in both electric and magnetic fields based on the kinetic approach. It consists of the representation of any cloud or emission source by the superposition of point-like clouds or sources with the corresponding initial particle distribution. As examples, the expansion of the following spatial domains filled by charged particles are analyzed : the semi-space, the plane layer of finite thickness, the circular cylinder, and the spherically symmetric cloud. In all the cases considered, Maxwell initial velocity distribution has been used for homogeneous magnetic and electric fields. It is found that in the case of the spherical cloud expansion, the cloud configuration at large times tends to an ellipsoid whose major axis expands along the magnetic field. Obtained results support the suggestion that this method has addressed the problem of plasma-cloud expansion into a uniform magnetic. field, with emphasis on the dynamics of lower density parts which appear to be highly structured in the form of field aligned striations (Davis et al., Planet. Space Sci.22, 67-78, 1974). Different specific situations for a small charged-particle source is considered

  17. Thermionic and photoelectric emission of electrons from positively charged particles in a plasma with Debye shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Mishra, Rashmi; Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, Sanjay Kumar

    2015-09-01

    By utilizing the recent concept [G. Delzanno et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 062102 (2005) and G. Delzanno and X. Tang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 035002 (2014)] that the radial potential, experienced by an electron in the vicinity of a positively charged spherical particle depends on the transverse momentum of the electron, we have evaluated the rate of thermionic and photoelectron emission from a positively charged spherical particle and the corresponding average electron energy in a plasma, with Debye Screening. The effect of screening is manifested in the magnitude of a maximum in the radial potential energy versus r curve and is characterized by a parameter β which depends solely on ( r 0 / λ ) . Simple expressions for the change in the rates of emission and corresponding electron energy due to inclusion of the mechanism (mentioned above) in the analysis have been derived. The results of numerical computations have been presented and discussed. Simple expressions for the rates of electron emission from positively charged particles and corresponding average electron energy are necessary in the study of kinetics of complex plasmas. This work suffers from the limitation that the Debye length and even the nature of screening is not apriori known. In general, the evaluation of the nature of shielding and the shielding length requires a self consistent computation, similar to that carried out by Delzanno and Tang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 035002 (2014)] in their work on thermionic emission in vacuum.

  18. Double differential light charged particle emission cross sections for some structural fusion materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpün, Ismail Hakki; n, Abdullah Aydı; Tel, Eyyup

    2017-09-01

    In fusion reactors, neutron induced radioactivity strongly depends on the irradiated material. So, a proper selection of structural materials will have been limited the radioactive inventory in a fusion reactor. First-wall and blanket components have high radioactivity concentration due to being the most flux-exposed structures. The main objective of fusion structural material research is the development and selection of materials for reactor components with good thermo-mechanical and physical properties, coupled with low-activation characteristics. Double differential light charged particle emission cross section, which is a fundamental data to determine nuclear heating and material damages in structural fusion material research, for some elements target nuclei have been calculated by the TALYS 1.8 nuclear reaction code at 14-15 MeV neutron incident energy and compared with available experimental data in EXFOR library. Direct, compound and pre-equilibrium reaction contribution have been theoretically calculated and dominant contribution have been determined for each emission of proton, deuteron and alpha particle.

  19. First Compilation and Evaluation of Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Probabilities and Associated Half-Lives for A ≤ 72 Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, M.; Singh, B.; Abriola, D.; Dillmann, I.; Johnson, T. D.; McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive compilation and evaluation of beta-delayed neutron (β- n) emission probabilities, Pn, and associated half-lives for A ≤ 72 nuclei has been performed for the first time. The recommended values have been used to analyze the systematics of β- n emission in this region. The ratio Pn /T1/2 is better correlated with the Q-value of the β- n decay mode than the previously proposed Kratz-Herrmann Formula (KHF). The recommended values are also compared with theoretical quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) calculations.

  20. {beta}-decay half-lives and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of nuclei in the region A < or approx. 110, relevant for the r process

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, J.; Galaviz, D.; Matos, M.; Montes, F.; Hennrich, S.; Kessler, R.; Schertz, F.; Aprahamian, A.; Quinn, M.; Woehr, A.; Arndt, O.; Pfeiffer, B.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Estrade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Schatz, H.; Kratz, K.-L.; Mantica, P. F.; Moeller, P.

    2009-03-15

    Measurements of {beta}-decay properties of A < or approx. 110 r-process nuclei have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. {beta}-decay half-lives for {sup 105}Y, {sup 106,107}Zr, and {sup 111}Mo, along with {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of {sup 104}Y, {sup 109,110}Mo and upper limits for {sup 105}Y, {sup 103-107}Zr, and {sup 108,111}Mo have been measured for the first time. Studies on the basis of the quasi-random-phase approximation are used to analyze the ground-state deformation of these nuclei.

  1. First Compilation and Evaluation of Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Probabilities and Associated Half-Lives for A ≤ 72 Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, M.; Singh, B.; Abriola, D.; Dillmann, I.; Johnson, T.D.; McCutchan, E.A.; Sonzogni, A.A.

    2014-06-15

    A comprehensive compilation and evaluation of beta-delayed neutron (β{sup −}n) emission probabilities, P{sub n}, and associated half-lives for A ≤ 72 nuclei has been performed for the first time. The recommended values have been used to analyze the systematics of β{sup −}n emission in this region. The ratio P{sub n}/T{sub 1/2} is better correlated with the Q-value of the β{sup −}n decay mode than the previously proposed Kratz-Herrmann Formula (KHF). The recommended values are also compared with theoretical quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) calculations.

  2. Competition of coalescence and 'fireball' processes in nonequilibrium emission of light charged particles from p+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Budzanowski, A.; Kistryn, M.; Kliczewski, St.; Kozik, E.; Fidelus, M.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, St.; Kowalczyk, A.; Magiera, A.; Rudy, Z.; Wojciechowski, M.; Filges, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Machner, H.; Hodde, H.; Kulessa, P.; Pysz, K.; Siudak, R.; Piskor-Ignatowicz, B.

    2008-08-15

    The energy and angular dependence of the double differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/d{omega}dE were measured for p,d,t,{sup 3,4,6}He, {sup 6,7,8,9}Li, {sup 7,9,10}Be, and {sup 10,11,12}B isotopes produced in reactions of 1.2- and 1.9-GeV protons on a Au target. The beam energy dependence of the data, supplemented by the cross sections from a previous experiment at 2.5 GeV, is very smooth. The shape of the spectra and angular distributions do not change significantly in the beam energy range from 1.2 to 2.5 GeV. However, the absolute value of the cross sections increases for all ejectiles. The intermediate mass fragment spectra and their angular distributions are very well reproduced by a phenomenological model of two emitting, moving sources, with parameters smoothly varying with energy. The double differential cross sections for light charged particles were analyzed in the framework of the microscopic model calculations of intranuclear cascade, including the coalescence of nucleons and a statistical model for evaporation of particles from excited residual nuclei. However, the energy and angular dependencies of the data agree with neither predictions of the microscopic intranuclear cascade calculations for protons nor the coalescence calculations for other light charged particles. A very good description of the data is achieved by the phenomenological inclusion of the emission of light charged particles from a 'fireball' (i.e., a fast and hot moving source). It was found that the nonequilibrium processes are very important for the production of light charged particles. They exhaust 40%-80% of the total cross section--depending on the emitted particles. Coalescence and fireball emission yield comparable contributions to the cross sections with the exception of the {sup 3}He data where coalescence clearly dominates. For all light charged particles, the ratio of nonequilibrium processes to processes proceeding through a phase of statistical equilibrium does

  3. First Compilation and Evaluation of Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Probabilities and Associated Half-Lives for A ≤72 Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, M.; Singh, B.; Abriola, D.; Dillmann, I.; Johnson, T.; McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2014-06-01

    After a comprehensive compilation and evaluation of beta-delayed neutron (β-n) emission probabilities, Pn, and associated half-lives for A ≤ 72 nuclei has been performed for the first time. The recommended values have been used to analyze the systematics of β-nemission in this region. The ratio Pn/T1/2 is better correlated with the Q-value of the β-n decay mode than the previously proposed Kratz-Herrmann Formula (KHF). Moreover, the recommended values are also compared with theoretical quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) calculations.

  4. Extension of the Tz = -3/2, A = 4n + 1 series of beta-delayed proton emitters to 65Se and 73Sr, and low energy beta-delayed proton emission from the Tz = -3/2, A = 4n + 3 nucleus 23Al

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, Jon Charles

    1993-12-01

    The series of known Tz = -3/2, A = 4n + 1 nuclei has been extended to include the previously undiscovered isotopes 65Se and 73Sr, through the observation of beta-delayed proton emission via the isobaric analog state (IAS) of the beta-daughter (emitter). Due to the relatively large proton energies involved, these experiments were conducted using standard Si-Si ΔE-E telescopes. Beta-delayed protons arising from 65Se have been observed at an energy (laboratory) of 3.55 ± 0.03 MeV, corresponding to the decay of the T = 3/2 isobaric analog state in 65As to the ground state of 64Ge. Similarly, beta-delayed protons from 73Sr at an energy of 3.75 ± 0.04 MeV have been observed, corresponding to decay of the T = 3/2 isobaric analog state in 73Rb to the ground state of 72Kr. From the energies of these proton transitions, an improved prediction of the mass excesses of the two parent nuclei (65Se and 73Sr) is made through the use of a Coulomb displacement formula. These predictions are -33.41 ± 0.26 and -31.87 ± 0.24 MeV for 65Se and 73Sr, respectively. Studies of low energy (down to ~200 keV) beta-delayed protons from 23Al necessitated that a particle identification telescope with a low energy threshold for observation and identification of protons be developed. 23Al is of interest because of its role in the breakout of the hot CNO cycle leading to the astrophysical rp process.

  5. Influence of the Coulomb Field on Charged Particle Emission in Ar + Ni Reaction at 77 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosinska, K.; Pluta, J.; Hanappe, F.; Stuttge, L.; Angelique, J. C.; Basrak, Z.; Benoit, B.; de Goes Brennand, E.; Bizard, G.; Colin, J.; Costa, G.; Desesquelles, P.; Dorvaux, O.; Durand, D.; Erazmus, B.; Kuleshov, S.; Lednicky, R.; Leszczynski, P.; Marques, M.; Materna, Th.; Mikhailov, K.; Papatheofanous, G.; Pawlak, T.; Przewlocki, M.; Staranowicz, A.; Stavinskiy, A.; Sztenkiel, A.; Tamain, B.; Vlasov, A.; Vorobyev, L.

    2004-03-01

    Ar+Ni collisions at 77 MeV/u were studied in the experiment E286 performed at GANIL. An important advantage of this experiment was an application of the neutron detector DEMON for registration of both neutral and charged particles. This feature allows to compare characteristics of neutrons and protons detected by the same detector and gives a possibility to determine the influence of the Coulomb field on the proton emission. Estimation of a charge of the emitting source was performed by comparing energy spectra of neutrons and protons detected under identical experimental conditions. The experimental results were compared with the prediction of the SIMON model [D. Durand, Nucl. Phys. A541, 266 (1992)] and Landau--Vlasov model [Z. Basrak, Ph. Eudes, P. Abgrall, F. Haddad, F. Sébille, Nucl. Phys. A624, 472 (1997)].

  6. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of ^{78}Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies.

    PubMed

    Madurga, M; Paulauskas, S V; Grzywacz, R; Miller, D; Bardayan, D W; Batchelder, J C; Brewer, N T; Cizewski, J A; Fijałkowska, A; Gross, C J; Howard, M E; Ilyushkin, S V; Manning, B; Matoš, M; Mendez, A J; Miernik, K; Padgett, S W; Peters, W A; Rasco, B C; Ratkiewicz, A; Rykaczewski, K P; Stracener, D W; Wang, E H; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Zganjar, E F

    2016-08-26

    The β-delayed neutron emission of ^{83,84}Ga isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to ^{78}Ni core-excited states in ^{83,84}Ge favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton fpg_{9/2} and neutron extended fpg_{9/2}+d_{5/2} valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β-decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β-decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β-delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models.

  7. Evidence for Gamow-Teller Decay of 78Ni Core from Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Grzywacz, R.; Miller, D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Batchelder, J. C.; Brewer, N. T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Fijałkowska, A.; Gross, C. J.; Howard, M. E.; Ilyushkin, S. V.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; Mendez, A. J.; Miernik, K.; Padgett, S. W.; Peters, W. A.; Rasco, B. C.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Stracener, D. W.; Wang, E. H.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    The β -delayed neutron emission of Ga,8483 isotopes was studied using the neutron time-of-flight technique. The measured neutron energy spectra showed emission from states at excitation energies high above the neutron separation energy and previously not observed in the β decay of midmass nuclei. The large decay strength deduced from the observed intense neutron emission is a signature of Gamow-Teller transformation. This observation was interpreted as evidence for allowed β decay to 78Ni core-excited states in Ge,8483 favored by shell effects. We developed shell model calculations in the proton f p g9 /2 and neutron extended f p g9 /2+d5 /2 valence space using realistic interactions that were used to understand measured β -decay lifetimes. We conclude that enhanced, concentrated β -decay strength for neutron-unbound states may be common for very neutron-rich nuclei. This leads to intense β -delayed high-energy neutron and strong multineutron emission probabilities that in turn affect astrophysical nucleosynthesis models.

  8. Evaluation of Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Probabilities and Half-Lives for Z = 2–28

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, M.; Singh, B.; Dillmann, I.; Abriola, D.; Johnson, T.D.; McCutchan, E.A.; Sonzogni, A.A.

    2015-09-15

    We present an evaluation and compilation of β-delayed neutron probabilities and half-lives for nuclei in the region Z = 2–28 ({sup 8}He–{sup 80}Ni). This article includes the recommended values of these quantities as well as a compiled list of experimental measurements for each nucleus in the region for which β-delayed neutron emission is possible. The literature cut-off for this work is August 15{sup th}, 2015. Some notable cases as well as new standards for β-delayed neutron measurements in this mass region are also discussed.

  9. Numerical simulations of the charged-particle flow dynamics for sources with a curved emission surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altsybeyev, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    The implementation of numerical methods for studying the dynamics of particle flows produced by pulsed sources is discussed. A particle tracking method with so-called gun iteration for simulations of beam dynamics is used. For the space charge limited emission problem, we suggest a Gauss law emission model for precise current-density calculation in the case of a curvilinear emitter. The results of numerical simulations of particle-flow formation for cylindrical bipolar diode and for diode with elliptical emitter are presented.

  10. Half-lives and branchings for {beta}-delayed neutron emission for neutron-rich Co-Cu isotopes in the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Hosmer, P.; Estrade, A.; Montes, F.; Ouellette, M.; Pellegrini, E.; Schatz, H.; Aprahamian, A.; Arndt, O.; Pfeiffer, B.; Clement, R. R. C.; Mueller, W. F.; Morton, A. C.; Pereira, J.; Santi, P.; Steiner, M.; Stolz, A.; Farouqi, K.; Kratz, K.-L.; Liddick, S. N.; Mantica, P. F.

    2010-08-15

    The {beta} decays of very neutron-rich nuclides in the Co-Zn region were studied experimentally at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the NSCL {beta}-counting station in conjunction with the neutron detector NERO. We measured the branchings for {beta}-delayed neutron emission (P{sub n} values) for {sup 74}Co (18{+-}15%) and {sup 75-77}Ni (10{+-}2.8%, 14{+-}3.6%, and 30{+-}24%, respectively) for the first time, and remeasured the P{sub n} values of {sup 77-79}Cu, {sup 79,81}Zn, and {sup 82}Ga. For {sup 77-79}Cu and for {sup 81}Zn we obtain significantly larger P{sub n} values compared to previous work. While the new half-lives for the Ni isotopes from this experiment had been reported before, we present here in addition the first half-life measurements of {sup 75}Co (30{+-}11 ms) and {sup 80}Cu (170{sub -50}{sup +110} ms). Our results are compared with theoretical predictions, and their impact on various types of models for the astrophysical rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is explored. We find that with our new data, the classical r-process model is better able to reproduce the A=78-80 abundance pattern inferred from the solar abundances. The new data also influence r-process models based on the neutrino-driven high-entropy winds in core collapse supernovae.

  11. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal; McNeill, Fiona E.; Prestwich, William V.; Byun, Soo Hyun; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel E.

    2014-01-01

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some "bystander effects" that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 1010 protons mm-2 s-1. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  12. Apparatus for measuring charged particle beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus to measure the incident charged particle beam flux while effectively eliminating losses to reflection and/or secondary emission of the charged particle beam being measured is described. It comprises a sense cup through which the charged particle beam enters. A sense cone forms the rear wall of the interior chamber with the cone apex adjacent the entry opening. An outer case surrounds the sense cup and is electrically insulated therefrom. Charged particles entering the interior chamber are trapped and are absorbed by the sense cup and cone and travel through a current measuring device to ground.

  13. Measurement of double differential charged-particle emission cross sections for reactions induced by 26 MeV protons and FKK model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Aoto, A.; Kashimoto, H.

    1994-06-01

    Double differential charged-particle emission cross sections of proton-induced reactions have been measured for {sup nat}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Si, {sup 98}Mo, {sup 106}Pd, {sup 159}Tb and {sup 181}Ta at energies around 26 MeV. Several (p,p{prime}) and (p,n) data for {sup 98}Mo and {sup 106}Pd in the incident energy range from 12 to 26 MeV are analysed in terms of the Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin model, in order to study preequilibrium nucleon emission from nucleon-induced reactions.

  14. Effect of surface energy constant and surface asymmetry constant in the charged particle emission cross-section for the reactions $ (78,82,86) Kr +(12) C $ 78 , 82 , 86 K r + 12 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarzadeh, P.; Davoodabadi, S.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of the surface energy constant and the surface asymmetry constant in the charged particle emission cross section, have been examined by using the proximity potentials Prox77, BW91, AW95. The charged particle emission cross-section for the reactions ^{78,82,86} Kr +^{12} C have been calculated. Good consistency between the results of this work and the experimental data have been obtained using appropriate values of these constants.

  15. Charged Particle Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    Improved version of Faraday cup increases accuracy of measurements of flux density of charged particles incident along axis through collection aperture. Geometry of cone-and-sensing cup combination assures most particles are trapped.

  16. Streams of Charged Particles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-28

    This graphic shows the different streams of charged particles inside the bubble around our sun and outside, in the unexplored territory of interstellar space. The heliosheath, where NASA two Voyager spacecraft are now traveling, is shown in red.

  17. The charged-particle fluxes at auroral and polar latitudes and related low-frequency auroral kilometric radiation-type and high-frequency wideband emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutte, N.; Prutensky, I.; Pulinets, S.; Kløos, Z.; Rothkaehl, H.

    1997-02-01

    The results of simultaneous observations of charged particle fluxes within the energy range 50 eV to 20 keV (plasma energy-angle spectrometer, PEAS experiment) and plasma waves within the frequency range 0.1 to 10 MHz (plasma radio spectrometer, PRS 3 experiment) on board the APEX spacecraft are presented. The data were obtained at polar and auroral latitudes in the dawn-dusk and noon-midnight time sectors. The low-frequency (LF) sporadic emission mainly on frequencies lower than the local gyrofrequency was commonly observed within a comparatively narrow latitude interval (~5°-6°) of the auroral oval. The maximum of spectral wave intensity was revealed at a frequency of ~200kHz. The sporadic character of the observed emissions, the spectra, are very similar to those reported for auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), and the temporal and spatial occurrences imply its relation to the source of AKR emissions measured at the higher altitudes, with regards to our wave measurements as LF AKR-type emissions. Comparative analysis of spatial distributions of charged particle energy spectra and variations of wave spectra at auroral oval latitudes showed that several conditions should be fulfilled for LF AKR generation. These conditions are related both to the intensity and energy of precipitating ion and electron fluxes, and to albedo electrons and the ionospheric plasma parameters. The wideband HF emission was observed together with the LF AKR-type emission during the morning auroral oval crossing. At spacecraft apogee altitudes, in the polar cap zone intense electron precipitations and an increase of plasma noise intensity at frequencies equal or below fHe were observed at the period when the IMF was northward. These precipitations and emissions were accompanied by the horizontal currents crossing the polar cap, the so-called theta structure.

  18. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Emission of charged particles from the surface of a moving target acted on by cw CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. I.; Petrov, A. L.; Shadrin, A. N.

    1990-06-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the emission of charged particles due to the irradiation of moving steel and graphite targets with cw CO2 laser radiation. The characteristics of the emission current signals were determined for different laser irradiation regimes. The maximum emission current density from the surface of a melt pool ( ~ 1.1 × 10 - 2 A/cm2) and the average temperature of the liquid metal (~ 2040 K) were measured for an incident radiation power density of 550 W and for horizontal and vertical target velocities of respectively ~ 1.5 mm/s and ~ 0.17 mm/s. The authors propose to utilize this phenomenon for monitoring the laser processing of materials.

  19. Light Charged Particles Emission and the Giant Dipole Resonance in Highly Excited Ce Nucleus Formed in Reactions with Different Mass Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Gramegna, F.; Lanchais, A.; Mastinu, P. F.; Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Airoldi, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Moroni, A.; Sacchi, R.; Brekiesz, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bruno, M.

    2006-08-14

    Recent measurements have been performed at the National Laboratoty of Legnaro using mass-symmetric (400, 500 MeV 64Ni + 68Zn) and mass-asymmetric (250 MeV 16O + 116Sn) entrance channel reactions to form {sup 132}Ce compound nucleus at different excitation energies (E*=150, 200 and 200 MeV, respectively). The decay of the composite system has been followed studying the {gamma}-rays and Light Charged Particles (LCP) spectra emitted in coincidence with the Evaporation Residues (ER). In this way the emission mechanism of the LCP, depending on the mass-asymmetry at the entrance channel and on the projectile energy, and the results of the Full Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) of the Giant Dipole Resonance as a function of the nuclear temperature have been studied.

  20. Light-charged-particle emission in the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf, /sup 256/Fm, and /sup 257/Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, J.F.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Hulet, E.K.; Lougheed, R.W.; Landrum, J.H.

    1985-08-01

    We have measured the energy spectra for the emission of long-range ..cap alpha.. particles from the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf, /sup 256/Fm, and /sup 257/Fm, and for tritons and protons from the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf and /sup 256/Fm. We have determined ..cap alpha.., triton, and proton emission probabilities and estimated total light-particle emission probabilities for these nuclides. We compare these and known emission probabilities for five other spontaneously fissioning nuclides with the deformation energy available at scission and show that there is a possible correlation that is consistent with a one-body dissipation mechanism for transferring release energy to particle clusters.

  1. Study of beta-delayed two-proton emission in /sup 22/Al and /sup 26/P and search for new emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, M.D.; Honkanen, J.; Schloemer, E.C.; Ahmed, M.; Reiff, J.E.; Zhou, Z.Y.; Cerny, J.

    1984-04-01

    As predicted by Gol'danskii, nuclei far from stability may decay via the unusual manner of /sup 2/He (or 'diproton') emission. The diproton corresponds to a coupling of two protons in a virtual /sup 1/S/sub 0/ state which subsequently decays to two unbound protons. This /sup 2/He nucleus has been calculated to have an increased probability of barrier penetration relative to the independent emission of two protons. When the energetics permit /sup 2/He emission, two competing modes of two-proton emission are also frequently allowed. These are a sequential proton decay through an intermediate state and the simultaneous emission of two uncoupled protons. Recent studies on /sup 22/Al and /sup 26/P are described and proposed partial decay schemes are given. (WHK)

  2. Energetic Charged Particles Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Diver, Declan; Pinçon, Jean-Louis; Phelps, Alan D. R.; Bourdon, Anne; Helling, Christiane; Blanc, Elisabeth; Honary, Farideh; Harrison, R. Giles; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Lester, Mark; Rycroft, Michael; Kosch, Mike; Horne, Richard B.; Soula, Serge; Gaffet, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The French government has committed to launch the satellite TARANIS to study transient coupling processes between the Earth's atmosphere and near-Earth space. The prime objective of TARANIS is to detect energetic charged particles and hard radiation emanating from thunderclouds. The British Nobel prize winner C.T.R. Wilson predicted lightning discharges from the top of thunderclouds into space almost a century ago. However, new experiments have only recently confirmed energetic discharge processes which transfer energy from the top of thunderclouds into the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space; they are now denoted as transient luminous events, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and relativistic electron beams. This meeting report builds on the current state of scientific knowledge on the physics of plasmas in the laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas in the Earth's atmosphere to propose areas of future research. The report specifically reflects presentations delivered by the members of a novel Franco-British collaboration during a meeting at the French Embassy in London held in November 2011. The scientific subjects of the report tackle ionization processes leading to electrical discharge processes, observations of transient luminous events, electromagnetic emissions, energetic charged particles and their impact on the Earth's atmosphere. The importance of future research in this area for science and society, and towards spacecraft protection, is emphasized.

  3. Effects of T-odd asymmetry of the emission of light charged particles and photons during fission of heavy nuclei by polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gagarskii, A. M.; Guseva, I. S.; Goennenwein, F.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Mutterer, M.; Kuz'mina, T. E.; Petrov, G. A.; Tyurin, G.; Nesvizhevsky, V.

    2011-12-15

    The new physical effects of T-odd asymmetry of the emission of light charged particles (LCPs) during the ternary fission of some heavy nuclei by cold polarized neutrons have been experimentally studied. The coefficients of triple scalar and vector correlation of the pulses of light particles and fission fragments (TRI effect) and the fivefold correlation of the same vectors (ROT effect) have been measured. These effects are believed to be caused by the rotation of polarized fissioning system around its polarization direction. The treatment of the experimental data for LCPs in the framework of this hypothesis leads to a good agreement between the calculation results and experimental data. The calculated value of the angle of rotation of the fission axis in the ternary fission of the polarized fissioning {sup 236}U* compound nucleus was used to process the results of measuring the ROT effect for {gamma} photons from binary-fission fragments of the same nucleus. A satisfactory description of these experimental data is obtained which serves a convincing confirmation of the rotation hypothesis.

  4. Optically powered charged particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesner, Larry D.

    1991-09-01

    A charged particle control apparatus provides very high voltage particle beams. One or more photocell arrays provide bias voltages for beam accelerating stages. The arrays are made from a number of microfabricated photocells connected in series to produce a voltage output that is the sum of the voltages from the individual cells. Arrays of each stage are connected in series to produce a cumulative stage voltage that is applied to an accelerating electrode made part of the stage. Optical power illuminates the stages to generate desired voltage biases to the accelerating electrodes. A light source is used to excite the photocathode when this emission source is used. Electrons from the emission source are accelerated electrodes and are emitted from the chamber which is typically conjoined with other apparatus. By utilizing photocell arrays to generate beam current and accelerating biases, as well as a photocathode for providing a source of electrons, the apparatus of the invention is completely optically isolated thereby requiring no direct electrical connections to the apparatus even though multiple accelerating stages are used to facilitate the achievement of very high voltage particle beams.

  5. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Schultz, Larry Joe; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Sossong, Michael James; Blanpied, Gary

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  6. Beta-delayed fission probabilities of transfermium nuclei, involved in the r-process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, I.; Lutostansky, Yu; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2016-01-01

    For the nucleosynthesis of heavy and superheavy nuclei fission becomes very important when the r-process runs in a very high neutron density environment. In part, fission is responsible for the formation of heavy nuclei due to the inclusion of fission products as new seed nuclei (fission cycling). More than that, beta-delayed fission, along with spontaneous fission, is responsible in the late stages of the r-process for the suppression of superheavy element yields. For beta-delayed fission probability calculations a model description of the beta-strength- functions is required. Extended theoretical predictions for astro-physical applications were provided long ago, and new predictions also for superheavy nuclei with uptodate nuclear input are needed. For the further extension of data to heavier transactinides the models of strength- functions should be modified, taking into account more complicated level schemes. In our present calculations the strength-function model is based on the quasi-particle approximation of Finite Fermi Systems Theory. The probabilities of beta-delayed fission and beta-delayed neutron emission are calculated for some transfermium neutron-rich nuclei, and the influence of beta-delayed fission upon superheavy element formation is discussed.

  7. Coaxial charged particle energy analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael A. (Inventor); Bryson, III, Charles E. (Inventor); Wu, Warren (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A non-dispersive electrostatic energy analyzer for electrons and other charged particles having a generally coaxial structure of a sequentially arranged sections of an electrostatic lens to focus the beam through an iris and preferably including an ellipsoidally shaped input grid for collimating a wide acceptance beam from a charged-particle source, an electrostatic high-pass filter including a planar exit grid, and an electrostatic low-pass filter. The low-pass filter is configured to reflect low-energy particles back towards a charged particle detector located within the low-pass filter. Each section comprises multiple tubular or conical electrodes arranged about the central axis. The voltages on the lens are scanned to place a selected energy band of the accepted beam at a selected energy at the iris. Voltages on the high-pass and low-pass filters remain substantially fixed during the scan.

  8. Fog dispersion. [charged particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of using the charged particle technique to disperse warm fog at airports is investigated and compared with other techniques. The charged particle technique shows potential for warm fog dispersal, but experimental verification of several significant parameters, such as particle mobility and charge density, is needed. Seeding and helicopter downwash techniques are also effective for warm fog disperals, but presently are not believed to be viable techniques for routine airport operations. Thermal systems are currently used at a few overseas airports; however, they are expensive and pose potential environmental problems.

  9. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  10. {beta}-delayed proton decay of {sup 69}Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.J.; Huang, W.X.; Ma, R.C.; Gu, Z.D.; Yang, Y.F.; Wang, Y.Y.; Dong, C.F.; Xu, L.L.

    1997-02-01

    The nuclide {sup 69}Kr with T{sub z}={minus}3/2, A=4n+1 produced in the {sup 40}Ca({sup 32}S,3n) reaction has been observed via {beta}-delayed proton emission by using pulsed-beam technique. A single proton group at a laboratory energy of 4.07{plus_minus}0.05 MeV with half-life of 32{plus_minus}10 ms was observed for the first time, corresponding to decay of the T=3/2 isobaric analog state in {sup 69}Br to the ground state of {sup 68}Se. Combining this result with a Coulomb displacement energy calculation yields a mass excess for {sup 69}Kr of {minus}32.15{plus_minus}0.30 MeV. The partial decay scheme of {sup 69}Kr is proposed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Electrodynamics of massless charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Kurt

    2015-02-15

    We derive the classical dynamics of massless charged particles in a rigorous way from first principles. Since due to ultraviolet divergences this dynamics does not follow from an action principle, we rely on (a) Maxwell’s equations, (b) Lorentz- and reparameterization-invariance, and (c) local conservation of energy and momentum. Despite the presence of pronounced singularities of the electromagnetic field along Dirac-like strings, we give a constructive proof of the existence of a unique distribution-valued energy-momentum tensor. Its conservation requires the particles to obey standard Lorentz equations and they experience, hence, no radiation reaction. Correspondingly, the dynamics of interacting classical massless charged particles can be consistently defined, although they do not emit bremsstrahlung end experience no self-interaction.

  12. New Beta-delayed Neutron Measurements in the Light-mass Fission Group

    SciTech Connect

    Agramunt, J.; García, A.R.; Algora, A.; Äystö, J.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cortés, G.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Eronen, T.; Gelletly, W.; Gómez-Hornillos, M.B.; and others

    2014-06-15

    A new accurate determination of beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities from nuclei in the low mass region of the light fission group has been performed. The measurements were carried out using the BELEN 4π neutron counter at the IGISOL-JYFL mass separator in combination with a Penning trap. The new results significantly improve the uncertainties of neutron emission probabilities for {sup 91}Br, {sup 86}As, {sup 85}As, and {sup 85}Ge nuclei.

  13. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  14. New {beta}-delayed proton precursor {sup 121}Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Zhankui, L.; Shuwei, X.; Yuanxiang, X.; Ruichang, M.; Yuanxiu, G.; Chunfang, W.; Wenxue, H.; Tianmei, Z.

    1997-08-01

    The new {beta}-delayed proton precursor {sup 121}Ce was synthesized in the reaction {sup 92}Mo({sup 32}S,3n) and first identified in p-{gamma}(X) coincidence measurements with a helium-jet recoil fast-moving tape-transport system. The half-life of the {sup 121}Ce decay was determined to be 1.1{plus_minus}0.1 s. Its {beta}-delayed proton spectrum was observed and the {beta}-delayed proton branching ratio for {sup 121}Ce decay was estimated to be {approximately}1{percent}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Coincident emission of neutrons and charged particles after π- absorption in 6Li, 7Li, 12C, 59Co and 197Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusi, P.; Isaak, H. P.; Pruys, H. S.; Engfer, R.; Hermes, E. A.; Kozlowski, T.; Sennhauser, U.; Walter, H. K.

    1983-10-01

    Energy spectra d 3W/d E1 d E2 d cos ϑ of neutron-neutron and neutron-charged particle pairs (nn, np, nd, nt) emitted after the absorption of stopped negative pions in 6Li, 7Li, 12C, 59Co and 197Au have been measured for opening angles between 50° and 180°. Particle pairs emitted from light nuclei without energy loss due to final-state interactions were identified by the energy balance. Pion absorption on two nucleons (quasi-deuteron mechanism) was found to be the main process. The yields of nucleon pairs from quasi-free absorption on a quasi-deuteron are 0.52 ± 0.09 per π-stop, 0.57 ± 0.10 per π-stop and 0.19 ± 0.04 per π-stop for 6Li, 7Li and 12C, respectively. The ratio R of np to pp pairs that absorb the pion was determined for quasi-free absorption on p-shell nucleons of 12C: R(p-shell) = 6.3 ± 1.4. For pion absorption on s-shell nucleons of lithium lower limits R(s-shell) > 4.4 for 6Li and R(s-shell) > 7.8 for 7Li were determined. These values are larger than the statistical ratios Rstat = 2 N/( Z - 1) of np to pp pairs in the nucleus. Lower limits for the probability for pion absorption on heavier clusters ( 3He, α) are W(hc) > 0.16 per π-stop for 6Li, W(hc) > 0.11 per π-stop for 7Li and W( α) > 0.01 per π-stop for 12C. The shape of the energy spectra of pairs emitted directly after quasi-free absorption on 2 or 4 nucleons could be explained by a simple model for the momentum distribution of the absorbing nucleons. The results are in agreement with the parameters of the momentum distributions known from other reactions. Energy spectra and opening-angle distributions were compared with the intranuclear cascade calculations of Chiang, Hüfner and Hachenberg. For 59Co and 197Au the spectra are strongly influenced by the final-state interactions; lower limits of R > 1.8 for 59Co and R > 2.5 for 197Au were determined.

  16. Search for {beta}-delayed fission of {sup 228}Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yanbing; Ding Huajie; Yuan Shuanggui; Yang Weifan; Niu Yanning; Li Yingjun; Xiao Yonghou; Zhang Shengdong; Lu Xiting

    2006-10-15

    Radium was radiochemically separated from natural thorium. Thin {sup 228}Ra{yields}{beta}{sup -228}Ac sources were prepared and exposed to mica fission track detectors, and measured by an HPGe {gamma}-ray detector. The {beta}-delayed fission events of {sup 228}Ac were observed and its {beta}-delayed fission probability was found to be (5{+-}2)x10{sup -12}.

  17. Magnetic guidance of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbers, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Many experiments and devices in physics use static magnetic fields to guide charged particles from a source onto a detector, and we ask the innocent question: What is the distribution of particle intensity over the detector surface? One should think that the solution to this seemingly simple problem is well known. We show that, even for uniform guide fields, this is not the case, and we present analytical point spread functions (PSF) for magnetic transport that deviate strongly from previous results. The "magnetic" PSF shows unexpected singularities, which were recently also observed experimentally, and which make detector response very sensitive to minute changes of position, field amplitude, or particle energy. In the field of low-energy particle physics, these singularities may become a source of error in modern high precision experiments, or may be used for instrument tests.

  18. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  19. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, Robert W.; Dobelbower, M. Christian

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  20. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  1. Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sachchida

    2010-05-01

    Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere Marykutty Michael1, Sachchida Nand Tripathi1,2,3, Pratima Arya1 1Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 2Oak Ridge Associated Universities 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Observations by two instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft, Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and CAssini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS), revealed the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile species with masses of several thousand atomic mass units at altitudes of 950 - 1400 km in the atmosphere of Titan (Waite et al., 2007; Crary et al., 2009). Though these particles were believed to be molecules, they are most likely aerosols formed by the clumping of smaller molecules (Waite et al., 2009). These particles were estimated to have a density of 10-3 kg m-3 and a size of up to 256 nm. The existence of very heavy ions has also been observed by the CAPS components with a mass by charge ratio of up to 10000 (Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Sittler et al., 2009). The goal of this paper is to find out whether the so called heavy ions (or charged particles) are generated by the charge transfer of ions and electrons to the particles. The charging of these particles has been studied by using the charge balance equations that include positive ions, negative ions, electrons, neutral and charged particles. Information on the most abundant ion clusters are obtained from Vuitton et al., (2009) and Wilson and Atreya, (2004). Mass by charge ratio thus calculated will be compared with those observed by Coates et al. (2007). References: Coates AJ, et al., Discovery of heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34:L22103, 2007. Coates AJ, et al., Heavy negative ions in titan's ionosphere: altitude and latitude dependence. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.05.009, 2009. Crary F.J., et al., Heavy ions, temperatures and winds in titan's ionosphere: Combined cassini caps and inms observations. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.006, 2009

  2. Beta delayed neutrons for nuclear structure and astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzywacz, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Beta-delayed neutron emission (β xn) is a significant or even dominant decay channel for the majority of very neutron-rich nuclei, especially for those on the r-process path. The recent theoretical models predicts that it may play more significant role then previously expected for astrophysics and this realization instigated a renewed experimental interest in this topic as a part of a larger scope of research on beta-decay strength distribution. Because studies of the decay strength directly probe relevant physics on the microscopic level, energy-resolved measurements of the beta-decay strength distribution is a better test of nuclear models than traditionally used experimental observables like half-lives and neutron branching ratios. A new detector system called the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) was constructed to directly address this issue. In its first experimental campaign at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility neutron energy spectra in key regions of the nuclear chart were measured: near the shell closures at 78Ni and 132Sn, and for the deformed nuclei near 100Rb. In several cases, unexpectedly intense and concentrated, resonant-like, high-energy neutron structures were observed. These results were interpreted within shell model framework which clearly indicated that these neutron emission is driven by nuclear structure effects and are due to large Gamow-Teller type transition matrix elements. This research was sponsored in part by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FG52-08NA28552.

  3. Means for counteracting charged particle beam divergence

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Jr., Edwin B.

    1978-01-01

    To counteract charge particle beam divergence, magnetic field-generating means are positioned along the edges of a charged particle beam to be controlled, such as to deflect and redirect particles tending to diverge from a desired beam direction. By selective arrangement of the magnetic field-generating means, the entire beam may be deflected and guided into different directions.

  4. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  5. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, David K.; Haverty, Thomas W.; Nordin, Carl W.; Tyree, William H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  6. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  7. Ferroelectric Devices Emit Charged Particles and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Felsteiner, Joshua; Karsik, Yakov

    2005-01-01

    Devices called solid-state ferroelectric- based sources (SSFBSs) are under development as sources of electrons, ions, ultraviolet light, and x-rays for diverse applications in characterization and processing of materials. Whereas heretofore it has been necessary to use a different device to generate each of the aforementioned species of charged particles or radiation, a single SSFBS can be configured and operated to selectively generate any of the species as needed using a single source. Relative to comparable prior sources based, variously, on field emission, thermionic emission, and gaseous discharge plasmas, SSFBSs demand less power, and are compact and lightweight. An SSFBS exploits the unique physical characteristics of a ferroelectric material in the presence of a high-frequency pulsed electric field. The basic building block of an SSFBS is a ferroelectric cathode -- a ferroelectric wafer with a solid electrode covering its rear face and a grid electrode on its front face (see figure). The application of a voltage pulse -- typically having amplitude of several kilovolts and duration of several nanoseconds -- causes dense surface plasma to form near the grid wires on the front surface.

  8. Quenching gas for detectors of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1974-01-22

    Operation of detectors of charged particles such as wire counters and Geiger-Muller tubes is improved by filling the counters with a quenching-gas mixture of argon, isobutane and methylchloroform. (Official Gazette)

  9. Robust statistical reconstruction for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Larry Joe; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Morris, Christopher; Orum, John Christopher; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Sossong, Michael James; Hengartner, Nicolas W

    2013-10-08

    Systems and methods for charged particle detection including statistical reconstruction of object volume scattering density profiles from charged particle tomographic data to determine the probability distribution of charged particle scattering using a statistical multiple scattering model and determine a substantially maximum likelihood estimate of object volume scattering density using expectation maximization (ML/EM) algorithm to reconstruct the object volume scattering density. The presence of and/or type of object occupying the volume of interest can be identified from the reconstructed volume scattering density profile. The charged particle tomographic data can be cosmic ray muon tomographic data from a muon tracker for scanning packages, containers, vehicles or cargo. The method can be implemented using a computer program which is executable on a computer.

  10. Charged particle periodicity in the Saturnian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the first definitive evidence for charged particle modulations near the magnetic rotation period at Saturn. This periodicity is apparent in the ratios (and spectra) of low energy charged particles in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Most of the data presented were taken during the Voyager 2 outbound portion of the Saturn encounter. During this time the spacecraft was at high latitudes (approximately 30 deg) in the southern hemisphere of the Saturnian magnetosphere. The probe's trajectory was approximately along the dawn meridian at an essentially constant local time. The observation that the charged particle modulation is consistent with the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) period provides a basic input for the resolution of a puzzle which has existed ever since the discovery of the SKR modulation. The charged particle periodicity identified suggests that a basic asymmetry must exist in the Saturnian magnetosphere.

  11. Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This image shows the low-energy charged particle instrument before it was installed on one of NASA Voyager spacecraft in 1977. The instrument includes a stepper motor that turns the platform on which the sensors are mounted.

  12. Beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy using ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Barbara; Czeszumska, A.; Siegl, K.; Caldwell, S.; Aprahamian, A.; Burkey, M.; Clark, J.; Levand, A.; Marley, S.; Morgan, G.; Norman, E.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Perez Galvan, A.; Savard, G.; Scielzo, N.; Sharma, K.; Strauss, S.

    2016-09-01

    Trapped radioactive ions suspended in vacuum allow for a new way to perform beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy. Decay branching ratios and energy spectra of the emitted neutrons are inferred from a measurement of the nuclear recoil, thereby circumventing the many limitations associated with direct neutron detection. Beta-delayed neutron measurements were carried out for 137 - 138 , 140I, 134-136Sb, and 144-145Cs at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The data collected are needed in many fields of basic and applied science such as nuclear energy, nuclear astrophysics, and stockpile stewardship. Results for the isotopes 135-136Sb and 140I will be presented. Supported by NSF under PHY-1419765, U.S. DOE under NEUP 13-5485, DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  13. Beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy using ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Barbara; Czeszumska, A.; Siegl, K.; Caldwell, S.; Aprahamian, A.; Burkey, M.; Clark, J.; Levand, A.; Marley, S.; Morgan, G.; Norman, E.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Perez Galvan, A.; Savard, G.; Scielzo, N.; Sharma, K.; Strauss, S.

    2017-01-01

    Trapped radioactive ions suspended in vacuum allow for a new way to perform beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy. Decay branching ratios and energy spectra of the emitted neutrons are inferred from a measurement of the nuclear recoil, thereby circumventing the many limitations associated with direct neutron detection. Beta-delayed neutron measurements were carried out for 137-138,140I, 134-136Sb, and 144-145Cs at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The data collected are needed in many fields of basic and applied science such as nuclear energy, nuclear astrophysics, and stockpile stewardship. Results for the isotopes 135-136Sb and 140I will be presented. Supported by NSF under PHY-1419765, and U.S. DOE under NEUP 13-5485, DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  14. Quantum and classical dissipation of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra-Sierra, V.G.; Anzaldo-Meneses, A.; Cardoso, J.L.; Hernández-Saldaña, H.; Kunold, A.; Roa-Neri, J.A.E.

    2013-08-15

    A Hamiltonian approach is presented to study the two dimensional motion of damped electric charges in time dependent electromagnetic fields. The classical and the corresponding quantum mechanical problems are solved for particular cases using canonical transformations applied to Hamiltonians for a particle with variable mass. Green’s function is constructed and, from it, the motion of a Gaussian wave packet is studied in detail. -- Highlights: •Hamiltonian of a damped charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Exact Green’s function of a charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Time evolution of a Gaussian wave packet of a damped charged particle. •Classical and quantum dynamics of a damped electric charge.

  15. Charged particle multiplicity studies with PHOBOS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2008-01-01

    Summary and conclusion: (1) Multiplicity - PHOBOS have performed complete charged particle multiplicity measurements for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions, System size dependence, and 'Complete' pseudorapidity distributions; 'Universality' compared to elementary e+e- collisions; and (2) Midrapidity multiplicity - Factorization of centrality and energy dependencies; (3) Limiting fragmentation - extended longitudinal scaling - Seen for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, and d+Au, Also observed in flow observables; (4) Total charged particle multiplicity - N{sub ch}/N{sub part} constant with centrality, (5) Future - Finish up many analysis and reviews.

  16. Charged particle therapy: the physics of interaction.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Antony J

    2009-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long and distinguished history with more than 50,000 patients having been treated, mainly with high-energy proton therapy. Particularly, for proton therapy, there is an increasing interest in exploiting the physical characteristics of charged particles for further improving the potential of radiation therapy. In this article, we review the most important interactions of charged particles with matter and describe the basic physical principles that underlie why particle beams behave the way they do and why such a behavior could bring many benefits in radiation therapy.

  17. Hybrid charged-particle guide for studying (n, charged particle) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; White, R.M.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1982-08-25

    Charged-particle transport systems consisting of magnetic quadrupole lenses have been employed in recent years in the study of (n, charged particle) reactions. We have completed a new transport system that is based both on magnetic lenses as well as electrostatic fields. The magnetic focusing of this charged-particle guide is provided by six magnetic quadrupole lenses arranged in a CDCCDC sequence (in the vertical plane). The electrostatic field is produced by a wire at high voltage which stretches the length of the guide and is physically at the center of the magnetic axis. The magnetic lenses are used for charged particles above 5 MeV; the electrostatic guide is used for lower energies. This hybrid system possesses the excellent focusing and background rejection properties of other magnetic systems. For low energy charged-particles, the electrostatic transport avoids the narrow band-passes in charged-particle energy which are a problem with purely magnetic transport systems. This system is installed at the LLNL Cyclograaff facility for the study of (n, charged particle) reactions at neutron energies up to 35 MeV.

  18. CHARGED-PARTICLE AND NEUTRON-CAPTURE PROCESSES IN THE HIGH-ENTROPY WIND OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Truran, J. W.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K. E-mail: truran@nova.uchicago.ed E-mail: k-l.Kratz@mpic.d E-mail: F-K.Thielemann@unibas.c

    2010-04-01

    The astrophysical site of the r-process is still uncertain, and a full exploration of the systematics of this process in terms of its dependence on nuclear properties from stability to the neutron drip-line within realistic stellar environments has still to be undertaken. Sufficiently high neutron-to-seed ratios can only be obtained either in very neutron-rich low-entropy environments or moderately neutron-rich high-entropy environments, related to neutron star mergers (or jets of neutron star matter) and the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernova explosions. As chemical evolution models seem to disfavor neutron star mergers, we focus here on high-entropy environments characterized by entropy S, electron abundance Y{sub e} , and expansion velocity V{sub exp}. We investigate the termination point of charged-particle reactions, and we define a maximum entropy S{sub final} for a given V{sub exp} and Y{sub e} , beyond which the seed production of heavy elements fails due to the very small matter density. We then investigate whether an r-process subsequent to the charged-particle freeze-out can in principle be understood on the basis of the classical approach, which assumes a chemical equilibrium between neutron captures and photodisintegrations, possibly followed by a beta-flow equilibrium. In particular, we illustrate how long such a chemical equilibrium approximation holds, how the freeze-out from such conditions affects the abundance pattern, and which role the late capture of neutrons originating from beta-delayed neutron emission can play. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of nuclear properties from different theoretical mass models on the final abundances after these late freeze-out phases and beta-decays back to stability. As only a superposition of astrophysical conditions can provide a good fit to the solar r-abundances, the question remains how such superpositions are attained, resulting in the apparently robust r-process pattern observed in low

  19. The charged particle accelerators subsystems modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Kobylyatskiy, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Presented web-based resource for information support the engineering, science and education in Electrophysics, containing web-based tools for simulation subsystems charged particle accelerators. Formulated the development motivation of Web-Environment for Virtual Electrophysical Laboratories. Analyzes the trends of designs the dynamic web-environments for supporting of scientific research and E-learning, within the framework of Open Education concept.

  20. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  1. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  2. The charged particle radiation environment for AXAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) will be subjected to several sources of charged particle radiation during its 15-year orbital lifetime: geomagnetically-trapped electrons and protons, galactic cosmic ray particles, and solar flare events. These radiation levels are presented for the AXAF orbit for use in the design of the observatory's science instruments.

  3. Bounding millimagnetically charged particles with magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Huang, Junwu

    2017-09-01

    Millimagnetically charged particles generically appear in scenarios with kinetic mixing. We present model independent bounds on these particles coming from magnetars. Schwinger pair production discharges the magnetic field of the magnetar. Thus the existence of large magnetic fields at magnetars place strong bounds on the millimagnetic charge to be smaller than 10-18 over a large mass range.

  4. Beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy of spherical and deformed neutron emitters with VANDLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Thomas; Gross, C. J.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Stracener, D. W.,; Taylor, S. Z.; Vandle Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    For many neutron-rich isotopes, the main decay mode is through beta-delayed neutron and gamma emission. Neutron and gamma coincidences provide information necessary to extract the beta-strength distribution. These distributions are inputs to test nuclear models needed for r-process modeling. The detailed data on beta decay feeding to neutron-unbound states are used to calculate reactor decay heat and understand the antineutrino spectrum. A series of measurements with selective ion sources was performed at the On-Line Test Facility (OLTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE). These experiments revisited decays of spherical and deformed isotopes produced in proton induced fission of 238U, which included beta delayed precursors of bromine, rubidium, cesium, and iodine. Unique data sets with neutron and gamma ray coincidences were collected. Achieving high coincidence efficiency required the addition of high-efficiency gamma-ray detectors consisting of 16 LaBr3 crystals (HAGRiD) and a large volume set of NaI detectors to VANDLE. Preliminary results will be presented. This research was sponsored by DOE under Contracts DE-FG52-08NA2855, DE-AC05-00OR22725 and DE-FG02-96ER40983.

  5. Charged Particle Monitor on the Astrosat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. R.; Patil, M. H.; Bhargava, Yash; Khanna, Rakesh; Hingar, M. K.; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Basak, Rupal; Sreekumar, S.; Samuel, Essy; Priya, P.; Vinod, P.; Bhattacharya, D.; Bhalerao, V.; Vadawale, S. V.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Pandiyan, R.; Subbarao, K.; Seetha, S.; Sarma, K. Suryanarayana

    2017-06-01

    Charged Particle Monitor (CPM) on-board the Astrosat satellite is an instrument designed to detect the flux of charged particles at the satellite location. A Cesium Iodide Thallium (CsI(Tl)) crystal is used with a Kapton window to detect protons with energies greater than 1 MeV. The ground calibration of CPM was done using gamma-rays from radioactive sources and protons from particle accelerators. Based on the ground calibration results, energy deposition above 1 MeV are accepted and particle counts are recorded. It is found that CPM counts are steady and the signal for the onset and exit of South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region are generated in a very reliable and stable manner.

  6. Charged Particle lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Research development in the Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE) is reported. The CPLEE is ion-electron spectrometer placed on the lunar surface for the purpose of measuring charged particle fluxes impacting the moon from a variety of regions and to study the interactions between space plasmas and the lunar surface. The principal accomplishments reported include: (1) furnishing design specifications for construction of the CPLEE instruments; (2) development of an advanced computer-controlled facility for automated instrument calibration; (3) active participation in the deployment and past-deployment operational phases with regard to data verification and operational mode selection; and (4) publication of research papers, including a study of lunar photoelectrons, a study of plasmas resulting from man-made lunar impart events, a study of magnetotail and magnetosheath particle populations, and a study of solar-flare interplanetary particles.

  7. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  8. Charged particle concepts for fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Collins, F. G.; Koepf, D.

    1981-01-01

    Charged particle techniques hold promise for dispersing warm fog in the terminal area of commercial airports. This report focuses on features of the charged particle technique which require further study. The basic physical principles of the technique and the major verification experiments carried out in the past are described. The fundamentals of the nozzle operation are given. The nozzle characteristics and the theory of particle charging in the nozzle are discussed, including information from extensive literature on electrostatic precipitation relative to environmental pollution control and a description of some preliminary reported analyses on the jet characteristics and interaction with neighboring jets. The equation governing the transfer of water substances and of electrical charge is given together with a brief description of several semi-empirical, mathematical expressions necessary for the governing equations. The necessary ingredients of a field experiment to verify the system once a prototype is built are described.

  9. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator includes an evacuated chamber having a gun for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam or ion beam. The beam is discharged through a beam exit in the chamber into a higher pressure region. A plasma interface is disposed at the beam exit and includes a plasma channel for bounding a plasma maintainable between a cathode and an anode disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel is coaxially aligned with the beam exit for propagating the beam from the chamber, through the plasma, and into the higher pressure region. The plasma is effective for pumping down the beam exit for preventing pressure increase in the chamber and provides magnetic focusing of the beam discharged into the higher pressure region 24. 7 figs.

  10. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. . Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Div. California Univ., San Francisco, CA . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  11. Charged Particle Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Heath D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the use of external beam radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been limited by toxicity to the uninvolved liver and surrounding structures. Advances in photon radiotherapy have improved dose conformality to the tumor and facilitated dose escalation, a key contributor to improved HCC radiation treatment outcomes. However, despite these advances in photon radiotherapy, significant volumes of liver still receive low doses of radiation that can preclude dose escalation, particularly in patients with limited functional liver reserves. By capitalizing on the lack of exit dose along the beam path beyond the tumor and higher biological effectiveness, charged particle therapy offers the promise of maximizing tumor control via dose escalation without excessive liver toxicity. In this review we discuss the distinctive biophysical attributes of both proton and carbon ion radiotherapy, particularly as they pertain to treatment of HCC. We also review the available literature regarding clinical outcomes and toxicity of using charged particles for the treatment of HCC. PMID:21939857

  12. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. |

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  13. Controlling Charged Particles with Inhomogeneous Electrostatic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An energy analyzer for a charged-particle spectrometer may include a top deflection plate and a bottom deflection plate. The top and bottom deflection plates may be non-symmetric and configured to generate an inhomogeneous electrostatic field when a voltage is applied to one of the top or bottom deflection plates. In some instances, the top and bottom deflection plates may be L-shaped deflection plates.

  14. Acceleration technologies for charged particles: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Particle accelerators have many important uses in scientific experiments, in industry and in medicine. This paper reviews the variety of technologies which are used to accelerate charged particles to high energies. It aims to show how the capabilities and limitations of these technologies are related to underlying physical principles. The paper emphasises the way in which different technologies are used together to convey energy from the electrical supply to the accelerated particles.

  15. Energetic charged particle interactions at icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Hand, K. P.; Paranicas, C.; Howett, C.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Satellites embedded within planetary magnetospheres are typically exposed to bombardment by charged particles, from thermal plasma to more energetic particles at radiation belt energies. At many planetary satellites, energetic charged particles are typically unimpeded by patchy atmospheres or induced satellite magnetic fields and instead are stopped in the surface itself. Most of these primaries have ranges in porous water ice that are at most centimeters, but some of their secondary photons, emitted during the deceleration process, can reach meter depths [Paranicas et al., 2002, 2004; Johnson et al., 2004]. Examples of radiation-induced surface alteration includes sputtering, radiolysis and grain sintering, processes that are capable of significantly altering the physical properties of surface material. Thus, accurate characterization of energetic charged particle weathering at icy satellites is crucial to a more comprehensive understanding of these bodies. At Saturn's inner mid-size moons remote sensing observations by several instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft have revealed distinct weathering patterns which have been attributed to energetic electron bombardment of the surface [Howett et al., 2011, 2012, 2014; Schenk et al., 2011; Paranicas et al., 2014]. In the Jovian system, radiolytic production of oxidants has been invoked as a potential source of energy for life which may reside in the sub-surface ocean of its satellite Europa [Johnson et al., 2003; Hand et al., 2007; Vance et al., 2016]. Here we will discuss the near-surface energetic charged particle environment of icy satellites, with particular emphasis on comparative studies between the Saturnian and Jovian systems and interpretation of remote sensing observations by instruments onboard missions such as Cassini and Galileo. In addition, we will discuss implications for surface sampling by future lander missions (e.g. the proposed Europa lander now under study).

  16. Location of Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This graphic shows the NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft and the location of its low-energy charged particle instrument. A labeled close-up of the low-energy charged particle instrument appears as the inset image.

  17. CHARGED PARTICLE MOTION IN AN EXPLOSIVELY GENERATED IONIZING SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, Christopher J.; O'Connor, Patrick D.

    2009-12-28

    Different aspects of the plasma generated in a gas contained in a tube due to detonation of a small explosive charge located at one end of the tube are presented. The motion of the charged particles within the plasma is monitored using Rogowski coils. Using time-resolved emission spectroscopy the temperature and species in the detonation products and compressed gas behind the shock wave are recorded. From the spectral lines of the emission profiles the temperatures and electron density were evaluated to be in the vicinity of 7,000 K and 5x10{sup 22} m{sup -3}. An ultra fast wave traveling down the guide tube ahead of the hydrodynamic shock and causing any charged particles there to move fast enough to be detected by the Rogowski coils was recorded. From the measurements the phase velocity of the wave was calculated at 525 km/s when krypton filled the tube, and 1300 km/s in the case of argon. The temperature and density measurements are consistent with the data reported in the literature for similar tests. The electrostatic pulse measurements are a new phenomena not previously observed.

  18. Beta-Delayed Neutron Spectroscopy Using VANDLE at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S.; Kolos, K.; Grzywacz, R.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Madurga, M.; Savard, G.; Brewer, N. T.; Vandle Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of spectroscopic information on beta-delayed neutrons of neutron rich fission fragments is of interest to the areas of astrophysics, reactor design, nuclear structure and stockpile stewardship. Using the Time of Flight (TOF) method, the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy(VANDLE)[1,2,3] measured fission fragments of 252Cf provided by CARIBU at Argonne National Lab. 135,136Sb and 85As isotopes were measured to explore the nuclear structure around doubly magic nuclei 132Sn and 78Ni. A new TOF start detector was developed for this experiment using new Silicon Photo-Multipliers from SensL to allow for a lower beta particle energy detection threshold and better timing resolution compared to previous VANDLE experiments. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy NNSA under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliance program through DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FG52-08NA28552.

  19. {beta}-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.-W.; Li, Z.-K.; Xie, Y.-X.; Pan, Q.-Y.; Huang, W.-X.; Wang, X.-D.; Yu, Y.; Xing, Y.-B.; Shu, N.-C.; Chen, Y.-S.; Xu, F.-R.; Wang, K.

    2005-05-01

    We briefly reviewed and summarized the experimental study on {beta}-delayed proton decays published by our group over the last 8 years, namely the experimental observation of {beta}-delayed proton decays of nine new nuclides in the rare-earth region near the proton drip line and five nuclides in the mass 90 region with N{approx}Z by utilizing the p-{gamma} coincidence technique in combination with a He-jet tape transport system. In addition, important technical details of the experiments were provided. The experimental results were compared to the theoretical predictions of some nuclear models, resulting in the following conclusions. (1) The experimental half-lives for {sup 85}Mo, {sup 92}Rh, as well as the predicted 'waiting point' nuclei {sup 89}Ru and {sup 93}Pd were 5-10 times longer than the macroscopic-microscopic model predictions of Moeller et al. [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 66,131(1997)]. These data considerably influenced the predictions of the mass abundances of the nuclides produced in the rp process. (2) The experimental assignments of spin and parity for the drip-line nuclei {sup 142}Ho and {sup 128}Pm could not be well predicted by any of the nuclear models. Nevertheless, the configuration-constrained nuclear potential-energy surfaces calculated by means of a Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky method could reproduce the assignments. (3) The ALICE code overestimated by one or two orders of magnitude the production-reaction cross sections of the nine studied rare-earth nuclei, while the HIVAP code overestimated them by approximately one order of magnitude.

  20. Modeling the Production of Beta-Delayed Gamma Rays for the Detection of Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J M; Pruet, J A; Brown, D A; Descalle, M; Hedstrom, G W; Prussin, S G

    2005-02-14

    The objective of this LDRD project was to develop one or more models for the production of {beta}-delayed {gamma} rays following neutron-induced fission of a special nuclear material (SNM) and to define a standardized formatting scheme which will allow them to be incorporated into some of the modern, general-purpose Monte Carlo transport codes currently being used to simulate inspection techniques proposed for detecting fissionable material hidden in sea-going cargo containers. In this report, we will describe a Monte Carlo model for {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray emission following the fission of SNM that can accommodate arbitrary time-dependent fission rates and photon collection histories. The model involves direct sampling of the independent fission yield distributions of the system, the branching ratios for decay of individual fission products and spectral distributions representing photon emission from each fission product and for each decay mode. While computationally intensive, it will be shown that this model can provide reasonably detailed estimates of the spectra that would be recorded by an arbitrary spectrometer and may prove quite useful in assessing the quality of evaluated data libraries and identifying gaps in the libraries. The accuracy of the model will be illustrated by comparing calculated and experimental spectra from the decay of short-lived fission products following the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f). For general-purpose transport calculations, where a detailed consideration of the large number of individual {gamma}-ray transitions in a spectrum may not be necessary, it will be shown that a simple parameterization of the {gamma}-ray source function can be defined which provides high-quality average spectral distributions that should suffice for calculations describing photons being transported through thick attenuating media. Finally, a proposal for ENDF-compatible formats that describe each of the models and

  1. Charged-Particle Impact Ionization of Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bartschat, Klaus; Guan Xiaoxu

    2008-08-08

    We have developed a hybrid method to treat charged-particle impact ionization of complex atoms and ions. The essential idea is to describe the interaction between a fast projectile and the target perturbatively, up to second order, while the initial bound state and the ejected-electron--residual-ion interaction can be handled via a convergent R-matrix with pseudo-states (close-coupling) expansion. Example results for ionization of the heavy noble gases (Ne-Xe) by positron and electron impact are presented. The general scheme for a distorted-wave treatment of ionization by heavy-particle impact is described.

  2. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed.

  3. Position Sensitive Detection System for Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, E. A.; Favela, F.; Curiel, Q.; Chavez, E; Huerta, A.; Varela, A.; Shapira, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The position sensitive detection system presented in this work employs the Anger logic algorithm to determine the position of the light spark produced by the passage of charged particles on a 170 x 170 x 10 mm3 scintillator material (PILOT-U). The detection system consists of a matrix of nine photomultipliers, covering a fraction of the back area of the scintillators. Tests made with a non-collimated alpha particle source together with a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the data, suggest an intrinsic position resolution of up to 6 mm is achieved.

  4. EXTRACTOR FOR HIGH ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Lambertson, G.R.

    1964-04-01

    A particle-extracting apparatus for use with a beam of high-energy charged particles such as travel in an evacuated chamber along a circular equilibrium axis is described. A magnetized target is impacted relatively against the beam whereby the beam particles are deflected from the beam by the magnetic induction in the target. To this end the target may be moved into the beam or the beam may coast into the target and achieve high angular particle deflection and slow extraction. A deflecting septum magnet may additionally be used for deflection at even sharper angles. (AEC)

  5. Reaction dynamics and hot nuclei formation in the 36Ar+98Mo reaction at 37A MeV studied through light charged particle and γ-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santonocito, D.; Piattelli, P.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Suomijärvi, T.; Agodi, C.; Alamanos, N.; Alba, R.; Auger, F.; Bellia, G.; Chomaz, Ph.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frascaria, N.; Gillibert, A.; Le Faou, J. H.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Roynette, J. C.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    2002-10-01

    Central and mid-central collisions which lead to the formation of a heavy residue in the 37A MeV 36Ar+98Mo reaction have been studied with the MEDEA multidetector array coupled to a Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter. The dependence of the high energy gamma ray and light charged particle production as a function of the linear momentum transferred to the fused system has been studied. The unique potentialities of the MEDEA detector have made it possible to follow the evolution of the reaction dynamics from the pre-equilibrium stage to the formation of a heavy compound nucleus. The analysis of the correlation between the most energetic photons and protons shows how both of them are mainly produced in the most energetic primary nucleon-nucleon collisions. The multiplicity of high energy (Eγ>30 MeV) γ rays has been found to increase with the linear momentum transfer, showing the dominance of two-body dissipation in the transfer mechanism and giving a tool to correlate the momentum transfer with the centrality of the collision. Light charged particle kinetic energy spectra show how in these collisions, compound systems with excitation energies of more than 3A MeV and temperature up to 7 MeV are formed. The experimental findings are compared with Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov calculations. A scenario is found where the nucleus-nucleus interaction starts with two-body nucleon-nucleon collisions in the overlap region of nuclear densities. These collisions give rise to the production of high energy nucleons and γ rays, and play a fundamental role in the energy transfer from the relative motion to internal excitation of the quasiprojectile and the target.

  6. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator 14,14b includes an evacuated chamber 16a,b having a gun 18,18b for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam 12 or ion beam 12b. The beam 12,12b is discharged through a beam exit 22 in the chamber 16a,b into a higher pressure region 24. A plasma interface 34 is disposed at the beam exit 22 and includes a plasma channel 38 for bounding a plasma 40 maintainable between a cathode 42 and an anode 44 disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel 38 is coaxially aligned with the beam exit 22 for propagating the beam 12,12b from the chamber 16a,b, through the plasma 40, and into the higher pressure region 24. The plasma 40 is effective for pumping down the beam exit 22 for preventing pressure increase in the chamber 16a,b, and provides magnetic focusing of the beam 12,12b discharged into the higher pressure region 24.

  7. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, W.G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. Electrostatic Confinement of Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Jose; Weathers, Duncan; Ordonez, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    Many experiments rely on the confinement of charged particles. Examples of these experiments range from fusion studies to antiproton-positron studies for antihydrogen production. Researchers have already developed a variety of techniques for controlling and trapping charged particles. Examples of systems devised for such purposes include electrostatic traps in the form of a cavity [1],[2] or in the form of a storage ring like ELISA [3]. For this project, we are pursuing a different approach [4], which relies on a purely electrostatic environment for ion confinement. This system consists of a periodic electrode configuration of cylindrical symmetry that acts to confine an ion beam in the radial direction. In this manner, it is expected that long particle lifetimes inside the trap will be achieved, and that the system will have an inherent scalability to different ion energy. Results obtained from simulation of the proposed system will be presented and discussed along with a brief overview of the steps taken to develop a laboratory prototype. [1] M. Dahan et al., Rev. Sci. Instr. 69 (1998) 76. [2] H. F. Krause et al., American Institute of Physics. CAARI 16^th Int'l Conf. (2001). [3] S.P. Moller et al., Proc. of the 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference. vol 1. pp 1027-1029. Vancouver, Canada. May 1997. [4] J.R. Correa et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. In Phys. Res. B 241 (2005) 909-912.

  9. Treatment of cancer with heavy charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.; Saunders, W.M.; Tobias, C.A.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Curtis, S.; Lyman, J.T.; Collier, J.M.; Pitluck, S.; Woodruff, K.A.; Blakely, E.A.

    1982-12-01

    A clinical radiotherapeutic trial using heavy charged particles in the treatment of human cancers has accrued over 400 patients since 1975, 378 of whom were treated with particles and 28 with low LET photons as control patients. Heavy charged particle radiotherapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and/or enhanced biologic effect, depending on particle selected for treatment. Target sites have included selected head and neck tumors, ocular melanomata, malignant gliomata of the brain, carcinoma of the esophagus, carcinoma of the stomach, carcinoma of the pancreas, selected juxtaspinal tumors and other locally advanced, unresectable tumors. A Phase III prospective clinical trial has been started in carcinoma of the pancreas using helium ions. Phase I-II studies are underway with heavier particles such as carbon, neon and argon ions in order to prepare for prospective Phase III trials. Silicon ions are also under consideration for clinical trial. These studies are supported by the United States Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health.

  10. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/μm to 975 KeV/gmm with particle energy (on the cells) between 94 - 603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/μm. The inactivation cross-section (αi) and the action-section for mutant induction (αm) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 μm2 and 0.09 to 5.56 × 10-3 μm2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/μm. The mutagenicity (αm/αi) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 × 10-5 with the maximum value at 150 keV/μm. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  11. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  12. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  13. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  14. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  15. Hybrid quantum systems with trapped charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Trapped charged particles have been at the forefront of quantum information processing (QIP) for a few decades now, with deterministic two-qubit logic gates reaching record fidelities of 99.9 % and single-qubit operations of much higher fidelity. In a hybrid system involving trapped charges, quantum degrees of freedom of macroscopic objects such as bulk acoustic resonators, superconducting circuits, or nanomechanical membranes, couple to the trapped charges and ideally inherit the coherent properties of the charges. The hybrid system therefore implements a "quantum transducer," where the quantum reality (i.e., superpositions and entanglement) of small objects is extended to include the larger object. Although a hybrid quantum system with trapped charges could be valuable both for fundamental research and for QIP applications, no such system exists today. Here we study theoretically the possibilities of coupling the quantum-mechanical motion of a trapped charged particle (e.g., an ion or electron) to the quantum degrees of freedom of superconducting devices, nanomechanical resonators, and quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators. For each case, we estimate the coupling rate between the charged particle and its macroscopic counterpart and compare it to the decoherence rate, i.e., the rate at which quantum superposition decays. A hybrid system can only be considered quantum if the coupling rate significantly exceeds all decoherence rates. Our approach is to examine specific examples by using parameters that are experimentally attainable in the foreseeable future. We conclude that hybrid quantum systems involving a single atomic ion are unfavorable compared with the use of a single electron because the coupling rates between the ion and its counterpart are slower than the expected decoherence rates. A system based on trapped electrons, on the other hand, might have coupling rates that significantly exceed decoherence rates. Moreover, it might have appealing properties such

  16. Charged particle radiation exposure of geocentric satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1989-01-01

    The near-earth radiation environment is characterized, summarizing published data on trapped and transient charged particles and their potential effects on hardware systems and the crews of manned missions. Topics examined include the role of the magnetosphere, the five radiation domains, cyclic and sporadic variations in the radiation environment, the potential effect of a high-altitude nuclear explosion, NASA empirical models for predicting trapped proton and electron fluxes, and the South Atlantic anomaly and the estimation of flux-free periods. Consideration is given to solar cosmic rays and heavy ions, Galactic cosmic rays, geomagnetic shielding, secondary radiation, the design of shielding systems, variables affecting dose evaluations, and ionizing-radiation doses. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  17. Track-Structure Simulations for Charged Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte-Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest. PMID:23032889

  18. Position sensitive disc for charged particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, V.; Palazzolo, F.; Scirè, A.; Sperduto, M. L.; Albergo, S.; Poli, G.; Potenza, R.; Randieri, C.; Russo, V.; Sutera, M. C.; Capogni, M.; Schaerf, C.; D'Angelo, A.; Moricciani, D.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Girolami, B.; Ghio, F.

    2001-04-01

    A plastic scintillating disc (NE102, 3 cm thick, 1 m diameter) has been designed for detecting charged pions in nuclear reactions at intermediate energy. A hole of 20 cm diameter was made in the middle of the disc in order to allow for the beam passage through the detector. The originality of the detector consists of the simultaneous use of four very compact central Photo Multiplier Tubes (PMT) and eight peripheral PMTs in order to retrieve the hitting point of a charged particle onto the disc surface with a space resolution of ±3 cm. The original method has been developed by using polar coordinates and only the Time-Of-Flight information (TOF) from three or four nearest PMTs, including at least one central PMT.

  19. Charged particle distributions in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, N.; Garrett, H. B.

    1983-01-01

    In situ data from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, supplemented by earth-based observations and theoretical considerations, are used as the basis for the present quantitative, compact model of the 1 eV-several MeV charged particle distribution in the Jovian magnetosphere. The thermal plasma parameters of convection speed, number density, and characteristic energy, are specified as functions of position for electrons and for the ion species H(+), O(+), O(2+), S(+), S(2+), S(3+), and Na(+). Major features of the magnetic field, thermal plasma, and trapped particle distributions, are modeled and results for each plasma region are compared with observed spectra. Comparisons show that the model represents the data to within a factor of 2 + or - 1, except where time variations are significant. Practical applications of the model to spacecraft near Jupiter are given.

  20. Mutations induced by heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    The relative biological-effectiveness of radiation is increased when cells or tissue are exposed to densely ionizing (high-LET) radiation. A large number of studies focus on the following aspects of the biological effects of high-LET radiation: (i) basic understanding of radiation damage and repair; (ii) developing radiotherapy protocols for accelerated charged particles; and (iii) estimation of human risks from exposure to high-LET heavy charged particles. The increased lethal effectiveness (cell inactivation) of high-LET radiation contributes to new methods for using radiation therapy, but it is also necessary to study the enhanced mutagenic effect of high LET radiation, because higher frequencies of mutation can be expected to provide higher rates of carcinogenicity with human exposure. It is important to note that both measures of biological effectiveness (lethality and mutagenicity) depend on the quality of radiation, the dose, dose-rate effects, and the biological endpoints studied. This paper is intended to provide a review of current research on the mutagenic effects of high-LET radiation, and is organized into three sections. First, are descriptions of the induced mutations studied with various detection systems (section 1) because the detectable mutations induced by ionizing radiation, including heavy-ions, depend largely on the detection system used. Second is a discussion of the biological significance of the dependence of induced mutations on LET (section 2). This is related to the molecular nature of radiation lesions and to the repair mechanisms used to help cells recover from such damage. Finally, applications of mutation detection systems for studies in space (section 3) are described, in which the carcinogenic effects of space environmental radiation are considered.

  1. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38charged-particles, mainly protons and {alpha}-particles, that in turn can by interaction with the stellar material modify the surface content.The present contribution explores to what extent the spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  2. Physical sputtering of metallic systems by charged-particle impact

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.

    1989-12-01

    The present paper provides a brief overview of our current understanding of physical sputtering by charged-particle impact, with the emphasis on sputtering of metals and alloys under bombardment with particles that produce knock-on collisions. Fundamental aspects of ion-solid interactions, and recent developments in the study of sputtering of elemental targets and preferential sputtering in multicomponent materials are reviewed. We concentrate only on a few specific topics of sputter emission, including the various properties of the sputtered flux and depth of origin, and on connections between sputtering and other radiation-induced and -enhanced phenomena that modify the near-surface composition of the target. The synergistic effects of these diverse processes in changing the composition of the integrated sputtered-atom flux is described in simple physical terms, using selected examples of recent important progress. 325 refs., 27 figs.

  3. Development of a WDM platform for charged-particle stopping experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Collins, G. W.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Glenzer, S.; Graziani, F.; Hansen, S. B.; Hu, S. X.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Keiter, P.; Reynolds, H.; Rygg, J. R.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    A platform has been developed for generating large and relatively quiescent plasmas in the warm-dense matter (WDM) regime on the OMEGA laser facility. A cylindrical geometry is used to allow charged-particle probing along the axis. The plasma heating is radiative by L-shell emission generated on the outside of the cylinder. The cylinder drive is characterized with x-ray diagnostics. Possibilities for direct characterization of the plasma temperature are discussed. Lastly, the unimportance of electromagnetic fields around the target is demonstrated with proton radiography. We expect this platform to be used extensively in future experiments studying charged-particle stopping in this regime.

  4. Development of a WDM platform for charged-particle stopping experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; ...

    2016-05-26

    A platform has been developed for generating large and relatively quiescent plasmas in the warm-dense matter (WDM) regime on the OMEGA laser facility. A cylindrical geometry is used to allow charged-particle probing along the axis. The plasma heating is radiative by L-shell emission generated on the outside of the cylinder. The cylinder drive is characterized with x-ray diagnostics. Possibilities for direct characterization of the plasma temperature are discussed. Lastly, the unimportance of electromagnetic fields around the target is demonstrated with proton radiography. We expect this platform to be used extensively in future experiments studying charged-particle stopping in this regime.

  5. Electrostatic wire for stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Prono, Daniel S.; Caporaso, George J.; Briggs, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  6. Boundary effects of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations on charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiang, J.-T.; Wu, T.-H.; Leet, D.-S.

    2008-10-10

    The nature of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations in the presence of the boundary is investigated from their effects on the dynamics of charged particles. These effects may be observable via the velocity fluctuations of the charge particles near the conducting plate, where the effects of vacuum fluctuations are found to be anisotrpoic. The corresponding stochastic equation of motion for the charged particle is also derived under the semiclassical approximation.

  7. Effects of Charged Particles on Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Kaminuma, Takuya; Paz, Athena Evalour S.; Yoshida, Yukari; Liu, Qi; Willers, Henning; Takahashi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects, including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors, and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors, such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions, and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles. PMID:26904502

  8. {beta}-delayed proton decays in the rare-earth region near drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.-W.; Li, Z.-K.; Xie, Y.-X.; Huang, W.-X.; Wang, X.-D.; Yu, Y.; Xu, F.-R.; Pan, Q.-Y.; Shu, N.-C.; Chen, Y.-S.; Wang, K.

    2006-11-02

    The history of experimental study on {beta}-delayed proton decays in the rare-earth region was simply reviewed. The physical results of the {beta}-delayed proton decays obtained at IMP, Lanzhou over the last 10 years were summarized, mainly including the first observation of 9 new {beta}-delayed proton precursors along the odd-Z proton drip line and the new data for 2 waiting-point nuclei in the rp-process. The results were compared and discussed with different nuclear model calculations. Finally, the perspective in near future was briefly introduced.

  9. Impact of comprehensive simulations on trapped ion beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegl, Kevin; Aprahamian, A.; Scielzo, N. D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Burkey, M.; Caldwell, S.; Czeszumska, A.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Marley, S. T.; Morgan, G. E.; Norman, E. B.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S.; Pérez Galván, A.; Sharma, K. S.; Strauss, S.; Wang, B. S.

    2015-10-01

    The decay of radioactive ions confined in an RF ion trap allows indirect measurements of beta-delayed neutron emission. This is accomplished by measuring the energy of the recoiling ion which can be much larger after neutron emission than from just beta decay. This method removes most systematic errors from neutron detection but introduces dependencies on specifics of the decay and interactions of the ion with the RF fields. Measurements were made of the 134-136Sb beta decays with this technique at Argonne National Laboratory using the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU). A suite of simulations were developed to model the interaction of the decays and the influence of the trap fields on the recoiling ions. Measurements of these data can impact many fields, such as nuclear energy, nuclear astrophysics, and stockpile stewardship. Results of the simulations and analyses will be reported. Supported by NSF Grant # PHY-1419765, and U.S. DOE under the NEUP Project # 13-5485, Contract #s DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL) and DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and Award # DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  10. DNA fragmentation by charged particle tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenerlöw, B.; Höglund, E.; Carlsson, J.

    High-LET (linear energy transfer) charged particles induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in a non-random fashion in mammalian cells. The clustering of DSB, probably determined by track structure as well as chromatin conformation, results in an excess of small- and intermediate-sized DNA fragments. DNA fragmentation in normal human fibroblasts (GM5758) was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after irradiation with photons ( 60Co) or 125 keV/μm nitrogen ions. Compared to conventional DSB analysis, i.e. assays only measuring the fraction of DNA smaller than a single threshold, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction increased with 100%. Further, the size distribution of DNA fragments showed a significant dependence on radiation quality, with an excess of fragments up to 1 Mbp. Irradiation of naked genomic DNA without histone proteins increased the DSB yields 25 and 13 times for photons and nitrogen ions, respectively. The results suggest possible roles of both track structure and chromatin organization in the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks along the chromosome.

  11. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Jason, Andrew J.; Blind, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  12. Deposition of charged particles on lung airways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B S; Xiong, J Q; Fang, C P; Li, W

    1998-05-01

    The effect of a single electric charge on the efficiency with which ultrafine particles deposit in human airways has been investigated. When inhaled short-lived radon progeny are attached to electrically neutral particles their deposition efficiency is controlled by diffusion. But most ambient particles carry one, or a few, charges. We measured and compared the deposition (DE) of singly charged, charge-neutralized, and zero-charge 20-nm and 125-nm particles in hollow-cast models of human airways. These particle sizes were selected because they are about where modal peaks occur for the activity of the short-lived radon progeny in indoor air. For singly charged 20-nm particles deposition (+/- standard error) in the casts was 3.4 +/- 0.3 times that for charge neutralized aerosols and 5.3 +/- 0.3 times the amount deposited for zero-charged particles. Corresponding ratios for the 125-nm particles were 2.3 +/- 0.3 and 6.2 +/- 0.7. Since most ambient particles are charged this effect must be considered when models are used to predict dose from inhaled ultrafine particles.

  13. Charged-particle telescope experiment on Clementine.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S; Blake, J B; Adams, J H

    1995-01-01

    The charged-particle telescope (CPT) onboard the Clementine spacecraft measured the fluxes of energetic protons emitted in solar energetic particle events. Protons in the energy range from 10 to 80 MeV were of greatest interest for radiation effects such as total dose and single event upsets. Energetic electrons were also of interest for spacecraft charging and their contribution to total dose. The lower-energy CPT electron channels (25-500 keV) were mainly of geophysical interest. While orbiting the moon, the CPT observed the wake created by the moon when it blocked the flow of energetic particles in the magnetotail region. The CPT provided opportunities to observe energetic electron bursts during magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms. CPT data are particularly useful in multispacecraft studies of interplanetary disturbances and their interaction with the magnetosphere. The proton channels on the CPT provided data on solar energetic protons and storm-time protons associated with the passage of an interplanetary shock at 0903 UT on Feb. 21, 1994. Results are compared with those from GOES-7, SAMPEX, and GEOTAIL.

  14. Peculiarities of propagation of charged particles in solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morozova, E. I.; Pisarenko, N. F.; Mikryukova, N. A.; Klimenko, V. V.; Timofeev, V. E.; Shafer, Y. G.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of boundaries of the large scale unipolar magnetic regions (UMR) on the Sun upon the charged particle propagation in the solar corona and interplanetary space is investigated. Increases of the charged particle fluxes from solar flares on November 4 and 20, 1978 detected by Venera-11 and Prognoz-1 and on December 7, 1982 by Venera-13 and "GMS-2" were analyzed.

  15. Determination of time zero from a charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jesse Andrew [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-15

    A method, system and computer program is used to determine a linear track having a good fit to a most likely or expected path of charged particle passing through a charged particle detector having a plurality of drift cells. Hit signals from the charged particle detector are associated with a particular charged particle track. An initial estimate of time zero is made from these hit signals and linear tracks are then fit to drift radii for each particular time-zero estimate. The linear track having the best fit is then searched and selected and errors in fit and tracking parameters computed. The use of large and expensive fast detectors needed to time zero in the charged particle detectors can be avoided by adopting this method and system.

  16. Charged particle acceleration in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S.V.; Naumova, N.M.; Dudnikova, G.I.; Vshivkov, V.A.; Pegoraro, F.; Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-11-01

    The high-gradient electron acceleration schemes that have been demonstrated using LWFA appear promising for the development of plasma-based laser accelerators into practical devices. However, a question still exists: how to avoid the wake field deterioration and the loss of the phase synchronism between the plasma wave and the electrons that prevent them from being accelerated up to the theoretical limit. In order to obtain the highest possible values of the wake electric field one must use as intense laser pulses as possible i.e., pulses with dimensionless amplitudes a {much_gt} 1. Pulses that have a dimensionless amplitude larger than one tend to be subject to a host of instabilities, such as relativistic self-focusing, self modulation and stimulated Raman scattering, that affect their propagation in the plasma. Such processes could be beneficial, in so far as they increase the pulse energy density, enhance the wake field generation, and provide the mechanism for transporting the laser radiation over several Rayleigh lengths without diffraction spreading. However, it is still far from certain that these processes can be exploited in a controlled form and can lead to regular, stationary wake fields. It is known that, in order to create good quality wake fields, it would be preferable to use laser pulses with steep fronts of order {lambda}{sub p}. The present paper aims at analyzing the influence of the laser pulse shape and of the plasma nonuniformity on the charged particle acceleration. This study is based on the results obtained with one dimensional PIC simulations.

  17. Guiding of charged particles through capillaries in insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolterfoht, Nikolaus; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2016-04-01

    Studies of charged particle guiding through capillaries in insulating materials, performed during the last decade, are reviewed in a comprehensive manner. First, the principles of capillary guiding of slow highly charged ions are introduced describing the self-organized formation of charge patches. Basic quantities are defined, such as the guiding power characterizing a capillary. Challenges of the guiding experiments are pointed out. Then, experiments are described with emphasis on the guiding of highly charged ions in the keV energy range. Samples with an array of nanocapillaries as well as single macrocapillaries are treated. Emission profiles of transmitted ions are analyzed to establish scaling laws for the guiding angle, which quantifies the guiding power. Oscillations of the mean ion emission angle reveal the temporal dynamics of the charge patch formation. Next, experiments with ions of high (MeV) energies are focused on single tapered capillaries allowing for the production of a microbeam for various applications. Experiments concerning electrons are presented showing that apart from being elastically scattered these negative particles may enter into the capillary surface where they suffer energy losses. Finally, theoretical concepts of the capillary guiding are discussed. Simulations based on different charge transport methods clearly support the understanding of the guiding mechanisms. Altogether, capillary guiding involves several novel phenomena for which understanding have progressed far beyond their infancy.

  18. Quantum interface to charged particles in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    A superconducting qubit device suitable for interacting with a flying electron has recently been proposed [Okamoto and Nagatani, Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 062604 (2014), 10.1063/1.4865244]. Either a clockwise or counterclockwise directed loop of half magnetic flux quantum encodes a qubit, which naturally interacts with any single charged particle with arbitrary kinetic energy. Here, the device's properties, sources of errors, and possible applications are studied in detail. In particular, applications include detection of a charged particle essentially without applying a classical force to it. Furthermore, quantum states can be transferred between an array of the proposed devices and the charged particle.

  19. Charged particle beam scanning using deformed high gradient insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu -Jiuan

    2015-10-06

    Devices and methods are provided to allow rapid deflection of a charged particle beam. The disclosed devices can, for example, be used as part of a hadron therapy system to allow scanning of a target area within a patient's body. The disclosed charged particle beam deflectors include a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) with a hollow center and a dielectric wall that is substantially parallel to a z-axis that runs through the hollow center. The dielectric wall includes one or more deformed high gradient insulators (HGIs) that are configured to produce an electric field with an component in a direction perpendicular to the z-axis. A control component is also provided to establish the electric field component in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis and to control deflection of a charged particle beam in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis as the charged particle beam travels through the hollow center of the DWA.

  20. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  1. Interactive design environment transportation channel of relativistic charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadchuk, I. O.; Averyanov, G. P.; Budkin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Considered a modern implementation of a computer environment for the design of channels of transportation of high-energy charged particle beams. The environment includes a software package for the simulation of the dynamics of charged particles in the channel, operating means for changing parameters of the channel, the elements channel optimization and processing of the output characteristics of the beam with the graphical output the main output parameters.

  2. Simulation of heavy charged particles damage on MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhnov, V.; Glushko, A.; Makarchuk, V.; Zinchenko, L.; Terekhov, V.; Mikhaylichenko, S.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents computer simulation results of heavy charged particles radiation effect on elements of electrostatic microelectromechanical systems. Modeling methods of heavy charged particles impact on MEMS elements were envisaged. The radiation sensitivity of different types of fractal electrostatic MEMS were evaluated. Methods of reduction of radiation impact on electrostatic MEMS based on fractal theory were discussed. Conclusions about fractal electrostatic MEMS features were outlined.

  3. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged particle current flow

    DOEpatents

    Pollock, G.G.

    1997-01-28

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved. 5 figs.

  4. Multipole radiation in charged-particle scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper formulates the general problem of photon emission in particle scattering using a classical and quantum mechanical approach. The connection between the classical short collision time (SCT) and Born results is examined for various special classifications of problems. In the dipole case the two formulations yield results that can be expressed in the same form and for arbitrary scattering potential. For quadrupole emission the SCT and Born results are the same only for a short-range potential, however. The quadrupole problem is more sensitive to details in the process because the calculation requires an expansion of the total amplitude for the process to lowest order in the photon wave number or momentum. The special case of photon emission associated with spin-flip transitions during scattering is considered for spin-1/2 particles. Like classical magnetic dipole radiation, there is no infrared divergence feature for this type of emission.

  5. Internal bremsstrahlung of strongly interacting charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgalin, S. D.; Tchuvil'sky, Yu. M.; Churakova, T. A.

    2016-11-01

    A universal theoretical model intended for calculating internal-bremsstrahlung spectra is proposed. In this model, which can be applied to describing nuclear decays of various type (such as alpha decay, cluster decay, and proton emission), use is made of realistic nucleus-nucleus potentials. Theoretical internal-bremsstrahlung spectra were obtained for the alpha decay of the 214Po nucleus, as well as for the decay of the 222Ra nucleus via the emission of a 14C cluster and for the decay of the 113Cs nucleus via proton emission, and the properties of these spectra were studied. The contributions of various regions (internal, subbarrier, and external) to the internal-bremsstrahlung amplitude were analyzed in detail. It is shown that the contribution of the internal region to the amplitude for internal bremsstrahlung generated in nuclear decay via proton emission is quite large, but that this is not so for alpha decay and decay via cluster emission. Thus, a process in which strong interaction of nuclear particles affects the internal-bremsstrahlung spectrum if found.

  6. Internal bremsstrahlung of strongly interacting charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kurgalin, S. D.; Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M.; Churakova, T. A.

    2016-11-15

    A universal theoretical model intended for calculating internal-bremsstrahlung spectra is proposed. In this model, which can be applied to describing nuclear decays of various type (such as alpha decay, cluster decay, and proton emission), use is made of realistic nucleus–nucleus potentials. Theoretical internal-bremsstrahlung spectra were obtained for the alpha decay of the {sup 214}Po nucleus, as well as for the decay of the {sup 222}Ra nucleus via the emission of a {sup 14}C cluster and for the decay of the {sup 113}Cs nucleus via proton emission, and the properties of these spectra were studied. The contributions of various regions (internal, subbarrier, and external) to the internal-bremsstrahlung amplitude were analyzed in detail. It is shown that the contribution of the internal region to the amplitude for internal bremsstrahlung generated in nuclear decay via proton emission is quite large, but that this is not so for alpha decay and decay via cluster emission. Thus, a process in which strong interaction of nuclear particles affects the internal-bremsstrahlung spectrum if found.

  7. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Wan, M.; Montgomery, D.

    2013-12-01

    Study of the transport and diffusion of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider Diffusion of charged particles in fully three dimensional statistically isotropic magnetic field turbulence with no mean field which is pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We classify different regions of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius of the charged particle to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. We propose three different theoretical models to calculate the diffusion coefficient each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared with those from computer simulations, showing very good agreement.

  8. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.; Jaeckel, J. E-mail: joerg.jaeckel@durham.ac.uk E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de

    2009-11-01

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini-charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster.

  9. Cyclotron motion of a charged particle with anisotropic mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftja, Orion; Livingston, Victoria; Thomas, Elsa

    2017-05-01

    The cyclotron motion of a charged particle subject to a uniform magnetic field is thoroughly described in many classical physics textbooks. Although the assumption of a particle with isotropic mass is taken for granted in classical physics, a key concept in condensed matter physics is that of particles with an effective anisotropic mass, such as electrons in the context of band structure studies of solids. Since some exposure to the concept of anisotropic mass is important within the framework of classical physics, here we consider the cyclotron motion of a charged particle with anisotropic mass in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The exact solution of this problem exposes a broad audience of readers to concepts in condensed matter physics that are rarely mentioned within the framework of classical physics. Key ideas on the topic are illustrated in a pedagogical way by considering specific examples that show how an anisotropic mass modifies the cyclotron motion of a charged particle.

  10. Systems for detecting charged particles in object inspection

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2013-08-20

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons. In one implementation, a monitoring system has a cosmic ray-produced charged particle tracker with a plurality of drift cells. The drift cells, which can be for example aluminum drift tubes, can be arranged at least above and below a volume to be scanned to thereby track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons, while also detecting gamma rays. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can also detect any radioactive sources occupying the volume from gamma rays emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift tubes can be sealed to eliminate the need for a gas handling system. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  11. Optical detection of the Aharonov-Bohm effect on a charged particle in a nanoscale quantum ring.

    PubMed

    Bayer, M; Korkusinski, M; Hawrylak, P; Gutbrod, T; Michel, M; Forchel, A

    2003-05-09

    We study spectroscopically the current produced by a charged particle moving in a nanosize semiconductor quantum ring subject to a perpendicular magnetic field. Several Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are observed in the emission of a charged exciton confined in a single ring structure. The magnetic field period of the oscillations correlates well with the size of the rings.

  12. Scaling beta-delayed neutron measurements to large detector areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanto, F.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2017-08-01

    We explore the performance of a cargo screening system that consists of two large-sized composite scintillation detectors and a high-energy neutron interrogation source by modeling and simulation. The goal of the system is to measure β-delayed neutron emission from an illicit special nuclear material by use of active interrogation. This task is challenging because the β-delayed neutron yield is small in comparison with the yield of the prompt fission secondary products, β-delayed neutrons are emitted with relatively low energies, and high neutron and gamma backgrounds are typically present. Detectors used to measure delayed neutron emission must exhibit high intrinsic efficiency and cover a large solid angle, which also makes them sensitive to background neutron radiation. We present a case study where we attempt to detect the presence of 5 kg-scale quantities of 235U in a standard air-filled cargo container using 14 MeV neutrons as a probe. We find that by using a total measurement time of ˜11.6 s and a dose equivalent of ˜1.7 mrem, the presence of 235U can be detected with false positive and false negative probabilities that are both no larger than 0.1%.

  13. Self-organization of charged particles in circular geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazmitdinov, R. G.; Puente, A.; Cerkaski, M.; Pons, M.

    2017-04-01

    The basic principles of self-organization of one-component charged particles, confined in disk and circular parabolic potentials, are proposed. A system of equations is derived, which allows us to determine equilibrium configurations for an arbitrary, but finite, number of charged particles that are distributed over several rings. Our approach reduces significantly the computational effort in minimizing the energy of equilibrium configurations and demonstrates a remarkable agreement with the values provided by molecular dynamics calculations. With the increase of particle number n >180 we find a steady formation of a centered hexagonal lattice that smoothly transforms to valence circular rings in the ground-state configurations for both potentials.

  14. Self-organization of charged particles in circular geometry.

    PubMed

    Nazmitdinov, R G; Puente, A; Cerkaski, M; Pons, M

    2017-04-01

    The basic principles of self-organization of one-component charged particles, confined in disk and circular parabolic potentials, are proposed. A system of equations is derived, which allows us to determine equilibrium configurations for an arbitrary, but finite, number of charged particles that are distributed over several rings. Our approach reduces significantly the computational effort in minimizing the energy of equilibrium configurations and demonstrates a remarkable agreement with the values provided by molecular dynamics calculations. With the increase of particle number n>180 we find a steady formation of a centered hexagonal lattice that smoothly transforms to valence circular rings in the ground-state configurations for both potentials.

  15. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  16. Perturbation theory for charged-particle transport in one dimension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Lamkin, S. L.

    1975-01-01

    Perturbation theory, when applied to charged-particle transport, generates a series solution that requires a double quadrature per term. The continuity of higher-order terms leads to numerical evaluation of the series. The high rate of convergence of the series makes the method a practical tool for charged-particle transport problems. The coupling of the neutron component in the case of proton transport in tissue does not greatly alter the rate of convergence. The method holds promise for a practical high-energy proton transport theory.

  17. Current and future accelerator technologies for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Hywel; Lomax, Antony; Jolly, Simon

    2016-02-01

    The past few years have seen significant developments both of the technologies available for proton and other charged particle therapies, and of the number and spread of therapy centres. In this review we give an overview of these technology developments, and outline the principal challenges and opportunities we see as important in the next decade. Notable amongst these is the ever-increasing use of superconductivity both in particle sources and for treatment delivery, which is likely to greatly increase the accessibility of charged particle therapy treatments to hospital centres worldwide.

  18. Detection of Charged Particles with Charge Injection Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, K.A.; Apker, B.; Hammond, S.; Punaro, J.; Marshall, F.J.; Laine, J.; Forties, R.

    2007-07-02

    A method for using charge injection devices (CIDs) for detection of high-energy charged particles from inertial-confinement fusion reactions is described. Because of the relatively small depletion region of the CID camera (depletion depth of ~7 um), aluminum foils are placed in front of the device to reduce the energy of the charged particles and maximize the energy deposited in the CID. Simultaneous measurements of ^2H(d,p)^3H protons with a CID and a surface barrier detector indicate that the CID is an efficient detector of charged fusion products. Tests using high energy alpha particles emitted from a radium-226 source are also reported.

  19. Streak Camera 101: Visualizing Charged-Particle Beam Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingxin

    2006-11-01

    Radiation generated by high-energy particle beams such as optical transition radiation (OTR) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) is widely used to characterize the beam properties. It has enabled dual-sweep streak cameras to visualize charged-particle beam dynamics. In this introductory paper, we will discuss properties of dual-sweep streak cameras and basic optics systems for imaging charged-particle bunches at different projection angles to produce top view, side view, and front view. Examples will be used to illustrate the beam dynamics that streak images reveal. We will also discuss practical considerations of optical transport line design to preserve spatial and temporal resolution of the camera system.

  20. Energetic Charged-Particle Phenomena in the Jovian Magnetosphere: First Results from the Ulysses COSPIN Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J A; Anglin, J D; Balogh, A; Burrows, J R; Cowley, S W; Ferrando, P; Heber, B; Hynds, R J; Kunow, H; Marsden, R G; McKibben, R B; Müller-Mellin, R; Page, D E; Raviart, A; Sanderson, T R; Staines, K; Wenzel, K P; Wilson, M D; Zhang, M

    1992-09-11

    The Ulysses spacecraft made the first exploration of the region of Jupiter's magnetosphere at high Jovigraphic latitudes ( approximately 37 degrees south) on the dusk side and reached higher magnetic latitudes ( approximately 49 degrees north) on the day side than any previous mission to Jupiter. The cosmic and solar particle investigations (COSPIN) instrumentation achieved a remarkably well integrated set of observations of energetic charged particles in the energy ranges of approximately 1 to 170 megaelectron volts for electrons and 0.3 to 20 megaelectron volts for protons and heavier nuclei. The new findings include (i) an apparent polar cap region in the northern hemisphere in which energetic charged particles following Jovian magnetic field lines may have direct access to the interplanetary medium, (ii) high-energy electron bursts (rise times approximately 17 megaelectron volts) on the dusk side that are apparently associated with field-aligned currents and radio burst emissions, (iii) persistence of the global 10-hour relativistic electron "clock" phenomenon throughout Jupiter's magnetosphere, (iv) on the basis of charged-particle measurements, apparent dragging of magnetic field lines at large radii in the dusk sector toward the tail, and (v) consistent outflow of megaelectron volt electrons and large-scale departures from corotation for nucleons.

  1. Energetic charged-particle phenomena in the Jovian magnetosphere - First results from the Ulysses COSPIN collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Anglin, J. D.; Balogh, A.; Burrows, J. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Ferrando, P.; Heber, B.; Hynds, R. J.; Kunow, H.; Marsden, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft made the first exploration of the region of Jupiter's magnetosphere at high Jovigraphic latitudes on the dusk side and reached higher magnetic latitudes on the day side than any previous mission to Jupiter. The cosmic and solar particle investigations (COSPIN) instrumentation achieved a remarkably well integrated set of observations of energetic charged particles in the energy ranges of about 1 to 170 megaelectron volts for electrons and 0.3 to 20 megaelectron volts for protons and heavier nuclei. The new findings include an apparent polar cap region in the northern hemisphere in which energetic charged particles following Jovian magnetic field lines may have direct access to the interplanetary medium; high-energy electron bursts on the dusk side that are apparently associated with field-aligned currents and radio burst emissions; persistence of the global 10-hour relativistic electron 'clock' phenomenon throughout Jupiter's magnetosphere; on the basis of charged-particle measurements, apparent dragging of magnetic field lines at large radii in the dusk sector toward the tail; and consistent outflow of megaelectron volt electrons and large-scale departures from corotation for nucleons.

  2. Optical imaging of charged particle tracks in a gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.E.; Hamn, R.N.; Hunter, S.R.; Gibson, W.A.; Hurst, G.S.; Wright, H.A.

    1995-09-28

    The development of a new detector designed to optically image the track of a charged particle in a gas is outlined. In the detector, a pulsed high-voltage (up to {approx} 30--40 kV), high-frequency (f = 27.125 MHz) RF field is temporarily applied (pulse duration {approx} 1--3 {mu}s) across a pair of electrodes, immediately following, or alternatively, just prior to the passage of a charged particle through the chamber. The pulsed RF field excites the subexcitation electrons left along the particle`s path leading to excitation and ionization of the surrounding gas and the emission of light. The track is then imaged by a fast intensified digital camera (shutter speed {approx} 0.1--5 {mu}s). The image is recorded in a two-dimensional pixel array (512 {times} 512 pixels) within the camera, and transferred to a computer for later analysis. The detector has been operated over the total gas pressure range 2.5--100 kPa (20--750 torr) using a gas mixture of 2--10% N2 in Ar. Images of both {alpha} and {beta} tracks obtained with this detector are discussed to demonstrate the usefulness of the present technique in charged-particle track analysis for dosimetry and microdosimetry applications.

  3. Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

    2013-02-19

    A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

  4. Electromagnetic field of fractal distribution of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2005-08-15

    Electric and magnetic fields of fractal distribution of charged particles are considered. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. The fractional integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Using the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equation, the simple examples of the fields of homogeneous fractal distribution are considered. The electric dipole and quadrupole moments for fractal distribution are derived.

  5. Return flux of neutral and charged particles in geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. D.; Fong, Michael C.; Neier, Karen L.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes a model for the return flux of neutral and charged particles to a satellite in geosynchronous earth orbit. For neutral particles, the main return flux mechanisms is back-scattering via self-collisions among molecules outgassed or vented from the satellite; whereas for charged particles, the main mechanism is electrostatic re-attraction of ionized outgassed or vented molecules to a negatively charged satellite. Computer codes that simulate spacecraft charging typically contain a 3D charged particle trajectory-tracking procedure that, in principle, could be used for contamination studies. In practice, however, it is difficult to obtain quantitative results on the return flux distribution by this method. This makes such a code impractical to use as an engineering tool for identifying contamination problems reliably and evaluating corrective measures through simulation. To achieve a practical engineering tool, we prose an alternative to the particle tracking technique. We treat the problem for both neutral and charged particles in a unified manner by direct numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation in the BGK approximation. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by favorable numerical results presented for the simplified geometry of a spherical spacecraft.

  6. Apparatus for Suspension of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to study the properties of charged particles suspended in an electric field. The apparatus consists of a suspension chamber, an optical system and power supplies and controls. Experiments conducted include determination of particle size, charge-to-mass ratio and particle collisions and exchange. (LC)

  7. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  8. Apparatus for the Study of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe; Gaulkler, T. A.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an apparatus for the free suspension of charged particles and droplets in the range 5-200u and for their study with respect to charge and mass and their variations with time in various gaseous environments. High-speed photography is used to determine the motion of particles. (LC)

  9. Quantum aspects of charged-particle beam optics

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Sameen Ahmed

    2016-06-10

    The classical treatments have been successful in designing numerous charged-particle devices. It is natural to develop a quantum prescription, since all systems are fundamentally quantum mechanical in nature. The quantum theory leads to new insights accompanied with wavelength-dependent contributions. The action of a magnetic quadrupole is derived from the Dirac equation.

  10. Indirect Charged Particle Detection: Concepts and a Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nicholas B.; Horányi, Mihály; Collette, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We describe the principles of macroscopic charged particle detection in the laboratory and their connections to concepts taught in the physics classroom. Electrostatic dust accelerator systems, capable of launching charged dust grains at hypervelocities (1-100 km/s), are a critical tool for space exploration. Dust grains in space typically have…

  11. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  12. Apparatus for Suspension of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to study the properties of charged particles suspended in an electric field. The apparatus consists of a suspension chamber, an optical system and power supplies and controls. Experiments conducted include determination of particle size, charge-to-mass ratio and particle collisions and exchange. (LC)

  13. Indirect Charged Particle Detection: Concepts and a Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nicholas B.; Horányi, Mihály; Collette, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We describe the principles of macroscopic charged particle detection in the laboratory and their connections to concepts taught in the physics classroom. Electrostatic dust accelerator systems, capable of launching charged dust grains at hypervelocities (1-100 km/s), are a critical tool for space exploration. Dust grains in space typically have…

  14. Charged-particle spectroscopy in organic semiconducting single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ciavatti, A.; Basiricò, L.; Fraboni, B.; Fraleoni-Morgera, A.

    2016-04-11

    The use of organic materials as radiation detectors has grown, due to the easy processability in liquid phase at room temperature and the possibility to cover large areas by means of low cost deposition techniques. Direct charged-particle detectors based on solution-grown Organic Semiconducting Single Crystals (OSSCs) are shown to be capable to detect charged particles in pulse mode, with very good peak discrimination. The direct charged-particle detection in OSSCs has been assessed both in the planar and in the vertical axes, and a digital pulse processing algorithm has been used to perform pulse height spectroscopy and to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the applied bias voltage. Taking advantage of the charge spectroscopy and the good peak discrimination of pulse height spectra, an Hecht-like behavior of OSSCs radiation detectors is demonstrated. It has been possible to estimate the mobility-lifetime value in organic materials, a fundamental parameter for the characterization of radiation detectors, whose results are equal to μτ{sub coplanar} = (5 .5 ± 0.6 ) × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/V and μτ{sub sandwich} = (1 .9 ± 0.2 ) × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/V, values comparable to those of polycrystalline inorganic detectors. Moreover, alpha particles Time-of-Flight experiments have been carried out to estimate the drift mobility value. The results reported here indicate how charged-particle detectors based on OSSCs possess a great potential as low-cost, large area, solid-state direct detectors operating at room temperature. More interestingly, the good detection efficiency and peak discrimination observed for charged-particle detection in organic materials (hydrogen-rich molecules) are encouraging for their further exploitation in the detection of thermal and high-energy neutrons.

  15. Charged-particle spectroscopy in organic semiconducting single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavatti, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Basiricò, L.; Fraleoni-Morgera, A.; Fraboni, B.

    2016-04-01

    The use of organic materials as radiation detectors has grown, due to the easy processability in liquid phase at room temperature and the possibility to cover large areas by means of low cost deposition techniques. Direct charged-particle detectors based on solution-grown Organic Semiconducting Single Crystals (OSSCs) are shown to be capable to detect charged particles in pulse mode, with very good peak discrimination. The direct charged-particle detection in OSSCs has been assessed both in the planar and in the vertical axes, and a digital pulse processing algorithm has been used to perform pulse height spectroscopy and to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the applied bias voltage. Taking advantage of the charge spectroscopy and the good peak discrimination of pulse height spectra, an Hecht-like behavior of OSSCs radiation detectors is demonstrated. It has been possible to estimate the mobility-lifetime value in organic materials, a fundamental parameter for the characterization of radiation detectors, whose results are equal to μτcoplanar = (5 .5 ± 0.6 ) × 10-6 cm2/V and μτsandwich = (1 .9 ± 0.2 ) × 10-6 cm2/V, values comparable to those of polycrystalline inorganic detectors. Moreover, alpha particles Time-of-Flight experiments have been carried out to estimate the drift mobility value. The results reported here indicate how charged-particle detectors based on OSSCs possess a great potential as low-cost, large area, solid-state direct detectors operating at room temperature. More interestingly, the good detection efficiency and peak discrimination observed for charged-particle detection in organic materials (hydrogen-rich molecules) are encouraging for their further exploitation in the detection of thermal and high-energy neutrons.

  16. A trapped-ion technique for beta-delayed neutron studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Shane

    The properties of beta-delayed neutron emission (betan) are important in basic and applied nuclear physics. The neutron spectra and branching ratios of betan emitters reflect the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich nuclei. Branching ratios affect the heavy-element abundances resulting from the astrophysical r process. Energy spectra and branching ratios are also important to nuclear stockpile stewardship and the safe design of nuclear reactors. Recently we demonstrated a novel technique for betan spectroscopy using I137+ ions confined to a ˜1 mm 3 volume within a linear RFQ ion trap [61, 77]. By measuring the time-of-flight spectrum of ions recoiling from both beta and betan decays, the betan branching ratio and spectrum can be determined. This recoil-ion technique has several advantages over techniques that rely on neutron detection: the recoil-ions are easily detectable; complications due to scattered neutrons and gamma-rays are avoided; and the betan branching ratio can be extracted in several ways. In this thesis we present new measurements of the delayed-neutron energy spectra and branching ratios of 137I, 135Sb, and 136Sb, which include the first observation of the 136Sb spectrum. These measurements were motivated by the impact that the branching ratios of 135Sb and136Sb can have on the r-process abundances and by the use of 137 I, a well-studied case, as a benchmark for the new technique. Our current understanding of the r process is severely limited by the lack of an exhaustive body of data on neutron-rich nuclei. Relative to the previous demonstration on 137I, the present iteration of the experiment incorporates a 10x improvement in both the detection efficiencies and the beam intensity, as well as a position-sensitive design for the recoil-ion detectors that enables an improvement in energy resolution. An important analytical tool is introduced, which models the evolution of each ion population in the trap and is used to provide a needed

  17. Distinguishing fissions of 232Th, 237Np and 238U with beta-delayed gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyengar, A.; Norman, E. B.; Howard, C.; Angell, C.; Kaplan, A.; Ressler, J. J.; Chodash, P.; Swanberg, E.; Czeszumska, A.; Wang, B.; Yee, R.; Shugart, H. A.

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of beta-delayed gamma-ray spectra following 14-MeV neutron-induced fissions of 232Th, 238U, and 237Np were conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Spectra were collected for times ranging from 1 min to 14 h after irradiation. Intensity ratios of gamma-ray lines were extracted from the data that allow identification of the fissioning isotope.

  18. Experimental study on {beta}-delayed proton decays in the rare-earth region near drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.-W.; Li, Z.-K.; Xie, Y.-X.

    2007-11-30

    The history of experimental study on {beta}-delayed proton decays in the rare-earth region was simply reviewed. The physical results of the {beta}-delayed proton decays obtained at IMP, Lanzhou over the last 10 years were summarized, mainly including the first observation of 9 new {beta}-delayed proton precursors along the odd-Z proton drip line and the new data for 2 waiting-point nuclei in the rp-process. The results were compared and discussed with different nuclear model calculations. Finally, the perspective in near future was briefly introduced.

  19. Modulation of graphene field effect by heavy charged particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazalas, Edward; Sarker, Biddut K.; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-12-01

    Device architectures based on the two-dimensional material graphene can be used for sensing of electromagnetic and particle radiation. The sensing mechanism may be direct, by absorbance of radiation by the graphene or the immediately adjacent material, and indirect, via the field effect principle, whereby the change in conductivity within a semiconducting absorber substrate induces electric field change at graphene. Here, we report on a graphene field effect transistor (GFET) sensitive to heavy charged particle radiation (α particles) at MeV energies by use of the indirect sensing mechanism. Both the continuous and discrete changes of graphene are observed, and the latter are attributed to single α particle interactions with the GFET. While this study provides the basis for understanding of the irradiation effects, it also opens prospects for the use of GFETs as heavy charged particle detectors.

  20. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Blasi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.; Chuychai, P.; Dmitruk, P.; Wan, M.; Parashar, T. N.; Chhiber, R.

    2017-03-01

    The investigation of the diffusive transport of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider the diffusion of charged particles in fully three-dimensional isotropic turbulent magnetic fields with no mean field, which may be pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We identify different ranges of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. Two different theoretical models are proposed to calculate the diffusion coefficient, each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared to those from computer simulations, showing good agreement.

  1. Arnold Diffusion of Charged Particles in ABC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, Alejandro; Peralta-Salas, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    We prove the existence of diffusing solutions in the motion of a charged particle in the presence of ABC magnetic fields. The equations of motion are modeled by a 3DOF Hamiltonian system depending on two parameters. For small values of these parameters, we obtain a normally hyperbolic invariant manifold and we apply the so-called geometric methods for a priori unstable systems developed by A. Delshams, R. de la Llave and T.M. Seara. We characterize explicitly sufficient conditions for the existence of a transition chain of invariant tori having heteroclinic connections, thus obtaining global instability (Arnold diffusion). We also check the obtained conditions in a computer-assisted proof. ABC magnetic fields are the simplest force-free-type solutions of the magnetohydrodynamics equations with periodic boundary conditions, and can be considered as an elementary model for the motion of plasma-charged particles in a tokamak.

  2. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  3. Optical characterization of electrically charged particles using discrete dipole approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Kundracik, František; Videen, Gorden

    2016-11-01

    The dependence of the electric potential on the absorption and scattering of light by small particles has emerged as an interesting research topic, as the unexpected amplified optical signatures of a system of electrically charged particles were satisfactory predicted recently for homogeneous, uniformly charged spheres. However, natural particles are rarely of spherical shape. A comprehensive understanding of how arbitrarily shaped, charged particles interact with electromagnetic radiation has been missing. The approach we present here attempts to fill this gap by introducing a numerical formulation of the electromagnetic scattering problem for these particles. The first results from the intercomparison of numerical and analytical solutions for a pseudosphere show that the resonance features found are largely consistent, except for the magnitude and width of the peak amplitude, which may be due to inherent differences in the approaches used.

  4. Introduction of Electrostatically Charged Particles into Metal Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, Olga; Vorozhtsov, Sergey; Stepkina, Maria; Khrustalev, Anton

    2017-09-01

    One of the possible methods to produce composite alloys with improved mechanical characteristics is the modification of metal melts using submicron- or nanosized particles. Different methods, like ultrasonic or vibration processing, have been used to introduce these particles into the metal melt. The introduction of particles into a metal melt is prevented by the poor wettability of the liquid metal. The present study explores the use of electrostatic charge for increasing the wettability of the particles and preventing their agglomeration. The wettability of electrostatically charged particles by the metal melt under the impact of ultrasound has been studied. The relationships between the impact time and the physical and chemical properties of the particles and the melt along with the characteristics of the acoustic radiation have been studied. It was experimentally demonstrated that the introduction of electrostatically charged particles into the metal melt reduces the porosity and the crystal grain size.

  5. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  6. First- and second-order charged particle optics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1984-07-01

    Since the invention of the alternating gradient principle there has been a rapid evolution of the mathematics and physics techniques applicable to charged particle optics. In this publication we derive a differential equation and a matrix algebra formalism valid to second-order to present the basic principles governing the design of charged particle beam transport systems. A notation first introduced by John Streib is used to convey the essential principles dictating the design of such beam transport systems. For example the momentum dispersion, the momentum resolution, and all second-order aberrations are expressed as simple integrals of the first-order trajectories (matrix elements) and of the magnetic field parameters (multipole components) characterizing the system. 16 references, 30 figures.

  7. Production of carbon monoxide by charged particle deposition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Sawada, T.; Edgar, B. C.; Uman, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Recent studies of electron energy deposition in CO2 and CO based upon a large set of electron impact cross sections are utilized to estimate the telluric CO directly produced by various charged-particle deposition mechanisms. The mechanisms considered are (1) lightning, (2) cloud coronal discharges, (3) background radioactivity, (4) natural electrostatic discharges, (5) photoelectrons in the ionosphere, (6) auroral electrons, (7) auroral protons, (8) cosmic rays, and (9) solar wind. 'Ball park' estimates of the global CO production by each of these mechanisms are given. Apart from mechanisms 1, 2, and 5, all CO production mechanisms are estimated to be small compared to artificial sources. If, as appears to be the case, the hot oxygen atoms and ions and other atomic species immediately produced by these three charged-particle deposition mechanisms react rapidly with CO2 to produce CO, these mechanisms can readily lead to CO production levels in the multimegaton-per-year range.

  8. Brownian dynamics of charged particles in a constant magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, L. J.; Piel, A.; Miskovic, Z. L.; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-05-15

    Numerical algorithms are proposed for simulating the Brownian dynamics of charged particles in an external magnetic field, taking into account the Brownian motion of charged particles, damping effect, and the effect of magnetic field self-consistently. Performance of these algorithms is tested in terms of their accuracy and long-time stability by using a three-dimensional Brownian oscillator model with constant magnetic field. Step-by-step recipes for implementing these algorithms are given in detail. It is expected that these algorithms can be directly used to study particle dynamics in various dispersed systems in the presence of a magnetic field, including polymer solutions, colloidal suspensions, and, particularly, complex (dusty) plasmas. The proposed algorithms can also be used as thermostat in the usual molecular dynamics simulation in the presence of magnetic field.

  9. Shock drift acceleration. [of charged particles in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Thomas P.; Pesses, Mark E.; Decker, Robert B.

    1985-01-01

    This is a review of the fundamental physics of the interactions of charged particles treated individually while they interact with fast mode magnetohydrodynamic shocks. Numerical simulation and analytical theory are used to develop predictions of the expected characteristics of this process strong upstream anisotropies directed along the magnetic field and downstream anisotropies tending to be peaked more perpendicular to the field; relatively more of the enhancement of higher-energy particles occurring upstream; sensitive dependence on shock normal to magnetic field angle of the efficiency of energization. Observations which display all of the above characteristics are reviewed. Also discussed is the relationship of shock drift acceleration to the models for stochastic transport of charged particles in the vicinity of shocks. Extensions of this work in both the observational and theoretical approaches are discussed.

  10. Peculiarities of charged particle dynamics under cyclotron resonance conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseev, S. S.; Buts, V. A.; Erokhin, N. S.

    2016-08-15

    Peculiarities of the dynamics of charged particles interacting with electromagnetic radiation under nearly autoresonance conditions are analyzed. In particular, analysis of nonlinear cyclotron resonances shows that their widths increase when the autoresonance conditions are approached. In this case, however, the distance between nonlinear resonances increases even faster, due to which nonlinear resonances do not overlap and, accordingly, regimes with dynamic chaos do not occur. According to calculations, the dynamics of charged particles under the autoresonance conditions is very sensitive to fluctuations, the effect of which can be anomalously large and lead to superdiffusion. It is shown that, under the autoresonance conditions, particle dynamics on small time intervals can differ significantly from that on large time intervals. This effect is most pronounced in the presence of fluctuations in the system.

  11. Stopping power of charged particles due to ion wave excitations.

    PubMed

    Nitta, H; Muroki, C; Nambu, M

    2002-08-01

    Stopping power due to ion wave excitations is derived for a charged particle moving in a two-component plasma. Unlike previous theories based on ion-acoustic-wave approximation (IAWA), the excitation of short-wavelength ion waves is taken into account. The obtained stopping power has a magnitude larger than that of IAWA. Stopping power at subsonic velocities, where stopping power in IAWA disappears, is even larger than that of supersonic velocities.

  12. Stopping power of charged particles due to ion wave excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, H.; Muroki, C.; Nambu, M.

    2002-08-01

    Stopping power due to ion wave excitations is derived for a charged particle moving in a two-component plasma. Unlike previous theories based on ion-acoustic-wave approximation (IAWA), the excitation of short-wavelength ion waves is taken into account. The obtained stopping power has a magnitude larger than that of IAWA. Stopping power at subsonic velocities, where stopping power in IAWA disappears, is even larger than that of supersonic velocities.

  13. Canonical algorithms for numerical integration of charged particle motion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, I. N.; Morozov, E. A.; Morozova, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    A technique for numerically integrating the equation of charged particle motion in a magnetic field is considered. It is based on the canonical transformations of the phase space in Hamiltonian mechanics. The canonical transformations make the integration process stable against counting error accumulation. The integration algorithms contain a minimum possible amount of arithmetics and can be used to design accelerators and devices of electron and ion optics.

  14. Searches for Fractionally Charged Particles: What Should Be Done Next?

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    Since the initial measurements of the electron charge a century ago, experimenters have faced the persistent question as to whether elementary particles exist that have charges that are fractional multiples of the electron charge. I concisely review the results of the last 50 years of searching for fractional charge particles with no confirmed positive results. I discuss the question of whether more searching is worthwhile?

  15. Generation of narrow peaks in spectroscopy of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbers, Dirk; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    In spectroscopy of charged particles, narrow peaks may appear in continuous spectra if magnetic transport of the particles is involved. These artefacts, which so far have escaped the attention of investigators, can develop whenever geometric detection efficiency is less than 100%. As such peaks may be misinterpreted as new physics, their generation is investigated, both analytically and experimentally, for various detector configurations, including those used in searches for the spontaneous decay of the vacuum in heavy-ion collisions.

  16. Motion of charged particles in planetary magnetospheres with nonelectromagnetic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Hill, T. W.; Wolf, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Expressions are derived for the mirror point, the bounce period, the second adiabatic invariant, and the bounce-averaged azimuthal drift velocity as functions of equatorial pitch angle for a charged particle in a dipole magnetic field in the presence of centrifugal, gravitational, and Coriolis forces. These expressions are evaluated numerically, and the results are displayed graphically. The average azimuthal drift speed for a flux tube containing a thermal equilibrium plasma distribution is also evaluated.

  17. Electrostatic energy analyzers for high energy charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. M.; Ilyina, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    The electrostatic energy analyzers for high energy charged particle beams emitted from extended large-size objects as well as from remote point sources are proposed. Results of the analytical trajectory solutions in ideal cylindrical field provide focusing characteristics for both configurations. The instruments possess of simple compact design, based on an ideal cylindrical field with entrance window arranged in the end-boundary between electrodes and can be used for measurements in space technologies, plasma and nuclear physics.

  18. A fast numerical integrator for relativistic charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we report on a fast second-order numerical integrator to solve the Lorentz force equations of a relativistic charged particle in electromagnetic fields. This numerical integrator shows less numerical error than the popular Boris algorithm in tracking the relativistic particle subject to electric and magnetic space-charge fields and requires less number of operations than another recently proposed relativistic integrator.

  19. Charged Particle Environment Definition for NGST: Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Evans, Steven W.; Hardage, Donna M.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    NGST will operate in a halo orbit about the L2 point, 1.5 million km from the Earth, where the spacecraft will periodically travel through the magnetotail region. There are a number of tools available to calculate the high energy, ionizing radiation particle environment from galactic cosmic rays and from solar disturbances. However, space environment tools are not generally available to provide assessments of charged particle environment and its variations in the solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail at L2 distances. An engineering-level phenomenology code (LRAD) was therefore developed to facilitate the definition of charged particle environments in the vicinity of the L2 point in support of the NGST program. LRAD contains models tied to satellite measurement data of the solar wind and magnetotail regions. The model provides particle flux and fluence calculations necessary to predict spacecraft charging conditions and the degradation of materials used in the construction of NGST. This paper describes the LRAD environment models for the deep magnetotail (XGSE < -100 Re) and solar wind, and presents predictions of the charged particle environment for NGST.

  20. Search for fractional-charge particles in meteoritic material.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter C; Lee, Eric R; Lee, Irwin T; Perl, Martin L; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-19

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5 microm with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth's surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3 x 10(-21) particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9 x 10(-23) particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  1. Glass transition of charged particles in two-dimensional confinement.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Anoosheh; Heinen, Marco; Ivlev, Alexei; Löwen, Hartmut; Sperl, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    The glass transition of mesoscopic charged particles in two-dimensional confinement is studied by mode-coupling theory. We consider two types of effective interactions between the particles, corresponding to two different models for the distribution of surrounding ions that are integrated out in coarse-grained descriptions. In the first model, a planar monolayer of charged particles is immersed in an unbounded isotropic bath of ions, giving rise to an isotropically screened Debye-Hückel (Yukawa)-type effective interaction. The second, experimentally more relevant system is a monolayer of negatively charged particles that levitate atop a flat horizontal electrode, as frequently encountered in laboratory experiments with complex (dusty) plasmas. A steady plasma current toward the electrode gives rise to an anisotropic effective interaction potential between the particles, with an algebraically long-ranged in-plane decay. In a comprehensive parameter scan that covers the typical range of experimentally accessible plasma conditions, we calculate and compare the mode-coupling predictions for the glass transition in both kinds of systems.

  2. Determining Charged Particle Flux Direction in MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, J. K.; Kohler, J.; Guo, J.; Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Rafkin, S. C.; Boehm, E.; Böttcher, S. I.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Brinza, D. E.; Weigle, E.; Lohf, H.; Burmeister, S.; Reitz, G.; Matthiae, D.; Posner, A.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is an instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity, currently characterizing the radiation environment on the surface of Mars. The radiation entering the instrument from above consists mostly of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) modulated by the Martian atmosphere. From below, the instrument is exposed to secondary radiation produced by the interactions of the GCR with the soil. This secondary radiation gets further modulated going through the rover body before entering RAD. We developed a method of determining the direction of the charged particles measured by RAD. This method also extends the energy range possible for measurements with RAD beyond the intruments design limit. Using a combination of GEANT4 and Planetocosmics simulations, we reconstructed the expected charged particle spectra and intensities for upward and downward directed radiation which can be compared with observations. With the developed method, we are able to, for the first time, measure the upward charged particle flux with RAD both during the cruise phase and the surface science phase. Comparing the results of the simulations with the instrument data sets enables us to evaluate the simulation tools used to predict the Martian radiation envronment.

  3. Search for Fractional-Charge Particles in Meteoritic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-01

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5μm with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth‘s surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3×10-21 particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9×10-23 particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  4. Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Chen, D J; Brenner, D J; Hall, E J

    1988-07-01

    The mutagenic potential of charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) was assessed using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus (HGPRT) in primary human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing cultures of early passaged fibroblasts were grown as monolayers on thin mylar sheets and were irradiated with accelerated protons, deuterons or helium-3 ions. The mutation rates were compared with those generated by 137Cs gamma-rays. LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, using the track segment mode, ranged from 10 to 150 keV/micron. After irradiation, cells were trypsinized, subcultured and assayed for both cytotoxicity and 6-thioguanine resistance. For gamma-rays, and for the charged particles of lower LET, the dose-response curves for cell survival were characterized by a marked initial shoulder, but approximated to an exponential function of dose for higher LETs. Mutation frequencies, likewise, showed a direct correlation to LET over the dose range examined. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for mutagenesis, based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, ranged from 1.30 for 10 keV/micron protons to 9.40 for 150 keV/micron helium-3 ions. Results of the present studies indicate that high-LET radiations, apart from being efficient inducers of cell lethality, are even more efficient in mutation induction as compared to low-LET ionizing radiation. These data are consistent with results previously obtained with both rodent and human fibroblast cell lines.

  5. Charged Particle Therapy Steps Into the Clinical Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberer, Th.

    Beams of heavy charged particles like protons or carbon ions represent the ideal tool for the treatment of deep-seated, inoperable and radioresistant tumors. For more than 4 decades research with beams of charged particles has been performed. In total more than 40000 patients have been treated, mostly using protons being delivered by accelerators that were designed for basic research centers. In Berkeley, USA heavier particles like helium or neon ions were used to conduct clinical trials until 1992. Based on that somewhat limited technological standard and triggered by the promising results from Berkeley the first dedicated charged particle facilities were constructed. In order to maximally exploit the advantageous physical and radiobiological characteristics of these beams enormous effort was put into developing dynamic beam delivery techniques and tailoring the capabilities of the accelerators, the planning systems and the quality assurance procedures and equipment to the requirements resulting from these new treatment modalities. Active beam delivery systems integrated in rotating gantries, if necessary, will allow the production of superior dose distributions that precisely follow the medical prescription. The technological progress being made during the last 10 years defines the state of the art of the upcoming next-generation facilities for the clinical environment in Europe and Japan.

  6. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system is a device that produces by acceleration high energy charged particles (e.g., electrons and protons...

  7. The present status of the LLNL Evaluated Charged Particle Library (ECPL)

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Gregor, M.H.

    1987-03-13

    The present report is written with two purposes in mind: to summarize the charged-particle reactions that presently exist in Evaluated Charge Particle Library; and to list all of the low-Z charged-particle reactions for which data exist in the Livermore experimental data compilation. 2 tabs.

  8. Monte Carlo Models for the Production of beta-delayed Gamma Rays Following Fission of Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Prussin, S; Descalle, M; Hall, J

    2004-02-03

    A Monte Carlo method for the estimation of {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray spectra following fission is described that can accommodate an arbitrary time-dependent fission rate and photon collection history. The method invokes direct sampling of the independent fission yield distributions of the fissioning system, the branching ratios for decay of individual fission products and the spectral distributions for photon emission for each decay mode. Though computationally intensive, the method can provide a detailed estimate of the spectrum that would be recorded by an arbitrary spectrometer, and can prove useful in assessing the quality of evaluated data libraries, for identifying gaps in these libraries, etc. The method is illustrated by a first comparison of calculated and experimental spectra from decay of short-lived fission products following the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f). For general purpose transport calculations, where detailed consideration of the large number of individual {gamma}-ray transitions in a spectrum may be unnecessary, it is shown that an accurate and simple parameterization of a {gamma}-ray source function can be obtained. These parametrizations should provide high-quality average spectral distributions that should prove useful in calculations describing photons escaping from thick attenuating media.

  9. Decays of /sup 22/Al and /sup 26/P: discovery of beta-delayed two-proton radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, M.D.

    1983-02-01

    A helium-jet system and the /sup 24/Mg(/sup 3/He,p4n)/sup 22/Al and /sup 28/Si(/sup 3/He,p4n)/sup 26/P reactions have been used to discover the only known odd-odd, T/sub Z/ = -2 nuclides, /sup 22/Al(t/sub 1/2/ approx. 70ms) and /sup 26/P(t/sub 1/2/ approx. 20 ms). Observations of beta-delayed protons from each isotope (laboratory energies 7.839 +- 0.015 MeV and 8.149 +- 0.021 MeV for /sup 22/Al and 7.269 +- 0.015 MeV and 6.827 +- 0.050 MeV for /sup 26/P) established the existence of these nuclides and provided a measurement of the mass excesses of the lowest T = 2 states in their beta decay daughters, /sup 22/Mg and /sup 26/Si (13.650 +- 0.015 MeV and 5.936 +- 0.015 MeV, respectively). Measurement of these masses confirmed that these T = 2 states were unbound to two-proton emission as had been predicted theoretically.

  10. Proton branching ratios in the {beta}-delayed proton decay of {sup 87}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W.X.; Ma, R.C.; Xu, X.J.; Xu, S.W.; Xie, Y.X.; Li, Z.K.; Ge, Y.X.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wang, C.F.; Zhang, T.M.; Sun, X.F.; Jin, G.M.; Luo, Y.X.

    1997-08-01

    The nuclide {sup 87}Mo with A=4n+3 and T{sub z}=3/2 was reinvestigated via its {beta}-delayed proton decay with p-{gamma} coincidence. The proton branching ratios in the decay of {sup 87}Mo populating the first 2{sup +}, 4{sup +}, and 6{sup +} excited states in {sup 86}Zr have been measured to be (11{plus_minus}6){percent}, (2{plus_minus}1){percent}, and (2{plus_minus}1){percent}, respectively, which revise the previous results. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Monitoring of Hadrontherapy Treatments by Means of Charged Particle Detection.

    PubMed

    Muraro, Silvia; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Fiore, Salvatore; Frallicciardi, Paola; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Morganti, Silvio; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Traini, Giacomo; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the incoming beam radiation with the patient body in hadrontherapy treatments produces secondary charged and neutral particles, whose detection can be used for monitoring purposes and to perform an on-line check of beam particle range. In the context of ion-therapy with active scanning, charged particles are potentially attractive since they can be easily tracked with a high efficiency, in presence of a relatively low background contamination. In order to verify the possibility of exploiting this approach for in-beam monitoring in ion-therapy, and to guide the design of specific detectors, both simulations and experimental tests are being performed with ion beams impinging on simple homogeneous tissue-like targets (PMMA). From these studies, a resolution of the order of few millimeters on the single track has been proven to be sufficient to exploit charged particle tracking for monitoring purposes, preserving the precision achievable on longitudinal shape. The results obtained so far show that the measurement of charged particles can be successfully implemented in a technology capable of monitoring both the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target and finally lead to the design of a novel profile detector. Crucial aspects to be considered are the detector positioning, to be optimized in order to maximize the available statistics, and the capability of accounting for the multiple scattering interactions undergone by the charged fragments along their exit path from the patient body. The experimental results collected up to now are also valuable for the validation of Monte Carlo simulation software tools and their implementation in Treatment Planning Software packages.

  12. Monitoring of Hadrontherapy Treatments by Means of Charged Particle Detection

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Silvia; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Fiore, Salvatore; Frallicciardi, Paola; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Morganti, Silvio; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Traini, Giacomo; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the incoming beam radiation with the patient body in hadrontherapy treatments produces secondary charged and neutral particles, whose detection can be used for monitoring purposes and to perform an on-line check of beam particle range. In the context of ion-therapy with active scanning, charged particles are potentially attractive since they can be easily tracked with a high efficiency, in presence of a relatively low background contamination. In order to verify the possibility of exploiting this approach for in-beam monitoring in ion-therapy, and to guide the design of specific detectors, both simulations and experimental tests are being performed with ion beams impinging on simple homogeneous tissue-like targets (PMMA). From these studies, a resolution of the order of few millimeters on the single track has been proven to be sufficient to exploit charged particle tracking for monitoring purposes, preserving the precision achievable on longitudinal shape. The results obtained so far show that the measurement of charged particles can be successfully implemented in a technology capable of monitoring both the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target and finally lead to the design of a novel profile detector. Crucial aspects to be considered are the detector positioning, to be optimized in order to maximize the available statistics, and the capability of accounting for the multiple scattering interactions undergone by the charged fragments along their exit path from the patient body. The experimental results collected up to now are also valuable for the validation of Monte Carlo simulation software tools and their implementation in Treatment Planning Software packages. PMID:27536555

  13. First Results from the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semones, Edward; Zeitland, Cary

    2016-01-01

    The Charged Particle Detector (CPD) subsystem of the ISS-RAD detector has been making measurements of high-energy charged and neutral particles since the unit was deployed on Feb. 1, 2016. The CPD is nearly identical to the MSL-RAD instrument, but onboard data processing has been significantly modified to meet ISS requirements. We will present dose rates and LET spectra obtained over the first six months of operations, as well as preliminary results obtained from the limited sample of pulse-height analyzed raw data that has been telemetered to Earth.

  14. Electromagnetic potential vectors and the Lagrangian of a charged particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    Maxwell's equations can be shown to imply the existence of two independent three-dimensional potential vectors. A comparison between the potential vectors and the electric and magnetic field vectors, using a spatial Fourier transformation, reveals six independent potential components but only four independent electromagnetic field components for each mode. Although the electromagnetic fields determined by Maxwell's equations give a complete description of all possible classical electromagnetic phenomena, potential vectors contains more information and allow for a description of such quantum mechanical phenomena as the Aharonov-Bohm effect. A new result is that a charged particle Lagrangian written in terms of potential vectors automatically contains a 'spontaneous symmetry breaking' potential.

  15. Charged-particle transport in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, C. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of electromagnetic fluctuations, or plasma turbulence, on the motion of the individual particles in a plasma is investigated. Two alternative methods are used to find a general equation governing the time-evolution of a distribution of charged particles subject to both an external force field and the random fields of the fluctuations. It is found that, for the high-temperature, low-density plasmas frequently encountered in the study of astrophysics, the presence of even a small amount of turbulence can have a very important effect on the behavior of the plasma. Two problems in which turbulence plays an important role are treated.

  16. Large Bulk Matter Search for Fractional Charge Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Irwin T

    2002-06-11

    We have carried out the largest search for stable particles with fractional electric charge, based on an oil drop method that incorporates a horizontal electric field and upward air flow. No evidence for such particles was found, giving a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.17 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon on the abundance of fractional charge particles in silicone oil for 0.18e {le} |Q{sub residual}| {le} 0.82e. Since this is the first use of this new method we describe the advantages and limitations of the method.

  17. Large Bulk Matter Search for Fractional Charge Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Irwin T

    2002-12-04

    We have carried out the largest search for stable particles with fractional electric charge, based on an oil drop method that incorporates a horizontal electric field and upward air flow. No evidence for such particles was found, giving a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.17 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon on the abundance of fractional charge particles in silicone oil for 0.18e {le} |Q{sub residual}| {le} 0.82e. Since this is the first use of this new method we describe the advantages and limitations of the method.

  18. On charged particle tracks in cellulose nitrate and Lexan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Henke, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were performed aimed at developing plastic nuclear track detectors into quantitative tools for recording and measuring multicharged, heavy particles. Accurate track etch rate measurements as a function of LET were performed for cellulose nitrate and Lexan plastic detectors. This was done using a variety of incident charged particle types and energies. The effect of aging of latent tracks in Lexan in different gaseous atmospheres was investigated. Range distributions of high energy N-14 particle bevatron beams in nuclear emulsion were measured. Investigation of charge resolution and Bragg peak measurements were carried out using plastic nuclear track detectors.

  19. Trajectories of charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, M. Kaan

    2012-05-01

    This article presents the theory of relativistic charged-particle motion in Earth's magnetosphere, at a level suitable for undergraduate courses. I discuss particle and guiding center motion and derive the three adiabatic invariants associated with the three periodic motions in a dipolar field. I provide 12 computational exercises that can be used as classroom assignments or for self-study. Two of the exercises, drift-shell bifurcation and Speiser orbits, are adapted from active magnetospheric research. The PYTHON code provided in the supplement can be used to replicate the trajectories and can be easily extended for different field geometries.

  20. Inclusive charged particle cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Aid, S.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bärwolff, H.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Binder, E.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Bosetti, P. C.; Boudry, V.; Bourdarios, C.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braun, U.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Chyla, J.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; Devel, M.; De Roeck, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dingus, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Drescher, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebbinghaus, R.; Eberle, M.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellis, N. N.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Fensome, I. F.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuhrmann, P.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Gennis, M.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Godfrey, L.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Greif, H.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Harjes, J.; Haydar, R.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Huot, N.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kazarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Langkau, R.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leuschner, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Lewin, D.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfiedl, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Monnier, E.; Moreau, F.; Moreels, J.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Murray, S. A.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Orenstein, S.; Ould-Saada, F.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Peters, S.; Phillips, H. T.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pilgram, W.; Pitzl, D.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Rauschnabel, K.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rudowicz, M.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitz, W.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schulz, M.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Scobel, W.; Seehausen, U.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Tichomirov, I.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Urban, L.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Vick, R.; Villet, G.; Vogel, E.; Wacker, K.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Womersley, L. A.; Wright, A. E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Cross sections are presented for the inclusive production of charged particles measured in electron-proton collisions at low Q2 with the H1 detector at HERA. The transverse momentum distribution extends up to 8 GeV/ c. Its shape is found to be harder than that observed in overlinepp collisions at comparable centre-of-mass energies √S γp ≈ √S overlinepp ≈ 200 GeV, and also harder than in γp collisions at lower energies √ Sγp ≈ 18 GeV. Results from quantum chromodynamics (QCD) calculations agree with the measured transverse momentum and pseudorapidity cross sections.

  1. Explicit K-symplectic algorithms for charged particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Zhou, Zhaoqi; Sun, Yajuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong

    2017-02-01

    We study the Lorentz force equation of charged particle dynamics by considering its K-symplectic structure. As the Hamiltonian of the system can be decomposed as four parts, we are able to construct the numerical methods that preserve the K-symplectic structure based on Hamiltonian splitting technique. The newly derived numerical methods are explicit, and are shown in numerical experiments to be stable over long-term simulation. The error convergency as well as the long term energy conservation of the numerical solutions is also analyzed by means of the Darboux transformation.

  2. Transverse-structure electrostatic charged particle beam lens

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Electrostatic particle-beam lenses using a concentric co-planar array of independently biased rings can be advantageous for some applications. Traditional electrostatic lenses often consist of axial series of biased rings, apertures, or tubes. The science of lens design has devoted much attention to finding axial arrangements that compensate for the substantial optical aberrations of the individual elements. Thus, as with multi-element lenses for light, a multi-element charged-particle lens can have optical behavior that is far superior to that of the individual elements. Transverse multiple-concentric-ring lenses achieve high performance, while also having advantages in terms of compactness and optical versatility.

  3. Transverse-structure electrostatic charged particle beam lens

    DOEpatents

    Moran, M.J.

    1998-10-13

    Electrostatic particle-beam lenses using a concentric co-planar array of independently biased rings can be advantageous for some applications. Traditional electrostatic lenses often consist of axial series of biased rings, apertures, or tubes. The science of lens design has devoted much attention to finding axial arrangements that compensate for the substantial optical aberrations of the individual elements. Thus, as with multi-element lenses for light, a multi-element charged-particle lens can have optical behavior that is far superior to that of the individual elements. Transverse multiple-concentric-ring lenses achieve high performance, while also having advantages in terms of compactness and optical versatility. 7 figs.

  4. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  5. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor’s p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles’ LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90–300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  6. The one charged particle decay modes of the tau

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1987-11-01

    Tables of measurements of the total branching fraction of tau lepton decays to modes with one charged particle are given along with the major individual branching fractions. The reason a combination of measurements and calculations is needed to display the discrepancy is described briefly. It is argued that uncertainties in measurements of the branching fractions for multiple photon decay modes prevent complete reliance on experiment. The multiple photon modes are discussed in more detail. Present research on experimental technique problems relative to the apparent discrepancy is summarized. (LEW)

  7. Laser-driven deflection arrangements and methods involving charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Plettner, Tomas [San Ramon, CA; Byer, Robert L [Stanford, CA

    2011-08-09

    Systems, methods, devices and apparatus are implemented for producing controllable charged particle beams. In one implementation, an apparatus provides a deflection force to a charged particle beam. A source produces an electromagnetic wave. A structure, that is substantially transparent to the electromagnetic wave, includes a physical structure having a repeating pattern with a period L and a tilted angle .alpha., relative to a direction of travel of the charged particle beam, the pattern affects the force of the electromagnetic wave upon the charged particle beam. A direction device introduces the electromagnetic wave to the structure to provide a phase-synchronous deflection force to the charged particle beam.

  8. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating 88Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Morelli, L.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chbihi, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Myalski, S.; Nicolini, R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-03-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the 88Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction 48Ti+40Ca at 300, 450, and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted α particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as deep inelastic collisions or quasifission/quasifusion) different from the compound nucleus formation.

  9. Measurement of light charged particles in the decay channels of medium-mass excited compound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Carboni, S.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Morelli, L.; Nannini, A.; Nicolini, R.; Poggi, G.; Vannini, G.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Dudek, J.; Fornal, B.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazurek, K.; Męczyński, W. M.; Myalski, S.; Styczeń, J.; Ziębliński, M.

    2014-03-01

    The 48Ti on 40Ca reactions have been studied at 300 and 600 MeV focusing on the fusion-evaporation (FE) and fusion-fission (FF) exit channels. Energy spectra and multiplicities of the emitted light charged particles have been compared to Monte Carlo simulations based on the statistical model. Indeed, in this mass region (A ~ 100) models predict that shape transitions can occur at high spin values and relatively scarce data exist in the literature about coincidence measurements between evaporation residues and light charged particles. Signals of shape transitions can be found in the variations of the lineshape of high energy gamma rays emitted from the de-excitation of GDR states gated on different region of angular momenta. For this purpose it is important to keep under control the FE and FF processes, to regulate the statistical model parameters and to control the onset of possible pre-equilibrium emissions from 300 to 600 MeV bombarding energy.

  10. Kinetics of charged particles in a high-voltage gas discharge in a nonuniform electrostatic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, V. A.; Krichevskii, S. V.; Markushin, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    A high-voltage gas discharge is of interest as a possible means of generating directed flows of low-temperature plasma in the off-electrode space distinguished by its original features [1-4]. We propose a model for calculating the trajectories of charges particles in a high-voltage gas discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.15 Torr existing in a nonuniform electrostatic field and the strength of this field. Based on the results of our calculations, we supplement and refine the extensive experimental data concerning the investigation of such a discharge published in [1, 2, 5-8]; good agreement between the theory and experiment has been achieved. The discharge burning is initiated and maintained through bulk electron-impact ionization and ion-electron emission. We have determined the sizes of the cathode surface regions responsible for these processes, including the sizes of the axial zone involved in the discharge generation. The main effect determining the kinetics of charged particles consists in a sharp decrease in the strength of the field under consideration outside the interelectrode space, which allows a free motion of charges with specific energies and trajectories to be generated in it. The simulation results confirm that complex electrode systems that allow directed plasma flows to be generated at a discharge current of hundreds or thousands of milliamperes and a voltage on the electrodes of 0.3-1 kV can be implemented in practice [3, 9, 10].

  11. Plasma current sustained by fusion charged particles in a field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, H. L.; Momota, H.; Tajima, T.

    1987-11-01

    The distribution of energetic charged particles generated by thermonuclear fusion reactions in a field-reversed configuration (FRC) are studied analytically and numerically. A fraction of the charged fusion products escapes directly while the others are trapped to form a directed particle flow parallel to the plasma current. It is shown that the resultant current density produced by these fusion charged particles can be comparable to background plasma current density that produces the original field-reversed configuration in a D-3He reactor. Self-consistent equilibria arising from the currents of the background plasma and proton fusion products are constructed where the Larmor radius of the fusion product is of arbitrary size. Reactor relevant parameters are examined, such as how the fusion reactivity rate varies as a result of supporting the pressure associated with the fusion products. A model for synchrotron emission from various pressure profiles is developed and it is shown quantitatively how synchrotron losses vary with different pressure profiles in a FRC.

  12. Diagnostic resonant cavity for a charged particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Barov, Nikolai

    2007-10-02

    Disclosed is a diagnostic resonant cavity for determining characteristics of a charged particle beam, such as an electron beam, produced in a charged particle accelerator. The cavity is based on resonant quadrupole-mode and higher order cavities. Enhanced shunt impedance in such cavities is obtained by the incorporation of a set of four or more electrically conductive rods extending inwardly from either one or both of the end walls of the cavity, so as to form capacitive gaps near the outer radius of the beam tube. For typical diagnostic cavity applications, a five-fold increase in shunt impedance can be obtained. In alternative embodiments the cavity may include either four or more opposing pairs of rods which extend coaxially toward one another from the opposite end walls of the cavity and are spaced from one another to form capacitative gaps; or the cavity may include a single set of individual rods that extend from one end wall to a point adjacent the opposing end wall.

  13. Charged-particle motion in multidimensional magnetic-field turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the fundamental physics of charged-particle motion in a turbulent magnetic field using a numerical simulation. The magnetic field fluctuations are taken to be static and to have a power spectrum which is Kolmogorov. The charged particles are treated as test particles. It is shown that when the field turbulence is independent of one coordinate (i.e., k lies in a plane), the motion of these particles across the magnetic field is essentially zero, as required by theory. Consequently, the only motion across the average magnetic field direction that is allowed is that due to field-line random walk. On the other hand, when a fully three-dimensional realization of the turbulence is considered, the particles readily cross the field. Transport coefficients both along and across the ambient magnetic field are computed. This scheme provides a direct computation of the Fokker-Planck coefficients based on the motions of individual particles, and allows for comparison with analytic theory.

  14. Radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, S. K. L. Broussard, L. J.; Makela, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2015-02-15

    The radial spread of charged particles emitted from a point source in a magnetic field is a potential source of systematic error for any experiment where magnetic fields guide charged particles to detectors with finite size. Assuming uniform probability as a function of the phase along the particle’s helical trajectory, an analytic solution for the radial probability distribution function follows which applies to experiments in which particles are generated throughout a volume that spans a sufficient length along the axis of a homogeneous magnetic field. This approach leads to the same result as a different derivation given by Dubbers et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 763, 112–119 (2014). But the constant phase approximation does not strictly apply to finite source volumes or fixed positions, which lead to local maxima in the radial distribution of emitted particles at the plane of the detector. A simple method is given to calculate such distributions, then the effect is demonstrated with data from a {sup 207}Bi electron-conversion source in the superconducting solenoid magnet spectrometer of the Ultracold Neutron facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Implications for neutron beta decay spectroscopy are discussed.

  15. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING CHARGED PARTICLE MOTION

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1959-08-01

    An analog system for determining the motion of charged particles in three dimensional electrical fields is described. A model electrode structure is formed and potentials are applied to the electrodes to provide an analog of the field which is to be studied. To simulate charged particles within the model, conducting spheres are placed at points from which particle motion is to be traced. To free the spheres from gravitational attraction in order that they will be electrostatically accelerated through the model, the apparatus is suspended and dropped. During the pericd that the model is dropping the spheres move through the electrcde structure with a motion corresponding to that of particles in the real system. The model is photographed in the course of falling so that the instantaneous position of the spheres within the simulated field at selected times may be observed and measured. The device thus gives data of particles in the real system. The model is photographed in the course of falling so that the instantaneous position of the spheres within the simulated field at selected times may be observed and measured. The device thus gives data which frequently can otherwise be obtained only with a digital computer.

  16. Charged-particle motion in multidimensional magnetic-field turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the fundamental physics of charged-particle motion in a turbulent magnetic field using a numerical simulation. The magnetic field fluctuations are taken to be static and to have a power spectrum which is Kolmogorov. The charged particles are treated as test particles. It is shown that when the field turbulence is independent of one coordinate (i.e., k lies in a plane), the motion of these particles across the magnetic field is essentially zero, as required by theory. Consequently, the only motion across the average magnetic field direction that is allowed is that due to field-line random walk. On the other hand, when a fully three-dimensional realization of the turbulence is considered, the particles readily cross the field. Transport coefficients both along and across the ambient magnetic field are computed. This scheme provides a direct computation of the Fokker-Planck coefficients based on the motions of individual particles, and allows for comparison with analytic theory.

  17. Can Coulomb repulsion for charged particle beams be overcome?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    Mutual repulsion of discrete charged particles or Coulomb repulsion is widely considered to be an ultimate hard limit in charged particle optics. It prevents the ability to finely focus high current beams into a small spots at large distances from the defining apertures. A classic example is the 1970s era "Star Wars" study of an electron beam directed energy weapon as an orbiting antiballistic missile device. After much analysis, it was considered physically impossible to focus a 1000-amp 1-GeV beam into a 1-cm diameter spot 1000-km from the beam generator. The main reason was that a 1-cm diameter beam would spread to 5-m diameter at 1000-km due to Coulomb repulsion. Since this could not be overcome, the idea was abandoned. But is this true? What if the rays were reversed? That is, start with a 5-m beam converging slightly with the same nonuniform angular and energy distribution as the electrons from the original problem were spreading at 1000-km distance. Could Coulomb repulsion be overcome? Looking at the terms in computational studies, some are reversible while others are not. Since the nonreversible terms should be small, it might be possible to construct an electron beam directed energy weapon.

  18. Boron concentration measurement in biological tissues by charged particle spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of boron concentration in biological tissues is a fundamental aspect of boron neutron capture therapy, because the outcome of the therapy depends on the distribution of boron at a cellular level, besides on its overall concentration. This work describes a measurement technique based on the spectroscopy of the charged particles emitted in the reaction (10)B(n,α)(7)Li induced by thermal neutrons, allowing for a quantitative determination of the boron concentration in the different components that may be simultaneously present in a tissue sample, such as healthy cells, tumor cells and necrotic cells. Thin sections of tissue containing (10)B are cut at low temperatures and irradiated under vacuum in a thermal neutron field. The charged particles arising from the sample during the irradiation are collected by a thin silicon detector, and their spectrum is used to determine boron concentration through relatively easy calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique are here described, and validation of the method using tissue standards with known boron concentrations is presented.

  19. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances.

  20. Charged particles and cluster ions produced during cooking activities.

    PubMed

    Stabile, L; Jayaratne, E R; Buonanno, G; Morawska, L

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that a significant number of the particles present in indoor air are generated by cooking activities, and measured particle concentrations and exposures have been used to estimate the related human dose. The dose evaluation can be affected by the particle charge level which is usually not considered in particle deposition models. To this purpose, in this paper we show, for the very first time, the electric charge of particles generated during cooking activities and thus extending the interest on particle charging characterization to indoor micro-environments, so far essentially focused on outdoors. Particle number, together with positive and negative cluster ion concentrations, was monitored using a condensation particle counter and two air ion counters, respectively, during different cooking events. Positively-charged particle distribution fractions during gas combustion, bacon grilling, and eggplant grilling events were measured by two Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer spectrometers, used with and without a neutralizer. Finally, a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer was used to measure the charge specific particle distributions of bacon and eggplant grilling experiments, selecting particles of 30, 50, 80 and 100 nm in mobility diameter. The total fraction of positively-charged particles was 4.0%, 7.9%, and 5.6% for gas combustion, bacon grilling, and eggplant grilling events, respectively, then lower than other typical outdoor combustion-generated particles.

  1. Radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Broussard, L. J.; Makela, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2015-02-01

    The radial spread of charged particles emitted from a point source in a magnetic field is a potential source of systematic error for any experiment where magnetic fields guide charged particles to detectors with finite size. Assuming uniform probability as a function of the phase along the particle's helical trajectory, an analytic solution for the radial probability distribution function follows which applies to experiments in which particles are generated throughout a volume that spans a sufficient length along the axis of a homogeneous magnetic field. This approach leads to the same result as a different derivation given by Dubbers et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 763, 112-119 (2014). But the constant phase approximation does not strictly apply to finite source volumes or fixed positions, which lead to local maxima in the radial distribution of emitted particles at the plane of the detector. A simple method is given to calculate such distributions, then the effect is demonstrated with data from a 207Bi electron-conversion source in the superconducting solenoid magnet spectrometer of the Ultracold Neutron facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Implications for neutron beta decay spectroscopy are discussed.

  2. Analysis of LEAM experiment response to charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, D.

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorites Experiment (LEAM) were to measure the long-term variations in cosmic dust influx rates and the extent and nature of the lunar ejecta. While analyzing these characteristics in the data, it was discovered that a majority of the events could not be associated with hypervelocity particle impacts of the type usually identified with cosmic dust, but could only be correlated with the lunar surface and local sun angle. The possibility that charged particles could be incident on the sensors led to an analysis of the electronics to determine if such signals could cause the large pulse height analysis (PHA) signals. A qualitative analysis of the PHA circuit showed that an alternative mode of operation existed if the input signal were composed of pulses with pulse durations very long compared to the durations for which it was designed. This alternative mode would give large PHA outputs even though the actual input amplitudes were small. This revelation led to the examination of the sensor and its response to charged particles to determine the type of signals that could be expected.

  3. Measurement of charged particle yields from therapeutic beams in view of the design of an innovative hadrontherapy dose monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistoni, G.; Bellini, F.; Bini, F.; Collamati, F.; Collini, F.; De Lucia, E.; Durante, M.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; La Tessa, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Miraglia, F.; Morganti, S.; Ortega, P. G.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Vanstalle, M.; Voena, C.

    2015-02-01

    Particle Therapy (PT) is an emerging technique, which makes use of charged particles to efficiently cure different kinds of solid tumors. The high precision in the hadrons dose deposition requires an accurate monitoring to prevent the risk of under-dosage of the cancer region or of over-dosage of healthy tissues. Monitoring techniques are currently being developed and are based on the detection of particles produced by the beam interaction into the target, in particular: charged particles, result of target and/or projectile fragmentation, prompt photons coming from nucleus de-excitation and back-to-back γ s, produced in the positron annihilation from β + emitters created in the beam interaction with the target. It has been showed that the hadron beam dose release peak can be spatially correlated with the emission pattern of these secondary particles. Here we report about secondary particles production (charged fragments and prompt γ s) performed at different beam and energies that have a particular relevance for PT applications: 12C beam of 80 MeV/u at LNS, 12C beam 220 MeV/u at GSI, and 12C, 4He, 16O beams with energy in the 50-300 MeV/u range at HIT. Finally, a project for a multimodal dose-monitor device exploiting the prompt photons and charged particles emission will be presented.

  4. Three charged particles in the continuum: astrophysical examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. B.; Levin, S. B.; Yakovlev, S. L.

    2004-03-01

    We suggest a new adiabatic approach for the description of three charged particles in the continuum. This approach is based on the Coulomb-Fourier transformation of a three-body Hamiltonian, which allows us to develop a scheme, alternative to the Born-Oppenheimer one. The approach appears as an expansion of the kernels of corresponding integral transformations in terms of small mass-ratio parameter. To be specific, the results are presented for the system ppe in the continuum. The wavefunction of such a system is compared with the one which is used for the estimation of the rate for triple reaction p + p + e rarr d + ngr, which takes place as a step of the pp-cycle in the centre of the Sun. The problem of microscopic screening for this particular reaction is discussed.

  5. Energetic Charged Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere: Voyager 2 Results.

    PubMed

    Vogt, R E; Chenette, D L; Cummings, A C; Garrard, T L; Stone, E C; Schardt, A W; Trainor, J H; Lal, N; McDonald, F B

    1982-01-29

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the >/= 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more variable, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14- to > 1.0- million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approximately 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  6. Charged particle motion in the vicinity of a neutral plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D.

    1972-01-01

    The motion of a charged particle in a 2-dimensional neutral sheet with linear magnetic field variation is analyzed by Hamiltonian methods. From the basic Hamiltonian formulation, results of Sonnerup are recovered and given intuitive interpretation. The transformed Hamiltonian is used to derive the correct frequency of oscillation and serves as the basis of analytical treatment of perturbed versions of the motion, e.g. with electric field added. For 2-dimensional fields with slightly differing configurations - in particular, with added small field component orthogonal to the sheet, with an X-type null or with a chain of null points - two alternative methods are developed, reducing the problem either to motion in a 2-dimensional potential or to a pair of coupled oscillators.

  7. Early experiments in charged particle beams from the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Banks, P. M.; Williamson, P. R.; Baker, K. D.; Obayashi, T.; Burch, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of studies on board the Shuttle involving the interaction of particle beams with the atmosphere and the ionosphere, and the effects of the beams on the electrical potential of the platform, are discussed. Noting that the Shuttle allows greater weight and power demands by scientific payloads than previous satellite launches, the OSS-1 Vehicle Charging and Potential experiment and the Spacelab 1 Particle Accelerator and Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams are described. Instrumentation details are provided, including charge and current probes, the Spherical Retarding Potential Analyzer, the Fast Pulse Electron Generator, and digital control and interface units. The SEPAC equipment, which comprises an electron beam accelerator, and MPD plasma jet, and diagnostic units are detailed, and operating procedures and experiment objectives are outlined.

  8. The ST environment: Expected charged particle radiation levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    The external (surface incident) charged particle radiation, predicted for the ST satellite at the three different mission altitudes, was determined in two ways: (1) by orbital flux-integration and (2) by geographical instantaneous flux-mapping. The latest standard models of the environment were used in this effort. Magnetic field definitions for three nominal circular trajectories and for the geographic mapping positions were obtained from a current field model. Spatial and temporal variations or conditions affecting the static environment models were considered and accounted for, wherever possible. Limited shielding and dose evaluations were performed for a simple geometry. Results, given in tabular and graphical form, are analyzed, explained, and discussed. Conclusions are included.

  9. Nonequatorial charged particle confinement around Kerr black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Preti, Giovanni

    2010-01-15

    We analyze the nonequatorial charged particle dynamics around a rotating black hole in the presence of an external magnetic field, the latter being given by Wald's exact analytical solution to the Maxwell's equations in the Kerr background. At variance with the corresponding Schwarzschild case, the behavior of the particle becomes here markedly charge-sign dependent, and the more so the more the Kerr parameter increases. The interplay between the rotating black hole and the magnetic field is shown to provide a mechanism both for selective charge ejection in axially collimated jetlike trajectories, and for selective charge confinement into nonequatorial bound orbits around the hole; the possibility of such a confinement allows the fate of an accreting particle to not necessarily be doomed: infall into the hole can be prevented, and the neutrality of the Kerr source could therefore be preserved, while the charge is safely parked into bound cross-equatorial orbits all around it.

  10. Early and late mammalian responses to heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    This overview summarizes murine results on acute lethality responses, inactivation of marrow CFU-S and intestinal microcolonies, testes weight loss, life span shortening, and posterior lens opacification in mice irradiated with heavy charged particles. RBE-LET relationships for these mammalian responses are compared with results from in vitro studies. The trend is that the maximum RBE for in vivo responses tends to be lower and occurs at a lower LET than for inactivation of V79 and T-1 cells in culture. Based on inactivation cross sections, the response of CFU-S in vivo conforms to expectations from earlier studies with prokaryotic systems and mammalian cells in culture. Effects of heavy ions are compared with fission spectrum neutrons, and the results are consistent with the interpretation that RBEs are lower than for fission neutrons at about the same LET, probably due to differences in track structure.

  11. Inclusive photoproduction of single charged particles at high p T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, C.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Koersgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Reid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Voigtlaender-Tetzner, A.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1989-03-01

    Single charged-particle inclusive cross sections for photon, pion and kaon beams on hydrogen at the CERN-SPS are presented as functions of p T and x F . Data cover the range 0.0< p T <5.0 GeV/c and 0.0< x F <1.0 at incident momenta from 70 to 170 GeV/c. The comparison between photon- and hadron-induced data indicates a relative excess of particles with p T >1.6 GeV/c for the photon-induced data. Using the hadron-induced data to estimate the hadronic behaviour of the photon, the difference distributions and ratios of cross sections are a measure of the contribution of the point-like photon interactions. The data are compared with QCD calculations and show broadly similar features.

  12. Charged Particle Multiplicity Analysis in MicroBooNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Aleena; MicroBooNE Experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    MicroBooNE is a short baseline neutrino experiment that utilizes 89 ton active volume liquid argon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) situated on the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab. It is the first of three liquid argon TPC detectors planned for the Fermilab Short Baseline Neutrino program and will directly probe the source of the anomalous excess of electron-like events in MiniBooNE, while also measuring low-energy neutrino cross sections and providing important R&D for future detectors. In this talk, a study of charged particle multiplicity using neutrino charged-current inclusive events is presented. This analysis can be used to test models of neutrino-argon scattering, and it may be particularly sensitive to nuclear final state interaction effects. Kansas State University.

  13. Diffusion Limit of Kinetic Equations for Multiple Species Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Lin, Tai-Chia; Liu, Chun

    2015-02-01

    In ionic solutions, there are multi-species charged particles (ions) with different properties like mass, charge etc. Macroscopic continuum models like the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) systems have been extensively used to describe the transport and distribution of ionic species in the solvent. Starting from the kinetic theory for the ion transport, we study a Vlasov-Poisson-Fokker-Planck (VPFP) system in a bounded domain with reflection boundary conditions for charge distributions and prove that the global renormalized solutions of the VPFP system converge to the global weak solutions of the PNP system, as the small parameter related to the scaled thermal velocity and mean free path tends to zero. Our results may justify the PNP system as a macroscopic model for the transport of multi-species ions in dilute solutions.

  14. Explicit symplectic methods for solving charged particle trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaoqi; He, Yang; Sun, Yajuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the Lorentz force system based on its Hamiltonian formulation. We decompose the Lorentz force system into four subsystems which can be solved with the help of coordinate transformations. Via the coordinate transformations, three kinds of explicit symplectic numerical methods have been established for simulating the motion of charged particles under the time-independent electromagnetic field. We generalize our methods to solve the system with time-dependent external electromagnetic fields, and also the system with a relativistic effect. In numerical experiments, the computing efficiency and accuracy over a long time for the newly derived methods are demonstrated. Also, the long-term simulation for the dynamics of runaway electrons is performed.

  15. Laser magneto-cumulative accelerator of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Skvortsov, V.

    2011-02-01

    High energy ion generation (energy in order of 10 Gev) have been estimated by interaction of picosecond laser pulses with an intensity of 6x1014 W/cm2 with metallic target in vacuum and gas atmosphere. In this paper we shall discuss the production of very high magnetic fields by flux compression in laser-induced plasmas and show experimental results on particle acceleration due to an explosively collapsed magnetic fields. Different nuclear track detectors have been used for heavy charged particle identification: synthetic mica, plastic nuclear detector CR-39, and glasses. Magnetic fields generated in laser-induced plasmas of order 30 -130 MGauss have been estimated by means of Faraday rotation and interferometric diagnostics with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  16. Laser magneto-cumulative accelerator of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Skvortsov, V.

    2010-09-01

    High energy ion generation (energy in order of 10 Gev) have been estimated by interaction of picosecond laser pulses with an intensity of 6x1014 W/cm2 with metallic target in vacuum and gas atmosphere. In this paper we shall discuss the production of very high magnetic fields by flux compression in laser-induced plasmas and show experimental results on particle acceleration due to an explosively collapsed magnetic fields. Different nuclear track detectors have been used for heavy charged particle identification: synthetic mica, plastic nuclear detector CR-39, and glasses. Magnetic fields generated in laser-induced plasmas of order 30 -130 MGauss have been estimated by means of Faraday rotation and interferometric diagnostics with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  17. Early and late mammalian responses to heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    This overview summarizes murine results on acute lethality responses, inactivation of marrow CFU-S and intestinal microcolonies, testes weight loss, life span shortening, and posterior lens opacification in mice irradiated with heavy charged particles. RBE-LET relationships for these mammalian responses are compared with results from in vitro studies. The trend is that the maximum RBE for in vivo responses tends to be lower and occurs at a lower LET than for inactivation of V79 and T-1 cells in culture. Based on inactivation cross sections, the response of CFU-S in vivo conforms to expectations from earlier studies with prokaryotic systems and mammalian cells in culture. Effects of heavy ions are compared with fission spectrum neutrons, and the results are consistent with the interpretation that RBEs are lower than for fission neutrons at about the same LET, probably due to differences in track structure.

  18. Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-09-02

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

  19. Iron free permanent magnet systems for charged particle beam optics

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S.M.; Halbach, K.

    1995-09-03

    The strength and astounding simplicity of certain permanent magnet materials allow a wide variety of simple, compact configurations of high field strength and quality multipole magnets. Here we analyze the important class of iron-free permanent magnet systems for charged particle beam optics. The theory of conventional segmented multipole magnets formed from uniformly magnetized block magnets placed in regular arrays about a circular magnet aperture is reviewed. Practical multipole configurations resulting are presented that are capable of high and intermediate aperture field strengths. A new class of elliptical aperture magnets is presented within a model with continuously varying magnetization angle. Segmented versions of these magnets promise practical high field dipole and quadrupole magnets with an increased range of applicability.

  20. Energetic charged particles in Saturn's magnetosphere: Voyager 2 results

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.E.; Chenette, D.L.; Cummings, A.C.; Garrard, T.L.; Stone, E.C.; Schardt, A.W.; Trainor, J.H.; Lal, N.; McDonald, F.B.

    1982-01-29

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the greater than or equal to 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more varible, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14- to > 1.0-million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approx. 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  1. Note on the field of a fast, charged particle

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, B.A.

    1984-08-01

    As the velocity of a charged particle increases, its electric flux lines become more and more concentrated about the transverse plane. This picture is sometimes construed to mean that the electric field is zero in front of a very fast particle. For many purposes, this is a valid approximation, but we must remember that it is still an approximation. No matter what the velocity of the particle, the field ahead of it never is zero. This becomes apparent if the field component along the direction of motion is integrated over the transverse plane. Here, Gauss' Theorem constrains the longitudinal field component to be finite, and the approximation that sets it equal to zero breaks down.

  2. Multiple scattering and charged-particle - hydrogen-atom collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Thomas, B. K.

    1979-01-01

    Glauber-approximation scattering amplitudes for charged-particle - hydrogen-atom elastic and inelastic collisions are derived directly in terms of the known particle-electron and particle-proton Coulomb scattering amplitudes and the known hydrogen-atom form factors. It is shown that the particle-hydrogen amplitude contains no single-scattering term. The double-scattering term is obtained as a two-dimensional integral in momentum space. It is demonstrated how the result can be used as the starting point for an alternative and relatively simple derivation, in closed form, of the Glauber particle-hydrogen scattering amplitude for transitions from the ground state to an arbitrary (nlm) state.

  3. Energetic charged particle beams for disablement of mines

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.

    1995-03-27

    LLNL has an ongoing program of weapons disablement using energetic charged particle beams; this program combines theoretical and experimental expertise in accelerators, high-energy and nuclear physics, plasma physics and hydrodynamics to simulate/measure effects of electron and proton beams on weapons. This paper reviews work by LLNL, LANL and NSWC on detonating sensitive and insensitive high explosives and land mines using high-current electron beams. Computer simulations are given. 20--160 MeV electron beams incident on wet/dry soils are being studied, along with electron beam propagation in air. Compact high current, high energy accelerators are being developed for mine clearing. Countermine missions of interest are discussed. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Measuring charged particle multiplicity with early ATLAS public data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Üstün, G.; Barut, E.; Bektaş, E.; Özcan, V. E.

    2017-07-01

    We study 100 images of early LHC collisions that were recorded by the ATLAS experiment and made public for outreach purposes, and extract the charged particle multiplicity as a function of momentum for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. As these collisions have already been pre-processed by the ATLAS Collaboration, the particle tracks are visible, but are available to the public only in the form of low-resolution bitmaps. We describe two separate image processing methods, one based on the industry-standard OpenCV library and C++, another based on self-developed algorithms in Python. We present our analysis of the transverse momentum and azimuthal angle distributions of the particles, in agreement with the literature.

  5. Charged-particle acceleration in braking plasma jets.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we describe the mechanism of the charged particle acceleration in space plasma systems. We consider the interaction of nonrelativistic particles with a sub-Alfvenic plasma jet originated from the magnetic reconnection. The sharp front with increased magnetic field amplitude forms in the jet leading edge. Propagation of the jet in the inhomogeneous background plasma results in front braking. We show that particles can interact with this front in a resonance manner. Synchronization of particle reflections from the front and the front braking provides the stable trapping of particles in the vicinity of the front. This trapping supports the effective particle acceleration along the front. The mechanism of acceleration is potentially important due to the prevalence of the magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas.

  6. Wake effect in graphene due to moving charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radović, I.; Borka, D.; Mišković, Z. L.

    2014-12-01

    We study the wake effect in a supported graphene layer induced by external charged particles moving parallel to it by using the dynamic polarization function of graphene within the random phase approximation for its π electrons described as Dirac's fermions. We explore the effects of a substrate assuming that graphene is supported by an insulating substrate, such as SiO2, and a strongly polar substrate, such as SiC, under the gating conditions. Strong effects are observed in the wake pattern in the induced density of charge carriers in supported graphene due to finite size of the graphene-substrate gap, as well as due to strong coupling effects, and plasmon damping of graphene's π electrons. We find that the excitation of surface phonons in the substrate may exert quite strong influences on the wake effect in the total electrostatic potential in the graphene plane at low particle speeds.

  7. Anisotropy-driven collective instability in intense charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2005-12-01

    The classical electrostatic Harris instability is generalized to the case of a one-component intense charged particle beam with anisotropic temperature including the important effects of finite transverse geometry and beam space charge. For a long, coasting beam, the eigenmode code bEASt have been used to determine detailed 3D stability properties over a wide range of temperature anisotropy and beam intensity. A simple theoretical model is developed which describes the essential features of the linear stage of the instability. Both the simulations and the analytical theory clearly show that moderately intense beams are linearly unstable to short-wavelength perturbations provided the ratio of the longitudinal temperature to the transverse temperature is smaller than some threshold value. The delta-f particle-in-cell code BEST has been used to study the detailed nonlinear evolution and saturation of the instability.

  8. Visual Basic VPython Interface: Charged Particle in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayaga, Chandra

    2006-12-01

    A simple Visual Basic (VB) to VPython interface is described and illustrated with the example of a charged particle in a magnetic field. This interface allows data to be passed to Python through a text file read by Python. The first component of the interface is a user-friendly data entry screen designed in VB, in which the user can input values of the charge, mass, initial position and initial velocity of the particle, and the magnetic field. Next, a command button is coded to write these values to a text file. Another command button starts the VPython program, which reads the data from the text file, numerically solves the equation of motion, and provides the 3d graphics animation. Students can use the interface to run the program several times with different data and observe changes in the motion.

  9. Energetic charged particles in Saturn's magnetosphere - Voyager 2 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R. E.; Chenette, D. L.; Cummings, A. C.; Garrard, T. L.; Stone, E. C.; Schardt, A. W.; Trainor, J. H.; Lal, N.; McDonald, F. B.

    1982-01-01

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the not less than 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more variable, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14to greater than 1.0-million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approximately 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  10. Physical qubits from charged particles: Infrared divergences in quantum information

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Juan; Martin-Martinez, Eduardo

    2009-05-15

    We consider soft-photon effects (ir structure of QED) on the construction of physical qubits. Soft photons appear when we build charged qubits from the asymptotic states of QED. This construction is necessary in order to include the effect of soft photons on entanglement measures. The nonexistence of free charged particles (due to the long range of QED interactions) leads us to question the sense of the very concept of free charged qubit. In this work, using the ''dressing'' formalism, we build physical charged qubits from dressed fields which have the correct asymptotic behavior, are gauge invariant, have propagators with a particle pole structure, and are free from infrared divergences. Finally, we discuss the impact of the soft corrections on the entanglement measures.

  11. Photonic crystal devices formed by a charged-particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Koops, Hans W. P.

    2000-01-01

    A photonic crystal device and method. The photonic crystal device comprises a substrate with at least one photonic crystal formed thereon by a charged-particle beam deposition method. Each photonic crystal comprises a plurality of spaced elements having a composition different from the substrate, and may further include one or more impurity elements substituted for spaced elements. Embodiments of the present invention may be provided as electromagnetic wave filters, polarizers, resonators, sources, mirrors, beam directors and antennas for use at wavelengths in the range from about 0.2 to 200 microns or longer. Additionally, photonic crystal devices may be provided with one or more electromagnetic waveguides adjacent to a photonic crystal for forming integrated electromagnetic circuits for use at optical, infrared, or millimeter-wave frequencies.

  12. Resistive cooling circuits for charged particle traps using crystal resonators.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbacher, T; Caspers, F; Doser, M; Kellerbauer, A; Pribyl, W

    2011-11-01

    The paper addresses a novel method to couple a signal from charged particles in a Penning trap to a high Q resonant circuit using a crystal resonator. Traditionally, the trap capacity is converted into a resonator by means of an inductance. The tuned circuit's Q factor is directly linked to the input impedance "seen" by the trapped particles at resonance frequency. This parallel resonance impedance is a measure of the efficiency of resistive cooling and thus it should be optimized. We propose here a commercially available crystal resonator since it exhibits a very high Q value and a parallel resonance impedance of several MΩ. The possibility to tune the parallel resonance frequency of the quartz results in filter behavior that allows covering a range of some tens of its 3dB bandwidth by means of tuning.

  13. Cataract production in mice by heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.; Jose, U.; Yang, V. V.; Barker, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles are evaluated in mice in relation to dose and ionization density. The relative biological effectiveness in relation to linear energy transfer for various particles is considered. Results indicated that low single doses (5 to 20 rad) of Fe 56 or Ar 40 particles are cataractogenic at 11 to 18 months after irradiation; onset and density of the opacification are dose related and cataract density (grade) at 9, 11, 13, and 16 months after irradiation shows partial linear energy transfer dependence. The severity of cataracts is reduced significantly when 417 rad of Co 60 gamma radiation is given in 24 weekly 17 rad fractions compared to giving this radiation as a single dose, but cataract severity is not reduced by fractionation of C12 doses over 24 weeks.

  14. Beta-Delayed Multiparticle Emission Studies at ISOL-type Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borge, M. J. G.; Bergmann, U. C.; Boutami, R.; Cederkäll, J.; Dendooven, P.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Huang, W. X.; Huikari, J.; Jading, Y.; Jeppesen, H.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Martel, I.; Meister, M.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Prezado, Y.; Riisager, K.; Tengblad, O.; Weissman, L.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Äystö, J.

    2004-12-01

    We report here on the recent β-decay studies made at ISOL-type Facilities to determine the multiparticle breakup mechanism of excited states in light nuclei by studying them in full kinematics. In particular the results obtained for the A = 9 isobars and the breakup of the 12.7 MeV state in 12C of unnatural parity are discussed. The breakup of the latter has been debated since more than a decade. Mirror beta transitions in the A=9 chain are compared and a large asymmetry factor is deduced for the transitions to high excitation energy in 9Be (11.8 MeV) and 9B (12.2 MeV) fed in the β-decay of 9Li and 9C respectively. It is shown that the asymmetry is not due to experimental problems or differences in the mechanisms of breakup or in the spin of the states. As no asymmetry is found in the gs to gs transition it must be due to the particular structure of these excited states. The controversy on the breakup mechanism of the 12.7 MeV state is resolved.

  15. Fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronel-Escamilla, A.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Guerrero-Ramírez, G. V.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    In many physical applications the electrons play a relevant role. For example, when a beam of electrons accelerated to relativistic velocities is used as an active medium to generate Free Electron Lasers (FEL), the electrons are bound to atoms, but move freely in a magnetic field. The relaxation time, longitudinal effects and transverse variations of the optical field are parameters that play an important role in the efficiency of this laser. The electron dynamics in a magnetic field is a means of radiation source for coupling to the electric field. The transverse motion of the electrons leads to either gain or loss energy from or to the field, depending on the position of the particle regarding the phase of the external radiation field. Due to the importance to know with great certainty the displacement of charged particles in a magnetic field, in this work we study the fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields. Newton’s second law is considered and the order of the fractional differential equation is (0;1]. Based on the Grünwald-Letnikov (GL) definition, the discretization of fractional differential equations is reported to get numerical simulations. Comparison between the numerical solutions obtained on Euler’s numerical method for the classical case and the GL definition in the fractional approach proves the good performance of the numerical scheme applied. Three application examples are shown: constant magnetic field, ramp magnetic field and harmonic magnetic field. In the first example the results obtained show bistability. Dissipative effects are observed in the system and the standard dynamic is recovered when the order of the fractional derivative is 1.

  16. Multifractal analysis of charged particle distributions using horizontal visibility graph and sandbox algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Manna, S. K.; Haldar, P. K.; Singh, G.

    2017-03-01

    Horizontal visibility graphs (HVGs) and the sandbox (SB) algorithm usually applied for multifractal characterization of complex network systems that are converted from time series measurements, are used to characterize the fluctuations in pseudorapidity densities of singly charged particles produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Besides obtaining the degree distribution associated with event-wise pseudorapidity distributions, the common set of observables, typical of any multifractality measurement, are studied in 16O-Ag/Br and 32S-Ag/Br interactions, each at an incident laboratory energy of 200 GeV/nucleon. For a better understanding, we systematically compare the experiment with a Monte Carlo model simulation based on the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Our results suggest that the HVG-SB technique is an efficient tool that can characterize multifractality in multiparticle emission data, and in some cases, it is even superior to other methods more commonly used in this regard.

  17. Analytical description of the charged particle dynamics in the field of a spherical magnetic dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, V. K.; Bogdanovich, B. Yu.; Nesterovich, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The equations of charged particle motion in the earth's magnetic field are analyzed. Analytical data allow us to estimate important parameters of the charge dynamics, such as the charge capture conditions, oscillation amplitude and frequency, and longitudinal drift, and also relate these parameters to the parameters of the charged particles and the height of their trajectory. The results may be used in designing space vehicles intended for investigation of the near-earth space, specifically, earth's magnetosphere, with charged particle beams.

  18. Energy losses of positive and negative charged particles in electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diachenko, M. M.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2017-02-01

    A heavy charged particle propagation through electron gas has been studied using combination of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and the Green’s functions method. The energy loss of a charged particle has been found in the case of large transferred momentum taking into account the interference term in the expression for the rate. The dependence of the energy loss of a charged particles in electron gas with nonzero temperature on the sign of the charge has been obtained.

  19. Use of zeolites in the capture of charged particles from plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sung Il; Lee, Seong Eui; Kim, Sun Ho; Cho, Kwan Hyun; Choi, Kyung Cheol

    2008-08-01

    The zeolites NaA and 13X were introduced to a coplanar discharge cell to investigate the behavior of charged particles from plasma. The zeolite crystals were attached to the surface without blocking their nanopores. The memory margin related to the accumulated charged particles on the surface indicated that the zeolites absorb charged particles. This phenomenon was also observed at the displacement and discharge current plots. Zeolites with a different window size cause abnormally high displacement and a saturation phenomenon of discharge currents. Note in particular that NaA seems to not only absorb charged particles but also capture gas molecules.

  20. TIME BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLES INJECTED BY 1962 HIGH ALTITUDE RUSSIAN NUCLEAR TESTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CHARGED PARTICLES, FALLOUT, GEOPHYSICS, HIGH ALTITUDE , USSR, NUCLEAR RADIATION SPECTROMETERS, RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, SCIENTIFIC SATELLITES, GEOMAGNETISM, BETA PARTICLES, RADIOACTIVE DECAY, SCINTILLATION COUNTERS.

  1. A novel silicon array designed for intraoperative charged particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Tornai, Martin P; Patt, Bradley E; Iwanczyk, Jan S; Tull, Carolyn R; MacDonald, Lawrence R; Hoffman, Edward J

    2002-11-01

    A novel Si-PIN imaging array is under investigation for a charged particle (beta, positron, or alpha) sensitive intraoperative camera to be used for (residual) tumor identification during surgery. This class of collimator-less nuclear imaging device has a higher signal response for direct interactions than its scintillator-optical detector-based counterparts. Monte Carlo simulations with 635 keV betas were performed, yielding maximum and projected ranges of 1.64 and 0.55 mm in Si. Up to 90% of these betas were completely absorbed in the first 0.30 mm. Based on these results, 300 microm thick prototype Si detector arrays were designed in a 16 x 16 crossed-grid arrangement with 0.8 mm wide orthogonal strips on 1.0 mm pitch. A NIM- and CAMAC-based high-density data acquisition and processing system was used to collect the list mode data. The system was calibrated by comparisons of measured spectra to energy deposition simulations or by direct measurement of various >100 keV conversion electron or beta emitters. Mean electronic noise per strip was <3.6 keV FWHM at room temperature. When detecting positrons, which have an accompanying 511 keV annihilation background, the flood irradiated beta/gamma ratio was approximately 40, indicating that beta images could be made without the use of background rejection techniques. The intrinsic spatial resolution corresponds to the 1 x 1 mm2 pixel size, and measurements of beta emitting point and line sources yielded FWHM resolutions of 1.5 (lateral) and 2.5 mm (diagonal), respectively, with the larger widths due to particle range blurting effects. Deconvolution of the finite source size yielded intrinsic resolutions that corresponded to the image pixel size. Transmission images of circle and line phantoms with various hole sizes and pitch were resolved with either pure beta or positron irradiation without a background correction. This novel semiconductor imaging device facilitates high charged particle and low gamma sensitivity

  2. Charged Particle Trajectories in Sweeper Magnet for LISA Commissioning Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Alyson; Garrett, Sierra; Taylor, Nathaniel; Rogers, Warren F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) located at NSCL, MSU, is used in conjunction with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Sweeper Magnet for experiments investigating the properties of exotic neutron-rich nuclei near the neutron dripline. In the LISA commissioning experiment, designed to study neutron unstable 24O excited states, decay energy calculations require careful determination of charged fragment and neutron trajectories following breakup. Tracking of charged particles through the Sweeper Chamber is accomplished using two Cathode Readout Drift Chamber (CRDC) detectors separated by 1.8 m. During analysis of individual charged fragment passages through both CRDCs we recognized a majority of events had incomplete charge collection in the center pads. Without correction, standard peak location algorithms incorrectly determined the individual event centroids thereby reducing trajectory resolution. We developed a method and algorithm for correctly determining the centroids to restore trajectory resolution, critical for neutron breakup event reconstruction and decay energy determination. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  3. O the Penetration of Fast-Charged Particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, David John

    The work presented here is intended to provide theoretical support for medical physicists who are interested in improving radiotherapy treatment plans involving charged particle beams. These plans still rely heavily on empirical behavior rather than theory as a basis for making predictions. In the most frequent therapy applications, electron beams, typically with initial energies between 5-20 MeV, penetrate materials of low atomic number. Energy loss is predominately by ionization and the effects of multiple scattering by repeated Coulomb deflections from nuclei are of primary interest. Our development is strongly influenced by these applications and so we begin our work with a review of Fermi-Eyges theory. This theory and ideas which were equivalent to it have dramatically improved electron beam treatment plans over the last several years, as is now generally recognized. This theory also has significant limitations due to the approximations or assumptions that it makes. Since we can improve and extend these results by relaxing some of the key assumptions, we continue by considering some generalizations of this basic theory and we discuss those which were given by Snyder-Scott, Lewis and Yang in some detail. Yang's theory had significant potential for applications but this theory will not work properly unless its time development is handled differently. This leads us to present a wave solution to the penetration problem in our final chapter. Sample calculations of the most important distributions are given there as well.

  4. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PULSING A CHARGED PARTICLE BEAM

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.; Kuenning, R.W.; Harmon, R.K.

    1961-05-01

    A system is offered for pulsing a continuous beam of charged particles to form beam pulses that are consistently rectangular and of precise time durations which may be varied over an extremely wide range at a widely variable range of repetition rates. The system generally comprises spaced deflection plates on opposite sides of a beam axis in between which a unidirectional bias field is established to deflect the beam for impingement on an off-axis collector. The bias field is periodically neutralized by the application of fast rise time substantially rectangular pulses to one of the deflection plates in opposition to the bias field and then after a time delay to the other deflection plate in aiding relation to the bias field and during the flat crest portion of the bias opposing pulses. The voltage distribution of the resulting deflection field then includes neutral or zero portions which are of symmetrical substantially rectangular configuration relative to time and during which the beam axially passes the collector in the form of a substantially rectangular beam pulse.

  5. Cataract production in mice by heavy charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, E.H.; Jose, J.; Yang, V.V.; Barker, M.E.

    1981-03-01

    The cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles have been evaluated in mice in relation to dose and ionization density (LET/sub infinity/). The study was undertaken due to the high potential for eye exposures to HZE particles among SPS personnel working in outer space. This has made it imperative that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in relation to LET/sub infinity/ for various particles be defined so that appropriate quality factors (Q) could be assigned for estimation of risk. Although mice and men differ in susceptibility to radiation-induced cataracts, the results from this project should assist in defining appropriate quality factors in relation to LET/sub infinity/, particle mass, charge, or velocity. Evaluation of results indicated that : (1) low single doses (5 to 20 rad) of iron (/sup 56/Fe) or argon (/sup 40/Ar) particles are cataractogenic at 11 to 18 months after irradiation; (2) onset and density of the opacification are dose related; (3) cataract density (grade) at 9, 11, 13, and 16 months after irradiation shows partial LET/sub infinity/-dependence; and (4) the severity of cataracts is reduced significantly when 417 rad of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation is given in 24 weekly 17 rad fractions compared to giving this radiation as a single dose, but cataract severity is not reduced by fractionation of /sup 12/C doses over 24 weeks.

  6. Coherent pulses in the diffusive transport of charged particles`

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kota, J.

    1994-01-01

    We present exact solutions to the diffusive transport of charged particles following impulsive injection for a simple model of scattering. A modified, two-parameter relaxation-time model is considered that simulates the low rate of scattering through perpendicular pitch-angle. Scattering is taken to be isotropic within each of the foward- and backward-pointing hemispheres, respectively, but, at the same time, a reduced rate of sccattering is assumed from one hemisphere to the other one. By applying a technique of Fourier- and Laplace-transform, the inverse transformation can be performed and exact solutions can be reached. By contrast with the first, and so far only exact solutions of Federov and Shakov, this wider class of solutions gives rise to coherent pulses to appear. The present work addresses omnidirectional densities for isotropic injection from an instantaneous and localized source. The dispersion relations are briefly discussed. We find, for this particular model, two diffusive models to exist up to a certain limiting wavenumber. The corresponding eigenvalues are real at the lowest wavenumbers. Complex eigenvalues, which are responsible for coherent pulses, appear at higher wavenumbers.

  7. Charged-Particle Acceleration and Energy Loss Measurements on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Ram, A. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Soures, J. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Roberts, S.; Sorce, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Phillips, T. W.

    2000-10-01

    Measurements have been made of charged fusion products produced in D ^3He-filled targets irradiated on OMEGA. Comparing the energy shifts of four particle types has probed two distinct physical processes: electrostatic acceleration in the low-density corona and energy loss in the high-density target. When the burn occurred during the laser pulse, particle energy shifts were dominated by acceleration effects. Using a simple mode, the time history of the target's electrostatic potential was found and shown to decay to zero soon after laser irradiation was complete. When the burn occurred after the pulse, particle energy shifts were dominated by energy losses in the target, allowing charged-particle stopping-power predictions to be tested. The results provide the first verification of the general form of stopping power theories over a wide velocity range. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of ICF under Coop. Agreem. No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  8. Chaotic phenomena of charged particles in crystal lattices.

    PubMed

    Desalvo, Agostino; Giannerini, Simone; Rosa, Rodolfo

    2006-06-01

    In this article, we have applied the methods of chaos theory to channeling phenomena of positive charged particles in crystal lattices. In particular, we studied the transition between two ordered types of motion; i.e., motion parallel to a crystal axis (axial channeling) and to a crystal plane (planar channeling), respectively. The transition between these two regimes turns out to occur through an angular range in which the particle motion is highly disordered and the region of phase space spanned by the particle is much larger than the one swept in the two ordered motions. We have evaluated the maximum Lyapunov exponent with the method put forward by Rosenstein et al. [Physica D 65, 117 (1993)] and by Kantz [Phys. Lett. A 185, 77 (1994)]. Moreover, we estimated the correlation dimension by using the Grassberger-Procaccia method. We found that at the transition the system exhibits a very complex behavior showing an exponential divergence of the trajectories corresponding to a positive Lyapunov exponent and a noninteger value of the correlation dimension. These results turn out to be linked to a physical interpretation. The Lyapunov exponents are in agreement with the model by Akhiezer et al. [Phys. Rep. 203, 289 (1991)], based on the equivalence between the ion motion along the crystal plane described as a "string of strings" and the "kicked" rotator. The nonintegral value of the correlation dimension can be explained by the nonconservation of transverse energy at the transition.

  9. Chaotic motion of charged particles in toroidal magnetic configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; Dumont, Rémi; Garbet, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    We study the motion of a charged particle in a tokamak magnetic field and discuss its chaotic nature. Contrary to most of recent studies, we do not make any assumption on any constant of the motion and solve numerically the cyclotron gyration using Hamiltonian formalism. We take advantage of a symplectic integrator allowing us to make long-time simulations. First considering an idealized magnetic configuration, we add a nongeneric perturbation corresponding to a magnetic ripple, breaking one of the invariant of the motion. Chaotic motion is then observed and opens questions about the link between chaos of magnetic field lines and chaos of particle trajectories. Second, we return to an axisymmetric configuration and tune the safety factor (magnetic configuration) in order to recover chaotic motion. In this last setting with two constants of the motion, the presence of chaos implies that no third global constant exists, we highlight this fact by looking at variations of the first order of the magnetic moment in this chaotic setting. We are facing a mixed phase space with both regular and chaotic regions and point out the difficulties in performing a global reduction such as gyrokinetics.

  10. Electromagnetic fields and potentials generated by massless charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Azzurli, Francesco; Lechner, Kurt

    2014-10-15

    We provide for the first time the exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for a massless charged particle moving on a generic trajectory at the speed of light. In particular we furnish explicit expressions for the vector potential and the electromagnetic field, which were both previously unknown, finding that they entail different physical features for bounded and unbounded trajectories. With respect to the standard Liénard–Wiechert field the electromagnetic field acquires singular δ-like contributions whose support and dimensionality depend crucially on whether the motion is (a) linear, (b) accelerated unbounded, (c) accelerated bounded. In the first two cases the particle generates a planar shock-wave-like electromagnetic field traveling along a straight line. In the second and third cases the field acquires, in addition, a δ-like contribution supported on a physical singularity-string attached to the particle. For generic accelerated motions a genuine radiation field is also present, represented by a regular principal-part type distribution diverging on the same singularity-string. - Highlights: • First exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for massless charges in arbitrary motion. • Explicit expressions of electromagnetic fields and potentials. • Derivations are rigorous and based on distribution theory. • The form of the field depends heavily on whether the motion is bounded or unbounded. • The electromagnetic field contains unexpected Dirac-delta-function contributions.

  11. Accelerators for heavy-charged-particle radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, George B

    2007-08-01

    This paper focuses on current and future designs of medical hadron accelerators for treating cancers and other diseases. Presently, five vendors and several national laboratories have produced heavy-particle medical accelerators for accelerating nuclei from hydrogen (protons) up through carbon and oxygen. Particle energies are varied to control the beam penetration depth in the patient. As of the end of 2006, four hospitals and one clinic in the United States offer proton treatments; there are five more such facilities in Japan. In most cases, these facilities use accelerators designed explicitly for cancer treatments. The accelerator types are a combination of synchrotrons, cyclotrons, and linear accelerators; some carry advanced features such as respiration gating, intensity modulation, and rapid energy changes, which contribute to better dose conformity on the tumor when using heavy charged particles. Recent interest in carbon nuclei for cancer treatment has led some vendors to offer carbon-ion and proton capability in their accelerator systems, so that either ion can be used. These features are now being incorporated for medical accelerators in new facilities.

  12. Particle Simulation Schemes for High Intensity Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Startsev, Edward; Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-10-01

    Numerical schemes for the electromagnetic particle simulations of high intensity charged particle beams have been developed. The purpose of devising these schemes is to avoid the numerical difficulties associated with the direct calculation of the time derivatives of the vector potential, partial A / partial t, in the Darwin model, for which the transverse induction current in Ampere's law is neglected. The first scheme requires the calculations of higher order velocity moments of the distribution function to obtain the time derivatives for both the scalar potential Φ and A, similar to the method used for shear-Alfven waves.[1] The second uses the canonical momentum P = p + q A/c in the equations of motion as a means to eliminate the troublesome time derivatives.[2] The use of these schemes for physics problems in heavy ion fusion systems will be reported. [1] W. W. Lee, J. L. V. Lewandowski, T. S. Hahm, and Z. Lin, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4435 (2001). [2] W. W. Lee, E. Startsev, H. Qin and R. C. Davidson, Proceedings of 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference 1906 (2001).

  13. Moving charged particles in lattice Boltzmann-based electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuron, Michael; Rempfer, Georg; Schornbaum, Florian; Bauer, Martin; Godenschwager, Christian; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2016-12-01

    The motion of ionic solutes and charged particles under the influence of an electric field and the ensuing hydrodynamic flow of the underlying solvent is ubiquitous in aqueous colloidal suspensions. The physics of such systems is described by a coupled set of differential equations, along with boundary conditions, collectively referred to as the electrokinetic equations. Capuani et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 973 (2004)] introduced a lattice-based method for solving this system of equations, which builds upon the lattice Boltzmann algorithm for the simulation of hydrodynamic flow and exploits computational locality. However, thus far, a description of how to incorporate moving boundary conditions into the Capuani scheme has been lacking. Moving boundary conditions are needed to simulate multiple arbitrarily moving colloids. In this paper, we detail how to introduce such a particle coupling scheme, based on an analogue to the moving boundary method for the pure lattice Boltzmann solver. The key ingredients in our method are mass and charge conservation for the solute species and a partial-volume smoothing of the solute fluxes to minimize discretization artifacts. We demonstrate our algorithm's effectiveness by simulating the electrophoresis of charged spheres in an external field; for a single sphere we compare to the equivalent electro-osmotic (co-moving) problem. Our method's efficiency and ease of implementation should prove beneficial to future simulations of the dynamics in a wide range of complex nanoscopic and colloidal systems that were previously inaccessible to lattice-based continuum algorithms.

  14. Charged Particle Effects on Solar Sails - An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Program is currently sponsoring a comprehensive look at the effects of the charged particle environment on the first generation of Solar Sail propulsion systems. As part of this, a joint NASA MSFC/JPL team is investigating the effects of spacecraft charging on the preliminary ISP Solar Sail mission designs. This paper will begin by reviewing the plasma environments being proposed for such missions-these range from the ambient solar wind at approximately 1 AU in the ecliptic plane, approximately 0.5 AU solar-polar orbit, and geosynchronous orbit. Following a discussion of the critical design issues associated with Solar Sails from a charging standpoint, a simple Sail configuration for modeling purposes will be presented. Results for the various environments will be illustrated in terms of the estimated surface potentials for the Solar Sail using the NASCAP-2K charging analysis program. Based on these potentials, representative plasma flow fields and potential contours surrounding the Solar Sail will then be presented. The implications of these results--the surface potentials and plasma flow--will be discussed in the context of their effects on Solar Sail operations and structural configurations.

  15. Hamilton-Dirac systems for charged particles in gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we use the Sternberg phase space (which may be considered as the classical phase space of particles in gauge fields) in order to explore the dynamics of such particles in the context of Hamilton-Dirac systems and their associated Hamilton-Pontryagin variational principles. For this, we develop an analogue of the Pontryagin bundle in the case of the Sternberg phase space. Moreover, we show the link of this new bundle to the so-called magnetized Tulczyjew triple, which is an analogue of the link between the Pontryagin bundle and the usual Tulczyjew triple. Taking advantage of the symplectic nature of the Sternberg space, we induce a Dirac structure on the Sternberg-Pontryagin bundle which leads to the Hamilton-Dirac structure that we are looking for. We also analyze the intrinsic and variational nature of the equations of motion of particles in gauge fields in regards of the defined new geometry. Lastly, we illustrate our theory through the case of a U(1) gauge group, leading to the paradigmatic example of an electrically charged particle in an electromagnetic field.

  16. Negatively-charged particle pickup in the Enceladus plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. H.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Kriegel, H.; Meier, P.

    2013-09-01

    One of the key discoveries of the Cassini spacecraft's traverses of the Enceladus plume was that of negatively-charged nanograins and ions, as detected by CAPS- ELS. The trajectories of these charged particles are expected to be affected by the motional electric field in the vicinity of the moon, especially those of the low mass ions. During some Enceladus encounters, the particles have been observed arriving at the spacecraft in the local ram direction, i.e. close to being at rest with respect to Enceladus, presumably shortly after their formation and before the acceleration associated with the pickup process. During other encounters however, the ions have been observed to arrive at the spacecraft well away from the ram direction, in the gyroplane at ~90 degrees to the local magnetic field direction, indicating their pickup by the local plasma flow. We present an overview of observations of these negative pickup nanograins in the Enceladus plume, and our interpretation of these observations, and attempts to trace the origins of the grains using a hybrid simulation of the plume.

  17. Moving charged particles in lattice Boltzmann-based electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Kuron, Michael; Rempfer, Georg; Schornbaum, Florian; Bauer, Martin; Godenschwager, Christian; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2016-12-07

    The motion of ionic solutes and charged particles under the influence of an electric field and the ensuing hydrodynamic flow of the underlying solvent is ubiquitous in aqueous colloidal suspensions. The physics of such systems is described by a coupled set of differential equations, along with boundary conditions, collectively referred to as the electrokinetic equations. Capuani et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 973 (2004)] introduced a lattice-based method for solving this system of equations, which builds upon the lattice Boltzmann algorithm for the simulation of hydrodynamic flow and exploits computational locality. However, thus far, a description of how to incorporate moving boundary conditions into the Capuani scheme has been lacking. Moving boundary conditions are needed to simulate multiple arbitrarily moving colloids. In this paper, we detail how to introduce such a particle coupling scheme, based on an analogue to the moving boundary method for the pure lattice Boltzmann solver. The key ingredients in our method are mass and charge conservation for the solute species and a partial-volume smoothing of the solute fluxes to minimize discretization artifacts. We demonstrate our algorithm's effectiveness by simulating the electrophoresis of charged spheres in an external field; for a single sphere we compare to the equivalent electro-osmotic (co-moving) problem. Our method's efficiency and ease of implementation should prove beneficial to future simulations of the dynamics in a wide range of complex nanoscopic and colloidal systems that were previously inaccessible to lattice-based continuum algorithms.

  18. Clustering of settling charged particles in turbulence: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiang; Nordsiek, Hansen; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric clouds, electrosprays and protoplanetary nebula (dusty plasma) contain electrically charged particles embedded in turbulent flows, often under the influence of an externally imposed, approximately uniform gravitational or electric force. We have developed a theoretical description of the dynamics of such systems of charged, sedimenting particles in turbulence, allowing radial distribution functions (RDFs) to be predicted for both monodisperse and bidisperse particle size distributions. The governing parameters are the particle Stokes number (particle inertial time scale relative to turbulence dissipation time scale), the Coulomb-turbulence parameter (ratio of Coulomb 'terminal' speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale) and the settling parameter (the ratio of the gravitational terminal speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale). The theory is compared to measured RDFs for water particles in homogeneous, isotropic air turbulence. The RDFs are obtained from particle positions measured in three dimensions using digital holography. The measurements verify the general theoretical expression, consisting of a power law increase in particle clustering due to particle response to dissipative turbulent eddies, modulated by an exponential electrostatic interaction term. Both terms are modified as a result of the gravitational diffusion-like term, and the role of 'gravity' is explored by imposing a macroscopic uniform electric field to create an enhanced, effective gravity.

  19. Coherent Light induced in Optical Fiber by a Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, Xavier; Ray, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Coherent light production in an optical fiber by a charged particle (named PIGL, for particle-induced guided, light) is reviewed. From the microscopic point of view, light is emitted by transient electric dipoles induced in the fiber medium by the Coulomb field of the particle. The phenomenon can also considered as the capture of virtual photons of the particle field by the fiber. Two types of captures are distinguished. Type-I takes place in a uniform part of the fiber; then the photon keeps its longitudinal momentum pz . Type-II takes place near an end or in a non-uniform part of the fiber; then pz is not conserved. Type-I PIGL is not affected by background lights external to the fiber. At grazing incidence it becomes nearly monochromatic. Its circular polarization depends on the angular momentum of the particle about the fiber and on the relative velocity between the particle and the guided wave. A general formula for the yield of Type-II radiation, based on the reciprocity theorem, is proposed. This radiation can be assisted by metallic objects stuck to the fiber, via plasmon excitation. A periodic structure leads to a guided Smith-Purcell radiation. Applications of PIGL in beam diagnostics are considered.

  20. Stochastization of charged particle motion near magnetotail current layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I. I.; Geviksman, Kh. V.; Kropotkin, A. P.; Sitnov, M. I.

    Charged particle dynamics near the magnetotail current layer in the parabolic magnetic field model, B = B(sub 0)(Z/L)e(sub x) + B(sub n)e(sub z), are considered (L is the typical acceleration scale of the B(sub 0) field component, parallel to the layer) in the area of kappa = (B(sub n)/B(sub 0))(L/rho(sub 0))exp 1/2 much less than 1 (rho(sub 0) - larmor particle radius in the B(sub 0) field). In this area, it is shown that stochastization of motion can be at least of two types, corresponding to the local and global (in the layer plane) adiabaticity violation. The model proposed to describe the second type stochasticity agrees with results of numeric simulation and in particular describes in the right way the dependence of stochasticity area size on the kappa parameter as well as the presence of resonance necklace at the boundary of this area. Evaluation of the diffusion coefficient near the boundary of the stochasticity area is conducted.

  1. Charged Particle Effects on Solar Sails - An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Program is currently sponsoring a comprehensive look at the effects of the charged particle environment on the first generation of Solar Sail propulsion systems. As part of this, a joint NASA MSFC/JPL team is investigating the effects of spacecraft charging on the preliminary ISP Solar Sail mission designs. This paper will begin by reviewing the plasma environments being proposed for such missions-these range from the ambient solar wind at approximately 1 AU in the ecliptic plane, approximately 0.5 AU solar-polar orbit, and geosynchronous orbit. Following a discussion of the critical design issues associated with Solar Sails from a charging standpoint, a simple Sail configuration for modeling purposes will be presented. Results for the various environments will be illustrated in terms of the estimated surface potentials for the Solar Sail using the NASCAP-2K charging analysis program. Based on these potentials, representative plasma flow fields and potential contours surrounding the Solar Sail will then be presented. The implications of these results--the surface potentials and plasma flow--will be discussed in the context of their effects on Solar Sail operations and structural configurations.

  2. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  3. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  4. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  5. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  6. Channeling and electromagnetic radiation of relativistic charged particles in metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevago, N. K.; Glebov, V. I.

    2017-06-01

    We have developed the theory of electromagnetic interaction of relativistic charged particles with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The electrostatic potential and electron number density distribution in MOFs were calculated using the most accurate data for the atomic form factors. Peculiarities of axial channeling of fast charged particles and various types of electromagnetic radiation from relativistic particles has been discussed.

  7. Method and system for treating an interior surface of a workpiece using a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, David Richard

    2007-05-23

    A method and system of treating an interior surface on an internal cavity of a workpiece using a charged particle beam. A beam deflector surface of a beam deflector is placed within the internal cavity of the workpiece and is used to redirect the charged particle beam toward the interior surface to treat the interior surface.

  8. BDO-RFQ Program Complex of Modelling and Optimization of Charged Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsyannikov, D. A.; Ovsyannikov, A. D.; Antropov, I. V.; Kozynchenko, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The article is dedicated to BDO Code program complex used for modelling and optimization of charged particle dynamics with consideration of interaction in RFQ accelerating structures. The structure of the program complex and its functionality are described; mathematical models of charged particle dynamics, interaction models and methods of optimization are given.

  9. A dedicated ion trap at CARIBU for beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Barbara; Scielzo, N. D.; Norman, E. B.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Aprahamian, A.; Burkey, M.; Caldwell, S.; Czeszumska, A.; Marley, S. T.; Morgan, G. E.; Nystrom, A.; Orford, R.; Padgett, S. W.; Perez Galvan, A.; Sharma, K. S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S.

    2015-10-01

    Trapped radioactive ions suspended in vacuum allow for a new way to perform beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy. Decay branching ratios and energy spectra of the emitted neutrons are inferred from a measurement of the nuclear recoil, thereby circumventing the many limitations associated with direct neutron detection. Plans for the development of a dedicated ion trap for experiments using the intense fission fragment beams from the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory are summarized. The trap design has been guided by experience gained from recent ion-trap experiments measuring 137 - 138 , 140I, 134-136Sb, and 144-145Cs. The improved nuclear data that can be collected are needed in many fields of basic and applied science such as nuclear energy, nuclear astrophysics, and stockpile stewardship. Supported by NSF under Grant Number PHY-1419765 and by U.S. DOE under the Nuclear Energy University Program Project Number 13-5485, Contract Numbers DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL) and DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), and Award Number DE-NA0000979 (NNSA).

  10. Experimental study of {beta}-delayed proton decay of {sup 23}Al for nucleosynthesis in novae

    SciTech Connect

    Saastamoinen, A.; Aeystoe, J.; Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tribble, R. E.; Bentley, M. A.; Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J.

    2011-04-15

    The {beta}-delayed {gamma} and proton decay of {sup 23}Al has been studied with an alternative detector setup at the focal plane of the momentum achromat recoil separator MARS at Texas A and M University. We could detect protons down to an energy of 200 keV and determine the corresponding branching ratios. Contrary to results of previous {beta}-decay studies, no strong proton intensity from the decay of the isobaric analog state (IAS) of the {sup 23}Al ground state at E{sub x}=7803 keV in {sup 23}Mg was observed. Instead we assign the observed low-energy group E{sub p,c.m.}=206 keV to the decay from a state that is 16 keV below the IAS. We measured both proton and gamma branches from the decay of this state at E{sub x}=7787 keV in {sup 23}Mg, which is a very rare case in the literature. Combining our data with its measured lifetime, we determine its resonance strength to be {omega}{gamma}=1.4{sub -0.4}{sup +0.5} meV. The value is in agreement with older direct measurements, but disagrees with a recent direct measurement. This state is the most important resonance for the radiative proton capture {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg in some astrophysical environments, such as novae.

  11. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  12. The "Puck" Energetic Charged Particle Detector: Design, Heritage, and Advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of approximately 10 kiloelectronvolts to several megaelectronvolts. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of kiloelectronvolts to about 1 megaelectronvolt. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 kiloelectronvolt per nucleon,with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  13. Self-Assembly of Heterogeneously Charged Particles under Confinement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly—the spontaneous organization of microscopic units into well-defined mesoscopic structures—is a fundamental mechanism for a broad variety of nanotechnology applications in material science. The central role played by the anisotropy resulting from asymmetric shapes of the units and/or well-defined bonding sites on the particle surface has been widely investigated, highlighting the importance of properly designing the constituent entities in order to control the resulting mesoscopic structures. Anisotropy driven self-assembly can also result from the multipolar interactions characterizing many naturally occurring systems, such as proteins and viral capsids, as well as experimentally synthesized colloidal particles. Heterogeneously charged particles represent a class of multipolar units that are characterized by a competitive interplay between anisotropic attractive and repulsive interactions, due to the repulsion/attraction between charged-like/oppositely charged regions on the particle surface. In the present work, axially symmetric quadrupolar colloids are considered in a confined planar geometry; the role of both the overall particle charge and the patch extension as well as the effect of the substrate charge are studied in thermodynamic conditions such that the formation of extended structures is favored. A general tendency to form quasi-two-dimensional aggregates where particles align their symmetry axes within the plane is observed; among these planar self-assembled scenarios, a clear distinction between the formation of microcrystalline gels—branched networks consisting of purely crystalline domains—as opposed to disordered aggregates can be observed based on the specific features of the particle–particle interaction. Additionally, the possible competition of interparticle and particle–substrate interactions affects the size and the internal structure of the aggregates and can possibly inhibit the aggregation process. PMID:23627740

  14. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  15. The Average Quality Factors by TEPC for Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2004-01-01

    The quality factor used in radiation protection is defined as a function of LET, Q(sub ave)(LET). However, tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) measure the average quality factors as a function of lineal energy (y), Q(sub ave)(Y). A model of the TEPC response for charged particles considers energy deposition as a function of impact parameter from the ion s path to the volume, and describes the escape of energy out of sensitive volume by delta-rays and the entry of delta rays from the high-density wall into the low-density gas-volume. A common goal for operational detectors is to measure the average radiation quality to within accuracy of 25%. Using our TEPC response model and the NASA space radiation transport model we show that this accuracy is obtained by a properly calibrated TEPC. However, when the individual contributions from trapped protons and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are considered; the average quality factor obtained by TEPC is overestimated for trapped protons and underestimated for GCR by about 30%, i.e., a compensating error. Using TEPC's values for trapped protons for Q(sub ave)(y), we obtained average quality factors in the 2.07-2.32 range. However, Q(sub ave)(LET) ranges from 1.5-1.65 as spacecraft shielding depth increases. The average quality factors for trapped protons on STS-89 demonstrate that the model of the TEPC response is in good agreement with flight TEPC data for Q(sub ave)(y), and thus Q(sub ave)(LET) for trapped protons is overestimated by TEPC. Preliminary comparisons for the complete GCR spectra show that Q(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is approximately 3.2-4.1, while TEPC measures 2.9-3.4 for QQ(sub ave)(y), indicating that QQ(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is underestimated by TEPC.

  16. Theory of using magnetic deflections to combine charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckbeck, Mackenzie K.; Doyle, Barney Lee

    2014-09-01

    Several radiation effects projects in the Ion Beam Lab (IBL) have recently required two disparate charged particle beams to simultaneously strike a single sample through a single port of the target chamber. Because these beams have vastly different mass–energy products (MEP), the low-MEP beam requires a large angle of deflection toward the sample by a bending electromagnet. A second electromagnet located further upstream provides a means to compensate for the small angle deflection experienced by the high-MEP beam during its path through the bending magnet. This paper derives the equations used to select the magnetic fields required by these two magnets to achieve uniting both beams at the target sample. A simple result was obtained when the separation of the two magnets was equivalent to the distance from the bending magnet to the sample, and the equation is given by: Bs= 1/2(rc/rs) Bc, where Bs and Bc are the magnetic fields in the steering and bending magnet and rc/rs is the ratio of the radii of the bending magnet to that of the steering magnet. This result is not dependent upon the parameters of the high MEP beam, i.e. energy, mass, charge state. Therefore, once the field of the bending magnet is set for the low-MEP beam, and the field in the steering magnet is set as indicted in the equation, the trajectory path of any high-MEP beam will be directed into the sample.

  17. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  18. The "Puck" Energetic Charged Particle Detector: Design, Heritage, and Advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of approximately 10 kiloelectronvolts to several megaelectronvolts. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of kiloelectronvolts to about 1 megaelectronvolt. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 kiloelectronvolt per nucleon,with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  19. The Average Quality Factors by TEPC for Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2004-01-01

    The quality factor used in radiation protection is defined as a function of LET, Q(sub ave)(LET). However, tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) measure the average quality factors as a function of lineal energy (y), Q(sub ave)(Y). A model of the TEPC response for charged particles considers energy deposition as a function of impact parameter from the ion s path to the volume, and describes the escape of energy out of sensitive volume by delta-rays and the entry of delta rays from the high-density wall into the low-density gas-volume. A common goal for operational detectors is to measure the average radiation quality to within accuracy of 25%. Using our TEPC response model and the NASA space radiation transport model we show that this accuracy is obtained by a properly calibrated TEPC. However, when the individual contributions from trapped protons and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are considered; the average quality factor obtained by TEPC is overestimated for trapped protons and underestimated for GCR by about 30%, i.e., a compensating error. Using TEPC's values for trapped protons for Q(sub ave)(y), we obtained average quality factors in the 2.07-2.32 range. However, Q(sub ave)(LET) ranges from 1.5-1.65 as spacecraft shielding depth increases. The average quality factors for trapped protons on STS-89 demonstrate that the model of the TEPC response is in good agreement with flight TEPC data for Q(sub ave)(y), and thus Q(sub ave)(LET) for trapped protons is overestimated by TEPC. Preliminary comparisons for the complete GCR spectra show that Q(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is approximately 3.2-4.1, while TEPC measures 2.9-3.4 for QQ(sub ave)(y), indicating that QQ(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is underestimated by TEPC.

  20. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements.

    PubMed

    Clark, G; Cohen, I; Westlake, J H; Andrews, G B; Brandt, P; Gold, R E; Gkioulidou, M A; Hacala, R; Haggerty, D; Hill, M E; Ho, G C; Jaskulek, S E; Kollmann, P; Mauk, B H; McNutt, R L; Mitchell, D G; Nelson, K S; Paranicas, C; Paschalidis, N; Schlemm, C E

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  1. Enke-like method for tracing trajectories of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabin, K.; Bonner, G.

    2013-12-01

    Using analytical properties of particle dynamics is often beneficial for numerical solutions of the equations of motion. Enke's method, sometimes used in Astrodynamics and Orbital Mechanics, is a good example of such an approach. In Enke's method, instead of solving the equations of motion directly one solves for the deviation from an exact solution of a more tractable problem (the 'osculating solution'). For the motion of charged particles, the simplest osculating solution corresponds to gyration in a constant magnetic field. We apply this method to trace electrons in a geomagnetic field; this initial work focuses on equatorially mirroring particles. We find that solving for the deviations from the gyration motion substantially improves the accuracy as well as stability of the integration. Reasonable approximations to particles' trajectories are obtained with time steps as large as half of the gyroperiod. Another benefit of Enke's method is a superior conservation of energy. Although not symplectic by design, Enke's method is almost completely free of secular error for the energy, in sharp contrast to most commonly-used Runge-Kutta methods. Further improvements in accuracy can be achieved by using more sophisticated osculating solutions which account for the gradient-curvature drift of the particles. Enke's method can be straightforwardly applied as an integration scheme for test-particle simulation of radiation belt or ring current electrons and protons and it can be used with any empirical or MHD model of the magnetic field. We suggest that, with small time steps Enke's approach may be valuable in applications where high accuracy is required. We also suggest that with large time steps it may be used as an alternative to a guiding center approximation.

  2. Discrimination of charged particles in a neutral beam line by using a solid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jong-Kwan; Ko, Jewou; Liu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the past several decades, many studies have been conducted to search for non-baryonic dark matter, such as weakly interactive massive particles (WIMPs). In the search for WIMPs, charged particles incident on the detector are background particles because WIMPs are neutral. Charged particles originate from various sources, such as cosmic rays and laboratory materials surrounding the main detector. Therefore, a veto that discriminates charged particles can improve the particle-detection efficiency of the entire experiment for detecting WIMPs. Here, we investigate in the thickness range of 1 mm to 5 mm, the optimal thickness of a polystyrene scintillator as a chargedparticle veto detector. We found that 3-mm-thick polystyrene provides the best performance to veto charged particles and the charged-particle background in the search for the WIMP signal. Furthermore, we fabricated 3-mm-thick and 5-mm-thick polystyrene charged particle veto detectors that will be used in an underground laboratory in the search for WIMP dark matter. After exposing those detectors are the actual beam line, we compared the rate of charged particles measured using those detectors and the rate simulated through a Monte Carlo simulation.

  3. Charged Particle Therapy with Mini-Segmented Beams

    PubMed Central

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Eley, John G.; Rusek, Adam; Krishnan, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    One of the fundamental attributes of proton therapy and carbon ion therapy is the ability of these charged particles to spare tissue distal to the targeted tumor. This significantly reduces normal tissue toxicity and has the potential to translate to a wider therapeutic index. Although, in general, particle therapy also reduces dose to the proximal tissues, particularly in the vicinity of the target, dose to the skin and to other very superficial tissues tends to be higher than that of megavoltage x-rays. The methods presented here, namely, “interleaved carbon minibeams” and “radiosurgery with arrays of proton and light ion minibeams,” both utilize beams segmented into arrays of parallel “minibeams” of about 0.3 mm incident-beam size. These minibeam arrays spare tissues, as demonstrated by synchrotron x-ray experiments. An additional feature of particle minibeams is their gradual broadening due to multiple Coulomb scattering as they penetrate tissues. In the case of interleaved carbon minibeams, which do not broaden much, two arrays of planar carbon minibeams that remain parallel at target depth, are aimed at the target from 90° angles and made to “interleave” at the target to produce a solid radiation field within the target. As a result, the surrounding tissues are exposed only to individual carbon minibeam arrays and are therefore spared. The method was used in four-directional geometry at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to ablate a 6.5-mm target in a rabbit brain at a single exposure with 40 Gy physical absorbed dose. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and histology 6-month later showed very focal target necrosis with nearly no damage to the surrounding brain. As for minibeams of protons and light ions, for which the minibeam broadening is substantial, measurements at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX, USA; and Monte Carlo simulations showed that the broadening minibeams will merge with their neighbors at a certain

  4. A moment-preserving nonanalog method for charged particle transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, Anil K.; Franke, Brian Claude; Fichtl, Erin; Harding, Lee T.

    2004-09-01

    Extremely short collision mean free paths and near-singular elastic and inelastic differential cross sections (DCS) make analog Monte Carlo simulation an impractical tool for charged particle transport. The widely used alternative, the condensed history method, while efficient, also suffers from several limitations arising from the use of precomputed smooth distributions for sampling. There is much interest in developing computationally efficient algorithms that implement the correct transport mechanics. Here we present a nonanalog transport-based method that incorporates the correct transport mechanics and is computationally efficient for implementation in single event Monte Carlo codes. Our method systematically preserves important physics and is mathematically rigorous. It builds on higher order Fokker-Planck and Boltzmann Fokker-Planck representations of the scattering and energy-loss process, and we accordingly refer to it as a Generalized Boltzmann Fokker-Planck (GBFP) approach. We postulate the existence of nonanalog single collision scattering and energy-loss distributions (differential cross sections) and impose the constraint that the first few momentum transfer and energy loss moments be identical to corresponding analog values. This is effected through a decomposition or hybridizing scheme wherein the singular forward peaked, small energy-transfer collisions are isolated and de-singularized using different moment-preserving strategies, while the large angle, large energy-transfer collisions are described by the exact (analog) DCS or approximated to a high degree of accuracy. The inclusion of the latter component allows the higher angle and energy-loss moments to be accurately captured. This procedure yields a regularized transport model characterized by longer mean free paths and smoother scattering and energy transfer kernels than analog. In practice, acceptable accuracy is achieved with two rigorously preserved moments, but accuracy can be

  5. Means and method for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1983-07-05

    A novel apparatus and method for focussing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The quadrupole arrays may comprise electrodes which are shared by two or more quadrupoles. Such quadrupole arrays are particularly adapted to providing strong focussing forces for high current, high brightness, beams of charged particles, said beams further comprising a plurality of parallel beams, or beamlets, each such beamlet being focussed by one quadrupole of the array. Such arrays may be incorporated in various devices wherein beams of charged particles are accelerated or transported, such as linear accelerators, klystron tubes, beam transport lines, etc.

  6. Charged particle multiplicities in ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2006-01-01

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  7. Intermediate regime of charged particle scattering in the field-reversal configuration.

    PubMed

    Shustov, P I; Artemyev, A V; Yushkov, E V

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the charged particle scattering in the magnetic field configuration with stretched magnetic field lines. This scattering results from the violation of the adiabaticity of charged particle motion in the region with the strong gradient of the magnetic field. We consider the intermediate regime of charged particle dynamics, when the violation of the adiabaticity is significant enough, but particle motion is not chaotic. We demonstrate and describe the significant scattering of particles with large adiabatic invariants (magnetic moment). We discuss a possible application of obtained results for description of the peculiarities of pitch-angle diffusion of relativistic electrons in the Earth radiation belts.

  8. Intermediate regime of charged particle scattering in the field-reversal configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, P. I. Yushkov, E. V.; Artemyev, A. V.

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the charged particle scattering in the magnetic field configuration with stretched magnetic field lines. This scattering results from the violation of the adiabaticity of charged particle motion in the region with the strong gradient of the magnetic field. We consider the intermediate regime of charged particle dynamics, when the violation of the adiabaticity is significant enough, but particle motion is not chaotic. We demonstrate and describe the significant scattering of particles with large adiabatic invariants (magnetic moment). We discuss a possible application of obtained results for description of the peculiarities of pitch-angle diffusion of relativistic electrons in the Earth radiation belts.

  9. Charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions measured with the PHOBOS detector in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M. P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Vale, C.

    2011-02-15

    Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions over a wide energy range have been measured using the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The centrality dependence of both the charged particle distributions and the multiplicity at midrapidity were measured. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted with |{eta}|<5.4, which account for between 95% and 99% of the total charged-particle emission associated with collision participants, are presented for different collision centralities. Both the midrapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} and the total charged-particle multiplicity N{sub ch} are found to factorize into a product of independent functions of collision energy, {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}}), and centrality given in terms of the number of nucleons participating in the collision, N{sub part}. The total charged particle multiplicity, observed in these experiments and those at lower energies, assumes a linear dependence of (lns{sub N{sub N}}){sup 2} over the full range of collision energy of {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}})=2.7-200 GeV.

  10. Charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributionsmeasured with the PHOBOS detector in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions at ultra-relativistic energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Wuosmaa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions over a wide energy range have been measured using the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The centrality dependence of both the charged particle distributions and the multiplicity at midrapidity were measured. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted with |{eta}| < 5.4, which account for between 95% and 99% of the total charged-particle emission associated with collision participants, are presented for different collision centralities. Both the midrapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} and the total charged-particle multiplicity N{sub ch} are found to factorize into a product of independent functions of collision energy, {radical}s{sub NN}, and centrality given in terms of the number of nucleons participating in the collision, N{sub part}. The total charged particle multiplicity, observed in these experiments and those at lower energies, assumes a linear dependence of (lns{sub NN}){sup 2} over the full range of collision energy of {radical}s{sub NN} = 2.7-200 GeV.

  11. Early applications of the R-matrix SAMMY code for charged-particle induced reactions and related covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigni, Marco T.; Gauld, Ian C.; Croft, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    The SAMMY code system is mainly used in nuclear data evaluations for incident neutrons in the resolved resonance region (RRR), however, built-in capabilities also allow the code to describe the resonance structure produced by other incident particles, including charged particles. (α,n) data provide fundamental information that underpins nuclear modeling and simulation software, such as ORIGEN and SOURCES4C, used for the analysis of neutron emission and definition of source emission processes. The goal of this work is to carry out evaluations of charged-particle-induced reaction cross sections in the RRR. The SAMMY code was recently used in this regard to generate a Reich-Moore parameterization of the available 17,18O(α,n) experimental cross sections in order to estimate the uncertainty in the neutron generation rates for uranium oxide fuel types. This paper provides a brief description of the SAMMY evaluation procedure for the treatment of 17,18O(α,n) reaction cross sections. The results are used to generate neutron source rates for a plutonium oxide matrix.

  12. Production of leading charged particles and leading charged-particle jets at small transverse momenta in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-12-01

    The per-event yield of the highest transverse momentum charged particle and charged-particle jet, integrated above a given pminT threshold starting at pminT=0.8 and 1 GeV, respectively, is studied in pp collisions at s√=8 TeV. Furthermore, the particles and the jets are measured in the pseudorapidity ranges |η|<2.4 and 1.9, respectively. Our data are sensitive to the momentum scale at which parton densities saturate in the proton, to multiple partonic interactions, and to other key aspects of the transition between the soft and hard QCD regimes in hadronic collisions.

  13. Method of measuring a profile of the density of charged particles in a particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, L.G.; Jankowski, D.J.

    1975-10-01

    A profile of the relative density of charged particles in a beam is obtained by disposing a number of rods parallel to each other in a plane perpendicular to the beam and shadowing the beam. A second number of rods is disposed perpendicular to the first rods in a plane perpendicular to the beam and also shadowing the beam. Irradiation of the rods by the beam of charged particles creates radioactive isotopes in a quantity proportional to the number of charged particles incident upon the rods. Measurement of the radioactivity of each of the rods provides a measure of the quantity of radioactive material generated thereby and, together with the location of the rods, provides information sufficient to identify a profile of the density of charged particles in the beam.

  14. Calibration and Readiness of the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, R.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is an intravehicular energetic particle detector designed to measure a broad spectrum of charged particle and neutron radiation unique to the ISS radiation environment. In this presentation, a summary of calibration and readiness of the RAD Sensor Head (RSH) - also referred to as the Charged Particle Detector (CPD) - for ISS will be presented. Calibration for the RSH consists of p, He, C, O, Si, and Fe ion data collected at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). The RSH consists of four detectors used in measuring the spectroscopy of charged particles - A, B, C, and D; high-energy neutral particles and charged particles are measured in E; and the last detector - F - is an anti-coincidence detector. A, B, and C are made from Si; D is made from BGO; E and F are made from EJ260XL plastic scintillator.

  15. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  16. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-03

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  17. Global Aspects of Charged Particle Motion in Axially Symmetric Multipole Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    The motion of a single charged particle in the space outside of a compact region of steady currents is investigated. The charged particle is assumed to produce negligible electromagnetic radiation, so that its energy is conserved. The source of the magnetic field is represented as a point multipole. After a general description, attention is focused on magnetic fields with axial symmetry. Lagrangian dynamical theory is utilized to identify constants of the motion as well as the equations of motion themselves. The qualitative method of Stonner is used to examine charged particle motion in axisymmetric multipole fields of all orders. Although the equations of motion generally have no analytical solutions and must be integrated numerically to produce a specific orbit, a topological examination of dynamics is possible, and can be used, d la Stonner, to completely describe the global aspects of the motion of a single charged particle in a space with an axisymmetric multipole magnetic field.

  18. A model for electrophoretic transport of charged particles through membrane before steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Tatiana Miranda; Fragoso, Viviane Muniz da Silva; Cruz, Frederico Alan de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we are presenting a model for electrophoretic motion of a charged particle through the membrane before it reaches the steady state, based on concepts of Physics. Some results from analysis of the model are discussed.

  19. Construction of the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Masami, Mukai; Yutaka, Ando; Yasuo, Okuda; Naoto, Takahashi; Yoshihisa, Yoda; Hiroshi, Tsuji; Tadashi, Kamada

    2013-01-01

    Our hospital started the charged particle therapy since 1996. New institutions for charged particle therapy are planned in the world. Our hospital are accepting many visitors from those newly planned medical institutions and having many opportunities to provide with the training to them. Based upon our experiences, we have developed the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle therapy. We adopted the PowerPoint of Microsoft as a basic framework of our teaching files system. By using our export function of the viewer any physician can create teaching files easily and effectively. Now our teaching file system has 33 cases for clinical and physics contents. We expect that we can improve the safety and accuracy of charged particle therapy by using our teaching files system substantially.

  20. The formation of molecular hydrogen from water ice in the lunar regolith by energetic charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Wilson, J. K.

    2013-06-01

    On 9 October 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket into the permanently shadowed region (PSR) within Cabeus crater and detected water vapor and ice, as well as other volatiles, in the ejecta plume. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), a far ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), observed this plume as FUV emissions from the fluorescence of sunlight by molecular hydrogen (H2) and other constituents. Energetic charged particles, such as galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs), can dissociate the molecules in water ice to form H2. We examine how much H2can be formed by these types of particle radiation interacting with water ice sequestered in the regolith within PSRs, and we assess whether it can account for the H2 observed by LAMP. To estimate H2formation, we use the GCR and SEP radiation dose rates measured by the LRO Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER). The exposure time of the ice is calculated by considering meteoritic gardening and the penetration depth of the energetic particles. We find that GCRs and SEPs could convert at least 1-7% of the original water molecules into H2. Therefore, given the amount of water detected by LCROSS, such particle radiation‒induced dissociation of water ice could likely account for a significant percentage (10-100%) of the H2measured by LAMP.

  1. Array of micro-machined mass energy micro-filters for charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Roland E. (Inventor); Van Zandt, Thomas R. (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An energy filter for charged particles includes a stack of micro-machined wafers including plural apertures passing through the stack of wafers, focusing electrodes bounding charged particle paths through the apertures, an entrance orifice to each of the plural apertures and an exit orifice from each of the plural apertures and apparatus for biasing the focusing electrodes with an electrostatic potential corresponding to an energy pass band of the filter.

  2. System and method for trapping and measuring a charged particle in a liquid

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Mark A; Krstic, Predrag S; Guan, Weihua; Zhao, Xiongce

    2013-07-23

    A system and method for trapping a charged particle is disclosed. A time-varying periodic multipole electric potential is generated in a trapping volume. A charged particle under the influence of the multipole electric field is confined to the trapping volume. A three electrode configuration giving rise to a 3D Paul trap and a four planar electrode configuration giving rise to a 2D Paul trap are disclosed.

  3. System and method for trapping and measuring a charged particle in a liquid

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Mark A; Krstic, Predrag S; Guan, Weihua; Zhao, Xiongce

    2012-10-23

    A system and method for trapping a charged particle is disclosed. A time-varying periodic multipole electric potential is generated in a trapping volume. A charged particle under the influence of the multipole electric field is confined to the trapping volume. A three electrode configuration giving rise to a 3D Paul trap and a four planar electrode configuration giving rise to a 2D Paul trap are disclosed.

  4. On the motion of a charged particle in a plane monochromatic electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Stepan N; Makarov, Vyacheslav P; Rukhadze, Anri A

    2009-01-31

    The motion of a charged particle in the external specified field of a plane electromagnetic wave of large amplitude, when the relativistic consideration is required, is analysed in detail. The cases of different initial conditions for the motion of the charged particle and different polarisations of the wave are studied. It is shown that the expression for the kinetic energy of an electron oscillating in the transverse field of the wave, proposed in [1], is valid only in the nonrelativistic limit. (superstrong fields)

  5. Charged particle's flux measurement from PMMA irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Agodi, C; Battistoni, G; Bellini, F; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Domenico, A Di; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Vitale, E; Voena, C

    2012-09-21

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique in cancer therapy that uses beams of charged particles. To meet the improved capability of hadrontherapy in matching the dose release with the cancer position, new dose-monitoring techniques need to be developed and introduced into clinical use. The measurement of the fluxes of the secondary particles produced by the hadron beam is of fundamental importance in the design of any dose-monitoring device and is eagerly needed to tune Monte Carlo simulations. We report the measurements carried out with charged secondary particles produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, with a poly-methyl methacrylate target. Charged secondary particles, produced at 90° with respect to the beam axis, have been tracked with a drift chamber, while their energy and time of flight have been measured by means of a LYSO scintillator. Secondary protons have been identified exploiting the energy and time-of-flight information, and their emission region has been reconstructed backtracking from the drift chamber to the target. Moreover, a position scan of the target indicates that the reconstructed emission region follows the movement of the expected Bragg peak position. Exploiting the reconstruction of the emission region, an accuracy on the Bragg peak determination in the submillimeter range has been obtained. The measured differential production rate for protons produced with E(Prod)(kin) > 83 MeV and emitted at 90° with respect to the beam line is dN(P)/(dN(C)dΩ) (E(Prod)(kin) > 83 MeV, θ = 90°) = (2.69 ± 0.08(stat) ± 0.12(sys)) × 10⁻⁴ sr⁻¹.

  6. Mapping of electrical potential distributions with charged particle beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for measuring electrostatic potentials on and near dielectric surfaces charged to several kilovolts are studied. Secondary emission from those charged dielectrics is measured. Candidates for potential measurement include the induced charge, from which potential is calculated; the trajectory endpoints of either high or low energy particles traversing the region near the surface; trajectory impact on the surface; and creating ions at points of interest near the surface. Some of the methods require computer simulations and iterative calculation if potential maps are to be generated. Several approaches are described and compared. A method using a half-cylinder as a test chamber and low-energy probing beams is adapted for the measurement of seconary emission.

  7. beta. -delayed fission from /sup 256/Es/sup m/ and the level scheme of /sup 256/Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, H.L.; Gregorich, K.E.; Henderson, R.A.; Lee, D.M.; Hoffman, D.C.; Bunker, M.E.; Fowler, M.M.; Lysaght, P.; Starner, J.W.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; and others

    1989-05-01

    The 7.6-h isotope /sup 256/Es/sup m/ was produced from a 2.5-..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ target of /sup 254/Es by the (t,p) reaction. The reaction products were separated radiochemically, and the decay properties of /sup 256/Es/sup m/ were determined via ..beta..-..gamma.., ..gamma..-..gamma.., and ..beta..-fission correlation techniques. From these measurements we were able to assign 57 ..gamma.. rays to 26 levels in the daughter /sup 256/Fm. An isomeric level was observed at 1425 keV and assigned a spin and parity of 7/sup -/. This level has a t/sub 1/2/ of (70 +- 5) ns and we observed two ..beta..-delayed fissions with delay times in the proper time range to be associated with fission from this level. This gives a ..beta..-delayed fission probability of 2 x 10/sup -5/ for this level and a partial fission half-life of 0.8/sub -0.7//sup +8.8/ ms at the 95% confidence level.

  8. Synchro-curvature radiation of charged particles in the strong curved magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kelner, S. R.; Prosekin, A. Yu.; Aharonian, F. A. E-mail: Anton.Prosekin@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2015-01-01

    It is generally believed that the radiation of relativistic particles in a curved magnetic field proceeds in either the synchrotron or the curvature radiation modes. In this paper we show that in strong curved magnetic fields a significant fraction of the energy of relativistic electrons can be radiated away in the intermediate, the so-called synchro-curvature regime. Because of the persistent change of the trajectory curvature, the radiation varies with the frequency of particle gyration. While this effect can be ignored in the synchrotron and curvature regimes, the variability plays a key role in the formation of the synchro-curvature radiation. Using the Hamiltonian formalism, we find that the particle trajectory has the form of a helix wound around the drift trajectory. This allows us to calculate analytically the intensity and energy distribution of prompt radiation in the general case of magnetic bremsstrahlung in the curved magnetic field. We show that the transition to the limit of the synchrotron and curvature radiation regimes is determined by the relation between the drift velocity and the component of the particle velocity perpendicular to the drift trajectory. The detailed numerical calculations, which take into account the energy losses of particles, confirm the principal conclusions based on the simplified analytical treatment of the problem, and allow us to analyze quantitatively the transition between different radiation regimes for a broad range of initial pitch angles. These calculations demonstrate that even very small pitch angles may lead to significant deviations from the spectrum of the standard curvature radiation when it is formally assumed that a charged particle moves strictly along the magnetic line. We argue that in the case of realization of specific configurations of the electric and magnetic fields, the gamma-ray emission of the pulsar magnetospheres can be dominated by the component radiated in the synchro-curvature regime.

  9. Contributions of R.H. Ritchie to the understanding of charged particle penetration phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Oakley H.

    1995-05-01

    Contributions of R.H. Ritchie to the understanding of phenomena associated with the penetration of charged particles in condensed matter are reviewed. Ritchie was the first to predict the existence of the surface plasmon and to suggest how it might be observed experimentally, and has since made many contributions related to it. He pioneered in developing theoretical concepts and methods in numerous other areas including energy loss of charged particles, transport theory, nonlinear response of solids, the charged-particle wake, stopping power for slow ions, self-energy of slow electrons, and theoretical electron microscopy. Other trailblazing work of his, including various aspects of radiation dosimetry, and instrument theory and design, are discussed briefly.

  10. An APL program for the distribution of energy deposition by charged particles passing through thin absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    An APL program which numerically evaluates the probability density function (PDF) for the energy deposited in a thin absorber by a charged particle is proposed, with application to the construction, pointing, and control of spacecraft. With this program, the PDF of the restricted energy loss distribution of Watts (1973) is derived, and Vavilov's (1957) distribution is obtained by proper parameter selection. The method is demonstrated with the example of the effect of charged particle induced radiation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) pointing accuracy. A Monte Carlo study simulates the photon noise caused by charged particles passing through the photomultiplier tube window, and the stochastic variation of energy loss is introduced into the simulation by generating random energy losses from a power law distribution. The program eliminates annoying loop procedures, and model parameter sensitivity can be studied using the graphical output.

  11. Integral charged particle nuclear data bibliography: Literature scanned from April 11, 1987 through November 10, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Ramavataram, S.

    1988-12-01

    This publication is the annual supplement to the first edition published in 1984. The primary goal of this publication has been to satisfy the need expressed by the Nuclear Reaction Data Center Network for a concise and comprehensive bibliography of integral charged-particle cross section data. The reader is referred to a partial list of other bibliographies relevant to charged-particle-induced reaction data and to ''A Source List of Nuclear Data Bibliographies, Compilations, and Evaluations'' for a more comprehensive list. Since this publication is not cumulative, earlier versions are also shown in this paper. This publication makes use of a modification to the database of the Nuclear Structure References (NSR) file. This modification allows the retrieval of integral charged particle nuclear data entries from the NSR file. In recent years, the presentation of various sections was changed, as a result of users' suggestions. The authors continue to welcome users' comments. 190 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Charged-particle distributions in pp interactions at [Formula: see text] measured with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramaniam, R; Suchek, S; Sugaya, Y; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Svatos, M; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Taccini, C; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tannenwald, B B; Tapia Araya, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, A C; Taylor, G N; Taylor, P T E; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Temple, D; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todome, K; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, B; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Trofymov, A; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; Truong, L; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsui, K M; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turgeman, D; Turra, R; Turvey, A J; Tuts, P M; Tyndel, M; Ucchielli, G; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valdes Santurio, E; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasquez, J G; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloce, L M; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigani, L; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vittori, C; Vivarelli, I; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wallangen, V; Wang, C; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Washbrook, A; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Whallon, N L; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilk, F; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winston, O J; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamaguchi, D; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W-M; Yap, Y C; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yuen, S P Y; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zakharchuk, N; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zeng, J C; Zeng, Q; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, G; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of distributions of charged particles which are produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of [Formula: see text] and recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. A special dataset recorded in 2012 with a small number of interactions per beam crossing (below 0.004) and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 160 [Formula: see text] was used. A minimum-bias trigger was utilised to select a data sample of more than 9 million collision events. The multiplicity, pseudorapidity, and transverse momentum distributions of charged particles are shown in different regions of kinematics and charged-particle multiplicity, including measurements of final states at high multiplicity. The results are corrected for detector effects and are compared to the predictions of various Monte Carlo event generator models which simulate the full hadronic final state.

  13. Charged-Particle Pseudorapidity Density Distributions from Au+Au Collisions at

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.

    2001-09-03

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} has been measured for Au+Au collisions at s{sub NN}=130 GeV at RHIC, using the PHOBOS apparatus. The total number of charged particles produced for the 3% most-central Au+Au collisions for |{eta}|{<=}5.4 is found to be 4200{+-}470 . The evolution of dN{sub ch}/d{eta} with centrality is discussed, and compared to model calculations and to data from proton-induced collisions. The data show an enhancement in charged-particle production at midrapidity, while in the fragmentation regions, the results are consistent with expectations from pp and pA scattering.

  14. Light charged particles emitted in fission reactions induced by protons on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Paradela, C.; Ayyad, Y.; Casarejos, E.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-09-01

    Light charged particles emitted in proton-induced fission reactions on 208Pb have been measured at different kinetic energies: 370 A ,500 A , and 650 A MeV. The experiment was performed by the SOFIA Collaboration at the GSI facilities in Darmstadt (Germany). The inverse kinematics technique was combined with a setup especially designed to measure light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments. This measurement allowed us, for the first time, to obtain correlations between the light charged particles emitted during the fission process and the charge distributions of the fission fragments. These correlations were compared with different model calculations to assess the ground-to-saddle dynamics. The results confirm that transient and dissipative effects are required for an accurate description of the fission observables.

  15. Radiation doping methods of semiconductor materials: The nuclear doping by charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskii, Vitali V.; Zakharenkov, Leonid F.

    A review is given of the state of the art in one of the current topics in radiation doping of semiconductors, which is process of nuclear transmutation doping (NTD) by charged particles. In contrast to the neutron and photonuclear transmutation doping, which have been dealt with in monograths and reviews, NTD caused by the action of charged particles is a subject growing very rapidly in the last 10-15 years, but still lacking systematic accounts. The review consists of three sections. The first section deals with the characteristics of nuclear reactions in semiconductors caused by the action of charged particles: the main stress is on the modeling of NTD processes in semiconductors under the action of charged particles. An analysis is made of the modeling intended to give the total numbers of donor and acceptor impurities introduced by the NTD process, to optimize the compensation coefficients, and to estimate the distributions of the dopants with depth in a semiconductor crystal. In the second section the state of the art of experimental investigations of NTD under the influence of charged particles is considered. In view of the specific objects that have been investigated experimentally, the second section is divided into three subsections: silicon, III-V compounds, other semiconductors and related materials (such as high-temperature superconductors, ferroelectric films, etc.). An analysis is made of the communications reporting experimental data on the total numbers of dopants which are introduced, concentration of the electrically active fraction of the impurity, profiles of the dopant distributions, and conditions for efficient annealing of radiation defects. The third section deals with the suitability of NTD by charged particles for the fabrication of semiconductor devices.

  16. Search for fractionally charged particles in the Mont Blanc LSD scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietta, M.; Antonioli, P.; Badino, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Castellina, A.; Dadykin, V. L.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Khalchukov, F. F.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortchaguin, P. V.; Kortchaguin, V. B.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Malguin, A. S.; Marchetti, G.; Periale, L.; Ryassny, V. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Saavedra, O.; Trinchero, G. C.; Vernetto, S.; Yakushev, V. F.; Zatsepin, G. T.

    1994-02-01

    An analysis of the events recorded by the Mont Blanc Neutrino Scintillation Detector was performed in order to search for fractionally charged particles with |Q| = 1/3and |Q| = 2/3. In a live time of 2378 days, the obtained 90% C. L. upper limits on the fluxes of fractionally charged particles in the core of our detector are Φ(|Q| = 1/3) < 2. 3 10 -13cm-2s-1sr-1and Φ(|Q| = 2/3) < 2. 7 10 -13cm-2s-1sr-1, the best available limits obtained by scintillation counters technique.

  17. A second-order differential equation for a point charged particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torromé, Ricardo Gallego

    A model for the dynamics of a classical point charged particle interacting with higher order jet fields is introduced. In this model, the dynamics of the charged particle is described by an implicit ordinary second-order differential equation. Such equation is free of run-away and pre-accelerated solutions of Dirac’s type. The theory is Lorentz invariant, compatible with the first law of Newton and Larmor’s power radiation formula. Few implications of the new equation in the phenomenology of non-neutral plasmas is considered.

  18. Use of CMOS imagers to measure high fluxes of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Tucceri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of high flux charged particle beams, specifically at medical accelerators and with small fields, poses several challenges. In this work we propose a single particle counting method based on CMOS imagers optimized for visible light collection, exploiting their very high spatial segmentation (> 3 106 pixels/cm2) and almost full efficiency detection capability. An algorithm to measure the charged particle flux with a precision of ~ 1% for fluxes up to 40 MHz/cm2 has been developed, using a non-linear calibration algorithm, and several CMOS imagers with different characteristics have been compared to find their limits on flux measurement.

  19. Charged-particle inclusive distributions from hadronic Z sup 0 decays

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shaughnessy, K.

    1990-05-01

    We have measured inclusive distributions for charged particles in hadronic decays of the Z boson. The variables chosen for study were the mean charged-particle multiplicity ({l angle} n{sub ch} {r angle}), scaled momentum (x), and momenta transverse to the sphericity axes (p{perpendicular}{sub in} and p{perpendicular}{sub out}). The distributions have been corrected for detector effects and are compared with data from e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation at lower energies and with the predictions of several QCD-based models. The data are in reasonable agreement with expectations. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.-M. Rax

    2002-01-18

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation.

  1. Gel electrophoretic mobility of charged particles in a medium with curved channels.

    PubMed

    Fridrikh, S; Gotlib, Y; Belenkij, B

    1997-01-01

    A model of electrophoretic mobility of small charged particles (for example short DNA fragments) in media with curved channels is proposed. The medium is represented by a dense material embedding the curved channels accessible to the charged particles. The steady flow method is used to obtain an analytical expression of the particles' electrophoretic mobility as a function of the channel's shape. The analogy between the statistical properties of the channels and polymer chains (free-jointed and with the persistent mobility mechanism) is used.

  2. Analysis of a model for transport of charged particles in a random magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, F. B.; Ramanathan, G. V.; Klimas, A.; Sandri, G.

    1973-01-01

    A model for the transport of charged particles in a random magnetic field is a Volterra integrodifferential equation with a long-range kernel. The integrodifferential equation is solved numerically with the method of Bellman, Kalaba, and Lockett (1966). The results are shown to be in excellent agreement with analytical asymptotic results.-

  3. CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION AT HIGH RAPIDITY IN p+p COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DEBBE,R.

    2006-05-30

    This report describes the recent analysis of identified charged particle production at high rapidity performed on data collected from p+p collisions at RHIC ({radical}s = 200 GeV). The extracted invariant cross-sections compare well to NLO pQCD calculations. However, a puzzling high yield of protons at high rapidity and p{sub T} has been found.

  4. Motion of a Charged Particle in a Constant and Uniform Electromagnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladino, L. A.; Rondón, S. H.; Orduz, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of software developed by the authors that allows the visualization of the motion of a charged particle under the influence of magnetic and electric fields in 3D, at a level suitable for introductory physics courses. The software offers the possibility of studying a great number of physical situations that can…

  5. Review of Basic Physics of Laser-Accelerated Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, H.; Hur, M. S.; Jang, H.; Kim, J.

    2007-07-11

    Laser-plasma wake wave can accelerate charged particles, especially electrons with an enormously large acceleration gradient. The electrons in the plasma wake wave have complicated motions in the longitudinal and transverse directions. In this paper, basic physics of the laser-accelerated electron beam is reviewed.

  6. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Chang, H. C.; Cho, I. C.; Chen, C. H.; Liu, C. S.; Chou, W. T.

    2014-08-01

    In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair.

  7. Transition radiations in X-ray region. [considering charged particle passage through Mylar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of production of radiations in the transoptical region by the passage of high energy charged particles through the interface of two media is discussed. Based on the theoretical model, calculations are made for electrons of selected energy range passing through Mylar.

  8. Relaxation and emittance growth of a thermal charged-particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Teles, Tarcisio N.; Pakter, Renato; Levin, Yan

    2009-10-26

    We present a theory that allows us to accurately calculate the distribution functions and the emittance growth of a thermal charged-particle beam after it relaxes to equilibrium. The theory can be used to obtain the fraction of particles, which will evaporate from the beam to form a halo. The calculated emittance growth is found to be in excellent agreement with the simulations.

  9. On the Energy and Momentum of an Accelerated Charged Particle and the Sources of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksen, Erik; Gron, Oyvind

    2007-01-01

    We give a systematic development of the theory of the radiation field of an accelerated charged particle with reference to an inertial reference frame in flat spacetime. Special emphasis is given to the role of the Schott energy and momentum in the energy-momentum balance of the charge and its field. It is shown that the energy of the radiation…

  10. Dynamical derivation of momentum diffusion coefficients at collisions of relativistic charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ognivenko, V. V.

    2016-01-15

    An expression has been obtained for the diffusion tensor of particles in the momentum space on the basis of the dynamics of particles motion. The general equations have been used to determine the rms momentum spread at collisions of relativistic charged particles at times shorter than the time of randomization of particles motion and at greater times when motion is completely random.

  11. Macroscopic Description of Pressure-anisotropy-driven Collective Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Strasburg; Ronald C. Davidson

    2000-05-30

    The macroscopic warm-fluid model developed by Lund and Davidson [Phys.Plasmas 5, 3028 (1998)] is used in the smooth-focusing approximation to investigate detailed stability properties of an intense charged particle beam with pressure anisotropy, assuming small-amplitude electrostatic pertubations about a waterbag equilibrium.

  12. Polarization correction in the theory of energy losses by charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, D. N. Matveev, V. I.

    2015-05-15

    A method for finding the polarization (Barkas) correction in the theory of energy losses by charged particles in collisions with multielectron atoms is proposed. The Barkas correction is presented in a simple analytical form. We make comparisons with experimental data and show that applying the Barkas correction improves the agreement between theory and experiment.

  13. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1980-09-23

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  14. Explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions for charged particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruili; Qin, Hong; Tang, Yifa; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Xiao, Jianyuan

    2016-07-01

    Dynamics of a charged particle in the canonical coordinates is a Hamiltonian system, and the well-known symplectic algorithm has been regarded as the de facto method for numerical integration of Hamiltonian systems due to its long-term accuracy and fidelity. For long-term simulations with high efficiency, explicit symplectic algorithms are desirable. However, it is generally believed that explicit symplectic algorithms are only available for sum-separable Hamiltonians, and this restriction limits the application of explicit symplectic algorithms to charged particle dynamics. To overcome this difficulty, we combine the familiar sum-split method and a generating function method to construct second- and third-order explicit symplectic algorithms for dynamics of charged particle. The generating function method is designed to generate explicit symplectic algorithms for product-separable Hamiltonian with form of H(x,p)=p_{i}f(x) or H(x,p)=x_{i}g(p). Applied to the simulations of charged particle dynamics, the explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions demonstrate superiorities in conservation and efficiency.

  15. Trajectory of Charged Particle in Combined Electric and Magnetic Fields Using Interactive Spreadsheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambade, Popat S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to graphically illustrate to the students the physical phenomenon of motion of charged particle under the action of simultaneous electric and magnetic fields by simulating particle motion on a computer. Differential equations of motions are solved analytically and path of particle in three-dimensional space are…

  16. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1982-09-21

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  17. First Results of an ADIS Type Charged Particle Detector, Taken at the NSCL Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopate, C.; Connell, J. J.; McKibben, R. B.

    2004-12-01

    We report here the first results from a working ADIS-type charged particle detector for use in space missions. The ADIS system consists of three detectors, two of which are inclined at an angle to the telescope axis, forming the first detectors in a multi-element charged particle instrument. By comparing signals from the ADIS detectors, the angle of incidence of incoming particles can be determined. The ADIS system can thus replace hodoscopes using conventional position sensing detectors (PSD's). PSD's add significant complexity and require additional electronics, increasing instrument mass, power usage and, in many cases telemetry requirements. The ADIS system's angle determination requires only the processing of simple equations, easily within the capabilities of even the slowest on-board processors. Thus a light-weight, low-power ADIS based charged particle telescope is a good candidate for studying high energy charged particles in deep space. We have built a prototype ADIS telescope for laboratory testing. While the detector housing is made specifically for this system, this test model used off-the-shelf components. The prototype model was taken to the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. There the instrument was subjected to a primary beam of 48Ca, and fragment beams from that primary. Various detector systems are compared to show how the instrument response varies with respect to detector thickness and orientation. The preliminary results show that the ADIS instrument can distinguish element in the sub-Ca region with charge resolution of ~0.25e.

  18. Charged Particle Dynamics in the Magnetic Field of a Long Straight Current-Carrying Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, A.; Fatuzzo, M.; Toepker, T.

    2015-01-01

    By describing the motion of a charged particle in the well-known nonuniform field of a current-carrying long straight wire, a variety of teaching/learning opportunities are described. 1) Brief review of a standard problem 2) Vector analysis 3) Dimensionless variables 4) Coupled differential equations 5) Numerical solutions

  19. Motion of a Charged Particle in a Constant and Uniform Electromagnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladino, L. A.; Rondón, S. H.; Orduz, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of software developed by the authors that allows the visualization of the motion of a charged particle under the influence of magnetic and electric fields in 3D, at a level suitable for introductory physics courses. The software offers the possibility of studying a great number of physical situations that can…

  20. Charged Particle Dynamics in the Magnetic Field of a Long Straight Current-Carrying Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, A.; Fatuzzo, M.; Toepker, T.

    2015-01-01

    By describing the motion of a charged particle in the well-known nonuniform field of a current-carrying long straight wire, a variety of teaching/learning opportunities are described: 1) Brief review of a standard problem; 2) Vector analysis; 3) Dimensionless variables; 4) Coupled differential equations; 5) Numerical solutions.

  1. Explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions for charged particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruili; Qin, Hong; Tang, Yifa; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Xiao, Jianyuan

    2016-07-01

    Dynamics of a charged particle in the canonical coordinates is a Hamiltonian system, and the well-known symplectic algorithm has been regarded as the de facto method for numerical integration of Hamiltonian systems due to its long-term accuracy and fidelity. For long-term simulations with high efficiency, explicit symplectic algorithms are desirable. However, it is generally believed that explicit symplectic algorithms are only available for sum-separable Hamiltonians, and this restriction limits the application of explicit symplectic algorithms to charged particle dynamics. To overcome this difficulty, we combine the familiar sum-split method and a generating function method to construct second- and third-order explicit symplectic algorithms for dynamics of charged particle. The generating function method is designed to generate explicit symplectic algorithms for product-separable Hamiltonian with form of H (x ,p ) =pif (x ) or H (x ,p ) =xig (p ) . Applied to the simulations of charged particle dynamics, the explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions demonstrate superiorities in conservation and efficiency.

  2. Charged-particle therapy in cancer: clinical uses and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Durante, Marco; Orecchia, Roberto; Loeffler, Jay S

    2017-08-01

    Radiotherapy with high-energy charged particles has become an attractive therapeutic option for patients with several tumour types because this approach better spares healthy tissue from radiation than conventional photon therapy. The cost associated with the delivery of charged particles, however, is higher than that of even the most elaborate photon-delivery technologies. Reliable evidence of the relative cost-effectiveness of both modalities can only come from the results of randomized clinical trials. Thus, the hurdles that currently limit direct comparisons of these two approaches in clinical trials, especially those related to insurance coverage, should be removed. Herein, we review several randomized trials of charged-particle therapies that are ongoing, with results that will enable selective delivery to patients who are most likely to benefit from them. We also discuss aspects related to radiobiology, including the immune response and hypoxia, which will need to be taken into consideration in future randomized trials to fully exploit the potential of charged particles.

  3. Influence of gravitation on the self-energy of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zel'nikov, A.; Frolov, V.

    1982-02-01

    The influence of the gravitational field of a charged black hole on the self-energy of an electric and scalar charge at rest in this field is investigated. An exact expression is obtained for the energy of the charged particle, and the transition to the limit of a homogeneous gravitational field is investigated.

  4. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  5. Charged Particle Dynamics in the Magnetic Field of a Long Straight Current-Carrying Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, A.; Fatuzzo, M.; Toepker, T.

    2015-01-01

    By describing the motion of a charged particle in the well-known nonuniform field of a current-carrying long straight wire, a variety of teaching/learning opportunities are described: 1) Brief review of a standard problem; 2) Vector analysis; 3) Dimensionless variables; 4) Coupled differential equations; 5) Numerical solutions.

  6. On the Energy and Momentum of an Accelerated Charged Particle and the Sources of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksen, Erik; Gron, Oyvind

    2007-01-01

    We give a systematic development of the theory of the radiation field of an accelerated charged particle with reference to an inertial reference frame in flat spacetime. Special emphasis is given to the role of the Schott energy and momentum in the energy-momentum balance of the charge and its field. It is shown that the energy of the radiation…

  7. Magnetometer Application for GAMMA-400 Telescope Switching into the Mode with Increased Low Energy Charged Particles Intensity Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khyzhniak, E. V.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Topchiev, N. P.

    GAMMA-400 is an international project of a high apogee orbital astrophysical observatory for studying the characteristics of high-energy gamma-emission, electrons/positrons and light nuclei fluxes. The energy range for γ-rays and electrons/positrons registration in the main aperture is from ∼0.1 GeV to ∼3.0 TeV. Also, this aperture allows high energy light nuclei fluxes characteristics investigation. Moreover, special aperture configuration allows registering of gamma-quanta, electrons (positrons) and light nuclei from the lateral directions too. The spacecraft GAMMA-400 orbit will be located in the Earth's magnetosphere and will pass front shock wave from magnetosphere interaction with the solar wind, turbulent-transition region, magnetopause and so on. During the satellite's movement through various Earth's magnetosphere regions its anticoincidence detectors will register high intensity fluxes of low energy charged particles captured by the magnetic field. The working area sections of GAMMA-400 detector systems used as anticoincidence shield are about 1 m2 each. The high intensity low energy charged particles flux influence on anticoincidence detectors should be taken into account during particle identification. This article presents a comparison between Earth's magnetosphere theoretical model according to SPENVIIS package and real data measured by detectors onboard THEMIS series satellites. The differences between these two datasets indicate that the calculated data are not sufficient to make short time predictions of variations of magnetic induction in the outer magnetosphere. A special trigger marker flag will be produced by GAMMA-400 counting and triggers signals formation system accordingly to the data of two onboard magnetometers. This flag's presence leads to special algorithms execution start, putting the plastic detectors into a dedicated working mode taking into account possible high count rates of external detector layers.

  8. Charged particle pseudorapidity density near mid-rapidity in ultrarelativistic gold + gold collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Michael Anthony

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides access to the highest center-of-mass energies achieved in the field of relativistic heavy-ion physics. During the year 2000, RHIC produced Au+Au collisions at sNN = 56 and 130 GeV. In 2001, Au+Au collisions at the design energy of sNN = 200 GeV were achieved. These unprecedented energies allow for the continued search for a state of deconfined hadronic matter produced in the collisions. Part of that search will be to measure global event characteristics of the collisions. Global event characterization is an important task which provides a baseline for understanding the overall physics governing this new collision environment. One topic of global event characterization is the energy density present in the collision region, especially near mid-rapidity. The energy density is proportional to the observed particle production. The PHOBOS detector is designed to provide measurements of global event characteristics in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions including charged particle production. This thesis explores the charged particle production (dN ch/dη) in Au+Au collisions for the previously mentioned energies at RHIC averaged over |η| < 1. The PHOBOS Vertex detector was used to obtain the measurement of charged particle production through the use of tracklets. The conversion of hits in the Vertex detector to tracklets to dNch/dη will be discussed. The dependence of the measured charged particle production on energy and collision geometry will be detailed. Relations to particle production results from the AGS, the SPS and high-energy physics experiments will also be presented. Comparison to model predictions and post-dictions of the charged particle production will also be discussed.

  9. Histogramming of the Charged Particle Measurements with MSL/RAD - Comparison of Histogram Data with Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C.; Hassler, D. M.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Boettcher, S.; Koehler, J.; Martin, C.; Brinza, D.; Rafkin, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on-board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is designed to measure a broad range of energetic particle radiation. A significant part of this radiation consists of charged particles, which mainly stem from cosmic background radiation, Solar particle events, and secondaries created by the interaction of these particles with the Martian atmosphere and soil. To measure charged particles RAD is equipped with a set of detectors: a particle telescope consisting of three silicon Solid-State Detectors (SSDs), a CsI scintillator and a plastic scintillator, as well as a further plastic scintillator used as anti-coincidence. RAD uses an elaborate post-processing logic to analyze if a measured event qualifies as a charged particle, as well as to distinguish between particles stopping in any one of the detectors and particles penetrating the whole detector stack. RAD then arranges these qualifying events in an appropriate stopping or penetrating charged particle histogram, reducing the data volume necessary to maintain crucial information about the measured particle. For ground-based data analysis it is of prime importance to derive information, such as particle species or energy, from the data in the downloaded histograms. Here, we will present how the chosen binning of these histograms enables us to derive this information. Pre-flight, we used the Monte-Carlo code GEANT4 to simulate the expected particle radiation and its interactions with a full model of the RAD sensor head. By mirroring the on-board processing logic, we derived statistics of which particle species and energies populate any one bin in the set of charged particle histograms. Finally, we will compare the resulting histogram data from RAD cruise and surface observations with simulations. RAD is supported by NASA (HEOMD) under JPL subcontract #1273039 to SwRI, and by DLR in Germany under contract to Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel (CAU).

  10. The quantum charged particle self-interaction problem within the Fock many temporal and Feynman proper time paradigms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prykarpatski, A. K.; Bogolubov, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    A quantum fermionic massless charged particle self-intercating with its own self-generated bosonic electromagnetic field is reanalyzed in the framework of the Fock many-temporal and Feynman proper time approaches. The self-interaction phenomenon structure is discussed within the renormalized quantum Fock space. The quantum electromagnetic charged particle mass origin is suggested.

  11. Unique decay process: {beta}-delayed emission of a proton and a neutron by the {sup 11}Li halo nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Tursunov, E. M.

    2010-11-15

    The neutron-rich {sup 11}Li halo nucleus is unique among nuclei with known separation energies in its ability to emit a proton and a neutron in a {beta}-decay process. The branching ratio toward this rare decay mode is evaluated within a three-body model for the initial bound state and with Coulomb three-body final scattering states. The branching ratio should be comprised between two extreme cases, i.e., a lower bound 6x10{sup -12} obtained with a pure Coulomb wave and an upper bound 5x10{sup -10} obtained with a plane wave. A simple model with modified Coulomb waves provides plausible values between 0.8x10{sup -10} and 2.2x10{sup -10}, with most probable total energies of the proton and neutron between 0.15 and 0.3 MeV.

  12. Large beta-delayed one-neutron and two-neutron emission rates in the decay of 86Ga

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J. C.; Gross, Carl J.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Miernik, Krzysztof A.; Anthony J. Mendez, II; Mazzocchi, C.; Madurga, M.; Liu, Yuan; Paulauskas, Stanley V.; Miller, D.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Winger, J. A.; Wolinska-Cichocka, M; Brewer, N. T.; Borzov, Ivan N.; Jost, Carola U.

    2013-09-24

    Beta decay of Ga86 was studied by means of β-neutron-γ spectroscopy. An isotopically pure 86Ga beam was produced at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility using a resonance ionization laser ion source and high-resolution electromagnetic separation. The decay of 86Ga revealed a half-life of 43+21-15 ms and large β-delayed one-neutron and two-neutron branching ratios of P1n=60(10)% and P2n=20(10)%. The βγ decay of 86Ga populated a 527 keV transition that is interpreted as the deexcitation of the first 2+ state in the N=54 isotone Ge86 and suggests a quick onset of deformation in Ge isotopes beyond N=50.

  13. Status of the L2 and Lunar Charged Particle Environment Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Diekmann, Anne M.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The L2 Charged Particle Environment (L2-CPE) model is an engineering tool which provides free field charged particle environments for distant magnetotail, magnetosheath, and solar wind environments. L2-CPE is intended for use in assessing contributions from low energy radiation environments (4.1 keV to few MeV) to radiation dose in thin materials used in construction of spacecraft to be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 point. This paper describes the status of the current version of the L2-CPE model including structure of the model used to organize plasma environments into solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail environments, the algorithms used to estimate radiation fluence in sparsely sampled environments, the updated graphical user interface, and output options for flux and fluence environments. In addition, we describe the status and plans for updating the model to include environments relevant to lunar programs.

  14. New and improved apparatus and method for monitoring the intensities of charged-particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Varma, M.N.; Baum, J.W.

    1981-01-16

    Charged particle beam monitoring means are disposed in the path of a charged particle beam in an experimental device. The monitoring means comprise a beam monitoring component which is operable to prevent passage of a portion of beam, while concomitantly permitting passage of another portion thereof for incidence in an experimental chamber, and providing a signal (I/sub m/) indicative of the intensity of the beam portion which is not passed. Caibration means are disposed in the experimental chamber in the path of the said another beam portion and are operable to provide a signal (I/sub f/) indicative of the intensity thereof. Means are provided to determine the ratio (R) between said signals whereby, after suitable calibration, the calibration means may be removed from the experimental chamber and the intensity of the said another beam portion determined by monitoring of the monitoring means signal, per se.

  15. Charged particle in higher dimensional weakly charged rotating black hole spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Krtous, Pavel

    2011-01-15

    We study charged particle motion in weakly charged higher dimensional black holes. To describe the electromagnetic field we use a test field approximation and the higher dimensional Kerr-NUT-(A)dS metric as a background geometry. It is shown that for a special configuration of the electromagnetic field, the equations of motion of charged particles are completely integrable. The vector potential of such a field is proportional to one of the Killing vectors (called a primary Killing vector) from the 'Killing tower' of symmetry generating objects which exists in the background geometry. A free constant in the definition of the adopted electromagnetic potential is proportional to the electric charge of the higher dimensional black hole. The full set of independent conserved quantities in involution is found. We demonstrate that Hamilton-Jacobi equations are separable, as is the corresponding Klein-Gordon equation and its symmetry operators.

  16. Generation of fast charged particles in a superposition of oscillating electric fields with stochastically jumping phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, V. M.

    2017-07-01

    The motion of a nonrelativistic charged particle in an alternating electric field representing a superposition of monochromatic waves with phases described by stochastic jumplike functions of time has been studied. Statistical analysis is performed in the framework of an exactly solvable model, in which the phases are treated as independent random telegraph signals. The mean kinetic energy of the charged particle is calculated. It is shown that there is a manifold of characteristics of stochastically jumping phases (shift amplitudes and mean frequencies) for which the oscillating mean energy grows with the time. For time periods much greater than the characteristic decay time of phase correlations, the mean kinetic energy linearly increases with time (stochastic heating). The growth rate nonmonotonically depends on the parameters of phase jumps, and the maximum increment is proportional to the number of harmonics.

  17. CHARGED-PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN MAGNETIC TURBULENCE. I. A GLOBALLY ANISOTROPIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2015-12-10

    Collisionless magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence is common in large scale astrophysical environments. The determination of the transport of charged particles both parallel and perpendicular in such a system is of considerable interest. Quasi-linear analysis or direct numerical simulation can be used to find the effects of the turbulent magnetic field on the transport of charged particles. A number of different magnetic turbulence models have been proposed in the last several decades. We present here the results of studying particle transport in synthesized, anisotropic turbulence and compare the results with those obtained using the standard isotropic turbulence model in a series of papers. In this paper we consider the magnetic field turbulence model with global anisotropy.

  18. Detection of charged particles with a methylammonium lead tribromide perovskite single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiang; Wei, Haotong; Wei, Wei; Chuirazzi, William; DeSantis, Dylan; Huang, Jinsong; Cao, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr3) perovskite crystals have attracted significant attention due to their attractive performance in various optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, light-emitting devices, photodetectors, and recently in X-ray detectors. In this study, we demonstrate a possible use of perovskite-based devices for detection of charged particles (which can be applied in basic scientific research, health physics, and environmental analysis) and investigate the mechanism of fundamental charge transport inside perovskite crystals. It was found that inexpensive MAPbBr3 single crystals could be used for measuring the energy spectrum of charged particles through direct collection of the produced charge. After fitting the plot of the centroid peak position versus voltage with the Hecht equation for single-polarity charge transport, the obtained hole mobility-lifetime product was in the range of (0.4-1.6)×10-3 cm2/V.

  19. Electrodynamics of a generalized charged particle in doubly special relativity framework

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir; Pal, Probir

    2014-07-15

    In the present paper, dynamics of generalized charged particles are studied in the presence of external electromagnetic interactions. This particular extension of the free relativistic particle model lives in Non-Commutative κ-Minkowski space–time, compatible with Doubly Special Relativity, that is motivated to describe Quantum Gravity effects. Furthermore we have also considered the electromagnetic field to be dynamical and have derived the modified forms of Lienard–Wiechert like potentials for these extended charged particle models. In all the above cases we exploit the new and extended form of κ-Minkowski algebra where electromagnetic effects are incorporated in the lowest order, in the Dirac framework of Hamiltonian constraint analysis.

  20. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Periodically Focused Intense Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-06-26

    The purpose of this report is to summarize results of theoretical and computational investigations of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research. The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from April 1, 2010 to March 30, 2013 were: a) Theory and simulation of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow; b) Particle-in-cell simulations of adiabatic thermal beams in periodic solenoidal focusing field; c)Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium in a periodic solenoidal focusing field; d) Training of undergraduate researchers and graduate student in accelerator and beam physics. A brief introduction and summary is presented. Detailed descriptions of research results are provided in an appendix of publications at the end of the report.

  1. Interplay of Classical and Quantum Mechanics in the Theory of Charged-Particle Stopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, Peter

    A quarter of a century ago the author stepped into Jens Oddershede's office and asked for support on a problem involving computation with atomic wave functions in connection with a new theoretical scheme to treat stopping of charged particles at intermediate speed. This visit resulted in two related publications, two joint papers and a number of follow-up studies by Jens and several others. In 1989 a Sanibel Symposium was devoted to aspects of the penetration of charged particles through matter, and since then, quite a few quantum chemists have joined the community of theoreticians dealing with particle penetration. Niels Bohr, a pioneer in both disciplines, emphasized the significance of classical vs. quantal arguments in particle penetration. Not the least in view of the complexity of ab initio computations in this area, such considerations keep being relevant. This note adds new points to an old discussion based on recent developments.

  2. Radiation biophysical aspects of charged particles: From the nanoscale to therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scifoni, Emanuele

    2015-04-01

    Charged particle applications for radiotherapy are motivated by their specific advantages in terms of dose delivery and biological effect. These advantages have to a large extent originated from the peculiarities of ion beam energy deposition patterns in the medium on a microscopic, down to a nanoscopic scale. A large amount of research was conducted in this direction, especially in the last two decades, profiting also from the parallel investigations going on in radiation protection for space exploration. The main biophysical aspects of charged particles, which are relevant to hadrontherapy are shortly reviewed in the present contribution, namely focusing on relative biological effectiveness (RBE), oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and combination with radiosensitizers. A summary of present major research direction on both microscopic and macroscopic assessment of the specific mechanism of radiation damage will be given, as well as several open challenges for a better understanding of the whole process, which still limit the full exploitation of ion beams for radiotherapy.

  3. Guided assembly of gold colloidal nanoparticles on silicon substrates prepatterned by charged particle beams.

    PubMed

    Kolíbal, Miroslav; Konečný, Martin; Ligmajer, Filip; Škoda, David; Vystavěl, Tomáš; Zlámal, Jakub; Varga, Peter; Šikola, Tomáš

    2012-11-27

    Colloidal gold nanoparticles represent technological building blocks which are easy to fabricate while keeping full control of their shape and dimensions. Here, we report on a simple two-step maskless process to assemble gold nanoparticles from a water colloidal solution at specific sites of a silicon surface. First, the silicon substrate covered by native oxide is exposed to a charged particle beam (ions or electrons) and then immersed in a HF-modified solution of colloidal nanoparticles. The irradiation of the native oxide layer by a low-fluence charged particle beam causes changes in the type of surface-terminating groups, while the large fluences induce even more profound modification of surface composition. Hence, by a proper selection of the initial substrate termination, solution pH, and beam fluence, either positive or negative deposition of the colloidal nanoparticles can be achieved.

  4. Apparatus and method for monitoring the intensities of charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Matesh N.; Baum, John W.

    1982-11-02

    Charged particle beam monitoring means (40) are disposed in the path of a charged particle beam (44) in an experimental device (10). The monitoring means comprise a beam monitoring component (42) which is operable to prevent passage of a portion of beam (44), while concomitantly permitting passage of another portion thereof (46) for incidence in an experimental chamber (18), and providing a signal (I.sub.m) indicative of the intensity of the beam portion which is not passed. Calibration means (36) are disposed in the experimental chamber in the path of the said another beam portion and are operable to provide a signal (I.sub.f) indicative of the intensity thereof. Means (41 and 43) are provided to determine the ratio (R) between said signals whereby, after suitable calibration, the calibration means may be removed from the experimental chamber and the intensity of the said another beam portion determined by monitoring of the monitoring means signal, per se.

  5. PITCH-ANGLE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS OF CHARGED PARTICLES FROM COMPUTER SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, G.; Shalchi, A.

    2009-12-10

    Pitch-angle diffusion is a key process in the theory of charged particle scattering by turbulent magnetic plasmas. This process is usually assumed to be diffusive and can, therefore, be described by a pitch-angle diffusion or Fokker-Planck coefficient. This parameter controls the parallel spatial diffusion coefficient as well as the parallel mean free path of charged particles. In the present paper, we determine pitch-angle diffusion coefficients from numerical computer simulations. These results are then compared with results from analytical theories. Especially, we compare the simulations with quasilinear, second-order, and weakly nonlinear diffusion coefficients. Such a comparison allows the test of previous theories and will lead to an improved understanding of the mechanism of particle scattering.

  6. Birkeland currents and charged particles in the high-latitude prenoon region - A new interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bythrow, P. F.; Potemra, T. A.; Erlandson, R. E.; Zanetti, L. J.; Klumpar, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between Birkeland currents and charged particles in the ionosphere was investigated for the period between the late morning through early afternoon, using data on simultaneous conjugate measurements of magnetic fields and charged particles at low altitude in the high-latitude prenoon sector, acquired on November 1, 1984 by four spacecraft, IMP 8, AMPTE CCE, DMSP F7, and HILAT. The results of these observations indicate that, for both northward and southward IMF, the traditional 'cusp Birkeland currents' lie poleward of the most intense sheathlike particle precipitation, and it is likely that these currents map to the plasma mantle and are associated with divergent flow of ionospheric plasma near noon. It is suggested that the traditional 'cusp' current system might be more appropriately named the 'mantle' Birkeland current system.

  7. Search for fractionally charged particles in pp collisions at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.

    2013-05-01

    A search is presented for free heavy long-lived fractionally charged particles produced in pp collisions at s=7TeV. The data sample was recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. Candidate fractionally charged particles are identified by selecting tracks with associated low charge measurements in the silicon tracking detector. Observations are found to be consistent with expectations for background processes. The results of the search are used to set upper limits on the cross section for pair production of fractionally charged, massive spin-1/2 particles that are neutral under SU(3)C and SU(2)L. We exclude at 95% confidence level such particles with electric charge ±2e/3 with masses below 310 GeV, and those with charge ±e/3 with masses below 140 GeV.

  8. Charged particle behavior in localized ultralow frequency waves: Theory and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Rankin, Robert; Zou, Hong; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xing-Ran; Hao, Yi-Xin

    2017-06-01

    The formation and variability of the Van Allen radiation belts are highly influenced by charged particles accelerated via drift-resonant interactions with ultralow frequency (ULF) waves. In the prevailing theory of drift resonance, the ULF wave amplitude is assumed independent of magnetic longitude. This assumption is not generally valid in Earth's magnetosphere, as supported by numerous observations that point to the localized nature of ULF waves. Here we introduce a longitude dependence of the ULF wave amplitude, achieved via a von Mises function, into the theoretical framework of ULF wave-particle drift resonance. To validate the revised theory, the predicted particle signatures are compared with observational data through a best fit procedure. It is demonstrated that incorporation of nonlocal effects in drift-resonance theory provides an improved understanding of charged particle behavior in the inner magnetosphere through the intermediary of ULF waves.

  9. Test results of modified electrical charged particle generator for application to fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Huang, K. H.

    1983-01-01

    Modifications to a charged particle generator for use in fog dispersal applications were made and additional testing carried out. The modified nozzle, however, did not work as planned, and reported results are the unmodified nozzle. The addition of a positive displacement pump to supply the liquid water was highly successful. Measurements of the generator output current were made with a cylindrical collector system as well as with the needle probe used in previous studies. Measurements with the cylindrical collector and the needle probe showed identical agreement within the variability of the experiment. A high-voltage prove was purchased, and measurements of the corona voltage as well as the voltage variation in the charged particle jet were made. Electric fields in the vertical direction on the order of 1,000,000 v/m were measured. The voltage distribution along the centerline of the jet was compared with the numerical solutions of the Poisson equation and showed very good agreement. Velocity measurements using a pitot tube were made. The resulting measurements were compared with theoretical and other reported experimental results. The measured data showed the appropriate trends and agreed well with reported results. Based on the measured current-to-mass ratio from the charged particle generator, a calculation of the average droplet size was made. Droplet sizes were estimated to range between 0.8 and 0.4 microns. Using measured data, an analysis of the height to which the droplet can be dispersed by the charged particle generator was made. Although the mathematical model is highly simplified, the results indicated that particles would achieve heights on the order of 80 m.

  10. Generalized Ohm's law for a background plasma in the presence of relativistic charged particles.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, M

    2010-05-21

    A generalized Ohm's law is derived for a system composed of a background magnetohydrodynamic plasma and a lower density relativistic charged-particle distribution. The interpretation of Ohmic electric fields occurring due to force balance breaks down for such a system and instead an approach based on Maxwell's equations along with the particle flux equations is necessary. Three additional terms arise in Ohm's law and each is verified numerically.

  11. Generalized Ohm's Law for a Background Plasma in the Presence of Relativistic Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sherlock, M.

    2010-05-21

    A generalized Ohm's law is derived for a system composed of a background magnetohydrodynamic plasma and a lower density relativistic charged-particle distribution. The interpretation of Ohmic electric fields occurring due to force balance breaks down for such a system and instead an approach based on Maxwell's equations along with the particle flux equations is necessary. Three additional terms arise in Ohm's law and each is verified numerically.

  12. Bounding Lorentz violation at particle colliders by tracking the motion of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2011-10-01

    In the presence of Lorentz violation, the motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field is distorted. By measuring the eccentricities of particles' elliptical orbits and studying how those eccentricities vary with the absolute orientation of the laboratory, it is possible to constrain the Lorentz-violating c{sub JK} parameters. For each observed species, this method can provide constraints on four linear combinations of coefficients for which, in some species, there are presently no two-sided bounds.

  13. Phase Separation of Binary Charged Particle Systems with Small Size Disparities using a Dusty Plasma.

    PubMed

    Killer, Carsten; Bockwoldt, Tim; Schütt, Stefan; Himpel, Michael; Melzer, André; Piel, Alexander

    2016-03-18

    The phase separation in binary mixtures of charged particles has been investigated in a dusty plasma under microgravity on parabolic flights. A method based on the use of fluorescent dust particles was developed that allows us to distinguish between particles of slightly different size. A clear trend towards phase separation even for smallest size (charge) disparities is observed. The diffusion flux is directly measured from the experiment and uphill diffusion coefficients have been determined.

  14. A scaled experiment to study energy dissipation process during longitudinal compression of charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Y.; Nakajima, M.; Hasegawa, J.; Kikuchi, T.; Horioka, K.

    2016-03-01

    Beam behavior during longitudinal bunch compression of charged particles was investigated using a compact simulator device based on electron beams. Beam current waveforms and bunch compression ratios were measured as a function of the initial beam current. We found that the current waveform became blunt and the compression ratio degraded at higher beam currents. These results indicate that space-charge fields dissipate the kinetic energy of beam particles.

  15. Energy losses of charged particles in a finite layer of substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechin, V. A.

    1985-04-01

    The energy lost by a charged particle as it crosses a plane-parallel plate with dielectric permittivity in a vacuum is calculated theoretically, applying the intermediate transition to the Heaviside transformation and considering various combinations of particle Lorentz factor and plate thickness. The problems encountered in comparing the theoretical predictions with experimental data are examined, and the application of the model of energy loss in very thin layers of Ermilova et al. (1974) is found to explain the observed anomalies.

  16. Formating double layer mechanism by electric charged particle stream in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan-jun, Ma; Qian-li, Yang; Xiao-qing, Li

    1998-08-01

    In this paper, two-fluid equations have been solved after having considered magnetic field generated by charged particle stream. Finally, the distribution of electric field Ez(z, r) and its growth rate γ in plasma have been obtained. From the expression of Ez(z, r) it can be known that the double layer has been formed. With the increase of disturbance γ will be larger, and finally this will result in the interruption of electric current and occurrence of burst.

  17. Experience in charged particle irradiation of tumors of the skull base

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.; Linstadt, D.E.; Bahary, J.P.; Petti, P.L.; Daftari, I. Collier, J.M.; Gutin, P.H.; Gauger, G.; Phillips, T.L.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose was to review the experience at University of California Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in using charged particles to irradiate primary neoplasms of the skull base and those extending to the skull base from the nasopharynx and paranasal sinuses. During the period from 1977 to 1992, 223 patients were irradiated with charged particles at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for tumors either arising in or extending to the skull base, of whom 48 (22%) had recurrent lesions, either post previous surgery or radiotherapy. One hundred twenty-six patients had lesions arising in the cranial base, mostly chordoma (53), chondrosarcoma (27), paraclival meningioma (27) with 19 patients having other histologies such as osteosarcoma or neurofibrosarcoma. There were also 31 patients with primary or recurrent squamous carcinoma of the nasopharynx extending to the skull base, 44 patients with major or minor salivary gland tumors, mostly adenocarcinoma, and 22 patients with squamous carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses, all with cranial base extension. Local control and survival appeared improved in tumors arising in the skull base, following the ability with charged particles to deliver high doses (mean of 65 GY-equivalent) with relative sparing of the adjacent normal tissues. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year local control was 85% for meningioma, 78% for chondrosarcoma, 63% for chordoma and 58% for other sarcoma. Follow-up ranged from 4-191 months with a median of 51 months. Charged particle radiotherapy is highly effective in controlling cranial base lesions which have been partially resected. Better tumor localization with CT and MRI, improved 3-D treatment planning and beam delivery techniques have continued to reduce the level of serious complications and increase local control and survival. 35 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Concluding remarks on ASR 2007 Symposium “Charged particle and photon interactions with matter”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokuti, Mitio; Belloni, Jacqueline

    2008-10-01

    The symposium succeeded in bringing forth valuable surveys of current topic ranging from fundamental physics and chemistry related to the interactions of charged particles or photons with matter, to advanced instrumentation including accelerators and analyzing systems, and to applications to materials science, biology, and medicine. The present article summarizes salient points of most of the lectures of the symposium. Incisive outlook and germs of ideas for work in the near future were apparent in some of the lectures.

  19. Measurement of charged particle yields from PMMA irradiated by a 220 MeV/u 12C beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersanti, L.; Bellini, F.; Bini, F.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Durante, M.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Fiore, S.; Iarocci, E.; La Tessa, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Patera, V.; Ortega, P. G.; Sarti, A.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Vanstalle, M.; Voena, C.

    2014-04-01

    The radiation used in hadrontherapy treatments interacts with the patient body producing secondary particles, either neutral or charged, that can be used for dose and Bragg peak monitoring and to provide a fast feedback on the treatment plans. Recent results obtained from the authors on simplified setups (mono-energetic primary beams interacting with homogeneous tissue-like target) have already indicated the correlation that exists between the flux of these secondaries coming from the target (e.g. protons and photons) and the position of the primary beam Bragg peak. In this paper, the measurements of charged particle fluxes produced by the interaction of a 220 MeV/u carbon ion beam at GSI, Darmstadt, with a polymethyl methacrylate target are reported. The emission region of protons (p), deuterons (d) and tritons (t) has been characterized using a drift chamber while the particle time-of-flight, used to compute the kinetic energy spectra, was measured with a LYSO scintillator. The energy released in the LYSO crystal was used for particle identification purposes. The measurements were repeated with the setup at 60° and 90° with respect to the primary beam direction. The accuracy on the fragments emission profile reconstruction and its relationship with the Bragg peak position have been studied. Based on the acquired experimental evidence, a method to monitor the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target is proposed.

  20. Measurement of charged particle yields from PMMA irradiated by a 220 MeV/u (12)C beam.

    PubMed

    Piersanti, L; Bellini, F; Bini, F; Collamati, F; De Lucia, E; Durante, M; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Iarocci, E; La Tessa, C; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Patera, V; Ortega, P G; Sarti, A; Schuy, C; Sciubba, A; Vanstalle, M; Voena, C

    2014-04-07

    The radiation used in hadrontherapy treatments interacts with the patient body producing secondary particles, either neutral or charged, that can be used for dose and Bragg peak monitoring and to provide a fast feedback on the treatment plans. Recent results obtained from the authors on simplified setups (mono-energetic primary beams interacting with homogeneous tissue-like target) have already indicated the correlation that exists between the flux of these secondaries coming from the target (e.g. protons and photons) and the position of the primary beam Bragg peak. In this paper, the measurements of charged particle fluxes produced by the interaction of a 220 MeV/u carbon ion beam at GSI, Darmstadt, with a polymethyl methacrylate target are reported. The emission region of protons (p), deuterons (d) and tritons (t) has been characterized using a drift chamber while the particle time-of-flight, used to compute the kinetic energy spectra, was measured with a LYSO scintillator. The energy released in the LYSO crystal was used for particle identification purposes. The measurements were repeated with the setup at 60° and 90° with respect to the primary beam direction. The accuracy on the fragments emission profile reconstruction and its relationship with the Bragg peak position have been studied. Based on the acquired experimental evidence, a method to monitor the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target is proposed.

  1. LET spectra measurements of charged particles in the P0006 experiment on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Oda, K.; Henke, R. P.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Frigo, L. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Derrickson, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements are under way of the charged particle radiation environment of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite using stacks of plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's) placed in different locations of the satellite. In the initial work the charge, energy, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles were measured with CR-39 double layer PNTD's located on the west side of the satellite (Experiment P0006). Primary and secondary stopping heavy ions were measured separately from the more energetic particles. Both trapped and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles are included, with the latter component being dominated by relativistic iron particles. The results from the P0006 experiment will be compared with similar measurements in other locations on LDEF with different orientation and shielding conditions. The remarkably detailed investigation of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite will lead to a better understanding of the radiation environment of the Space Station Freedom. It will enable more accurate prediction of single event upsets (SEU's) in microelectronics and, especially, more accurate assessment of the risk - contributed by different components of the radiation field (GCR's, trapped protons, secondaries and heavy recoils, etc.) - to the health and safety of crew members.

  2. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  3. Preliminary test results of electrical charged particle generator for application to fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1982-01-01

    A charged particle generator for use in fog dispersal applications was built and preliminary tests were carried out. The parameter used as a measure of performance was the current measured with a needle probe positioned in the charged jet connected to ground through an ammeter. The needle was movable and allowed the current profile throughout the jet to be determined. The measured current is referred to as the current output. The major independent parameters were liquid water injection rate, plenum pressure, and corona voltage. Optimum current output was achieved at the approximate pressure of 30 psig, corona voltage of 5600 volts, and liquid water injection rate of 6 cc/min. The results of the test with the prototype charged particle generator clearly demonstrate that a current on the order of 20 microamperes can be routinely achieved with the system. This measurement of current does not necessarily represent the total issuing from the nozzle current which is expected to be larger. From these results, confidence was established that a charged particle generator which will operate continuously and consistently can be designed, constructed, and operated. Further work is required, however, to better understand the physical mechanisms involved and to optimize the system for fog dispersal application.

  4. Charge, energy, and LET spectra measurements of charged particles in P0006 experiment of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Oda, K.; Henke, R. P.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Frigo, L. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Derrickson, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements are under way of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite using stacks of plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) placed in different locations of the satellite. In the initial work, the charge, energy, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles were measured with CR-39 double layer PNTDs located on the west end of the satellite. Primary and secondary stopping heavy ions as well as relativistic galactic cosmic rays (mostly iron particles) were measured separately. The results will be compared with similar measurements in other locations on LDEF with different orientation and shielding conditions. The remarkably detailed study of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite will lead to a better understanding of the radiation environment of the Space Station Freedom. It will enable more accurate prediction of single event upsets (SEUs) in microelectronics and, especially, more accurate assessment of the risk, contributed by the different components of the radiation field to the health and safety of crew members.

  5. A Generalized Boltzmann Fokker-Planck Method for Coupled Charged Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, Anil K

    2012-01-09

    The goal of this project was to develop and investigate the performance of reduced-physics formulations of high energy charged particle (electrons, protons and heavier ions) transport that are computationally more efficient than not only analog Monte Carlo methods but also the established condensed history Monte Carlo technique. Charged particles interact with matter by Coulomb collisions with target nuclei and electrons, by bremsstrahlung radiation loss and by nuclear reactions such as spallation and fission. Of these, inelastic electronic collisions and elastic nuclear collisions are the dominant cause of energy-loss straggling and angular deflection or range straggling of a primary particle. These collisions are characterized by extremely short mean free paths (sub-microns) and highly peaked, near-singular differential cross sections about forward directions and zero energy loss, with the situation for protons and heavier ions more extreme than for electrons. For this reason, analog or truephysics single-event Monte Carlo simulation, while possible in principle, is computationally prohibitive for routine calculation of charged particle interaction phenomena.

  6. New Density Estimation Methods for Charged Particle Beams With Applications to Microbunching Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Gabriele Bassi

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we discuss representations of charge particle densities in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, analyze the sources and profiles of the intrinsic numerical noise, and present efficient methods for their removal. We devise two alternative estimation methods for charged particle distribution which represent significant improvement over the Monte Carlo cosine expansion used in the 2d code of Bassi, designed to simulate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in charged particle beams. The improvement is achieved by employing an alternative beam density estimation to the Monte Carlo cosine expansion. The representation is first binned onto a finite grid, after which two grid-based methods are employed to approximate particle distributions: (i) truncated fast cosine transform (TFCT); and (ii) thresholded wavelet transform (TWT). We demonstrate that these alternative methods represent a staggering upgrade over the original Monte Carlo cosine expansion in terms of efficiency, while the TWT approximation also provides an appreciable improvement in accuracy. The improvement in accuracy comes from a judicious removal of the numerical noise enabled by the wavelet formulation. The TWT method is then integrated into Bassi's CSR code, and benchmarked against the original version. We show that the new density estimation method provides a superior performance in terms of efficiency and spatial resolution, thus enabling high-fidelity simulations of CSR effects, including microbunching instability.

  7. Simulation of Neutron Wall and Charged Particle Veto Wall for Heavy Ion Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiashen

    2016-09-01

    Comparison of neutrons and protons emitted in heavy ion collisions is an observable to probe the density dependence of symmetry energy. The dimension of Neutron Wall (NW) at NSCL is about 2x2 m2 which is made of 25 Pyrex tubes filled with liquid Scintillator NE213 that detects recoil protons when neutron interacts with the scintillator. Although it attains excellent discrimination of γ - μ and neutron using Pulse Shape Discrimination method, it fails to discriminate charged particles from neutrons. To ensure 100% rejection of charged particles, we plan to build a Charged Particle Veto wall (VW), which will consist of 25 1-cm thick plastic scintillator bars placed directly in front of NW. Simulations using NPTool have been performed to determine the exact design of the VW. To make sure the VW completely covers the NW, overlap of alternate bars is needed. In the poster, I will show the advantage and disadvantage of the positioning plastic bars in a horizontal versus a vertical position as well as position correlation between NW and VW for signal matching. US NSF Grant No. PHY 1102511 and SURE programme, CUHK.

  8. Survival of Deinococcus radiodurans against laboratory-simulated solar wind charged particles.

    PubMed

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Gláucio; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; Galante, Douglas; Cockell, Charles; Olsson-Francis, Karen; Brucato, John Robert; Baratta, Giuseppe Antonio; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Merrigan, Tony; McCullough, Robert; Mason, Nigel; Lage, Claudia

    2011-11-01

    In this experimental study, cells of the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans were exposed to several different sources of radiation chosen to replicate the charged particles found in the solar wind. Naked cells or cells mixed with dust grains (basalt or sandstone) differing in elemental composition were exposed to electrons, protons, and ions to determine the probability of cell survival after irradiation. Doses necessary to reduce the viability of cell population to 10% (LD(10)) were determined under different experimental conditions. The results of this study indicate that low-energy particle radiation (2-4 keV), typically present in the slow component of the solar wind, had no effect on dehydrated cells, even if exposed at fluences only reached in more than 1000 years at Sun-Earth distance (1 AU). Higher-energy ions (200 keV) found in solar flares would inactivate 90% of exposed cells after several events in less than 1 year at 1 AU. When mixed with dust grains, LD(10) increases about 10-fold. These results show that, compared to the highly deleterious effects of UV radiation, solar wind charged particles are relatively benign, and organisms protected under grains from UV radiation would also be protected from the charged particles considered in this study.

  9. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. The decrease in the values of the labeling indices 1 week after charged particle irradiation was dose- and ion-dependent. Mitotic indices 1 week after 10 and 25 Gy helium and after 10 Gy neon were the same as those seen in the control mice. Analysis of cell kinetics 1 week after 10 Gy helium and 10 Gy neon irradiation suggests the presence of a progenitor subpopulation that is proliferating with a shorter cell cycle. Comparison of the responses to the different charged particle beams indicates that neon ions are more effective in producing direct cellular damage than the helium ions, but the surviving proliferating cells several divisions later continue to maintain active cell renewal. Based on the 1 week post-irradiation H{sup 3}-TdR labeling indices, a rough estimate of the RBE for neon ions is at least 2.5 when compared to helium ions.

  10. Comparative biology approaches for charged particle exposures and cancer development processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Kwoh, Ely; Sudo, Hiroko; Wiese, Claudia; Dan, Cristian; Turker, Mitchell

    Comparative biology studies can provide useful information for the extrapolation of results be-tween cells in culture and the more complex environment of the tissue. In other circumstances, they provide a method to guide the interpretation of results obtained for cells from differ-ent species. We have considered several key cancer development processes following charged particle exposures using comparative biology approaches. Our particular emphases have been mutagenesis and genomic instability. Carcinogenesis requires the accumulation of mutations and most of htese mutations occur on autosomes. Two loci provide the greatest avenue for the consideration of charged particle-induced mutation involving autosomes: the TK1 locus in human cells and the APRT locus in mouse cells. Each locus can provide information on a wide variety of mutational changes, from small intragenic mutations through multilocus dele-tions and extensive tracts of mitotic recombination. In addition, the mouse model can provide a direct measurement of chromosome loss which cannot be accomplished in the human cell system. Another feature of the mouse APRT model is the ability to examine effects for cells exposed in vitro with those obtained for cells exposed in situ. We will provide a comparison of the results obtained for the TK1 locus following 1 GeV/amu Fe ion exposures to the human lymphoid cells with those obtained for the APRT locus for mouse kidney epithelial cells (in vitro or in situ). Substantial conservation of mechanisms is found amongst these three exposure scenarios, with some differences attributable to the specific conditions of exposure. A similar approach will be applied to the consideraiton of proton-induced autosomal mutations in the three model systems. A comparison of the results obtained for Fe ions vs. protons in each case will highlight LET-specificc differences in response. Another cancer development process that is receiving considerable interest is genomic instability. We

  11. An overview of recent charged-particle radiation biology in Italy.

    PubMed

    Belli, M

    2001-01-01

    Radiobiology with charged particles is being carried out in Italy since several decades, starting with the experiments with protons in Milan. Later, also other groups entered the field, such as those in Naples, in Legnaro (LNL) and in Rome. In the last 10-15 years the activities in the field began to grow in a significant way. This happened in concomitance with the involvement of various researchers and Institutions in European and international projects devoted to radiation protection aspects, such as those aimed at elucidating and modelling radiation action mechanisms (EC/EU) and those aimed at radiation protection in space (NASA). A special role has been played since then by the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro of the INFN, where a radiobiology facility for low energy light ions was set up and operated in 1985. A formidable stimulus for charged-particle radiobiology was more recently given by the onset of plans for developing hadrontherapy Centres in Italy. The TERA Foundation first, and than the TOP Project at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità, at the same time favoured the spreading in Italy of radiobiology research with charged particles and encouraged co-operation among various groups. The Italian radiobiology community, though relatively small, developed a number of valuable activities with charged particles, mostly at the cellular and molecular levels, that span from mechanisms of radiation action to radiation protection in space and to therapy with charged hadrons. In this article, due to space limitations, we have just been able to list the present activities and to briefly review some research that forms a common background for the various areas. This includes the work on Chinese hamster V79 cells irradiated with light ions at LNL, that provided extensive data on the relationships between radiation quality, molecular damage and cellular effects, and the related work aimed at possible interpretation by mechanistic models. It appears that the multiplicity

  12. Drift velocity of charged particles in magnetic fields and its relation to the direction of the source current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essén, Hanno; Nordmark, Arne B.

    2016-10-01

    Integrable motion of charged particles in magnetic fields produced by stationary current distributions is investigated. We treat motion in the magnetic field from an infinite flat current sheet, a Harris current sheath, an infinite rectilinear current, and a dipole in its equatorial plane. We find that positively charged particles as a rule will drift in the same direction as the current that is the source of the magnetic field in question. The conclusion is that charged particles moving under the influence of current distributions tend to enhance the current and that this indicates current self-amplification.

  13. Conceptual design of a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator for protons and carbon ions for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, K. J.; Aslaninejad, M.; Barlow, R. J.; Beard, C. D.; Bliss, N.; Cobb, J. H.; Easton, M. J.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fenning, R.; Gardner, I. S. K.; Hill, M. A.; Owen, H. L.; Johnstone, C. J.; Jones, B.; Jones, T.; Kelliher, D. J.; Khan, A.; Machida, S.; McIntosh, P. A.; Pattalwar, S.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Prior, C. R.; Rochford, J.; Rogers, C. T.; Seviour, R.; Sheehy, S. L.; Smith, S. L.; Strachan, J.; Tygier, S.; Vojnovic, B.; Wilson, P.; Witte, H.; Yokoi, T.

    2013-03-01

    The conceptual design for a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator suitable for charged particle therapy (the use of protons and other light ions to treat some forms of cancer) is described.

  14. Nonlinear Vacuum Polarization In Intense Blackbody Radiation And The Generation Of Cherenkov Radiation By Energetic Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheldon S. Q.; Hartemann, F. V.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-03-01

    A study of thermally-induced vacuum polarization stemming from the Euler-Heisenberg nonlinear radiation correction to Maxwell equations is conducted. While nonlinear effects associated with photon-photon scattering in the photon gas had been previously calculated, we present an analysis in the framework of stochastic electrodynamics. To lowest order of approximation, it is shown that the phase velocity of light is reduced in the presence of intense ambient electromagnetic radiation. Therefore Cherenkov radiation can be generated when charged particles traverse a region of intense blackbody radiation. Suitable conditions may be found in astrophysical environments. Cosmic ray electrons and positrons in the GeV to TeV range meet the energy requirement for this process to occur. We present calculations of the emission characteristics and conditions under which Cherenkov radiation may be observed. This effect combined with synchrotron and inverse Compton processes may lead to a more complete understanding of cosmic ray propagation. Also of interest, the question of the linearity of the relic cosmic microwave background is under investigation using this formalism and will be discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Persistent oxidative stress in human neural stem cells exposed to low fluences of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Baulch, Janet E; Craver, Brianna M; Tran, Katherine K; Yu, Liping; Chmielewski, Nicole; Allen, Barrett D; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to the space radiation environment poses risks for a range of deleterious health effects due to the unique types of radiation encountered. Galactic cosmic rays are comprised of a spectrum of highly energetic nuclei that deposit densely ionizing tracks of damage along the particle trajectory. These tracks are distinct from those generated by the more sparsely ionizing terrestrial radiations, and define the geometric distribution of the complex cellular damage that results when charged particles traverse the tissues of the body. The exquisite radiosensitivity of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells found within the neurogenic regions of the brain predispose the central nervous system to elevated risks for radiation induced sequelae. Here we show that human neural stem cells (hNSC) exposed to different charged particles at space relevant fluences exhibit significant and persistent oxidative stress. Radiation induced oxidative stress was found to be most dependent on total dose rather than on the linear energy transfer of the incident particle. The use of redox sensitive fluorogenic dyes possessing relative specificity for hydroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial superoxide confirmed that most irradiation paradigms elevated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) in hNSC over a 1 week interval following exposure. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was not the major source of elevated nitric oxides, as the use of NOS inhibitors had little effect on NO dependent fluorescence. Our data provide extensive evidence for the capability of low doses of charged particles to elicit marked changes in the metabolic profile of irradiated hNSC. Radiation induced changes in redox state may render the brain more susceptible to the development of neurocognitive deficits that could affect an astronaut's ability to perform complex tasks during extended missions in deep space. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  16. Persistent oxidative stress in human neural stem cells exposed to low fluences of charged particles

    PubMed Central

    Baulch, Janet E.; Craver, Brianna M.; Tran, Katherine K.; Yu, Liping; Chmielewski, Nicole; Allen, Barrett D.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the space radiation environment poses risks for a range of deleterious health effects due to the unique types of radiation encountered. Galactic cosmic rays are comprised of a spectrum of highly energetic nuclei that deposit densely ionizing tracks of damage along the particle trajectory. These tracks are distinct from those generated by the more sparsely ionizing terrestrial radiations, and define the geometric distribution of the complex cellular damage that results when charged particles traverse the tissues of the body. The exquisite radiosensitivity of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells found within the neurogenic regions of the brain predispose the central nervous system to elevated risks for radiation induced sequelae. Here we show that human neural stem cells (hNSC) exposed to different charged particles at space relevant fluences exhibit significant and persistent oxidative stress. Radiation induced oxidative stress was found to be most dependent on total dose rather than on the linear energy transfer of the incident particle. The use of redox sensitive fluorogenic dyes possessing relative specificity for hydroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial superoxide confirmed that most irradiation paradigms elevated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) in hNSC over a 1 week interval following exposure. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was not the major source of elevated nitric oxides, as the use of NOS inhibitors had little effect on NO dependent fluorescence. Our data provide extensive evidence for the capability of low doses of charged particles to elicit marked changes in the metabolic profile of irradiated hNSC. Radiation induced changes in redox state may render the brain more susceptible to the development of neurocognitive deficits that could affect an astronaut’s ability to perform complex tasks during extended missions in deep space. PMID:25800120

  17. Developing Antimatter Containment Technology: Modeling Charged Particle Oscillations in a Penning-Malmberg Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Martin, J. J.; Pearson, J. B.; Lewis, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA MSFC Propulsion Research Center (PRC) is conducting a research activity examining the storage of low energy antiprotons. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is an electromagnetic system (Penning-Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Tesla superconductor, a high voltage confinement electrode system, and an ultra high vacuum test section; designed with an ultimate goal of maintaining charged particles with a half-life of 18 days. Currently, this system is being experimentally evaluated using normal matter ions which are cheap to produce and relatively easy to handle and provide a good indication of overall trap behavior, with the exception of assessing annihilation losses. Computational particle-in-cell plasma modeling using the XOOPIC code is supplementing the experiments. Differing electrode voltage configurations are employed to contain charged particles, typically using flat, modified flat and harmonic potential wells. Ion cloud oscillation frequencies are obtained experimentally by amplification of signals induced on the electrodes by the particle motions. XOOPIC simulations show that for given electrode voltage configurations, the calculated charged particle oscillation frequencies are close to experimental measurements. As a two-dimensional axisymmetric code, XOOPIC cannot model azimuthal plasma variations, such as those induced by radio-frequency (RF) modulation of the central quadrupole electrode in experiments designed to enhance ion cloud containment. However, XOOPIC can model analytically varying electric potential boundary conditions and particle velocity initial conditions. Application of these conditions produces ion cloud axial and radial oscillation frequency modes of interest in achieving the goal of optimizing HiPAT for reliable containment of antiprotons.

  18. A multi-channel integrated readout circuit (MIROC) chip for solid state charged particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiang

    2011-12-01

    Various electronic amplifier systems have been developed during the past years for solid state detectors for energetic charged particle detection. Most of them were based on the design of discrete parts or high performance hybrid packaged chips. With rapid development of modern integrated circuit industry, there are more and more integrated systems built for such applications. This work describes a novel multi-channel integrated readout circuit (MIROC) mixed-signal ASIC for solid stage charged particle detectors. The chip contains nineteen analog amplifier channels including the test channel, three on-chip 8-bit ADCs, each equipped with a 8-bit parallel-to-serial shift register, three 19-input analog multiplexers, and other digital control logic modules. This was the first known integrated readout system with multiple channels and multiple ADCs, by the time the project started. The chip is designed with special interest in 1MeV electrons. It is a highly integrated system that only requires minimal external controls, which could significantly reduce cost, space, power and total mass of the readout system, and reduce the development cycle of new instruments. MIROC chip was fabricated with IBM 7WL 0.18microm SiGe BiCMOS technology through MOSIS MEP research license, and has been tested, with key components characterized. Measured only 4mmx4mm, this highly integrated readout system has a FWHM noise below 20keV. The four configurable conversion gain levels of the amplifier chains, measured to be 164mV/MeV, 378mV/MeV, 611mV/MeV and 950mV/MeV, make the chip capable of studying energetic charged particles over the range of 100keV up to 6MeV.

  19. Charged particle therapy for cancer: the inheritance of the Cavendish scientists?

    PubMed

    Jones, Bleddyn; Dale, Roger G; Cárabe-Fernández, Alejandro

    2009-03-01

    The history of developments in atomic physics and its applications follows the decisive input provided by Maxwell and subsequent discoveries by his successors at the Cavendish Laboratory. In medicine the potential applications of particle physics (with the notable exception of the electron) were unfortunately delayed by the disappointing experiences with neutron therapy, which produced long-term scepticism. Neutrons are not appropriate for cancer therapy because not only their physical dose distributions offer no advantages over X-rays, but also their biological dose distributions are worse. The much improved dose distributions achieved with charged particles offer real prospects for better treatment outcomes because of the large reduction in the volume of unnecessarily irradiated tissue in many situations. Charged particle therapy is relatively new and can be applied with increasing confidence due to advances in radiology and computing, but at present there are insufficient numbers of treatment facilities to produce statistically powerful studies to compare treatment outcomes with those of X-rays. Considerable progress has been achieved in Japan and Germany with pilot studies of carbon ions but their efficacy compared with protons needs to be tested: in theory carbon should be better for intrinsically radio-resistant and for the most hypoxic tumours. The optimisation of proton and ion beam therapy in clinical practice remains to be achieved, but there are good scientific reasons why these modalities will be preferred by patients and their physicians in the future. Regrettably, despite hosting many of the momentous discoveries that enabled the development of charged particle therapy, the UK is slow to adopt and implement this very important form of cancer treatment.

  20. Charged particle production in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with the ALICE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floris, M.

    2013-08-01

    The ALICE collaboration measured charged particle production in √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. We report on results on charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum spectra. All the results are presented as a function of the centrality of the collision, estimated with a Glauber Monte Carlo fit to multiplicity distributions reconstructed in various detectors. The applicability of the Glauber model at LHC energies, the precision of the centrality determination and the related systematic uncertainties are discussed in detail. Particles are tracked in the pseudorapidity window | η | ≲ 0.9 with the silicon Inner Tracking System (ITS) and the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), over the range 0.15 charged particle multiplicity is measured in | η | < 0.5 to be dNch /d η = 1601 ± 60 in 5% most central Pb-Pb collisions, indicating an energy density a factor ∼ 3 higher than at RHIC. Its evolution with centrality shows a pattern strikingly similar to the one measured at RHIC. Intermediate (5 ≲pT ≲ 15 GeV / c) transverse momentum particles are found to be most strongly suppressed with respect to pp collisions, consistent with a large energy loss of hardscattered partons in the hot and dense medium. The results are presented in terms of the nuclear modification factor RAA and compared to theoretical expectations.

  1. Electromagnetic Weibel Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-10-20

    In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions, collective instabilities may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Our previous numerical and theoretical studies of intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson and H. Qin, PRSTAB, 6, 084401 (2003); Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002)] demonstrated that a fast, electrostatic, Harris-like instability develops, and saturates nonlinearly, for sufficiently large temperature anisotropy (T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b} >> 1). The total distribution function after saturation, however, is still far from equipartitioned. In this paper the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate detailed properties of the transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r{sub w}. The kinetic stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure and instability thresholds are determined. The stability analysis shows that, although there is free energy available to drive the electromagnetic Weibel instability, the finite transverse geometry of the charged particle beam introduces a large threshold value for the temperature anisotropy ((T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b}){sup Weibel} >> (T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b}){sup Harris}) below which the instability is absent. Hence, unlike the case of an electrically neutral plasma, the Weibel instability is not expected to play as significant a role in the process of energy isotropization of intense unneutralized charged particle beams as the electrostatic Harris-type instability.

  2. Long-Term Variability of Precipitation of Charged Particles on Mercury's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benna, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Baker, D. N.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; McClintock, W. E.; Schriver, D.; Travnicek, P. M.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    With over 18 months in orbit, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has been providing the opportunity for studying the long-term variability of Mercury's magnetosphere and exosphere with high temporal and spatial resolution. To investigate the variability of the planet's magnetospheric and exospheric structures, we computed global models of the magnetosphere for the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions measured during MESSENGER's first 270 orbits. These global models were generated for a wide range of possible solar wind ram pressures. By fitting the locations of the modeled boundary crossings with those measured by the spacecraft Magnetometer we were able to recover the values of the solar wind moments that were acting on the magnetosphere during each orbit. The reliability of this method was validated through comparisons with the solar wind moments derived independently from the WSA-ENLIL model. Results from these models reveal that the magnitude of the solar wind forcing is modulated primarily by the orbital distance of the planet from the Sun. Moreover, sporadic fluctuations in solar wind and IMF inputs (on timescales of a few hours) lead to the major reconfigurations of the magnetosphere and the exosphere that were observed by MESSENGER. These reconfigurations not only affect the distributions and energetics of charged particles but also the geographical location and extent of space weathering from charged particle precipitation onto the planet's surface. Modeling the precipitation of charged particle on Mercury's surface reveals an intermittent, often (north-south) asymmetric and IMF-driven bombardment of the dayside of the planet. The intensity of the dayside precipitation is function of the solar wind pressure and the magnitude of induction in the Mercury's outer core. In contrast, precipitation in nightside regions appears to be persistent and less dependent in location and intensity on IMF

  3. Pondermotive acceleration of charged particles along the relativistic jets of an accreting blackhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisuzaki, T.; Tajima, T.

    2014-05-01

    Accreting blackholes such as miniquasars and active galactic nuclei can contribute to the highest energy components of intra- (˜1015 eV) galactic and extra-galactic components (˜1020 eV) of cosmic rays. Alfven wave pulses which are excited in the accretion disk around blackholes propagate in relativistic jets. Because of their highly non-linear nature of the waves, charged particles (protons, ions, and electrons) can be accelerated to high energies in relativistic jets in accreting blackhole systems, the central engine of miniquasars and active galactic nuclei.

  4. Analytical Solutions for the Nonlinear Longitudinal Drift Compression (Expansion) of Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-04-09

    To achieve high focal spot intensities in heavy ion fusion, the ion beam must be compressed longitudinally by factors of ten to one hundred before it is focused onto the target. The longitudinal compression is achieved by imposing an initial velocity profile tilt on the drifting beam. In this paper, the problem of longitudinal drift compression of intense charged particle beams is solved analytically for the two important cases corresponding to a cold beam, and a pressure-dominated beam, using a one-dimensional warm-fluid model describing the longitudinal beam dynamics.

  5. Influence of numerical schemes on statistical properties of computed charged particle trajectories in turbulent electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lalescu, C.C.; Teaca, B.; Carati, D.

    2013-05-15

    A class of numerical schemes is developed for the study of charged particle transport in complex stationary electromagnetic fields and tested for fields obtained from a numerical solution of the magneto-hydrodynamic equation. The performances of these schemes are evaluated by analyzing the conservation of energy and the statistical properties of the trajectories. Energy conservation is affected by the interpolation technique used to estimate the field value at the particle position. However, the particle transport properties are more robust, except in the limit of low energy when a significant fraction of the particles are trapped.

  6. Review of linear optics measurement and correction for charged particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás, Rogelio; Aiba, Masamitsu; Franchi, Andrea; Iriso, Ubaldo

    2017-05-01

    Measurement and correction of charged particle beam optics have been a major concern since the advent of strong focusing synchrotron accelerators. Traditionally, particle colliders have led the development of optics control based on turn-by-turn beam centroid measurements, while lepton storage rings have focused on closed-orbit-response matrix techniques. Recently, considerable efforts are being invested in comparing these techniques at different synchrotron radiation sources and colliders. An emerging class of less invasive techniques based on the optimization of performance-related observables is demonstrating a great potential. In this paper, a review of existing techniques is presented highlighting comparisons, relative merits and limitations.

  7. Stable charged-particle acceleration and focusing in a laser accelerator using spatial harmonics.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, B; Valloni, A; Putterman, S; Rosenzweig, J B

    2012-10-19

    Regarding the laser-driven acceleration of charged particles in photonic systems, a central unmet challenge is the achievement of simultaneous transverse and longitudinal stability at nonultrarelativistic energies. At such energies, Earnshaw's theorem [S. Earnshaw, Trans. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 7, 97 (1842)] indicates that a synchronous accelerating wave gives a defocusing effect. We present a scheme in which particles are accelerated by interaction with a resonant spatial harmonic and are focused by strong ponderomotive interaction with nonresonant spatial harmonics. We show that this scheme exhibits net transverse focusing and longitudinal stability, and we discuss its use in a compact laser accelerator.

  8. The thermal-wave model: A Schroedinger-like equation for charged particle beam dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedele, Renato; Miele, G.

    1994-01-01

    We review some results on longitudinal beam dynamics obtained in the framework of the Thermal Wave Model (TWM). In this model, which has recently shown the capability to describe both longitudinal and transverse dynamics of charged particle beams, the beam dynamics is ruled by Schroedinger-like equations for the beam wave functions, whose squared modulus is proportional to the beam density profile. Remarkably, the role of the Planck constant is played by a diffractive constant epsilon, the emittance, which has a thermal nature.

  9. Nonlinear d--ta-f Simulation Studies of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Temperature Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson; Hong Qin

    2002-05-07

    In this paper, a 3-D nonlinear perturbative particle simulation code (BEST) [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson and W.W. Lee, Physical Review Special Topics on Accelerators and Beams 3 (2000) 084401] is used to systematically study the stability properties of intense nonneutral charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy (T{sub {perpendicular}b} >> T{sub {parallel}b}). The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigen frequencies, radial mode structure, and nonlinear dynamics are determined for axisymmetric perturbations with {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}{theta} = 0.

  10. The average motion of a charged particle in a dipole field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, A. J.; Stern, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    The numerical representation of the average motion of a charged particle trapped in a geomagnetic field is developed. An assumption is made of the conservation of the first two adiabatic invariants where integration is along a field line between mirror points. The averaged motion also involved the parameters defining the magnetic field line to which the particle is attached. Methods involved in obtaining the motion in the equatorial plane of model magnetospheres are based on Hamiltonian functions. The restrictions imposed by the special nature of the dipole field are defined.

  11. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Deyang Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-15

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O{sup 3+} ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  12. Charged particle identification with the liquid Xenon calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Kozyrev, A. A.; Shebalin, V. E.; Ruban, A. A.; Bashtovoy, N. S.

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes a procedure of particle identification with the liquid Xenon calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector currently being developed. The procedure uses the boosted decision tree classification method with specific energy losses of charged particles in the liquid Xenon calorimeter as input variables. The efficiency of the procedure is illustrated by an example of the measurement of the cross section of the process e+e‑→K+K‑ in the center-of-mass energy range from 1.8 to 2.0 GeV.

  13. Charged Particle in a Time-dependent Electric Field: A White Noise Functional Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Gravador, E. B.; Bornales, J. B.; Liwanag, M. J.

    2008-06-18

    The propagator for a charged particle in a time-dependent electric field is calculated following Hida and Streit's framework where the propagator is the T-transform of Feynman functional. However, we have to regard the potential V = -qE({tau})x{identical_to}{radical}((m/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}))){xi}x following C. C. Bernido and M. V. Carpio-Bernido's prescription of time-dependent potentials. The result agrees with the limiting form of Eqn. (16) of N. Morgenstern Horing, H. L. Cui, and G. Fiorenza, when the magnetic field is switched off, and Eqn. (17) of [3] when the electric field is constant in time.

  14. Installing a Milli-charge Particle Detector at LHC P5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossberndt, Silas; MilliQan Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Our collaboration has proposed a dedicated experiment that would detect ``milli-charged'' particles produced in pp collisions. The experiment, which would be a plastic scintillator array subdivided into three sections, should be sensitive to charges of order 10-3 e for mass of order 1 GeV and charges of order 10-2 e for mass of order 10 GeV with 300 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. This greatly extends the parameter space explored for small mass charges above 100 MeV.

  15. Dynamics of a charged particle around a weakly magnetized naked singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babar, Gulmina Zaman; Jamil, Mubasher; Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2016-12-01

    We examine the motion of a charged particle in the vicinity of a weakly magnetized naked singularity. The escape velocity and energy of the particle moving around the naked singularity after being kicked by another particle or photon are investigated. Also at innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) escape velocity and energy are examined. Effective potential and angular momentum of the particle are also discussed. We discuss the center-of-mass energy after collision between two particles having same mass and opposite charges moving along the same circular orbit in the opposite direction. It is investigated that under what conditions maximum energy can be produced as a result of collision.

  16. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszczyk, M. K.; Benettoni, M.; Calabrese, R.; Cardinale, R.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Cavallero, G.; Cojocariu, L.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dorosz, P. A.; Easo, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Fiorini, M.; Frei, C.; Gambetta, S.; Gibson, V.; Gotti, C.; Harnew, N.; He, J.; Keizer, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Maciuc, F.; Maino, M.; Malaguti, R.; Matteuzzi, C.; McCann, M.; Morris, A.; Muheim, F.; Papanestis, A.; Pessina, G.; Petrolini, A.; Piedigrossi, D.; Pistone, A.; Placinta, V. M.; Sigurdsson, S.; Simi, G.; Smith, J.; Spradlin, P.; Tomassetti, L.; Wotton, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to make more efficient use of the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors are key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper we describe the setup and the results of tests in a charged particle beam, carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded opto-electronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  17. Explicit high-order symplectic integrators for charged particles in general electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Molei

    2016-12-01

    This article considers non-relativistic charged particle dynamics in both static and non-static electromagnetic fields, which are governed by nonseparable, possibly time-dependent Hamiltonians. For the first time, explicit symplectic integrators of arbitrary high-orders are constructed for accurate and efficient simulations of such mechanical systems. Performances superior to the standard non-symplectic method of Runge-Kutta are demonstrated on two examples: the first is on the confined motion of a particle in a static toroidal magnetic field used in tokamak; the second is on how time-periodic perturbations to a magnetic field inject energy into a particle via parametric resonance at a specific frequency.

  18. Well-posedness on a new hydrodynamic model of the fluid with the dilute charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Chun; Tan, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    We use an energetic variational approach to derive a new hydrodynamic model, which could be called a generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Navier-Stokes system. Such the system could describe the dynamics of the compressible conductive fluid with the dilute charged particles and be used to analyze the interactions between the macroscopic fluid motion and the microscopic charge transportation. Then, we develop a general method to obtain the unique local classical solution, the unique global solution under small perturbations and the optimal decay rates of the solution and its derivatives of any order.

  19. Electrostatic charged-particle spectrograph made up of discrete plane and box electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkova, T. Ya.

    2014-07-01

    A simple spectrograph is suggested for rapid analysis of the charged particle beam energy. The device is protected against the penetration of stray self-fields and extraneous fields into its operating region. A distinctive feature of such a spectrograph is that potentials applied to different parts of the split plane electrode vary in proportion to the square root of the distance from the frontal end electrode to the middle of the respective part. Optimal operating conditions for the spectrograph are found using computer simulation. Under these conditions, the range of energies recorded simultaneously covers two orders of magnitude, which is several times larger than the maximal range of the spectrographs currently available.

  20. Hardware and software for ground tests of onboard charged particle spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Batischev, A. G. Galper, A. M.; Grishin, S. A.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Niadvetski, N. S.

    2015-12-15

    The article presents a hardware and software complex for ground tests of onboard charged particle spectrometers that are designed at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI for monitoring of nuclear-physical factors of space weather and can be installed in a wide class of satellites. The structural scheme and operating principles of component parts are discussed. The main algorithm and software features are presented. The technique of ground spectrometer tests and calibrations in various measurement modes at atmospheric cosmic particle flows, both in autonomous laboratories and in interface tests as part of a satellite, is also described.

  1. A study of CR-39 plastic charged-particle detector replacement by consumer imaging sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Plaud-Ramos, K. O.; Freeman, M. S.; Wei, W.; Guardincerri, E.; Bacon, J. D.; Cowan, J.; Durham, J. M.; Huang, D.; Gao, J.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Morley, D. J.; Morris, C. L.; Poulson, D. C.; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-11-15

    Consumer imaging sensors (CIS) are examined for real-time charged-particle detection and CR-39 plastic detector replacement. Removing cover glass from CIS is hard if not impossible, in particular for the latest inexpensive webcam models. We show that $10-class CIS are sensitive to MeV and higher energy protons and α-particles by using a {sup 90}Sr β-source with its cover glass in place. Indirect, real-time, high-resolution detection is also feasible when combining CIS with a ZnS:Ag phosphor screen and optics. Noise reduction in CIS is nevertheless important for the indirect approach.

  2. A study of CR-39 plastic charged-particle detector replacement by consumer imaging sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Plaud-Ramos, Kenie Omar; Freeman, Matthew Stouten; Wei, Wanchun; Guardincerri, Elena; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Cowan, Joseph Sarno; Durham, J. Matthew; Huang, Di; Gao, Jun; Hoffbauer, Mark Arles; Morley, Deborah Jean; Morris, Christopher L.; Poulson, Daniel Cris; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-08-03

    Consumer imaging sensors (CIS) are examined for real-time charged-particle detection and CR-39 plastic detector replacement. Removing cover glass from CIS is hard if not impossible, in particular for the latest inexpensive webcam models. We show that $10-class CIS are sensitive to MeV and higher energy protons and α-particles by using a 90Sr β-source with its cover glass in place. Indirect, real-time, high-resolution detection is also feasible when combining CIS with a ZnS:Ag phosphor screen and optics. Furthermore, noise reduction in CIS is nevertheless important for the indirect approach.

  3. Large space system - Charged particle environment interaction technology. [effects on high voltage solar array performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Roche, J. C.; Grier, N. T.

    1979-01-01

    Large high-voltage space power systems proposed for future applications in both low earth orbit and geosynchronous altitudes must operate in the space charged-particle environment with possible interactions between this environment and the high-voltage surfaces. The paper reviews the ground experimental work to provide indicators for the interactions that could exist in the space power system. A preliminary analytical model of a large space power system is constructed using the existing NASA Charging Analyzer Program, and its performance in geosynchronous orbit is evaluated. The analytical results are used to illustrate the regions where detrimental interactions could exist and to establish areas where future technology is required.

  4. Energy flow and charged particle spectra in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Aid, S.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bärwolff, H.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Binder, E.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Bosetti, P. C.; Boudry, V.; Bourdarios, C.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braun, U.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Chyla, J.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; Devel, M.; de Roeck, A.; di Nezza, P.; Dingus, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Drescher, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebbinghaus, R.; Eberle, M.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellis, N. N.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Fensome, I. F.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuhrmann, P.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Gennis, M.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Godfrey, L.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Greif, H.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Harjes, J.; Haydar, R.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Huot, N.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kazarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Langkau, R.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leuschner, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Lewin, D.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Monnier, E.; Moreau, F.; Moreels, J.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Murray, S. A.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Orenstein, S.; Ould-Saada, F.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Peters, S.; Phillips, H. T.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pilgram, W.; Pitzl, D.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Rauschnabel, K.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rudowicz, M.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitz, W.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schulz, M.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Scobel, W.; Seehausen, U.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Tichomirov, I.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Urban, L.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallée, C.; van Esch, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Vick, R.; Villet, G.; Vogel, E.; Wacker, K.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Wegener, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Womersley, L. A.; Wright, A. E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.

    1994-09-01

    Global properties of the hadronic final state in deep inelastic scattering events at HERA are investigated. The data are corrected for detector effects and are compared directly with QCD phenomenology. Energy flows in both the laboratory frame and the hadronic centre of mass system and energy-energy correlations in the laboratory frame are presented. Comparing various QCD models, the colour dipole model provides the only satisfactory description of the data. In the hadronic centre of mass system the momentum components of charged particles longitudinal and transverse to the virtual boson direction are measured and compared with lower energy lepton-nucleon scattering data as well as with e + e - dat from LEP.

  5. Volume-preserving algorithm for secular relativistic dynamics of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ruili; Liu, Jian; Wang, Yulei; He, Yang; Qin, Hong; Sun, Yajuan

    2015-04-15

    Secular dynamics of relativistic charged particles has theoretical significance and a wide range of applications. However, conventional algorithms are not applicable to this problem due to the coherent accumulation of numerical errors. To overcome this difficulty, we develop a volume-preserving algorithm (VPA) with long-term accuracy and conservativeness via a systematic splitting method. Applied to the simulation of runaway electrons with a time-span over 10 magnitudes, the VPA generates accurate results and enables the discovery of new physics for secular runaway dynamics.

  6. Restoring The Azimuthal Symmetry Of Charged Particle Lateral Density In The Range Of KASCADE-Grande

    SciTech Connect

    Sima, O.; Rebel, H.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Gils, H. J.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Klages, H. O.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Nehls, S.

    2010-11-24

    KASCADE-Grande, an extension of the former KASCADE experiment, is a multi-component Extensive Air Shower (EAS) experiment located in Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Campus North), Germany. An important observable for analyzing the EAS is the lateral density of charged particles in the intrinsic shower plane. This observable is deduced from the basic information provided by the Grande scintillators - the energy deposit - first in the observation plane, by using a Lateral Energy Correction Function (LECF), then in the intrinsic shower plane, by applying an adequate mapping procedure. In both steps azimuthal.

  7. Charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative ion source for NBI

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, S.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Shibuya, M.

    2016-02-15

    Experiments by a four-pin probe and photodetachment technique were carried out to investigate the charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative hydrogen ion source for neutral beam injector. Electron and positive ion flows were obtained from the polar distribution of the probe saturation current. Negative hydrogen ion flow velocity and temperature were obtained by comparing the recovery times of the photodetachment signals at opposite probe tips. Electron and positive ions flows are dominated by crossed field drift and ambipolar diffusion. Negative hydrogen ion temperature is evaluated to be 0.12 eV.

  8. Chaos and collective relaxation in galaxies and charged-particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Courtlandt; Kandrup, Henry E.; Kishek, Rami A.; O'Shea, Patrick G.; Reiser, Martin; Sideris, Ioannis V.; /Florida U. /Northern Illinois U.

    2003-01-01

    Both galaxies and charged particle beams can exhibit collective relaxation on surprisingly short time scales. This can be attributed to the effects of chaos, often triggered by resonances caused by time-dependences in the bulk potential, which act almost identically for attractive gravitational and repulsive electrostatic forces. These similarities suggest that many physical processes at work in galaxies, albeit not subject to direct controlled experiments, can be tested indirectly using facilities such as the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) currently nearing completion.

  9. GENERAL: Hawking Radiation of Charged Particles in Reissner-Nordström Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ren; Zhang, Li-Chun; Li, Huai-Fan

    2010-03-01

    We extend the method that Banerjee and Majhi have used to discuss Hawking radiation. Under the condition that the total energy and electrical charge of spacetime are conserved, we investigate Hawking radiation of the charged black hole by a new Tortoise coordinate transformation. Taking the reaction of the radiation of the particle to the spacetime into consideration, we not only derive the radiation spectrum that satisfies the unitary principle in quantum mechanics but also show that the contribution of ingoing particles is equal to the one of outgoing particles on the similar chemical potential term in radiation spectrum caused by charged particles.

  10. Mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) semiconductor devices as charged-particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Becchetti, F.D.; Raymond, R.S.; Ristinen, R.A.; Schnepple, W.F.; Ortale, C.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of HgI/sub 2/ semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors have been investigated. Nearly linear energy response with FWHM resolution of 5 to 15% is observed for /sup 1/ /sup 2/H and /sup 3/ /sup 4/He ions, E < 40 MeV. Fast proton damage is observed for > 10/sup 10/ protons/cm/sup 2/. However, based on measurements with two HgI/sub 2/ detectors, little fast neutron damage is apparent at fluences up to 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/. This suggests considerably greater resistance to radiation damage than is observed for Si and other solid state devices.

  11. A study of CR-39 plastic charged-particle detector replacement by consumer imaging sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Plaud-Ramos, Kenie Omar; Freeman, Matthew Stouten; Wei, Wanchun; Guardincerri, Elena; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Cowan, Joseph Sarno; Durham, J. Matthew; Huang, Di; Gao, Jun; Hoffbauer, Mark Arles; Morley, Deborah Jean; Morris, Christopher L.; Poulson, Daniel Cris; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-08-03

    Consumer imaging sensors (CIS) are examined for real-time charged-particle detection and CR-39 plastic detector replacement. Removing cover glass from CIS is hard if not impossible, in particular for the latest inexpensive webcam models. We show that $10-class CIS are sensitive to MeV and higher energy protons and α-particles by using a 90Sr β-source with its cover glass in place. Indirect, real-time, high-resolution detection is also feasible when combining CIS with a ZnS:Ag phosphor screen and optics. Furthermore, noise reduction in CIS is nevertheless important for the indirect approach.

  12. A study of CR-39 plastic charged-particle detector replacement by consumer imaging sensors

    DOE PAGES

    Plaud-Ramos, Kenie Omar; Freeman, Matthew Stouten; Wei, Wanchun; ...

    2016-08-03

    Consumer imaging sensors (CIS) are examined for real-time charged-particle detection and CR-39 plastic detector replacement. Removing cover glass from CIS is hard if not impossible, in particular for the latest inexpensive webcam models. We show that $10-class CIS are sensitive to MeV and higher energy protons and α-particles by using a 90Sr β-source with its cover glass in place. Indirect, real-time, high-resolution detection is also feasible when combining CIS with a ZnS:Ag phosphor screen and optics. Furthermore, noise reduction in CIS is nevertheless important for the indirect approach.

  13. A New Method for Searching for Free Fractional Charge Particles in Bulk Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin

    1999-11-10

    We present a new experimental method for searching for free fractional charge in bulk matter; this new method derives from the traditional Millikan liquid drop method, but allows the use of much larger drops, 20 to 100 {micro}m in diameter, compared to the traditional method that uses drops less than 15 {micro}m in diameter. These larger drops provide the substantial advantage that it is then much easier to consistently generate drops containing liquid suspensions of powdered meteorites and other special minerals. These materials are of great importance in bulk searches for fractional charge particles that may have been produced in the early universe.

  14. A new look at the pushing force of an electromagnetic wave on a classical charged particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essén, Hanno; C-E Stén, Johan

    2015-09-01

    The interaction between a plane wave and a classical charged particle is reviewed in this paper. A matrix formulation is used to derive the relativistic motion of the particle due to the Lorentz force of a spatially homogeneous time-harmonic radiation field. The Landau-Lifshitz approach to the radiation damping force is then investigated for the same field. In conclusion only the radiation damping accelerates the particle in the direction of the Poynting vector for this type of field. The Lorentz force only leads to an extra constant drift velocity, plus oscillations with the frequency of the field.

  15. Gridless retarding potential analyzer for use in very-low-energy charged particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyn, T. W.; Sharp, W. E.; Hays, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of the hyperbolic retarding potential analyzer in the electrostatic mode is developed in detail and verified in the laboratory. A monoenergetic electron beam is used for the laboratory investigation. The analyzer (acronym HARP) has advantages over other conventional electrostatic analyzers; among them are less contact potential influence and high throughput because of the symmetry shape of the analyzer. The most useful application of the HARP is in detecting low-energy charged particles. A sample of low-energy particle data obtained in the earth's ionosphere is given.

  16. A study of CR-39 plastic charged-particle detector replacement by consumer imaging sensors.

    PubMed

    Plaud-Ramos, K O; Freeman, M S; Wei, W; Guardincerri, E; Bacon, J D; Cowan, J; Durham, J M; Huang, D; Gao, J; Hoffbauer, M A; Morley, D J; Morris, C L; Poulson, D C; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-11-01

    Consumer imaging sensors (CIS) are examined for real-time charged-particle detection and CR-39 plastic detector replacement. Removing cover glass from CIS is hard if not impossible, in particular for the latest inexpensive webcam models. We show that $10-class CIS are sensitive to MeV and higher energy protons and α-particles by using a (90)Sr β-source with its cover glass in place. Indirect, real-time, high-resolution detection is also feasible when combining CIS with a ZnS:Ag phosphor screen and optics. Noise reduction in CIS is nevertheless important for the indirect approach.

  17. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deyang; Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-01

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O(3+) ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  18. A novel CMOS sensor with in-pixel auto-zeroed discrimination for charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degerli, Y.; Guilloux, F.; Orsini, F.

    2014-05-01

    With the aim of developing fast and granular Monolithic Active Pixels Sensors (MAPS) as new charged particle tracking detectors for high energy physics experiments, a new rolling shutter binary pixel architecture concept (RSBPix) with in-pixel correlated double sampling, amplification and discrimination is presented. The discriminator features auto-zeroing in order to compensate process-related transistor mismatches. In order to validate the pixel, a first monolithic CMOS sensor prototype, including a pixel array of 96 × 64 pixels, has been designed and fabricated in the Tower-Jazz 0.18 μm CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) process. Results of laboratory tests are presented.

  19. A study of CR-39 track response to charged particles from NOVA implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.W.; Cable, M.D.; Hicks, D.G.; Li, C.K.; Petrasso, R.D.; Seguin, F.H.

    1996-06-14

    We have exposed CR-39 track recording material to a number of NOVA implosions. Radiation from the implosion passed through an array of ranging filters, which aided identification of the incident particles and their energies. The etching procedure was calibrated by including a piece of track exposed to DD protons from a small accelerator. For the same shots, we quantitatively compare the DD neutron yield with the DD proton yield determined from the track. In DT implosions, tracks produced by neutron interactions prevent observation of charged-particle tracks that are produced by the processes of knock-on, secondary or tertiary fusion.

  20. Final Report - Interaction of radiation and charged particles in miniature plasma structures

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2014-07-16

    The extension of our program to the development of theories and models capable of describing the interactions of intense laser pulses and charged particles in miniature plasma channels is reported. These channels, which have recently been created in the laboratory, have unique dispersion properties that make them interesting for a variety of applications including particle acceleration, high harmonic generation, and THz generation. Our program systematically explored the properties of these channels, including dispersion, losses, and coupling. A particular application that was pursued is the generation of intense pulses of THz radiation by short laser pulses propagating these channels. We also explored the nonlinear dynamics of laser pulses propagating in these channels.

  1. Molecular theory of a charged particle in a polarizable nonpolar liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lado, F.

    1997-03-01

    A generalization of liquid state theory that treats internal degrees of freedom on the same mathematical footing as orientational degrees of freedom is used to calculate the Maxwell field of a charged particle in a fluid of polarizable nonpolar molecules. The polarizable fluid is modeled by Lennard-Jones molecules with classical Drude oscillators. The electric field E(r) of the charged impurity is given in terms of a screening function that yields the correct dielectric constant at large r and can be computed using standard procedures for the pair correlation function of classical liquid state theory. Sample numerical results using the hypernetted-chain approximation are compared with simulation.

  2. Gridless retarding potential analyzer for use in very-low-energy charged particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyn, T. W.; Sharp, W. E.; Hays, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of the hyperbolic retarding potential analyzer in the electrostatic mode is developed in detail and verified in the laboratory. A monoenergetic electron beam is used for the laboratory investigation. The analyzer (acronym HARP) has advantages over other conventional electrostatic analyzers; among them are less contact potential influence and high throughput because of the symmetry shape of the analyzer. The most useful application of the HARP is in detecting low-energy charged particles. A sample of low-energy particle data obtained in the earth's ionosphere is given.

  3. Two distinct types of the inhibition of vasculogenesis by different species of charged particles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Charged particle radiation is known to be more biologically effective than photon radiation. One example of this is the inhibition of the formation of human blood vessels. This effect is an important factor influencing human health and is relevant to space travel as well as to cancer radiotherapy. We have previously shown that ion particles with a high energy deposition, or linear energy transfer (LET) are more than four times more effective at disrupting mature vessel tissue models than particles with a lower LET. For vasculogenesis however, the relative biological effectiveness between particles is the same. This unexpected result prompted us to investigate whether the inhibition of vasculogenesis was occurring by distinct mechanisms. Methods Using 3-Dimensional human vessel models, we developed assays that determine at what stage angiogenesis is inhibited. Vessel morphology, the presence of motile tip structures, and changes in the matrix architecture were assessed. To confirm that the mechanisms are distinct, stimulation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) with phorbol ester (PMA) was employed to selectively restore vessel formation in cultures where early motile tip activity was inhibited. Results Endothelial cells in 3-D culture exposed to low LET protons failed to make connections with other cells but eventually developed a central lumen. Conversely, cells exposed to high LET Fe charged particles extended cellular processes and made connections to other cells but did not develop a central lumen. The microtubule and actin cytoskeletons indicated that motility at the extending tips of endothelial cells is inhibited by low LET but not high LET particles. Actin-rich protrusive structures that contain bundled microtubules showed a 65% decrease when exposed to low LET particles but not high LET particles, with commensurate changes in the matrix architecture. Stimulation of PKC with PMA restored tip motility and capillary formation in low but not high LET particle

  4. Design and implementation of a slope measuring instrument for measurement of charged particle temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, S. S.; Garg, S. C.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports the design considerations, implementation, and performance of an instrument, used to measure the slope of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of ionospheric plasma, for onboard measurement of charged particle temperatures. The instrument measures the reflected ac signal in the probe current, when an ac voltage is superposed over the probe bias, and is designed for the slope measurement from 6.3×10-14 A/V2 to 6.3×10-9 A/V2 with full scale resolution of 0.2%.

  5. The use of radiochromic films to measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Avila-Rodriguez, M A; Wilson, J S; McQuarrie, S A

    2009-11-01

    The use of radiochromic films as a simple and inexpensive tool to accurately measure and analyze the beam profile of charged particle accelerators is described. In this study, metallic foils of different materials and thicknesses were irradiated with 17.8MeV protons and autoradiographic images of the beam strike were acquired by exposing pieces of RCF in direct contact with the irradiated foils. The films were digitalized using a conventional scanner and images were analyzed using DoseLab. Beam intensity distributions, isodose curves and linear beam profiles of the digitalized images were acquired.

  6. Importance of separated efficiencies between positively and negatively charged particles for cumulant calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Toshihiro; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Esumi, ShinIchi; Masui, Hiroshi; Luo, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    We show the importance of separated efficiency corrections between positively and negatively charged particles for cumulant calculations by toy models and analytical calculations. Our results indicate that S σ in published net-proton results from the STAR experiment will be suppressed about 10% in central collisions and 20% in peripheral collisions at the beam energy of √{sN N}=200 GeV if the separated efficiencies are used to perform the efficiency correction, while no sizable efffect can be seen for κ σ2 .

  7. Hardware and software for ground tests of onboard charged particle spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batischev, A. G.; Galper, A. M.; Grishin, S. A.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Niadvetski, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    The article presents a hardware and software complex for ground tests of onboard charged particle spectrometers that are designed at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI for monitoring of nuclear-physical factors of space weather and can be installed in a wide class of satellites. The structural scheme and operating principles of component parts are discussed. The main algorithm and software features are presented. The technique of ground spectrometer tests and calibrations in various measurement modes at atmospheric cosmic particle flows, both in autonomous laboratories and in interface tests as part of a satellite, is also described.

  8. Calibration of the Sweeper Chamber Charged-Particle Detectors for the LISA Commissioning Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, J.; Grovom, A.; Rogers, W.; MoNA Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The new LISA (Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array) neutron detector array, designed to be used in conjunction with MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) was recently commissioned at the NSCL in an experiment designed to investigate excited states of neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes near the neutron drip-line. Charged fragments resulting from the neutron decays were swept out of the beam direction by the Sweeper Magnet after which they passed through a series of charged-particle detectors for fragment trajectory and energy determination. In order to achieve isotope separation and identification at the focal plane, which is then used to reconstruct the invariant mass of the unbound states, precise determinations of the fragment and neutron energies and trajectories are required. To correct for time-drifts in the charge-particle detectors that develop over the entire length of the experiment, Root C++ macros were developed to analyze and precisely correct for these detector drifts to within few tenths of a nanosecond. Root macros were also developed to position calibrate the ion chamber and CRDC's. Results for the LISA commissioning run will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  9. Charged Particle Radiation Therapy for Uveal Melanoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhen; Nabhan, Mohammed; Schild, Steven E.; Stafford, Scott L.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Foote, Robert L.; Murad, M. Hassan

    2013-05-01

    Charged particle therapy (CPT) delivered with either protons, helium ions, or carbon ions, has been used to treat uveal melanoma. The present analysis was performed to systematically evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of CPT for uveal melanoma. We searched EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and SciVerse Scopus and cross-referenced recent systematic reviews through January 2012. Two independent reviewers identified clinical trials and observational studies of CPT (protons, helium ions, and carbon ions). These reviewers extracted data and assessed study quality. Twenty-seven studies enrolling 8809 uveal melanoma patients met inclusion criteria. The rate of local recurrence was significantly less with CPT than with brachytherapy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.22, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.21-0.23). There were no significant differences in mortality or enucleation rates. Results were robust in multiple sensitivity analyses. CPT was also associated with lower retinopathy and cataract formation rates. Data suggest better outcomes may be possible with charged particle therapy with respect to local recurrence, retinopathy, and cataract formation rates. The overall quality of the evidence is low, and higher quality comparative effectiveness studies are needed to provide better evidence.

  10. Tracking down the links between charged particles and biological response: A UK perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Mark A.

    2013-07-18

    The UK has a long history of radiobiology research into charged particles, with interest likely to expand in the coming years following the recent government announcement of Pound-Sign 250 million to build two proton beam therapy facilities in the UK. A brief overview of research and facilities past and present with respect to radiation protection and oncology along with biological consequences and underlying mechanisms will be presented and discussed. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms underpinning the radiation action on biological systems is important in understanding, not only the risks associated with exposure, but also in optimising radiotherapy treatment of cancer. Ionizing radiation is always in the form of structure tracks which are a unique characteristic of ionizing radiation alone producing damage grossly different and far more biologically effective than endogenous damage. The track structure is the prime determinant of biological response to DNA, with charged particles of increasing LET leading to an increase in the frequency and complexity of clustered DNA damage. High-LET particles will also produce non-homogeneous dose distribution through a cell nucleus resulting in correlated DNA breaks along the path of the particle and an increase in the probability of complex chromosomal rearrangements. However it is now well established that there is variety of phenomena that do not conform to the conventional paradigm of targeted radiobiology, but there is insufficient evidence to assess the implications of these non-targeted effects for radiotherapy or relevance to risk for human health.

  11. Effect of magnetic helicity upon rectilinear propagation of charged particles in random magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, James A.

    1992-01-01

    When charged particles spiral along a large constant magnetic field, their trajectories are scattered by any random field components that are superposed on the guiding field. If the random field configuration embodies helicity, the scattering is asymmetrical with respect to a plane perpendicular to the guiding field, for particles moving into the forward hemisphere are scattered at different rates from those moving into the backward hemisphere. This asymmetry gives rise to new terms in the transport equations that describe propagation of charged particles. Helicity has virtually no impact on qualitative features of the diffusive mode of propagation. However, characteristic velocities of the coherent modes that appear after a highly anisotropic injection exhibit an asymmetry related to helicity. Explicit formulas, which embody the effects of helicity, are given for the anisotropies, the coefficient diffusion, and the coherent velocities. Predictions derived from these expressions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport, but the simulations reveal certain phenomena whose explanation calls for further analytical work.

  12. Cellular and molecular analysis of mutagenesis induced by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L. X.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannias, D.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) and gamma rays was scored using human-hamster hybrid AL cells. The LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility ranged from 10 keV/microm protons to 150 keV/microm 4He ions. The induced mutant fractions at both the S1 and HGPRT loci were dependent on the dose and LET. In addition, for each dose examined, the mutant yield at the S1 locus was 30-60 fold higher than at the corresponding HGPRT locus. To determine whether the mutation spectrum was comparably dependent on dose and LET, independent S1- and HGPRT- mutants induced by 150 keV/microm 4He ions and gamma rays were isolated, and their DNA was analyzed by both Southern blotting and multiplex PCR methods. While the majority of radiation-induced mutants showed deletions of varying sizes, the relative percentage of large deletions was found to be related to both the dose and LET of the radiation examined. Using a mutation system that can detect multilocus changes, results of the present study show that radiation-induced chromosomal loss can be in the millions of base pairs.

  13. Cellular and molecular analysis of mutagenesis induced by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L X; Waldren, C A; Vannias, D; Hei, T K

    1996-03-01

    Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) and gamma rays was scored using human-hamster hybrid AL cells. The LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility ranged from 10 keV/microm protons to 150 keV/microm 4He ions. The induced mutant fractions at both the S1 and HGPRT loci were dependent on the dose and LET. In addition, for each dose examined, the mutant yield at the S1 locus was 30-60 fold higher than at the corresponding HGPRT locus. To determine whether the mutation spectrum was comparably dependent on dose and LET, independent S1- and HGPRT- mutants induced by 150 keV/microm 4He ions and gamma rays were isolated, and their DNA was analyzed by both Southern blotting and multiplex PCR methods. While the majority of radiation-induced mutants showed deletions of varying sizes, the relative percentage of large deletions was found to be related to both the dose and LET of the radiation examined. Using a mutation system that can detect multilocus changes, results of the present study show that radiation-induced chromosomal loss can be in the millions of base pairs.

  14. Measurements of charged-particle stopping around the Bragg peak in OMEGA ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R.; Grabowski, P.; Mancini, R.; Regan, S.; Delettrez, J.; Glebov, V.; Sangster, T.

    2014-10-01

    We report on measurements of charged-particle stopping around the Bragg peak in plasmas relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The energy loss of DD-tritons, DD-protons, D3He-alphas and D3He-protons, which are ideal particles for validating approximations to the ion-electron collision operator, have been measured in D3He gas-filled filled implosions. These experiments are relevant to alpha-particle transport and heating in hot-sport ignition experiments. As the DD and D3He fusion products span a large range of velocities, these measurements represent the first detailed experimental study of charged-particle stopping, ranging from linear low-velocity stopping, through the Bragg peak, to high-velocity stopping. The results are contrasted to commonly used theories, including the Brown-Preston-Singleton and Li-Petrasso formalisms. The data is also used to rule out theories that neglect quantum diffraction and dynamic screening. This work was supported in part by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE and GA.

  15. Dynamical and scale invariance of charged particles slipping on a rough surface with periodic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Luo, Pengcheng; Ding, Huifang

    2017-07-01

    This letter deals with the dynamical and scaling invariance of charged particles slipping on a rough surface with periodic excitation. A variant of the Fermi-Ulam model (FUM) is proposed to describe the transport behavior of the particles when the electric field force Fe is smaller or larger than the friction force Ff, i.e., A < 0 or A > 0. For these two cases, the stability of fixed points is analyzed with the help of the eigenvalue analysis method, and further the invariant manifolds are constructed to investigate the dynamical invariance such as energy diffusion for some initial conditions in the case A > 0 and decay process in the case A < 0. Moreover, the scaling invariance analysis is performed to demonstrate the power law of the statistical behavior. It follows that both the FA phenomenon for A > 0 and the velocity decay process for A < 0 satisfy scaling invariance with respect to the nondimensional acceleration A. Besides, for A < 0, the transient number nx is proposed to evaluate the speed of the velocity decay process. More importantly, nx is found to possess the attribute of scaling invariance with respect to both the initial velocity V0 and the nondimensional acceleration A. These results are very useful for the in-depth understanding of the energy transport properties of charged particle systems.

  16. Cellular and molecular analysis of mutagenesis induced by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L. X.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannias, D.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) and gamma rays was scored using human-hamster hybrid AL cells. The LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility ranged from 10 keV/microm protons to 150 keV/microm 4He ions. The induced mutant fractions at both the S1 and HGPRT loci were dependent on the dose and LET. In addition, for each dose examined, the mutant yield at the S1 locus was 30-60 fold higher than at the corresponding HGPRT locus. To determine whether the mutation spectrum was comparably dependent on dose and LET, independent S1- and HGPRT- mutants induced by 150 keV/microm 4He ions and gamma rays were isolated, and their DNA was analyzed by both Southern blotting and multiplex PCR methods. While the majority of radiation-induced mutants showed deletions of varying sizes, the relative percentage of large deletions was found to be related to both the dose and LET of the radiation examined. Using a mutation system that can detect multilocus changes, results of the present study show that radiation-induced chromosomal loss can be in the millions of base pairs.

  17. Tracking down the links between charged particles and biological response: A UK perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Mark A.

    2013-07-01

    The UK has a long history of radiobiology research into charged particles, with interest likely to expand in the coming years following the recent government announcement of £250 million to build two proton beam therapy facilities in the UK. A brief overview of research and facilities past and present with respect to radiation protection and oncology along with biological consequences and underlying mechanisms will be presented and discussed. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms underpinning the radiation action on biological systems is important in understanding, not only the risks associated with exposure, but also in optimising radiotherapy treatment of cancer. Ionizing radiation is always in the form of structure tracks which are a unique characteristic of ionizing radiation alone producing damage grossly different and far more biologically effective than endogenous damage. The track structure is the prime determinant of biological response to DNA, with charged particles of increasing LET leading to an increase in the frequency and complexity of clustered DNA damage. High-LET particles will also produce non-homogeneous dose distribution through a cell nucleus resulting in correlated DNA breaks along the path of the particle and an increase in the probability of complex chromosomal rearrangements. However it is now well established that there is variety of phenomena that do not conform to the conventional paradigm of targeted radiobiology, but there is insufficient evidence to assess the implications of these non-targeted effects for radiotherapy or relevance to risk for human health.

  18. DNA Damage by Ionizing Radiation: Tandem Double Lesions by Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Wang, Dunyou; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation are the source of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, damage to the central nervous system, lowering of the immune response, as well as other radiation-induced damages to human health. Monte Carlo track simulations and kinetic modeling of radiation damages to the DNA employ available molecular and cellular data to simulate the biological effect of high and low LET radiation io the DNA. While the simulations predict single and double strand breaks and base damages, so far all complex lesions are the result of stochastic coincidence from independent processes. Tandem double lesions have not yet been taken into account. Unlike the standard double lesions that are produced by two separate attacks by charged particles or radicals, tandem double lesions are produced by one single attack. The standard double lesions dominate at the high dosage regime. On the other hand, tandem double lesions do not depend on stochastic coincidences and become important at the low dosage regime of particular interest to NASA. Tandem double lesions by hydroxyl radical attack of guanine in isolated DNA have been reported at a dosage of radiation as low as 10 Gy. The formation of two tandem base lesions was found to be linear with the applied doses, a characteristic of tandem lesions. However, tandem double lesions from attack by a charged particle have not been reported.

  19. [A Generator of Mono-energetic Electrons for Response Test of Charged Particle Detectors.].

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Fumiyasu; Yoshida, Katsuhide; Maruyama, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a generator of mono-energetic electrons for the response test of charged particle detectors, which is used to measure fragmented particles of the carbon beam for cancer therapy. Mono-energetic electrons are extracted from (90)Sr by analyzing the energy of beta rays in the generator with a magnetic field. We evaluated performance parameters of the generator such as the absolute energy, the energy resolution and the counting rates of extracted electrons. The generator supplies mono-energetic electrons from 0.5MeV to 1.7MeV with the energy resolution of 20% in FWHM at higher energies than 1.0MeV. The counting rate of electrons is 400cpm at the maximum when the activity of (90)Sr is 298kBq. The generator was used to measure responses of fragmented-particle detectors and to determine the threshold energy of the detectors. We evaluated the dependence of pulse height variation on the detector position and the threshold energy by using the generator. We concluded this generator is useful for the response test of general charged particle detectors.

  20. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.; FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-18

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.