Science.gov

Sample records for betacellulin gene transduction

  1. Gene therapy with neurogenin3, betacellulin and SOCS1 reverses diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Buras, E; Lee, J; Liu, R; Liu, V; Espiritu, C; Ozer, K; Thompson, B; Nally, L; Yuan, G; Oka, K; Chang, B; Samson, S; Yechoor, V; Chan, L

    2015-11-01

    Islet transplantation for type 1 diabetes is limited by a shortage of donor islets and requirement for immunosuppression. We approached this problem by inducing in vivo islet neogenesis in non-obese diabetic (NOD) diabetic mice, a model of autoimmune diabetes. We demonstrate that gene therapy with helper-dependent adenovirus carrying neurogenin3 (Ngn3), an islet lineage-defining transcription factor, and betacellulin (Btc), an islet growth factor, leads to the induction of periportal insulin-positive cell clusters in the liver, which are rapidly destroyed. To specifically accord protection to these 'neo-islets' from cytokine-mediated destruction, we overexpressed suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) gene, using a rat insulin promoter in combination with Ngn3 and Btc. With this approach, about half of diabetic mice attained euglycemia sustained for over 4 months, regain glucose tolerance and appropriate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Histological analysis revealed periportal islet hormone-expressing 'neo-islets' in treated mouse livers. Despite evidence of persistent 'insulitis' with activated T cells, these 'neo-islets' persist to maintain euglycemia. This therapy does not affect diabetogenicity of splenocytes, as they retain the ability to transfer diabetes. This study thus provides a proof-of-concept for engineering in vivo islet neogenesis with targeted resistance to cytokine-mediated destruction to provide a long-term reversal of diabetes in NOD mice.

  2. Gene Expressions for Signal Transduction under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Syunsuke; Wang, Xin; Saito, Hiromi; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Although it is now well known that some diseased areas, such as cancer nests, inflammation loci, and infarction areas, are acidified, little is known about cellular signal transduction, gene expression, and cellular functions under acidic conditions. Our group showed that different signal proteins were activated under acidic conditions compared with those observed in a typical medium of around pH 7.4 that has been used until now. Investigations of gene expression under acidic conditions may be crucial to our understanding of signal transduction in acidic diseased areas. In this study, we investigated gene expression in mesothelioma cells cultured at an acidic pH using a DNA microarray technique. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 379 genes were increased more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5. Genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors numbered 35, 32, and 17 among the 379 genes, respectively. Since the functions of 78 genes are unknown, it can be argued that cells may have other genes for signaling under acidic conditions. The expressions of 37 of the 379 genes were observed to increase after as little as 2 h. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 412 genes were repressed more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5, and the 412 genes contained 35, 76, and 7 genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors, respectively. These results suggest that the signal pathways in acidic diseased areas are different, at least in part, from those examined with cells cultured at a pH of around 7.4. PMID:24705103

  3. Betacellulin in Chronic Periodontitis Patients With and Without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalburgi, Nagaraj B.; Bilichodmath, Shivaprasad; Warad, Shivaraj B.; Ugale, Mahesh S.; Koregol, Arati C.; Bijjargi, Shobha C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The host immune response to bacterial dental plaque determines periodontal disease susceptibility by increasing the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The Epidermal Growth Factor family cytokines stimulate proliferation and keratinization of cells in dermis and oral epithelium. Epidermal Growth Factor family consists of Amphiregulin, Betacellulin, Epiregulin, Epigen, Heparin binding Epidermal Growth Factor like growth factor and transforming Growth Factor-alpha. Aim The current study aimed to investigate expression of Betacellulin in chronic periodontitis patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus and thereby assessing role of betacellulin in periodontal health and disease. Materials and Methods Present study comprised of 90 participants, age ranges from 18 to 60-year-old, for the period of March 2010 to May 2011. Participants were categorized into three groups based Gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CA Loss). Group 1 consisted 30 individuals with clinically healthy periodontium, Group-2 consisted 30 individuals with GI>1, PD≥5 mm, and CA Loss>3 mm. Group-3 (Chronic Periodontitis with type 2 diabetes mellitus) consisted 30 with GI >1, PD≥5 mm, and CA Loss>3 mm. Immunohistochemical localization and quantification of Betacellulin was done in gingival tissue samples from all groups. Results Data showed expression of Betacellulin were higher in chronic periodontitis as compared to healthy. A positive correlation found in Betacellulin expression and Probing Depth in chronic periodontitis. Conclusion This footmark study impacts the role of Betacellulin in pathogenesis and progression of periodontal disease which will help in exploration of novel immunotherapeutic strategies and immunological research activity in this field. PMID:26673371

  4. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C.

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Changes in gene expression and signal transduction in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies from space flights over the past three decades have demonstrated that basic physiological changes occur in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalic fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known and until recently, the general approach was to investigate general systemic changes, not basic cellular responses to microgravity. This laboratory has recently studied gene growth and activation of normal osteoblasts (MC3T3-El) during spaceflight. Osteoblast cells were grown on glass coverslips and loaded in the Biorack plunger boxes. The osteoblasts were launched in a serum deprived state, activated in microgravity and collected in microgravity. The osteoblasts were examined for changes in gene expression and signal transduction. Approximately one day after growth activation significant changes were observed in gene expression in 0-G flight samples. Immediate early growth genes/growth factors cox-2, c-myc, bcl2, TGF beta1, bFGF and PCNA showed a significant diminished mRNA induction in microgravity FCS activated cells when compared to ground and 1-G flight controls. Cox-1 was not detected in any of the samples. There were no significant differences in the expression of reference gene mRNA between the ground, 0-G and 1-G samples. The data suggest that quiescent osteoblasts are slower to enter the cell cycle in microgravity and that the lack of gravity itself may be a significant factor in bone loss in spaceflight. Preliminary data from our STS 76 flight experiment support our hypothesis that a basic biological response occurs at the tissue, cellular, and molecular level in 0-G. Here we examine ground-based and space flown data to help us understand the mechanism of bone loss in microgravity.

  6. Changes in gene expression and signal transduction in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Fulford, M

    2001-07-01

    Studies from space flights over the past three decades have demonstrated that basic physiological changes occur in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalic fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known and until recently, the general approach was to investigate general systemic changes, not basic cellular responses to microgravity. This laboratory has recently studied gene growth and activation of normal osteoblasts (MC3T3-El) during spaceflight. Osteoblast cells were grown on glass coverslips and loaded in the Biorack plunger boxes. The osteoblasts were launched in a serum deprived state, activated in microgravity and collected in microgravity. The osteoblasts were examined for changes in gene expression and signal transduction. Approximately one day after growth activation significant changes were observed in gene expression in 0-G flight samples. Immediate early growth genes/growth factors cox-2, c-myc, bcl2, TGF beta1, bFGF and PCNA showed a significant diminished mRNA induction in microgravity FCS activated cells when compared to ground and 1-G flight controls. Cox-1 was not detected in any of the samples. There were no significant differences in the expression of reference gene mRNA between the ground, 0-G and 1-G samples. The data suggest that quiescent osteoblasts are slower to enter the cell cycle in microgravity and that the lack of gravity itself may be a significant factor in bone loss in spaceflight. Preliminary data from our STS 76 flight experiment support our hypothesis that a basic biological response occurs at the tissue, cellular, and molecular level in 0-G. Here we examine ground-based and space flown data to help us understand the mechanism of bone loss in microgravity.

  7. Changes in gene expression and signal transduction in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies from space flights over the past three decades have demonstrated that basic physiological changes occur in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalic fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known and until recently, the general approach was to investigate general systemic changes, not basic cellular responses to microgravity. This laboratory has recently studied gene growth and activation of normal osteoblasts (MC3T3-El) during spaceflight. Osteoblast cells were grown on glass coverslips and loaded in the Biorack plunger boxes. The osteoblasts were launched in a serum deprived state, activated in microgravity and collected in microgravity. The osteoblasts were examined for changes in gene expression and signal transduction. Approximately one day after growth activation significant changes were observed in gene expression in 0-G flight samples. Immediate early growth genes/growth factors cox-2, c-myc, bcl2, TGF beta1, bFGF and PCNA showed a significant diminished mRNA induction in microgravity FCS activated cells when compared to ground and 1-G flight controls. Cox-1 was not detected in any of the samples. There were no significant differences in the expression of reference gene mRNA between the ground, 0-G and 1-G samples. The data suggest that quiescent osteoblasts are slower to enter the cell cycle in microgravity and that the lack of gravity itself may be a significant factor in bone loss in spaceflight. Preliminary data from our STS 76 flight experiment support our hypothesis that a basic biological response occurs at the tissue, cellular, and molecular level in 0-G. Here we examine ground-based and space flown data to help us understand the mechanism of bone loss in microgravity.

  8. Identification and chromosomal localizations of signal transduction genes associated with human ovarian cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhu; Shenhua, Xu; Hanzhou, Mou; Linhui, Gu; Chihong, Zhu; Xianglin, Liu

    2012-12-01

    Gene chip technology can be used to identify and localize signal transduction genes associated with metastasis. We used the human genome U133A gene chip to detect differences in gene expression profiles among high (H) and low (L) metastatic human ovarian cancer cell lines (HO-8910PM, HO-8910), and normal ovarian tissues (C), to identify metastasis-associated signal transduction genes and determine their chromosomal localizations. A total of 37 signal transduction genes showed more than twofold differences in expression levels between the H and L metastatic ovarian cancer cell lines; of these, 21 genes were up-regulated [signal log ratio (SLR)≥1], and 16 genes were down-regulated (SLR≤-1). Most genes were located on chromosome 1 (7 genes, 18.9%), followed by chromosome 8 (5 genes, 13.5%), then chromosomes 6, 11, and 17 (3 genes each, 8.1%). A total of 21 of the differentially expressed genes (56.7%) were localized on the short arm of the chromosome (q). The disruption of signal transduction gene expression may be an important factor associated with ovarian cancer metastasis. The affected signal transduction genes were localized to chromosomes 1, 8, 6, 11, and 17.

  9. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  10. Transduction-Like Gene Transfer in the Methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 × 10−5 (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10−3 (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae. PMID:10321998

  11. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  12. Axonal-Transport-Mediated Gene Transduction in the Interior of Rat Bone

    PubMed Central

    Okabayashi, Toshitaka; Nakanishi, Kuniaki; Tsuchihara, Toyokazu; Arino, Hiroshi; Yoshihara, Yasuo; Tominaga, Susumu; Uenoyama, Maki; Suzuki, Shinya; Asagiri, Masataka; Nemoto, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene transduction has been considered advantageous for the sustained delivery of proteins to specific target tissues. However, in the case of hard tissues, such as bone, local gene delivery remains problematic owing to anatomical accessibility limitations of the target sites. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we evaluated the feasibility of exogenous gene transduction in the interior of bone via axonal transport following intramuscular administration of a nonviral vector. A high expression level of the transduced gene was achieved in the tibia ipsilateral to the injected tibialis anterior muscle, as well as in the ipsilateral sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglia. In sciatic transection rats, the gene expression level was significantly lowered in bone. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that axonal transport is critical for gene transduction. Our study may provide a basis for developing therapeutic methods for efficient gene delivery into hard tissues. PMID:20927397

  13. Phylogenomic networks reveal limited phylogenetic range of lateral gene transfer by transduction

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Ovidiu; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages are recognized DNA vectors and transduction is considered as a common mechanism of lateral gene transfer (LGT) during microbial evolution. Anecdotal events of phage-mediated gene transfer were studied extensively, however, a coherent evolutionary viewpoint of LGT by transduction, its extent and characteristics, is still lacking. Here we report a large-scale evolutionary reconstruction of transduction events in 3982 genomes. We inferred 17 158 recent transduction events linking donors, phages and recipients into a phylogenomic transduction network view. We find that LGT by transduction is mostly restricted to closely related donors and recipients. Furthermore, a substantial number of the transduction events (9%) are best described as gene duplications that are mediated by mobile DNA vectors. We propose to distinguish this type of paralogy by the term autology. A comparison of donor and recipient genomes revealed that genome similarity is a superior predictor of species connectivity in the network in comparison to common habitat. This indicates that genetic similarity, rather than ecological opportunity, is a driver of successful transduction during microbial evolution. A striking difference in the connectivity pattern of donors and recipients shows that while lysogenic interactions are highly species-specific, the host range for lytic phage infections can be much wider, serving to connect dense clusters of closely related species. Our results thus demonstrate that DNA transfer via transduction occurs within the context of phage–host specificity, but that this tight constraint can be breached, on rare occasions, to produce long-range LGTs of profound evolutionary consequences. PMID:27648812

  14. Hypergravity signal transduction and gene expression in cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Y.; Whitson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted during space flight and with clinostats and centrifuges, suggesting that gravity effects the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian cells in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which mammalian cells respond to changes in gravitational stress. This paper summarizes studies designed to clarify the effects of hypergravity on the cultured human HeLa cells and to investigate the mechanism of hypergravity signal transduction in these cells.

  15. Hypergravity signal transduction and gene expression in cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Y.; Whitson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted during space flight and with clinostats and centrifuges, suggesting that gravity effects the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian cells in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which mammalian cells respond to changes in gravitational stress. This paper summarizes studies designed to clarify the effects of hypergravity on the cultured human HeLa cells and to investigate the mechanism of hypergravity signal transduction in these cells.

  16. Efficient lentiviral gene transfer to canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol.

    PubMed

    Horn, Peter A; Keyser, Kirsten A; Peterson, Laura J; Neff, Tobias; Thomasson, Bobbie M; Thompson, Jesse; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2004-05-15

    The use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of hematopoietic stem cells has evoked much interest owing to their ability to stably integrate into the genome of nondividing cells. However, published large animal studies have reported highly variable gene transfer rates of typically less than 1%. Here we report the use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of canine CD34(+) hematopoietic repopulating cells using a very short, 18-hour transduction protocol. We compared lentiviral transduction of hematopoietic repopulating cells from either stem cell factor (SCF)- and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed marrow or mobilized peripheral blood in a competitive repopulation assay in 3 dogs. All dogs engrafted rapidly within 9 days. Transgene expression was detected in all lineages (B cells, T cells, granulocytes, and red blood cells as well as platelets) indicating multilineage engraftment of transduced cells, with overall long-term marking levels of up to 12%. Gene transfer levels in mobilized peripheral blood cells were slightly higher than in primed marrow cells. In conclusion, we show efficient lentiviral transduction of canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol. These results have important implications for the design of stem cell gene therapy protocols, especially for those diseases in which the maintenance of stem cells in culture is a major limitation.

  17. Effects of Adenoviral Gene Transduction on the Stemness of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marasini, Subash; Chang, Da-Young; Jung, Jin-Hwa; Lee, Su-Jung; Cha, Hye Lim; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being evaluated as a cell-based therapy for tissue injury and degenerative diseases. Recently, several methods have been suggested to further enhance the therapeutic functions of MSCs, including genetic modifications with tissue- and/or disease-specific genes. The objective of this study was to examine the efficiency and stability of transduction using an adenoviral vector in human MSCs. Additionally, we aimed to assess the effects of transduction on the proliferation and multipotency of MSCs. The results indicate that MSCs can be transduced by adenoviruses in vitro, but high viral titers are necessary to achieve high efficiency. In addition, transduction at a higher multiplicity of infection (MOI) was associated with attenuated proliferation and senescence-like morphology. Furthermore, transduced MSCs showed a diminished capacity for adipogenic differentiation while retaining their potential to differentiate into osteocytes and chondrocytes. This work could contribute significantly to clinical trials of MSCs modified with therapeutic genes. PMID:28835020

  18. Signal transduction pathways that regulate CAB gene expression. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, J.

    1993-12-31

    We have completed the initial genetic and phenotypic characterization of several classes of new mutants that affect CAB gene expression. The doc mutants (for dark overexpression of cab) are characterized by elevated levels of CAB gene expression in the dark; however, unlike the previously isolated de-etiolated mutants (also isolated in my lab), the doc mutants still appear etiolated. The doc alleles define 3 loci, each of which maps to a separate chromosome. The details of the mutant isolation scheme and the genetic and phenotypic description of these new mutants are described. The second class of mutants, the gun mutants (for genomes uncoupled) show accumulation of CAB mRNA in the absence of chloroplast gene expression and development. Thus, the normally tightly coordinated expression between the chloroplast and nuclear genes that encode chloroplast-destined proteins has been uncoupled. We have shown that the Arabidopsis HY3 locus encodes the type B phytochrome apoprotein gene and have characterized the phenotypes of null hy3 alleles to ascertain a role for this phytochrome in Arabidopsis development. We have also isolated and characterized a number of alleles of the phytochrome A gene.

  19. Cancer classification through filtering progressive transductive support vector machine based on gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinguo; Chen, Dan

    2017-08-01

    Traditional supervised classifiers neglect a large amount of data which not have sufficient follow-up information, only work with labeled data. Consequently, the small sample size limits the advancement of design appropriate classifier. In this paper, a transductive learning method which combined with the filtering strategy in transductive framework and progressive labeling strategy is addressed. The progressive labeling strategy does not need to consider the distribution of labeled samples to evaluate the distribution of unlabeled samples, can effective solve the problem of evaluate the proportion of positive and negative samples in work set. Our experiment result demonstrate that the proposed technique have great potential in cancer prediction based on gene expression.

  20. MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction regulates the actin cytoskeleton through the downregulation of WAVE2.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-L; Ueno, M; Liu, D; Masuya, D; Nakano, J; Yokomise, H; Nakagawa, T; Miyake, M

    2006-10-19

    Motility-related protein-1 (MRP-1/CD9) is involved in cell motility. We studied the change in the actin cytoskeleton, and the expression of actin-related protein (Arp) 2 and Arp3 and the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family according to MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction into HT1080 cells. The frequency of cells with lamellipodia was significantly lower in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells than in control HT1080 cells (P<0.0001). MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction affected the subcellular localization of Arp2 and Arp3 proteins. Furthermore, MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction induced a downregulation of WAVE2 expression (P<0.0001). However, no difference was observed in the expression of Arp2, Arp3 or other WASPs. A neutralizing anti-MRP-1/CD9 monoclonal antibody inhibited downregulation of WAVE2 in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells (P<0.0001), and reversed the morphological effects of MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction. Furthermore, downregulation of WAVE2 by transfection of WAVE2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) mimicked the morphological effects of MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction and suppressed cell motility. However, transfection of each siRNA for Wnt1, Wnt2b1 or Wnt5a did not affect WAVE2 expression. Transfection of WAVE2-specific siRNA also did not affect expressions of these Wnts. These results indicate that MRP-1/CD9 regulates the actin cytoskeleton by downregulating of the WAVE2, through the Wnt-independent signal pathway.

  1. Insulin signal transduction pathways and insulin-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Adam B; Amsler, Maggie O; Venable, Derwei Y; Messina, Joseph L

    2002-12-13

    Insulin regulates metabolic activity, gene transcription, and cell growth by modulating the activity of several intracellular signaling pathways. Insulin activation of one mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, the MEK/ERK kinase cascade, is well described. However, the effect of insulin on the parallel p38 pathway is less well understood. The present work examines the effect of inhibiting the p38 signaling pathway by use of specific inhibitors, either alone or in combination with insulin, on the activation of ERK1/2 and on the regulation of gene transcription in rat hepatoma cells. Activation of ERK1/2 was induced by insulin and was dependent on the activation of MEK1, the kinase upstream of ERK in this pathway. Treatment of cells with p38 inhibitors also induced ERK1/2 activation/phosphorylation. The addition of p38 inhibitors followed by insulin addition resulted in a greater than additive activation of ERK1/2. The two genes studied, c-Fos and Pip92, are immediate-early genes that are dependent on the ERK1/2 pathway for insulin-regulated induction because the insulin effect was inhibited by pretreatment with a MEK1 inhibitor. The addition of p38 inhibitors induced transcription of both genes in a dose-dependent manner, and insulin stimulation of both genes was enhanced by prior treatment with p38 inhibitors. The ability of the p38 inhibitors to induce ERK1/2 and gene transcription, both alone and in combination with insulin, was abolished by prior inhibition of MEK1. These data suggest possible cross-talk between the p38 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and a potential role of p38 in insulin signaling.

  2. Transductional targeting of adenovirus vectors for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, JN; Everts, M; Curiel, DT

    2007-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy approaches will derive considerable benefit from adenovirus (Ad) vectors capable of self-directed localization to neoplastic disease or immunomodulatory targets in vivo. The ablation of native Ad tropism coupled with active targeting modalities has demonstrated that innate gene delivery efficiency may be retained while circumventing Ad dependence on its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and Ad receptor. Herein, we describe advances in Ad targeting that are predicated on a fundamental understanding of vector/cell interplay. Further, we propose strategies by which existing paradigms, such as nanotechnology, may be combined with Ad vectors to form advanced delivery vehicles with multiple functions. PMID:16439993

  3. Optimized retroviral transduction of mouse T cells for in vivo assessment of gene function.

    PubMed

    Kurachi, Makoto; Kurachi, Junko; Chen, Zeyu; Johnson, John; Khan, Omar; Bengsch, Bertram; Stelekati, Erietta; Attanasio, John; McLane, Laura M; Tomura, Michio; Ueha, Satoshi; Wherry, E John

    2017-09-01

    Retroviral (RV) expression of genes of interest (GOIs) is an invaluable tool and has formed the foundation of cellular engineering for adoptive cell therapy in cancer and other diseases. However, monitoring of transduced T cells long term (weeks to months) in vivo remains challenging because of the low frequency and often poor durability of transduced T cells over time when transferred without enrichment. Traditional methods often require additional overnight in vitro culture after transduction. Moreover, in vitro-generated effector CD8(+) T cells enriched by sorting often have reduced viability, making it difficult to monitor the fate of transferred cells in vivo. Here, we describe an optimized mouse CD8(+) T-cell RV transduction protocol that uses simple and rapid Percoll density centrifugation to enrich RV-susceptible activated CD8(+) T cells. Percoll density centrifugation is simple, can be done on the day of transduction, requires minimal time, has low reagent costs and improves cell recovery (up to 60%), as well as the frequency of RV-transduced cells (∼sixfold over several weeks in vivo as compared with traditional methods). We have used this protocol to assess the long-term stability of CD8(+) T cells after RV transduction by comparing the durability of T cells transduced with retroviruses expressing each of six commonly used RV reporter genes. Thus, we provide an optimized enrichment and transduction approach that allows long-term in vivo assessment of RV-transduced T cells. The overall procedure from T-cell isolation to RV transduction takes 2 d, and enrichment of activated T cells can be done in 1 h.

  4. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  5. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  6. Mutations in olfactory signal transduction genes are not a major cause of human congenital general anosmia.

    PubMed

    Feldmesser, Ester; Bercovich, Dani; Avidan, Nili; Halbertal, Shmuel; Haim, Liora; Gross-Isseroff, Ruth; Goshen, Sivan; Lancet, Doron

    2007-01-01

    Anosmia affects the western world population, mostly the elderly, reaching to 5% in subjects over the age of 45 years and strongly lowering their quality of life. A smaller minority (about 0.01%) is born without a sense of smell, afflicted with congenital general anosmia (CGA). No causative genes for human CGA have been identified yet, except for some syndromic cases such as Kallman syndrome. In mice, however, deletion of any of the 3 main olfactory transduction components (guanidine triphosphate binding protein, adenylyl cyclase, and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-gated channel) causes profound reduction of physiological responses to odorants. In an attempt to identify human CGA-related mutations, we performed whole-genome linkage analysis in affected families, but no significant linkage signals were observed, probably due to the small size of families analyzed. We further carried out direct mutation screening in the 3 main olfactory transduction genes in 64 unrelated anosmic individuals. No potentially causative mutations were identified, indicating that transduction gene variations underlie human CGA rarely and that mutations in other genes have to be identified. The screened genes were found to be under purifying selection, suggesting that they play a crucial functional role not only in olfaction but also potentially in additional pathways.

  7. Retrovirus-mediated transduction of a cytosine deaminase gene preserves the stemness of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Sung; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Ji-Hoi; Jung, Jin Hwa; Park, JoonSeong; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2013-02-22

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as attractive cellular vehicles to deliver therapeutic genes for ex-vivo therapy of diverse diseases; this is, in part, because they have the capability to migrate into tumor or lesion sites. Previously, we showed that MSCs could be utilized to deliver a bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene to brain tumors. Here we assessed whether transduction with a retroviral vector encoding CD gene altered the stem cell property of MSCs. MSCs were transduced at passage 1 and cultivated up to passage 11. We found that proliferation and differentiation potentials, chromosomal stability and surface antigenicity of MSCs were not altered by retroviral transduction. The results indicate that retroviral vectors can be safely utilized for delivery of suicide genes to MSCs for ex-vivo therapy. We also found that a single retroviral transduction was sufficient for sustainable expression up to passage 10. The persistent expression of the transduced gene indicates that transduced MSCs provide a tractable and manageable approach for potential use in allogeneic transplantation.

  8. Efficient preparation of cationized gelatin for gene transduction.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Naoto; Onuma, Tsuyoshi; Jujo, Shio; Tamai, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Myojin, Kazunori; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Ishihara, Yoshimi; Takano, Jiro; Mori, Hidezo

    2006-07-20

    We previously reported gene therapy using cationized gelatin microspheres of φ20-32 μm, prepared from pig skin, as a transducing agent, but although the gelatin offered various advantages, its yield was extremely low (only 0.1%). In this study, we markedly improved the yield of φ20-32 μm cationized gelatin microspheres and prepared a newly less than φ20 μm cationized gelatin. Conventionally, cationized gelatin is prepared by cationization, particulation by agitation, and cross-linking. The yield is determined by the particulation step, for which we had used a three-necked distillation flask of 500 mL and an agitation speed of 420 rpm. The yield was significantly increased from 0.13 ± 0.02% to 8.80 ± 1.90% by using a smaller flask of 300 mL and an agitation speed of 25000 rpm (p < 0.01). We could also prepare cationized gelatin of less than φ20 μm, which had not been possible previously. We confirmed that efficient gene introduction into peritoneal macrophages could be achieved with the new cationized gelatin.

  9. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Transduction of ferret airway epithelia using a pre-treatment and lentiviral gene vector.

    PubMed

    Cmielewski, Patricia; Farrow, Nigel; Donnelley, Martin; McIntyre, Chantelle; Penny-Dimri, Jahan; Kuchel, Tim; Parsons, David

    2014-11-21

    The safety and efficiency of gene therapies for cystic fibrosis (CF) need to be assessed in pre-clinical models. Using the normal ferret, this study sought to determine whether ferret airway epithelia could be transduced with a lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) pre-treatment followed by a VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 based lentiviral (LV) vector, in preparation for future studies in CF ferrets. Six normal ferrets (7 -8 weeks old) were treated with a 150 μL LPC pre-treatment, followed one hour later by a 500 μL LV vector dose containing the LacZ transgene. LacZ gene expression in the conducting airways and lung was assessed by X-gal staining after 7 days. The presence of transduction in the lung, as well as off-target transduction in the liver, spleen and gonads, were assessed by qPCR. The levels of LV vector p24 protein bio-distribution in blood sera were assessed by ELISA at 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The dosing protocol was well tolerated. LacZ gene expression was observed en face in the trachea of all animals. Histology showed that ciliated and basal cells were transduced in the trachea, with rare LacZ transduced single cells noted in lung. p24 levels was not detectable in the sera of 5 of the 6 animals. The LacZ gene was not detected in the lung tissue and no off-target transduction was detected by qPCR. This study shows that ferret airway epithelia are transducible using our unique two-step pre-treatment and LV vector dosing protocol. We have identified a number of unusual anatomical factors that are likely to influence the level of transduction that can be achieved in ferret airways. The ability to transduce ferret airway epithelium is a promising step towards therapeutic LV-CFTR testing in a CF ferret model.

  11. Modeling the infection dynamics of bacteriophages in enteric Escherichia coli: estimating the contribution of transduction to antimicrobial gene spread.

    PubMed

    Volkova, Victoriya V; Lu, Zhao; Besser, Thomas; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2014-07-01

    Animal-associated bacterial communities are infected by bacteriophages, although the dynamics of these infections are poorly understood. Transduction by bacteriophages may contribute to transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes, but the relative importance of transduction among other gene transfer mechanisms is unknown. We therefore developed a candidate deterministic mathematical model of the infection dynamics of enteric coliphages in commensal Escherichia coli in the large intestine of cattle. We assumed the phages were associated with the intestine and were predominantly temperate. Model simulations demonstrated how, given the bacterial ecology and infection dynamics, most (>90%) commensal enteric E. coli bacteria may become lysogens of enteric coliphages during intestinal transit. Using the model and the most liberal assumptions about transduction efficiency and resistance gene frequency, we approximated the upper numerical limits ("worst-case scenario") of gene transfer through specialized and generalized transduction in E. coli by enteric coliphages when the transduced genetic segment is picked at random. The estimates were consistent with a relatively small contribution of transduction to lateral gene spread; for example, generalized transduction delivered the chromosomal resistance gene to up to 8 E. coli bacteria/hour within the population of 1.47 × 10(8) E. coli bacteria/liter luminal contents. In comparison, the plasmidic blaCMY-2 gene carried by ~2% of enteric E. coli was transferred by conjugation at a rate at least 1.4 × 10(3) times greater than our generalized transduction estimate. The estimated numbers of transductants varied nonlinearly depending on the ecology of bacteria available for phages to infect, that is, on the assumed rates of turnover and replication of enteric E. coli.

  12. Modeling the Infection Dynamics of Bacteriophages in Enteric Escherichia coli: Estimating the Contribution of Transduction to Antimicrobial Gene Spread

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhao; Besser, Thomas; Gröhn, Yrjö T.

    2014-01-01

    Animal-associated bacterial communities are infected by bacteriophages, although the dynamics of these infections are poorly understood. Transduction by bacteriophages may contribute to transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes, but the relative importance of transduction among other gene transfer mechanisms is unknown. We therefore developed a candidate deterministic mathematical model of the infection dynamics of enteric coliphages in commensal Escherichia coli in the large intestine of cattle. We assumed the phages were associated with the intestine and were predominantly temperate. Model simulations demonstrated how, given the bacterial ecology and infection dynamics, most (>90%) commensal enteric E. coli bacteria may become lysogens of enteric coliphages during intestinal transit. Using the model and the most liberal assumptions about transduction efficiency and resistance gene frequency, we approximated the upper numerical limits (“worst-case scenario”) of gene transfer through specialized and generalized transduction in E. coli by enteric coliphages when the transduced genetic segment is picked at random. The estimates were consistent with a relatively small contribution of transduction to lateral gene spread; for example, generalized transduction delivered the chromosomal resistance gene to up to 8 E. coli bacteria/hour within the population of 1.47 × 108 E. coli bacteria/liter luminal contents. In comparison, the plasmidic blaCMY-2 gene carried by ∼2% of enteric E. coli was transferred by conjugation at a rate at least 1.4 × 103 times greater than our generalized transduction estimate. The estimated numbers of transductants varied nonlinearly depending on the ecology of bacteria available for phages to infect, that is, on the assumed rates of turnover and replication of enteric E. coli. PMID:24814786

  13. Efficient transduction of cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 genes by a gene-regulatable lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Yasuhiko; Hieda, Kuniko; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Suzuki, Youichi

    2009-10-01

    Lentiviral vectors modified from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) offer a promising approach for gene therapy, facilitating transduction of genes into non-dividing cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transducing cytotoxic or anti-HIV genes, however, the vector must avoid self-inhibition by the transgene that can lead to a disruption in production of infectious virions. In this study, we constructed two HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors harboring the mifepristone-inducible gene expression unit in either the forward or the reverse orientation with respect to the direction of viral genomic RNA. The ability of these vectors to transduce cytotoxic and anti-HIV genes was evaluated. When human CD14 was used as a transgene, infectious lentiviral vectors were produced by both forward and reverse vector systems. CD14 expression was efficiently induced in cells transduced by both lentiviral vectors following treatment with mifepristone. However, a higher level of basal transgene expression was observed in the forward vector system in the absence of mifepristone. In contrast, high titers of infectious lentiviral vector containing the cytotoxic vesicular stomatitis virus M gene were successfully generated using the reverse vector, but not the forward vector. In addition, when a VPS4Bdominant negative mutant against HIV-1 budding was cloned into the reverse vector, significant amounts of lentiviral vector were obtained. Subsequent transduction of cells with the VPS4B mutant resulted in approximately 50% inhibition of HIV-1 production only in the presence of mifepristone. Our study thus demonstrates that incorporation of a mifepristone-regulatable gene expression unit in the reverse orientation makes significant advances toward development of a lentiviral vector that allows transduction of harmful genes.

  14. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-01-01

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  15. Plant gravitropic signal transduction: A network analysis leads to gene discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Although a significant body of research has helped define the events of gravity perception, the role of the plant growth regulator auxin, and the mechanisms resulting in the gravity response, the events of signal transduction, those that link the biophysical action of perception to a biochemical signal that results in auxin redistribution, those that regulate the gravitropic effects on plant growth, remain, for the most part, a “black box.” Using a cold affect, dubbed the gravity persistent signal (GPS) response, we developed a mutant screen to specifically identify components of the signal transduction pathway. Cloning of the GPS genes have identified new proteins involved in gravitropic signaling. We have further exploited the GPS response using a multi-faceted approach including gene expression microarrays, proteomics analysis, and bioinformatics analysis and continued mutant analysis to identified additional genes, physiological and biochemical processes. Gene expression data provided the foundation of a regulatory network for gravitropic signaling. Based on these gene expression data and related data sets/information from the literature/repositories, we constructed a gravitropic signaling network for Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. To generate the network, both a dynamic Bayesian network approach and a time-lagged correlation coefficient approach were used. The dynamic Bayesian network added existing information of protein-protein interaction while the time-lagged correlation coefficient allowed incorporation of temporal regulation and thus could incorporate the time-course metric from the data set. Thus the methods complemented each other and provided us with a more comprehensive evaluation of connections. Each method generated a list of possible interactions associated with a statistical significance value. The two networks were then overlaid to generate a more rigorous, intersected

  16. Transduction of Herpesvirus saimiri-Transformed T Cells with Exogenous Genes of Interest.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; de Jong, Sarah Jill; Markle, Janet; de Paus, Roel; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; van de Vosse, Esther; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-11-01

    Human T cells can be transformed and expanded with herpesvirus saimiri (HVS). HVS-transformed T cells from patients have facilitated the study of a broad range of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) in which T-cell development or function is altered. However, the utility of HVS-transformed T cells for genetic studies has been limited by technical challenges in the expression of exogenous genes, including wild-type or mutant alleles. A novel, gamma retrovirus-based method for the simple and reliable transduction, purification, and study of HVS-transformed T cells is described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Sequential and γ-secretase-dependent processing of the betacellulin precursor generates a palmitoylated intracellular-domain fragment that inhibits cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Stoeck, Alexander; Shang, Li; Dempsey, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Betacellulin (BTC) belongs to the family of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factors that are expressed as transmembrane precursors and undergo proteolytic ectodomain shedding to release soluble mature ligands. BTC is a dual-specificity ligand for ErbB1 and ErbB4 receptors, and can activate unique signal-transduction pathways that are beneficial for the function, survival and regeneration of pancreatic β-cells. We have previously shown that BTC precursor (proBTC) is cleaved by ADAM10 to generate soluble ligand and a stable, transmembrane remnant (BTC-CTF). In this study, we analyzed the fate of the BTC-CTF in greater detail. We demonstrated that proBTC is cleaved by ADAM10 to produce BTC-CTF, which then undergoes intramembrane processing by presenilin-1- and/or presenilin-2-dependent γ-secretase to generate an intracellular-domain fragment (BTC-ICD). We found that the proBTC cytoplasmic domain is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation is not required for ADAM10-dependent cleavage but is necessary for the stability and γ-secretase-dependent processing of BTC-CTF to generate BTC-ICD. Additionally, palmitoylation is required for nuclear-membrane localization of BTC-ICD, as demonstrated by the redistribution of non-palmitoylated BTC-ICD mutant to the nucleoplasm. Importantly, a novel receptor-independent role for BTC-ICD signaling is suggested by the ability of BTC-ICD to inhibit cell growth in vitro. PMID:20530572

  18. Grafting of Beads into Developing Chicken Embryo Limbs to Identify Signal Transduction Pathways Affecting Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Rabeea H; Sweetman, Dylan

    2016-01-17

    Using chicken embryos it is possible to test directly the effects of either growth factors or specific inhibitors of signaling pathways on gene expression and activation of signal transduction pathways. This technique allows the delivery of signaling molecules at precisely defined developmental stages for specific times. After this embryos can be harvested and gene expression examined, for example by in situ hybridization, or activation of signal transduction pathways observed with immunostaining. In this video heparin beads soaked in FGF18 or AG 1-X2 beads soaked in U0126, a MEK inhibitor, are grafted into the limb bud in ovo. This shows that FGF18 induces expression of MyoD and ERK phosphorylation and both endogenous and FGF18 induced MyoD expression is inhibited by U0126. Beads soaked in a retinoic acid antagonist can potentiate premature MyoD induction by FGF18. This approach can be used with a wide range of different growth factors and inhibitors and is easily adapted to other tissues in the developing embryo.

  19. Modulated expression of genes associated with NO signal transduction contributes to the cholesterol-lowering effect of electro-acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Tan, Guang-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2012-07-01

    Electro-acupuncture (EA) at Fenglong acupoint (ST40) can lower the levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols. To study the hepatic genes responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effect of EA, suppression subtractive hybridization combined with the switch mechanism at the 5'-end of RNA template cDNA synthesis and long-distance PCR were employed using hepatic tissues from hypercholesterolemia and EA-treated mice. 68 % of the identified genes are involved in metabolism, immune response, and signal transduction pathways. Real-time PCR and western blot indicate that EA at ST40 induces the expression of nNOS and Mt1, two genes involved in NO signal transduction. EA treatment for hypercholesterolemia thus involves the modulation of several biological pathways and provides a physiological link between NO signal transduction and the cholesterol-lowering effect of EA.

  20. Combination of adenovirus and cross-linked low molecular weight PEI improves efficiency of gene transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianfeng; Zhao, Dong; Zhong, Zhirong; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2010-03-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene therapy is an exciting novel strategy in cancer treatment. However, poor infection efficiency with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) down-regulated cancer cell lines is one of the major challenges for its practical and extensive application. As an alternative method of viral gene delivery, a non-viral carrier using cationic materials could compensate for the limitation of adenovirus. In our study, adenovectors were complexed with a new synthetic polymer PEI-DEG-bis-NPC (PDN) based on polyethylenimine (PEI), and then the properties of the vehicle were characterized by measurement of size distribution, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhancement of gene transduction by Ad/PDN complexes was observed in both CAR-overexpressing cell lines (A549) and CAR-lacking cell lines (MDCK, CHO, LLC), as a result of facilitating binding and cell uptake of adenoviral particles by the cationic component. Ad/PDN complexes also promoted the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that a combination of viral and non-viral gene delivery methods may offer a new approach to successful cancer gene therapy.

  1. Prion Infection of Mouse Brain Reveals Multiple New Upregulated Genes Involved in Neuroinflammation or Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Striebel, James F.; Race, Brent; Phillips, Katie; Chesebro, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gliosis is often a preclinical pathological finding in neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases, but the mechanisms facilitating gliosis and neuronal damage in these diseases are not understood. To expand our knowledge of the neuroinflammatory response in prion diseases, we assessed the expression of key genes and proteins involved in the inflammatory response and signal transduction in mouse brain at various times after scrapie infection. In brains of scrapie-infected mice at pre- and postclinical stages, we identified 15 previously unreported differentially expressed genes related to inflammation or activation of the STAT signal transduction pathway. Levels for the majority of differentially expressed genes increased with time postinfection. In quantitative immunoblotting experiments of STAT proteins, STAT1α, phosphorylated-STAT1α (pSTAT1α), and pSTAT3 were increased between 94 and 131 days postinfection (p.i.) in brains of mice infected with strain 22L. Furthermore, a select group of STAT-associated genes was increased preclinically during scrapie infection, suggesting early activation of the STAT signal transduction pathway. Comparison of inflammatory markers between mice infected with scrapie strains 22L and RML indicated that the inflammatory responses and gene expression profiles in the brains were strikingly similar, even though these scrapie strains infect different brain regions. The endogenous interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an inflammatory marker, was newly identified as increasing preclinically in our model and therefore might influence scrapie pathogenesis in vivo. However, in IL-1Ra-deficient or overexpressor transgenic mice inoculated with scrapie, neither loss nor overexpression of IL-1Ra demonstrated any observable effect on gliosis, protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) formation, disease tempo, pathology, or expression of the inflammatory genes analyzed. IMPORTANCE Prion infection leads to Pr

  2. Systemic gene transfer reveals distinctive muscle transduction profile of tyrosine mutant AAV-1, -6, and -9 in neonatal dogs.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Chady H; Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Williams, Regina R; Zhang, Keqing; Smith, Bruce F; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-03-05

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of devastating genetic disorders that affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle. An effective gene therapy for these diseases requires bodywide muscle delivery. Tyrosine mutant adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been considered as a class of highly potent gene transfer vectors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that systemic delivery of tyrosine mutant AAV can result in bodywide muscle transduction in newborn dogs. Three tyrosine mutant AAV vectors (Y445F/Y731F AAV-1, Y445F AAV-6, and Y731F AAV-9) were evaluated. These vectors expressed the alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under transcriptional regulation of either the muscle-specific Spc5-12 promoter or the ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Robust skeletal and cardiac muscle transduction was achieved with Y445F/Y731F AAV-1. However, Y731F AAV-9 only transduced skeletal muscle. Surprisingly, Y445F AAV-6 resulted in minimal muscle transduction. Serological study suggests that the preexisting neutralization antibody may underlie the limited transduction of Y445F AAV-6. In summary, we have identified Y445F/Y731F AAV-1 as a potentially excellent systemic gene transfer vehicle to target both skeletal muscle and the heart in neonatal puppies. Our findings have important implications in exploring systemic neonatal gene therapy in canine models of muscular dystrophy.

  3. Lentivirus Gene Transfer in Murine Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Is Compromised by a Delay in Proviral Integration and Results in Transduction Mosaicism and Heterogeneous Gene Expression in Progeny Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mikkola, Hanna; Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Sjögren, Marketa; Helgadottir, Hildur; Hamaguchi, Isao; Jacobsen, Sten-Eirik; Trono, Didier; Karlsson, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-based lentivirus vectors containing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene were used to transduce murine Lin− c-kit+ Sca1+ primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells. Following transduction, the cells were plated into hematopoietic progenitor cell assays in methylcellulose and the colonies were scored for GFP positivity. After incubation for 20 h, lentivirus vectors transduced 27.3% ± 6.7% of the colonies derived from unstimulated target cells, but transduction was more efficient when the cells were supported with stem cell factor (SCF) alone (42.0% ± 5.5%) or SCF, interleukin-3 (IL-3), and IL-6 (53.3 ± 1.8%) during transduction. The, vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped MGIN oncoretrovirus control vector required IL-3, IL-6, and SCF for significant transduction (39.3 ± 9.4%). Interestingly, only a portion of the progeny cells within the lentivirus-transduced methylcellulose colonies expressed GFP, in contrast to the homogeneous expression in oncoretrovirus-transduced colonies. Secondary plating of the primary GFP+ lentivirus vector-transduced colonies revealed vector PCR+ GFP+ (42%), vector PCR− GFP− (46%), and vector PCR+ GFP− (13%) secondary colonies, indicating true genetic mosaicism with respect to the viral genome in the progeny cells. The degree of vector mosaicism in individual colonies could be reduced by extending the culture time after transduction and before plating into the clonal progenitor cell assay, indicating a delay in the lentiviral integration process. Furthermore, supplementation with exogenous deoxynucleoside triphosphates during transduction decreased mosaicism within the colonies. Although cytokine stimulation during transduction correlates with higher transduction efficiency, rapid cell division after transduction may result in loss of the viral genome in the progeny cells. Therefore, optimal transduction may require activation without promoting intense cell proliferation prior

  4. Combined transductional untargeting/retargeting and transcriptional restriction enhance adenovirus gene targeting and therapy for hepatic colorectal cancer tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua-Jung; Everts, Maaike; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T.; Herschman, Harvey R.

    2009-01-01

    Unresectable hepatic colorectal cancer (CRC) metastases are a leading cause of cancer mortality. These tumors, and other epithelial tumors, often express both cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Because adenovirus vectors infect liver and lack tumor tropism, they cannot be utilized for systemic therapy of hepatic metastases. We used COX-2 transcriptional restriction, in combination with transductional adenovirus hepatic untargeting and tumor retargeting by a bispecific adapter, sCARhMFE, composed of sCAR (the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor ectodomain) and MFE-23 (a single-chain anti-CEA antibody), to untarget liver following intravenous administration of adenovirus vectors expressing firefly luciferase and to retarget virus to hepatic colorectal tumor xenografts and non-small cell lung tumor xenografts. To improve both liver untargeting and tumor retargeting, we developed sCARfMFE, a trimerized sCARhMFE adapter. Trimerization greatly improves both untargeting of CAR-dependent adenovirus infection and CEA-dependent virus retargeting, in culture and in vivo. Combining sCARfMFE bispecific adapter transductional liver untargeting and transductional tumor retargeting with COX-2 transcriptional tumor-restricted transgene expression increases systemically-administered adenovirus therapeutic efficacy for hepatic CRC tumors, using Herpes Virus Type 1 thymidine kinase as a therapeutic gene in conjunction with the prodrug ganciclovir. Both transductional untargeting and COX-2 transcriptional restriction also reduce HSV1-tk/GCV hepatic toxicity. In addition, transductional sCARfMFE untargeting reduces the innate immune response to systemic adenovirus administration. Combined transductional liver Ad untargeting, transductional tumor retargeting and transcriptional transgene restriction suggests a means to engineer practical, effective therapeutic agents for hepatic CRC metastases in particular, as well as hepatic metastases of other epithelial

  5. Combined transductional untargeting/retargeting and transcriptional restriction enhances adenovirus gene targeting and therapy for hepatic colorectal cancer tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Jung; Everts, Maaike; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T; Herschman, Harvey R

    2009-01-15

    Unresectable hepatic colorectal cancer (CRC) metastases are a leading cause of cancer mortality. These tumors and other epithelial tumors often express both cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Because adenovirus (Ad) vectors infect the liver and lack tumor tropism, they cannot be used for systemic therapy of hepatic metastases. We used COX-2 transcriptional restriction, in combination with transductional Ad hepatic untargeting and tumor retargeting by a bispecific adapter, sCARhMFE, composed of sCAR [the coxsackie/Ad receptor (CAR) ectodomain] and MFE-23 (a single-chain anti-CEA antibody), to untarget liver after i.v. administration of Ad vectors expressing firefly luciferase and to retarget virus to hepatic colorectal tumor xenografts and non-small cell lung tumor xenografts. To improve both liver untargeting and tumor retargeting, we developed sCARfMFE, a trimerized sCARhMFE adapter. Trimerization greatly improves both untargeting of CAR-dependent Ad infection and CEA-dependent virus retargeting in culture and in vivo. Combining sCARfMFE bispecific adapter transductional liver untargeting and transductional tumor retargeting with COX-2 transcriptional tumor-restricted transgene expression increases systemically administered Ad therapeutic efficacy for hepatic CRC tumors, using herpes virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) as a therapeutic gene in conjunction with the prodrug ganciclovir (GCV). Both transductional untargeting and COX-2 transcriptional restriction also reduce HSV1-tk/GCV hepatic toxicity. In addition, transductional sCARfMFE untargeting reduces the innate immune response to systemic Ad administration. Combined transductional liver Ad untargeting, transductional tumor retargeting, and transcriptional transgene restriction suggests a means to engineer practical, effective therapeutic agents for hepatic CRC metastases in particular, as well as hepatic metastases of other epithelial cancers.

  6. Signal transduction mechanism for glucagon-induced leptin gene expression in goldfish liver

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ai-fen; Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Tang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Xiao; Huang, Wen; Ren, Chun-hua; Hu, Chao-qun

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a peripheral satiety hormone that also plays important roles in energy homeostasis in vertebrates ranging from fish to mammals. In teleost fish, however, the regulatory mechanism for leptin gene expression still remains unclear. In this study, we found that glucagon, a key hormone in glucose homeostasis, was effective at elevating the leptin-AI and leptin-AII transcript levels in goldfish liver via both in vivo intraperitoneal injection and in vitro cells incubation approaches. The responses of leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA to glucagon treatment were highly comparable. In contrast, blockade of local glucagon action could reduce the basal and induced leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA expression. The stimulation of leptin levels by glucagon was caused by the activation of adenylate cyclase (AC)/cyclic-AMP (cAMP)/ protein kinase A (PKA), and probably cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) cascades. Our study described the effect and signal transduction mechanism of glucagon on leptin gene expression in goldfish liver, and may also provide new insight into leptin as a mediator in the regulatory network of energy metabolism in the fish model. PMID:27994518

  7. Syngeneic AAV Pseudo-particles Potentiate Gene Transduction of AAV Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qizhao; Dong, Biao; Pokiniewski, Katie A; Firrman, Jenni; Wu, Zhongren; Chin, Mario P S; Chen, Xiongwen; Liu, LinShu; Xu, Ruian; Diao, Yong; Xiao, Weidong

    2017-03-17

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have emerged as a safe and efficient gene therapy platform. One complication is that a significant amount of empty particles have always been generated as impurities during AAV vector production. However, the effects of such particles on AAV vector performance remain unclear. Here we systemically evaluated the biological properties of three types of "empty" AAV particles: syngeneic pseudo-vectors with partial AAV genomes derived from DNA of the corresponding full particles, allogeneic pseudo-vectors with partial genomes different from the corresponding full particles, and null pseudo-vectors with no DNA inside the capsids. The syngeneic particles in excess increased the corresponding full AAV vector transgene expression both in vivo and in vitro. However, such effects were not observed with null or allogeneic particles. The observed differences among these pseudo-AAV particles may be ascribed to the syngeneic pseudo-vector DNA facilitating the complementary DNA synthesis of the corresponding full AAV particles. Our study suggests that the DNA content in the pseudo-vectors plays a key role in dictating their effects on AAV transduction. The effects of residual "empty" particles should be adequately assessed when comparing AAV vector performance. The syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors may be used to enhance the efficacy of gene therapy.

  8. Signal transduction mechanism for glucagon-induced leptin gene expression in goldfish liver.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ai-Fen; Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Tang, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Xiao; Huang, Wen; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a peripheral satiety hormone that also plays important roles in energy homeostasis in vertebrates ranging from fish to mammals. In teleost fish, however, the regulatory mechanism for leptin gene expression still remains unclear. In this study, we found that glucagon, a key hormone in glucose homeostasis, was effective at elevating the leptin-AI and leptin-AII transcript levels in goldfish liver via both in vivo intraperitoneal injection and in vitro cells incubation approaches. The responses of leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA to glucagon treatment were highly comparable. In contrast, blockade of local glucagon action could reduce the basal and induced leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA expression. The stimulation of leptin levels by glucagon was caused by the activation of adenylate cyclase (AC)/cyclic-AMP (cAMP)/ protein kinase A (PKA), and probably cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) cascades. Our study described the effect and signal transduction mechanism of glucagon on leptin gene expression in goldfish liver, and may also provide new insight into leptin as a mediator in the regulatory network of energy metabolism in the fish model.

  9. Intelligent bioengineering in vitiligo treatment: transdermal protein transduction of melanocyte-lineage-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yi; Jiang, Xian; Du, Yu; Xue, Li

    2012-12-01

    Vitiligo is a common, incurable skin disease with a prevalence of about 1%. Although many vitiligo therapies are available in clinics, there is almost no one method that causes significant improvement in all vitiligo patients. Some have hypothesized that melanocyte dysfunction or deficiency underlies the loss of skin pigmentation observed in vitiligo. The autoimmune-mediated apoptosis of melanocytes might be an important part of the etiology of vitiligo, which prevents the formation of melanocytes in the skin. Here we propose a novel hypothesis for vitiligo treatment using in situ melanocyte regeneration induced by melanocyte-lineage-specific genes (MLSGs). This may serve as an intelligent bioengineering prototype. The hypothesis is based on the fact that MLSGs regulate melanocyte differentiation through epigenetic reprogramming, which includes microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), paired box 3 (PAX3), and Notch signaling. MITF directs the terminal differentiation of melanocytes, and PAX3 helps to establish the properties of the melanocyte stem cells. Notch signaling promotes adult stem cell proliferation and self-renewal. This process could be mimicked by Notch intracellular domain (NICD). MLSGs could also stimulate anti-apoptotic gene expression. Recent improvements in relevant biotechniques allow the transdermal delivery of MLSG proteins into the patient, where they enter cells through protein transduction. This process may promote melanocyte regeneration in situ with little impact on the hair follicular cycle or on carcinogenesis. This simple and efficient treatment may have significant impact on the treatment of vitiligo patients.

  10. Signal transduction pathways mediating parathyroid hormone regulation of osteoblastic gene expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, N. C.; Bloch, S. R.; Pearman, A. T.

    1994-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) plays a central role in regulation of calcium metabolism. For example, excessive or inappropriate production of PTH or the related hormone, parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), accounts for the majority of the causes of hypercalcemia. Both hormones act through the same receptor on the osteoblast to elicit enhanced bone resorption by the osteoclast. Thus, the osteoblast mediates the effect of PTH in the resorption process. In this process, PTH causes a change in the function and phenotype of the osteoblast from a cell involved in bone formation to one directing the process of bone resorption. In response to PTH, the osteoblast decreases collagen, alkaline phosphatase, and osteopontin expression and increases production of osteocalcin, cytokines, and neutral proteases. Many of these changes have been shown to be due to effects on mRNA abundance through either transcriptional or post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, the signal transduction pathway for the hormone to cause these changes is not completely elucidated in any case. Binding of PTH and PTHrP to their common receptor has been shown to result in activation of protein kinases A and C and increases in intracellular calcium. The latter has not been implicated in any changes in mRNA of osteoblastic genes. On the other hand activation of PKA can mimic all the effects of PTH; protein kinase C may be involved in some responses. We will discuss possible mechanisms linking PKA and PKC activation to changes in gene expression, particularly at the nuclear level.

  11. Identification of a two-component signal transduction system that regulates maltose genes in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Thomas J; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru; Cheung, Jackie K; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive rod that is widely distributed in nature and is the etiological agent of several human and animal diseases. The complete genome sequence of C. perfringens strain 13 has been determined and multiple two-component signal transduction systems identified. One of these systems, designated here as the MalNO system, was analyzed in this study. Microarray analysis was used to carry out functional analysis of a malO mutant. The results, which were confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, indicated that genes putatively involved in the uptake and metabolism of maltose were up-regulated in the malO mutant. These effects were reversed by complementation with the wild-type malO gene. Growth of these isogenic strains in medium with and without maltose showed that the malO mutant recovered more quickly from maltose deprivation when compared to the wild-type and complemented strains, leading to the conclusion that the MalNO system regulates maltose utilization in C. perfringens. It is postulated that this regulatory network may allow this soil bacterium and opportunistic pathogen to respond to environmental conditions where there are higher concentrations of maltose or maltodextrins, such as in the presence of decaying plant material in rich soil.

  12. Signal transduction pathways mediating parathyroid hormone regulation of osteoblastic gene expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, N. C.; Bloch, S. R.; Pearman, A. T.

    1994-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) plays a central role in regulation of calcium metabolism. For example, excessive or inappropriate production of PTH or the related hormone, parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), accounts for the majority of the causes of hypercalcemia. Both hormones act through the same receptor on the osteoblast to elicit enhanced bone resorption by the osteoclast. Thus, the osteoblast mediates the effect of PTH in the resorption process. In this process, PTH causes a change in the function and phenotype of the osteoblast from a cell involved in bone formation to one directing the process of bone resorption. In response to PTH, the osteoblast decreases collagen, alkaline phosphatase, and osteopontin expression and increases production of osteocalcin, cytokines, and neutral proteases. Many of these changes have been shown to be due to effects on mRNA abundance through either transcriptional or post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, the signal transduction pathway for the hormone to cause these changes is not completely elucidated in any case. Binding of PTH and PTHrP to their common receptor has been shown to result in activation of protein kinases A and C and increases in intracellular calcium. The latter has not been implicated in any changes in mRNA of osteoblastic genes. On the other hand activation of PKA can mimic all the effects of PTH; protein kinase C may be involved in some responses. We will discuss possible mechanisms linking PKA and PKC activation to changes in gene expression, particularly at the nuclear level.

  13. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Akiko; Taura, Kojiro; Koyama, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Ito, Juichi; Ryan, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. While this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. While γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 hrs after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1–43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs. PMID:26886463

  14. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taura, A; Taura, K; Koyama, Y; Yamamoto, N; Nakagawa, T; Ito, J; Ryan, A F

    2016-05-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. Although this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin-bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. Although γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 h after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1-43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs.

  15. Prenatal exposure to arsenic and cadmium impacts infectious disease-related genes within the glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Rager, Julia E; Yosim, Andrew; Fry, Rebecca C

    2014-12-03

    There is increasing evidence that environmental agents mediate susceptibility to infectious disease. Studies support the impact of prenatal/early life exposure to the environmental metals inorganic arsenic (iAs) and cadmium (Cd) on increased risk for susceptibility to infection. The specific biological mechanisms that underlie such exposure-mediated effects remain understudied. This research aimed to identify key genes/signal transduction pathways that associate prenatal exposure to these toxic metals with changes in infectious disease susceptibility using a Comparative Genomic Enrichment Method (CGEM). Using CGEM an infectious disease gene (IDG) database was developed comprising 1085 genes with known roles in viral, bacterial, and parasitic disease pathways. Subsequently, datasets collected from human pregnancy cohorts exposed to iAs or Cd were examined in relationship to the IDGs, specifically focusing on data representing epigenetic modifications (5-methyl cytosine), genomic perturbations (mRNA expression), and proteomic shifts (protein expression). A set of 82 infection and exposure-related genes was identified and found to be enriched for their role in the glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction pathway. Given their common identification across numerous human cohorts and their known toxicological role in disease, the identified genes within the glucocorticoid signal transduction pathway may underlie altered infectious disease susceptibility associated with prenatal exposures to the toxic metals iAs and Cd in humans.

  16. Prenatal Exposure to Arsenic and Cadmium Impacts Infectious Disease-Related Genes within the Glucocorticoid Receptor Signal Transduction Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Julia E.; Yosim, Andrew; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that environmental agents mediate susceptibility to infectious disease. Studies support the impact of prenatal/early life exposure to the environmental metals inorganic arsenic (iAs) and cadmium (Cd) on increased risk for susceptibility to infection. The specific biological mechanisms that underlie such exposure-mediated effects remain understudied. This research aimed to identify key genes/signal transduction pathways that associate prenatal exposure to these toxic metals with changes in infectious disease susceptibility using a Comparative Genomic Enrichment Method (CGEM). Using CGEM an infectious disease gene (IDG) database was developed comprising 1085 genes with known roles in viral, bacterial, and parasitic disease pathways. Subsequently, datasets collected from human pregnancy cohorts exposed to iAs or Cd were examined in relationship to the IDGs, specifically focusing on data representing epigenetic modifications (5-methyl cytosine), genomic perturbations (mRNA expression), and proteomic shifts (protein expression). A set of 82 infection and exposure-related genes was identified and found to be enriched for their role in the glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction pathway. Given their common identification across numerous human cohorts and their known toxicological role in disease, the identified genes within the glucocorticoid signal transduction pathway may underlie altered infectious disease susceptibility associated with prenatal exposures to the toxic metals iAs and Cd in humans. PMID:25479081

  17. Evaluation of ADA gene expression and transduction efficiency in ADA/SCID patients undergoing gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, F; Tabucchi, A; Aiuti, A; Rosi, F; Floccari, F; Pagani, R; Marinello, E

    2004-10-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for ADA/SCID diagnosis and monitoring of enzyme replacement therapy, as well as for exploring the transfection efficiency for different retroviral vectors in gene therapy.

  18. Signal transduction and transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of iron-regulated genes in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Crosa, J H

    1997-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for nearly all living cells. Thus, the ability of bacteria to utilize iron is a crucial survival mechanism independent of the ecological niche in which the microorganism lives, because iron is scarce both in potential biological hosts, where it is bound by high-affinity iron-binding proteins, and in the environment, where it is present as part of insoluble complex hydroxides. Therefore, pathogens attempting to establish an infection and environmental microorganisms must all be able to utilize the otherwise unavailable iron. One of the strategies to perform this task is the possession of siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems that are capable of scavenging the hoarded iron. This metal is, however, a double-edged sword for the cell because it can catalyze the production of deadly free hydroxyl radicals, which are harmful to the cells. It is therefore imperative for the cell to control the concentration of iron at levels that permit key metabolic steps to occur without becoming a messenger of cell death. Early work identified a repressor, Fur, which as a complex with iron repressed the expression of most iron uptake systems as well as other iron-regulated genes when the iron concentration reached a certain level. However, later work demonstrated that this regulation by Fur was not the only answer under low-iron conditions, there was a need for activation of iron uptake genes as well as siderophore biosynthetic genes. Furthermore, it was also realized that in some instances the actual ferric iron-siderophore complex induced the transcription of the cognate receptor and transport genes. It became evident that control of the expression of iron-regulated genes was more complex than originally envisioned. In this review, I analyze the processes of signal transduction, transcriptional control, and posttranscriptional control of iron-regulated genes as reported for the ferric dicitrate system in Escherichia coli; the pyochelin, pyoverdin, and

  19. Comprehensive characterization of genes associated with the TP53 signal transduction pathway in various tumors.

    PubMed

    Ohnami, Shumpei; Ohshima, Keiichi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Urakami, Kenichi; Shimoda, Yuji; Saito, Junko; Naruoka, Akane; Hatakeyama, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Tohru; Serizawa, Masakuni; Ohnami, Sumiko; Kusuhara, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2017-03-03

    The TP53 signal transduction pathway is an attractive target for cancer treatments. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 907 patients with cancer in Japan to identify genomic alterations in the TP53 pathway. TP53 mutations were frequently detected in many cancers, except melanoma, thymic tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and renal cancers. The frequencies of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the TP53 family members TP63 and TP73 were relatively low, although genes with increased frequencies of SNVs were as follows: PTEN (11.7%) in breast cancer, CDKN2A (11.1 and 9.6%) in pancreas and head and neck cancers, and ATM (18.0 and 11.1%) in liver and esophageal cancers. MDM2 expression was decreased or increased in patients with mutant or wild-type TP53, respectively. CDKN1A expression was increased with mutant TP53 in head and neck cancers. Moreover, TP63 overexpression was characteristically observed in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, esophagus, and head and neck region. Additionally, overexpression of TP63 and TP73 was frequently observed in thymomas. Our results reveal a spectrum of genomic alterations in the TP53 pathway that is characteristic of many tumor types, and these data may be useful in the trials of targeted therapies.

  20. Towards understanding the nitrogen signal transduction for nif gene expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Glöer, Jens; Thummer, Robert; Ullrich, Heike; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2008-12-01

    In the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae, the nitrogen sensory protein GlnK mediates the cellular nitrogen status towards the NifL/NifA system that regulates transcription of the nitrogen fixation genes in response to ammonium and molecular oxygen. To identify amino acids of GlnK essential for this signal transduction by protein-protein interaction, we performed random point mutagenesis by PCR amplification under conditions of reduced Taq polymerase fidelity. Three thousand two hundred mutated glnK genes were screened to identify those that would no longer complement a K. pneumoniaeDeltaglnK strain for growth under nitrogen fixing conditions. Twenty-four candidates resulting in a Nif(-) phenotype were identified, carrying 1-11 amino acid changes in GlnK. Based on these findings, as well as structural data, several single mutations were introduced into glnK by site-directed mutagenesis, and the Nif phenotype and the respective effects on NifA-mediated nif gene induction was monitored in K. pneumoniae using a chromosomal nifK'-'lacZ fusion. Single amino acid changes resulting in significant nif gene inhibition under nitrogen limiting conditions were located within the highly conserved T-loop (A43G, A49T and N54D), the body of the protein (G87V and K79E) and in the C-terminal region (I100M, R103S, E106Q and D108G). Complex formation analyses between GlnK (wild-type or derivatives) and NifL or NifA in response to 2-oxoglutarate indicated that: (a) besides the T-loop, the C-terminal region of GlnK is essential for the interaction with NifL and NifA and (b) GlnK binds both proteins in the absence of 2-oxoglutarate, whereas, in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate, NifA is released but NifL remains bound to GlnK.

  1. Improved Intravitreal AAV-Mediated Inner Retinal Gene Transduction after Surgical Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Igarashi, Tsutomu; Miyake, Koichi; Kobayashi, Maika; Yaguchi, Chiemi; Iijima, Osamu; Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki; Katakai, Yuko; Miyake, Noriko; Kameya, Shuhei; Shimada, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Okada, Takashi

    2017-01-04

    The retina is an ideal target for gene therapy because of its easy accessibility and limited immunological response. We previously reported that intravitreally injected adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduced the inner retina with high efficiency in a rodent model. In large animals, however, the efficiency of retinal transduction was low, because the vitreous and internal limiting membrane (ILM) acted as barriers to transduction. To overcome these barriers in cynomolgus monkeys, we performed vitrectomy (VIT) and ILM peeling before AAV vector injection. Following intravitreal injection of 50 μL triple-mutated self-complementary AAV serotype 2 vector encoding EGFP, transduction efficiency was analyzed. Little expression of GFP was detected in the control and VIT groups, but in the VIT+ILM group, strong GFP expression was detected within the peeled ILM area. To detect potential adverse effects, we monitored the retinas using color fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, and electroretinography. No serious side effects associated with the pretreatment were observed. These results indicate that surgical ILM peeling before AAV vector administration would be safe and useful for efficient transduction of the nonhuman primate retina and provide therapeutic benefits for the treatment of retinal diseases.

  2. Chronic persistent post-surgical pain following staging laparotomy for carcinoma of ovary and its relationship to signal transduction genes.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashok Kumar; Chilkoti, Geetanjali T; Chopra, Anand K; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Sharma, Tusha

    2016-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of chronic persistent post-surgical pain (CPPP) and the role of signal transduction genes in patients undergoing staging laparotomy for carcinoma ovary. The present observational study was undertaken following institutional ethical committee approval and informed consent from all the participants. A total 21 patients of ASA grade I to III with age 20-70 years, scheduled for elective staging laparotomy for carcinoma ovary were included. Patients were excluded if had other causes of pain, cognitive dysfunction or chronic neurological disorders. Statistical analysis of pool data was done using SPSS version-17. For various scales like GPE, PDQ, NPSI, the visual analogue scale (VAS), global perceived effect (GPE), the pain DETECT questionnaire (PDQ), and neuropathic pain symptoms inventory (NPSI), one factor repaeted measure ANOVA applied with simple contrast with baseline as on post-operative day 1 (considered as reference and compared with subsequent time-interval), and the P values were adjusted according to "Bonferroni adjustments". In patients with CPPP, the Δct values of mRNA expressions of genes at the end of postoperative day 90 were compared with the baseline control values by one factor repeated ANOVA. P value < 0.005 significant. The present study demonstrates 38.1% (8 out of 21 patients) incidence of CPPP. The functional status and quality of life as were observed to be significantly diminished in all patients with chronic pain. An up-regulation in the mRNA expression of signal transduction and a positive correlation was noted between the mRNA expression of signal transduction genes and VAS score in all patients with CPPP at the end of postoperative day 90. The reported incidence of CPPP in patients with carcinoma ovary was 38.1%. An up-regulation and positive correlation between mRNA expression of signal transduction genes and VAS score depicts its potential role in the pathogenesis of CPPP.

  3. Inhibition of intracellular antiviral defense mechanisms augments lentiviral transduction of human natural killer cells: implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sutlu, Tolga; Nyström, Sanna; Gilljam, Mari; Stellan, Birgitta; Applequist, Steven E; Alici, Evren

    2012-10-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically modified natural killer (NK) cells is a promising approach for cancer treatment. Yet, optimization of highly efficient and clinically applicable gene transfer protocols for NK cells still presents a challenge. In this study, we aimed at identifying conditions under which optimum lentiviral gene transfer to NK cells can be achieved. Our results demonstrate that stimulation of NK cells with interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 supports efficient transduction using a VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vector. Moreover, we have identified that inhibition of innate immune receptor signaling greatly enhances transduction efficiency. We were able to boost the efficiency of lentiviral genetic modification on average 3.8-fold using BX795, an inhibitor of the TBK1/IKKɛ complex acting downstream of RIG-I, MDA-5, and TLR3. We have also observed that the use of BX795 enhances lentiviral transduction efficiency in a number of human and mouse cell lines, indicating a broadly applicable, practical, and safe approach that has the potential of being applicable to various gene therapy protocols.

  4. Prospects for herpes-simplex-virus thymidine-kinase and cytokine gene transduction as immunomodulatory gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hassan, W; Sanford, M A; Woo, S L; Chen, S H; Hall, S J

    2000-04-01

    In completed and ongoing clinical trials, adenovirus-mediated (Ad.) expression of herpes-simplex-virus thymidine-kinase (HSV-tk) gene transduction followed by ganciclovir (GCV) therapy has produced limited toxicity and evidence of antitumor activity following injection of the prostate. Furthermore, this system has been shown to direct systemic antitumor activity in several experimental cancer models, including that of prostate cancer, which may serve as the basis for in-situ immunomodulatory gene therapy. In a mouse model of prostate cancer, natural killer (NK) cells have been identified as the mediator of antimetastatic activity following Ad.HSV-tk + GCV, resulting in the combination of Ad.HSV-tk and adenovirus-mediated expression of interleukin 12 (Ad.IL-12) to exploit this cytokine's ability to enhance NK proliferation and cytotoxicity. Combination therapy demonstrated superior local and systemic growth suppression over that obtained with either therapy alone. Importantly, when the metastatic tumor burden was increased to an extent that negated the growth-suppressive activity directed by Ad.HSV-tk + GCV or Ad.IL-12 alone, combination therapy continued to demonstrate significant growth suppression. Examination of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes documented enhanced NK lytic activity following combination therapy. Therefore, it appears that the combination of Ad.HSV-tk and Ad.IL-12 should be validated in a clinical trial for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. Induction of Human Blood Group A Antigen Expression on Mouse Cells, Using Lentiviral Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaohu; Lang, Haili; Zhou, Xianpei; Zhang, Li; Yin, Rong; Maciejko, Jessica; Giannitsos, Vasiliki; Motyka, Bruce; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ABO histo-blood group system is the most important antigen system in transplantation medicine, yet no small animal model of the ABO system exists. To determine the feasibility of developing a murine model, we previously subcloned the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (H-transferase, EC 2.4.1.69) cDNA and the human α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (A-transferase, EC 2.4.1.40) cDNA into lentiviral vectors to study their ability to induce human histo-blood group A antigen expression on mouse cells. Herein we investigated the optimal conditions for human A and H antigen expression in murine cells. We determined that transduction of a bicistronic lentiviral vector (LvEF1-AH-trs) resulted in the expression of A antigen in a mouse endothelial cell line. We also studied the in vivo utility of this vector to induce human A antigen expression in mouse liver. After intrahepatic injection of LvEF1-AH-trs, A antigen expression was observed on hepatocytes as detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. In human group A erythrocyte-sensitized mice, A antigen expression in the liver was associated with tissue damage, and deposition of antibody and complement. These results suggest that this gene transfer strategy can be used to simulate the human ABO blood group system in a murine model. This model will facilitate progress in the development of interventions for ABO-incompatible transplantation and transfusion scenarios, which are difficult to develop in clinical or large animal settings. PMID:20163247

  6. Constitutive sensory transduction mutations in the Bordetella pertussis bvgS gene.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J F; Johnson, S A; Black, W J; Beattie, D T; Mekalanos, J J; Falkow, S

    1992-01-01

    The products of the bvgAS locus coordinately regulate expression of the Bordetella pertussis virulence regulon in response to environmental signals. Transcription of bvgAS-activated genes is nearly eliminated by several modulating conditions, including the presence of sulfate anion or nicotinic acid and growth at low temperature. We have isolated spontaneous mutations that result in the constitutive synthesis of multiple bvg-regulated loci. Several of these mutations have been analyzed and were found to result from single-nucleotide substitutions within bvgS, in a region encoding a 161-amino-acid segment which links the transmembrane sequence with cytoplasmic domains that appear to be involved in signaling events. The effect of signal transduction mutations in Escherichia coli was determined by measuring the expression of an fhaB-lacZYA transcriptional fusion, and that in B. pertussis was determined by measuring expression of both fhaB-cat and ptxA3201-cat fusions. The constitutive mutations have little effect on fhaB-cat or fhaB-lacZYA expression in the absence of modulating signals but result in a nearly complete insensitivity to MgSO4, nicotinic acid, or growth at low temperature. Furthermore, insertion and deletion mutations in bvgS sequences encoding the periplasmic domain eliminate activity of the wild-type product, whereas constitutive mutants remain active. In B. pertussis cultures grown in Stainer-Scholte broth, expression of ptxA3201-cat differed from that of fhaB-cat in several respects. In combination with a wild-type bvgS allele, ptxA3201-cat expression required the addition of heptakis-(2,6-O-dimethyl)-beta-cyclodextrin, and this requirement was eliminated by the presence of the constitutive mutations. Images PMID:1732230

  7. Constitutive sensory transduction mutations in the Bordetella pertussis bvgS gene.

    PubMed

    Miller, J F; Johnson, S A; Black, W J; Beattie, D T; Mekalanos, J J; Falkow, S

    1992-02-01

    The products of the bvgAS locus coordinately regulate expression of the Bordetella pertussis virulence regulon in response to environmental signals. Transcription of bvgAS-activated genes is nearly eliminated by several modulating conditions, including the presence of sulfate anion or nicotinic acid and growth at low temperature. We have isolated spontaneous mutations that result in the constitutive synthesis of multiple bvg-regulated loci. Several of these mutations have been analyzed and were found to result from single-nucleotide substitutions within bvgS, in a region encoding a 161-amino-acid segment which links the transmembrane sequence with cytoplasmic domains that appear to be involved in signaling events. The effect of signal transduction mutations in Escherichia coli was determined by measuring the expression of an fhaB-lacZYA transcriptional fusion, and that in B. pertussis was determined by measuring expression of both fhaB-cat and ptxA3201-cat fusions. The constitutive mutations have little effect on fhaB-cat or fhaB-lacZYA expression in the absence of modulating signals but result in a nearly complete insensitivity to MgSO4, nicotinic acid, or growth at low temperature. Furthermore, insertion and deletion mutations in bvgS sequences encoding the periplasmic domain eliminate activity of the wild-type product, whereas constitutive mutants remain active. In B. pertussis cultures grown in Stainer-Scholte broth, expression of ptxA3201-cat differed from that of fhaB-cat in several respects. In combination with a wild-type bvgS allele, ptxA3201-cat expression required the addition of heptakis-(2,6-O-dimethyl)-beta-cyclodextrin, and this requirement was eliminated by the presence of the constitutive mutations.

  8. Analysis of transduction in wastewater bacterial populations by targeting the phage-derived 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Flanagan, Paul V; Larkin, Michael J; Allen, Christopher C R; Kulakov, Leonid A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial 16S rRNA genes transduced by bacteriophages were identified and analyzed in order to estimate the extent of the bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the wastewater environment. For this purpose, phage and bacterial DNA was isolated from the oxidation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences cloned from a phage metagenome revealed that bacteriophages transduce genetic material in several major groups of bacteria. The groups identified were as follows: Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales and Firmicutes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences in the total bacterial DNA from the same sample revealed that several bacterial groups found in the oxidation tank were not present in the phage metagenome (e.g. Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and many Actinobacteria genera). These results suggest that transduction in a wastewater environment occurs in several bacterial groups; however, not all species are equally involved into this process. The data also showed that a number of distinctive bacterial strains participate in transduction-mediated gene transfer within identified bacterial groupings. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that profiles of the transduced 16S rRNA gene sequences and those present in the whole microbial community show significant differences.

  9. Functional characterization and signal transduction ability of nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat resistance genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R K; Nayak, S

    2011-10-25

    Pathogen infection in plants is often limited by a multifaceted defense response triggered by resistance genes. The most prevalent class of resistance proteins includes those that contain a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) domain. Over the past 15 years, more than 50 novel NBS-LRR class resistance genes have been isolated and characterized; they play a significant role in activating conserved defense-signaling networks. Recent molecular research on NBS-LRR resistance proteins and their signaling networks has the potential to broaden the use of resistance genes for disease control. Various transgenic approaches have been tested to broaden the disease resistance spectrum using NBS-LRR genes. This review highlights the recent progress in understanding the structure, function, signal transduction ability of NBS-LRR resistance genes in different host-pathogen systems and suggests new strategies for engineering pathogen resistance in crop plants.

  10. Up-regulation of JAM-1 in AR42J cells treated with activin A and betacellulin and the diabetic regenerating islets.

    PubMed

    Yoshikumi, Yukako; Ohno, Hideki; Suzuki, Junko; Isshiki, Masashi; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Ohnishi, Hirohide; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Omata, Masao; Fujita, Toshiro; Mashima, Hirosato

    2008-08-01

    Pancreatic AR42J cells demonstrate the pluripotency in precursor cells of the gut endoderm and also provide an excellent model system to study the differentiation of the pancreas. Using the mRNA differential display technique, we identified junctional adhesion molecule-1 (JAM-1), a component of the tight junction, was highly up-regulated during the differentiation of AR42J cells, although junctions were not formed. The expression level of JAM-1 showed an up-regulation in the mRNA level after 3 hours and in the protein level after 24 hours in [activin A + betacellulin]-treated AR42J cells. The expressions of its signaling molecules, PAR-3 and atypical PKC lambda, also increased after the addition of activin A + betacellulin. When JAM-1 was over-expressed in [activin A + betacellulin]-treated AR42J cells, tagged-JAM-1 was observed in cytoplasm as vesicular structures and JAM-1 was colocalized with Rab3B and Rab13, members of the Rab family expressed at tight junctions. In streptozotocin-induced regenerating islets, the expression of JAM-1 was also up-regulated in the mRNA level and the protein level. JAM-1 might therefore play an important role in the differentiation of AR42J cells and the regeneration of pancreatic islets.

  11. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors mediate efficient gene transduction in cultured neonatal and adult microglia.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei; Kang, John; Sopher, Bryce; Gillespie, James; Aloi, Macarena S; Odom, Guy L; Hopkins, Stephanie; Case, Amanda; Wang, David B; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Garden, Gwenn A

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are a specialized population of myeloid cells that mediate CNS innate immune responses. Efforts to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate microglia behaviors have been hampered by the lack of effective tools for manipulating gene expression. Cultured microglia are refractory to most chemical and electrical transfection methods, yielding little or no gene delivery and causing toxicity and/or inflammatory activation. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAVs) vectors are non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA vectors commonly used to transduce many primary cell types and tissues. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing rAAV serotype 2 (rAAV2) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia. rAAV2 yields high transduction and causes minimal toxicity or inflammatory response in both neonatal and adult microglia. To demonstrate that rAAV transduction can induce functional protein expression, we used rAAV2 expressing Cre recombinase to successfully excise a LoxP-flanked miR155 gene in cultured microglia. We further evaluated rAAV serotypes 5, 6, 8, and 9, and observed that all efficiently transduced cultured microglia to varying degrees of success and caused little or no alteration in inflammatory gene expression. These results provide strong encouragement for the application of rAAV-mediated gene expression in microglia for mechanistic and therapeutic purposes. Neonatal microglia are functionally distinct from adult microglia, although the majority of in vitro studies utilize rodent neonatal microglia cultures because of difficulties of culturing adult cells. In addition, cultured microglia are refractory to most methods for modifying gene expression. Here, we developed a novel protocol for culturing adult microglia and evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia.

  12. Chronic persistent post-surgical pain following staging laparotomy for carcinoma of ovary and its relationship to signal transduction genes

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ashok Kumar; Chopra, Anand K; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Sharma, Tusha

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of chronic persistent post-surgical pain (CPPP) and the role of signal transduction genes in patients undergoing staging laparotomy for carcinoma ovary. Methods The present observational study was undertaken following institutional ethical committee approval and informed consent from all the participants. A total 21 patients of ASA grade I to III with age 20−70 years, scheduled for elective staging laparotomy for carcinoma ovary were included. Patients were excluded if had other causes of pain, cognitive dysfunction or chronic neurological disorders. Statistical analysis of pool data was done using SPSS version-17. For various scales like GPE, PDQ, NPSI, the visual analogue scale (VAS), global perceived effect (GPE), the pain DETECT questionnaire (PDQ), and neuropathic pain symptoms inventory (NPSI), one factor repaeted measure ANOVA applied with simple contrast with baseline as on post-operative day 1 (considered as reference and compared with subsequent time-interval), and the P values were adjusted according to "Bonferroni adjustments". In patients with CPPP, the Δct values of mRNA expressions of genes at the end of postoperative day 90 were compared with the baseline control values by one factor repeated ANOVA. P value < 0.005 significant. Results The present study demonstrates 38.1% (8 out of 21 patients) incidence of CPPP. The functional status and quality of life as were observed to be significantly diminished in all patients with chronic pain. An up-regulation in the mRNA expression of signal transduction and a positive correlation was noted between the mRNA expression of signal transduction genes and VAS score in all patients with CPPP at the end of postoperative day 90. Conclusions The reported incidence of CPPP in patients with carcinoma ovary was 38.1%. An up-regulation and positive correlation between mRNA expression of signal transduction genes and VAS score depicts its potential

  13. The Role of Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN) in Hormone Signaling Transduction and Prostate Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    prostate cancer. A review. Minerva Urol Nefrol. 2005; 57(2):71-84. 3. Steinkamp MP, O’Mahony OA, Brogley M, Rehman H, Lapensee EW , Dhanasekaran S ...Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ...transduction and prostate tumorigenesis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0303 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Kongming Wu

  14. Molecular characterization of SIG1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene involved in negative regulation of G-protein-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Dignard, D; Harcus, D; Whiteway, M; Thomas, D Y

    1994-01-01

    Two recessive mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIG1 (suppressor of inhibitory G-protein) gene have been identified by their ability to suppress the signalling defect of dominant-negative variants of the mating response G-protein beta-subunit. The mutations and deletion of SIG1 enhance the sensitivity of the cells to pheromone and stimulate the basal transcription of a mating specific gene, FUS1, suggesting that Sig1p plays a negatively regulatory role in G beta gamma-mediated signal transduction. An additional function of Sig1p in vegetatively growing cells is suggested by the finding that the mutations and deletion of SIG1 cause temperature-sensitive growth defects. The SIG1 gene encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 65 kDa that contains at the amino-terminus two zinc finger-like sequence motifs. Epistasis experiments localize the action of Sig1p within the pheromone signalling pathway at a position at or shortly after the G-protein. We propose that Sig1p represents a novel negative regulator of G beta gamma-mediated signal transduction. Images PMID:8039500

  15. Synaptic Plasticity and Signal Transduction Gene Polymorphisms and Vulnerability to Drug Addictions in Populations of European or African Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Levran, Orna; Peles, Einat; Randesi, Matthew; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Ott, Jurg; Rotrosen, John; Adelson, Miriam; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-11-01

    Drug addiction is characterized, in part, by deregulation of synaptic plasticity in circuits involved in reward, stress, cue learning, and memory. This study was designed to assess whether 185 variants in 32 genes central to synaptic plasticity and signal transduction contribute to vulnerability to develop heroin and/or cocaine addiction. Analyses were conducted in a sample of 1860 subjects divided according to ancestry (African and European) and drug of abuse (heroin or cocaine). Eighteen SNPs in 11 genes (CDK5R1, EPHA4, EPHA6, FOSL2, MAPK3, MBP, MPDZ, NFKB1, NTRK2, NTSR1, and PRKCE) showed significant associations (P < 0.01), but the signals did not survive correction for multiple testing. SNP rs230530 in the NFKB1 gene, encoding the transcription regulator NF-kappa-B, was the only SNP indicated in both ancestry groups and both addictions. This SNP was previously identified in association with alcohol addiction. SNP rs3915568 in NTSR1, which encodes neurotensin receptor, and SNP rs1389752 in MPDZ, which encodes the multiple PDZ domain protein, were previously associated with heroin addiction or alcohol addiction, respectively. The study supports the involvement of genetic variation in signal transduction pathways in heroin and cocaine addiction and provides preliminary evidence suggesting several new risk or protective loci that may be relevant for diagnosis and treatment success. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. HRGRN: A Graph Search-Empowered Integrative Database of Arabidopsis Signaling Transduction, Metabolism and Gene Regulation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xinbin; Li, Jun; Liu, Tingsong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The biological networks controlling plant signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulation are composed of not only tens of thousands of genes, compounds, proteins and RNAs but also the complicated interactions and co-ordination among them. These networks play critical roles in many fundamental mechanisms, such as plant growth, development and environmental response. Although much is known about these complex interactions, the knowledge and data are currently scattered throughout the published literature, publicly available high-throughput data sets and third-party databases. Many ‘unknown’ yet important interactions among genes need to be mined and established through extensive computational analysis. However, exploring these complex biological interactions at the network level from existing heterogeneous resources remains challenging and time-consuming for biologists. Here, we introduce HRGRN, a graph search-empowered integrative database of Arabidopsis signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulatory networks. HRGRN utilizes Neo4j, which is a highly scalable graph database management system, to host large-scale biological interactions among genes, proteins, compounds and small RNAs that were either validated experimentally or predicted computationally. The associated biological pathway information was also specially marked for the interactions that are involved in the pathway to facilitate the investigation of cross-talk between pathways. Furthermore, HRGRN integrates a series of graph path search algorithms to discover novel relationships among genes, compounds, RNAs and even pathways from heterogeneous biological interaction data that could be missed by traditional SQL database search methods. Users can also build subnetworks based on known interactions. The outcomes are visualized with rich text, figures and interactive network graphs on web pages. The HRGRN database is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/hrgrn/. PMID:26657893

  17. Transduction of renal cells in vitro and in vivo by adeno-associated virus gene therapy vectors.

    PubMed

    Lipkowitz, M S; Hanss, B; Tulchin, N; Wilson, P D; Langer, J C; Ross, M D; Kurtzman, G J; Klotman, P E; Klotman, M E

    1999-09-01

    There has been an increasing interest recently in the possibility of treating renal diseases using gene therapy. The ability to pursue gene therapy for renal diseases has been limited by the availability of an adequate system for gene delivery to the kidney. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a defective virus of the parvovirus family that has a number of properties attractive for renal gene delivery: recombinant AAV contains no viral genes; expression of genes delivered by these vectors does not activate cell-mediated immunity; the virus is able to transduce nondividing as well as dividing cells; and both wild-type and recombinant AAV integrate into the host chromosome resulting in long-term gene expression. Studies were performed to determine whether AAV can deliver reporter genes to kidney cells in vitro and in vivo. These studies show that AAV can deliver reporter genes with approximately equal efficiency to human mesangial, proximal tubule, thick ascending limb, collecting tubule, and renal cell carcinoma cells in primary culture. Immortalized mouse mesangial cells are transduced at a much greater efficiency. Transduction can be enhanced by pharmaceutical agents up to sevenfold in primary cells (transducing up to 20% of primary cells per well) and as much as 400-fold in immortalized mesangial cells. AAV delivered in vivo by intraparenchymal injection results in at least 3 mo of reporter gene expression in tubular epithelial, but not glomerular or vascular, cells at the injection site. These data indicate that AAV can deliver genes to renal cells both in vitro and in vivo resulting in prolonged gene expression, and thus AAV can be a useful tool for renal gene delivery.

  18. Reconstitution of T cell receptor signaling in ZAP-70-deficient cells by retroviral transduction of the ZAP-70 gene.

    PubMed

    Taylor, N; Bacon, K B; Smith, S; Jahn, T; Kadlecek, T A; Uribe, L; Kohn, D B; Gelfand, E W; Weiss, A; Weinberg, K

    1996-11-01

    A variant of severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID) with a selective inability to produce CD8 single positive T cells and a signal transduction defect in peripheral CD4+ cells has recently been shown to be the result of mutations in the ZAP-70 gene. T cell receptor (TCR) signaling requires the association of the ZAP-70 protein tyrosine kinase with the TCR complex. Human T cell leukemia virus type I-transformed CD4+ T cell lines were established from ZAP-70-deficient patients and normal controls. ZAP-70 was expressed and appropriately phosphorylated in normal T cell lines after TCR engagement, but was not detected in T cell lines from ZAP-70-deficient patients. To determine whether signaling could be reconstituted, wild-type ZAP-70 was introduced into deficient cells with a ZAP-70 retroviral vector. High titer producer clones expressing ZAP-70 were generated in the Gibbon ape leukemia virus packaging line PG13. After transduction, ZAP-70 was detected at levels equivalent to those observed in normal cells, and was appropriately phosphorylated on tyrosine after receptor engagement. The kinase activity of ZAP-70 in the reconstituted cells was also appropriately upregulated by receptor aggregation. Moreover, normal and transduced cells, but not ZAP-70-deficient cells, were able to mobilize calcium after receptor ligation, indicating that proximal TCR signaling was reconstituted. These results indicate that this form of SCID may be corrected by gene therapy.

  19. Cochlear gene therapy with ancestral AAV in adult mice: complete transduction of inner hair cells without cochlear dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jun; Hashimoto, Ken; Xiao, Ru; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Liberman, M Charles

    2017-04-03

    The use of viral vectors for inner ear gene therapy is receiving increased attention for treatment of genetic hearing disorders. Most animal studies to date have injected viral suspensions into neonatal ears, via the round window membrane. Achieving transduction of hair cells, or sensory neurons, throughout the cochlea has proven difficult, and no studies have been able to efficiently transduce sensory cells in adult ears while maintaining normal cochlear function. Here, we show, for the first time, successful transduction of all inner hair cells and the majority of outer hair cells in an adult cochlea via virus injection into the posterior semicircular canal. We used a "designer" AAV, AAV2/Anc80L65, in which the main capsid proteins approximate the ancestral sequence state of AAV1, 2, 8, and 9. Our injections also transduced ~10% of spiral ganglion cells and a much larger fraction of their satellite cells. In the vestibular sensory epithelia, the virus transduced large numbers of hair cells and virtually all the supporting cells, along with close to half of the vestibular ganglion cells. We conclude that this viral vector and this delivery route hold great promise for gene therapy applications in both cochlear and vestibular sense organs.

  20. Cochlear gene therapy with ancestral AAV in adult mice: complete transduction of inner hair cells without cochlear dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jun; Hashimoto, Ken; Xiao, Ru; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2017-01-01

    The use of viral vectors for inner ear gene therapy is receiving increased attention for treatment of genetic hearing disorders. Most animal studies to date have injected viral suspensions into neonatal ears, via the round window membrane. Achieving transduction of hair cells, or sensory neurons, throughout the cochlea has proven difficult, and no studies have been able to efficiently transduce sensory cells in adult ears while maintaining normal cochlear function. Here, we show, for the first time, successful transduction of all inner hair cells and the majority of outer hair cells in an adult cochlea via virus injection into the posterior semicircular canal. We used a “designer” AAV, AAV2/Anc80L65, in which the main capsid proteins approximate the ancestral sequence state of AAV1, 2, 8, and 9. Our injections also transduced ~10% of spiral ganglion cells and a much larger fraction of their satellite cells. In the vestibular sensory epithelia, the virus transduced large numbers of hair cells and virtually all the supporting cells, along with close to half of the vestibular ganglion cells. We conclude that this viral vector and this delivery route hold great promise for gene therapy applications in both cochlear and vestibular sense organs. PMID:28367981

  1. CNS-restricted Transduction and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Deletion with an Engineered AAV Vector

    PubMed Central

    Murlidharan, Giridhar; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Rao, Lavanya; Corriher, Travis; Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping; Sullivan, Patrick; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is emerging as a promising approach to treat central nervous system disorders such as Spinal muscular atrophy, Batten, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease amongst others. A critical remaining challenge for central nervous system-targeted gene therapy, silencing or gene editing is to limit potential vector dose-related toxicity in off-target cells and organs. Here, we characterize a lab-derived AAV chimeric (AAV2g9), which displays favorable central nervous system attributes derived from both parental counterparts, AAV2 and AAV9. This synthetic AAV strain displays preferential, robust, and widespread neuronal transduction within the brain and decreased glial tropism. Importantly, we observed minimal systemic leakage, decreased sequestration and gene transfer in off-target organs with AAV2g9, when administered into the cerebrospinal fluid. A single intracranial injection of AAV2g9 vectors encoding guide RNAs targeting the schizophrenia risk gene MIR137 (encoding MIR137) in CRISPR/Cas9 knockin mice resulted in brain-specific gene deletion with no detectable events in the liver. This engineered AAV vector is a promising platform for treating neurological disorders through gene therapy, silencing or editing modalities. PMID:27434683

  2. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction inhibits telomerase activity independent of its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, M; Ogawa, T; Mizumoto, K; Ueno, H; Niiyama, H; Sato, N; Nakamura, M; Tanaka, M

    1999-08-01

    Evidence for a relationship between overexpression of wild-type p53 and telomerase activity remains controversial. We investigated whether p53 gene transduction could cause telomerase inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines, focusing on the relation of transduction to growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic cell death. The cells were infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 or p21WAF1 at a multiplicity of infection of 100 or were continuously exposed to 10 microM VP-16, which is well known to induce apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction caused G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and resultant growth inhibition in MIA PaCa-2 cells; the cell number 2 days after infection was 50% of preinfection value, and 13% of the cells were dead. Moreover, the transduction resulted in complete depression of telomerase activity through down-regulation of hTERT mRNA expression. In contrast, p21WAF1 gene transduction only arrested cell growth and cell cycle at G1 phase, and VP-16 treatment inhibited cell growth with G2-M arrest and apoptosis; after treatment, the cell number was 73% of pretreatment, and 12% of the cells were dead. Neither p21WAF1 gene transduction nor VP-16 treatment caused telomerase inhibition. Similar results were obtained in two other pancreatic cancer cell lines, SUIT-2 and AsPC-1. Thus, our results demonstrate that the p53 gene transduction directly inhibits telomerase activity, independent of its effects on cell growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis.

  3. CGRP-RCP, a novel protein required for signal transduction at calcitonin gene-related peptide and adrenomedullin receptors.

    PubMed

    Evans, B N; Rosenblatt, M I; Mnayer, L O; Oliver, K R; Dickerson, I M

    2000-10-06

    It is becoming clear that receptors that initiate signal transduction by interacting with G-proteins do not function as monomers, but often require accessory proteins for function. Some of these accessory proteins are chaperones, required for correct transport of the receptor to the cell surface, but the function of many accessory proteins remains unknown. We determined the role of an accessory protein for the receptor for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilator neuropeptide. We have previously shown that this accessory protein, the CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP), is expressed in CGRP responsive tissues and that RCP protein expression correlates with the biological efficacy of CGRP in vivo. However, the function of RCP has remained elusive. In this study stable cell lines were made that express antisense RCP RNA, and CGRP- and adrenomedullin-mediated signal transduction were greatly reduced. However, the loss of RCP did not effect CGRP binding or receptor density, indicating that RCP did not behave as a chaperone but was instead coupling the CGRP receptor to downstream effectors. A candidate CGRP receptor named calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) has been identified, and in this study RCP co-immunoprecipitated with CRLR indicating that these two proteins interact directly. Since CGRP and adrenomedullin can both signal through CRLR, which has been previously shown to require a chaperone protein for function, we now propose that a functional CGRP or adrenomedullin receptor consists of at least three proteins: the receptor (CRLR), the chaperone protein (RAMP), and RCP that couples the receptor to the cellular signal transduction pathway.

  4. An Arabidopsis thaliana thionin gene is inducible via a signal transduction pathway different from that for pathogenesis-related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Epple, P; Apel, K; Bohlmann, H

    1995-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding thionin preproteins have been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The corresponding genes have been designated Thi2.1 and Thi2.2. Southern blot analysis suggests that A. thaliana most probably contains single genes for both thionins. Thi2.2 transcripts have a low basal level in seedlings and show circadian variation. Thi2.2 transcripts were also detected in rosette leaves. No potent elicitors have been found for the Thi2.2 gene. Transcripts of the Thi2.1 gene are not detectable in seedlings but are present in rosette leaves and at a very high level in flowers and in siliques. The expression of the Thi2.1 gene is highly inducible in seedlings by pathogens, silver nitrate, and methyl jasmonate, but not by salicylate, indicating that the gene is induced by a signal transduction pathway that is at least partly different from that for the pathogenesis-related proteins. PMID:8552715

  5. Identification of a signal transduction response sequence element necessary for induction of a Dictyostelium discoideum gene by extracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, J; Haribabu, B; Dottin, R P

    1989-01-01

    The signal transduction pathways that lead to gene induction are being intensively investigated in Dictyostelium discoideum. We have identified by deletion and transformation analysis a sequence element necessary for induction of a gene coding for uridine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase (UDPGP1) of D. discoideum in response to extracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). This regulatory element is located 380 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site and contains a G+C-rich partially palindromic sequence. It is not required for transcription per se but is required for induction of the gene in response to the stimulus of extracellular cAMP. The cAMP response sequence is also required for induction of the gene during normal development. A second A+T-rich cis-acting region located immediately downstream of the cAMP response sequence appears to be essential for the basal level of expression of the UDPGP1 gene. The position of the cAMP response element coincides with a DNase I-hypersensitive site that is observed when the UDPGP1 gene is actively transcribed. Images PMID:2557538

  6. Characterization and expression of genes involved in the ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction during ripening of mulberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changying; Zhao, Aichun; Zhu, Panpan; Li, Jun; Han, Leng; Wang, Xiling; Fan, Wei; Lü, Ruihua; Wang, Chuanhong; Li, Zhengang; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Maode

    2015-01-01

    Although ethylene is well known as an essential regulator of fruit development, little work has examined the role ethylene plays in the development and maturation of mulberry (Morus L.) fruit. To study the mechanism of ethylene action during fruit development in this species, we measured the ethylene production, fruit firmness, and soluble solids content (SSC) during fruit development and harvest. By comparing the results with those from other climacteric fruit, we concluded that Morus fruit are probably climacteric. Genes associated with the ethylene signal transduction pathway of Morus were characterized from M. notabilis Genome Database, including four ethylene receptor genes, a EIN2-like gene, a CTR1-like gene, four EIN3-like genes, and a RTE1-like gene. The expression patterns of these genes were analyzed in the fruit of M. atropurpurea cv. Jialing No.40. During fruit development, transcript levels of MaETR2, MaERS, MaEIN4, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were lower at the early stages and higher after 26 days after full bloom (DAF), while MaETR1, MaEIL1, MaEIL2, and MaEIL3 remained constant. In ripening fruit, the transcripts of MaACO1 and MaACS3 increased, while MaACS1 and MaACO2 decreased after harvest. The transcripts of MaACO1, MaACO2, and MaACS3 were inhibited by ethylene, and 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene) upregulated MaACS3. The transcripts of the MaETR-like genes, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were inhibited by ethylene and 1-MCP, suggesting that ethylene may accelerate the decline of MaETRs transcripts. No significant changes in the expression of MaEIN2, MaEIL1, and MaEIL3 were observed during ripening or in response to ethylene, while the expressions of MaEIL2 and MaEIL4 increased rapidly after 24 h after harvest (HAH) and were upregulated by ethylene. The present study provides insights into ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction in Morus plants and lays a foundation for the further understanding of the mechanisms underlying Morus fruit development and ripening.

  7. Characterization and Expression of Genes Involved in the Ethylene Biosynthesis and Signal Transduction during Ripening of Mulberry Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changying; Zhao, Aichun; Zhu, Panpan; Li, Jun; Han, Leng; Wang, Xiling; Fan, Wei; Lü, Ruihua; Wang, Chuanhong; Li, Zhengang; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Maode

    2015-01-01

    Although ethylene is well known as an essential regulator of fruit development, little work has examined the role ethylene plays in the development and maturation of mulberry (Morus L.) fruit. To study the mechanism of ethylene action during fruit development in this species, we measured the ethylene production, fruit firmness, and soluble solids content (SSC) during fruit development and harvest. By comparing the results with those from other climacteric fruit, we concluded that Morus fruit are probably climacteric. Genes associated with the ethylene signal transduction pathway of Morus were characterized from M. notabilis Genome Database, including four ethylene receptor genes, a EIN2-like gene, a CTR1-like gene, four EIN3-like genes, and a RTE1-like gene. The expression patterns of these genes were analyzed in the fruit of M. atropurpurea cv. Jialing No.40. During fruit development, transcript levels of MaETR2, MaERS, MaEIN4, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were lower at the early stages and higher after 26 days after full bloom (DAF), while MaETR1, MaEIL1, MaEIL2, and MaEIL3 remained constant. In ripening fruit, the transcripts of MaACO1 and MaACS3 increased, while MaACS1 and MaACO2 decreased after harvest. The transcripts of MaACO1, MaACO2, and MaACS3 were inhibited by ethylene, and 1-MCP (1–methylcyclopropene) upregulated MaACS3. The transcripts of the MaETR-like genes, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were inhibited by ethylene and 1-MCP, suggesting that ethylene may accelerate the decline of MaETRs transcripts. No significant changes in the expression of MaEIN2, MaEIL1, and MaEIL3 were observed during ripening or in response to ethylene, while the expressions of MaEIL2 and MaEIL4 increased rapidly after 24 h after harvest (HAH) and were upregulated by ethylene. The present study provides insights into ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction in Morus plants and lays a foundation for the further understanding of the mechanisms underlying Morus fruit development and ripening. PMID

  8. Extracellular matrix-dependent tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelial cells requires both physical and biochemical signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Roskelley, C.D.; Desprez, P.Y.; Bissell, M.J. )

    1994-12-20

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) profoundly influences the growth and differentiation of the mammary gland epithelium, both in culture and in vivo. Utilizing a clonal population of mouse mammary epithelial cells that absolutely requires an exogenous ECM for function, we developed a rapid assay to study signal transduction by ECM. Two components of the cellular response to a basement membrane overlay that result in the expression of the milk protein [beta]-casein were defined. The first component of this response involves a rounding and clustering of the cells that can be physically mimicked by plating the cells on a nonadhesive substratum. The second component is biochemical in nature, and it is associated with [beta][sub 1] integrin clustering and increased tyrosine phosphorylation. The second component is initiated in a morphology-independent manner, but the proper translation of this biochemical signal into a functional response requires cell rounding and cell clustering. Thus, physical and biochemical signal transduction events contribute to the ECM-dependent regulation of tissue-specific gene expression in mouse mammary epithelial cells. 44 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Recombinant MafA protein containing its own protein transduction domain stimulates insulin gene expression in IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Luo, Hailan; Wu, Huiling; Lan, Michael S; Tan, Jianming; Lu, Daru

    2011-07-18

    MafA, a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, functions as a potent activator of insulin gene transcription in β-cell. In this paper, we aimed to investigate whether the entire MafA protein has the self-delivery activity, and that the arginine- and lysine-rich sequence in MafA bZIP domain is an efficient protein transduction domain (PTD). Entire MafA protein internalization was evaluated with Western blot and immunofluorescence. The distribution of the PTD-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein) was examined by fluorescent microscope observation. Luciferase reporter assay was used to investigate the effect of the transduced MafA protein on insulin 2 promoter activity. Additionally, we conducted RT-PCR to detect the expression of insulin mRNA in MafA treated IEC-6 cells. The arginine- and lysine-rich peptide of MafA serves as a novel PTD. PTD-EGFP can permeate into various cell types including Min6 (a β-cell line), and transduce in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The cellular uptake of MafA PTD can be completely blocked by heparin, whereas cytochalasin D and amiloride were partially effective in blocking the PTD-EGFP protein entry. Transduced intact MafA protein behaves in the same way as the endogenous MafA, stimulating the transcription of insulin promoter and further inducing insulin expression in treated non-β-cell line (IEC-6). These results indicate that the MafA PTD could serve as a therapeutic delivery vehicle, and further suggest that MafA protein transduction could be a valuable strategy for enhancing insulin gene transcription without requiring gene transfer technology. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. A novel gene that interferes with the phosphotransfer signal transduction mediated by the EnvZ osmosensor in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, K; Ogino, T; Aiba, H; Mizuno, T

    1996-10-01

    In Escherichia coli, expression of the major outer membrane proteins, OmpC and OmpF, is regulated in response to the medium osmolarity and other environmental stimuli. A two-component signal transduction system, mediated by EnvZ and OmpR, is crucially responsible for this osmotic regulation of the ompC and ompF genes. In this study, an E. coli gene was cloned, which interferes with expression of both the ompC and ompF genes at the level of transcription, provided that the cloned gene was introduced in E. coli cells by a multicopy plasmid. The gene product was identified as F107, which was previously characterized as a hypothetical protein in E. coli genome databases. F107 containing 107 amino acids appears to be highly hydrophobic, and has a sequence similarity to the eukaryotic type of cytochrome-c oxidase subunit III. The mechanism by which F107 inhibits transcription of ompC and ompF was examined extensively, mainly by using a set of envZ and ompR mutants. These results suggested that F107 interferes specifically with a function of the EnvZ osmosensory kinase. Possible mechanisms by which F107 affects the EnvZ function are discussed.

  11. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems That Regulate the Temporal and Spatial Expression of Myxococcus xanthus Sporulation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Zaara

    2015-01-01

    When starved for nutrients, Myxococcus xanthus produces a biofilm that contains a mat of rod-shaped cells, known as peripheral rods, and aerial structures called fruiting bodies, which house thousands of dormant and stress-resistant spherical spores. Because rod-shaped cells differentiate into spherical, stress-resistant spores and spore differentiation occurs only in nascent fruiting bodies, many genes and multiple levels of regulation are required. Over the past 2 decades, many regulators of the temporal and spatial expression of M. xanthus sporulation genes have been uncovered. Of these sporulation gene regulators, two-component signal transduction circuits, which typically contain a histidine kinase sensor protein and a transcriptional regulator known as response regulator, are among the best characterized. In this review, we discuss prototypical two-component systems (Nla6S/Nla6 and Nla28S/Nla28) that regulate an early, preaggregation phase of sporulation gene expression during fruiting body development. We also discuss orphan response regulators (ActB and FruA) that regulate a later phase of sporulation gene expression, which begins during the aggregation stage of fruiting body development. In addition, we summarize the research on a complex two-component system (Esp) that is important for the spatial regulation of sporulation. PMID:26369581

  12. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems That Regulate the Temporal and Spatial Expression of Myxococcus xanthus Sporulation Genes.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Zaara; Garza, Anthony G

    2015-09-14

    When starved for nutrients, Myxococcus xanthus produces a biofilm that contains a mat of rod-shaped cells, known as peripheral rods, and aerial structures called fruiting bodies, which house thousands of dormant and stress-resistant spherical spores. Because rod-shaped cells differentiate into spherical, stress-resistant spores and spore differentiation occurs only in nascent fruiting bodies, many genes and multiple levels of regulation are required. Over the past 2 decades, many regulators of the temporal and spatial expression of M. xanthus sporulation genes have been uncovered. Of these sporulation gene regulators, two-component signal transduction circuits, which typically contain a histidine kinase sensor protein and a transcriptional regulator known as response regulator, are among the best characterized. In this review, we discuss prototypical two-component systems (Nla6S/Nla6 and Nla28S/Nla28) that regulate an early, preaggregation phase of sporulation gene expression during fruiting body development. We also discuss orphan response regulators (ActB and FruA) that regulate a later phase of sporulation gene expression, which begins during the aggregation stage of fruiting body development. In addition, we summarize the research on a complex two-component system (Esp) that is important for the spatial regulation of sporulation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. CyTRANSFINDER: a Cytoscape 3.3 plugin for three-component (TF, gene, miRNA) signal transduction pathway construction.

    PubMed

    Politano, Gianfranco; Orso, Francesca; Raimo, Monica; Benso, Alfredo; Savino, Alessandro; Taverna, Daniela; Di Carlo, Stefano

    2016-04-08

    Biological research increasingly relies on network models to study complex phenomena. Signal Transduction Pathways are molecular circuits that model how cells receive, process, and respond to information from the environment providing snapshots of the overall cell dynamics. Most of the attempts to reconstruct signal transduction pathways are limited to single regulator networks including only genes/proteins. However, networks involving a single type of regulator and neglecting transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations mediated by transcription factors and microRNAs, respectively, may not fully reveal the complex regulatory mechanisms of a cell. We observed a lack of computational instruments supporting explorative analysis on this type of three-component signal transduction pathways. We have developed CyTRANSFINDER, a new Cytoscape plugin able to infer three-component signal transduction pathways based on user defined regulatory patterns and including miRNAs, TFs and genes. Since CyTRANSFINDER has been designed to support exploratory analysis, it does not rely on expression data. To show the potential of the plugin we have applied it in a study of two miRNAs that are particularly relevant in human melanoma progression, miR-146a and miR-214. CyTRANSFINDER supports the reconstruction of small signal transduction pathways among groups of genes. Results obtained from its use in a real case study have been analyzed and validated through both literature data and preliminary wet-lab experiments, showing the potential of this tool when performing exploratory analysis.

  14. Transduction of the Streptococcus pyogenes bacteriophage Φm46.1, carrying resistance genes mef(A) and tet(O), to other Streptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Giovanetti, Eleonora; Brenciani, Andrea; Morroni, Gianluca; Tiberi, Erika; Pasquaroli, Sonia; Mingoia, Marina; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2014-01-01

    Φm46.1 - Streptococcus pyogenes bacteriophage carrying mef(A) and tet(O), respectively, encoding resistance to macrolides (M phenotype) and tetracycline - is widespread in S. pyogenes but has not been reported outside this species. Φm46.1 is transferable in vitro among S. pyogenes isolates, but no information is available about its transferability to other Streptococcus species. We thus investigated Φm46.1 for its ability to be transduced in vitro to recipients of different Streptococcus species. Transductants were obtained from recipients of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus suis. Retransfer was always achieved, and from S. suis to S. pyogenes occurred at a much greater frequency than in the opposite direction. In transductants Φm46.1 retained its functional properties, such as inducibility with mitomycin C, presence both as a prophage and as a free circular form, and transferability. The transductants shared the same Φm46.1 chromosomal integration site as the donor, at the 3' end of a conserved RNA uracil methyltransferase (rum) gene, which is an integration hotspot for a variety of genetic elements. No transfer occurred to recipients of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus salivarius, even though rum-like genes were also detected in the sequenced genomes of these species. A largely overlapping 18-bp critical sequence, where the site-specific recombination process presumably takes place, was identified in the rum genes of all recipients, including those of the species yielding no transductants. Growth assays to evaluate the fitness cost of Φm46.1 acquisition disclosed a negligible impact on S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, and S. gordonii transductants and a noticeable fitness advantage in S. suis. The S. suis transductant also displayed marked overexpression of the autolysin-encoding gene atl.

  15. Design of a Retrovirus-Derived Vector for Expression and Transduction of Exogenous Genes in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Archibald S.; Kirschmeier, Paul T.; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano; Weinstein, I. Bernard

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a transfection vector for animal cells that contains long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences to promote expression. Plasmid p101/101, a derivative of plasmid pBR322 containing the complete Moloney murine sarcoma virus genome, was cut with restriction enzymes and religated so that both the 5′ and 3′ LTRs were retained and all but about 700 base pairs of the intervening viral sequences were removed. To test this vector, the Escherichia coli gene gpt was cloned into a unique PstI site, between the two LTRs, with guanine and cytosine tailing, a method that can be generalized for insertion of any DNA segment into this vector. When DNA from recombinant plasmids in which the gpt gene was inserted in the same transcriptional polarity as the LTR sequences was transfected onto murine or rat fibroblast cultures, we obtained a high yield of Gpt+ colonies. However, plasmid constructs with the gpt gene in the opposite polarity were virtually devoid of activity. With gpt in the proper orientation, restriction enzyme cuts within the LTRs or between the 5′ LTR and the gpt gene reduced transfection by more than 98%, whereas a cut between the gpt gene and the 3′ LTR gave an 80% reduction in activity. Thus, both 5′ and 3′ LTR sequences are essential for optimal gpt expression, although the 5′ LTR appears to play a more important role. When the LTR-gpt plasmid was transfected onto murine leukemia virus-infected mouse fibroblasts, we obtained evidence that RNA copies became pseudotyped into viral particles which could transfer the Gpt+ phenotype into rodent cells with extremely high efficiency. This vector should prove useful for high-efficiency transduction of a variety of genes in mammalian cells. Images PMID:6308426

  16. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-particles potentiate gene transduction of AAV vectors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene delivery vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) have emerged as safe and efficient therapeutic platform for numerous diseases. Excessive empty particles were generated as impurities during AAV vector production, but their effects on clinical outcome of AAV gene therapy are unclear. Here,...

  17. Transduction of a Foreign Histocompatibility Gene into the Arterial Wall Induces Vasculitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Plautz, Gregory; Nabel, Gary J.

    1992-06-01

    Autoimmune vasculitis represents a disease characterized by focal inflammation within arteries at multiple sites in the vasculature. Therapeutic interventions in this disease are empirical and often unsuccessful, and the mechanisms of immune injury are not well-defined. The direct transfer of recombinant genes and their expression in the arterial wall provides an opportunity to explore the pathogenesis and treatment of vascular disease. In this report, an animal model for vasculitis has been developed. Inflammation has been elicited by direct gene transfer of a foreign class I major histocompatibility complex gene, HLA-B7, to specific sites in porcine arteries. Transfer and expression of this recombinant gene was confirmed by a polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and cytolytic T cells specific for HLA-B7 were detected. These findings demonstrate that expression of a recombinant gene in the vessel wall can induce a focal immune response and suggest that vessel damage induced by cell-mediated immune injury can initiate vasculitis.

  18. Environmental factors influencing gene transfer agent (GTA) mediated transduction in the subtropical ocean.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Lauren D; Young, Elizabeth C; Ritchie, Kimberly B; Paul, John H

    2012-01-01

    Microbial genomic sequence analyses have indicated widespread horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, an adequate mechanism accounting for the ubiquity of HGT has been lacking. Recently, high frequencies of interspecific gene transfer have been documented, catalyzed by Gene Transfer Agents (GTAs) of marine α-Proteobacteria. It has been proposed that the presence of bacterial genes in highly purified viral metagenomes may be due to GTAs. However, factors influencing GTA-mediated gene transfer in the environment have not yet been determined. Several genomically sequenced strains containing complete GTA sequences similar to Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA, type strain) were screened to ascertain if they produced putative GTAs, and at what abundance. Five of nine marine strains screened to date spontaneously produced virus-like particles (VLP's) in stationary phase. Three of these strains have demonstrated gene transfer activity, two of which were documented by this lab. These two strains Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM and Nitratireductor 44B9s, were utilized to produce GTAs designated RnGTA and NrGTA and gene transfer activity was verified in culture. Cell-free preparations of purified RnGTA and NrGTA particles from marked donor strains were incubated with natural microbial assemblages to determine the level of GTA-mediated gene transfer. In conjunction, several ambient environmental parameters were measured including lysogeny indicated by prophage induction. GTA production in culture systems indicated that approximately half of the strains produced GTA-like particles and maximal GTA counts ranged from 10-30% of host abundance. Modeling of GTA-mediated gene transfer frequencies in natural samples, along with other measured environmental variables, indicated a strong relationship between GTA mediated gene transfer and the combined factors of salinity, multiplicity of infection (MOI) and ambient bacterial abundance. These results indicate that GTA-mediated HGT in the

  19. Environmental Factors Influencing Gene Transfer Agent (GTA) Mediated Transduction in the Subtropical Ocean

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Lauren D.; Young, Elizabeth C.; Ritchie, Kimberly B.; Paul, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial genomic sequence analyses have indicated widespread horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, an adequate mechanism accounting for the ubiquity of HGT has been lacking. Recently, high frequencies of interspecific gene transfer have been documented, catalyzed by Gene Transfer Agents (GTAs) of marine α-Proteobacteria. It has been proposed that the presence of bacterial genes in highly purified viral metagenomes may be due to GTAs. However, factors influencing GTA-mediated gene transfer in the environment have not yet been determined. Several genomically sequenced strains containing complete GTA sequences similar to Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA, type strain) were screened to ascertain if they produced putative GTAs, and at what abundance. Five of nine marine strains screened to date spontaneously produced virus-like particles (VLP's) in stationary phase. Three of these strains have demonstrated gene transfer activity, two of which were documented by this lab. These two strains Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM and Nitratireductor 44B9s, were utilized to produce GTAs designated RnGTA and NrGTA and gene transfer activity was verified in culture. Cell-free preparations of purified RnGTA and NrGTA particles from marked donor strains were incubated with natural microbial assemblages to determine the level of GTA-mediated gene transfer. In conjunction, several ambient environmental parameters were measured including lysogeny indicated by prophage induction. GTA production in culture systems indicated that approximately half of the strains produced GTA-like particles and maximal GTA counts ranged from 10–30% of host abundance. Modeling of GTA-mediated gene transfer frequencies in natural samples, along with other measured environmental variables, indicated a strong relationship between GTA mediated gene transfer and the combined factors of salinity, multiplicity of infection (MOI) and ambient bacterial abundance. These results indicate that GTA-mediated HGT in the

  20. Salinity stress induces the production of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones and regulates novel classes of responsive genes involved in signal transduction in Aquilaria sinensis calli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Gao, Bowen; Liu, Xiao; Dong, Xianjuan; Zhang, Zhongxiu; Fan, Huiyan; Zhang, Le; Wang, Juan; Shi, Shepo; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-05-26

    Agarwood, is a resinous portion derived from Aquilaria sinensis, has been widely used in traditional medicine and incense. 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones are principal components responsible for the quality of agarwood. However, the molecular basis of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones biosynthesis and regulation remains almost unknown. Our research indicated that salt stress induced production of several of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones in A. sinensis calli. Transcriptome analysis of A. sinensis calli treated with NaCl is required to further facilitate the multiple signal pathways in response to salt stress and to understand the mechanism of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones biosynthesis. Forty one 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones were identified from NaCl-treated A. sinensis calli. 93 041 unigenes with an average length of 1562 nt were generated from the control and salt-treated calli by Illmunina sequencing after assembly, and the unigenes were annotated by comparing with the public databases including NR, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, and GO database. In total, 18 069 differentially expressed transcripts were identified by the transcriptome comparisons on the control calli and calli induced by 24 h or 120 h salinity stress. Numerous genes involved in signal transduction pathways including the genes responsible for hormone signal transduction, receptor-like kinases, MAPK cascades, Ca(2+) signal transduction, and transcription factors showed clear differences between the control calli and NaCl-treated calli. Furthermore, our data suggested that the genes annotated as chalcone synthases and O-methyltransferases may contribute to the biosynthesis of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones. Salinity stress could induce the production of 41 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones in A. sinensis calli. We conducted the first deep-sequencing transcriptome profiling of A. sinensis under salt stress and observed a large number of differentially expressed genes in response to salinity stress. Moreover, salt stress induced

  1. Transduction of skeletal muscles with common reporter genes can promote muscle fiber degeneration and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winbanks, Catherine E; Beyer, Claudia; Qian, Hongwei; Gregorevic, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV vectors) are promising tools for delivering transgenes to skeletal muscle, in order to study the mechanisms that control the muscle phenotype, and to ameliorate diseases that perturb muscle homeostasis. Many studies have employed rAAV vectors carrying reporter genes encoding for β-galactosidase (β-gal), human placental alkaline phosphatase (hPLAP), and green fluorescent protein (GFP) as experimental controls when studying the effects of manipulating other genes. However, it is not clear to what extent these reporter genes can influence signaling and gene expression signatures in skeletal muscle, which may confound the interpretation of results obtained in experimentally manipulated muscles. Herein, we report a strong pro-inflammatory effect of expressing reporter genes in skeletal muscle. Specifically, we show that the administration of rAAV6:hPLAP vectors to the hind limb muscles of mice is associated with dose- and time-dependent macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle damage. Dose-dependent expression of hPLAP also led to marked activity of established pro-inflammatory IL-6/Stat3, TNFα, IKKβ and JNK signaling in lysates obtained from homogenized muscles. These effects were independent of promoter type, as expression cassettes featuring hPLAP under the control of constitutive CMV and muscle-specific CK6 promoters both drove cellular responses when matched for vector dose. Importantly, the administration of rAAV6:GFP vectors did not induce muscle damage or inflammation except at the highest doses we examined, and administration of a transgene-null vector (rAAV6:MCS) did not cause damage or inflammation at any of the doses tested, demonstrating that GFP-expressing, or transgene-null vectors may be more suitable as experimental controls. The studies highlight the importance of considering the potential effects of reporter genes when designing experiments that examine gene manipulation in vivo.

  2. Differential usage of signal transduction pathways defines two types of serum response factor target gene.

    PubMed

    Gineitis, D; Treisman, R

    2001-07-06

    Activation of the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) is dependent on Rho-controlled changes in actin dynamics. We used pathway-specific inhibitors to compare the roles of actin dynamics, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in signaling either to SRF itself or to four cellular SRF target genes. Serum, lysophosphatidic acid, platelet-derived growth factor, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) each activated transcription of a stably integrated SRF reporter gene dependent on functional RhoA GTPase. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase-ERK kinase (MEK) signalling reduced activation of the SRF reporter by all stimuli by about 50%, except for PMA, which was effectively blocked. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase slightly reduced reporter activation by serum and lysophosphatidic acid but substantially inhibited activation by platelet-derived growth factor and PMA. Reporter induction by all stimuli was absolutely dependent on actin dynamics. Regulation of the SRF (srf) and vinculin (vcl) genes was similar to that of the SRF reporter gene; activation by all stimuli was Rho-dependent and required actin dynamics but was largely independent of MEK activity. In contrast, activation of fos and egr1 occurred independently of RhoA and actin polymerization but was almost completely dependent on MEK activation. These results show that at least two classes of SRF target genes can be distinguished on the basis of their relative sensitivity to RhoA-actin and MEK-ERK signaling pathways.

  3. Signal transduction controls heterogeneous NF-κB dynamics and target gene expression through cytokine-specific refractory states

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Antony; Boddington, Christopher; Downton, Polly; Rowe, William; Bagnall, James; Lam, Connie; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Schmidt, Lorraine; Harper, Claire V.; Spiller, David G.; Rand, David A.; Jackson, Dean A.; White, Michael R. H.; Paszek, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Cells respond dynamically to pulsatile cytokine stimulation. Here we report that single, or well-spaced pulses of TNFα (>100 min apart) give a high probability of NF-κB activation. However, fewer cells respond to shorter pulse intervals (<100 min) suggesting a heterogeneous refractory state. This refractory state is established in the signal transduction network downstream of TNFR and upstream of IKK, and depends on the level of the NF-κB system negative feedback protein A20. If a second pulse within the refractory phase is IL-1β instead of TNFα, all of the cells respond. This suggests a mechanism by which two cytokines can synergistically activate an inflammatory response. Gene expression analyses show strong correlation between the cellular dynamic response and NF-κB-dependent target gene activation. These data suggest that refractory states in the NF-κB system constitute an inherent design motif of the inflammatory response and we suggest that this may avoid harmful homogenous cellular activation. PMID:27381163

  4. Clinical-scale lentiviral vector transduction of PBL for TCR gene therapy and potential for expression in less differentiated cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shicheng; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In human gene therapy applications, lentiviral vectors may have advantages over gamma-retroviral vectors because of their ability to transduce non-dividing cells, their resistance to gene silencing, and a lack of integration site preference. In this study, we utilized VSV-G pseudotype third generation lentiviral vectors harboring specific anti-tumor T-cell receptor (TCR) to establish clinical-scale lentiviral transduction of PBL. Spinoculation (1000 × g, 32°C for 2 h) in the presence of protamine sulfate represents the most efficient and economical approach to transduce a large number of PBLs compared to RetroNectin-based methods. Up to 20 million cells per well of a 6-well plate were efficiently transduced and underwent an average 50-fold expansion in two weeks. TCR transduced PBL mediated specific anti-tumor activities including IFN-γ release and cell lysis. Compared to gamma-retroviral vectors, the TCR transgene could be preferentially expressed on a less-differentiated cell population. PMID:18833004

  5. Carbohydrate Stress Affecting Fruitlet Abscission and Expression of Genes Related to Auxin Signal Transduction Pathway in Litchi

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jian-Fei; Wu, Jian-Yang; Zhong, Hai-Ying; Li, Cai-Qin; Chen, Jian-Ye; Lu, Wang-Jin; Li, Jian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Auxin, a vital plant hormone, regulates a variety of physiological and developmental processes. It is involved in fruit abscission through transcriptional regulation of many auxin-related genes, including early auxin responsive genes (i.e., auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA), Gretchen Hagen3 (GH3) and small auxin upregulated (SAUR)) and auxin response factors (ARF), which have been well characterized in many plants. In this study, totally five auxin-related genes, including one AUX/IAA (LcAUX/IAA1), one GH3 (LcGH3.1), one SAUR (LcSAUR1) and two ARFs (LcARF1 and LcARF2), were isolated and characterized from litchi fruit. LcAUX/IAA1, LcGH3.1, LcSAUR1, LcARF1 and LcARF2 contain open reading frames (ORFs) encoding polypeptides of 203, 613, 142, 792 and 832 amino acids, respectively, with their corresponding molecular weights of 22.67, 69.20, 11.40, 88.20 and 93.16 kDa. Expression of these genes was investigated under the treatment of girdling plus defoliation which aggravated litchi fruitlet abscission due to the blockage of carbohydrates transport and the reduction of endogenous IAA content. Results showed that transcript levels of LcAUX/IAA1, LcGH3.1 and LcSAUR1 mRNAs were increased after the treatment in abscission zone (AZ) and other tissues, in contrast to the decreasing accumulation of LcARF1 mRNA, suggesting that LcAUX/IAA1, LcSAUR1 and LcARF1 may play more important roles in abscission. Our results provide new insight into the process of fruitlet abscission induced by carbohydrate stress and broaden our understanding of the auxin signal transduction pathway in this process at the molecular level. PMID:23443112

  6. Modified HIV-1 based lentiviral vectors have an effect on viral transduction efficiency and gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Park, F; Kay, M A

    2001-09-01

    Gene transfer using lentiviral vectors has been recently shown to be enhanced with cis-acting elements in a cell-type-dependent manner in vivo. For this reason, the study reported here was designed to modify lentiviral vectors that express lacZ, human factor IX (FIX), or human alpha1-anti-trypsin (AAT) to study the effect of different cis DNA elements on transduction efficiencies. We found that incorporation of the central polypurine tract sequence (cppt) increased transduction efficiency in vitro while increasing the transduction of non-cell-cycling hepatocytes in vivo. C57Bl/6 scid mice that were administered lentiviral vectors devoid of the cppt (2 x 10(8) transducing units (T.U.)/mouse) had 81% of their lacZ-transduced hepatocytes colabeled with the cell cycle marker 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). In contrast, inclusion of the cppt reduced the colabeling in mouse hepatocytes by 50%. Further modifications in the lentiviral vectors were performed to enhance viral titer and gene expression. We found that the inclusion of a matrix attachment region (MAR) from immunoglobulin-kappa (Igkappa) significantly increased the transduction efficiency, as measured by transgene protein expression and proviral DNA copy number, compared with vectors without Igkappa MAR. In vitro studies using human hepatoma cells demonstrated a significant increase (two- to fourfold) in human AAT and human FIX production when the Igkappa MAR was incorporated. In vivo transduction of partially hepatectomized C57Bl/6 mice given an optimized lentiviral vector containing the cppt and Igkappa MAR (2 x 10(8) T.U./mouse) resulted in sustained therapeutic levels of serum FIX (approximately 65 ng/ml). Our study demonstrates the importance of cis-acting elements to enhancing the transduction ability of lentiviral vectors and the expression of vector transgenes.

  7. Efficient gene delivery and selective transduction of astrocytes in the mammalian brain using viral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merienne, Nicolas; Douce, Juliette Le; Faivre, Emilie; Déglon, Nicole; Bonvento, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are now considered as key players in brain information processing because of their newly discovered roles in synapse formation and plasticity, energy metabolism and blood flow regulation. However, our understanding of astrocyte function is still fragmented compared to other brain cell types. A better appreciation of the biology of astrocytes requires the development of tools to generate animal models in which astrocyte-specific proteins and pathways can be manipulated. In addition, it is becoming increasingly evident that astrocytes are also important players in many neurological disorders. Targeted modulation of protein expression in astrocytes would be critical for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Gene transfer is valuable to target a subpopulation of cells and explore their function in experimental models. In particular, viral-mediated gene transfer provides a rapid, highly flexible and cost-effective, in vivo paradigm to study the impact of genes of interest during central nervous system development or in adult animals. We will review the different strategies that led to the recent development of efficient viral vectors that can be successfully used to selectively transduce astrocytes in the mammalian brain. PMID:23847471

  8. Novel effects of Helicobacter pylori CagA on key genes of gastric cancer signal transduction: a comparative transfection study.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Farzam; Peerayeh, Shahin N; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Maghsoudi, Nader; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Siadat, Seyed D; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is now recognized as a worldwide problem. Helicobacter pylori CagA is the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified in relation to human cancer. Helicobacter pylori CagA is noted for structural diversity in its C-terminal region (contains EPIYA motifs), with which CagA interacts with numerous host cell proteins. Deregulation of host signaling by translocated bacterial proteins provides a new aspect of microbial-host cell interaction. The aim of this study is to compare the cellular effects of two different CagA EPIYA motifs on identified signaling pathways involve in gastric carcinogenesis. To investigate the effects of CagA protein carboxyl region variations on the transcription of genes involved in gastric epithelial carcinogenesis pathways, the eukaryotic vector carrying the cagA gene (ABC and ABCCC types) was transfected into gastric cancer cell line. The 42 identified key genes of signal transduction involved in gastric cancer were analyzed at the transcription level by real-time PCR. The results of real-time PCR provide us important clue that the ABCCC oncoprotein variant can change the fate of the cell completely different from ABC type. In fact, these result proposed that the ABCCC type can induce the intestinal metaplasia, IL-8, perturbation of Crk adaptor proteins, anti-apoptotic effect and carcinogenic effect more significantly than ABC type. These data support our hypothesis of a complex interaction of host cell and these two different H. pylori effector variants that determines host cellular fate. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. In vitro correction of JAK3-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency by retroviral-mediated gene transduction

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Mutations affecting the expression of the Janus family kinase JAK3 were recently shown to be responsible for autosomal recessive severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). JAK3-deficient patients present with a clinical phenotype virtually indistinguishable from boys affected by X-linked SCID, a disease caused by genetic defects of the common gamma chain (gamma c) that is a shared component of the receptors for IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15. The specific interaction of JAK3 and gamma c represents the biochemical basis for the similarities between these two immunodeficiencies. Both forms of SCID are characterized by recurrent, severe infections leading to death in infancy unless successfully treated by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Because of the potentially lethal complications associated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and the frequent lack of suitable marrow donors, the development of alternative forms of therapy is highly desirable. To this end, we investigated a retroviral-mediated gene correction approach for JAK3-deficiency. A vector carrying a copy of JAK3 cDNA was constructed and used to transduce B cell lines derived from patients with JAK3-deficient SCID. We demonstrate restoration of JAK3 expression and phosphorylation upon IL-2 and IL-4 stimulation. Furthermore, patients' cells transduced with JAK3 acquired the ability to proliferate normally in response to IL-2. These data indicate that the biological defects of JAK3-deficient cells can be efficiently corrected in vitro by retroviral-mediated gene transfer, thus providing the basis for future investigation of gene therapy as treatment for JAK3- deficient SCID. PMID:8676091

  10. The Role of Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN) in Hormone Signaling Transduction and Prostate Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Probasin-erbB2Δ (Pb-erbB2) transgenic mice to create triple transgenic mice, Dach1fl/fl/Pb-Cre/ Pb-erbB2. Using Dach1fl/fl/Probasin-Cre bi...growth, via a helix -turn- helix DNA interaction domain which was required to both repress CRPC growth and inhibit expression and secretion of a CXCL...of DACH1 in tumor growth in vivo using xenograft models . DACH1 inhibition of prostate cancer cellular invasion and migration required CXCL gene

  11. Reversal of Diabetes Through Gene Therapy of Diabetic Rats by Hepatic Insulin Expression via Lentiviral Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Matthias; Terbish, Taivankhuu; Jörns, Anne; Naujok, Ortwin; Wedekind, Dirk; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2012-01-01

    Due to shortage of donor tissue a cure for type 1 diabetes by pancreas organ or islet transplantation is an option only for very few patients. Gene therapy is an alternative approach to cure the disease. Insulin generation in non-endocrine cells through genetic engineering is a promising therapeutic concept to achieve insulin independence in patients with diabetes. In the present study furin-cleavable human insulin was expressed in the liver of autoimmune-diabetic IDDM rats (LEW.1AR1/Ztm-iddm) and streptozotocin-diabetic rats after portal vein injection of INS-lentivirus. Within 5–7 days after the virus injection of 7 × 109 INS-lentiviral particles the blood glucose concentrations were normalized in the treated animals. This glucose lowering effect remained stable for the 1 year observation period. Human C-peptide as a marker for hepatic release of human insulin was in the range of 50–100 pmol/ml serum. Immunofluorescence staining of liver tissue was positive for insulin showing no signs of transdifferentiation into pancreatic β-cells. This study shows that the diabetic state can be efficiently reversed by insulin release from non-endocrine cells through a somatic gene therapy approach. PMID:22354377

  12. Reversal of diabetes through gene therapy of diabetic rats by hepatic insulin expression via lentiviral transduction.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Matthias; Terbish, Taivankhuu; Jörns, Anne; Naujok, Ortwin; Wedekind, Dirk; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2012-05-01

    Due to shortage of donor tissue a cure for type 1 diabetes by pancreas organ or islet transplantation is an option only for very few patients. Gene therapy is an alternative approach to cure the disease. Insulin generation in non-endocrine cells through genetic engineering is a promising therapeutic concept to achieve insulin independence in patients with diabetes. In the present study furin-cleavable human insulin was expressed in the liver of autoimmune-diabetic IDDM rats (LEW.1AR1/Ztm-iddm) and streptozotocin-diabetic rats after portal vein injection of INS-lentivirus. Within 5-7 days after the virus injection of 7 × 10(9) INS-lentiviral particles the blood glucose concentrations were normalized in the treated animals. This glucose lowering effect remained stable for the 1 year observation period. Human C-peptide as a marker for hepatic release of human insulin was in the range of 50-100 pmol/ml serum. Immunofluorescence staining of liver tissue was positive for insulin showing no signs of transdifferentiation into pancreatic β-cells. This study shows that the diabetic state can be efficiently reversed by insulin release from non-endocrine cells through a somatic gene therapy approach.

  13. A novel c-Jun-dependent signal transduction pathway necessary for the transcriptional activation of interferon gamma response genes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Daniel J; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Ko, Enoch Yi-No; Arthur, Helen A; Schreiber, Robert D; Trapani, Joseph A; Clarke, Christopher J P; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2007-01-12

    The biological effects of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) are mediated by interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), many of which are activated downstream of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling. Herein we have shown that IFNgamma rapidly activated AP-1 DNA binding that required c-Jun but was independent of JAK1 and STAT1. IFNgamma-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and AP-1 DNA binding required the MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, whereas the JNK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were dispensable. The induction of several ISGs, including ifi-205 and iNOS, was impaired in IFNgamma-treated c-Jun-/- cells, but others, such as IP-10 and SOCS3, were unaffected, and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c-Jun binds to the iNOS promoter following treatment with IFNgamma. Thus, IFNgamma induced JAK1- and STAT1-independent activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, phosphorylation of c-Jun, and activation of AP-1 DNA binding, which are important for the induction of a subset of ISGs. This represents a novel signal transduction pathway induced by IFNgamma that proceeds in parallel with conventional JAK/STAT signaling to activate ISGs.

  14. Characterization of CitA-CitB signal transduction activating genes involved in anaerobic citrate catabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Matsumoto, Fumika; Minagawa, Shu; Oshima, Taku; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Ogasawara, Naotake; Ishihama, Akira

    2009-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, CitA is a membrane-associated sensor histidine kinase that phosphorylates CitB, the response regulator. It is predicated to play a key role in anaerobic citrate catabolism. The citrate-binding site in CitA is located within its periplasmic domain, while the cytoplasmic domain (CitA-C) is involved in autophosphorylation. We found that autophosphorylation in vitro of CitA-C was induced by DTT. Using the whole set of CitA-C derivatives containing Cys-Ala substitution(s), Cys at 529 was found to be essential to the redox-sensing of autophosphorylation. The phosphorylated CitA-C transferred a phosphate to CitB. DNase-I footprinting assay indicated that CitB specifically bound on the intergenic region between the citA and citC genes. These results characterize the molecular mechanism of the CitA-CitB signal transduction system in E. coli.

  15. Systematic identification of genes and transduction pathways involved in radio-adaptive response

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Honglu

    2015-05-22

    Low doses of radiation have been shown to protect against the biological effects of later exposure to toxic levels of radiation. In this study, we propose to identify the molecular mechanisms of this adaptive response by systematically identifying the genes that play a role in radio-protection. In the original proposal, a human cell line that is well-documented to exhibit the radio-adaptive effect was to be used. In this revised study plan, we will use a mouse model, C57BL/6, which has also been well investigated for radio-adaptation. The goal of the proposed study is to enhance our understanding of cellular responses to low doses of radiation exposure at the molecular level.

  16. Viral/Nonviral Chimeric Nanoparticles to Synergistically Suppress Leukemia Proliferation via Simultaneous Gene Transduction and Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Cheol Am; Cho, Soo Kyung; Edson, Julius A.; Kim, Jane; Ingato, Dominique; Pham, Bryan; Chuang, Anthony; Fruman, David; Kwon, Young Jik

    2017-01-01

    Single modal cancer therapy that targets one pathological pathway often turns out to be inefficient. For example, relapse of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) after inhibiting BCR-ABL fusion protein using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) (e.g., Imatinib) is of significant clinical concern. This study developed a dual modal gene therapy that simultaneously tackles two key BCR-ABL-linked pathways using viral/nonviral chimeric nanoparticles (ChNPs). Consisting of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) core and an acid-degradable polymeric shell, the ChNPs were designed to simultaneously induce pro-apoptotic BIM expression by the AAV core and silence pro-survival MCL-1 by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) encapsulated in the shell. The resulting BIM/MCL-1 ChNPs were able to efficiently suppress the proliferation of BCR-ABL+ K562 and FL5.12/p190 cells in vitro and in vivo via simultaneously expressing BIM and silencing MCL-1. Interestingly, the synergistic anti-leukemic effects generated by BIM/MCL-1 ChNPs were specific to BCR-ABL+ cells and independent of a proliferative cytokine, IL-3. The AAV core of ChNPs was efficiently shielded from inactivation by anti-AAV serum and avoided the generation of anti-AAV serum, without acute toxicity. This study demonstrates the development of a synergistically efficient, specific, and safe therapy for leukemia using gene carriers that simultaneously manipulate multiple and inter-linked pathological pathways. PMID:27472284

  17. Expression of Signal Transduction System Encoding Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP32953 at 28°C and 3°C

    PubMed Central

    Palonen, Eveliina; Lindström, Miia; Karttunen, Reija; Somervuo, Panu; Korkeala, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a significant psychrotrophic food pathogen whose cold tolerance mechanisms are poorly understood. Signal transduction systems serve to monitor the environment, but no systematic investigation of their role at cold temperatures in Y. pseudotuberculosis has yet been undertaken. The relative expression levels of 54 genes predicted to encode proteins belonging to signal transduction systems in Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 were determined at 28°C and 3°C by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. The relative expression levels of 44 genes were significantly (p<0.05) higher at 3°C than at 28°C. Genes encoding the two-component system CheA/CheY had the highest relative expression levels at 3°C. Mutational analysis revealed that cheA is important for growth and motility at 3°C. The relative expression level of one gene, rssB, encoding an RpoS regulator, was significantly (p<0.05) lower at 3°C than at 28°C. The results suggest that several signal transduction systems might be used during growth at low temperature, and at least, CheA/CheY two-component system is important for low-temperature growth. PMID:21949852

  18. Ex vivo intracoronary gene transfer of adeno-associated virus 2 leads to superior transduction over serotypes 8 and 9 in rat heart transplants.

    PubMed

    Raissadati, Alireza; Jokinen, Janne J; Syrjälä, Simo O; Keränen, Mikko A I; Krebs, Rainer; Tuuminen, Raimo; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Anisimov, Andrey; Soronen, Jarkko; Pajusola, Katri; Alitalo, Kari; Nykänen, Antti I; Lemström, Karl

    2013-11-01

    Heart transplant gene therapy requires vectors with long-lasting gene expression, high cardiotropism, and minimal pathological effects. Here, we examined transduction properties of ex vivo intracoronary delivery of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 2, 8, and 9 in rat syngenic and allogenic heart transplants. Adult Dark Agouti (DA) rat hearts were intracoronarily perfused ex vivo with AAV2, AAV8, or AAV9 encoding firefly luciferase and transplanted heterotopically into the abdomen of syngenic DA or allogenic Wistar-Furth (WF) recipients. Serial in vivo bioluminescent imaging of syngraft and allograft recipients was performed for 6 months and 4 weeks, respectively. Grafts were removed for PCR-, RT-PCR, and luminometer analysis. In vivo bioluminescent imaging of recipients showed that AAV9 induced a prominent and stable luciferase activity in the abdomen, when compared with AAV2 and AAV8. However, ex vivo analyses revealed that intracoronary perfusion with AAV2 resulted in the highest heart transplant transduction levels in syngrafts and allografts. Ex vivo intracoronary delivery of AAV2 resulted in efficient transgene expression in heart transplants, whereas intracoronary AAV9 escapes into adjacent tissues. In terms of cardiac transduction, these results suggest AAV2 as a potential vector for gene therapy in preclinical heart transplants studies, and highlight the importance of delivery route in gene transfer studies.

  19. Molecular identification of candidate chemoreceptor genes and signal transduction components in the sensory epithelium of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Cummins, S F; Leblanc, L; Degnan, B M; Nagle, G T

    2009-07-01

    An ability to sense and respond to environmental cues is essential to the survival of most marine animals. How water-borne chemical cues are detected at the molecular level and processed by molluscs is currently unknown. In this study, we cloned two genes from the marine mollusk Aplysia dactylomela which encode multi-transmembrane proteins. We have performed in situ hybridization that reveals expression and spatial distribution within the long-distance chemosensory organs, the rhinophores. This finding suggests that they could be receptors involved in binding water-borne chemicals and coupling to an intracellular signal pathway. In support of this, we found expression of a phospholipase C and an inositol trisphosphate receptor in the rhinophore sensory epithelia and possibly distributed within outer dendrites of olfactory sensory neurons. In Aplysia, mate attraction and subsequent reproduction is initiated by responding to a cocktail of water-borne protein pheromones released by animal conspecifics. We show that the rhinophore contraction in response to pheromone stimulants is significantly altered following phospholipase C inhibition. Overall, these data provide insight into the molecular components of chemosensory detection in a mollusk. An important next step will be the elucidation of how these coordinate the detection of chemical cues present in the marine environment and activation of sensory neurons.

  20. Involvement of three annexin genes in the ripening of strawberry fruit regulated by phytohormone and calcium signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingxin; Mao, Linchun; Mi, Hongbo; Lu, Wenjing; Ying, Tiejin; Luo, Zisheng

    2016-04-01

    Three annexin genes may be involved in the ripening progress of strawberry fruit. Phytohormones and calcium regulate the expressions of three annexin genes during strawberry fruit ripening. Plant annexins are multi-functional membrane- and Ca(2+)-binding proteins that are involved in various developmental progresses and stress responses. Three annexins FaAnn5a, FaAnn5b and FaAnn8 cDNA obtained from strawberry fruit encode amino acid sequences of approximately 35 kDa containing four annexin repeats, Ca(2+)-binding site, GTP-binding motif, peroxidase residue, and conserved amino acid residues of tryptophan, arginine and cysteine. During fruit development, the transcript levels of FaAnn5a and FaAnn5b increased while FaAnn5b declined after 3/4R stage. The expression patterns of annexins suggested their potential roles in strawberry fruit development and ripening. Expressions of annexin genes were also highly correlated with hormone levels. In addition, exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) enhanced the expressions of FaAnn5a and FaAnn8 while exogenous auxin (IAA) retarded it. However, both ABA and IAA promoted the transcript levels of FaAnn5b, indicating the independent regulation of annexins in fruit likely due to multi-functions of their large family. The responses of annexin genes to exogenous ABA and IAA inhibitors verified the involvement of annexins in plant hormone signaling. Besides, calcium restrained the expressions of FaAnn5s (FaAnn5a and FaAnn5b) but promoted the expression of FaAnn8. Effects of calcium and ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) on the transcript levels of annexins confirmed that calcium likely mediated hormone signal transduction pathways, which helped to elucidate the mechanism of calcium in fruit ripening. Therefore, FaAnn5s and FaAnn8 might be involved in plant hormones' regulation in the development and ripening of strawberry fruit through calcium signaling in the downstream.

  1. Transduction of Oct6 or Oct9 gene concomitant with Myc family gene induced osteoblast-like phenotypic conversion in normal human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoshiri, N.; Kishida, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Shirai, T.; Terauchi, R.; Tsuchida, S.; Mori, Y.; Ejima, A.; Sato, Y.; Arai, Y.; Fujiwara, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kanamura, N.; Mazda, O.; Kubo, T.

    2015-11-27

    Introduction: Osteoblasts play essential roles in bone formation and regeneration, while they have low proliferation potential. Recently we established a procedure to directly convert human fibroblasts into osteoblasts (dOBs). Transduction of Runx2 (R), Osterix (X), Oct3/4 (O) and L-myc (L) genes followed by culturing under osteogenic conditions induced normal human fibroblasts to express osteoblast-specific genes and produce calcified bone matrix both in vitro and in vivo Intriguingly, a combination of only two factors, Oct3/4 and L-myc, significantly induced osteoblast-like phenotype in fibroblasts, but the mechanisms underlying the direct conversion remains to be unveiled. Materials and Methods: We examined which Oct family genes and Myc family genes are capable of inducing osteoblast-like phenotypic conversion. Results: As result Oct3/4, Oct6 and Oct9, among other Oct family members, had the capability, while N-myc was the most effective Myc family gene. The Oct9 plus N-myc was the best combination to induce direct conversion of human fibroblasts into osteoblast-like cells. Discussion: The present findings may greatly contribute to the elucidation of the roles of the Oct and Myc proteins in osteoblast direct reprogramming. The results may also lead to establishment of novel regenerative therapy for various bone resorption diseases. - Highlights: • Introducing L-myc in a combination with either Oct3/4, Oct6 or Oct9 enables the conversion of fibroblasts to osteoblasts. • A combination of L-myc with Oct3/4 or Oct9 can induce the cells to a phenotype closer to normal osteoblasts. • N-myc was considered the most appropriate Myc family gene for induction of osteoblast-like phenotype in fibroblasts. • The combination of Oct9 plus N-myc has the strongest capability of inducing osteoblast-like phenotype.

  2. Disrupting actions of bisphenol A and malachite green on growth hormone receptor gene expression and signal transduction in seabream.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Baowei; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2010-06-01

    Environmental estrogen could mimic natural estrogens thereby disrupting the endocrine systems of human and animals. The actions of such endocrine disruptors have been studied mainly on reproduction and development. However, estrogen could also affect the somatotropic axis via multiple targets such as growth hormone (GH). In the present study, two endocrine disruptors were chosen to investigate their effects on the expression level and signal transduction of growth hormone receptor (GHR) in fish. Using real-time PCR, it was found that exposure to both the estrogenic (bisphenol A) and anti-estrogenic (malachite green) compounds could attenuate the expression levels of GHR1 and GHR2 in black seabream (Acanthopagrus schlegeli) hepatocytes. The expression level of IGF-I, the downstream effector of GHR activation in the liver, was decreased by bisphenol A but not by malachite green. Luciferase reporter assay of the beta-casein promoter was used to monitor GHR signaling in transfected cells. In the fish liver cell line Hepa-T1, both GHR1 and GHR2 signaling were attenuated by bisphenol A and malachite green. This attenuation could only occur in the presence of estrogen receptor, indicating that these agents probably produce their actions via the estrogen receptor. Results of the present study demonstrated that estrogenic or anti-estrogenic compounds could down-regulate the somatotropic axis in fish by affecting both the gene expression and signaling of GHR. In view of the increasing prevalence of these compounds in the environment, the impact on fish growth and development both in the wild and in aquaculture would be considerable.

  3. Gene expression profiling of common signal transduction pathways affected by rBMSCs/F92A-Cav1 in the lungs of rat with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiying; Yang, Hongli; Xu, Chong; Yue, Hongmei; Xia, Peng; Strappe, Pádraig Michael; Wang, Lei; Pan, Li; Tang, Wenqiang; Chen, Shuangfeng; Wang, Lexin

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with sustained vasoconstriction, inflammation and suppressed apoptosis of smooth muscle cells. Our previous studies have found that rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) transduced with a mutant caveolin-1(F92A-Cav1) could enhance endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and improve pulmonary vascular remodeling, but the potential mechanism is not yet fully explored. The present study was to investigate the gene expression profile upon rBMSCs/F92A-Cav1delivered to PAH rat to evaluate the role of F92A-Cav1 in its regulation. PAH was induced with monocrotaline (MCT, 60mg/kg) prior to delivery of lentiviral vector transduced rBMSCs expressing Cav1 or F92A-Cav1. Gene expression profiling was performed using Rat Signal Transduction PathwayFinder array. The expression changes of 84 key genes representing 10 signal transduction pathways in rat following rBMSCs/F92A-Cav1 treatment was examined. Screening with the Rat Signal Transduction PathwayFinder R(2) PCR Array system and subsequent western blot, immunohistochemistry or real time PCR analysis revealed that F92A-Cav1 modified rBMSCs can inhibit the inflammation factors (TNF-alpha, Icam1 and C/EBPdelta), pro-proliferation genes (c-Myc, Bcl2a1d, Notch1and Hey2), oxidative stress gene (Hmox1) and activate cell cycle arrested gene Cdkn1a, ameliorating inflammation and inhibiting cell proliferation in PAH rat. rBMSCs/F92A-Cav1 inhibits inflammation and cell proliferation by regulating signaling pathways that related to inflammation, proliferation, cell cycle and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficient transduction of vascular smooth muscle cells with a translational AAV2.5 vector: a new perspective for in-stent restenosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lompré, A-M; Hadri, L; Merlet, E; Keuylian, Z; Mougenot, N; Karakikes, I; Chen, J; Atassi, F; Marchand, A; Blaise, R; Limon, I; McPhee, S W J; Samulski, R J; Hajjar, R J; Lipskaia, L

    2013-09-01

    Coronary artery disease represents the leading cause of mortality in the developed world. Percutaneous coronary intervention involving stent placement remains disadvantaged by restenosis or thrombosis. Vascular gene therapy-based methods may be approached, but lack a vascular gene delivery vector. We report a safe and efficient long-term transduction of rat carotid vessels after balloon injury intervention with a translational optimized AAV2.5 vector. Compared with other known adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes, AAV2.5 demonstrated the highest transduction efficiency of human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local delivery of AAV2.5-driven transgenes in injured carotid arteries resulted in transduction as soon as day 2 after surgery and persisted for at least 30 days. In contrast to adenovirus 5 vector, inflammation was not detected in AAV2.5-transduced vessels. The functional effects of AAV2.5-mediated gene transfer on neointimal thickening were assessed using the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase isoform 2a (SERCA2a) human gene, known to inhibit VSMC proliferation. At 30 days, human SERCA2a messenger RNA was detected in transduced arteries. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant decrease in neointimal hyperplasia in AAV2.5-SERCA2a-transduced arteries: 28.36±11.30 (n=8) vs 77.96±24.60 (n=10) μm(2), in AAV2.5-green fluorescent protein-infected, P<0.05. In conclusion, AAV2.5 vector can be considered as a promising safe and effective vector for vascular gene therapy.

  5. Gene transfer to pre-hematopoietic and committed hematopoietic precursors in the early mouse Yolk Sac: a comparative study between in situ electroporation and retroviral transduction

    PubMed Central

    Giroux, Sébastien JD; Alves-Leiva, Celmar; Lécluse, Yann; Martin, Patrick; Albagli, Olivier; Godin, Isabelle

    2007-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic development in vertebrate embryos results from the sequential contribution of two pools of precursors independently generated. While intra-embryonic precursors harbour the features of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), precursors formed earlier in the yolk sac (YS) display limited differentiation and self-renewal potentials. The mechanisms leading to the generation of the precursors in both sites are still largely unknown, as are the molecular basis underlying their different potential. A possible approach to assess the role of candidate genes is to transfer or modulate their expression/activity in both sites. We thus designed and compared transduction protocols to target either native extra-embryonic precursors, or hematopoietic precursors. Results One transduction protocol involves transient modification of gene expression through in situ electroporation of the prospective blood islands, which allows the evolution of transfected mesodermal cells in their "normal" environment, upon organ culture. Following in situ electroporation of a GFP reporter construct into the YS cavity of embryos at post-streak (mesodermal/pre-hematopoietic precursors) or early somite (hematopoietic precursors) stages, high GFP expression levels as well as a good preservation of cell viability is observed in YS explants. Moreover, the erythro-myeloid progeny typical of the YS arises from GFP+ mesodermal cells or hematopoietic precursors, even if the number of targeted precursors is low. The second approach, based on retroviral transduction allows a very efficient transduction of large precursor numbers, but may only be used to target 8 dpc YS hematopoietic precursors. Again, transduced cells generate a progeny quantitatively and qualitatively similar to that of control YS. Conclusion We thus provide two protocols whose combination may allow a thorough study of both early and late events of hematopoietic development in the murine YS. In situ electroporation constitutes

  6. A Drosophila mechanosensory transduction channel.

    PubMed

    Walker, R G; Willingham, A T; Zuker, C S

    2000-03-24

    Mechanosensory transduction underlies a wide range of senses, including proprioception, touch, balance, and hearing. The pivotal element of these senses is a mechanically gated ion channel that transduces sound, pressure, or movement into changes in excitability of specialized sensory cells. Despite the prevalence of mechanosensory systems, little is known about the molecular nature of the transduction channels. To identify such a channel, we analyzed Drosophila melanogaster mechanoreceptive mutants for defects in mechanosensory physiology. Loss-of-function mutations in the no mechanoreceptor potential C (nompC) gene virtually abolished mechanosensory signaling. nompC encodes a new ion channel that is essential for mechanosensory transduction. As expected for a transduction channel, D. melanogaster NOMPC and a Caenorhabditis elegans homolog were selectively expressed in mechanosensory organs.

  7. Co-transduction of lentiviral and adenoviral vectors for co-delivery of growth factor and shRNA genes in mesenchymal stem cells-based chondrogenic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yao, Yongchang; Su, Kai; Fang, Yu; Citra, Fudiman; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-09-01

    Gene delivery takes advantage of cellular mechanisms to express gene products and is an efficient way to deliver them into cells, influencing cellular behaviours and expression patterns. Among the delivery methods, viral vectors are applied due to their high efficiency. Two typical viral vectors for gene delivery include lentiviral vector for integrative transduction and adenoviral vector for transient episomal transduction, respectively. The selection and formulation of proper viral vectors applied to cells can modulate gene expression profiles and further impact the downstream pathways. In this study, recombinant lentiviral and adenoviral vectors were co-transduced in a synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs)-based articular chondrogenic system by which two transgenes were co-delivered - the gene for transforming growth factor (TGF)β3, to facilitate SMSC chondrogenesis, and the gene for small hairpin RNA (shRNA), targeting the mRNA of type I collagen (Col I) α1 chain to silence Col I expression and minimize fibrocartilage formation. Delivery of either gene could be achieved with either lentiviral or adenoviral vectors. Therefore, co-delivery of the two transgenes via the two types of vectors was performed to determine which combination was optimal for three-dimensional (3D) articular chondrogenesis to construct articular hyaline cartilage tissue. Suppression of Col I and expression of cartilage markers, including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), were assessed at both the transcriptome and protein phenotypic levels. It was concluded that the combination of lentiviral-mediated TGFβ3 release and adenoviral-mediated shRNA expression (LV-T + Ad-sh) generally demonstrated optimal efficacy in engineered articular cartilage with SMSCs.

  8. Recombinant Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A with N-terminal Mitochondrial Transduction Domain Increases Respiration and Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R.; Portell, Francisco R.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Bennett, James P.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a scalable procedure to produce human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) modified with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) and mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) that allow it to cross membranes and enter mitochondria through its “mitochondrial transduction domain” (MTD=PTD+MLS). Alexa488-labeled MTD-TFAM rapidly entered the mitochondrial compartment of cybrid cells carrying the G11778A LHON mutation. MTD-TFAM reversibly increased respiration and levels of respiratory proteins. In vivo treatment of mice with MTD-TFAM increased motor endurance and complex I-driven respiration in mitochondria from brain and skeletal muscle. MTD-TFAM increases mitochondrial bioenergetics and holds promise for treatment of mitochondrial diseases involving deficiencies of energy production. PMID:19460293

  9. Zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene correction using single AAV vector transduction and enhancement by Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, BL; Hirsch, ML; Porter, SN; Samulski, RJ; Porteus, MH

    2016-01-01

    An emerging strategy for the treatment of monogenic diseases uses genetic engineering to precisely correct the mutation(s) at the genome level. Recent advancements in this technology have demonstrated therapeutic levels of gene correction using a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-induced DNA double-strand break in conjunction with an exogenous DNA donor substrate. This strategy requires efficient nucleic acid delivery and among viral vectors, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has demonstrated clinical success without pathology. However, a major limitation of rAAV is the small DNA packaging capacity and to date, the use of rAAV for ZFN gene delivery has yet to be reported. Theoretically, an ideal situation is to deliver both ZFNs and the repair substrate in a single vector to avoid inefficient gene targeting and unwanted mutagenesis, both complications of a rAAV co-transduction strategy. Therefore, a rAAV format was generated in which a single polypeptide encodes the ZFN monomers connected by a ribosome skipping 2A peptide and furin cleavage sequence. On the basis of this arrangement, a DNA repair substrate of 750 nucleotides was also included in this vector. Efficient polypeptide processing to discrete ZFNs is demonstrated, as well as the ability of this single vector format to stimulate efficient gene targeting in a human cell line and mouse model derived fibroblasts. Additionally, we increased rAAV-mediated gene correction up to sixfold using a combination of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, which act at the level of AAV vector transduction. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the ability to deliver ZFNs and a repair substrate by a single AAV vector and offer insights for the optimization of rAAV-mediated gene correction using drug therapy. PMID:22257934

  10. Automated Enrichment, Transduction, and Expansion of Clinical-Scale CD62L+ T Cells for Manufacturing of Gene Therapy Medicinal Products

    PubMed Central

    Priesner, Christoph; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Esser, Ruth; Mockel-Tenbrinck, Nadine; Leise, Jana; Drechsel, Katharina; Marburger, Michael; Quaiser, Andrea; Goudeva, Lilia; Arseniev, Lubomir; Kaiser, Andrew D.; Glienke, Wolfgang; Koehl, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Multiple clinical studies have demonstrated that adaptive immunotherapy using redirected T cells against advanced cancer has led to promising results with improved patient survival. The continuously increasing interest in those advanced gene therapy medicinal products (GTMPs) leads to a manufacturing challenge regarding automation, process robustness, and cell storage. Therefore, this study addresses the proof of principle in clinical-scale selection, stimulation, transduction, and expansion of T cells using the automated closed CliniMACS® Prodigy system. Naïve and central memory T cells from apheresis products were first immunomagnetically enriched using anti-CD62L magnetic beads and further processed freshly (n = 3) or split for cryopreservation and processed after thawing (n = 1). Starting with 0.5 × 108 purified CD3+ T cells, three mock runs and one run including transduction with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-containing vector resulted in a median final cell product of 16 × 108 T cells (32-fold expansion) up to harvesting after 2 weeks. Expression of CD62L was downregulated on T cells after thawing, which led to the decision to purify CD62L+CD3+ T cells freshly with cryopreservation thereafter. Most important in the split product, a very similar expansion curve was reached comparing the overall freshly CD62L selected cells with those after thawing, which could be demonstrated in the T cell subpopulations as well by showing a nearly identical conversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio. In the GFP run, the transduction efficacy was 83%. In-process control also demonstrated sufficient glucose levels during automated feeding and medium removal. The robustness of the process and the constant quality of the final product in a closed and automated system give rise to improve harmonized manufacturing protocols for engineered T cells in future gene therapy studies. PMID:27562135

  11. Adeno-associated virus gene therapy vector scAAVIGF-I for transduction of equine articular chondrocytes and RNA-seq analysis.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, D D; McIlwraith, C W; Slayden, R A; Samulski, R J; Goodrich, L R

    2016-05-01

    IGF-I is one of several anabolic factors being investigated for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Due to the short biological half-life, extended administration is required for more robust cartilage healing. Here we create a self-complimentary adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy vector utilizing the transgene for IGF-I. Various biochemical assays were performed to investigate the cellular response to scAAVIGF-I treatment vs an scAAVGFP positive transduction control and a negative for transduction control culture. RNA-sequencing analysis was also performed to establish a differential regulation profile of scAAVIGF-I transduced chondrocytes. Biochemical analyses indicated an average media IGF-I concentration of 608 ng/ml in the scAAVIGF-I transduced chondrocytes. This increase in IGF-I led to increased expression of collagen type II and aggrecan and increased protein concentrations of cellular collagen type II and media glycosaminoglycan vs both controls. RNA-seq revealed a global regulatory pattern consisting of 113 differentially regulated GO categories including those for chondrocyte and cartilage development and regulation of apoptosis. This research substantiates that scAAVIGF-I gene therapy vector increased production of IGF-I to clinically relevant levels with a biological response by chondrocytes conducive to increased cartilage healing. The RNA-seq further established a set of differentially expressed genes and gene ontologies induced by the scAAVIGF-I vector while controlling for AAV infection. This dataset provides a static representation of the cellular transcriptome that, while only consisting of one time point, will allow for further gene expression analyses to compare additional cartilage healing therapeutics or a transient cellular response. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The ARG1-LIKE2 gene of Arabidopsis functions in a gravity signal transduction pathway that is genetically distinct from the PGM pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM.

  13. The ARG1-LIKE2 gene of Arabidopsis functions in a gravity signal transduction pathway that is genetically distinct from the PGM pathway.

    PubMed

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L; Masson, Patrick H

    2003-09-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM.

  14. The ARG1-LIKE2 gene of Arabidopsis functions in a gravity signal transduction pathway that is genetically distinct from the PGM pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM.

  15. Low temperature stress in maize (Zea mays L.) induces genes involved in photosynthesis and signal transduction as studied by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Thuy; Leipner, Jörg; Stamp, Peter; Guerra-Peraza, Orlene

    2009-02-01

    Unfavourable environmental conditions such as cold induce the transcription of a range of genes in plants in order to acclimate to these growth conditions. To better understand the cold acclimation of maize (Zea mays L.) it is important to identify components of the cold stress response. For this purpose, cold-induced genes were analysed using the PCR-select cDNA subtraction method. We identified several novel genes isolated from maize seedling exposed for 48h to 6 degrees C. Of 18 Zea mays cold-induced genes (ZmCOI genes) characterized, the majority share similarities with proteins with known function in signal transduction and photosynthesis regulation. RT-PCR was conducted for a selected group of genes, namely ZmCOI6.1, ZmACA1, ZmDREB2A and ZmERF3, confirming the induction by low temperature. In addition, it was found that their expression was strongly induced by other abiotic stresses such as drought and high salt concentration, by stress signalling molecules such as jasmonic acid, salicylic acid and abscisic acid, and by membrane rigidification. These results suggest that this group of genes is involved in a general response to abiotic stresses.

  16. Cytokine-independent growth and clonal expansion of a primary human CD8+ T-cell clone following retroviral transduction with the IL-15 gene.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cary; Jones, Stephanie A; Cohen, Cyrille J; Zheng, Zhili; Kerstann, Keith; Zhou, Juhua; Robbins, Paul F; Peng, Peter D; Shen, Xinglei; Gomes, Theotonius J; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Munroe, David J; Stewart, Claudia; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wangsa, Danny; Ried, Thomas; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2007-06-15

    Malignancies arising from retrovirally transduced hematopoietic stem cells have been reported in animal models and human gene therapy trials. Whether mature lymphocytes are susceptible to insertional mutagenesis is unknown. We have characterized a primary human CD8(+) T-cell clone, which exhibited logarithmic ex vivo growth in the absence of exogenous cytokine support for more than 1 year after transduction with a murine leukemia virus-based vector encoding the T-cell growth factor IL-15. Phenotypically, the clone was CD28(-), CD45RA(-), CD45RO(+), and CD62L(-), a profile consistent with effector memory T lymphocytes. After gene transfer with tumor-antigen-specific T-cell receptors, the clone secreted IFN-gamma upon encountering tumor targets, providing further evidence that they derived from mature lymphocytes. Gene-expression analyses revealed no evidence of insertional activation of genes flanking the retroviral insertion sites. The clone exhibited constitutive telomerase activity, and the presence of autocrine loop was suggested by impaired cell proliferation following knockdown of IL-15R alpha expression. The generation of this cell line suggests that nonphysiologic expression of IL-15 can result in the long-term in vitro growth of mature human T lymphocytes. The cytokine-independent growth of this line was a rare event that has not been observed in other IL-15 vector transduction experiments or with any other integrating vector system. It does not appear that the retroviral vector integration sites played a role in the continuous growth of this cell clone, but this remains under investigation.

  17. Cytokine-independent growth and clonal expansion of a primary human CD8+ T-cell clone following retroviral transduction with the IL-15 gene

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cary; Jones, Stephanie A.; Cohen, Cyrille J.; Zheng, Zhili; Kerstann, Keith; Zhou, Juhua; Robbins, Paul F.; Peng, Peter D.; Shen, Xinglei; Gomes, Theotonius J.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Munroe, David J.; Stewart, Claudia; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wangsa, Danny; Ried, Thomas; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Malignancies arising from retrovirally transduced hematopoietic stem cells have been reported in animal models and human gene therapy trials. Whether mature lymphocytes are susceptible to insertional mutagenesis is unknown. We have characterized a primary human CD8+ T-cell clone, which exhibited logarithmic ex vivo growth in the absence of exogenous cytokine support for more than 1 year after transduction with a murine leukemia virus–based vector encoding the T-cell growth factor IL-15. Phenotypically, the clone was CD28−, CD45RA−, CD45RO+, and CD62L−, a profile consistent with effector memory T lymphocytes. After gene transfer with tumor-antigen–specific T-cell receptors, the clone secreted IFN-γ upon encountering tumor targets, providing further evidence that they derived from mature lymphocytes. Gene-expression analyses revealed no evidence of insertional activation of genes flanking the retroviral insertion sites. The clone exhibited constitutive telomerase activity, and the presence of autocrine loop was suggested by impaired cell proliferation following knockdown of IL-15Rα expression. The generation of this cell line suggests that nonphysiologic expression of IL-15 can result in the long-term in vitro growth of mature human T lymphocytes. The cytokine-independent growth of this line was a rare event that has not been observed in other IL-15 vector transduction experiments or with any other integrating vector system. It does not appear that the retroviral vector integration sites played a role in the continuous growth of this cell clone, but this remains under investigation. PMID:17353346

  18. Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae infection affects the expression of genes involved in cellular signal transduction and iron metabolism in the kidney of the brown trout Salmo trutta.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Sarker, Subhodeep; Menanteau-Ledouble, Simon; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2015-06-01

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is an enigmatic endoparasite which causes proliferative kidney disease in various species of salmonids in Europe and North America. The life cycle of the European strain of T. bryosalmonae generally completes in an invertebrate host freshwater bryozoan and vertebrate host brown trout (Salmo trutta) Linnaeus, 1758. Little is known about the gene expression in the kidney of brown trout during the developmental stages of T. bryosalmonae. In the present study, quantitative real-time PCR was applied to quantify the target genes of interest in the kidney of brown trout at different time points of T. bryosalmonae development. PCR primers specific for target genes were designed and optimized, and their gene expression levels were quantified in the cDNA kidney samples using SYBR Green Supermix. Expression of Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta, integral membrane protein 2B, NADH dehydrogenase 1 beta subcomplex subunit 6, and 26S protease regulatory subunit S10B were upregulated significantly in infected brown trout, while the expression of the ferritin M middle subunit was downregulated significantly. These results suggest that host genes involved in cellular signal transduction, proteasomal activities, including membrane transporters and cellular iron storage, are differentially upregulated or downregulated in the kidney of brown trout during parasite development. The gene expression pattern of infected renal tissue may support the development of intraluminal sporogonic stages of T. bryosalmonae in the renal tubular lumen of brown trout which may facilitate the release of viable parasite spores to transmit to the invertebrate host bryozoan.

  19. Global gene expression changes underlying Stachybotrys chartarum toxin-induced apoptosis in murine alveolar macrophages: evidence of multiple signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyan; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2007-03-01

    The overall mechanism(s) underlying macrophage apoptosis caused by the toxins of the indoor mold Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) are not yet understood. In this direction, we report a microarray-based global gene expression profiling on the murine alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S) treated with SC toxins for short (2 h) and long (24 h) periods, coinciding with the pre-apoptotic (<3 h) and progressed apoptotic stages of the treated cells, respectively. Microarray results on differential expression were validated by real-time RT-PCR analysis using representative gene targets. The toxin-regulated genes corresponded to multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, proliferation and death, inflammatory/immune response, genotoxic stress and oxidative stress, and to the underlying multiple signal transduction pathways involving MAPK-, NF-kB-, TNF-, and p53-mediated signaling. Transcription factor NF-kB showed dynamic temporal changes, characterized by an initial activation and a subsequent inhibition. Up-regulation of a battery of DNA damage-responsive and DNA repair genes in the early stage of the treatment suggested a possible role of genotoxic stress in the initiation of apoptosis. Simultaneous expression changes in both pro-survival genes and pro-apoptotic genes indicated the role of a critical balance between the two processes in SC toxin-induced apoptosis. Taken together, the results imply that multiple signaling pathways underlie the SC toxin-induced apoptosis in alveolar macrophages.

  20. Optimization of retroviral gene transduction of mobilized primitive hematopoietic progenitors by using thrombopoietin, Flt3, and Kit ligands and RetroNectin culture.

    PubMed

    Murray, L; Luens, K; Tushinski, R; Jin, L; Burton, M; Chen, J; Forestell, S; Hill, B

    1999-07-20

    We have investigated the ability of several cytokine combinations to improve retrovirus-mediated transduction of human primitive hematopoietic progenitors (PHPs) from mobilized peripheral blood (MPB). Retroviral infection of CD34+ cells was performed by culture on fibronectin fragment CH-296 (RetroNectin, RN), using the truncated human nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) as the transgene reporter. Transgene expression among progeny of PHPs was assayed by FACS analysis after long-term stromal culture (LTC). Transgene delivery to PHPs was assessed by PCR of individual stromal culture-derived methylcellulose colonies (LTC-CFCs). Compared with interleukin 3 (IL-3), IL-6, and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), the combination of thrombopoietin (TPO), Flt3 ligand (FL), and Kit ligand (KL) effected a 73-fold increase in NGFR expression among CD34+ cells (to 14%) and a 14-fold increase in NGFR expression among total cells (to 10%) after LTC. In addition, a 2.4-fold increase in neo gene marking of LTC-CFCs was observed. A preclinical study comparing the effect of high-speed centrifugation ("spinoculation") or culture on RN during exposure to retroviral particles in teflon cell culture bags showed no difference in the efficiency of transduction of PHPs between these two methods.

  1. Isolation and in vitro phosphorylation of sensory transduction components controlling anaerobic induction of light harvesting and reaction center gene expression in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Kouadio, J L; Mosley, C S; Bauer, C E

    1995-01-17

    Anaerobic induction of light harvesting and reaction center gene expression involves two transacting factors termed RegA and RegB. Sequence and mutational analysis has indicated that RegA and RegB constitute cognate components of a prokaryotic sensory transduction cascade with RegB comprising a membrane-spanning sensor kinase and RegA a cytosolic response regulator. In this study we have purified RegA, as well as a truncated portion of RegB (RegB') and undertaken an in vitro analysis of autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer activities. Incubation of RegB' with [gamma-32P]ATP and MgCl2 resulted in phosphorylation of RegB' (RegB' approximately P) over a 20-min incubation period. Incubation of RegB' approximately P with RegA resulted in rapid transfer of the phosphate from RegB' to RegA. In analogy to other characterized prokaryotic sensory transduction components, mutational and chemical stability studies also indicate that RegB' is autophosphorylated at a conserved histidine and that RegA accepts the phosphate from RegB at a conserved aspartate.

  2. The effect of surface modification of adenovirus with an arginine-grafted bioreducible polymer on transduction efficiency and immunogenicity in cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Il; Yockman, James W; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2010-03-01

    Adenoviral vectors offer many advantages for cancer gene therapy, including high transduction efficiency, but safety concerns related to severe immunogenicity and other side effects have led to careful reconsideration of their use in human clinical trials. To overcome these issues, a strategy of generating hybrid vectors that combine viral and non-viral elements as more intelligent gene carriers has been employed. Here, we coated adenovirus (Ad) with an arginine-grafted bioreducible polymer (ABP) via electrostatic interaction. We examined the effect of ABP-coated Ad complex at various ABP molecules/Ad particle ratios. Enhanced transduction efficiency was observed in cells treated with cationic ABP polymer-coated Ad complex compared to naked Ad. We also examined the coating of Ad with ABP polymers at the optimal polymer ratio using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. In both high and low coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-expressing cells, ABP-coated Ad complex produced higher levels of transgene expression than cationic polymer 25K PEI. Notably, high cytotoxicity was observed with 25K PEI-coated Ad complex treatment, but not with ABP-coated Ad complex treatment. In addition, ABP-coated Ad complex was not significantly inhibited by serum, in contrast to naked Ad. Moreover, ABP-coated Ad complex significantly reduced the innate immune response relative to naked Ad, as assessed by interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine release from macrophage cells. Overall, our studies demonstrate that Ad complex formed with ABP cationic polymer may improve the efficiency of Ad and be a promising tool for cancer gene therapy. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Portulaca oleracea extract can inhibit nodule formation of colon cancer stem cells by regulating gene expression of the Notch signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Heiying; Chen, Li; Wang, Shuiming; Chao, Deng

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether Portulaca oleracea extract affects tumor formation in colon cancer stem cells and its chemotherapy sensitivity. In addition, to analyze associated genetic changes within the Notch signal transduction pathway. Serum-free cultures of colon cancer cells (HT-29) and HT-29 cancer stem cells were treated with the chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil to assess sensitivity. Injections of the stem cells were also given to BALB/c mice to confirm tumor growth and note its characteristics. In addition, the effect of different concentrations of P. oleracea extract was tested on the growth of HT-29 colon cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells, as determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. The effects of P. oleracea extract on the expression of β-catenin, Notch1, and Notch2 in the HT-29 cells were studied using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The tumor volume of the HT29 cells was two times larger than that of HT29 cancer stem cells. Treatment with P. oleracea extract inhibited the proliferation of both HT-29 cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells at doses from 0.07 to 2.25 µg/mL. Apoptosis of HT-29 cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells was assessed by flow cytometry; it was enhanced by the addition of P. oleracea extract. Finally, treatment with P. oleracea extract significantly downregulated the expression of the Notch1 and β-catenin genes in both cell types. The results of this study show that P. oleracea extract inhibits the growth of colon cancer stem cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, it inhibits the expression of the Notch1 and β-catenin genes. Taken together, this suggests that it may elicit its effects through regulatory and target genes that mediate the Notch signal transduction pathway.

  4. The SOS Response Master Regulator LexA Regulates the Gene Transfer Agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus and Represses Transcription of the Signal Transduction Protein CckA

    PubMed Central

    Kuchinski, Kevin S.; Brimacombe, Cedric A.; Westbye, Alexander B.; Ding, Hao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gene transfer agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA) is a genetic exchange element that combines central aspects of bacteriophage-mediated transduction and natural transformation. RcGTA particles resemble a small double-stranded DNA bacteriophage, package random ∼4-kb fragments of the producing cell genome, and are released from a subpopulation (<1%) of cells in a stationary-phase culture. RcGTA particles deliver this DNA to surrounding R. capsulatus cells, and the DNA is integrated into the recipient genome though a process that requires homologs of natural transformation genes and RecA-mediated homologous recombination. Here, we report the identification of the LexA repressor, the master regulator of the SOS response in many bacteria, as a regulator of RcGTA activity. Deletion of the lexA gene resulted in the abolition of detectable RcGTA production and an ∼10-fold reduction in recipient capability. A search for SOS box sequences in the R. capsulatus genome sequence identified a number of putative binding sites located 5′ of typical SOS response coding sequences and also 5′ of the RcGTA regulatory gene cckA, which encodes a hybrid histidine kinase homolog. Expression of cckA was increased >5-fold in the lexA mutant, and a lexA cckA double mutant was found to have the same phenotype as a ΔcckA single mutant in terms of RcGTA production. The data indicate that LexA is required for RcGTA production and maximal recipient capability and that the RcGTA-deficient phenotype of the lexA mutant is largely due to the overexpression of cckA. IMPORTANCE This work describes an unusual phenotype of a lexA mutant of the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus in respect to the phage transduction-like genetic exchange carried out by the R. capsulatus gene transfer agent (RcGTA). Instead of the expected SOS response characteristic of prophage induction, this lexA mutation not only abolishes the production of RcGTA particles but also impairs the ability

  5. Auxin signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Gretchen

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA) controls growth and developmental responses throughout the life of a plant. A combination of molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches has identified several key components involved in auxin signal transduction. Rapid auxin responses in the nucleus include transcriptional activation of auxin-regulated genes and degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. The nuclear auxin receptor is an integral component of the protein degradation machinery. Although auxin signalling in the nucleus appears to be short and simple, recent studies indicate that there is a high degree of diversity and complexity, largely due to the existence of multigene families for each of the major molecular components. Current studies are attempting to identify interacting partners among these families, and to define the molecular mechanisms involved in the interactions. Future goals are to determine the levels of regulation of the key components of the transcriptional complex, to identify higher-order complexes and to integrate this pathway with other auxin signal transduction pathways, such as the pathway that is activated by auxin binding to a different receptor at the outer surface of the plasma membrane. In this case, auxin binding triggers a signal cascade that affects a number of rapid cytoplasmic responses. Details of this pathway are currently under investigation. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  6. N-Acylethanolamines in Signal Transduction of Elicitor Perception. Attenuation of Alkalinization Response and Activation of Defense Gene Expression1

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Swati; Venables, Barney J.; Chapman, Kent D.

    1999-01-01

    In a recent study of N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) metabolism in elicitor-treated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cells, we identified a rapid release and accumulation of medium-chain N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) (e.g. N-myristoylethanolamine or NAE 14:0) and a compensatory decrease in cellular NAPE (K.D. Chapman, S. Tripathy, B. Venables, A.D. Desouza [1998] Plant Physiol 116: 1163–1168). In the present study, we extend this observation and report a 10- to 50-fold increase in NAE 14:0 content in leaves of tobacco (cv Xanthi) plants treated with xylanase or cryptogein elicitors. Exogenously supplied synthetic NAE species affected characteristic elicitor-induced and short- and long-term defense responses in cell suspensions of tobacco and long-term defense responses in leaves of intact tobacco plants. In general, synthetic NAEs inhibited elicitor-induced medium alkalinization by tobacco cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Exogenous NAE 14:0 induced expression of phenylalanine ammonia lyase in a manner similar to fungal elicitors in both cell suspensions and leaves of tobacco. NAE 14:0, but not myristic acid, activated phenylalanine ammonia lyase expression at submicromolar concentrations, well within the range of NAE 14:0 levels measured in elicitor-treated plants. Collectively, these results suggest that NAPE metabolism, specifically, the accumulation of NAE 14:0, are part of a signal transduction pathway that modulates cellular defense responses following the perception of fungal elicitors. PMID:10594117

  7. Potential of flavonoids as anti-inflammatory agents: modulation of pro-inflammatory gene expression and signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Tuñón, M J; García-Mediavilla, M V; Sánchez-Campos, S; González-Gallego, J

    2009-03-01

    Flavonoids are a large class of naturally occurring compounds widely present in fruits, vegetables, and beverages derived from plants. Reports have suggested that these compounds might be useful for the prevention of a number of diseases, partly due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It has been demonstrated that flavonoids are able to inhibit expression of isoforms of inducible nitric oxide synthase, ciclooxygenase and lipooxygenase, which are responsible for the production of a great amount of nitric oxide, prostanoids and leukotrienes, as well as other mediators of the inflammatory process such as cytokines, chemokines or adhesion molecules. Modulation of the cascade of molecular events leading to the over-expression of those mediators include inhibition of transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B, activator protein 1, signal transducers and activators of transcription, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein and others. Effects on the binding capacity of transcription factors may be regulated through the inhibition of protein kinases involved in signal transduction, such as mitogen activated protein kinases. Although the numerous studies published with in vitro approaches allow identifying molecular mechanisms of flavonoid effects, the limited bioavailability of these molecules makes necessary validation in humans. Whatever the case, the data available make clear the potential utility of dietary flavonoids or new flavonoid-based agents for the possible treatment of inflammatory diseases. The present review summarizes recent research data focusing on the modulation of the expression of different inflammatory mediators by flavonoids and the effects on cell signaling pathways responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity.

  8. Regulation of Leukemic Cell Differentiation through the Vitamin D Receptor at the Levels of Intracellular Signal Transduction, Gene Transcription, and Protein Trafficking and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Gocek, Elżbieta; Baurska, Hanna; Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D) exerts its biological activities through vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is a member of the superfamily of steroid receptors, that act as ligand-dependent transcription factors. Ligated VDR in complex with retinoid X receptor (RXR) binds to regulatory regions of 1,25(OH)2D-target genes. 1,25(OH)2D is able to induce differentiation of leukemic blasts towards macrophage-like cells. Many different acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines respond to 1,25(OH)2D by increasing CD14 cell surface receptor, some additionally upregulate CD11b and CD11c integrins. In untreated AML cells VDR protein is present in cytosol at a very low level, even though its mRNA is continuously expressed. Ligation of VDR causes protein stabilization and translocation to the cell nuclei, where it regulates transcription of target genes. Several important groups of genes are regulated by 1,25(OH)2D in HL60 cells. These genes include differentiation-related genes involved in macrophage function, as well as a gene regulating degradation of 1,25(OH)2D, namely CYP24A1. We summarize here the data which demonstrate that though some cellular responses to 1,25(OH)2D in AML cells are transcription-dependent, there are many others which depend on intracellular signal transduction, protein trafficking and stabilization. The final effect of 1,25(OH)2D action in leukemic cells requires all these acting together. PMID:23213549

  9. OmpR, a response regulator of the two-component signal transduction pathway, influences inv gene expression in Yersinia enterocolitica O9.

    PubMed

    Brzóstkowska, Marta; Raczkowska, Adrianna; Brzostek, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    The environmental control of invasin (inv) expression in Yersinia enterocolitica is mediated by a regulatory network composed of negative and positive regulators of inv gene transcription. Previously, we demonstrated that OmpR, a response regulator of the two-component signal transduction pathway EnvZ/OmpR, negatively regulates inv gene expression in Y. enterocolitica O9 by direct interaction with the inv promoter region. This study was undertaken to clarify the role of OmpR in the inv regulatory circuit in which RovA protein has been shown to positively regulate inv transcription. Using ompR, rovA, and ompR rovA Y. enterocolitica mutant backgrounds we showed that the inhibitory effect of OmpR on inv transcription may be observed only when RovA is present/active in Y. enterocolitica cells. To extend our research on inv regulation we examined the effect of OmpR on rovA gene expression. Analysis of rovA-lacZ transcriptional fusion in Y. enterocolitica wild-type and ompR background indicated that OmpR does not influence rovA expression. Thus, our results indicate that OmpR influences inv expression directly via binding to the inv promoter, but not through modulation of rovA expression.

  10. Correction of a mouse model of sickle cell disease: lentiviral/antisickling beta-globin gene transduction of unmobilized, purified hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Levasseur, Dana N; Ryan, Thomas M; Pawlik, Kevin M; Townes, Tim M

    2003-12-15

    Although sickle cell anemia was the first hereditary disease to be understood at the molecular level, there is still no adequate long-term treatment. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is the only available cure, but this procedure is limited to a minority of patients with an available, histocompatible donor. Autologous transplantation of bone marrow stem cells that are transduced with a stably expressed, antisickling globin gene would benefit a majority of patients with sickle cell disease. Therefore, the development of a gene therapy protocol that corrects the disease in an animal model and is directly translatable to human patients is critical. A method is described in which unmobilized, highly purified bone marrow stem cells are transduced with a minimum amount of self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector containing a potent antisickling beta-globin gene. These cells, which were transduced in the absence of cytokine stimulation, fully reconstitute irradiated recipients and correct the hemolytic anemia and organ pathology that characterize the disease in humans. The mean increase of hemoglobin concentration was 46 g/L (4.6 g/dL) and the average lentiviral copy number was 2.2; therefore, a 21-g/L /vector copy increase (2.1-g/dL) was achieved. This transduction protocol may be directly translatable to patients with sickle cell disease who cannot tolerate current bone marrow mobilization procedures and may not safely be exposed to large viral loads.

  11. Transductional mapping of ksgB and a new Tn5-induced kasugamycin resistance gene, ksgD, in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Fouts, K E; Barbour, S D

    1981-02-01

    We have mapped the Escherichia coli ksgB gene to min 36.5, 0.8 min from man and 0.7 min from aroD. A new kasugamycin resistance (Ksgr) gene, ksgD, has been isolated, using a transposon, Tn5. ksgD::TN5 is 44% cotransducible with sbcA, unlinked to trp, and unlinked to man (by P1 transduction). The ksgD::Tn5 has a late time of entry from HfrB7 (PO43). These data place ksgD clockwise from sbcA (which enters early from HfrB7) at min 30.4. The reistance of ksgB ksgD single and double mutant strains has been quantitated. Single mutations, ksgB or ksgD, gave resistance to 600 micrograms of kasugamycin per ml, whereas a ksgB ksgD strain was able to grow in the presence of kasugamycin levels in excess of 3,000 micrograms/ml. This indicates that the mechanisms of resistance coded for by the two genes are independent and synergistic.

  12. Robust Lentiviral Gene Delivery But Limited Transduction Capacity of Commonly Used Adeno-Associated Viral Serotypes in Xenotransplanted Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Maria; Askou, Anne Louise; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Jensen, Thomas G; Corydon, Thomas J; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Aagaard, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Skin is an easily accessible organ, and therapeutic gene transfer to skin remains an attractive alternative for the treatment of skin diseases. Although we have previously documented potent lentiviral gene delivery to human skin, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) rank among the most promising gene delivery tools for in vivo purposes. Thus, we compared the potential usefulness of various serotypes of recombinant AAV vectors and lentiviral vectors for gene transfer to human skin in a xenotransplanted mouse model. Vector constructs encoding firefly luciferase were packaged in AAV capsids of serotype 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, and 9 and separately administered by intradermal injection in human skin transplants. For all serotypes, live bioimaging demonstrated low levels of transgene expression in the human skin graft, and firefly luciferase expression was observed primarily in neighboring tissue outside of the graft. In contrast, gene delivery by intradermally injected lentiviral vectors was efficient and led to extensive and persistent firefly luciferase expression within the human skin graft only. The study demonstrates the limited capacity of single-stranded AAV vectors of six commonly used serotypes for gene delivery to human skin in vivo.

  13. Robust Lentiviral Gene Delivery But Limited Transduction Capacity of Commonly Used Adeno-Associated Viral Serotypes in Xenotransplanted Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Maria; Askou, Anne Louise; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Jensen, Thomas G.; Corydon, Thomas J.; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Aagaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Skin is an easily accessible organ, and therapeutic gene transfer to skin remains an attractive alternative for the treatment of skin diseases. Although we have previously documented potent lentiviral gene delivery to human skin, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) rank among the most promising gene delivery tools for in vivo purposes. Thus, we compared the potential usefulness of various serotypes of recombinant AAV vectors and lentiviral vectors for gene transfer to human skin in a xenotransplanted mouse model. Vector constructs encoding firefly luciferase were packaged in AAV capsids of serotype 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, and 9 and separately administered by intradermal injection in human skin transplants. For all serotypes, live bioimaging demonstrated low levels of transgene expression in the human skin graft, and firefly luciferase expression was observed primarily in neighboring tissue outside of the graft. In contrast, gene delivery by intradermally injected lentiviral vectors was efficient and led to extensive and persistent firefly luciferase expression within the human skin graft only. The study demonstrates the limited capacity of single-stranded AAV vectors of six commonly used serotypes for gene delivery to human skin in vivo. PMID:26204415

  14. Sentra, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Maltsev, N.; Marland, E.; Yu, G. X.; Bhatnagar, S.; Lusk, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-01-01

    Sentra (http://www-wit.mcs.anl.gov/sentra) is a database of signal transduction proteins with the emphasis on microbial signal transduction. The database was updated to include classes of signal transduction systems modulated by either phosphorylation or methylation reactions such as PAS proteins and serine/threonine kinases, as well as the classical two-component histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Currently, Sentra contains signal transduction proteins from 43 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes as well as sequences from SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL. Signal transduction proteins are annotated with information describing conserved domains, paralogous and orthologous sequences, and conserved chromosomal gene clusters. The newly developed user interface supports flexible search capabilities and extensive visualization of the data.

  15. Identification and expression analysis of the genes involved in serotonin biosynthesis and transduction in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Sadamoto, Hitoshi; Aonuma, H

    2011-10-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates various aspects of behaviours such as aggressive behaviour and circadian behaviour in the cricket. To elucidate the molecular basis of the cricket 5-HT system, we identified 5-HT-related genes in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer. Complementary DNA of tryptophan hydroxylase and phenylalanine-tryptophan hydroxylase, which convert tryptophan into 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP), and that of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, which converts 5-HTP into 5-HT, were isolated from a cricket brain cDNA library. In addition, four 5-HT receptor genes (5-HT(1A) , 5-HT(1B) , 5-HT(2α) , and 5-HT(7) ) were identified. Expression analysis of the tryptophan hydroxylase gene TRH and phenylalanine-tryptophan hydroxylase gene TPH, which are selectively involved in neuronal and peripheral 5-HT synthesis in Drosophila, suggested that two 5-HT synthesis pathways co-exist in the cricket neuronal tissues. The four 5-HT receptor genes were expressed in various tissues at differential expression levels, suggesting that the 5-HT system is widely distributed in the cricket. © 2011 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology © 2011 The Royal Entomological Society.

  16. Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes retain high adipogenic potential suitable for use as a vehicle for gene transduction therapy.

    PubMed

    Asada, Sakiyo; Kuroda, Masayuki; Aoyagi, Yasuyuki; Fukaya, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Shigeaki; Konno, Shunichi; Tanio, Masami; Aso, Masayuki; Satoh, Kaneshige; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Nakayama, Toshinori; Saito, Yasushi; Bujo, Hideaki

    2011-07-01

    Adipose tissue is expected to provide a source of proliferative cells for regenerative medicine and cell-transplantation therapies using gene transfer manipulation. We have recently identified ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) from the mature adipocyte fraction as cells suitable as a therapeutic gene vehicle because of their stable proliferative capacity. In this study, we examined the capability of adipogenic differentiation of the ccdPAs compared with stromal vascular fraction (SVF)-derived progenitor cells (adipose-derived stem cells, ASCs) with regard to their multipotential ability to be converted to another lineage and therefore their potential to be used for regenerative medicine research. After in vitro passaging, the surface antigen profile and the basal levels of adipogenic marker genes of the ccdPAs were not obviously different from those of the ASCs. However, the ccdPAs showed increased lipid-droplet accumulation accompanied with higher adipogenic marker gene expression after stimulation of differentiation compared with the ASCs. The higher adipogenic potential of the ccdPAs than the ASCs from the SVF was maintained for 42 days in culture. Furthermore, the difference in the adipogenic response was enhanced after partial stimulation without indomethacin. These results indicate that the ccdPAs retain a high adipogenic potential even after in vitro passaging, thus suggesting the commitment of ccdPAs to stable mature adipocytes after autotransplantation, indicating that they may have potential for use in regenerative and gene-manipulated medicine.

  17. Fetal gene transfer using lentiviral vectors and the potential for germ cell transduction in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Lee, C Chang I; Jimenez, Daniel F; Kohn, Donald B; Tarantal, Alice F

    2005-04-01

    Genetic modification of germ cells in somatic gene therapy protocols is a concern, particularly with fetal approaches. This study focused on the potential for germ cell gene transfer post-fetal gene delivery using a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein (VSV-G). Rhesus monkey fetuses (n = 47) were administered vector supernatant (10(7) infectious particles per fetus) via the intraperitoneal (IP), intrapulmonary (Ipu), or intracardiac routes (Ica) under ultrasound guidance. Tissue harvests were performed near term or 3 months postnatal age, and genomic DNA obtained to analyze for vector sequences from collected sections of gonads and gonadal cells obtained by laser capture microdissection (germ cells, stroma, epithelium). Results indicated no evidence of germ cell gene transfer in fetuses or infants with Ipu or Ica routes of administration. However, evidence of the transgene (1.33 +/- 0.78 enhanced green fluorescent protein [EGFP] copies per copy epsilon-globin) was found in females, but not males, when using the IP administration approach (p < 0.05). The highest EGFP copies were detected on the surface epithelium (p < 0.05). The results of these studies suggest that the HIV-1-derived lentiviral vector pseudotyped with VSV-G may transduce a subpopulation of gonadal cells in female fetuses with IP administration, whereas no evidence of gene transfer was shown to occur in males or with organ-targeting approaches.

  18. In TCR-Stimulated T-cells, N-ras Regulates Specific Genes and Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Stephen J.; Zavadil, Jiri; Pellicer, Angel

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently shown that N-ras plays a preferential role in immune cell development and function; specifically: N-ras, but not H-ras or K-ras, could be activated at and signal from the Golgi membrane of immune cells following a low level T-cell receptor stimulus. The goal of our studies was to test the hypothesis that N-ras and H-ras played distinct roles in immune cells at the level of the transcriptome. First, we showed via mRNA expression profiling that there were over four hundred genes that were uniquely differentially regulated either by N-ras or H-ras, which provided strong evidence in favor of the hypothesis that N-ras and H-ras have distinct functions in immune cells. We next characterized the genes that were differentially regulated by N-ras in T cells following a low-level T-cell receptor stimulus. Of the large pool of candidate genes that were differentially regulated by N-ras downstream of TCR ligation, four genes were verified in qRT-PCR-based validation experiments (Dntt, Slc9a6, Chst1, and Lars2). Finally, although there was little overlap between individual genes that were regulated by N-ras in unstimulated thymocytes and stimulated CD4+ T-cells, there was a nearly complete correspondence between the signaling pathways that were regulated by N-ras in these two immune cell types. PMID:23755101

  19. Distinct Nongenomic Signal Transduction Pathways Controlled by 17β-Estradiol Regulate DNA Synthesis and Cyclin D1 Gene Transcription in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Acconcia, Filippo; Bresciani, Francesco; Weisz, Alessandro; Trentalance, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Estrogens induce cell proliferation in target tissues by stimulating progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Activation of cyclin D1 gene expression is a critical feature of this hormonal action. The existence of rapid/nongenomic estradiol-regulated protein kinase C (PKC-α) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction pathways, their cross talk, and role played in DNA synthesis and cyclin D1 gene transcription have been studied herein in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. 17β-Estradiol was found to rapidly activate PKC-α translocation and ERK-2/mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in this cell line. These actions were independent of each other, preceding the increase of thymidine incorporation into DNA and cyclin D1 expression, and did not involve DNA binding by estrogen receptor. The results obtained with specific inhibitors indicated that PKC-α pathway is necessary to mediate the estradiol-induced G1-S progression of HepG2 cells, but it does not exert any effect(s) on cyclin D1 gene expression. On the contrary, ERK-2 cascade was strongly involved in both G1-S progression and cyclin D1 gene transcription. Deletion of its activating protein-1 responsive element motif resulted in attenuation of cyclin D1 promoter responsiveness to estrogen. These results indicate that estrogen-induced cyclin D1 transcription can occur in HepG2 cells independently of the transcriptional activity of estrogen receptor, sustaining the pivotal role played by nongenomic pathways of estrogen action in hormone-induced proliferation. PMID:12388769

  20. Retrovirus transduction: Generation of infectious retroviruses expressing dominant and selectable genes is associated with in vivo recombination and deletion events

    SciTech Connect

    Joyner, A.L.; Bernstein, A.

    1983-12-01

    The authors describe the generation of infectious retroviruses containing foreign genes by an in vivo recombination-deletion mechanism. Cotransfection into mouse cells of chimeric plasmids carrying a murine retrovirus 5' long terminal repeat and either the thymidine kinase (tk) gene of herpes virus or the dominant selectable bacterial gene for neomycin resistance (neo), along with a clone of Moloney murine leukemia virus, results in the generation of infectious thymidine kinase or neomycine-resistant viruses. Expression of the selectable marker in these viruses can be regulated by the homologous transcriptional promoter of the gene, by the promoter contained within the Friend spleen focus-forming virus long terminal repeat, or by the simian virus 40 early region promoter. In all cases, the rescued viruses appeared to arise by recombination in vivo with Moloney murine leukemia virus sequences, resulting in the acquisition of the Moloney 3' long terminal repeat and variable amounts of the 3' adjacent Moloney genome. In two of the thymidine kinase constructs where tk was inserted 200 base pairs downstream from the long terminal repeat, the rescued viruses acquired a large part of the murine leukemia virus genome, including the region involved in packaging genomic RNA into virions. The generation of infectious neomycin-resistant virus is associated with deletions of simian virus 40 splicing and polyadenylation sequences. These results demonstrate that nonhomologous recombination and deletion events can take place in animal cells, resulting in the acquisition or removal of cis-acting sequences required for, or inhibitory to, retrovirus infectivity.

  1. Multilineage transduction of resident lung cells in vivo by AAV2/8 for α1-antitrypsin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Julia G; Takahashi, Ayuko; Higgins, Michelle I; Porter, Emily L; Suki, Bela; Balazs, Alejandro; Wilson, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery has long represented an appealing potential treatment approach for monogenic diseases such as α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) but has proven challenging to achieve in practice. Alternate pseudotyping of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is producing vectors with increasingly heterogeneous tropic specificity, giving researchers the ability to target numerous end-organs affected by disease. Herein, we describe sustained pulmonary transgene expression for at least 52 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation of AAV2/8 and characterize the multiple cell types transduced within the lung utilizing this approach. We demonstrate that lung-directed AAV2/8 is able to achieve therapeutic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protein levels within the lung epithelial lining fluid and that AAT gene delivery ameliorates the severity of experimental emphysema in mice. We find that AAV2/8 efficiently transduces hepatocytes in vivo after intratracheal administration, a finding that may have significance for AAV-based human gene therapy studies. These results support direct transgene delivery to the lung as a potential alternative approach to achieve the goal of developing a gene therapy for AATD. PMID:27408904

  2. Multilineage transduction of resident lung cells in vivo by AAV2/8 for α1-antitrypsin gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Payne, Julia G; Takahashi, Ayuko; Higgins, Michelle I; Porter, Emily L; Suki, Bela; Balazs, Alejandro; Wilson, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery has long represented an appealing potential treatment approach for monogenic diseases such as α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) but has proven challenging to achieve in practice. Alternate pseudotyping of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is producing vectors with increasingly heterogeneous tropic specificity, giving researchers the ability to target numerous end-organs affected by disease. Herein, we describe sustained pulmonary transgene expression for at least 52 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation of AAV2/8 and characterize the multiple cell types transduced within the lung utilizing this approach. We demonstrate that lung-directed AAV2/8 is able to achieve therapeutic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protein levels within the lung epithelial lining fluid and that AAT gene delivery ameliorates the severity of experimental emphysema in mice. We find that AAV2/8 efficiently transduces hepatocytes in vivo after intratracheal administration, a finding that may have significance for AAV-based human gene therapy studies. These results support direct transgene delivery to the lung as a potential alternative approach to achieve the goal of developing a gene therapy for AATD.

  3. A Single Vector Platform for High-Level Gene Transduction of Central Neurons: Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Equipped with the Tet-Off System

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jaerin; Takahashi, Megumu; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Ishida, Yoko; Furuta, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    Visualization of neurons is indispensable for the investigation of neuronal circuits in the central nervous system. Virus vectors have been widely used for labeling particular subsets of neurons, and the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector has gained popularity as a tool for gene transfer. Here, we developed a single AAV vector Tet-Off platform, AAV-SynTetOff, to improve the gene-transduction efficiency, specifically in neurons. The platform is composed of regulator and response elements in a single AAV genome. After infection of Neuro-2a cells with the AAV-SynTetOff vector, the transduction efficiency of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was increased by approximately 2- and 15-fold relative to the conventional AAV vector with the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) or human synapsin I (SYN) promoter, respectively. We then injected the AAV vectors into the mouse neostriatum. GFP expression in the neostriatal neurons infected with the AAV-SynTetOff vector was approximately 40-times higher than that with the CMV or SYN promoter. By adding a membrane-targeting signal to GFP, the axon fibers of neostriatal neurons were clearly visualized. In contrast, by attaching somatodendritic membrane-targeting signals to GFP, axon fiber labeling was mostly suppressed. Furthermore, we prepared the AAV-SynTetOff vector, which simultaneously expressed somatodendritic membrane-targeted GFP and membrane-targeted red fluorescent protein (RFP). After injection of the vector into the neostriatum, the cell bodies and dendrites of neostriatal neurons were labeled with both GFP and RFP, whereas the axons in the projection sites were labeled only with RFP. Finally, we applied this vector to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive (VIP+) neocortical neurons, one of the subclasses of inhibitory neurons in the neocortex, in layer 2/3 of the mouse primary somatosensory cortex. The results revealed the differential distribution of the somatodendritic and axonal structures at the population level. The

  4. A Single Vector Platform for High-Level Gene Transduction of Central Neurons: Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Equipped with the Tet-Off System.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jaerin; Takahashi, Megumu; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Ishida, Yoko; Furuta, Takahiro; Hioki, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Visualization of neurons is indispensable for the investigation of neuronal circuits in the central nervous system. Virus vectors have been widely used for labeling particular subsets of neurons, and the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector has gained popularity as a tool for gene transfer. Here, we developed a single AAV vector Tet-Off platform, AAV-SynTetOff, to improve the gene-transduction efficiency, specifically in neurons. The platform is composed of regulator and response elements in a single AAV genome. After infection of Neuro-2a cells with the AAV-SynTetOff vector, the transduction efficiency of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was increased by approximately 2- and 15-fold relative to the conventional AAV vector with the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) or human synapsin I (SYN) promoter, respectively. We then injected the AAV vectors into the mouse neostriatum. GFP expression in the neostriatal neurons infected with the AAV-SynTetOff vector was approximately 40-times higher than that with the CMV or SYN promoter. By adding a membrane-targeting signal to GFP, the axon fibers of neostriatal neurons were clearly visualized. In contrast, by attaching somatodendritic membrane-targeting signals to GFP, axon fiber labeling was mostly suppressed. Furthermore, we prepared the AAV-SynTetOff vector, which simultaneously expressed somatodendritic membrane-targeted GFP and membrane-targeted red fluorescent protein (RFP). After injection of the vector into the neostriatum, the cell bodies and dendrites of neostriatal neurons were labeled with both GFP and RFP, whereas the axons in the projection sites were labeled only with RFP. Finally, we applied this vector to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive (VIP+) neocortical neurons, one of the subclasses of inhibitory neurons in the neocortex, in layer 2/3 of the mouse primary somatosensory cortex. The results revealed the differential distribution of the somatodendritic and axonal structures at the population level. The

  5. Sensitive Tumorigenic Potential Evaluation of Adult Human Multipotent Neural Cells Immortalized by hTERT Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da Eun; Kim, Sung Soo; Song, Hye Jin; Pyeon, Hee Jang; Kang, Kyeongjin; Hong, Seung-Cheol; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and therapeutic genes are emerging as a new therapeutic approach to treat various neurodegenerative diseases with few effective treatment options. However, potential formation of tumors by stem cells has hampered their clinical application. Moreover, adequate preclinical platforms to precisely test tumorigenic potential of stem cells are controversial. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of various animal models for in vivo stem cell tumorigenicity testing to identify the most sensitive platform. Then, tumorigenic potential of adult human multipotent neural cells (ahMNCs) immortalized by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene was examined as a stem cell model with therapeutic genes. When human glioblastoma (GBM) cells were injected into adult (4–6-week-old) Balb/c-nu, adult NOD/SCID, adult NOG, or neonate (1–2-week-old) NOG mice, the neonate NOG mice showed significantly faster tumorigenesis than that of the other groups regardless of intracranial or subcutaneous injection route. Two kinds of ahMNCs (682TL and 779TL) were primary cultured from surgical samples of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Although the ahMNCs were immortalized by lentiviral hTERT gene delivery (hTERT-682TL and hTERT-779TL), they did not form any detectable masses, even in the most sensitive neonate NOG mouse platform. Moreover, the hTERT-ahMNCs had no gross chromosomal abnormalities on a karyotype analysis. Taken together, our data suggest that neonate NOG mice could be a sensitive animal platform to test tumorigenic potential of stem cell therapeutics and that ahMNCs could be a genetically stable stem cell source with little tumorigenic activity to develop regenerative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27391353

  6. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene transduction into human lung cancer cells differentially regulates metastasis formations in various organ microenvironments of natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Nishioka, Y; Nokihara, H; Sone, S

    1997-02-15

    We investigated whether local production of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), responsible for migration and activation of monocytes/macrophages at a tumor growth site, affected the metastatic pattern of lung cancer. For this, highly metastatic human squamous (RERF-LC-AI) or small (H69/VP) cell lung carcinoma cells were transduced with the human M-CSF gene inserted into pRc/CMV-MCSF to establish M-CSF-producing clones (MCSF-AI-9-18, MCSF-AI-9-24, and MCSF-VP-5). M-CSF gene transduction had no effect on the expression of surface antigen or on in vitro proliferation. After s.c. injection into SCID mice, the growth rates of M-CSF-producing cells were slower than those of parent or mock-transduced cells. In the metastatic model in SCID mice depleted of natural killer cells, RERF-LC-AI cells formed metastases mainly in the liver and kidneys, whereas H69/VP cells metastasized mainly to the liver and systemic lymph nodes. The numbers of metastatic colonies of MCSF-AI-9-18 and MCSF-AI-9-24 cells in the liver but not the kidneys were significantly reduced. The development of lymph node metastases of MCSF-VP-5 cells was also less than that of parent or mock-transduced cells. Treatment of SCID mice with anti-human M-CSF antibody resulted in a significant increase in liver metastases of their M-CSF gene transfectants. No significant differences were observed in the distributions in mice or in the in vitro invasive potentials of MCSF-AI-9-18 cells and Neo-AI-3 cells. These findings indicate that the antimetastatic effect of M-CSF may be specific to particular organs, suggesting the influence of heterogeneity of organ microenvironments on the metastasis of lung cancer.

  7. Query by transduction.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shen-Shyang; Wechsler, Harry

    2008-09-01

    There has been recently a growing interest in the use of transductive inference for learning. We expand here the scope of transductive inference to active learning in a stream-based setting. Towards that end this paper proposes Query-by-Transduction (QBT) as a novel active learning algorithm. QBT queries the label of an example based on the p-values obtained using transduction. We show that QBT is closely related to Query-by-Committee (QBC) using relations between transduction, Bayesian statistical testing, Kullback-Leibler divergence, and Shannon information. The feasibility and utility of QBT is shown on both binary and multi-class classification tasks using SVM as the choice classifier. Our experimental results show that QBT compares favorably, in terms of mean generalization, against random sampling, committee-based active learning, margin-based active learning, and QBC in the stream-based setting.

  8. Molecular characterization of the cold- and heat-induced Arabidopsis PXL1 gene and its potential role in transduction pathways under temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Gyo; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Park, Yong Chan; Park, Hyeon Mi; Kim, Dong Sub; Park, Duck Hwan; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2015-03-15

    LRR-RLK (Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase) proteins are believed to play essential roles in cell-to-cell communication during various cellular processes including development, hormone perception, and abiotic stress responses. We isolated an LRR-RLK gene previously named Arabidopsis PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM-LIKE 1 (AtPXL1) and examined its expression patterns. AtPXL1 was highly induced by cold and heat stress, but not by drought. The fluorescence signal of 35S::AtPXL1-EGFP was closely localized to the plasma membrane. A yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay exhibited that AtPXL1 interacts with both proteins, A. thaliana histidine-rich dehydrin1 (AtHIRD1) and A. thaliana light-harvesting protein complex I (AtLHCA1). We found that AtPXL1 possesses autophosphorylation activity and phosphorylates AtHIRD1 and AtLHCA1 in an in vitro assay. Subsequently, we found that the knockout line (atpxl1) showed hypersensitive phenotypes when subjected to cold and heat during the germination stage, while the AtPXL1 overexpressing line as well as wild type plants showed high germination rates compared to the knockout plants. These results provide an insight into the molecular function of AtPXL1 in the regulation of signal transduction pathways under temperature fluctuations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Determining the Limitations and Benefits of Noise in Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction through Single Cell, Microscopy-Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Harton, Marie D; Batchelor, Eric

    2017-03-11

    Stochastic fluctuations, termed "noise," in the level of biological molecules can greatly impact cellular functions. While biological noise can sometimes be detrimental, recent studies have provided an increasing number of examples in which biological noise can be functionally beneficial. Rather than provide an exhaustive review of the growing literature in this field, in this review, we focus on single-cell studies based on quantitative microscopy that have generated a deeper understanding of the sources, characteristics, limitations, and benefits of biological noise. Specifically, we highlight studies showing how noise can help coordinate the expression of multiple downstream target genes, impact the channel capacity of signaling networks, and interact synergistically with oscillatory dynamics to enhance the sensitivity of signal processing. We conclude with a discussion of current challenges and future opportunities.

  10. Relationship between signal transduction and PPAR alpha-regulated genes of lipid metabolism in rat hepatic-derived Fao cells.

    PubMed

    Latruffe, N; Passilly, P; Jannin, B; Motojima, K; Cherkaoui Malki, M; Schohn, H; Clemencet, M C; Boscoboinik, D; Dauça, M

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize phosphorylated proteins and to evaluate the changes in their phosphorylation level under the influence of a peroxisome proliferator (PP) with hypolipidemic activity of the fibrate family. The incubation of rat hepatic derived Fao cells with ciprofibrate leads to an overphosphorylation of proteins, especially one of 85 kDa, indicating that kinase (or phosphatase) activities are modified. Moreover, immunoprecipitation of 32P-labeled cell lysates shows that the nuclear receptor, PP-activated receptor, alpha isoform, can exist in a phosphorylated form, and its phosphorylation is increased by ciprofibrate. This study shows that PP acts at different steps of cell signaling. These steps can modulate gene expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism and lipid homeostasis, as well as in detoxication processes.

  11. Transduction of SIV-Specific TCR Genes into Rhesus Macaque CD8+ T Cells Conveys the Ability to Suppress SIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Barsov, Eugene V.; Trivett, Matthew T.; Minang, Jacob T.; Sun, Haosi; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Background The SIV/rhesus macaque model for HIV/AIDS is a powerful system for examining the contribution of T cells in the control of AIDS viruses. To better our understanding of CD8+ T-cell control of SIV replication in CD4+ T cells, we asked whether TCRs isolated from rhesus macaque CD8+ T-cell clones that exhibited varying abilities to suppress SIV replication could convey their suppressive properties to CD8+ T cells obtained from an uninfected/unvaccinated animal. Principal Findings We transferred SIV-specific TCR genes isolated from rhesus macaque CD8+ T-cell clones with varying abilities to suppress SIV replication in vitro into CD8+ T cells obtained from an uninfected animal by retroviral transduction. After sorting and expansion, transduced CD8+ T-cell lines were obtained that specifically bound their cognate SIV tetramer. These cell lines displayed appropriate effector function and specificity, expressing intracellular IFNγ upon peptide stimulation. Importantly, the SIV suppression properties of the transduced cell lines mirrored those of the original TCR donor clones: cell lines expressing TCRs transferred from highly suppressive clones effectively reduced wild-type SIV replication, while expression of a non-suppressing TCR failed to reduce the spread of virus. However, all TCRs were able to suppress the replication of an SIV mutant that did not downregulate MHC-I, recapitulating the properties of their donor clones. Conclusions Our results show that antigen-specific SIV suppression can be transferred between allogenic T cells simply by TCR gene transfer. This advance provides a platform for examining the contributions of TCRs versus the intrinsic effector characteristics of T-cell clones in virus suppression. Additionally, this approach can be applied to develop non-human primate models to evaluate adoptive T-cell transfer therapy for AIDS and other diseases. PMID:21886812

  12. Phosphorylation in halobacterial signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, J; Tolliday, N; Schmitt, C; Schuster, S C; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-01-01

    Regulated phosphorylation of proteins has been shown to be a hallmark of signal transduction mechanisms in both Eubacteria and Eukarya. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are also the underlying mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in Archaea, the third branch of the living world. Cloning and sequencing of the region upstream of the cheA gene, known to be required for chemo- and phototaxis in Halobacterium salinarium, has identified cheY and cheB analogs which appear to form part of an operon which also includes cheA and the following open reading frame of 585 nucleotides. The CheY and CheB proteins have 31.3 and 37.5% sequence identity compared with the known signal transduction proteins CheY and CheB from Escherichia coli, respectively. The biochemical activities of both CheA and CheY were investigated following their expression in E.coli, isolation and renaturation. Wild-type CheA could be phosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and Mg2+, whereas the mutant CheA(H44Q) remained unlabeled. Phosphorylated CheA was dephosphorylated rapidly by the addition of wild-type CheY. The mutant CheY(D53A) had no effect on phosphorylated CheA. The mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in the Archaeon H.salinarium, therefore, is similar to the two-component signaling system known from chemotaxis in the eubacterium E.coli. Images PMID:7556066

  13. Identical Hik-Rre systems are involved in perception and transduction of salt signals and hyperosmotic signals but regulate the expression of individual genes to different extents in synechocystis.

    PubMed

    Shoumskaya, Maria A; Paithoonrangsarid, Kalyanee; Kanesaki, Yu; Los, Dmitry A; Zinchenko, Vladislav V; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Suzuki, Iwane; Murata, Norio

    2005-06-03

    In previous studies, we characterized five histidine kinases (Hiks) and the cognate response regulators (Rres) that control the expression of approximately 70% of the hyperosmotic stress-inducible genes in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. In the present study, we screened a gene knock-out library of Rres by RNA slot-blot hybridization and with a genome-wide DNA microarray and identified three Hik-Rre systems, namely, Hik33-Rre31, Hik10-Rre3, and Hik16-Hik41-Rre17, as well as another system that included Rre1, that were involved in perception of salt stress and transduction of the signal. We found that these Hik-Rre systems were identical to those that were involved in perception and transduction of the hyperosmotic stress signal. We compared the induction factors of the salt stress- and hyperosmotic stress-inducible genes that are located downstream of each system and found that these genes responded to the two kinds of stress to different respective extents. In addition, the Hik33-Rre31 system regulated the expression of genes that were specifically induced by hyperosmotic stress, whereas the system that included Rre1 regulated the expression of one or two genes that were specifically induced either by salt stress or by hyperosmotic stress. Our observations suggest that the perception of salt and hyperosmotic stress by the Hik-Rre systems is complex and that salt stress and hyperosmotic stress are perceived as distinct signals by the Hik-Rre systems.

  14. Transduction of Brain Dopamine Neurons by Adenoviral Vectors Is Modulated by CAR Expression: Rationale for Tropism Modified Vectors in PD Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Travis B.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Glandon, Anya M.; Curiel, David T.; Standaert, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene-based therapy is a new paradigm for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD) and offers considerable promise for precise targeting and flexibility to impact multiple pathobiological processes for which small molecule agents are not available. Some success has been achieved utilizing adeno-associated virus for this approach, but it is likely that the characteristics of this vector system will ultimately create barriers to progress in clinical therapy. Adenovirus (Ad) vector overcomes limitations in payload size and targeting. The cellular tropism of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5)–based vectors is regulated by the Ad attachment protein binding to its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). Many clinically relevant tissues are refractory to Ad5 infection due to negligible CAR levels but can be targeted by tropism-modified, CAR-independent forms of Ad. Our objective was to evaluate the role of CAR protein in transduction of dopamine (DA) neurons in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Ad5 was delivered to the substantia nigra (SN) in wild type (wt) and CAR transgenic animals. Cellular tropism was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the SN and striatal terminals. CAR expression was assessed by western blot and IHC. We found in wt animals, Ad5 results in robust transgene expression in astrocytes and other non-neuronal cells but poor infection of DA neurons. In contrast, in transgenic animals, Ad5 infects SNc neurons resulting in expression of transduced protein in their striatal terminals. Western blot showed low CAR expression in the ventral midbrain of wt animals compared to transgenic animals. Interestingly, hCAR protein localizes with markers of post-synaptic structures, suggesting synapses are the point of entry into dopaminergic neurons in transgenic animals. Conclusions/Significance These findings demonstrate that CAR deficiency limits infection of wild type DA neurons by Ad5 and provide a rationale for the development

  15. Quantitation of signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Krauss, S; Brand, M D

    2000-12-01

    Conventional qualitative approaches to signal transduction provide powerful ways to explore the architecture and function of signaling pathways. However, at the level of the complete system, they do not fully depict the interactions between signaling and metabolic pathways and fail to give a manageable overview of the complexity that is often a feature of cellular signal transduction. Here, we introduce a quantitative experimental approach to signal transduction that helps to overcome these difficulties. We present a quantitative analysis of signal transduction during early mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes, with steady-state respiration rate as a convenient marker of metabolic stimulation. First, by inhibiting various key signaling pathways, we measure their relative importance in regulating respiration. About 80% of the input signal is conveyed via identifiable routes: 50% through pathways sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and MAP kinase and 30% through pathways sensitive to an inhibitor of calcineurin. Second, we quantify how each of these pathways differentially stimulates functional units of reactions that produce and consume a key intermediate in respiration: the mitochondrial membrane potential. Both the PKC and calcineurin routes stimulate consumption more strongly than production, whereas the unidentified signaling routes stimulate production more than consumption, leading to no change in membrane potential despite increased respiration rate. The approach allows a quantitative description of the relative importance of signal transduction pathways and the routes by which they activate a specific cellular process. It should be widely applicable.

  16. Transduction in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    THORNE, C B

    1962-01-01

    Thorne, Curtis B. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.). Transduction in Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 83:106-111. 1962.-A bacteriophage, SP-10, isolated from soil carries out general transduction in Bacillus subtilis. Phage propagated on a streptomycin-resistant mutant of the wild-type strain W-23 was capable of transducing to prototrophy strain 168 (indole(-)), as well as all of the auxotrophic mutants of W-23-S(r) tested, which included mutants requiring arginine, histidine, adenine, guanine, thiamine, leucine, or methionine. Although strain 168 was transduced by phage SP-10, lytic activity on this strain could not be detected and attempts to propagate the phage on it failed. Transductions occurred at frequencies in the range of 10(-6) to 10(-5) per plaque-forming unit. Homologous phage was ineffective, deoxyribonuclease had no effect on the frequency of transduction, and transduction was prevented by the addition of phage antiserum. Phage SP-10 was capable of lysogenizing strain W-23-S(r), and this condition was maintained through repeated growth and sporulation cycles in potato-extract medium. Although heating at 65 C for 60 min inactivated free phage particles, spores retained their lysogenic condition after such heat treatment. When heat-treated spores of the lysogenic cultures were used as inocula for growth in a nutrient broth-yeast extract-glucose medium, filtrates contained 10(9), or more, phage particles per ml.

  17. Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    or the GTPase Rheb in a model of retrograde axonal degeneration induces axon growth by dopamine neurons. However, these molecules cannot be directly...eIF4E, to induce new axon growth. We have found that transduction of dopamine neurons of the SN by AAV eIF4E at three weeks after axonal destruction with...and then transduced the surviving dopamine neurons by use of an AAV1 vector with either a constitutively active mutant of the Akt kinase

  18. Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    dissection of either GFP-positive axons in the MFB in transgenic TH-GFP mice, or of Tomato -positive axons following transduction with anterograde tracer... Tomato -Tau.. We also determined that axons establish functional contact, demonstrated by reversal of a toxin-induced behavioral deficit. We conclude... Tomato -Tau is delivered to SN neurons by AAV and expression is driven by the robust chicken-beta actin promoter, which is less likely to be

  19. Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Austin L.; Ramot, Daniel; Goodman, Miriam B.

    The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has a well-defined and comparatively simple repertoire of sensory-guided behaviors, all of which rely on its ability to detect chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. In this chapter, we review what is known about the ion channels that mediate sensation in this remarkable model organism. Genetic screens for mutants defective in sensory-guided behaviors have identified genes encoding channel proteins, which are likely transducers of chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli. Such classical genetic approaches are now being coupled with molecular genetics and in vivo cellular physiology to elucidate how these channels are activated in specific sensory neurons. The ion channel superfamilies implicated in sensory transduction in C. elegans - CNG, TRP, and DEG/ENaC - are conserved across phyla and also appear to contribute to sensory transduction in other organisms, including vertebrates. What we learn about the role of these ion channels in C. elegans sensation is likely to illuminate analogous processes in other animals, including humans.

  20. Genetic Analysis in Bacillus pumilus by PBS1-Mediated Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, Paul S.; Young, Frank E.

    1970-01-01

    Bacteriophage PBS1 mediates generalized transduction in Bacillus pumilus NRRL B-3275 (BpB1). Transduction frequencies for single auxotrophic markers are of the order of 10−4 transductants per plaque-forming unit in crude phage lysates. The characteristics of PBS1 propagated on BpB1 and the properties of the system of transduction are similar to those reported for PBS1 propagated on Bacillus subtilis. By transduction, eight amino acid auxotrophic markers in BpB1 have been oriented into two linkage groups. One group contains the auxotrophic markers arginine A, leucine, and phenylalanine, and the other group contains the markers lysine, serine, tryptophan, isoleucine-valine, and isoleucine. The nature and relative order of the markers within each linkage group suggest that the arrangement of genes in these areas of the chromosome of BpB1 is similar to the arrangement of phenotypically comparable genes in two linkage groups (defined by PBS1 transduction) in B. subtilis. However, transduction of any of the above cited markers in BpB1 to prototrophy with PBS1 propagated on B. subtilis 168 could not be demonstrated. In addition to BpB1, seven other strains of B. pumilus can be infected with PBS1. Transduction has been demonstrated in three of these strains. Images PMID:5413829

  1. Signal transduction in Pneumocystis carinii: characterization of the genes (pcg1) encoding the alpha subunit of the G protein (PCG1) of Pneumocystis carinii carinii and Pneumocystis carinii ratti.

    PubMed Central

    Smulian, A G; Ryan, M; Staben, C; Cushion, M

    1996-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii is a eukaryotic organism that causes pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. The cell biology and life cycle of the organism are poorly understood primarily because of the lack of a continuous in vitro cultivation system. These limitations have prevented investigation of the organism's infectious cycle and hindered the rational development of new antimicrobial therapies and implementation of measures to prevent exposure to the organism or transmission. The interaction of P. carinii with its host and its environment may be critical determinants of pathogenicity and life cycle. Signal transduction pathways are likely to be critical in regulating these processes. G proteins are highly conserved members of the pathways important in many cellular events, including cell proliferation and environmental sensing. To characterize signal transduction pathways in P. carinii, we cloned a G-protein alpha subunit (G-alpha) of P. carinii carinii and P. carinii ratti by PCR amplification and hybridization screening. The gene encoding the G-alpha was present in single copy on a 450-kb chromosome of P.c. ratti. The 1,062-bp G-alpha open reading frame is interrupted by nine introns. The predicted polypeptide showed 29 to 53% identity with known fungal G-alpha proteins with greatest homology to Neurospora crassa Gna-2. Northern (RNA) blot analysis and immunoprecipitation demonstrated expression of the G-alpha mRNA and protein P. carinii isolated from heavily infected animals. Some alteration in the level of transcription was noted in short-term maintenance in starvation or rich medium. Characterization of signal transduction in P. carinii will permit a better understanding of the reproductive capacity and other cellular processes in this family or organisms that cannot be cultured continuously. PMID:8641768

  2. The gene expression profile of a drug metabolism system and signal transduction pathways in the liver of mice treated with tert-butylhydroquinone or 3-(3'-tert-butyl-4'-hydroxyphenyl)propylthiosulfonate of sodium.

    PubMed

    Shintyapina, Alexandra B; Vavilin, Valentin A; Safronova, Olga G; Lyakhovich, Vyacheslav V

    2017-01-01

    Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) is a highly effective phenolic antioxidant used in edible oils and fats in foods as well as in medicines and cosmetics. TBHQ has been shown to have both chemoprotective and carcinogenic effects. Furthermore, it has potential anti-inflammatory, antiatherogenic, and neuroprotective activities. TBHQ induces phase II detoxification enzymes via the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE mechanism, which contributes to its chemopreventive functions. Nonetheless, there is growing evidence that biological effects of tBHQ may be mediated by Nrf2-independent mechanisms related to various signaling cascades. Here, we studied changes in gene expression of phase I, II, and III drug metabolizing enzymes/transporters as well as protein levels and activities of cytochromes P450 (CYPs) elicited by tBHQ and its structural homolog TS-13 in the mouse liver. Next, we carried out gene expression analysis to identify signal transduction pathways modulated by the antioxidants. Mice received 100 mg/kg tBHQ or TS-13 per day or only vehicle. The liver was collected at 12 hours and after 7 days of the treatment. Protein and total RNA were extracted. Gene expression was analyzed using Mouse Drug Metabolism and Signal Transduction PathwayFinder RT2Profiler™PCR Arrays. A western blot analysis was used to measure protein levels and a fluorometric assay was employed to study activities of CYPs. Genes that were affected more than 1.5-fold by tBHQ or TS-13 treatment compared with vehicle were identified. Analysis of the gene expression data revealed changes in various genes that are important for drug metabolism, cellular defense mechanisms, inflammation, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. Novel target genes were identified, including xenobiotic metabolism genes encoding CYPs, phase II/III drug metabolizing enzymes/transporters. For Cyp1a2 and Cyp2b, we observed an increase in protein levels and activities during tBHQ or TS-13 treatment. Changes were found in the gene expression regulated

  3. Gravitational Effects on Signal Transduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytkowski, Arthur J.

    1999-01-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms by which individual cells perceive gravity and how these cells transduce and respond to gravitational stimuli is critical for the development of long-term manned space flight experiments. We now propose to use a well-characterized model erythroid cell system and to investigate gravitational perturbations of its erythropoietin (Epo) signaling pathway and gene regulation. Cells will be grown at 1-G and in simulated microgravity in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel bioreactor (RWV). Cell growth and differentiation, the Epo-receptor, the protein kinase C pathway to the c-myc gene, and the protein phosphatase pathway to the c-myb gene will be studied and evaluated as reporters of gravitational stimuli. The results of these experiments will have impact on the problems of 1) gravitational sensing by individual cells, and 2) the anemia of space flight. This ground-based study also will serve as a Space Station Development Study in gravitational effects on intracellular signal transduction.

  4. Evidence for the plasticity of arthropod signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Pace, Ryan M; Eskridge, P Cole; Grbić, Miodrag; Nagy, Lisa M

    2014-12-01

    Metazoans are known to contain a limited, yet highly conserved, set of signal transduction pathways that instruct early developmental patterning mechanisms. Genomic surveys that have compared gene conservation in signal transduction pathways between various insects and Drosophila support the conclusion that these pathways are conserved in evolution. However, the degree to which individual components of signal transduction pathways vary among more divergent arthropods is not known. Here, we report our results of a survey of the genome of the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae, using a set of 294 Drosophila orthologs of genes that function in signal transduction. We find a third of all genes surveyed absent from the spider mite genome. We also identify several novel duplications that have not been previously reported for a chelicerate. In comparison with previous insect surveys, Tetranychus contains a decrease in overall gene conservation, as well as an unusual ratio of ligands to receptors and other modifiers. These findings suggest that gene loss and duplication among components of signal transduction pathways are common among arthropods and suggest that signal transduction pathways in arthropods are more evolutionarily labile than previously hypothesized.

  5. The ethylene signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Using a simple response of etiolated seedlings to ethylene as a genetic screen, genes involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified in Arabidopsis. Analysis of two of these genes that have been cloned reveals that ethylene signalling involves a combination of a protein (ETR1) with similarity to bacterial histidine kinases and a protein (CTR1) with similarity to Raf-1, a protein kinase involved in multiple signalling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Several lines of investigation provide compelling evidence that ETR1 encodes an ethylene receptor. For the first time there is a glimpse of the molecular circuitry underlying the signal transduction pathway for a plant hormone.

  6. The ethylene signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Using a simple response of etiolated seedlings to ethylene as a genetic screen, genes involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified in Arabidopsis. Analysis of two of these genes that have been cloned reveals that ethylene signalling involves a combination of a protein (ETR1) with similarity to bacterial histidine kinases and a protein (CTR1) with similarity to Raf-1, a protein kinase involved in multiple signalling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Several lines of investigation provide compelling evidence that ETR1 encodes an ethylene receptor. For the first time there is a glimpse of the molecular circuitry underlying the signal transduction pathway for a plant hormone.

  7. In vivo transduction by intravenous injection of a lentiviral vector expressing human ADA into neonatal ADA gene knockout mice: a novel form of enzyme replacement therapy for ADA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, Denise A; Jin, Xiangyang; Petersen, Denise; Wang, Xingchao; Dorey, Fred; Kil, Ki Soo; Aldrich, Melissa; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Kohn, Donald B

    2006-06-01

    Using a mouse model of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency syndrome (ADA-deficient SCID), we have developed a noninvasive method of gene transfer for the sustained systemic expression of human ADA as enzyme replacement therapy. The method of delivery is a human immunodeficiency virus 1-based lentiviral vector given systemically by intravenous injection on day 1 to 2 of life. In this article we characterize the biodistribution of the integrated vector, the expression levels of ADA enzyme activity in various tissues, as well as the efficacy of systemic ADA expression to correct the ADA-deficient phenotype in this mouse model. The long-term expression of enzymatically active ADA achieved by this method, primarily from transduction of liver and lung, restored immunologic function and significantly extended survival. These studies illustrate the potential for sustained in vivo production of enzymatically active ADA, as an alternative to therapy by frequent injection of exogenous ADA protein.

  8. Effects of Zhichan powder on signal transduction and apoptosis-associated gene expression in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiajun; Ma, Jinshu; Qiu, Yafei; Yi, Shihong; Liu, Yongmao; Zhou, Qingwei; Zhang, Pengguo; Wan, Quan; Kuang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Zhichan powder elevated immunity and suppressed oxidation in mice. Rat models of Parkinson’s disease were induced by stereotaxically injecting 6-hydroxydopamine into the substantia nigra. The rat models were intragastrically treated with Zhichan powder, which is composed of milkvetch root, ginseng, bunge swallowwort root, himalayan teasel root, Magnolia officinalis, Ligustrum lucidum Ait. and szechwan lovage rhizome. Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, Fas, caspase-8, cytochrome C, Bax, caspase-3, and p53 significantly increased, but Bcl-2 expression significantly decreased in the substantia nigra of rats with Parkinson’s disease. Following Zhichan powder administration, mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, Fas, caspase-8, cytochrome C, Bax, caspase-3, and p53 diminished, but Bcl-2 expression increased in the rat substantia nigra. These results indicate that Zhichan powder regulates signal transduction protein expression, inhibits apoptosis, and exerts therapeutic effects on Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25558224

  9. Gene Expression Profiling on Global cDNA Arrays Gives Hints Concerning Potential Signal Transduction Pathways Involved in Cardiac Fibrosis of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ridinger, Heidrun; Rutenberg, Christiane; Ritz, Eberhard; Mall, Gerhard; Maercker, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Cardiac remodelling with interstitial fibrosis in renal failure, which so far is only poorly understood on the molecular level, was investigated in the rat model by a global gene expression profiling analysis. Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to subtotal nephrectomy (SNX) or sham operation (sham) and followed for 2 and 12 weeks, respectively. Heart-specific gene expression profiling, with RZPD Rat Unigene-1 cDNA arrays containing about 27 000 gene and EST sequences revealed substantial changes in gene expression in SNX compared to sham animals. Motor protein genes, growth and differentiation markers, and extracellular matrix genes were upregulated in SNX rats. Obviously, not only genes involved in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, but also genes involved in the expansion of non-vascular interstitial tissue are activated very early in animals with renal failure. Together with earlier findings in the SNX model, the present data suggest the hypothesis that the local renin–angiotensin system (RAS) may be activated by at least two pathways: (a) via second messengers and Gproteins (short-term signalling); and (b) via motor proteins, actins and integrins (longterm signalling). The study documents that complex hybridization analysis yields reproducible and promising results of patterns of gene activation pointing to signalling pathways involved in cardiac remodelling in renal failure. The complete array data are available via http://www.rzpd.de/cgi-bin/services/exp/viewExpressionData.pl.cgi PMID:18629021

  10. Retrovirus transduction: segregation of the viral transforming function and the herpes simplex virus tk gene in infectious Friend spleen focus-forming virus thymidine kinase vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, A L; Bernstein, A

    1983-01-01

    A series of deletions and insertions utilizing the herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene (tk) were constructed in the murine retrovirus Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV). In all cases, the coding region for the SFFV-specific glycoprotein (gp55), which is implicated in erythroleukemic transformation, was left intact. These SFFV-TK and SFFV deletion vectors were analyzed for expression of tk and gp55 after DNA-mediated gene transfer. In addition, virus rescued by cotransfection of these vectors with Moloney murine leukemia virus was analyzed for infectious TK-transducing virus, gp55 expression, and erythroleukemia-inducing ability. The experiments demonstrated that deletions or insertions within the intron for the gp55 env gene can interfere with expression of gp55 after both DNA-mediated gene transfer and virus infection. In contrast, the gene transfer efficiency of the tk gene was unaffected in the SFFV-TK vectors, and high-titer infectious TK virus could be recovered. Revertant viruses capable of inducing erythroleukemia and expressing gp55 were generated after cotransfection of the SFFV-TK vectors with murine leukemia virus. The revertant viruses lost both tk sequences and the ability to transduce TK- fibroblasts to a TK+ phenotype. These experiments demonstrate that segregation of the TK and erythroleukemia functions can occur in retrovirus vectors which initially carry both markers. Images PMID:6318088

  11. Retrovirus transduction: Segregation of the viral transforming function and the Herpes Simplex virus tk gene in infectious friend spleen focus-forming virus thymidine kinase vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joyner, A.L.; Bernstein, A.

    1983-12-01

    A series of deletions and insertions utilizing the herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene (tk) were constructed in the murine retrovirus Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV). In all cases, the coding region for the SFFV-specific glycoprotein (gp55), which is implicated in erythroleukemic transformation, was left intact. These SFFV-TK and SFFV deletion vectors were analyzed for expression of tk and gp55 after DNA-mediated gene transfer. In addition, virus rescued by cotranfection of these vectors with Moloney murine leukemia virus was analyzed for infectious TK-transducing virus, gp55 expression, and erythroleukemia-inducing ability. The experiments demonstrated that deletions or insertions within the intron for the gp55 env gene can interfere with expression of gp55 after both DNA-mediated gene transfer and virus infection. In contrast, the gene transfer efficiency of the tk gene was unaffected in the SFFV-TK vectors, and high-titer infectious TK virus could be recovered. Revertant viruses capable of inducing erythroleukemia and expressing gp55 were generated after cotranfection of the SFFV-TK vectors with murine leukemia virus. The revertant viruses lost both tk sequences and the ability to transduce TK/sup -/ fibroblasts to a TK/sup +/ phenotype. These experiments demonstrate that segregation of the TK and erythroleukemia functions can occur in retrovirus vectors which initially carry both markers.

  12. Signal Transduction in the Footsteps of Goethe and Schiller

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Karlheinz; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Entschladen, Frank; Serfling, Edgar; Thiel, Gerald; Kieser, Arnd; Giehl, Klaudia; Ehrhardt, Christina; Feller, Stephan M; Ullrich, Oliver; Schaper, Fred; Janssen, Ottmar; Hass, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The historical town of Weimar in Thuringia, the "green heart of Germany" was the sphere of Goethe and Schiller, the two most famous representatives of German literature's classic era. Not yet entirely as influential as those two cultural icons, the Signal Transduction Society (STS) has nevertheless in the last decade established within the walls of Weimar an annual interdisciplinary Meeting on "Signal Transduction – Receptors, Mediators and Genes", which is well recognized as a most attractive opportunity to exchange results and ideas in the field. The 12th STS Meeting was held from October 28 to 31 and provided a state-of-the-art overview of various areas of signal transduction research in which progress is fast and discussion lively. This report is intended to share with the readers of CCS some highlights of the Meeting Workshops devoted to specific aspects of signal transduction. PMID:19193215

  13. Signal transduction in the footsteps of goethe and schiller.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Karlheinz; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Entschladen, Frank; Serfling, Edgar; Thiel, Gerald; Kieser, Arnd; Giehl, Klaudia; Ehrhardt, Christina; Feller, Stephan M; Ullrich, Oliver; Schaper, Fred; Janssen, Ottmar; Hass, Ralf

    2009-02-04

    The historical town of Weimar in Thuringia, the "green heart of Germany" was the sphere of Goethe and Schiller, the two most famous representatives of German literature's classic era. Not yet entirely as influential as those two cultural icons, the Signal Transduction Society (STS) has nevertheless in the last decade established within the walls of Weimar an annual interdisciplinary Meeting on "Signal Transduction - Receptors, Mediators and Genes", which is well recognized as a most attractive opportunity to exchange results and ideas in the field.The 12th STS Meeting was held from October 28 to 31 and provided a state-of-the-art overview of various areas of signal transduction research in which progress is fast and discussion lively. This report is intended to share with the readers of CCS some highlights of the Meeting Workshops devoted to specific aspects of signal transduction.

  14. Pheromone Transduction in Moths

    PubMed Central

    Stengl, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Calling female moths attract their mates late at night with intermittent release of a species-specific sex-pheromone blend. Mean frequency of pheromone filaments encodes distance to the calling female. In their zig-zagging upwind search male moths encounter turbulent pheromone blend filaments at highly variable concentrations and frequencies. The male moth antennae are delicately designed to detect and distinguish even traces of these sex pheromones amongst the abundance of other odors. Its olfactory receptor neurons sense even single pheromone molecules and track intermittent pheromone filaments of highly variable frequencies up to about 30 Hz over a wide concentration range. In the hawkmoth Manduca sexta brief, weak pheromone stimuli as encountered during flight are detected via a metabotropic PLCβ-dependent signal transduction cascade which leads to transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. Strong or long pheromone stimuli, which are possibly perceived in direct contact with the female, activate receptor-guanylyl cyclases causing long-term adaptation. In addition, depending on endogenous rhythms of the moth's physiological state, hormones such as the stress hormone octopamine modulate second messenger levels in sensory neurons. High octopamine levels during the activity phase maximize temporal resolution cAMP-dependently as a prerequisite to mate location. Thus, I suggest that sliding adjustment of odor response threshold and kinetics is based upon relative concentration ratios of intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide levels which gate different ion channels synergistically. In addition, I propose a new hypothesis for the cyclic nucleotide-dependent ion channel formed by insect olfactory receptor/coreceptor complexes. Instead of being employed for an ionotropic mechanism of odor detection it is proposed to control subthreshold membrane potential oscillation of sensory neurons, as a basis for temporal encoding of odors. PMID:21228914

  15. Evidence of mitochondrial involvement in the transduction of signals required for the induction of genes associated with pathogen attack and senescence.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Denis P; Nickels, Roxy; McIntosh, Lee

    2002-02-01

    Using the mRNA differential display technique, seven cDNAs have been isolated that are rapidly induced when cultured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells are treated with the mitochondrial electron transport inhibitor antimycin A (AA). Interestingly, six of the cDNAs show distinct similarity to genes known to be induced by processes that involve programmed cell death (PCD), such as senescence and pathogen attack. All of the cDNAs as well as Aox1, a gene encoding the alternative oxidase, were found to also be strongly induced by H2O2 and salicylic acid (SA). AA, H2O2 and SA treatment of tobacco cells caused a rapid rise in intracellular ROS accumulation that, when prevented by antioxidant treatment, resulted in inhibition of gene induction. Besides AA, both H2O2 and SA were found to disrupt normal mitochondrial function resulting in decreased rates of electron transport and a lowering of cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, the pre-treatment of tobacco cells with bongkrekic acid, a known inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in animal cells, was found to completely block gene induction when AA, H2O2 or SA were subsequently added. These findings suggest that the mitochondrion may serve an important role in conveying intracellular stress signals to the nucleus, leading to alterations in gene expression.

  16. Limits on information transduction through amplitude and frequency regulation of transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders S; O'Shea, Erin K

    2015-05-18

    Signaling pathways often transmit multiple signals through a single shared transcription factor (TF) and encode signal information by differentially regulating TF dynamics. However, signal information will be lost unless it can be reliably decoded by downstream genes. To understand the limits on dynamic information transduction, we apply information theory to quantify how much gene expression information the yeast TF Msn2 can transduce to target genes in the amplitude or frequency of its activation dynamics. We find that although the amount of information transmitted by Msn2 to single target genes is limited, information transduction can be increased by modulating promoter cis-elements or by integrating information from multiple genes. By correcting for extrinsic noise, we estimate an upper bound on information transduction. Overall, we find that information transduction through amplitude and frequency regulation of Msn2 is limited to error-free transduction of signal identity, but not signal intensity information.

  17. High efficiency retroviral mediated gene transduction into single isolated immature and replatable CD34(3+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from human umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood is rich in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and has recently been used successfully in the clinic as an alternative source of engrafting and marrow repopulating cells. With the likelihood that cord blood stem/progenitor cells will be used for gene therapy to correct genetic disorders, we evaluated if a TK-neo gene could be directly transduced in a stable manner into single isolated subsets of purified immature hematopoietic cells that demonstrate self-renewed ability as estimated by colony replating capacity. Sorted CD34(3+) cells from cord blood were prestimulated with erythropoietin (Epo), steel factor (SLF), interleukin (IL)-3, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and transduced with the gene in two ways. CD34(3+) cells were incubated with retroviral-containing supernatant from TK-neo vector-producing cells, washed, and plated directly or resorted as CD34(3+) cells into single wells containing a single cell or 10 cells. Alternatively, CD34(3+) cells were sorted as a single cell/well and then incubated with viral supernatant. These cells were cultured with Epo, SLF, IL-3, and GM-CSF +/- G418. The TK-neo gene was introduced at very high efficiency into low numbers of or isolated single purified CD34(3+) immature hematopoietic cells without stromal cells as a source of virus or accessory cells. Proviral integration was detected in primary G418-resistant(R) colonies derived from single immature hematopoietic cells, and in cells from replated colonies derived from G418R-colony forming unit-granulocyte erythroid macrophage megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM) and -high proliferative potential colony forming cells (HPP-CFC). This demonstrates stable expression of the transduced gene into single purified stem/progenitor cells with replating capacity, results that should be applicable for future clinical studies that may utilize selected subsets of stem/progenitor cells for gene therapy. PMID:7504056

  18. Erwinia carotovora DsbA mutants: evidence for a periplasmic-stress signal transduction system affecting transcription of genes encoding secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Sealy, L V; Thomas, J D; Commander, P; Salmond, G P

    1999-08-01

    The dsbA genes, which encode major periplasmic disulfide-bond-forming proteins, were isolated from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) and Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca), and the dsbC gene, encoding another periplasmic disulfide oxidoreductase was isolated from Ecc. All three genes were sequenced and mutants deficient in these genes were created by marker exchange mutagenesis. The Ecc mutants were severely affected in activity and secretion of pectate lyase, probably due to the absence of functional PelC, which is predicted to require disulfide bond formation to achieve its correct conformation prior to secretion across the outer membrane. Similarly, endopolygalacturonase, also predicted to possess disulfide bonds, displayed reduced activity. The major Ecc cellulase (CelV) does not contain cysteine residues and was still secreted in dsbA-deficient strains. This observation demonstrated unequivocally that the localization and activity of the individual components of the Out apparatus are independent of disulfide bond formation. Surprisingly, cellulase activity was shown to be increased approximately two- to threefold in the DsbA mutant. This phenomenon resulted from transcriptional up-regulation of celV gene expression. In contrast, transcription of both pelC and peh were down-regulated in dsbA-deficient strains when compared to the wild-type. Protease (Prt) activity and secretion were unaffected in the Ecc dsbA mutant. Prt activity was considerably reduced in the double dsbA dsbC mutant. However Prt was secreted normally in this strain. The Eca dsbA mutant was found to be non-motile, suggesting that disulfide bond formation is essential for motility in this strain. All of the dsb mutants showed reduced tissue maceration in planta. These results suggest that a feedback regulation system operates in Ecc. In this system, defects in periplasmic disulfide bond formation act as a signal which is relayed to the transcription machinery regulating gene

  19. Nitrate- and molybdenum-independent signal transduction mutations in narX that alter regulation of anaerobic respiratory genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kalman, L V; Gunsalus, R P

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli can respire anaerobically by reducing nitrate, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, or fumarate. When nitrate is present, expression of the genes for fumarate (frdABCD), trimethylamine-N-oxide, and dimethyl sulfoxide (dmsABC) is repressed while expression of the nitrate reductase (narGHJI) gene is induced. This regulation requires molybdate and is mediated by the narX and narL gene products, which together form a two-component regulatory system. We provide evidence that NarX is a nitrate and molybdenum sensor which activates NarL when nitrate is available to cells. Mutants generated by hydroxylamine mutagenesis were repressed for frdA-lacZ expression even when cells were grown in the absence of nitrate. The mutations responsible for three of these nitrate independence (NarX*) phenotypes were localized to narX and further characterized in vivo for their ability to repress frdA-lacZ expression. Two of the mutants (the narX64 and narX71 mutants) had a greatly reduced requirement for molybdenum to function but still responded to nitrate. In contrast, a third mutant (the narX32 mutant) required molybdenum but did not exhibit full repression of frdA-lacZ expression even when nitrate was present. These narX* alleles also caused the induction of nitrate reductase gene expression and the repression of a dmsA-lacZ fusion in the absence of nitrate. Each narX* mutation was determined to lie in an 11-amino-acid region of the NarX polypeptide that follows a proposed transmembrane domain. We suggest that the conformation of the narX* gene products is altered such that even in the absence of nitrate each of these gene products more closely resembles the wild-type NarX protein when nitrate is present.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2254274

  20. Development of a Novel Prognostic Marker to Link a Potential Tumor Suppressor Gene at Chromosome 6q to Aberrant Signal Transduction Pathway in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    frequency of LOH is found in 6q24 region in breast cancers Laforin gene EPM2A is located in 6q24 in human genome (9-11). The long arm of chromosome 6 is...in patients (Wang et al., 2002). Although defects in the EPM2a gene have not been implicated in cancers, EPM2a is located in 6q24 of the human genome ...lymphoma, we treated the genomic DNA with bisulfite and sequenced 4 PCR products covering 102 CpG di-nucleotides within the 5’-CpG island. Our preliminary

  1. Different efficacy of in vivo herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene transduction and ganciclovir treatment on the inhibition of tumor growth of murine and human melanoma cells and rat glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, M; Adris, S; Ledda, F; Wolfmann, C; Medina, J; Bravo, A; Mordoh, J; Chernajovsky, Y; Podhajcer, O L

    1999-01-01

    Initial studies have demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy for cancer treatment of in vivo transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment. However, recent studies have questioned the validity of this approach. Using retroviral vector-producing cells (VPC) as a source for in vivo gene transfer, we evaluated the efficacy of in vivo transduction of malignant cells using three different tumor cell models: B16 murine and IIB-MEL-LES human melanomas and a C6 rat glioblastoma. In vitro studies showed a bystander effect only in C6 cells. In vivo studies showed an inhibition of tumor growth in the two melanoma models when tumor cells were coinjected with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, followed by GCV treatment; however, 100% of mice developed tumors in both models. Under similar experimental conditions, 70% (7 of 10) of syngeneic rats completely rejected stereotactically transferred C6 tumor cells; most of them (5 of 10) showed a prolonged survival. Treating established C6 tumors with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene and GCV led to the cure of 33% (4 of 12) of the animals. Rats that rejected tumor growth developed an antitumor immune memory, leading to a rejection of a stereotactic contralateral challenge with parental cells. The immune infiltrate, which showed the presence of T lymphocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear cells at the site of the first injection and mainly T lymphocytes and macrophages at the site of tumor challenge, strengthened the importance of the immune system in achieving complete tumor rejection.

  2. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  3. Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    amyotrophic lateral sclerosis .17 In these disorders, axon-targeting motifs could be used not only to monitor the anatomy and early pathogenesis in the...GTPase activity of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). This inhibition allows accumulation of activated GTP-bound Rheb, which is a principal...thereby the inhibition induced by the tuberous sclerosis complex (green rectangles) (Kim et al, Mol Therapy, 2012). In order to refine gene therapies

  4. Driving DNA transposition by lentiviral protein transduction

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujia; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2014-01-01

    Gene vectors derived from DNA transposable elements have become powerful molecular tools in biomedical research and are slowly moving into the clinic as carriers of therapeutic genes. Conventional uses of DNA transposon-based gene vehicles rely on the intracellular production of the transposase protein from transfected nucleic acids. The transposase mediates mobilization of the DNA transposon, which is typically provided in the context of plasmid DNA. In recent work, we established lentiviral protein transduction from Gag precursors as a new strategy for direct delivery of the transposase protein. Inspired by the natural properties of infecting viruses to carry their own enzymes, we loaded lentivirus-derived particles not only with vector genomes carrying the DNA transposon vector but also with hundreds of transposase subunits. Such particles were found to drive efficient transposition of the piggyBac transposable element in a range of different cell types, including primary cells, and offer a new transposase delivery approach that guarantees short-term activity and limits potential cytotoxicity. DNA transposon vectors, originally developed and launched as a non-viral alternative to viral integrating vectors, have truly become viral. Here, we briefly review our findings and speculate on the perspectives and potential advantages of transposase delivery by lentiviral protein transduction. PMID:25057443

  5. The presence of two distinct prolactin receptors in seabream with different tissue distribution patterns, signal transduction pathways and regulation of gene expression by steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xigui; Jiao, Baowei; Fung, Chun Kit; Zhang, Yong; Ho, Walter K K; Chan, Chi Bun; Lin, Haoran; Wang, Deshou; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2007-08-01

    Two prolactin receptors (PRLRs) encoded by two different genes were identified in the fugu and zebrafish genomes but not in the genomes of other vertebrates. Subsequently, two cDNA sequences corresponding to two PRLRs were identified in black seabream and Nile tilapia. Phylogenetic analysis of PRLR sequences in various vertebrates indicated that the coexistence of two PRLRs in a single species is a unique phenomenon in teleosts. Both PRLRs in teleosts (the classical one named as PRLR1, the newly identified one as PRLR2) resemble the long-form mammalian PRLRs. However, despite their overall structural similarities, the two PRLR subtypes in fish share very low amino acid similarities (about 30%), mainly due to differences in the intracellular domain. In particular, the Box 2 region and some intracellular tyrosine residues are missing in PRLR2. Tissue distribution study by real-time PCR in black seabream (sb) revealed that both receptors (sbPRLR1 and sbPRLR2) are widely expressed in different tissues. In gill, the expression level of sbPRLR2 is much higher than that of sbPRLR1. In the intestine, the expression of sbPRLR1 is higher than that of sbPRLR2. The expression levels of both receptors are relatively low in most other tissues, with sbPRLR1 generally higher than sbPRLR2. The sbPRLR1 and sbPRLR2 were functionally expressed in cultured human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Both receptors can activate the beta-casein and c-fos promoters; however, only sbPRLR1 but not sbPRLR2 can activate the Spi promoter upon receptor stimulation in a ligand-specific manner. These results indicate that both receptors share some common functions but are distinctly different from each other in mobilizing post-receptor events. When challenged with different steroid hormones, the two PRLRs exhibited very different gene expression patterns in the seabream kidney. The sbPRLR1 expression was up-regulated by estradiol and cortisol, whereas testosterone had no significant effect. For sbPRLR2

  6. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Morey, Kevin J; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A; Smith, J Jeff; Webb, Colleen T; Hellinga, Homme W; Medford, June I

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparently linear pathways, thereby establishing networks that integrate multiple signals. We show that sequence conservation and cross talk can extend across kingdoms and can be exploited to produce a synthetic plant signal transduction system. In response to HK cross talk, heterologously expressed bacterial response regulators, PhoB and OmpR, translocate to the nucleus on HK activation. Using this discovery, combined with modification of PhoB (PhoB-VP64), we produced a key component of a eukaryotic synthetic signal transduction pathway. In response to exogenous cytokinin, PhoB-VP64 translocates to the nucleus, binds a synthetic PlantPho promoter, and activates gene expression. These results show that conserved-signaling components can be used across kingdoms and adapted to produce synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. PMID:19455134

  7. Toll signal transduction pathway in bivalves: complete cds of intermediate elements and related gene transcription levels in hemocytes of immune stimulated Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Toubiana, Mylène; Rosani, Umberto; Giambelluca, Sonia; Cammarata, Matteo; Gerdol, Marco; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola; Roch, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Based on protein domain structure and organization deduced from mRNA contigs, 15 transcripts of the Toll signaling pathway have been identified in the bivalve, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Identical searches performed on publicly available Mytilus edulis ESTs revealed 11 transcripts, whereas searches performed in genomic and new transcriptome sequences of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, identified 21 Toll-related transcripts. The remarkable molecular diversity of TRAF and IKK coding sequences of C. gigas, suggests that the sequence data inferred from Mytilus cDNAs may not be exhaustive. Most of the Toll pathway genes were constitutively and ubiquitously expressed in M. galloprovincialis, although at different levels, and clearly induced after in vivo injection with bacteria. Such over-transcription was more rapid and intense with Gram-negative than with Gram-positive bacteria. Injection of a fungus modulated the transcription of few Toll pathway genes, with the induction levels of TLR/MyD88 complex being always less intense. Purified LPS and β-glucans had marginal effect whereas peptidoglycans were ineffective. At the moment, we found no evidence of an IMD transcript in bivalves. In conclusion, mussels possess a complete Toll pathway which can be triggered either by Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria.

  8. Abundance of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Bacteriophage following Soil Fertilization with Dairy Manure or Municipal Biosolids, and Evidence for Potential Transduction.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joseph; Topp, Edward

    2015-11-01

    Animal manures and municipal biosolids recycled onto crop production land carry antibiotic-resistant bacteria that can influence the antibiotic resistome of agricultural soils, but little is known about the contribution of bacteriophage to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in this context. In this work, we quantified a set of ARGs in the bacterial and bacteriophage fractions of agricultural soil by quantitative PCR. All tested ARGs were present in both the bacterial and phage fractions. We demonstrate that fertilization of soil with dairy manure or human biosolids increases ARG abundance in the bacterial fraction but not the bacteriophage fraction and further show that pretreatment of dairy manure can impact ARG abundance in the bacterial fraction. Finally, we show that purified bacteriophage can confer increased antibiotic resistance to soil bacteria when combined with selective pressure. The results indicate that soilborne bacteriophage represents a substantial reservoir of antibiotic resistance and that bacteriophage could play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of resistance genes in the context of an agricultural soil microbiome. Overall, our work reinforces the advisability of composting or digesting fecal material prior to field application and suggests that application of some antibiotics at subclinical concentrations can promote bacteriophage-mediated horizontal transfer of ARGs in agricultural soil microbiomes.

  9. Insulin directly regulates NPY and AgRP gene expression via the MAPK MEK/ERK signal transduction pathway in mHypoE-46 hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christopher M; Belsham, Denise D

    2009-08-13

    Insulin plays a key role in the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis through central regulation of neuropeptides. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) are vital orexigenic peptides that are regulated by insulin, although the processes utilized are unknown. Using a hypothalamic, clonal cell line, mHypoE-46, which endogenously expresses NPY, AgRP and the insulin receptor, we studied the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the NPY/AgRP neuron by insulin. We determined that insulin has direct actions on the neurons and acts to repress NPY/AgRP gene expression through a MAPK MEK/ERK-dependent pathway. Transient transfection analysis determined that human NPY and AgRP 5' flanking gene regions were not regulated by insulin in the mouse cell line, while sequence comparison analysis indicated only a 50% sequence similarity between human and mouse NPY and AgRP 5' flanking regions. These experiments indicate that insulin acts directly on specific hypothalamic neurons to regulate neuropeptide transcription.

  10. Abundance of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Bacteriophage following Soil Fertilization with Dairy Manure or Municipal Biosolids, and Evidence for Potential Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Animal manures and municipal biosolids recycled onto crop production land carry antibiotic-resistant bacteria that can influence the antibiotic resistome of agricultural soils, but little is known about the contribution of bacteriophage to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in this context. In this work, we quantified a set of ARGs in the bacterial and bacteriophage fractions of agricultural soil by quantitative PCR. All tested ARGs were present in both the bacterial and phage fractions. We demonstrate that fertilization of soil with dairy manure or human biosolids increases ARG abundance in the bacterial fraction but not the bacteriophage fraction and further show that pretreatment of dairy manure can impact ARG abundance in the bacterial fraction. Finally, we show that purified bacteriophage can confer increased antibiotic resistance to soil bacteria when combined with selective pressure. The results indicate that soilborne bacteriophage represents a substantial reservoir of antibiotic resistance and that bacteriophage could play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of resistance genes in the context of an agricultural soil microbiome. Overall, our work reinforces the advisability of composting or digesting fecal material prior to field application and suggests that application of some antibiotics at subclinical concentrations can promote bacteriophage-mediated horizontal transfer of ARGs in agricultural soil microbiomes. PMID:26341211

  11. Progeny of germ line knockouts of ASI2, a gene encoding a putative signal transduction receptor in Tetrahymena thermophila, fail to make the transition from sexual reproduction to vegetative growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuqiang; Yin, Lihui; Cole, Eric S; Udani, Rupa A; Karrer, Kathleen M

    2006-07-15

    The ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena has two nuclei: a germ line micronucleus and a somatic macronucleus. The transcriptionally active macronucleus has about 50 copies of each chromosome. At sexual reproduction (conjugation), the parental macronucleus is degraded and new macronucleus develops from a mitotic product of the zygotic micronucleus. Development of the macronucleus involves massive genome remodeling, including deletion of about 6000 specific internal eliminated sequences (IES) and multiple rounds of DNA replication. A gene encoding a putative signal transduction receptor, ASI2, (anlagen stage induced 2) is up-regulated during development of the new macronuclei (anlagen). Macronuclear ASI2 is nonessential for vegetative growth. Homozygous ASI2 germ line knockout cells with wild type parental macronuclei proceed through mating but arrest at late macronuclear anlagen development and die before the first post-conjugation fission. IES elimination occurs in these cells. Two rounds of postzygotic DNA replication occur normally in progeny of ASI2 germ line knockouts, but endoreduplication of the macronuclear genome is arrested. The germ line ASI2 null phenotype is rescued in a mating of a knockout strain with wild type cells.

  12. Membrane penetrating peptides greatly enhance baculovirus transduction efficiency into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong-Zhang; Wu, Carol P.; Chao, Yu-Chan; Liu, Catherine Yen-Yen

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Ligation of CTP with GP64 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} Fusion of PTD with VP39 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} CTP and PTD-carrying viruses improve the transduction of co-transduced baculoviruses. {yields} Virus entry and gene expression can be separate events in different cell types. -- Abstract: The baculovirus group of insect viruses is widely used for foreign gene introduction into mammalian cells for gene expression and protein production; however, the efficiency of baculovirus entry into mammalian cells is in general still low. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses were engineered and their ability to improve viral entry was examined: (1) cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was fused with baculovirus envelope protein, GP64, to produce a cytoplasmic membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-CTP); and (2) the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV TAT protein was fused with the baculovirus capsid protein VP39 to form a nuclear membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-PTD). Transduction experiments showed that both viruses had better transduction efficiency than vE, a control virus that only expresses EGFP in mammalian cells. Interestingly, vE-CTP and vE-PTD were also able to improve the transduction efficiency of a co-transduced baculovirus, resulting in higher levels of gene expression. Our results have described new routes to further enhance the development of baculovirus as a tool for gene delivery into mammalian cells.

  13. Comparison of hepatic-like cell production from human embryonic stem cells and adult liver progenitor cells: CAR transduction activates a battery of detoxification genes.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Natalie; Duret, Cédric; Pascussi, Jean-Marc; Blanc, Pierre; Maurel, Patrick; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine

    2011-09-01

    In vitro production of human hepatocytes is of primary importance in basic research, pharmacotoxicology and biotherapy of liver diseases. We have developed a protocol of differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (ES) towards hepatocyte-like cells (ES-Hep). Using a set of human adult markers including CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBPalpha), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4/7 ratio (HNF4alpha1/HNF4alpha7), cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), CYP3A4 and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and fetal markers including alpha-fetoprotein, CYP3A7 and glutathione S-transferase P1, we analyzed the expression of a panel of 41 genes in ES-Hep comparatively with human adult primary hepatocytes, adult and fetal liver. The data revealed that after 21 days of differentiation, ES-Hep are representative of fetal hepatocytes at less than 20 weeks of gestation. The glucocorticoid receptor pathway was functional in ES-Hep. Extending protocols of differentiation to 4 weeks did not improve cell maturation. When compared with hepatocyte-like cells derived from adult liver non parenchymal epithelial (NPE) cells (NPE-Hep), ES-Hep expressed several adult and fetal liver makers at much greater levels (at least one order of magnitude), consistent with greater expression of liver-enriched transcription factors Forkhead box A2, C/EBPalpha, HNF4alpha and HNF6. It therefore seems that ES-Hep reach a better level of differentiation than NPE-Hep and that these cells use different lineage pathways towards the hepatic phenotype. Finally we showed that lentivirus-mediated expression of xenoreceptor CAR in ES-Hep induced the expression of several detoxification genes including CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP3A4, UDP-glycosyltransferase 1A1, solute carriers 21A6, as well as biotransformation of midazolam, a CYP3A4-specific substrate.

  14. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene unc-89, required fpr muscle M-line assembly, encodes a giant modular protein composed of Ig and signal transduction domains

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans gene unc-89 result in nematodes having disorganized muscle structure in which thick filaments are not organized into A-bands, and there are no M-lines. Beginning with a partial cDNA from the C. elegans sequencing project, we have cloned and sequenced the unc-89 gene. An unc-89 allele, st515, was found to contain an 84-bp deletion and a 10-bp duplication, resulting in an in- frame stop codon within predicted unc-89 coding sequence. Analysis of the complete coding sequence for unc-89 predicts a novel 6,632 amino acid polypeptide consisting of sequence motifs which have been implicated in protein-protein interactions. UNC-89 begins with 67 residues of unique sequences, SH3, dbl/CDC24, and PH domains, 7 immunoglobulins (Ig) domains, a putative KSP-containing multiphosphorylation domain, and ends with 46 Ig domains. A polyclonal antiserum raised to a portion of unc-89 encoded sequence reacts to a twitchin-sized polypeptide from wild type, but truncated polypeptides from st515 and from the amber allele e2338. By immunofluorescent microscopy, this antiserum localizes to the middle of A-bands, consistent with UNC-89 being a structural component of the M-line. Previous studies indicate that myofilament lattice assembly begins with positional cues laid down in the basement membrane and muscle cell membrane. We propose that the intracellular protein UNC-89 responds to these signals, localizes, and then participates in assembling an M-line. PMID:8603916

  15. Molecular basis of mechanosensory transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Peter G.; Walker, Richard G.

    2001-09-01

    Mechanotransduction - a cell's conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal - reveals vital features of an organism's environment. From hair cells and skin mechanoreceptors in vertebrates, to bristle receptors in flies and touch receptors in worms, mechanically sensitive cells are essential in the life of an organism. The scarcity of these cells and the uniqueness of their transduction mechanisms have conspired to slow molecular characterization of the ensembles that carry out mechanotransduction. But recent progress in both invertebrates and vertebrates is beginning to reveal the identities of proteins essential for transduction.

  16. Gene expression of insulin signal-transduction pathway intermediates is lower in rats fed a beef tallow diet than in rats fed a safflower oil diet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y B; Nakajima, R; Matsuo, T; Inoue, T; Sekine, T; Komuro, M; Tamura, T; Tokuyama, K; Suzuki, M

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of dietary fatty acid composition on the insulin signaling pathway, we measured the gene expression of the earliest steps in the insulin action pathway in skeletal muscle of rats fed a safflower oil diet or a beef tallow diet. Rats were meal-fed an isoenergetic diet based on either safflower oil or beef tallow for 8 weeks. Both diets provided 45%, 35%, and 20% of energy as fat, carbohydrate, and protein, respectively. Insulin resistance, assessed from the diurnal rhythm of plasma glucose and insulin and the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), developed in rats fed a beef tallow diet. Body fat content was greater in rats fed a beef tallow diet versus a safflower oil diet. The level of insulin receptor mRNA, relative expression of the insulin receptor mRNA isoforms, and receptor protein were not affected by the composition of dietary fatty acids. The abundance of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase mRNA and protein was significantly lower in rats fed a beef tallow diet versus a safflower oil diet. We conclude that long-term feeding of a high-fat diet with saturated fatty acids induces decrease in IRS-1 and PI 3-kinase mRNA and protein levels, causing insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  17. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein–coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37–induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37–stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37–treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  18. Leucine leucine-37 uses formyl peptide receptor-like 1 to activate signal transduction pathways, stimulate oncogenic gene expression, and enhance the invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein-coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37-induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37-stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1.

  19. Enhancement of the antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-inducing ability in the PMDC11 leukemic plasmacytoid dendritic cell line via lentiviral vector-mediated transduction of the caTLR4 gene.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Minami; Narita, Miwako; Uchiyama, Takayoshi; Iwaya, Shunpei; Oiwa, Eri; Nishizawa, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Bonehill, Aude; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Takizawa, Jun; Takahashi, Masuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to enhance the efficiency of leukemia immunotherapy by increasing the antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-inducing ability of leukemia cells. The leukemic plasmacytoid dendritic cell line PMDC05 containing the HLA-A02/24 antigen, which was previously established in our laboratory (Laboratory of Hematology and Oncology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan), was used in the present study. It exhibited higher expression levels of CD80 following transduction with lentiviruses encoding the CD80 gene. This CD80-expressing PMDC05 was named PMDC11. In order to establish a more potent antigen-presenting cell for cellular immunotherapy of tumors or severe infections, PMDC11 cells were transduced with a constitutively active (ca) toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene using the Tet-On system (caTLR4-PMDC11). CD8(+) T cells from healthy donors with HLA-A02 were co-cultured with mutant WT1 peptide-pulsed PMDC11, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PMDC11 or caTLR4-PMDC11 cells. Interleukin (IL)-2 (50 IU/ml) and IL-7 (10 ng/ml) were added on day three of culture. Priming with mutant WT1 peptide-pulsed PMDC11, LPS-stimulated PMDC11 or caTLR4-PMDC11 cells was conducted once per week and two thirds of the IL-2/IL-7 containing medium was replenished every 3-4 days. Immediately prior to the priming with these various PMDC11 cells, the cultured cells were analyzed for the secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ in addition to the percentage and number of CD8(+)/WT1 tetramer(+) T cells using flow cytometry. caTLR4-PMDC11 cells were observed to possess greater antigen-presenting abilities compared with those of PMDC11 or LPS-stimulated PMDC11 cells in a mixed leukocyte culture. CD8 T cells positive for the WT1 tetramer were generated following 3-4 weeks of culture and CD8(+)/WT1 tetramer+ T cells were markedly increased in caTLR4-PMDC11-primed CD8(+) T cell culture compared with PMDC11 or LPS-stimulated PMDC11-primed CD8(+) T

  20. Reversible binding of heme to proteins in cellular signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shangwei; Reynolds, Mark F; Horrigan, Frank T; Heinemann, Stefan H; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2006-12-01

    Heme plays critical roles in numerous biological phenomena. Recent evidence has uncovered a new role of heme in cellular signal transduction, and its mechanism involves reversible binding of heme to proteins. This Account highlights the novel function of heme as an intracellular messenger in the regulation of gene expression and ion channel function.

  1. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of "teaching signal transduction." The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to…

  2. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of "teaching signal transduction." The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to…

  3. Signal transduction pathways involved in mechanotransduction in bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liedert, Astrid . E-mail: astrid.liedert@uni-ulm.de; Kaspar, Daniela; Blakytny, Robert; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2006-10-13

    Several in vivo and in vitro studies with different loading regimens showed that mechanical stimuli have an influence on proliferation and differentiation of bone cells. Prerequisite for this influence is the transduction of mechanical signals into the cell, a phenomenon that is termed mechanotransduction, which is essential for the maintenance of skeletal homeostasis in adults. Mechanoreceptors, such as the integrins, cadherins, and stretch-activated Ca{sup 2+} channels, together with various signal transduction pathways, are involved in the mechanotransduction process that ultimately regulates gene expression in the nucleus. Mechanotransduction itself is considered to be regulated by hormones, the extracellular matrix of the osteoblastic cells and the mode of the mechanical stimulus.

  4. Brassinosteroid signal transduction from receptor kinases to transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Wuk; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are growth-promoting steroid hormones in plants. Genetic studies in Arabidopsis illustrated the essential roles of BRs in a wide range of developmental processes and helped identify many genes involved in BR biosynthesis and signal transduction. Recently, proteomic studies identified missing links. Together, these approaches established the BR signal transduction cascade, which includes BR perception by the BRI1 receptor kinase at the cell surface, activation of BRI1/BAK1 kinase complex by transphosphorylation, subsequent phosphorylation of the BSK kinases, activation of the BSU1 phosphatase, dephosphorylation and inactivation of the BIN2 kinase, and accumulation of unphosphorylated BZR transcription factors in the nucleus. Mass spectrometric analyses are providing detailed information on the phosphorylation events involved in each step of signal relay. Thus, the BR signaling pathway provides a paradigm for understanding receptor kinase-mediated signal transduction as well as tools for the genetic improvement of the productivity of crop plants.

  5. Bacteriophage Transduction in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Michael E.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic manipulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis for molecular experimentation has long been an area of difficulty. Many of the traditional laboratory techniques for strain construction are laborious and hampered by poor efficiency. The ability to move chromosomal genetic markers and plasmids using bacteriophage transduction has greatly increased the speed and ease of S. epidermidis studies. These molecular genetic advances have advanced the S. epidermidis research field beyond a select few genetically tractable strains and facilitated investigations of clinically relevant isolates. PMID:24222465

  6. Optimization of a retroviral vector for transduction of human CD34 positive cells.

    PubMed

    Szyda, Anna; Paprocka, Maria; Krawczenko, Agnieszka; Lenart, Katarzyna; Heimrath, Jerzy; Grabarczyk, Piotr; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Duś, Danuta

    2006-01-01

    Human stem and progenitor cells have recently become objects of intensive studies as an important target for gene therapy and regenerative medicine. Retroviral vectors are among the most effective tools for genetic modification of these cells. However, their transduction efficiency strongly depends on the choice of the ex vivo transduction system. The aim of this study was to elaborate a system for retroviral vector transduction of human CD34 positive cells isolated from cord blood. The retroviral vector pMINV EGFP was chosen for transduction of two human erythroblastoid cell lines: KG-1a (CD34 positive) and K562 (CD34 negative). For vector construction, three promoters and two retroviral vector packaging cell lines were used. To optimize the physicochemical conditions of the transduction process, different temperatures of supernatant harvesting, the influence of centrifugation and the presence of transduction enhancing agents were tested. The conditions elaborated with KG-1a cells were further applied for transduction of CD34 positive cells isolated from cord blood. The optimal efficiency of transduction of CD34 positive cells with pMINV EGFP retroviral vector (26% of EGFP positive cells), was obtained using infective vector with LTR retroviral promoter, produced by TE FLY GA MINV EGFP packaging cell line. The transduction was performed in the presence of serum, at 37 degrees C, with co-centrifugation of cells with viral supernatants and the use of transduction enhancing agents. This study confirmed that for gene transfer into CD34 positive cells, the detailed optimization of each element of the transduction process is of great importance.

  7. [ALPHA-ACTININS AND SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS].

    PubMed

    Panyushev, N V; Tentler, D G

    2015-01-01

    Involvement of actin cytoskeleton proteins in signal transduction from cell surface to the nucleus, including regulation of transcription factors activity, has now been supported by a lot of experimental data. Here-with, cytoskeletal proteins may have different functions than ones they execute in the cytoplasm. Particularly, alpha-actinin 4 stabilizing actin microfilaments in the cytoplasm can translocate to the nucleus and change the activity of several transcription factors. Despite the lack of nuclear import signal and DNA binding domain, alpha-actinin 4 can bind to promoter sequences, and co-activate NF-κB-dependent transcription. Selective regulation of NF-κB gene targets may indicate involvement of alpha-actinin 4 in determining the specificity of cell response to NF-κB activation in cells of different types.

  8. Neuropilins are positive regulators of Hedgehog signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, R. Tyler; Feng, Brian Y.; Ni, Jun; Woo, Wei-Meng; Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Hayden Gephart, Melanie G.; Teruel, Mary N.; Oro, Anthony E.; Chen, James K.; Scott, Matthew P.

    2011-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is essential for vertebrate embryogenesis, and excessive Hh target gene activation can cause cancer in humans. Here we show that Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) and Nrp2, transmembrane proteins with roles in axon guidance and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, are important positive regulators of Hh signal transduction. Nrps are expressed at times and locations of active Hh signal transduction during mouse development. Using cell lines lacking key Hh pathway components, we show that Nrps mediate Hh transduction between activated Smoothened (Smo) protein and the negative regulator Suppressor of Fused (SuFu). Nrp1 transcription is induced by Hh signaling, and Nrp1 overexpression increases maximal Hh target gene activation, indicating the existence of a positive feedback circuit. The regulation of Hh signal transduction by Nrps is conserved between mammals and bony fish, as we show that morpholinos targeting the Nrp zebrafish ortholog nrp1a produce a specific and highly penetrant Hh pathway loss-of-function phenotype. These findings enhance our knowledge of Hh pathway regulation and provide evidence for a conserved nexus between Nrps and this important developmental signaling system. PMID:22051878

  9. Generalized transduction: new aspects of the events in the water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velimirov, B.; Chiura, H. X.; Kogure, K.

    2003-04-01

    Virus mediated transfer of genetic elements among bacteria in nature has become a major research topic in the last decade. Along with conjugation and transformation, transduction is a well-known mechanism resulting in horizontal gene transfer in procaryotic organisms. In the case of generalized transduction, all regions of the procaryotic chromosome or other genetic elements in the donor cell are transferred with nearly the same frequency to the recipient. The injection of this DNA induces the generation of stable transductants. Both virulent and temperate phages have the capability to induce general transduction.Within the frame of a study on intergeneric phage-mediated gene transfer between marine bacteria and enteric bacteria, namely an auxotrophic mutant of Escherichia coli (AB1157) we used virus like particles (VLPs) from an oligotrophic marine environment (Mediterranean Sea, West coast of Corsica) and obtained gene transfer frequencies ranging between 10-2 to 10-6 per viral particle. Consequently we had to assume that an important fraction of the VLPs obtained via ultrafiltration (Minitan Ultrafiltration System, Millipore, USA. 30 kDA cut-off filter) from surface seawater have the capability to induce general transduction. In the process of this investigation we made a number of new observations which were not compatible with the concept of general transduction. The obtained transductants were able to produce new VLPs, which had again the capability to induce transduction. In an attempt to characterize these particles we show that their appearance in the experiment was neither related to plaque formation nor to cell lysis and we discuss the concept of transduction in the light of new experimental evidence concerning transducing particles. Furthermore, a preliminary numerical model allowing an estimation of the transduction events, taking place in the water column within a year is presented.

  10. Highly efficient transduction of primary adult CNS and PNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Evgeny; Diekmann, Heike; Fischer, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Delivery and expression of recombinant genes, a key methodology for many applications in biological research, remains a challenge especially for mature neurons. Here, we report easy, highly efficient and well tolerated transduction of adult peripheral and central neuronal populations of diverse species in culture using VSV-G pseudo-typed, recombinant baculovirus (BacMam). Transduction rates of up to 80% were reliably achieved at high multiplicity of infection without apparent neuro-cytopathic effects. Neurons could be transduced either shortly after plating or after several days in culture. Co-incubation with two different baculoviruses attained near complete co-localization of fluorescent protein expression, indicating multigene delivery. Finally, evidence for functional protein expression is provided by means of cre-mediated genetic recombination and neurite outgrowth assays. Recombinant protein was already detected within hours after transduction, thereby enabling functional readouts even in relatively short-lived neuronal cultures. Altogether, these results substantiate the usefulness of baculovirus-mediated transduction of mature neurons for future research in neuroscience. PMID:27958330

  11. Elevation of serum IgE level and peripheral eosinophil count during T lymphocyte-directed gene therapy for ADA deficiency: implication of Tc2-like cells after gene transduction procedure.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, N; Ariga, T; Ohtsu, M; Yamada, M; Tame, A; Furuta, H; Kobayashi, I; Okano, M; Yanagihara, Y; Sakiyama, Y

    1998-11-01

    We have successfully carried out T-cell-directed gene therapy for a boy with severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA SCID) and unexpectedly found an elevation of serum IgE level and peripheral eosinophil count during the course. More than 90% of transduced cells cultured for 7-11 days before infusion into the patient were positive for CD8 and expressed Th2-type cytokine genes such as IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. Furthermore, CD4(+) T-depleted PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) from the patient synthesized IgE in vitro by stimulation with IL-4. Collectively, these results suggested that Tc2-like cells in the transduced cells have distinct immunological functions to help IgE synthesis and activate eosinophils.

  12. Adenoviral transduction supports matrix expression of alginate cultured articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pohle, D; Kasch, R; Herlyn, P; Bader, R; Mittlmeier, T; Pützer, B M; Müller-Hilke, B

    2012-09-01

    The present study examines the effects of adenoviral (Ad) transduction of human primary chondrocyte on transgene expression and matrix production. Primary chondrocytes were isolated from healthy articular cartilage and from cartilage with mild osteoarthritis (OA), transduced with an Ad vector and either immediately cultured in alginate or expanded in monolayer before alginate culture. Proteoglycan production was measured using dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay and matrix gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR. Viral infection of primary chondrocytes results in a stable long time transgene expression for up to 13 weeks. Ad transduction does not significantly alter gene expression and matrix production if chondrocytes are immediately embedded in alginate. However, if expanded prior to three dimension (3D) culture in alginate, chondrocytes produce not only more proteoglycans compared to non-transduced controls, but also display an increased anabolic and decreased catabolic activity compared to non-transduced controls. We therefore suggest that successful autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) should combine adenoviral transduction of primary chondrocytes with expansion in monolayer followed by 3D culture. Future studies will be needed to investigate whether the subsequent matrix production can be further improved by using Ad vectors bearing genes encoding matrix proteins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions. PMID:27886077

  14. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-11-23

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions.

  15. Effective transduction of osteogenic sarcoma cells by a baculovirus vector.

    PubMed

    Song, Sun U; Shin, Seok-Hwan; Kim, Soon-Ki; Choi, Gwang-Seong; Kim, Woo-Chul; Lee, Moon-Hee; Kim, Sei-Joong; Kim, In-Ho; Choi, Mi-Sook; Hong, Young-Jin; Lee, Kwan-Hee

    2003-03-01

    Efficient gene delivery of a baculovirus-derived vector (BV-p53-lacZ) to a human osteogenic sarcoma cell line, Saos-2, was serendipitously found while evaluating the vector for gene delivery to human p53-null tumour cells in a previous study. Therefore, we investigated other human, rat and mouse osteogenic sarcoma and other types of tumour cell lines for transduction efficiency via baculovirus vectors containing a lacZ reporter gene under the control of either a cytomegalovirus or Rous sarcoma virus promoter. The expression of beta-galactosidase protein, assessed by X-Gal staining and beta-galactosidase ELISA, demonstrated an extremely high level of transduction efficiency in some osteogenic sarcoma cell lines, such as U-2OS, Saos-2 and Saos-LM2. These human osteogenic sarcoma cell lines showed levels of beta-galactosidase expression 5-40 times greater than HepG2 cells, which were previously thought to be the mammalian cells most susceptible to baculovirus-mediated gene delivery. The level of acetylated histone proteins in these tumour lines did not correlate well with the high level of reporter gene expression. These results strongly suggest that some osteogenic sarcoma cells are highly susceptible to baculovirus-mediated gene delivery and that a baculovirus-derived vector is an efficient gene delivery vehicle into human osteogenic sarcoma cells.

  16. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of “teaching signal transduction.” The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to reflect on the development and delivery of their teaching activities in this area. This was achieved by combining open seminars with restricted access workshops and discussion events. The results suggest ways in which systems biology, information and communication technology, Web-based investigations, and high standard illustrations might be more effectively and efficiently incorporated into modern cell biology courses. PMID:17012185

  17. Electromagnetic transduction of ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passarelli, Frank; Alers, George; Alers, Ron

    2012-05-01

    Excitation and detection of ultrasonic vibrations without physical contact has proven to be of great commercial value. First used to excite the resonant vibration of bar shaped laboratory specimens in the 1930's, it was Bruce Thompson's contributions in 1973-5 that launched their practical application to a wide range of difficult NDE problems. As a fresh PhD, he championed the use of mathematical models for the electromagnetic transduction process in order to guide the design and construction of practical transducers. His early papers presented both theoretical and experimental results that exposed the wide range of wave types that could be generated along with the environmental conditions that could be overcome. Several laboratories around the world established research programs to apply the electromagnetic transducer (EMAT) to specific NDE problems. This paper will summarize those applications made by the authors.

  18. Mimicking photosynthetic solar energy transduction.

    PubMed

    Gust, D; Moore, T A; Moore, A L

    2001-01-01

    Increased understanding of photosynthetic energy conversion and advances in chemical synthesis and instrumentation have made it possible to create artificial nanoscale devices and semibiological hybrids that carry out many of the functions of the natural process. Artificial light-harvesting antennas can be synthesized and linked to artificial reaction centers that convert excitation energy to chemical potential in the form of long-lived charge separation. Artificial reaction centers can form the basis for molecular-level optoelectronic devices. In addition, they may be incorporated into the lipid bilayer membranes of artificial vesicles, where they function as components of light-driven proton pumps that generate transmembrane proton motive force. The proton gradient may be used to synthesize adenosine triphosphate via an ATP synthase enzyme. The overall energy transduction process in the liposomal system mimics the solar energy conversion system of a photosynthetic bacterium. The results of this research illustrate the advantages of designing functional nanoscale devices based on biological paradigms.

  19. Microbead-assisted retroviral transduction for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Bianca; Jorritsma, Annelies; Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Toebes, Mireille; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2010-10-01

    Retroviral transduction is the most commonly used strategy to obtain long-term expression of therapeutic genes. To efficiently transduce mammalian cells, a recombinant fibronectin molecule, RetroNectin, is generally used to juxtapose viral particles and cells, and thereby enhance viral uptake. Although this strategy has become widely adopted, in particular for the genetic modification of hematopoietic cells, several limitations apply. For example, it requires the use of culture systems that allow protein coating, something that is not possible for many of the closed cell culture systems that are used in clinical trials. Furthermore, efficient transduction is obtained only when culture systems can be exposed to centrifugation, an approach termed spin transduction. Here, we describe a novel and more potent strategy for the transduction of T cells that can be applied on a clinical scale. We show that RetroNectin can efficiently be coated onto epoxy-modified paramagnetic beads. After a blocking step, these beads can subsequently bind retroviral particles from viral supernatants, rendering such supernatants largely devoid of functional viral particles. Addition of these virus-loaded beads to activated T cells results in efficient retroviral infection. Importantly, transduction does not require the use of culture systems that are compatible with protein coating, nor is it dependent on centrifugation of either the viral supernatant or the cells. Finally, cell growth, phenotype, and function of spin-transduced versus bead-transduced cells are comparable. Viral coating of microbeads should facilitate the production of genetically modified cells, in particular for use in clinical trials.

  20. SENTRA, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, M.; Romine, M. F.; Maltsev, N.; Mathematics and Computer Science; PNNL

    2000-01-01

    SENTRA, available via URL http://wit.mcs.anl.gov/WIT2/Sentra/, is a database of proteins associated with microbial signal transduction. The database currently includes the classical two-component signal transduction pathway proteins and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, but will be expanded to also include other classes of signal transduction systems that are modulated by phosphorylation or methylation reactions. Although the majority of database entries are from prokaryotic systems, eukaroytic proteins with bacterial-like signal transduction domains are also included. Currently SENTRA contains signal transduction proteins in 34 complete and almost completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, as well as sequences from 243 organisms available in public databases (SWISS-PROT and EMBL). The analysis was carried out within the framework of the WIT2 system, which is designed and implemented to support genetic sequence analysis and comparative analysis of sequenced genomes.

  1. Polyploidization without mitosis improves in vivo liver transduction with lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Virginie; Couton, Dominique; Desdouets, Chantal; Ferry, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors are efficient gene delivery vehicles for therapeutic and research applications. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, they are able to infect most nonproliferating cells. In the liver, induction of cell proliferation dramatically improved hepatocyte transduction using all types of retroviral vectors. However, the precise relationship between hepatocyte division and transduction efficiency has not been determined yet. Here we compared gene transfer efficiency in the liver after in vivo injection of recombinant lentiviral or Moloney murine leukemia viral (MoMuLV) vectors in hepatectomized rats treated or not with retrorsine, an alkaloid that blocks hepatocyte division and induces megalocytosis. Partial hepatectomy alone resulted in a similar increase in hepatocyte transduction using either vector. In retrorsine-treated and partially hepatectomized rats, transduction with MoMuLV vectors dropped dramatically. In contrast, we observed that retrorsine treatment combined with partial hepatectomy increased lentiviral transduction to higher levels than hepatectomy alone. Analysis of nuclear ploidy in single cells showed that a high level of transduction was associated with polyploidization. In conclusion, endoreplication could be exploited to improve the efficiency of liver-directed lentiviral gene therapy.

  2. Widespread Losses of Vomeronasal Signal Transduction in Bats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huabin; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Shuyi; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate vomeronasal system (VNS) detects intraspecific pheromones and environmental odorants. We sequenced segments of the gene encoding Trpc2, an ion channel crucial for vomeronasal signal transduction, in 11 species that represent all main basal lineages of Yinpterochiroptera, one of the two suborders of the order Chiroptera (bats). Our sequences show that Trpc2 is a pseudogene in each of the 11 bats, suggesting that all yinpterochiropterans lack vomeronasal sensitivity. The Trpc2 sequences from four species of Yangochiroptera, the other suborder of bats, suggest vomeronasal insensitivity in some but not all yangochiropterans. These results, together with the available morphological data from the bat VNS, strongly suggest multiple and widespread losses of vomeronasal signal transduction and sensitivity in bats. Future scrutiny of the specific functions of the VNS in the few bats that still retain the VNS may help explain why it is dispensable in most bats. PMID:20693241

  3. Optimization of the transductional efficiency of lentiviral vectors: effect of sera and polycations.

    PubMed

    Denning, Warren; Das, Suvendu; Guo, Siqi; Xu, Jun; Kappes, John C; Hel, Zdenek

    2013-03-01

    Lentiviral vectors are widely used as effective gene-delivery vehicles. Optimization of the conditions for efficient lentiviral transduction is of a high importance for a variety of research applications. Presence of positively charged polycations reduces the electrostatic repulsion forces between a negatively charged cell and an approaching enveloped lentiviral particle resulting in an increase in the transduction efficiency. Although a variety of polycations are commonly used to enhance the transduction with retroviruses, the relative effect of various types of polycations on the efficiency of transduction and on the potential bias in the determination of titer of lentiviral vectors is not fully understood. Here, we present data suggesting that DEAE-dextran provides superior results in enhancing lentiviral transduction of most tested cell lines and primary cell cultures. Specific type and source of serum affects the efficiency of transduction of target cell populations. Non-specific binding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-containing membrane aggregates in the presence of DEAE-dextran does not significantly affect the determination of the titer of EGFP-expressing lentiviral vectors. In conclusion, various polycations and types of sera should be tested when optimizing lentiviral transduction of target cell populations.

  4. Impact of Heparan Sulfate Binding on Transduction of Retina by Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Boye, Sanford L.; Bennett, Antonette; Scalabrino, Miranda L.; McCullough, K. Tyler; Van Vliet, Kim; Choudhury, Shreyasi; Ruan, Qing; Peterson, James

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) currently are being developed to efficiently transduce the retina following noninvasive, intravitreal (Ivt) injection. However, a major barrier encountered by intravitreally delivered AAVs is the inner limiting membrane (ILM), a basement membrane rich in heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of HS binding on retinal transduction by Ivt-delivered AAVs. The heparin affinities of AAV2-based tyrosine-to-phenylalanine (Y-F) and threonine-to-valine (T-V) capsid mutants, designed to avoid proteasomal degradation during cellular trafficking, were established. In addition, the impact of grafting HS binding residues onto AAV1, AAV5, and AAV8(Y733F) as well as ablation of HS binding by AAV2-based vectors on retinal transduction was investigated. Finally, the potential relationship between thermal stability of AAV2-based capsids and Ivt-mediated transduction was explored. The results show that the Y-F and T-V AAV2 capsid mutants bind heparin but with slightly reduced affinity relative to that of AAV2. The grafting of HS binding increased Ivt transduction by AAV1 but not by AAV5 or AAV8(Y733F). The substitution of any canonical HS binding residues ablated Ivt-mediated transduction by AAV2-based vectors. However, these same HS variant vectors displayed efficient retinal transduction when delivered subretinally. Notably, a variant devoid of canonical HS binding residues, AAV2(4pMut)ΔHS, was remarkably efficient at transducing photoreceptors. The disparate AAV phenotypes indicate that HS binding, while critical for AAV2-based vectors, is not the sole determinant for transduction via the Ivt route. Finally, Y-F and T-V mutations alter capsid stability, with a potential relationship existing between stability and improvements in retinal transduction by Ivt injection. IMPORTANCE AAV has emerged as the vector of choice for gene delivery to the retina, with attention focused on developing vectors

  5. Characterization of the ABA signal transduction pathway in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Boneh, Uri; Biton, Iris; Schwartz, Amnon; Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-05-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many key processes in plants including the response to abiotic stress. ABA signal transduction consists of a double-negative regulatory mechanism, whereby ABA-bound PYR/RCARs inhibit PP2C activity, and PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s. We studied and analyzed the various genes participating in the ABA signaling cascade of the grape (Vitis vinifera). The grape ABA signal transduction consists of at least six SnRK2s. Yeast two-hybrid system was used to test direct interactions between core components of grape ABA signal transduction. We found that a total of forty eight interactions can occur between the various components. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stresses such as drought, high salt concentration and cold, were applied to vines growing in a hydroponic system. These stresses regulated the expression of various grape SnRK2s as well as ABFs in leaves and roots. Based on the interactions between SnRK2s and its targets and the expression pattern, we suggest that VvSnRK2.1 and VvSnRK2.6, can be considered the major VvSnRK2 candidates involved in the stomata response to abiotic stress. Furthermore, we found that the expression pattern of the two grape ABF genes indicates organ specificity of these genes. The key role of ABA signaling in response to abiotic stresses makes the genes involve in this signaling potential candidates for manipulation in programs designed to improve fruit tree performance in extreme environments. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Umami taste transduction mechanisms1234

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    l-Glutamate elicits the umami taste sensation, now recognized as a fifth distinct taste quality. A characteristic feature of umami taste is its potentiation by 5′-ribonucleotides such as guanosine-5'-monophosphate and inosine 5′-monophosphate, which also elicit the umami taste on their own. Recent data suggest that multiple G protein–coupled receptors contribute to umami taste. This review will focus on events downstream of the umami taste receptors. Ligand binding leads to Gβγ activation of phospholipase C β2, which produces the second messengers inositol trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. Inositol trisphosphate binds to the type III inositol trisphosphate receptor, which causes the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and Ca2+-dependent activation of a monovalent-selective cation channel, TRPM5. TRPM5 is believed to depolarize taste cells, which leads to the release of ATP, which activates ionotropic purinergic receptors on gustatory afferent nerve fibers. This model is supported by knockout of the relevant signaling effectors as well as physiologic studies of isolated taste cells. Concomitant with the molecular studies, physiologic studies show that l-glutamate elicits increases in intracellular Ca2+ in isolated taste cells and that the source of the Ca2+ is release from intracellular stores. Both Gα gustducin and Gα transducin are involved in umami signaling, because the knockout of either subunit compromises responses to umami stimuli. Both α-gustducin and α-transducin activate phosphodiesterases to decrease intracellular cAMP. The target of cAMP in umami transduction is not known, but membrane-permeant analogs of cAMP antagonize electrophysiologic responses to umami stimuli in isolated taste cells, which suggests that cAMP may have a modulatory role in umami signaling. PMID:19571214

  7. EDITORIAL: Special section on signal transduction Special section on signal transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsman, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    This special section of Physical Biology focuses on multiple aspects of signal transduction, broadly defined as the study of the mechanisms by which cells communicate with their environment. Mechanisms of cell communication involve detection of incoming signals, which can be chemical, mechanical or electromagnetic, relaying these signals to intracellular processes, such as cytoskeletal networks or gene expression systems, and, ultimately, converting these signals to responses such as cell differentiation or death. Given the multiscale nature of signal transduction systems, they must be studied at multiple levels, from the identities and structures of molecules comprising signal detection and interpretation networks, to the systems-level properties of these networks. The 11 papers in this special section illustrate some of the most exciting aspects of signal transduction research. The first two papers, by Marie-Anne Félix [1] and by Efrat Oron and Natalia Ivanova [2], focus on cell-cell interactions in developing tissues, using vulval patterning in worm and cell fate specification in mammalian embryos as prime examples of emergent cell behaviors. Next come two papers from the groups of Julio Saez-Rodriguez [3] and Kevin Janes [4]. These papers discuss how the causal relationships between multiple components of signaling systems can be inferred using multivariable statistical analysis of empirical data. An authoritative review by Zarnitsyna and Zhu [5] presents a detailed discussion of the sequence of signaling events involved in T-cell triggering. Once the structure and components of the signaling systems are determined, they can be modeled using approaches that have been successful in other physical sciences. As two examples of such approaches, reviews by Rubinstein [6] and Kholodenko [7], present reaction-diffusion models of cell polarization and thermodynamics-based models of gene regulation. An important class of models takes the form of enzymatic networks

  8. Increased transduction efficiency of primary hematopoietic cells by physical colocalization of retrovirus and target cells.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, M; Moriwaki, K; Dilloo, D; Hoffmann, T; Kimbrough, S; Johnsen, H E; Brenner, M K; Heslop, H E

    1998-06-01

    Efficient gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells offers a number of potential therapeutic applications. However, the relatively low titer of retroviral supernatants and the requirement for cell division to ensure integration have meant that transduction efficiency has been low. We have modified a flowthrough approach to cell transduction and have been able consistently to increase gene transfer efficiency into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. We transduced CD34 cells with retroviral vectors encoding a truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) or neo. Retroviral supernatant was pulled through 0.2-micron polycarbonated membranes, followed by placement of cells on the filter. In the absence of cytokines, the transduction efficiency of CD34 cells with a NGFR vector was increased 3-11-fold over that obtained at an identical MOI in liquid culture to produce 11%-44% transduction. Furthermore, both Thy1+ and Thy1- subsets in a total CD34 population were transduced with similar efficiency, and transduction with a neo vector, as measured by G418 resistance in clonogenic assays, increased 1.5-5-fold. The mechanism by which gene transfer is improved may reflect colocalization of cells and retrovirus. Costaining of cells transduced on the filter with an NGFR retrovirus with both an NGFR antibody and a gp70 antibody that recognizes viral coat protein revealed high-level coexpression. The levels of in vitro gene transfer we obtain are equivalent to those observed when CD34 cells are cocultured in liquid culture with cytokines. However, culture with cytokines may commit CD34 cells to differentiation and has produced disappointingly low levels of subsequent in vivo gene transfer. Gene marking studies using distinguishable retroviral vectors will provide a means of learning whether the effects of flowthrough transduction genuinely enhance the efficiency of gene transfer to human marrow-repopulating cells.

  9. Lymphatic Vessel Abnormalities Arising from Disorders of Ras Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; King, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic diseases in man have been described in which abnormalities in the development and function of the lymphatic vascular (LV) system are prominent features. The genes that are mutated in these diseases are varied and include genes that encode lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) growth factor receptors and their ligands and transcription factors that control LEC fate and function. In addition, an increasing number of genes have been identified that encode components of the Ras signal transduction pathway that conveys signals from cell surface receptors to regulate cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. Gene targeting studies performed in mice have confirmed that the LV system is particularly susceptible to perturbations in the Ras pathway. PMID:24183794

  10. Transduction of chemical into electrical energy.

    PubMed

    Nachmansohn, D

    1976-01-01

    The paper recalls some fundamental notions, developed by Otto Meyerhof, which were used in the analysis of the transduction of chemical into mechanical energy during muscular contraction. These notions formed the basis of the approach to the analysis of the transduction of chemical into electrical energy, i.e., the very principle underlying nerve and muscle excitability and bioelectricity. Instrumental for this purpose was the use, since 1937, of electric organs of fish, a tissue highly specialized for bioelectrogenesis.

  11. Transduction of chemical into electrical energy.

    PubMed Central

    Nachmansohn, D

    1976-01-01

    The paper recalls some fundamental notions, developed by Otto Meyerhof, which were used in the analysis of the transduction of chemical into mechanical energy during muscular contraction. These notions formed the basis of the approach to the analysis of the transduction of chemical into electrical energy, i.e., the very principle underlying nerve and muscle excitability and bioelectricity. Instrumental for this purpose was the use, since 1937, of electric organs of fish, a tissue highly specialized for bioelectrogenesis. Images PMID:1061129

  12. The Hippo signal transduction network in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Wackerhage, Henning; Del Re, Dominic P; Judson, Robert N; Sudol, Marius; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-08-05

    The discovery of the Hippo pathway can be traced back to two areas of research. Genetic screens in fruit flies led to the identification of the Hippo pathway kinases and scaffolding proteins that function together to suppress cell proliferation and tumor growth. Independent research, often in the context of muscle biology, described Tead (TEA domain) transcription factors, which bind CATTCC DNA motifs to regulate gene expression. These two research areas were joined by the finding that the Hippo pathway regulates the activity of Tead transcription factors mainly through phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivators Yap and Taz, which bind to and activate Teads. Additionally, many other signal transduction proteins crosstalk to members of the Hippo pathway forming a Hippo signal transduction network. We discuss evidence that the Hippo signal transduction network plays important roles in myogenesis, regeneration, muscular dystrophy, and rhabdomyosarcoma in skeletal muscle, as well as in myogenesis, organ size control, and regeneration of the heart. Understanding the role of Hippo kinases in skeletal and heart muscle physiology could have important implications for translational research. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Notch2 transduction by feline leukemia virus in a naturally infected cat.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Ito, Jumpei; Baba, Takuya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Kuse, Kyohei; Ochi, Haruyo; Anai, Yukari; Hisasue, Masaharu; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2014-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) induces neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases in cats. The transduction of cellular genes by FeLV is sometimes observed and associated with neoplastic diseases including lymphoma and sarcoma. Here, we report the first natural case of feline Notch2 transduction by FeLV in an infected cat with multicentric lymphoma and hypercalcemia. We cloned recombinant FeLVs harboring Notch2 in the env gene. Notch2 was able to activate expression of a reporter gene, similar to what was previously reported in cats with experimental FeLV-induced thymic lymphoma. Our findings suggest that the transduction of Notch2 strongly correlates with FeLV-induced lymphoma.

  14. On the calculation of signal transduction ability of signaling transduction pathways in intracellular communication: systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Wu, Chia-Chou

    2012-06-15

    The major function of signal transduction pathways in cells is to sense signals from the environment and process the information through signaling molecules in order to regulate the activity of transcription factors. On the molecular level, the information transmitted by a small number of signal molecules is amplified in the internal signaling pathway through enzyme catalysis, molecular modification and via the activation or inhibition of interactions. However, the dynamic system behavior of a signaling pathway can be complex and, despite knowledge of the pathway components and interactions, it is still a challenge to interpret the pathways behavior. Therefore, a systematic method is proposed in this study to quantify the signal transduction ability. Based on the non-linear signal transduction system, signal transduction ability can be investigated by solving a Hamilton-Jacobi inequality (HJI)-constrained optimization problem. To avoid difficulties associated with solving a complex HJI-constrained optimization problem for signal transduction ability, the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model is introduced to approximate the non-linear signal transduction system by interpolating several local linear systems so that the HJI-constrained optimization problem can be replaced by a linear matrix inequality (LMI)-constrained optimization problem. The LMI problem can then be efficiently solved for measuring signal transduction ability. Finally, the signal transduction ability of two important signal transduction pathways was measured by the proposed method and confirmed using experimental data, which is useful for biotechnological and therapeutic application and drug design.

  15. Targeting prostate cancer based on signal transduction and cell cycle pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John T.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Terrian, David M.; Chappell, William H.; Stivala, Franca; Libra, Massimo; Martelli, Alberto M.; Steelman, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of death in men despite increased capacity to diagnose at earlier stages. After prostate cancer has become hormone independent, which often occurs after hormonal ablation therapies, it is difficult to effectively treat. Prostate cancer may arise from mutations and dysregulation of various genes involved in regulation signal transduction (e.g., PTEN, Akt, etc.,) and the cell cycle (e.g., p53, p21Cip1, p27Kip1, Rb, etc.,). This review focuses on the aberrant interactions of signal transduction and cell cycle genes products and how they can contribute to prostate cancer and alter therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:18594202

  16. Gravitational sensory transduction chain in flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.; Richter, P.; Ntefidou, M.; Lebert, M.

    Earlier hypotheses have assumed that gravitactic orientation in flagellates, such as the photosynthetic unicell Euglena gracilis, is brought about by passive alignment of the cells in the water column by being tail heavy. A recent experiment on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 40) comparing immobilized cells with mobile cells demonstrated that the passive buoy effect can account for approximately 20% of the orientation of the cells in a gravity field. The cells show either positive or negative gravitaxis depending on other external or internal factors. Shortly after inoculation, the tendency of young cells to swim downward in the water column can be readily reverted by adding micromolar concentrations of some heavy metal ions including copper, cadmium or lead. The negative gravitaxis of older cells is converted into a positive one by stress factors such as increasing salinity or exposure to excessive visible or UV radiation. The mechanism for this switch seems to involve reactive oxygen species since the gravitactic sign change was suppressed when oxygen was removed by flushing the cell suspension with nitrogen. Also, the addition of radical scavengers (Trolox, ascorbic acid or potassium cyanide) abolished or reduced the gravitactic sign change. Addition of hydrogen peroxide induced a gravitactic sign change in the absence of external stress factors. The primary reception for the gravity vector seems to involve mechanosensitive ion channels which specifically gate calcium ions inward. We have identified several gene sequences for putative mechanosensory channels in Euglena and have applied RNAi to identify which of these channels are involved in graviperception. The influx of Ca 2+ activates calmodulin (CaM) which has been shown to be involved in the sensory transduction chain of graviorientation. It is known that an adenylyl cyclase is bound to the flagellar membrane in Euglena which is activated by CaM. This enzyme produces cAMP which has also been shown to be the key

  17. Superior In vivo Transduction of Human Hepatocytes Using Engineered AAV3 Capsid.

    PubMed

    Vercauteren, Koen; Hoffman, Brad E; Zolotukhin, Irene; Keeler, Geoffrey D; Xiao, Jing W; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund Cj; Rice, Charles M; Srivastava, Arun; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are currently being tested in multiple clinical trials for liver-directed gene transfer to treat the bleeding disorders hemophilia A and B and metabolic disorders. The optimal viral capsid for transduction of human hepatocytes has been under active investigation, but results across various models are inconsistent. We tested in vivo transduction in "humanized" mice. Methods to quantitate percent AAV transduced human and murine hepatocytes in chimeric livers were optimized using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy with image analysis. Distinct transduction efficiencies were noted following peripheral vein administration of a self-complementary vector expressing a gfp reporter gene. An engineered AAV3 capsid with two amino acid changes, S663V+T492V (AAV3-ST), showed best efficiency for human hepatocytes (~3-times, ~8-times, and ~80-times higher than for AAV9, AAV8, and AAV5, respectively). AAV5, 8, and 9 were more efficient in transducing murine than human hepatocytes. AAV8 yielded the highest transduction rate of murine hepatocytes, which was 19-times higher than that for human hepatocytes. In summary, our data show substantial differences among AAV serotypes in transduction of human and mouse hepatocytes, are the first to report on AAV5 in humanized mice, and support the use of AAV3-based vectors for human liver gene transfer.

  18. Superior In vivo Transduction of Human Hepatocytes Using Engineered AAV3 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Vercauteren, Koen; Hoffman, Brad E; Zolotukhin, Irene; Keeler, Geoffrey D; Xiao, Jing W; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund CJ; Rice, Charles M; Srivastava, Arun; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are currently being tested in multiple clinical trials for liver-directed gene transfer to treat the bleeding disorders hemophilia A and B and metabolic disorders. The optimal viral capsid for transduction of human hepatocytes has been under active investigation, but results across various models are inconsistent. We tested in vivo transduction in “humanized” mice. Methods to quantitate percent AAV transduced human and murine hepatocytes in chimeric livers were optimized using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy with image analysis. Distinct transduction efficiencies were noted following peripheral vein administration of a self-complementary vector expressing a gfp reporter gene. An engineered AAV3 capsid with two amino acid changes, S663V+T492V (AAV3-ST), showed best efficiency for human hepatocytes (~3-times, ~8-times, and ~80-times higher than for AAV9, AAV8, and AAV5, respectively). AAV5, 8, and 9 were more efficient in transducing murine than human hepatocytes. AAV8 yielded the highest transduction rate of murine hepatocytes, which was 19-times higher than that for human hepatocytes. In summary, our data show substantial differences among AAV serotypes in transduction of human and mouse hepatocytes, are the first to report on AAV5 in humanized mice, and support the use of AAV3-based vectors for human liver gene transfer. PMID:27019999

  19. Mig-6, signal transduction, stress response and cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Wen; Vande Woude, George F

    2007-03-01

    The mitogen-inducible gene-6 (Mig-6) is an immediate early response gene encoding a nonkinase scaffolding adaptor protein. Mig-6 gene expression can be rapidly and robustly induced under both normal and pathological scenarios by factors including hormones, growth factors, and stresses. However, the precise role of Mig-6 has virtually been a mystery until recently, when we and others discovered that Mig-6 may play important roles in regulating stress response, maintaining homeostasis in tissues like joints or cardiac muscle, and functioning as a tumor suppressor. The discovery that Mig-6 acts as a negative feedback inhibitor of EGF receptor signaling through a direct, physical interaction with the EGF receptor opens a door for understanding the mechanism underlying Mig-6 function. Yet how Mig-6 fine tunes or integrates signal transduction in many pathophysiological situations remains to be determined. Here we will highlight recent discoveries on the role of Mig-6 in stress response, tissue homeostasis, and cancer development; review the transcriptional regulation of Mig-6 expression; share insight into its mechanism in regulating signal transduction; and discuss the paradox of its action modes under different pathophysiological conditions.

  20. Mobile DNA in cancer. Extensive transduction of nonrepetitive DNA mediated by L1 retrotransposition in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Tubio, Jose M C; Li, Yilong; Ju, Young Seok; Martincorena, Inigo; Cooke, Susanna L; Tojo, Marta; Gundem, Gunes; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P; Zamora, Jorge; Raine, Keiran; Menzies, Andrew; Roman-Garcia, Pablo; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Shlien, Adam; Tarpey, Patrick S; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Knappskog, Stian; Van Loo, Peter; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Davies, Helen R; Marshall, John; Wedge, David C; Teague, Jon W; Butler, Adam P; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Alexandrov, Ludmil; Behjati, Sam; Yates, Lucy R; Bolli, Niccolo; Mudie, Laura; Hardy, Claire; Martin, Sancha; McLaren, Stuart; O'Meara, Sarah; Anderson, Elizabeth; Maddison, Mark; Gamble, Stephen; Foster, Christopher; Warren, Anne Y; Whitaker, Hayley; Brewer, Daniel; Eeles, Rosalind; Cooper, Colin; Neal, David; Lynch, Andy G; Visakorpi, Tapio; Isaacs, William B; van't Veer, Laura; Caldas, Carlos; Desmedt, Christine; Sotiriou, Christos; Aparicio, Sam; Foekens, John A; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Lakhani, Sunil R; Thomas, Gilles; Myklebost, Ola; Span, Paul N; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea L; Van de Vijver, Marc; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Van den Eynden, Gert G; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Futreal, P Andrew; Janes, Sam M; Bova, G Steven; Stratton, Michael R; McDermott, Ultan; Campbell, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (L1) retrotransposons are mobile repetitive elements that are abundant in the human genome. L1 elements propagate through RNA intermediates. In the germ line, neighboring, nonrepetitive sequences are occasionally mobilized by the L1 machinery, a process called 3' transduction. Because 3' transductions are potentially mutagenic, we explored the extent to which they occur somatically during tumorigenesis. Studying cancer genomes from 244 patients, we found that tumors from 53% of the patients had somatic retrotranspositions, of which 24% were 3' transductions. Fingerprinting of donor L1s revealed that a handful of source L1 elements in a tumor can spawn from tens to hundreds of 3' transductions, which can themselves seed further retrotranspositions. The activity of individual L1 elements fluctuated during tumor evolution and correlated with L1 promoter hypomethylation. The 3' transductions disseminated genes, exons, and regulatory elements to new locations, most often to heterochromatic regions of the genome.

  1. Interferons, Signal Transduction Pathways, and the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Nallar, Shreeram C.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) family of cytokines participates in the development of innate and acquired immune defenses against various pathogens and pathogenic stimuli. Discovered originally as a proteinaceous substance secreted from virus-infected cells that afforded immunity to neighboring cells from virus infection, these cytokines are now implicated in various human pathologies, including control of tumor development, cell differentiation, and autoimmunity. It is now believed that the IFN system (IFN genes and the genes induced by them, and the factors that regulate these processes) is a generalized alarm of cellular stress, including DNA damage. IFNs exert both beneficial and deleterious effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Our knowledge of the IFN-regulated processes in the CNS is far from being clear. In this article, we reviewed the current understanding of IFN signal transduction pathways and gene products that might have potential relevance to diseases of the CNS. PMID:25084173

  2. Pseudotyped adeno-associated viral vector tropism and transduction efficiencies in murine wound healing.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Balaji, Swathi; Le, Louis; Leung, Alice; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N; Wilson, James M; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    Cell specific gene transfer and sustained transgene expression are goals of cutaneous gene therapy for tissue repair and regeneration. Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2/2) mediated gene transfer to the skin results in stable transgene expression in the muscle fascicles of the panniculus carnosus in mice, with minimal gene transfer to the dermal or epidermal elements. We hypothesized that pseudotyped AAV vectors may have a unique and characteristic tropism and transduction efficiency profile for specific cells in the cutaneous wounds. We compared transduction efficiencies of cells in the epidermis, cells in the dermis, and the fascicles of the panniculus carnosus by AAV2/2 and three pseudotyped AAV vectors, AAV2/5, AAV2/7, and AAV2/8 in a murine excisional wound model. AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 result in significantly enhanced transduction of cells both in the epidermis and the dermis compared to AAV2/2. AAV2/5 transduces both the basilar and supra-basilar keratinocytes. In contrast, AAV2/8 transduces mainly supra-basilar keratinocytes. Both AAV2/7 and AAV2/8 result in more efficient gene transfer to the muscular panniculus carnosus compared to AAV2/2. The capsid of the different pseudotyped AAV vectors produces distinct tropism and efficiency profiles in the murine wound healing model. Both AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 administration result in significantly enhanced gene transfer. To further characterize cell specific transduction and tropism profiles of the AAV pseudotyped vectors, we performed in vitro experiments using human and mouse primary dermal fibroblasts. Our data demonstrate that pseudotyping strategy confers a differential transduction of dermal fibroblasts, with higher transduction of both human and murine cells by AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 at early and later time points. At later time points, AAV2/2 demonstrates increased transduction. Interestingly, AAV2/8 appears to be more efficacious in transducing human cells as compared to AAV2/5. The pseudotype-specific pattern of

  3. The Cornucopia of Intestinal Chemosensory Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Paul P.

    2009-01-01

    The chemosensory transduction mechanisms that the gastrointestinal (GI) tract uses to detect chemical and nutrient stimuli are poorly understood. The GI tract is presented with a wide variety of stimuli including potentially harmful chemicals or toxins as well as ‘normal’ stimuli including nutrients, bacteria and mechanical forces. Sensory transduction is at its simplest the conversion of these stimuli into a neural code in afferent nerves. Much of the information encoded is used by the enteric nervous system to generate local reflexes while complementary information is sent to the central nervous system via afferents or by release of hormones to affect behaviour. This review focuses on the chemosensory transduction mechanisms present in the GI tract. It examines the expression and localisation of the machinery for chemosensory transduction. It summarises the types of cells which might be involved in detecting stimuli and releasing neuroactive transmitters. Finally, it highlights the idea that chemosensory transduction mechanisms in the GI tract utilise many overlapping and complementary mechanisms for detecting and transducing stimuli into reflex action. PMID:20582275

  4. AAV-mediated photoreceptor transduction of the pig cone-enriched retina

    PubMed Central

    Mussolino, C; della Corte, M; Rossi, S; Viola, F; Di Vicino, U; Marrocco, E; Neglia, S; Doria, M; Testa, F; Giovannoni, R; Crasta, M; Giunti, M; Villani, E; Lavitrano, M; Bacci, M L; Ratiglia, R; Simonelli, F; Auricchio, A; Surace, E M

    2011-01-01

    Recent success in clinical trials supports the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for gene therapy of retinal diseases caused by defects in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In contrast, evidence of the efficacy of AAV-mediated gene transfer to retinal photoreceptors, the major site of inherited retinal diseases, is less robust. In addition, although AAV-mediated RPE transduction appears efficient, independently of the serotype used and species treated, AAV-mediated photoreceptor gene transfer has not been systematically investigated thus so far in large animal models, which also may allow identifying relevant species-specific differences in AAV-mediated retinal transduction. In the present study, we used the porcine retina, which has a high cone/rod ratio. This feature allows to properly evaluate both cone and rod photoreceptors transduction and compare the transduction characteristics of AAV2/5 and 2/8, the two most efficient AAV vector serotypes for photoreceptor targeting. Here we show that AAV2/5 and 2/8 transduces both RPE and photoreceptors. AAV2/8 infects and transduces photoreceptor more efficiently than AAV2/5, similarly to what we have observed in the murine retina. The use of the photoreceptor-specific rhodopsin promoter restricts transgene expression to porcine rods and cones, and results in photoreceptor transduction levels similar to those obtained with the ubiquitous promoters tested. Finally, immunological, toxicological and biodistribution studies support the safety of AAV subretinal administration to the large porcine retina. The data presented here on AAV-mediated transduction of the cone-enriched porcine retina may affect the development of gene-based therapies for rare and common severe photoreceptor diseases. PMID:21412286

  5. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction and visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2009-11-30

    In this review, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that mechanosensory transduction occurs in tubes and sacs and can initiate visceral pain. Experimental evidence for this mechanism in urinary bladder, ureter, gut, lung, uterus, tooth-pulp and tongue is reviewed. Potential therapeutic strategies are considered for the treatment of visceral pain in such conditions as renal colic, interstitial cystitis and inflammatory bowel disease by agents that interfere with mechanosensory transduction in the organs considered, including P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonists that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and agents that inhibit or enhance ATP release and breakdown.

  6. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction and visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In this review, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that mechanosensory transduction occurs in tubes and sacs and can initiate visceral pain. Experimental evidence for this mechanism in urinary bladder, ureter, gut, lung, uterus, tooth-pulp and tongue is reviewed. Potential therapeutic strategies are considered for the treatment of visceral pain in such conditions as renal colic, interstitial cystitis and inflammatory bowel disease by agents that interfere with mechanosensory transduction in the organs considered, including P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonists that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and agents that inhibit or enhance ATP release and breakdown. PMID:19948030

  7. Characterization of retroviral infectivity and superinfection resistance during retrovirus-mediated transduction of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, J; Wei, Q; Fan, J; Zou, Y; Song, D; Liu, J; Liu, F; Ma, C; Hu, X; Li, L; Yu, Y; Qu, X; Chen, L; Yu, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zeng, Z; Zhang, R; Yan, S; Wu, T; Wu, X; Shu, Y; Lei, J; Li, Y; Zhang, W; Wang, J; Reid, R R; Lee, M J; Huang, W; Wolf, J M; He, T-C; Wang, J

    2017-04-07

    Retroviral vectors including lentiviral vectors are commonly-used tools to stably express transgenes or RNA molecules in mammalian cells. Their utilities are roughly divided into two categories, stable overexpression of transgenes and RNA molecules, which requires maximal transduction efficiency, or functional selection with retrovirus-based libraries, which takes advantage of retroviral superinfection resistance. However, the dynamic features of retrovirus-mediated transduction are not well-characterized. Here, we engineered two MSCV-based retroviral vectors expressing dual fluorescence proteins and antibiotic markers and analyzed virion production efficiency and virion stability, dynamic infectivity and superinfection resistance in different cell types, and strategies to improve transduction efficiency. We found that the highest virion production occurred between 60 and 72 h after transfection. The stability of the harvested virion supernatant decreased by >60% after three days in storage. We found that retrovirus infectivity varied drastically in the tested human cancer lines, while low transduction efficiency was partially overcome with increased virus titer, prolonged infection duration, and/or repeated infections. Furthermore, we demonstrated that retrovirus receptors PIT1 and PIT2 were lowly expressed in the analyzed cells, and that PIT1 and/or PIT2 overexpression significantly improved transduction efficiency in certain cell lines. Thus, our findings provide resourceful information for the optimal conditions of retroviral-mediated gene delivery.Gene Therapy accepted article preview online, 07 April 2017. doi:10.1038/gt.2017.24.

  8. Signal transduction abnormalities in suicide: focus on phosphoinositide signaling system.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2013-11-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern and each year about one million people die by suicide worldwide. Recent studies suggest that suicide may be associated with specific neurobiological abnormalities. Earlier studies of neurobiology of suicide focused on abnormalities of the serotonergic mechanism. These studies suggested that some serotonin receptor subtypes may be abnormal in the postmortem brain of suicide victims. Since these receptors are linked to signal transduction pathways, abnormalities of signaling mechanisms have been recently studied in the postmortem brain of suicide victims. Of particular interest is the 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor-linked phosphoinositide signaling system. Several studies have focused on the abnormalities on the component of this signaling system and these studies suggest the abnormalities of G proteins, the effectors phospholipase C and the second or the third messenger systems, such as protein kinase A. Further studies revealed abnormalities in the downstream transcription factors such as the cyclic AMP response element binding protein and some of the targeted genes of these transcription factors. The most important gene in this aspect which has been studied in the suicide is the brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Here we critically review the studies focusing on these components of the phosphoinositide signaling system in the postmortem brain of both adult and teenage suicide victims. These studies provide a better understanding of the signal transduction abnormalities in suicide focusing on the phosphoinositide signaling pathway. These studies may lead to new therapeutic agents targeting specific sites in this signaling cascade.

  9. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Barker, Richard; Su, Shih-Heng

    Like most other plant organs, roots use gravity as a directional guide for growth. Specialized cells within the columella region of the root cap (the statocytes) sense the direction of gravity through the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts). Amyloplast movement and/or pressure on sensitive membranes triggers a gravity signal transduction pathway within these cells, which leads to a fast transcytotic relocalization of plasma-membrane associated auxin-efflux carrier proteins of the PIN family (PIN3 and PIN7) toward the bottom membrane. This leads to a polar transport of auxin toward the bottom flank of the cap. The resulting lateral auxin gradient is then transmitted toward the elongation zones where it triggers a curvature that ultimately leads to a restoration of vertical downward growth. Our laboratory is using strategies derived from genetics and systems biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that modulate gravity sensing and signal transduction in the columella cells of the root cap. Our previous research uncovered two J-domain-containing proteins, ARG1 and ARL2, as contributing to this process. Mutations in the corresponding paralogous genes led to alterations of root and hypocotyl gravitropism accompanied by an inability for the statocytes to develop a cytoplasmic alkalinization, relocalize PIN3, and transport auxin laterally, in response to gravistimulation. Both proteins are associated peripherally to membranes belonging to various compartments of the vesicular trafficking pathway, potentially modulating the trafficking of defined proteins between plasma membrane and endosomes. MAR1 and MAR2, on the other end, are distinct proteins of the plastidic outer envelope protein import TOC complex (the transmembrane channel TOC75 and the receptor TOC132, respectively). Mutations in the corresponding genes enhance the gravitropic defects of arg1. Using transformation-rescue experiments with truncated versions of TOC132 (MAR2), we have shown

  10. Strain-specific variation in a soilborne phytopathogenic fungus for the expression of genes involved in pH signal transduction pathway, pathogenesis and saprophytic survival in response to environmental pH changes.

    PubMed

    Daval, Stéphanie; Lebreton, Lionel; Gracianne, Cécile; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Boutin, Morgane; Marchi, Muriel; Gazengel, Kévin; Sarniguet, Alain

    2013-12-01

    The soilborne fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) causes take-all, a wheat root disease. In an original strain-specific way, a previous study indicates that inside the Ggt species, some strains grow preferentially at acidic pH and other strains at neutral/alkaline pH. The most important mechanism for a fungal response to the environmental pH is the Pal pathway which integrates the products of the six pal genes and the transcription factor PacC. To evaluate whether the Ggt strain-specific growth in function of the ambient pH is mediated via the Pal pathway, a transcriptional study of the genes encoding this pathway was carried out. This study provided the first evidence that the pH signalling pathway similar to those described in other fungi operated in Ggt. The pacC gene was induced at neutral pH whatever the strain. In an original way, the expression of Ggt genes coding for the different Pal proteins depended on the strain and on the ambient pH. In the strain growing better at acidic pH, few pal genes were pH-regulated, and some were overexpressed at neutral pH when regulated. In the strain growing better at neutral pH, underexpression of most of the pal genes at neutral pH occurred. The strains displayed higher gene expression in the ambient pH that unfavoured their growth as if it was a compensation system. All pH taken together, a globally weaker Pal transcript level occurred in the strains that were less sensitive to acidic pH, and on the contrary, the strain growing better on neutral pH showed higher Pal mRNA levels. The expression of genes involved in pathogenesis and saprophytic growth was also regulated by the ambient pH and the strain: each gene displayed a specific pH-regulation that was similar between strains. But all pH taken together, the global transcript levels of four out of six genes were higher in the strain growing better on neutral pH. Altogether, for the first time, the results show that inside a species, conditions affecting

  11. Concurrent measures of fusion and transduction efficiency of primary CD34+ cells with human immunodeficiency virus 1-based lentiviral vectors reveal different effects of transduction enhancers.

    PubMed

    Ingrao, Dina; Majdoul, Saliha; Seye, Ababacar K; Galy, Anne; Fenard, David

    2014-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are used for various gene transfer applications, notably for hematopoietic gene therapy, but methods are lacking for precisely evaluating parameters that control the efficiency of transduction in relation to the entry of vectors into target cells. We adapted a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based human immunodeficiency virus-1 fusion assay to measure the entry of nonreplicative recombinant LVs in various cell types, including primary human hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs), and to quantify the level of transduction of the same initially infected cells. The assay utilizes recombinant LVs containing β-lactamase (BLAM)-Vpr chimeric proteins (BLAM-LVs) and encoding a truncated form of the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (ΔNGFR). After infection of target cells with BLAM-LVs, the vector entry rapidly leads to BLAM-Vpr release into the cytoplasm, which is measured by cleavage of a fluorescent substrate using flow cytometry. Parallel cultures of the same infected cells show transduction efficiency resulting from ΔNGFR expression. This LV-based fusion/transduction assay is a dynamic and versatile tool, revealing, for instance, the postentry restrictions of LVs known to occur in cells of hematopoietic origin, especially human HSPCs. Furthermore, this BLAM-LV assay allowed us to evaluate the effect of cytokine prestimulation of HSPCs on the entry step of LVs. The assay also shows that transduction enhancers such as Vectofusin-1 or Retronectin can partially relieve the postentry block, but their effects differ in how they promote LV entry. In conclusion, one such assay should be useful to study hematopoietic postentry restrictions directed against LVs and therefore should allow improvements in various LV-based gene therapy protocols.

  12. Gene expression studies demonstrate that the K-ras/Erk MAP kinase signal transduction pathway and other novel pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of cumene-induced lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Collins, Jennifer B; Parker, Joel S; Tessema, Mathewos; Clayton, Natasha P; Ton, Thai-Vu T; Hong, Hue-Hua L; Belinsky, Steven; Devereux, Theodora R; Sills, Robert C; Lahousse, Stephanie A

    2008-07-01

    National Toxicology Program (NTP) inhalation studies demonstrated that cumene significantly increased the incidence of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in B6C3F1 mice. Cumene or isopropylbenzene is a component of crude oil used primarily in the production of phenol and acetone. The authors performed global gene expression analysis to distinguish patterns of gene regulation between cumene-induced tumors and normal lung tissue and to look for patterns based on the presence or absence of K-ras and p53 mutations in the tumors. Principal component analysis segregated the carcinomas into groups with and without K-ras mutations, but failed to separate the tumors based on p53 mutation status. Expression of genes associated with the Erk MAP kinase signaling pathway was significantly altered in carcinomas with K-ras mutations compared to tumors without K-ras mutations or normal lung. Gene expression analysis also suggested that cumene-induced carcinomas with K-ras mutations have greater malignant potential than those without mutations. In addition, significance analysis of function and expression (SAFE) demonstrated expression changes of genes regulated by histone modification in carcinomas with K-ras mutations. The gene expression analysis suggested the formation of alveolar/bronchiolar carcinomas in cumene-exposed mice typically involves mutation of K-ras, which results in increased Erk MAP kinase signaling and modification of histones.

  13. Inhibitors targeting two-component signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Okada, Ario; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2008-01-01

    A two-component signal transduction system (TCS) is an attractive target for antibacterial agents. In this chapter, we review the TCS inhibitors developed during the past decade and introduce novel drug discovery systems to isolate the inhibitors of the YycG/YycF system, an essential TCS for bacterial growth, in an effort to develop a new class of antibacterial agents.

  14. The Physiology of Mechanoelectrical Transduction Channels in Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Fettiplace, Robert; Kim, Kyunghee X.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about the mechanotransducer (MT) channels mediating transduction in hair cells of the vertrbrate inner ear. With the use of isolated preparations, it is experimentally feasible to deliver precise mechanical stimuli to individual cells and record the ensuing transducer currents. This approach has shown that small (1–100 nm) deflections of the hair-cell stereociliary bundle are transmitted via interciliary tip links to open MT channels at the tops of the stereocilia. These channels are cation-permeable with a high selectivity for Ca2+; two channels are thought to be localized at the lower end of the tip link, each with a large single-channel conductance that increases from the low- to high-frequency end of the cochlea. Ca2+ influx through open channels regulates their resting open probability, which may contribute to setting the hair cell resting potential in vivo. Ca2+ also controls transducer fast adaptation and force generation by the hair bundle, the two coupled processes increasing in speed from cochlear apex to base. The molecular intricacy of the stereocilary bundle and the transduction apparatus is reflected by the large number of single-gene mutations that are linked to sensorineural deafness, especially those in Usher syndrome. Studies of such mutants have led to the discovery of many of the molecules of the transduction complex, including the tip link and its attachments to the stereociliary core. However, the MT channel protein is still not firmly identified, nor is it known whether the channel is activated by force delivered through accessory proteins or by deformation of the lipid bilayer. PMID:24987009

  15. An Efficient Large-Scale Retroviral Transduction Method Involving Preloading the Vector into a RetroNectin-Coated Bag with Low-Temperature Shaking

    PubMed Central

    Dodo, Katsuyuki; Chono, Hideto; Saito, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Tahara, Kenichi; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    In retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer, transduction efficiency can be hampered by inhibitory molecules derived from the culture fluid of virus producer cell lines. To remove these inhibitory molecules to enable better gene transduction, we had previously developed a transduction method using a fibronectin fragment-coated vessel (i.e., the RetroNectin-bound virus transduction method). In the present study, we developed a method that combined RetroNectin-bound virus transduction with low-temperature shaking and applied this method in manufacturing autologous retroviral-engineered T cells for adoptive transfer gene therapy in a large-scale closed system. Retroviral vector was preloaded into a RetroNectin-coated bag and incubated at 4°C for 16 h on a reciprocating shaker at 50 rounds per minute. After the supernatant was removed, activated T cells were added to the bag. The bag transduction method has the advantage of increasing transduction efficiency, as simply flipping over the bag during gene transduction facilitates more efficient utilization of the retroviral vector adsorbed on the top and bottom surfaces of the bag. Finally, we performed validation runs of endoribonuclease MazF-modified CD4+ T cell manufacturing for HIV-1 gene therapy and T cell receptor-modified T cell manufacturing for MAGE-A4 antigen-expressing cancer gene therapy and achieved over 200-fold (≥1010) and 100-fold (≥5×109) expansion, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the large-scale closed transduction system is highly efficient for retroviral vector-based T cell manufacturing for adoptive transfer gene therapy, and this technology is expected to be amenable to automation and improve current clinical gene therapy protocols. PMID:24454964

  16. Discrete signal transduction pathway utilization by a neuropeptide (PACAP) and a cytokine (TNF-alpha) first messenger in chromaffin cells, inferred from coupled transcriptome-promoter analysis of regulated gene cohorts.

    PubMed

    Samal, Babru; Ait-Ali, Djida; Bunn, Stephen; Mustafa, Tomris; Eiden, Lee E

    2013-07-01

    Cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells (BCCs) are employed to study first messenger-specific signaling by cytokines and neurotransmitters occurring in the adrenal medulla following immune-related stress responses. Here, we show that the cytokine TNF-alpha, and the neuropeptide transmitter PACAP, acting through the TNFR2 and PAC1 receptors, activate distinct signaling pathways, with correspondingly distinct transcriptomic signatures in chromaffin cells. We have carried out a comprehensive integrated transcriptome analysis of TNF-alpha and PACAP gene regulation in BCCs using two microarray platforms to maximize transcript identification. Microarray data were validated using qRT-PCR. More than 90% of the transcripts up-regulated either by TNF-alpha or PACAP were specific to a single first messenger. The final list of transcripts induced by each first messenger was subjected to multiple algorithms to identify promoter/enhancer response elements for trans-acting factors whose activation could account for gene expression by either TNF-alpha or PACAP. Distinct groups of transcription factors potentially controlling the expression of TNF-alpha or PACAP-responsive genes were found: most of the genes up-regulated by TNF-alpha contained transcription factor binding sites for members of the Rel transcription factor family, suggesting TNF-alpha-TNFR2 signaling occurs mainly through the NF-KB signaling pathway. Surprisingly, EGR1 was predicted to be the primary transcription factor controlling PACAP-modulated genes, suggesting PACAP signaling to the nucleus occurs predominantly through ERK, rather than CREB activation. Comparison of TNFR2-dependent versus TNFR1-dependent gene induction, and EGR1-mediated transcriptional activation, may provide a pharmacological avenue to the unique pathways activated by the first messengers TNF-alpha and PACAP in neuronal and endocrine cells.

  17. Co-ordination of osmotic stress responses through osmosensing and signal transduction events in fishes.

    PubMed

    Evans, T G

    2010-05-01

    This review centres upon the molecular regulation of osmotic stress responses in fishes, focusing on how osmosensing and signal transduction events co-ordinate changes in the activity and abundance of effector proteins during osmotic stress and how these events integrate into osmotic stress responses of varying magnitude. The concluding sections discuss the relevance of osmosensory signal transduction to the evolution of euryhalinity and present experimental approaches that may best stimulate future research. Iterating the importance of osmosensing and signal transduction during fish osmoregulation may be pertinent amidst the increased use of genomic technologies that typically focus solely on changes in the abundances of gene products, and may limit insight into critical upstream events that occur mainly through post-translational mechanisms.

  18. The Global Redox Responding RegB/RegA Signal Transduction System Regulates the Genes Involved in Ferrous Iron and Inorganic Sulfur Compound Oxidation of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Moinier, Danielle; Byrne, Deborah; Amouric, Agnès; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2017-01-01

    The chemical attack of ore by ferric iron and/or sulfuric acid releases valuable metals. The products of these reactions are recycled by iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms. These acidophilic chemolithotrophic prokaryotes, among which Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, grow at the expense of the energy released from the oxidation of ferrous iron and/or inorganic sulfur compounds (ISCs). In At. ferrooxidans, it has been shown that the expression of the genes encoding the proteins involved in these respiratory pathways is dependent on the electron donor and that the genes involved in iron oxidation are expressed before those responsible for ISCs oxidation when both iron and sulfur are present. Since the redox potential increases during iron oxidation but remains stable during sulfur oxidation, we have put forward the hypothesis that the global redox responding two components system RegB/RegA is involved in this regulation. To understand the mechanism of this system and its role in the regulation of the aerobic respiratory pathways in At. ferrooxidans, the binding of different forms of RegA (DNA binding domain, wild-type, unphosphorylated and phosphorylated-like forms of RegA) on the regulatory region of different genes/operons involved in ferrous iron and ISC oxidation has been analyzed. We have shown that the four RegA forms are able to bind specifically the upstream region of these genes. Interestingly, the phosphorylation of RegA did not change its affinity for its cognate DNA. The transcriptional start site of these genes/operons has been determined. In most cases, the RegA binding site(s) was (were) located upstream from the -35 (or -24) box suggesting that RegA does not interfere with the RNA polymerase binding. Based on the results presented in this report, the role of the RegB/RegA system in the regulation of the ferrous iron and ISC oxidation pathways in At. ferrooxidans is discussed.

  19. Intrapulmonary Versus Nasal Transduction of Murine Airways With GP64-pseudotyped Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Mayumi; Maury, Wendy; McCray, Paul B; Sinn, Patrick L

    2013-01-01

    Persistent viral vector-mediated transgene expression in the airways requires delivery to cells with progenitor capacity and avoidance of immune responses. Previously, we observed that GP64-pseudotyped feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-mediated gene transfer was more efficient in the nasal airways than the large airways of the murine lung. We hypothesized that in vivo gene transfer was limited by immunological and physiological barriers in the murine intrapulmonary airways. Here, we systematically investigate multiple potential barriers to lentiviral gene transfer in the airways of mice. We show that GP64-FIV vector transduced primary cultures of well-differentiated murine nasal epithelia with greater efficiency than primary cultures of murine tracheal epithelia. We further demonstrate that neutrophils, type I interferon (IFN) responses, as well as T and B lymphocytes are not the major factors limiting the transduction of murine conducting airways. In addition, we observed better transduction of GP64-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in the nasal epithelia compared with the intrapulmonary airways in mice. VSVG glycoprotein pseudotyped VSV transduced intrapulmonary epithelia with similar efficiency as nasal epithelia. Our results suggest that the differential transduction efficiency of nasal versus intrapulmonary airways by FIV vector is not a result of immunological barriers or surface area, but rather differential expression of cellular factors specific for FIV vector transduction. PMID:23360952

  20. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Polymer-enhanced adenoviral transduction of CAR-negative bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kasman, Laura M; Barua, Sutapa; Lu, Ping; Rege, Kaushal; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The application of adenoviral gene therapy for cancer is limited by immune clearance of the virus as well as poor transduction efficiency, since the protein used for viral entry (CAR) serves physiological functions in adhesion and is frequently decreased among cancer cells. Cationic polymers have been used to enhance adenoviral gene delivery, but novel polymers with low toxicity are needed to realize this approach. We recently identified polymers that were characterized by high transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA and a low toxicity profile. In this study we evaluated the novel cationic polymer EGDE-3,3' for its potential to increase adenoviral transduction of the CAR-negative bladder cancer cell line TCCSUP. The amount of adenovirus required to transduce 50-60% of the cells was reduced 100-fold when Ad.GFP was preincubated with the EGDE-3,3' polymer. Polyethyleneimine (pEI), a positively charged polymer currently used as a standard for enhancing adenoviral transduction, also increased infectivity, but transgene expression was consistently higher with EGDE-3,3'. In addition, EGDE-3,3'-supplemented transduction of an adenovirus expressing an apoptosis inducing transgene, Ad.GFP-TRAIL, significantly enhanced the amount of cell death. Thus, our results indicate that novel biocompatible polymers may be useful in improving the delivery of adenoviral gene therapy.

  2. Vectofusin-1, a New Viral Entry Enhancer, Strongly Promotes Lentiviral Transduction of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fenard, David; Ingrao, Dina; Seye, Ababacar; Buisset, Julien; Genries, Sandrine; Martin, Samia; Kichler, Antoine; Galy, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Gene transfer into hCD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) has several promising therapeutic applications. Yet, efficiency, safety, and cost of LV gene therapy could be ameliorated by enhancing target cell transduction levels and reducing the amount of LV used on the cells. Several transduction enhancers already exist such as fibronectin fragments and cationic compounds, but all present limitations. In this study, we describe a new transduction enhancer called Vectofusin-1, which is a short cationic peptide, active on several LV pseudotypes. Vectofusin-1 is used as a soluble additive to safely increase the frequency of transduced HSCs and to augment the level of transduction to one or two copies of vector per cell in a vector dose-dependent manner. Vectofusin-1 acts at the entry step by promoting the adhesion and the fusion between viral and cellular membranes. Vectofusin-1 is therefore a promising additive that could significantly ameliorate hCD34+ cell-based gene therapy. PMID:23653154

  3. The role of the CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) in adrenomedullin receptor signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Oliver, K R; Dickerson, I M

    2001-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are usually thought to act as monomer receptors that bind ligand and then interact with G proteins to initiate signal transduction. In this study we report an intracellular peripheral membrane protein named the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) required for signal transduction at the G protein-coupled receptor for adrenomedullin. Cell lines were made that expressed an antisense construct of the RCP cDNA, and in these cells diminished RCP expression correlated with loss of adrenomedullin signal transduction. In contrast, loss of RCP did not diminish receptor density or affinity, therefore RCP does not appear to act as a chaperone protein. Instead, RCP represents a novel class of protein required to couple the adrenomedullin receptor to the cellular signal transduction pathway. A candidate adrenomedullin receptor named the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) has been described, which forms high affinity adrenomedullin receptors when co-expressed with the accessory protein receptor-activity modifying protein 2 (RAMP2). RCP co-immunoprecipitated with CRLR and RAMP2, indicating that a functional adrenomedullin receptor is composed of at least three proteins: the ligand binding protein (CRLR), an accessory protein (RAMP2), and a coupling protein for signal transduction (RCP).

  4. Cardiac hypertrophy: signal transduction, transcriptional adaptation, and altered growth control.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M; Mascareno, E; Siddiqui, M A

    1999-06-30

    Cardiac hypertrophy results from the enlargement of cardiac muscle and fibroblast cells. This abnormal pattern of growth can be elicited by a number of hypertrophic agents, such as cytokines and hormones that participate in normal cell-cell signaling events during development. Under conditions yet to be defined, these same signaling molecules can cause hypertrophy of the heart. Intracellular signal transduction pathways appear to be the prime means by which the hypertrophic signal is transduced in cardiomyocytes. There is no evidence that the signal transduction pathways in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes differ from those of normal cardiomyocytes. Perhaps the signal itself is aberrant, mistimed, misplaced, or occurring at non-physiological concentrations. Alternatively, as a quiescent cell, the cardiomyocyte may not be able to respond completely to a growth signal by turning on its proliferative machinery. Three avenues of research are described: (1) the study of the upregulation of the cardiac MLC-2 gene, (2) STAT proteins and activation of angiotensin II, and (3) hypertrophy as a perturbation of cell cycle controls.

  5. Phosphoglycerolipids are master players in plant hormone signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Janda, Martin; Planchais, Severine; Djafi, Nabila; Martinec, Jan; Burketova, Lenka; Valentova, Olga; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Phosphoglycerolipids are essential structural constituents of membranes and some also have important cell signalling roles. In this review, we focus on phosphoglycerolipids that are mediators in hormone signal transduction in plants. We first describe the structures of the main signalling phosphoglycerolipids and the metabolic pathways that generate them, namely the phospholipase and lipid kinase pathways. In silico analysis of Arabidopsis transcriptome data provides evidence that the genes encoding the enzymes of these pathways are transcriptionally regulated in responses to hormones, suggesting some link with hormone signal transduction. The involvement of phosphoglycerolipid signalling in the early responses to abscisic acid, salicylic acid and auxins is then detailed. One of the most important signalling lipids in plants is phosphatidic acid. It can activate or inactivate protein kinases and/or protein phosphatases involved in hormone signalling. It can also activate NADPH oxidase leading to the production of reactive oxygen species. We will interrogate the mechanisms that allow the activation/deactivation of the lipid pathways, in particular the roles of G proteins and calcium. Mediating lipids thus appear as master players of cell signalling, modulating, if not controlling, major transducing steps of hormone signals.

  6. Direct interaction of human serum proteins with AAV virions to enhance AAV transduction: immediate impact on clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Sun, J; Crosby, A; Woodard, K; Hirsch, M L; Samulski, R J; Li, C

    2017-01-01

    Recent hemophilia B clinical trials using adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery have demonstrated much lower coagulation factor IX (FIX) production in patients compared with the high levels observed in animal models and AAV capsid-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response elicited at high doses of AAV vectors. These results emphasize the necessity to explore effective approaches for enhancement of AAV transduction. Initially, we found that incubation of all AAV vectors with human serum enhanced AAV transduction. Complementary analytical experiments demonstrated that human serum albumin (HSA) directly interacted with the AAV capsid and augmented AAV transduction. The enhanced transduction was observed with clinical grade HSA. Mechanistic studies suggest that HSA increases AAV binding to target cells, and that the interaction of HSA with AAV does not interfere with the AAV infection pathway. Importantly, HSA incubation during vector dialysis also increased transduction. Finally, HSA enhancement of AAV transduction in a model of hemophilia B displayed greater than a fivefold increase in vector-derived circulating FIX, which improved the bleeding phenotype correction. In conclusion, incubation of HSA with AAV vectors supports a universal augmentation of AAV transduction and, more importantly, this approach can be immediately transitioned to the clinic for the treatment of hemophilia and other diseases.

  7. Signal transduction in the wound response of tomato plants.

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, D

    1998-01-01

    The wound response of tomato plants has been extensively studied, and provides a useful model to understand signal transduction events leading from injury to marker gene expression. The principal markers that have been used in these studies are genes encoding proteinase inhibitor (pin) proteins. Activation of pin genes occurs in the wounded leaf and in distant unwounded leaves of the plant. This paper reviews current understanding of signalling pathways in the wounded leaf, and in the systemically responding unwounded leaves. First, the nature of known elicitors and their potential roles in planta are discussed, in particular, oligogalacturonides, jasmonates and the peptide signal, systemin. Inhibitors of wound-induced proteinase inhibitor (pin) expression are also reviewed, with particular reference to phenolics, sulphydryl reagents and fusicoccin. In each section, results obtained from the bioassay are considered within the wider context of data from mutants and from transgenic plants with altered levels of putative signalling components. Following this introduction, current models for pin gene regulation are described and discussed, together with a summary for the involvement of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation in wound signalling. Finally, a new model for wound-induced pin gene expression is presented, arising from recent data from the author's laboratory. PMID:9800210

  8. Inverse zonation of hepatocyte transduction with AAV vectors between mice and non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Peter; Wang, Lili; Gao, Guangping; Haskins, Mark E.; Tarantal, Alice F.; McCarter, Robert J.; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors based on adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) are highly efficient in liver transduction and can be easily administered by intravenous injection. In mice, AAV8 transduces predominantly hepatocytes near central veins and yields lower transduction levels in hepatocytes in periportal regions. This transduction bias has important implications for gene therapy that aims to correct metabolic liver enzymes because metabolic zonation along the porto-central axis requires the expression of therapeutic proteins within the zone where they are normally localized. In the present study we compared the expression pattern of AAV8 expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in liver between mice, dogs, and non-human primates. We confirmed the pericentral dominance in transgene expression in mice with AAV8 when the liver-specific thyroid hormone-binding globulin (TBG) promoter was used but also observed the same expression pattern with the ubiquitous chicken β-actin (CB) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoters, suggesting that transduction zonation is not caused by promoter specificity. Predominantly pericentral expression was also found in dogs injected with AAV8. In contrast, in cynomolgus and rhesus macaques the expression pattern from AAV vectors was reversed, i.e. transgene expression was most intense around portal areas and less intense or absent around central veins. Infant rhesus macaques as well as newborn mice injected with AAV8 however showed a random distribution of transgene expression with neither portal nor central transduction bias. Based on the data in monkeys, adult humans treated with AAV vectors are predicted to also express transgenes predominantly in periportal regions whereas infants are likely to show a uniform transduction pattern in liver. PMID:21778099

  9. In vivo transduction of primitive mobilized hematopoietic stem cells after intravenous injection of integrating adenovirus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Maximilian; Saydaminova, Kamola; Yumul, Roma; Krishnan, Rohini; Liu, Jing; Nagy, Eniko-Eva; Singh, Manvendra; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Cattaneo, Roberto; Uckert, Wolfgang; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Haworth, Kevin G.; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Ehrhardt, Anja; Papayannopoulou, Thalia

    2016-01-01

    Current protocols for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) gene therapy, involving the transplantation of ex vivo genetically modified HSPCs are complex and not without risk for the patient. We developed a new approach for in vivo HSPC transduction that does not require myeloablation and transplantation. It involves subcutaneous injections of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor/AMD3100 to mobilize HSPCs from the bone marrow (BM) into the peripheral blood stream and the IV injection of an integrating, helper-dependent adenovirus (HD-Ad5/35++) vector system. These vectors target CD46, a receptor that is uniformly expressed on HSPCs. We demonstrated in human CD46 transgenic mice and immunodeficient mice with engrafted human CD34+ cells that HSPCs transduced in the periphery home back to the BM where they stably express the transgene. In hCD46 transgenic mice, we showed that our in vivo HSPC transduction approach allows for the stable transduction of primitive HSPCs. Twenty weeks after in vivo transduction, green fluorescent protein (GFP) marking in BM HSPCs (Lin−Sca1+Kit− cells) in most of the mice was in the range of 5% to 10%. The percentage of GFP-expressing primitive HSPCs capable of forming multilineage progenitor colonies (colony-forming units [CFUs]) increased from 4% of all CFUs at week 4 to 16% at week 12, indicating transduction and expansion of long-term surviving HSPCs. Our approach was well tolerated, did not result in significant transduction of nonhematopoietic tissues, and was not associated with genotoxicty. The ability to stably genetically modify HSPCs without the need of myeloablative conditioning is relevant for a broader clinical application of gene therapy. PMID:27554082

  10. Epigenetic modulation of signal transduction pathways in HPV-associated HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Worsham, Maria J; Chen, Kang Mei; Ghanem, Tamer; Stephen, Josena K; Divine, George

    2013-09-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) positive and HPV negative head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) are biologically distinct with a prognostic advantage for HPV positive patients compared to HPV negative cases. DNA promoter methylation is central to human diseases such as cancer, including HNSCC, with reported genome-wide hypomethylaton and promoter hypermethylation in HPV positive HNSCC tumors. The goal of this study was to identify differentially methylated genes in HPV positive versus HPV negative primary HNSCC genomes with clues to signaling networks. Laboratory-based study. Primary care academic health care system. DNA from 4 HPV positive and 4 HPV negative freshly frozen primary HNSCC were subject to comprehensive genome-wide methylation profiling. Differentially methylated gene lists were examined using the Signal Transduction Pathways (canonical) filter in the Genomatix Pathway System (GePS). Twofold methylation differences were observed between HPV positive and HPV negative cases for 1168 genes. Pathway analysis applied to investigate the biological role of the 1168 differentially methylated genes revealed 8 signal transduction pathways forming a network of 66 genes, of which 62% are hypermethylated. Our study reveals a predominant hypermethylation profile for genes in signal transduction pathways of HPV positive HNSCC tumor genomes. Because signaling events in the cell play a critical role in the execution of key biological functions, insights into how complex cellular signaling cascades and networks may be programmed in HNSCC are likely to be critical in the development of new biological agents designed to hit multiple targets.

  11. [Protein transduction, from technology to physiology].

    PubMed

    Prochiantz, Alain

    2006-01-01

    In the early 90s, we found that the DNA-binding domain (homeodomain) of Antennapedia, a homeoprotein transcription factor, was internalized by live cells gaining access to their cytoplasm and nuclei. It was soon revealed that internalization is due to the third helix of the homeodomain, composed of sixteen amino acids. This short peptide baptized Penetratin is the first of a large series of transduction peptides widely used for the internalization of all sorts of cargoes in vitro and in vivo. Although transduction peptides are being developed with the latter practical goal, the most intriguing outcome of our initial observation is that full-length homeoproteins are transferred between cells and have non-cell autonomous transcriptional and translational activities. This new signaling mechanism requires that homeoproteins be internalized and secreted. Secretion is Golgi independent and requires a small sequence also present in the homeodomain but distinct from the Penetratin sequence. The consequences of this novel signaling mechanism are briefly discussed.

  12. Advances in Targeting Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    McCubrey, James A.; Steelman, Linda S.; Chappell, William H.; Sun, Lin; Davis, Nicole M.; Abrams, Stephen L.; Franklin, Richard A.; Cocco, Lucio; Evangelisti, Camilla; Chiarini, Francesca; Martelli, Alberto M.; Libra, Massimo; Candido, Saverio; Ligresti, Giovanni; Malaponte, Grazia; Mazzarino, Maria C.; Fagone, Paolo; Donia, Marco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Polesel, Jerry; Talamini, Renato; Bäsecke, Jörg; Mijatovic, Sanja; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Milella, Michele; Tafuri, Agostino; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Laidler, Piotr; D'Assoro, Antonio B.; Drobot, Lyudmyla; Umezawa, Kazuo; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre; Demidenko, Zoya N.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, significant advances have occurred in both our understanding of the complexity of signal transduction pathways as well as the isolation of specific inhibitors which target key components in those pathways. Furthermore critical information is being accrued regarding how genetic mutations can affect the sensitivity of various types of patients to targeted therapy. Finally, genetic mechanisms responsible for the development of resistance after targeted therapy are being discovered which may allow the creation of alternative therapies to overcome resistance. This review will discuss some of the highlights over the past few years on the roles of key signaling pathways in various diseases, the targeting of signal transduction pathways and the genetic mechanisms governing sensitivity and resistance to targeted therapies. PMID:23455493

  13. Polyethylenimine-cationized beta-catenin protein transduction activates the Wnt canonical signaling pathway more effectively than cationic lipid-based transduction.

    PubMed

    Kitazoe, Midori; Futami, Junichiro; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Yamada, Hidenori; Maeda, Yoshitake

    2010-04-01

    The Wnt canonical signaling pathway is essential for the early development of eukaryotic organisms and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis. Moreover, the Wnt canonical signaling pathway contributes to the self-renewal of mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here, we demonstrate artificial activation of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway by beta-catenin protein transduction. Constitutively active beta-catenin protein was introduced into human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells using a polyethylenimine (PEI) cationization method, or with the BioPORTER protein transduction reagent. We have previously shown that modification with PEI effectively causes proteins to be internalized by living mammalian cells. PEI-cationized, constitutively active beta-catenin protein was added to HEK-293 cells, and induction of several Wnt/beta-catenin target genes was detected by real-time PCR. However, using BioPORTER to introduce active beta-catenin did not activate the Wnt canonical signaling pathway. Introduction of eGFPNuc (enhanced green fluorescent protein variant containing a nuclear localization signal) into HEK-293 cells using the BioPORTER reagent caused significant cell death, as determined by propidium iodide staining. In contrast, the PEI-modified eGFPNuc did not impair survival of HEK-293 cells. These results indicate that the Wnt canonical signaling pathway could be successfully activated by transduction of PEI-cationized active beta-catenin, and the PEI-cationization method is an effective and safe technology for protein transduction into mammalian cells.

  14. Signal transduction in T lymphocytes in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.

    1997-01-01

    More than 120 experiments conducted in space in the last 15 years have shown that dramatic changes are occurring in several types of single cells during their exposure to microgravity. One focus of today's research on cells in space is on signal transduction, especially those steps involving the cytoskeleton and cell-cell interactions. Signal transduction is often altered in microgravity as well as in hypergravity. This leads to changes in cell proliferation, genetic expression and differentiation. Interesting examples are leukocytes, HeLa cells, epidermoid cells and osteoblastic cells. Signalling pathways were studied in T lymphocytes in microgravity by several investigators after the discovery that mitogenic activation in vitro is virtually nil at 0g. T cells are a good model to study signal transduction because three extracellular signals (mitogen, IL-1 and IL-2) are required for full activation, and two classical pathways (via proteins G and PKC) are activated within the cell. In addition, low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins (Ras and Rap) are interacting with the cytoskeleton. The data at 0g support the notion that the expression of IL-2 receptor is inhibited at 0g, while mitogen binding and the transmission of IL-1 by accessory cells occur normally. In addition, alterations of the cytoskeleton suggest that the interaction with Rap proteins is disturbed. Data obtained with phorbol esters indicate that the function of PKC is changed in microgravity. Similar conclusions are drawn from the results with epidermoid cells A431.

  15. Mechanotransduction and auditory transduction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Maurice J

    2007-08-01

    Insects are utterly reliant on sensory mechanotransduction, the process of converting physical stimuli into neuronal receptor potentials. The senses of proprioception, touch, and hearing are involved in almost every aspect of an adult insect's complex behavioral repertoire and are mediated by a diverse array of specialized sensilla and sensory neurons. The physiology and morphology of several of these have been described in detail; genetic approaches in Drosophila, combining behavioral screens and sensory electrophysiology with forward and reverse genetic techniques, have now revealed specific proteins involved in their differentiation and operation. These include three different TRP superfamily ion channels that are required for transduction in tactile bristles, chordotonal stretch receptors, and polymodal nociceptors. Transduction also depends on the normal differentiation and mechanical integrity of the modified cilia that form the neuronal sensory endings, the accessory structures that transmit stimuli to them and, in bristles, a specialized receptor lymph and transepithelial potential. Flies hear near-field sounds with a vibration-sensitive, antennal chordotonal organ. Biomechanical analyses of wild-type antennae reveal non-linear, active mechanical properties that increase their sensitivity to weak stimuli. The effects of mechanosensory and ciliary mutations on antennal mechanics show that the sensory cilia are the active motor elements and indicate distinct roles for TRPN and TRPV channels in auditory transduction and amplification.

  16. Signal transduction in T lymphocytes in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.

    1997-01-01

    More than 120 experiments conducted in space in the last 15 years have shown that dramatic changes are occurring in several types of single cells during their exposure to microgravity. One focus of today's research on cells in space is on signal transduction, especially those steps involving the cytoskeleton and cell-cell interactions. Signal transduction is often altered in microgravity as well as in hypergravity. This leads to changes in cell proliferation, genetic expression and differentiation. Interesting examples are leukocytes, HeLa cells, epidermoid cells and osteoblastic cells. Signalling pathways were studied in T lymphocytes in microgravity by several investigators after the discovery that mitogenic activation in vitro is virtually nil at 0g. T cells are a good model to study signal transduction because three extracellular signals (mitogen, IL-1 and IL-2) are required for full activation, and two classical pathways (via proteins G and PKC) are activated within the cell. In addition, low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins (Ras and Rap) are interacting with the cytoskeleton. The data at 0g support the notion that the expression of IL-2 receptor is inhibited at 0g, while mitogen binding and the transmission of IL-1 by accessory cells occur normally. In addition, alterations of the cytoskeleton suggest that the interaction with Rap proteins is disturbed. Data obtained with phorbol esters indicate that the function of PKC is changed in microgravity. Similar conclusions are drawn from the results with epidermoid cells A431.

  17. Genetic analysis of gravity signal transduction in roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Baldwin, Katherine

    To grow downward into the soil, roots use gravity as a guide. Specialized cells, named stato-cytes, enable this directional growth response by perceiving gravity. Located in the columella region of the cap, these cells sense a reorientation of the root within the gravity field through the sedimentation of, and/or tension/pressure exerted by, dense amyloplasts. This process trig-gers a gravity signal transduction pathway that leads to a fast alkalinization of the cytoplasm and a change in the distribution of the plasma membrane-associated auxin-efflux carrier PIN3. The latter protein is uniformly distributed within the plasma membrane on all sides of the cell in vertically oriented roots. However, it quickly accumulates at the bottom side upon gravis-timulation. This process correlates with a preferential transport of auxin to the bottom side of the root cap, resulting in a lateral gradient across the tip. This gradient is then transported to the elongation zone where it promotes differential cellular elongation, resulting in downward curvature. We isolated mutations that affect gravity signal transduction at a step that pre-cedes cytoplasmic alkalinization and/or PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport across the cap. arg1 and arl2 mutations identify a common genetic pathway that is needed for all three gravity-induced processes in the cap statocytes, indicating these genes function early in the pathway. On the other hand, adk1 affects gravity-induced PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport, but it does not interfere with cytoplasmic alkalinization. ARG1 and ARL2 encode J-domain proteins that are associated with membranes of the vesicular trafficking path-way whereas ADK1 encodes adenosine kinase, an enzyme that converts adenosine derived from nucleic acid metabolism and the AdoMet cycle into AMP, thereby alleviating feedback inhibi-tion of this important methyl-donor cycle. Because mutations in ARG1 (and ARL2) do not completely eliminate

  18. In vivo protein transduction to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Loftus, L T; Li, H-F; Gray, A J; Hirata-Fukae, C; Stoica, B A; Futami, J; Yamada, H; Aisen, P S; Matsuoka, Y

    2006-01-01

    Proteins and peptides are useful research and therapeutic tools, however applications are limited because delivery to the desired location is not easily achievable. There are two hurdles in protein/peptide delivery to the brain: the blood-brain barrier and intracellular penetration. Penetration to both brain and the intracellular space can be achieved by adjusting hydrophilicity, and small molecule pharmacological agents have been successfully developed using this approach. But with proteins and peptides, it is difficult to modify the hydrophilicity without influencing biological functions. Trans-acting factor protein from the human immunodeficiency virus contains a highly conserved cationic peptide sequence necessary for transduction across the cell membrane. While trans-acting factor peptide has been used for in vitro protein transduction, its in vivo application is very limited because it is rapidly degraded by proteolysis. Polyethylenimine is a chemically synthesized small molecule cationization agent; the charge density is greater than a peptide-based cationic cluster such as trans-acting factor, and it is resistant to proteolysis in vivo. We first tested intracellular protein transduction following direct brain injection in mice using polyethylenimine-conjugated green fluorescence protein and beta-galactosidase (molecular weights 29 and 540 kDa, respectively). Polyethylenimine-conjugates penetrated to the intracellular space immediately surrounding the injection site within one hour. We further tested polyethylenimine-mediated protein transduction following intranasal administration, which bypasses the blood-brain barrier. Polyethylenimine-conjugates in pH 7.5 solution did not reach the brain, probably because the polyethylenimine-conjugates penetrated into the intracellular space where first exposed to the tissue, i.e. at the nasal mucosae. We temporarily reduced the electrostatic interaction between cationized polyethylenimine-conjugates and cellular

  19. Specialized transduction of D-serine deaminase genes: formation of lysogens that yield high lambda-d dsd/lambda ratios and formation of a dimeric lambda-d dsd.

    PubMed

    Palchaudhuri, S; McFall, E; Carothers, A M

    1976-08-01

    We have obtained two classes of double lysogens that on induction yield higher titers of lambda-d dsd transducing phage than of helper phage. One class was obtained by lysogenization of strain EM6116 (dsddelta attlambdadelta HfrC) with lambda-dsd type 2 (dsdC+ dsdO+ dsdA+, head-tail substitution). In the absence of either a normal attlambda or the homology of a chromosomal dsd region, the transducing phage integrated at other sites, at least one of which, in strain EM6177, is near the origin of HfrC. On induction, strain EM6177 yields a phage burst of 20 to 50 with a lambdadsd:lambda ratio of 10(4):1. The asnychronously high yield of lambda dsd is attributed to an efficiency of excision greater than that of lambda. The other class was obtained by lysogenization of strain EM1407 (dsdA attlambda+) with lambda-dsd type 2 (dsdO6 dsdA, partial deletion of dsdC). The DNA of mature lambda-dsd type 2 is a complete dimer. It lacks nearly all the phage late genes and b2 and carries about five bacterial genes. It could not be packaged as a monomer but is just within the packaging size limit as a dimer. Models for the derivation of these lambda dsd phages and the high-yielding lysogens are presented.

  20. Specialized transduction of D-serine deaminase genes: formation of lysogens that yield high lambda-d dsd/lambda ratios and formation of a dimeric lambda-d dsd.

    PubMed Central

    Palchaudhuri, S; McFall, E; Carothers, A M

    1976-01-01

    We have obtained two classes of double lysogens that on induction yield higher titers of lambda-d dsd transducing phage than of helper phage. One class was obtained by lysogenization of strain EM6116 (dsddelta attlambdadelta HfrC) with lambda-dsd type 2 (dsdC+ dsdO+ dsdA+, head-tail substitution). In the absence of either a normal attlambda or the homology of a chromosomal dsd region, the transducing phage integrated at other sites, at least one of which, in strain EM6177, is near the origin of HfrC. On induction, strain EM6177 yields a phage burst of 20 to 50 with a lambdadsd:lambda ratio of 10(4):1. The asnychronously high yield of lambda dsd is attributed to an efficiency of excision greater than that of lambda. The other class was obtained by lysogenization of strain EM1407 (dsdA attlambda+) with lambda-dsd type 2 (dsdO6 dsdA, partial deletion of dsdC). The DNA of mature lambda-dsd type 2 is a complete dimer. It lacks nearly all the phage late genes and b2 and carries about five bacterial genes. It could not be packaged as a monomer but is just within the packaging size limit as a dimer. Models for the derivation of these lambda dsd phages and the high-yielding lysogens are presented. Images PMID:783126

  1. Mechanistic Insights in Ethylene Perception and Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Ju, Chuanli; Chang, Caren

    2015-09-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene profoundly affects plant growth, development, and stress responses. Ethylene perception occurs at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and signal transduction leads to a transcriptional cascade that initiates diverse responses, often in conjunction with other signals. Recent findings provide a more complete picture of the components and mechanisms in ethylene signaling, now rendering a more dynamic view of this conserved pathway. This includes newly identified protein-protein interactions at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, as well as the major discoveries that the central regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2) is the long-sought phosphorylation substrate for the CONSTITUTIVE RESPONSE1 protein kinase, and that cleavage of EIN2 transmits the signal to the nucleus. In the nucleus, hundreds of potential gene targets of the EIN3 master transcription factor have been identified and found to be induced in transcriptional waves, and transcriptional coregulation has been shown to be a mechanism of ethylene cross talk.

  2. Determinants of specificity in two-component signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Podgornaia, Anna I; Laub, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Maintaining the faithful flow of information through signal transduction pathways is critical to the survival and proliferation of organisms. This problem is particularly challenging as many signaling proteins are part of large, paralogous families that are highly similar at the sequence and structural levels, increasing the risk of unwanted cross-talk. To detect environmental signals and process information, bacteria rely heavily on two-component signaling systems comprised of sensor histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators. Although most species encode dozens of these signaling pathways, there is relatively little cross-talk, indicating that individual pathways are well insulated and highly specific. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that enforce this specificity. Further, we highlight recent studies that have revealed how these mechanisms evolve to accommodate the introduction of new pathways by gene duplication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Protein transduction: cell penetrating peptides and their therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A

    2006-01-01

    Cell penetrating proteins or peptides (CPPs) have the ability to cross the plasma membranes of mammalian cells in an apparently energy- and receptor-independent fashion. Although there is much debate over the mechanism by which this "protein transduction" occurs, the ability of CPPs to translocate rapidly into cells is being exploited to deliver a broad range of therapeutics including proteins, DNA, antibodies, oligonucleotides, imaging agents and liposomes in a variety of situations and biological systems. The current review looks at the delivery of many such molecules by various CPPs, and their potential therapeutic application in a wide range of areas. CPP ability to deliver different cargoes in a relatively efficient and non-invasive manner has implications as far reaching as drug delivery, gene transfer, DNA vaccination and beyond. Although many questions remain to be answered and limitations on the use of CPPs exist, it is clear that this emerging technology has much to offer in a clinical setting.

  4. Coating with spermine-pullulan polymer enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Li; Yao, Xinglei; Faiola, Francesco; Liu, Bojun; Zhang, Tianyuan; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Gao, Jian-Qing; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with multilineage potential, which makes them attractive tools for regenerative medicine applications. Efficient gene transfer into MSCs is essential not only for basic research in developmental biology but also for therapeutic applications involving gene-modification in regenerative medicine. Adenovirus vectors (Advs) can efficiently and transiently introduce an exogenous gene into many cell types via their primary receptors, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors, but not into MSCs, which are deficient in coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors expression. To overcome this problem, we developed an Adv coated with a spermine-pullulan (SP) cationic polymer and investigated its physicochemical properties and internalization mechanisms. We demonstrated that the SP coating could enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without detectable cytotoxicity or effects on differentiation. Our results argue in favor of the potentiality of the SP-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction of MSCs. PMID:28008251

  5. Aptamer modification improves the adenoviral transduction of malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zheng, Xiaojing; Di, BingYan; Wang, Dongyang; Zhang, Yaling; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2013-12-01

    Adenovirus has shown increasing promise in the gene-viral therapy for glioblastoma, a treatment strategy that relies on the delivery of viruses or transgenes into tumor cells. However, targeting of adenovirus to human glioblastoma remains a challenge due to the low expression level of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in glioma cells. Aptamers are small and highly structured single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind at high affinity to a target molecule, and are good candidates for targeted imaging and therapy. In this study, to construct an aptamer-modified Ad5, we first genetically modified the HVR5 of Ad hexon by biotin acceptor peptide (BAP), which would be metabolically biotinylated during production in HEK293 cells, and then attached the biotin labeled aptamer to the modified Ad through avidin–biotin binding. The aptamers used in this study includes AS1411 and GBI-10. The former is a DNA aptamer that can bind to nucleolin, a nuclear matrix protein found on the surface of cancer cells. The latter is a DNA aptamer that can recognize the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on the surface of human glioblastoma cells. To examine if aptamer-modification of the hexon protein could improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency, a glioblastoma cell line, U251, was transduced with aptamer-modified Ads. The transduction efficiency of AS1411- or GBI-10-modified Ad was approximately 4.1-fold or 5.2-fold higher than that of the control. The data indicated that aptamer modified adenovirus would be a useful tool for cancer gene therapy. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The MiST2 database: a comprehensive genomics resource on microbial signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Luke E.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2010-01-01

    The MiST2 database (http://mistdb.com) identifies and catalogs the repertoire of signal transduction proteins in microbial genomes. Signal transduction systems regulate the majority of cellular activities including the metabolism, development, host-recognition, biofilm production, virulence, and antibiotic resistance of human pathogens. Thus, knowledge of the proteins and interactions that comprise these communication networks is an essential component to furthering biomedical discovery. These are identified by searching protein sequences for specific domain profiles that implicate a protein in signal transduction. Compared to the previous version of the database, MiST2 contains a host of new features and improvements including the following: draft genomes; extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor protein identification; enhanced classification of signaling proteins; novel, high-quality domain models for identifying histidine kinases and response regulators; neighboring two-component genes; gene cart; better search capabilities; enhanced taxonomy browser; advanced genome browser; and a modern, biologist-friendly web interface. MiST2 currently contains 966 complete and 157 draft bacterial and archaeal genomes, which collectively contain more than 245 000 signal transduction proteins. The majority (66%) of these are one-component systems, followed by two-component proteins (26%), chemotaxis (6%), and finally ECF factors (2%). PMID:19900966

  7. The MiST2 database: a comprehensive genomics resource on microbial signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Luke E; Zhulin, Igor B

    2010-01-01

    The MiST2 database (http://mistdb.com) identifies and catalogs the repertoire of signal transduction proteins in microbial genomes. Signal transduction systems regulate the majority of cellular activities including the metabolism, development, host-recognition, biofilm production, virulence, and antibiotic resistance of human pathogens. Thus, knowledge of the proteins and interactions that comprise these communication networks is an essential component to furthering biomedical discovery. These are identified by searching protein sequences for specific domain profiles that implicate a protein in signal transduction. Compared to the previous version of the database, MiST2 contains a host of new features and improvements including the following: draft genomes; extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor protein identification; enhanced classification of signaling proteins; novel, high-quality domain models for identifying histidine kinases and response regulators; neighboring two-component genes; gene cart; better search capabilities; enhanced taxonomy browser; advanced genome browser; and a modern, biologist-friendly web interface. MiST2 currently contains 966 complete and 157 draft bacterial and archaeal genomes, which collectively contain more than 245 000 signal transduction proteins. The majority (66%) of these are one-component systems, followed by two-component proteins (26%), chemotaxis (6%), and finally ECF factors (2%).

  8. Defective Antiviral Responses of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Baculoviral Vector Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guan-Yu; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Su, Hung-Ju; Kuo, Chien-Yi; Luo, Wen-Yi; Lo, Kai-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Chieh; Chen, Chiu-Ling; Yu, Sheng-Han

    2012-01-01

    Genetic engineering of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is important for their clinical applications, and baculovirus (BV) holds promise as a gene delivery vector. To explore the feasibility of using BV for iPSCs transduction, in this study we first examined how iPSCs responded to BV. We determined that BV transduced iPSCs efficiently, without inducing appreciable negative effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, pluripotency, and differentiation. BV transduction slightly perturbed the transcription of 12 genes involved in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway, but at the protein level BV elicited no well-known cytokines (e.g., interleukin-6 [IL-6], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and beta interferon [IFN-β]) except for IP-10. Molecular analyses revealed that iPSCs expressed no TLR1, -6, -8, or -9 and expressed merely low levels of TLR2, -3, and -4. In spite of evident expression of such RNA/DNA sensors as RIG-I and AIM2, iPSCs barely expressed MDA5 and DAI (DNA-dependent activator of IFN regulatory factor [IRF]). Importantly, BV transduction of iPSCs stimulated none of the aforementioned sensors or their downstream signaling mediators (IRF3 and NF-κB). These data together confirmed that iPSCs responded poorly to BV due to the impaired sensing and signaling system, thereby justifying the transduction of iPSCs with the baculoviral vector. PMID:22623765

  9. Serotype-dependent transduction efficiencies of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors in monkey neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Gerits, Annelies; Vancraeyenest, Pascaline; Vreysen, Samme; Laramée, Marie-Eve; Michiels, Annelies; Gijsbers, Rik; Van den Haute, Chris; Moons, Lieve; Debyser, Zeger; Baekelandt, Veerle; Arckens, Lutgarde; Vanduffel, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Viral vector-mediated expression of genes (e.g., coding for opsins and designer receptors) has grown increasingly popular. Cell-type specific expression is achieved by altering viral vector tropism through crosspackaging or by cell-specific promoters driving gene expression. Detailed information about transduction properties of most recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) serotypes in macaque cortex is gradually becoming available. Here, we compare transduction efficiencies and expression patterns of reporter genes in two macaque neocortical areas employing different rAAV serotypes and promoters. A short version of the calmodulin-kinase-II (CaMKIIα0.4) promoter resulted in reporter gene expression in cortical neurons for all tested rAAVs, albeit with different efficiencies for spread: rAAV2/5>>rAAV2/7>rAAV2/8>rAAV2/9>>rAAV2/1 and proportion of transduced cells: rAAV2/1>rAAV2/5>rAAV2/7=rAAV2/9>rAAV2/8. In contrast to rodent studies, the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter appeared least efficient in macaque cortex. The human synapsin-1 promoter preceded by the CMV enhancer (enhSyn1) produced homogeneous reporter gene expression across all layers, while two variants of the CaMKIIα promoter resulted in different laminar transduction patterns and cell specificities. Finally, differences in expression patterns were observed when the same viral vector was injected in two neocortical areas. Our results corroborate previous findings that reporter-gene expression patterns and efficiency of rAAV transduction depend on serotype, promoter, cortical layer, and area. PMID:26839901

  10. Tracing retinal vessel trees by transductive inference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Structural study of retinal blood vessels provides an early indication of diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and hypertensive retinopathy. These studies require accurate tracing of retinal vessel tree structure from fundus images in an automated manner. However, the existing work encounters great difficulties when dealing with the crossover issue commonly-seen in vessel networks. Results In this paper, we consider a novel graph-based approach to address this tracing with crossover problem: After initial steps of segmentation and skeleton extraction, its graph representation can be established, where each segment in the skeleton map becomes a node, and a direct contact between two adjacent segments is translated to an undirected edge of the two corresponding nodes. The segments in the skeleton map touching the optical disk area are considered as root nodes. This determines the number of trees to-be-found in the vessel network, which is always equal to the number of root nodes. Based on this undirected graph representation, the tracing problem is further connected to the well-studied transductive inference in machine learning, where the goal becomes that of properly propagating the tree labels from those known root nodes to the rest of the graph, such that the graph is partitioned into disjoint sub-graphs, or equivalently, each of the trees is traced and separated from the rest of the vessel network. This connection enables us to address the tracing problem by exploiting established development in transductive inference. Empirical experiments on public available fundus image datasets demonstrate the applicability of our approach. Conclusions We provide a novel and systematic approach to trace retinal vessel trees with the present of crossovers by solving a transductive learning problem on induced undirected graphs. PMID:24438151

  11. Mechano-Transduction: From Molecules to Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Beth L.; Dunn, Alexander R.; Weis, William I.; Nelson, W. James

    2014-01-01

    External forces play complex roles in cell organization, fate, and homeostasis. Changes in these forces, or how cells respond to them, can result in abnormal embryonic development and diseases in adults. How cells sense and respond to these mechanical stimuli requires an understanding of the biophysical principles that underlie changes in protein conformation and result in alterations in the organization and function of cells and tissues. Here, we discuss mechano-transduction as it applies to protein conformation, cellular organization, and multi-cell (tissue) function. PMID:25405923

  12. Mechanisms of sensory transduction in the skin.

    PubMed

    Lumpkin, Ellen A; Caterina, Michael J

    2007-02-22

    Sensory neurons innervating the skin encode the familiar sensations of temperature, touch and pain. An explosion of progress has revealed unanticipated cellular and molecular complexity in these senses. It is now clear that perception of a single stimulus, such as heat, requires several transduction mechanisms. Conversely, a given protein may contribute to multiple senses, such as heat and touch. Recent studies have also led to the surprising insight that skin cells might transduce temperature and touch. To break the code underlying somatosensation, we must therefore understand how the skin's sensory functions are divided among signalling molecules and cell types.

  13. Signal transduction mechanisms in plants: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Thompson, G. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This article provides an overview on recent advances in some of the basic signalling mechanisms that participate in a wide variety of stimulus-response pathways. The mechanisms include calcium-based signalling, G-protein-mediated-signalling and signalling involving inositol phospholipids, with discussion on the role of protein kinases and phosphatases interspersed. As a further defining feature, the article highlights recent exciting findings on three extracellular components that have not been given coverage in previous reviews of signal transduction in plants, extracellular calmodulin, extracellular ATP, and integrin-like receptors, all of which affect plant growth and development.

  14. Auditory neuroscience: Development, transduction, and integration

    PubMed Central

    Hudspeth, A. J.; Konishi, Masakazu

    2000-01-01

    Hearing underlies our ability to locate sound sources in the environment, our appreciation of music, and our ability to communicate. Participants in the National Academy of Sciences colloquium on Auditory Neuroscience: Development, Transduction, and Integration presented research results bearing on four key issues in auditory research. How does the complex inner ear develop? How does the cochlea transduce sounds into electrical signals? How does the brain's ability to compute the location of a sound source develop? How does the forebrain analyze complex sounds, particularly species-specific communications? This article provides an introduction to the papers stemming from the meeting. PMID:11050196

  15. The Molecular Basis of Mechanosensory Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Kara L.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple senses including hearing, touch, and osmotic regulation, require the ability to convert force into an electrical signal: a process called mechanotransduction. Mechanotransduction occurs through specialized proteins that open an ion channel pore in response to a mechanical stimulus. Many of these proteins remain unidentified in vertebrates, but known mechanotransduction channels in lower organisms provide clues into their identity and mechanism. Bacteria, fruit flies, and nematodes have all been used to elucidate the molecules necessary for force transduction. This chapter discusses many different mechanical senses and takes an evolutionary approach to review the proteins responsible for mechanotransduction in various biological kingdoms. PMID:22399400

  16. Signal transduction mechanisms in plants: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Thompson, G. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This article provides an overview on recent advances in some of the basic signalling mechanisms that participate in a wide variety of stimulus-response pathways. The mechanisms include calcium-based signalling, G-protein-mediated-signalling and signalling involving inositol phospholipids, with discussion on the role of protein kinases and phosphatases interspersed. As a further defining feature, the article highlights recent exciting findings on three extracellular components that have not been given coverage in previous reviews of signal transduction in plants, extracellular calmodulin, extracellular ATP, and integrin-like receptors, all of which affect plant growth and development.

  17. Cochlear transduction: an integrative model and review

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, William E.

    2009-01-01

    A model for cochlear transduction is presented that is based on considerations of the cell biology of its receptor cells, particularly the mechanisms of transmitter release at recepto-neural synapses. Two new interrelated hypotheses on the functional organization of the organ of Corti result from these considerations, one dealing with the possibility of electrotonic interaction between inner and outer hair cells and the other with a possible contributing source to acoustic emissions of cochlear origin that results from vesicular membrane turnover. PMID:6282796

  18. Intranuclear protein transduction through a nucleoside salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Tse, Chung-Ming; Chan, Grace; Heinze, Emil R; Nishimura, Robert N; Weisbart, Richard H

    2007-07-20

    Regulation of gene expression by intranuclear transduction of macromolecules such as transcription factors is an alternative to gene therapy for the treatment of numerous diseases. The identification of an effective intranuclear delivery vehicle and pathway for the transport of therapeutic macromolecules across plasma and nuclear membranes, however, has posed a significant challenge. The anti-DNA antibody fragment 3E10 Fv has received attention as a novel molecular delivery vehicle due to its penetration into living cells with specific nuclear localization, absence of toxicity, and successful delivery of therapeutic cargo proteins in vitro and in vivo. Elucidation of the pathway that allows 3E10 Fv to cross cell membranes is critical to the development of new molecular therapies. Here we show that 3E10 Fv penetrates cells through a nucleoside salvage transporter. 3E10 Fv is unable to penetrate into cells deficient in the equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT2, and reconstitution of ENT2 into ENT2-deficient cells restores 3E10 Fv transport into cell nuclei. Our results represent the first demonstration of protein transport through a nucleoside salvage pathway. We expect that our finding will facilitate a variety of methods of gene regulation in the treatment of human diseases, open up new avenues of research in nucleoside salvage pathways, and enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases.

  19. Optimization of adenovirus vectors for transduction in embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Katsuhisa

    2011-01-01

      Because embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can differentiate into various types of cells in vitro, they are considered as a valuable model to understand the processes involved in the differentiation into functional cells as well as an unlimited source of cells for therapeutic applications. Efficient gene transduction method is one of the powerful tools for the basic researches and for differentiating ES and iPS cells into lineage-committed cells. Recently, we have developed an adenovirus (Ad) vector for efficient transduction into ES and iPS cells. We showed that Ad vectors containing the cytomegalovirus enhancer/β-actin promoter with β-actin intron (CA) promoter or the elongation factor (EF)-1α promoter were the appropriate for the transduction into ES and iPS cells. We also found that enforced expression of a PPARγ gene or a Runx2 gene into mouse ES and iPS cells by an optimized Ad vector markedly augmented the differentiation of adipocytes or osteoblasts, respectively. Thus, a gene transfer technique using an Ad vector could be an advantage for the regulation of stem cell differentiation and could be applied to regenerative medicine based on ES and iPS cells.

  20. Progestins alter photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in eyes of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanbin; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Environmental progestins are implicated in endocrine disruption in vertebrates. Additional targets that may be affected in organisms are poorly known. Here we report that progesterone (P4) and drospirenone (DRS) interfere with the photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in the eyes of zebrafish. Breeding pairs of adult zebrafish were exposed to P4 and DRS for 21 days with different measured concentrations of 7–742 ng/L and 99-13´650 ng/L, respectively. Of totally 10 key photo-transduction cascade genes analyzed, transcriptional levels of most were significantly up-regulated, or normal down-regulation was attenuated. Similarly, for some circadian rhythm genes, dose-dependent transcriptional alterations were also observed in the totally 33 genes analyzed. Significant alterations occurred even at environmental relevant levels of 7 ng/L P4. Different patterns were observed for these transcriptional alterations, of which, the nfil3 family displayed most significant changes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of sampling time for the determination and interpretation of gene expression data, and put forward recommendations for sampling strategies to avoid false interpretations. Our results suggest that photo-transduction signals and circadian rhythm are potential targets for progestins. Further studies are required to assess alterations on the protein level, on physiology and behavior, as well as on implications in mammals.

  1. Manipulation of light signal transduction as a means of modifying fruit nutritional quality in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongsheng; Roof, Sherry; Ye, Zhibiao; Barry, Cornelius; van Tuinen, Ageeth; Vrebalov, Julia; Bowler, Chris; Giovannoni, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Fruit constitutes a major component of human diets, providing fiber, vitamins, and phytonutrients. Carotenoids are a major class of compounds found in many fruits, providing nutritional benefits as precursors to essential vitamins and as antioxidants. Although recent gene isolation efforts and metabolic engineering have primarily targeted genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis, factors that regulate flux through the carotenoid pathway remain largely unknown. Characterization of the tomato high-pigment mutations (hp1 and hp2) suggests the manipulation of light signal transduction machinery may be an effective approach toward practical manipulation of plant carotenoids. We demonstrate here that hp1 alleles represent mutations in a tomato UV-DAMAGED DNA-BINDING PROTEIN 1 (DDB1) homolog. We further demonstrate that two tomato light signal transduction genes, LeHY5 and LeCOP1LIKE, are positive and negative regulators of fruit pigmentation, respectively. Down-regulated LeHY5 plants exhibit defects in light responses, including inhibited seedling photomorphogenesis, loss of thylakoid organization, and reduced carotenoid accumulation. In contrast, repression of LeCOP1LIKE expression results in plants with exaggerated photomorphogenesis, dark green leaves, and elevated fruit carotenoid levels. These results suggest genes encoding components of light signal transduction machinery also influence fruit pigmentation and represent genetic tools for manipulation of fruit quality and nutritional value. PMID:15178762

  2. Priming of Hepatocytes Enhances In Vivo Liver Transduction with Lentiviral Vectors in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, Virginie; Boni, Sébastien; Baron, William; Nguyen, Tuan Huy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lentiviral vectors are promising tools for liver disease gene therapy, because they can achieve protracted expression of transgenes in hepatocytes. However, the question as to whether cell division is required for optimal hepatocyte transduction has still not been completely answered. Liver gene-transfer efficiency after in vivo administration of recombinant lentiviral vectors carrying a green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of a liver-specific promoter in mice that were either hepatectomized or treated with cholic acid or phenobarbital was compared. Phenobarbital is known as a weak inducer of hepatocyte proliferation, whereas cholic acid has no direct effect on the cell cycle. This study shows that cholic acid is able to prime hepatocytes without mitosis induction. Both phenobarbital and cholic acid significantly increased hepatocyte transduction six- to ninefold, although cholic acid did not modify the mitotic index or cell-cycle entry. However, the effect of either compound was weaker than that observed after partial hepatectomy. In no cases was there a correlation between the expression of cell-cycle marker and transduction efficiency. We conclude that priming of hepatocytes should be considered a clinically applicable strategy to enhance in vivo liver gene therapy with lentiviral vectors. PMID:22428976

  3. Manipulation of light signal transduction as a means of modifying fruit nutritional quality in tomato.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongsheng; Roof, Sherry; Ye, Zhibiao; Barry, Cornelius; van Tuinen, Ageeth; Vrebalov, Julia; Bowler, Chris; Giovannoni, Jim

    2004-06-29

    Fruit constitutes a major component of human diets, providing fiber, vitamins, and phytonutrients. Carotenoids are a major class of compounds found in many fruits, providing nutritional benefits as precursors to essential vitamins and as antioxidants. Although recent gene isolation efforts and metabolic engineering have primarily targeted genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis, factors that regulate flux through the carotenoid pathway remain largely unknown. Characterization of the tomato high-pigment mutations (hp1 and hp2) suggests the manipulation of light signal transduction machinery may be an effective approach toward practical manipulation of plant carotenoids. We demonstrate here that hp1 alleles represent mutations in a tomato UV-DAMAGED DNA-BINDING PROTEIN 1 (DDB1) homolog. We further demonstrate that two tomato light signal transduction genes, LeHY5 and LeCOP1LIKE, are positive and negative regulators of fruit pigmentation, respectively. Down-regulated LeHY5 plants exhibit defects in light responses, including inhibited seedling photomorphogenesis, loss of thylakoid organization, and reduced carotenoid accumulation. In contrast, repression of LeCOP1LIKE expression results in plants with exaggerated photomorphogenesis, dark green leaves, and elevated fruit carotenoid levels. These results suggest genes encoding components of light signal transduction machinery also influence fruit pigmentation and represent genetic tools for manipulation of fruit quality and nutritional value.

  4. Priming of hepatocytes enhances in vivo liver transduction with lentiviral vectors in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Virginie; Boni, Sébastien; Baron, William; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Ferry, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors are promising tools for liver disease gene therapy, because they can achieve protracted expression of transgenes in hepatocytes. However, the question as to whether cell division is required for optimal hepatocyte transduction has still not been completely answered. Liver gene-transfer efficiency after in vivo administration of recombinant lentiviral vectors carrying a green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of a liver-specific promoter in mice that were either hepatectomized or treated with cholic acid or phenobarbital was compared. Phenobarbital is known as a weak inducer of hepatocyte proliferation, whereas cholic acid has no direct effect on the cell cycle. This study shows that cholic acid is able to prime hepatocytes without mitosis induction. Both phenobarbital and cholic acid significantly increased hepatocyte transduction six- to ninefold, although cholic acid did not modify the mitotic index or cell-cycle entry. However, the effect of either compound was weaker than that observed after partial hepatectomy. In no cases was there a correlation between the expression of cell-cycle marker and transduction efficiency. We conclude that priming of hepatocytes should be considered a clinically applicable strategy to enhance in vivo liver gene therapy with lentiviral vectors.

  5. Molecular basis of thermosensing: a two-component signal transduction thermometer in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, P S; Hernandez-Arriaga, A M; Cybulski, L E; Erazo, A C; de Mendoza, D

    2001-04-02

    Both prokaryotes and eukaryotes respond to a decrease in temperature with the expression of a specific subset of proteins. Although a large body of information concerning cold shock-induced genes has been gathered, studies on temperature regulation have not clearly identified the key regulatory factor(s) responsible for thermosensing and signal transduction at low temperatures. Here we identified a two-component signal transduction system composed of a sensor kinase, DesK, and a response regulator, DesR, responsible for cold induction of the des gene coding for the Delta5-lipid desaturase from Bacillus subtilis. We found that DesR binds to a DNA sequence extending from position -28 to -77 relative to the start site of the temperature-regulated des gene. We show further that unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), the products of the Delta5-desaturase, act as negative signalling molecules of des transcription. Thus, a regulatory loop composed of the DesK-DesR two-component signal transduction system and UFAs provides a novel mechanism for the control of gene expression at low temperatures.

  6. MicroRNA and Signal Transduction Pathways in Tumor Radiation Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Luqing; Lu, Xiongbin; Cao, Ya

    2013-01-01

    Tumor radiation response is an essential issue in radiotherapy and a core determining factor of tumor radioresistance or radiosensitivity. Multiple factors can influence tumor radiation response, and among them tumor genetic and epigenetic background, tumor microenvironment and tumor blood flow status may take a leading role. During the whole process of tumor radiation response, tumor radiosensitivity can be regulated in an orderly manner through some classical signal transduction pathways. Although these pathways have already owned multiple biological functions and involved in the process of carcinogenesis, their regulatory roles in tumor radiation response can not be ignored. MicroRNA (miRNA) is a class of non-coding RNA of about 22 nucleotides in length, which binds to the 3’-untranslated region (3’-UTR) of target gene and controls the expression of it at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNA participates in numerous physiology and pathology processes and acts as oncogene or tumor suppressor to affect cancer progression. Through interplaying with the key components in radiation related signal transduction pathways, miRNA could effectively activate the expression of DNA damage response genes and cell cycle related genes in nucleus, and play a critical role in the modulation of radiation response and radiosensitivity in tumor cells. In this review, we mainly elucidate the regulatory mechanisms and functions of miRNA in these radiation related signal transduction pathways from three different aspects which include the upstream receptors, midstream transducer pathways, and downstream effector genes. PMID:23602933

  7. Progestins alter photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in eyes of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanbin; Fent, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Environmental progestins are implicated in endocrine disruption in vertebrates. Additional targets that may be affected in organisms are poorly known. Here we report that progesterone (P4) and drospirenone (DRS) interfere with the photo-transduction cascade and circadian rhythm network in the eyes of zebrafish. Breeding pairs of adult zebrafish were exposed to P4 and DRS for 21 days with different measured concentrations of 7–742 ng/L and 99-13´650 ng/L, respectively. Of totally 10 key photo-transduction cascade genes analyzed, transcriptional levels of most were significantly up-regulated, or normal down-regulation was attenuated. Similarly, for some circadian rhythm genes, dose-dependent transcriptional alterations were also observed in the totally 33 genes analyzed. Significant alterations occurred even at environmental relevant levels of 7 ng/L P4. Different patterns were observed for these transcriptional alterations, of which, the nfil3 family displayed most significant changes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of sampling time for the determination and interpretation of gene expression data, and put forward recommendations for sampling strategies to avoid false interpretations. Our results suggest that photo-transduction signals and circadian rhythm are potential targets for progestins. Further studies are required to assess alterations on the protein level, on physiology and behavior, as well as on implications in mammals. PMID:26899944

  8. Specificity in stress response: epidermal keratinocytes exhibit specialized UV-responsive signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Makoto; Gazel, Alix; Pintucci, Giuseppe; Shuck, Alyssa; Shifteh, Shiva; Ginsburg, Dov; Rao, Laxmi S; Kaneko, Takehiko; Freedberg, Irwin M; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2003-10-01

    UV light, a paradigmatic initiator of cell stress, invokes responses that include signal transduction, activation of transcription factors, and changes in gene expression. Consequently, in epidermal keratinocytes, its principal and frequent natural target, UV regulates transcription of a distinctive set of genes. Hypothesizing that UV activates distinctive epidermal signal transduction pathways, we compared the UV-responsive activation of the JNK and NFkappaB pathways in keratinocytes, with the activation of the same pathways by other agents and in other cell types. Using of inhibitors and antisense oligonucleotides, we found that in keratinocytes only UVB/UVC activate JNK, while in other cell types UVA, heat shock, and oxidative stress do as well. Keratinocytes express JNK-1 and JNK-3, which is unexpected because JNK-3 expression is considered brain-specific. In keratinocytes, ERK1, ERK2, and p38 are activated by growth factors, but not by UV. UVB/UVC in keratinocytes activates Elk1 and AP1 exclusively through the JNK pathway. JNKK1 is essential for UVB/UVC activation of JNK in keratinocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. In contrast, in HeLa cells, used as a control, crosstalk among signal transduction pathways allows considerable laxity. In parallel, UVB/UVC and TNFalpha activate the NFkappaB pathway via distinct mechanisms, as shown using antisense oligonucleotides targeted against IKKbeta, the active subunit of IKK. This implies a specific UVB/UVC responsive signal transduction pathway independent from other pathways. Our results suggest that in epidermal keratinocytes specific signal transduction pathways respond to UV light. Based on these findings, we propose that the UV light is not a genetic stress response inducer in these cells, but a specific agent to which epidermis developed highly specialized responses.

  9. Defining specificity determinants of cGMP mediated gustatory sensory transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heidi K; Luo, Linjiao; O'Halloran, Damien; Guo, Dagang; Huang, Xin-Yun; Samuel, Aravinthan D T; Hobert, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a key secondary messenger used in signal transduction in various types of sensory neurons. The importance of cGMP in the ASE gustatory receptor neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was deduced by the observation that multiple receptor-type guanylyl cyclases (rGCs), encoded by the gcy genes, and two presently known cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel subunits, encoded by the tax-2 and tax-4 genes, are essential for ASE-mediated gustatory behavior. We describe here specific mechanistic features of cGMP-mediated signal transduction in the ASE neurons. First, we assess the specificity of the sensory functions of individual rGC proteins. We have previously shown that multiple rGC proteins are expressed in a left/right asymmetric manner in the functionally lateralized ASE neurons and are required to sense distinct salt cues. Through domain swap experiments among three different rGC proteins, we show here that the specificity of individual rGC proteins lies in their extracellular domains and not in their intracellular, signal-transducing domains. Furthermore, we find that rGC proteins are also sufficient to confer salt sensory responses to other neurons. Both findings support the hypothesis that rGC proteins are salt receptor proteins. Second, we identify a novel, likely downstream effector of the rGC proteins in gustatory signal transduction, a previously uncharacterized cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channel, encoded by the che-6 locus. che-6 mutants show defects in gustatory sensory transduction that are similar to defects observed in animals lacking the tax-2 and tax-4 CNG channels. In contrast, thermosensory signal transduction, which also requires tax-2 and tax-4, does not require che-6, but requires another CNG, cng-3. We propose that CHE-6 may form together with two other CNG subunits, TAX-2 and TAX-4, a gustatory neuron-specific heteromeric CNG channel complex.

  10. Signal transduction during cold stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Solanke, Amolkumar U; Sharma, Arun K

    2008-04-01

    Cold stress signal transduction is a complex process. Many physiological changes like tissue break down and senescence occur due to cold stress. Low temperature is initially perceived by plasma membrane either due to change in membrane fluidity or with the help of sensors like Ca(2+) permeable channels, histidine kinases, receptor kinases and phospholipases. Subsequently, cytoskeleton reorganization and cytosolic Ca(2+) influx takes place. Increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) is sensed by CDPKs, phosphatase and MAPKs, which transduce the signals to switch on transcriptional cascades. Photosynthetic apparatus have also been thought to be responsible for low temperature perception and signal transduction. Many cold induced pathways are activated to protect plants from deleterious effects of cold stress, but till date, most studied pathway is ICE-CBF-COR signaling pathway. However, the importance of CBF independent pathways in cold acclimation is supported by few Arabidopsis mutants' studies. Cold stress signaling has certain pathways common with other abiotic and biotic stress signaling which suggest cross-talks among these. Most of the economically important crops are sensitive to low temperature, but very few studies are available on cold susceptible crop plants. Therefore, it is necessary to understand signal transducing components from model plants and utilize that knowledge to improve survival of cold sensitive crop plants at low temperature.

  11. Transductive face sketch-photo synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nannan; Tao, Dacheng; Gao, Xinbo; Li, Xuelong; Li, Jie

    2013-09-01

    Face sketch-photo synthesis plays a critical role in many applications, such as law enforcement and digital entertainment. Recently, many face sketch-photo synthesis methods have been proposed under the framework of inductive learning, and these have obtained promising performance. However, these inductive learning-based face sketch-photo synthesis methods may result in high losses for test samples, because inductive learning minimizes the empirical loss for training samples. This paper presents a novel transductive face sketch-photo synthesis method that incorporates the given test samples into the learning process and optimizes the performance on these test samples. In particular, it defines a probabilistic model to optimize both the reconstruction fidelity of the input photo (sketch) and the synthesis fidelity of the target output sketch (photo), and efficiently optimizes this probabilistic model by alternating optimization. The proposed transductive method significantly reduces the expected high loss and improves the synthesis performance for test samples. Experimental results on the Chinese University of Hong Kong face sketch data set demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method by comparing it with representative inductive learning-based face sketch-photo synthesis methods.

  12. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  13. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  14. Whole Body Skeletal Muscle Transduction in Neonatal Dogs with AAV-9

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy of muscular dystrophy requires systemic gene delivery to all muscles in the body. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been shown to lead to body-wide muscle transduction after a single intravascular injection. Proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Before initiating clinical trials, it is important to validate these promising results in large animal models. More than a dozen canine muscular dystrophy models have been developed. Here, we outline a protocol for performing systemic AAV gene transfer in neonatal dogs. Implementing this technique in dystrophic dogs will accelerate translational muscular dystrophy research. PMID:21194038

  15. Brassinosteroid signal transduction: from receptor kinase activation to transcriptional networks regulating plant development.

    PubMed

    Clouse, Steven D

    2011-04-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) signal transduction research has progressed rapidly from the initial discovery of the BR receptor to a complete definition of the basic molecular components required to relay the BR signal from perception by receptor kinases at the cell surface to activation of a small family of transcription factors that regulate the expression of more than a thousand genes in a BR-dependent manner. These mechanistic advances have helped answer the intriguing question of how a single molecule, such as a hormone, can have dramatic pleiotropic effects on a broad range of diverse developmental pathways and have shed light on how BRs interact with other plant hormones and environmental cues to shape the growth of the whole plant. This review summarizes the current state of BR signal transduction research and then examines recent articles uncovering gene regulatory networks through which BR influences both vegetative and reproductive development.

  16. Brassinosteroid Signal Transduction: From Receptor Kinase Activation to Transcriptional Networks Regulating Plant Development REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Clouse, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) signal transduction research has progressed rapidly from the initial discovery of the BR receptor to a complete definition of the basic molecular components required to relay the BR signal from perception by receptor kinases at the cell surface to activation of a small family of transcription factors that regulate the expression of more than a thousand genes in a BR-dependent manner. These mechanistic advances have helped answer the intriguing question of how a single molecule, such as a hormone, can have dramatic pleiotropic effects on a broad range of diverse developmental pathways and have shed light on how BRs interact with other plant hormones and environmental cues to shape the growth of the whole plant. This review summarizes the current state of BR signal transduction research and then examines recent articles uncovering gene regulatory networks through which BR influences both vegetative and reproductive development. PMID:21505068

  17. MGT-SM: A Method for Constructing Cellular Signal Transduction Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zheng, Ruiqing; Li, Yaohang; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Wang, Jianxin

    2017-05-19

    A cellular signal transduction network is an important means to describe biological responses to environmental stimuli and exchange of biological signals. Constructing the cellular signal transduction network provides an important basis for the study of the biological activities, the mechanism of the diseases, drug targets and so on. The statistical approaches to network inference are popular in literature. Granger test has been used as an effective method for causality inference. Compared with bivariate granger tests, multivariate granger tests reduce the indirect causality and were used widely for the construction of cellular signal transduction networks. A multivariate Granger test requires that the number of time points in the time-series data is more than the number of nodes involved in the network. However, there are many real datasets with a few time points which are much less than the number of nodes in the network. In this study, we propose a new multivariate Granger test-based framework to construct cellular signal transduction network, called MGT-SM. Our MGT-SM uses SVD to compute the coefficient matrix from gene expression data and adopts Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the significance of directed edges in the constructed networks. We apply the proposed MGT-SM to Yeast Synthetic Network and MDA-MB-468, and evaluate its performance in terms of the recall and the AUC. The results show that MGT-SM achieves better results, compared with other popular methods (CGC2SPR, PGC and DBN).

  18. Interplay between sugar and hormone signaling pathways modulate floral signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Matsoukas, Ianis G

    2014-01-01

    NOMENCLATURE The following nomenclature will be used in this article: Names of genes are written in italicized upper-case letters, e.g., ABI4.Names of proteins are written in non-italicized upper-case letters, e.g., ABI4.Names of mutants are written in italicized lower-case letters, e.g., abi4. The juvenile-to-adult and vegetative-to-reproductive phase transitions are major determinants of plant reproductive success and adaptation to the local environment. Understanding the intricate molecular genetic and physiological machinery by which environment regulates juvenility and floral signal transduction has significant scientific and economic implications. Sugars are recognized as important regulatory molecules that regulate cellular activity at multiple levels, from transcription and translation to protein stability and activity. Molecular genetic and physiological approaches have demonstrated different aspects of carbohydrate involvement and its interactions with other signal transduction pathways in regulation of the juvenile-to-adult and vegetative-to-reproductive phase transitions. Sugars regulate juvenility and floral signal transduction through their function as energy sources, osmotic regulators and signaling molecules. Interestingly, sugar signaling has been shown to involve extensive connections with phytohormone signaling. This includes interactions with phytohormones that are also important for the orchestration of developmental phase transitions, including gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, and brassinosteroids. This article highlights the potential roles of sugar-hormone interactions in regulation of floral signal transduction, with particular emphasis on Arabidopsis thaliana mutant phenotypes, and suggests possible directions for future research.

  19. Analysis of cellular signal transduction from an information theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    Uda, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Shinya

    2016-03-01

    Signal transduction processes the information of various cellular functions, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and death. The information for controlling cell fate is transmitted by concentrations of cellular signaling molecules. However, how much information is transmitted in signaling pathways has thus far not been investigated. Shannon's information theory paves the way to quantitatively analyze information transmission in signaling pathways. The theory has recently been applied to signal transduction, and mutual information of signal transduction has been determined to be a measure of information transmission. We review this work and provide an overview of how signal transduction transmits informational input and exerts biological output. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of Glycolytic Intermediates in Global Regulation and Signal Transduction. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, J.C.

    2000-05-08

    The goal of this project is to determine the role of glycolytic intermediates in regulation of cell physiology. It is known that many glycolytic intermediates are involved in regulation of enzyme activities at the kinetic level. However, little is known regarding the role of these metabolites in global regulation and signal transduction. This project aims to investigate the role of glycolytic intermediates in the regulation of gene expression.

  1. Adenoviral transduction of enterocytes and M-cells using in vitro models based on Caco-2 cells: the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) mediates both apical and basolateral transduction.

    PubMed

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Fleisher, David; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2010-06-07

    Understanding virus-cell interaction is a key to the design of successful gene delivery vectors. In the present study we investigated Ad5 transduction of enterocytes and M-cells utilizing differentiated Caco-2 cells and cocultures of Caco-2 cells with lymphocytes. Transduction inhibition studies showed that CAR is the major receptor mediating apical and basolateral virus entry in differentiated Caco-2 cells. Integrins and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans do not appear to play a significant role. Immunofluorescence localized CAR to sites of cell-cell contact, with staining mostly observed on the cell perimeter. Staining was observed even in nonpermeabilized monolayers, suggesting apical accessibility of the receptor. Cocultures with mouse Peyer's patch lymphocytes or Raji B human lymphocytes were more susceptible to transduction than Caco-2 cells, and the effects were dose-dependent. Similar to Caco-2 cells, CAR and not integrins mediated apical transduction. In conclusion, contrary to other epithelial cell lines, both apical and basolateral transduction of absorptive enterocytes and M-cells is mediated by binding to CAR. The coculture system can be used to study the interactions between M-cells and gene delivery vectors.

  2. The Evolution of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems

    PubMed Central

    Capra, Emily J.; Laub, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    To exist in a wide range of environmental niches, bacteria must sense and respond to a myriad of external signals. A primary means by which this occurs is through two-component signal transduction pathways, typically comprised of a histidine kinase that receives the input stimuli and a response regulator that effects an appropriate change in cellular physiology. Histidine kinases and response regulators have an intrinsic modularity that separates signal input, phosphotransfer, and output response; this modularity has allowed bacteria to dramatically expand and diversify their signaling capabilities. Recent work has begun to reveal the molecular basis by which two-component proteins evolve. How and why do orthologous signaling proteins diverge? How do cells gain new pathways and recognize new signals? What changes are needed to insulate a new pathway from existing pathways? What constraints are there on gene duplication and lateral gene transfer? Here, we review progress made in answering these questions, highlighting how the integration of genome sequence data with experimental studies is providing major new insights. PMID:22746333

  3. Evolution of two-component signal transduction systems.

    PubMed

    Capra, Emily J; Laub, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    To exist in a wide range of environmental niches, bacteria must sense and respond to a variety of external signals. A primary means by which this occurs is through two-component signal transduction pathways, typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase that receives the input stimuli and then phosphorylates a response regulator that effects an appropriate change in cellular physiology. Histidine kinases and response regulators have an intrinsic modularity that separates signal input, phosphotransfer, and output response; this modularity has allowed bacteria to dramatically expand and diversify their signaling capabilities. Recent work has begun to reveal the molecular basis by which two-component proteins evolve. How and why do orthologous signaling proteins diverge? How do cells gain new pathways and recognize new signals? What changes are needed to insulate a new pathway from existing pathways? What constraints are there on gene duplication and lateral gene transfer? Here, we review progress made in answering these questions, highlighting how the integration of genome sequence data with experimental studies is providing major new insights.

  4. Mutations of TMC1 cause deafness by disrupting mechanoelectrical transduction

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kurima, Kiyoto; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Griffith, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mutations of transmembrane channel-like 1 gene (TMC1) can cause dominant (DFNA36) or recessive (DFNB7/B11) deafness. In this article, we describe the characteristics of DFNA36 and DFNB7/B11 deafness, the features of the Tmc1 mutant mouse strains, and recent advances in our understanding of TMC1 function. Methods Publications related to TMC1, DFNA36 or DFNB7/B11 were identified through PubMed. Results All affected DFNA36 subjects showed post-lingual, progressive, sensorineural hearing loss (HL), initially affecting high frequencies. In contrast, almost all affected DFNB7/B11 subjects demonstrated congenital or prelingual severe to profound sensorineural HL. The mouse Tmc1 gene also has dominant and recessive mutant alleles that cause HL in mutant strains, including Beethoven, deafness and Tmc1 knockout mice. These mutant mice have been instrumental for revealing that Tmc1 and its closely related paralog Tmc2 are expressed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells, and are required for hair cell mechanoelectrical transduction (MET). Recent studies suggest that TMC1 and TMC2 may be components of the long-sought hair cell MET channel. Conclusion TMC1 mutations disrupt hair cell MET. PMID:24933710

  5. Protein transduction domain delivery of therapeutic macromolecules.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Arjen; Dowdy, Steven F

    2011-12-01

    Owing to their unprecedented selectivity, specific activity and potential for 1000+ fold amplification of signal, macromolecules, such as peptides, catalytic protein domains, complete proteins, and oligonucleotides, offer great potential as therapeutic molecules. However, therapeutic use of macromolecules is limited by their poor penetration in tissues and their inability to cross the cellular membrane. The discovery of small cationic peptides that cross the membrane, called Protein Transduction Domains (PTDs) or Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs), in the late 1980s opened the door to cellular delivery of large, bioactive molecules. Now, PTDs are widely used as research tools, and impressively, multiple clinical trials are testing PTD-mediated delivery of macromolecular drug conjugates in patients with a variety of diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Green Light to Illuminate Signal Transduction Events

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    When cells are exposed to hormones that act on cell surface receptors, information is processed through the plasma membrane into the cell interior via second messengers generated in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Individual biochemical steps along this cascade, starting with ligand binding to receptors to activation of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and their downstream effectors such as adenylate cyclase or phospholipase C, have been biochemically characterized. However, the complexity of temporal and spatial integration of these molecular events requires that they be studied in intact cells. The great expansion of fluorescent techniques and improved imaging technologies such as confocal- and TIRF microscopy combined with genetically engineered protein modules has provided a completely new approach to signal transduction research. Spatial definition of biochemical events followed with real-time temporal resolution has become a standard goal and we are breaking the resolution barrier of light microscopes with several new techniques. PMID:19818623

  7. Transduction of mechanical strain in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    One physiologic consequence of extended periods of weightlessness is the rapid loss of bone mass associated with skeletal unloading. Conversely, mechanical loading has been shown to increase bone formation and stimulate osteoblastic function. The mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction, or how the osteoblast senses and converts biophysical stimuli into cellular responses has yet to be determined. For non-innervated mechanosensitive cells like the osteoblast, mechanotransduction can be divided into four distinct phases: 1) mechanocoupling, or the characteristics of the mechanical force applied to the osteoblast, 2) biochemical coupling, or the mechanism through which mechanical strain is transduced into a cellular biochemical signal, 3) transmission of signal from sensor to effector cell and 4) the effector cell response. This review examines the characteristics of the mechanical strain encountered by osteoblasts, possible biochemical coupling mechanisms, and how the osteoblast responds to mechanical strain. Differences in osteoblastic responses to mechanical strain are discussed in relation to the types of strain encountered and the possible transduction pathways involved.

  8. Transduction of mechanical strain in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    One physiologic consequence of extended periods of weightlessness is the rapid loss of bone mass associated with skeletal unloading. Conversely, mechanical loading has been shown to increase bone formation and stimulate osteoblastic function. The mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction, or how the osteoblast senses and converts biophysical stimuli into cellular responses has yet to be determined. For non-innervated mechanosensitive cells like the osteoblast, mechanotransduction can be divided into four distinct phases: 1) mechanocoupling, or the characteristics of the mechanical force applied to the osteoblast, 2) biochemical coupling, or the mechanism through which mechanical strain is transduced into a cellular biochemical signal, 3) transmission of signal from sensor to effector cell and 4) the effector cell response. This review examines the characteristics of the mechanical strain encountered by osteoblasts, possible biochemical coupling mechanisms, and how the osteoblast responds to mechanical strain. Differences in osteoblastic responses to mechanical strain are discussed in relation to the types of strain encountered and the possible transduction pathways involved.

  9. Role for moesin in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Iontcheva, Iveta; Amar, Salomon; Zawawi, Khalid H; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2004-04-01

    Moesin is a 78-kDa protein with diverse functions in linking the cytoskeleton to the membrane while controlling cell shape, adhesion, locomotion, and signaling. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression and localization of moesin in mononuclear phagocytes by using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, immunoprecipitation, and Western blotting and to analyze the function of moesin as a lipopolysaccharide receptor, utilizing an antisense oligonucleotide approach to knock down the moesin gene. Results revealed that moesin is expressed on the surface of monocytes/macrophages and surface expression is increased after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. The total protein mass of moesin is increased in monocytes after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Immunoprecipitation showed that moesin coprecipitates with TLR4, a well-known lipopolysaccharide receptor, suggesting an early role of moesin in the formation of the initiation complex for lipopolysaccharide signaling. Two antisense and two control sense oligonucleotides were synthesized and introduced every 4 h for 48 h in adherent macrophage-like cells. Cells were then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide for 4 h, and the supernatants were assayed for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production. Cell lysates were assayed for moesin expression by Western blotting immediately after the 48-h treatment period and also after 116 h of recovery to assess the return of moesin expression and function. Moesin gene expression was completely suppressed after 48 h of incubation with antisense oligonucleotides. The antisense elimination of moesin gene expression led to a significant reduction of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha secretion. Restoration of moesin gene expression led to restoration of TNF-alpha production. These data suggest an important role for moesin in lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production, highlighting its importance in lipopolysaccharide-mediated signal transduction.

  10. Studying Cellular Signal Transduction with OMIC Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Benjamin D.; Clarke, David C.; Lee, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    In the gulf between genotype and phenotype exists proteins and, in particular, protein signal transduction systems. These systems use a relatively limited parts list to respond to a much longer list of extracellular, environmental, and/or mechanical cues with rapidity and specificity. Most signaling networks function in a highly nonlinear and often contextual manner. Furthermore, these processes occur dynamically across space and time. Because of these complexities, systems and “OMIC” approaches are essential for the study of signal transduction. One challenge in using OMIC-scale approaches to study signaling is that the “signal” can take different forms in different situations. Signals are encoded in diverse ways such as protein-protein interactions, enzyme activities, localizations, or post-translational modifications to proteins. Furthermore, in some cases signals may be encoded only in the dynamics, duration, or rates of change of these features. Accordingly, systems-level analyses of signaling may need to integrate multiple experimental and/or computational approaches. As the field has progressed, the non-triviality of integrating experimental and computational analyses has become apparent. Successful use of OMIC methods to study signaling will require the “right” experiments and the “right” modeling approaches, and it is critical to consider both in the design phase of the project. In this review, we discuss common OMIC and modeling approaches for studying signaling, emphasizing the philosophical and practical considerations for effectively merging these two types of approaches to maximize the probability of obtaining reliable and novel insights into signaling biology. PMID:26244521

  11. Striatal Signal Transduction and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Philibin, Scott D.; Hernandez, Adan; Self, David W.; Bibb, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug addiction. PMID

  12. Calcium and signal transduction in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Reddy, A. S.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental and hormonal signals control diverse physiological processes in plants. The mechanisms by which plant cells perceive and transduce these signals are poorly understood. Understanding biochemical and molecular events involved in signal transduction pathways has become one of the most active areas of plant research. Research during the last 15 years has established that Ca2+ acts as a messenger in transducing external signals. The evidence in support of Ca2+ as a messenger is unequivocal and fulfills all the requirements of a messenger. The role of Ca2+ becomes even more important because it is the only messenger known so far in plants. Since our last review on the Ca2+ messenger system in 1987, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating various aspects of Ca(2+) -signaling pathways in plants. These include demonstration of signal-induced changes in cytosolic Ca2+, calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins, identification of different Ca2+ channels, characterization of Ca(2+) -dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) both at the biochemical and molecular levels, evidence for the presence of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, and increased evidence in support of the role of inositol phospholipids in the Ca(2+) -signaling system. Despite the progress in Ca2+ research in plants, it is still in its infancy and much more needs to be done to understand the precise mechanisms by which Ca2+ regulates a wide variety of physiological processes. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of these recent developments in Ca2+ research as it relates to signal transduction in plants.

  13. Studying Cellular Signal Transduction with OMIC Technologies.

    PubMed

    Landry, Benjamin D; Clarke, David C; Lee, Michael J

    2015-10-23

    In the gulf between genotype and phenotype exists proteins and, in particular, protein signal transduction systems. These systems use a relatively limited parts list to respond to a much longer list of extracellular, environmental, and/or mechanical cues with rapidity and specificity. Most signaling networks function in a highly non-linear and often contextual manner. Furthermore, these processes occur dynamically across space and time. Because of these complexities, systems and "OMIC" approaches are essential for the study of signal transduction. One challenge in using OMIC-scale approaches to study signaling is that the "signal" can take different forms in different situations. Signals are encoded in diverse ways such as protein-protein interactions, enzyme activities, localizations, or post-translational modifications to proteins. Furthermore, in some cases, signals may be encoded only in the dynamics, duration, or rates of change of these features. Accordingly, systems-level analyses of signaling may need to integrate multiple experimental and/or computational approaches. As the field has progressed, the non-triviality of integrating experimental and computational analyses has become apparent. Successful use of OMIC methods to study signaling will require the "right" experiments and the "right" modeling approaches, and it is critical to consider both in the design phase of the project. In this review, we discuss common OMIC and modeling approaches for studying signaling, emphasizing the philosophical and practical considerations for effectively merging these two types of approaches to maximize the probability of obtaining reliable and novel insights into signaling biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Calcium and signal transduction in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Reddy, A. S.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental and hormonal signals control diverse physiological processes in plants. The mechanisms by which plant cells perceive and transduce these signals are poorly understood. Understanding biochemical and molecular events involved in signal transduction pathways has become one of the most active areas of plant research. Research during the last 15 years has established that Ca2+ acts as a messenger in transducing external signals. The evidence in support of Ca2+ as a messenger is unequivocal and fulfills all the requirements of a messenger. The role of Ca2+ becomes even more important because it is the only messenger known so far in plants. Since our last review on the Ca2+ messenger system in 1987, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating various aspects of Ca(2+) -signaling pathways in plants. These include demonstration of signal-induced changes in cytosolic Ca2+, calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins, identification of different Ca2+ channels, characterization of Ca(2+) -dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) both at the biochemical and molecular levels, evidence for the presence of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, and increased evidence in support of the role of inositol phospholipids in the Ca(2+) -signaling system. Despite the progress in Ca2+ research in plants, it is still in its infancy and much more needs to be done to understand the precise mechanisms by which Ca2+ regulates a wide variety of physiological processes. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of these recent developments in Ca2+ research as it relates to signal transduction in plants.

  15. Expansion of Signal Transduction Pathways in Fungi by Extensive Genome Duplication.

    PubMed

    Corrochano, Luis M; Kuo, Alan; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Polaino, Silvia; Salamov, Asaf; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M; Grimwood, Jane; Álvarez, M Isabel; Avalos, Javier; Bauer, Diane; Benito, Ernesto P; Benoit, Isabelle; Burger, Gertraud; Camino, Lola P; Cánovas, David; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Domínguez, Angel; Eliáš, Marek; Eslava, Arturo P; Glaser, Fabian; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Heitman, Joseph; Henrissat, Bernard; Iturriaga, Enrique A; Lang, B Franz; Lavín, José L; Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Wenjun; Lindquist, Erika; López-García, Sergio; Luque, Eva M; Marcos, Ana T; Martin, Joel; McCluskey, Kevin; Medina, Humberto R; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Muñoz-Torres, Elisa; Oguiza, José A; Ohm, Robin A; Olmedo, María; Orejas, Margarita; Ortiz-Castellanos, Lucila; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa; Sanz, Catalina; Schackwitz, Wendy; Shahriari, Mahdi; Shelest, Ekaterina; Silva-Franco, Fátima; Soanes, Darren; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tagua, Víctor G; Talbot, Nicholas J; Thon, Michael R; Tice, Hope; de Vries, Ronald P; Wiebenga, Ad; Yadav, Jagjit S; Braun, Edward L; Baker, Scott E; Garre, Victoriano; Schmutz, Jeremy; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Idnurm, Alexander; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Gabaldón, Toni; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2016-06-20

    Plants and fungi use light and other signals to regulate development, growth, and metabolism. The fruiting bodies of the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus are single cells that react to environmental cues, including light, but the mechanisms are largely unknown [1]. The related fungus Mucor circinelloides is an opportunistic human pathogen that changes its mode of growth upon receipt of signals from the environment to facilitate pathogenesis [2]. Understanding how these organisms respond to environmental cues should provide insights into the mechanisms of sensory perception and signal transduction by a single eukaryotic cell, and their role in pathogenesis. We sequenced the genomes of P. blakesleeanus and M. circinelloides and show that they have been shaped by an extensive genome duplication or, most likely, a whole-genome duplication (WGD), which is rarely observed in fungi [3-6]. We show that the genome duplication has expanded gene families, including those involved in signal transduction, and that duplicated genes have specialized, as evidenced by differences in their regulation by light. The transcriptional response to light varies with the developmental stage and is still observed in a photoreceptor mutant of P. blakesleeanus. A phototropic mutant of P. blakesleeanus with a heterozygous mutation in the photoreceptor gene madA demonstrates that photosensor dosage is important for the magnitude of signal transduction. We conclude that the genome duplication provided the means to improve signal transduction for enhanced perception of environmental signals. Our results will help to understand the role of genome dynamics in the evolution of sensory perception in eukaryotes.

  16. Expansion of signal transduction pathways in fungi by extensive genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Corrochano, Luis M.; Kuo, Alan; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Polaino, Silvia; Salamov, Asaf; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M.; Grimwood, Jane; Álvarez, M. Isabel; Avalos, Javier; Bauer, Diane; Benito, Ernesto P.; Benoit, Isabelle; Burger, Gertraud; Camino, Lola P.; Cánovas, David; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Domínguez, Angel; Eliáš, Marek; Eslava, Arturo P.; Glaser, Fabian; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Heitman, Joseph; Henrissat, Bernard; Iturriaga, Enrique A.; Lang, B. Franz; Lavín, José L.; Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Wenjun; Lindquist, Erika; López-García, Sergio; Luque, Eva M.; Marcos, Ana T.; Martin, Joel; McCluskey, Kevin; Medina, Humberto R.; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Muñoz-Torres, Elisa; Oguiza, José A.; Ohm, Robin A.; Orejas, Margarita; Ortiz-Castellanos, Lucila; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa; Sanz, Catalina; Schackwitz, Wendy; Shahriari, Mahdi; Shelest, Ekaterina; Silva-Franco, Fátima; Soanes, Darren; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tagua, Víctor G.; Talbot, Nicholas J.; Thon, Michael R.; Tice, Hope; de Vries, Ronald P.; Wiebenga, Ad; Yadav, Jagjit S.; Braun, Edward L.; Baker, Scott E.; Garre, Victoriano; Schmutz, Jeremy; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Idnurm, Alexander; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Gabaldón, Toni; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Plants and fungi use light and other signals to regulate development, growth, and metabolism. The fruiting bodies of the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus are single cells that react to environmental cues, including light, but the mechanisms are largely unknown [1]. The related fungus Mucor circinelloides is an opportunistic human pathogen that changes its mode of growth upon receipt of signals from the environment to facilitate pathogenesis [2]. Understanding how these organisms respond to environmental cues should provide insights into the mechanisms of sensory perception and signal transduction by a single eukaryotic cell, and their role in pathogenesis. We sequenced the genomes of P. blakesleeanus and M. circinelloides, and show that they have been shaped by an extensive genome duplication or, most likely, a whole genome duplication (WGD), which is rarely observed in fungi [3-6]. We show that the genome duplication has expanded gene families, including those involved in signal transduction, and that duplicated genes have specialized, as evidenced by differences in their regulation by light. The transcriptional response to light varies with the developmental stage and is still observed in a photoreceptor mutant of P. blakesleeanus. A phototropic mutant of P. blakesleeanus with a heterozygous mutation in the photoreceptor gene madA demonstrates that photosensor dosage is important for the magnitude of signal transduction. We conclude that the genome duplication provided the means to improve signal transduction for enhanced perception of environmental signals. Our results will help to understand the role of genome dynamics in the evolution of sensory perception in eukaryotes. PMID:27238284

  17. Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: TITLE: Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic ...Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0820 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Furthermore, while treatment with selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRI) is routine for autistic patients, therapeutic benefit is variable and

  18. Plasmid transfer via transduction from Streptococcus thermophilus to Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Andreas; Neve, Horst; Geis, Arnold; Heller, Knut J

    2008-04-01

    Using Streptococcus thermophilus phages, plasmid transduction in Lactococcus lactis was demonstrated. The transduction frequencies were 4 orders of magnitude lower in L. lactis than in S. thermophilus. These results are the first evidence that there is phage-mediated direct transfer of DNA from S. thermophilus to L. lactis. The implications of these results for phage evolution are discussed.

  19. Report of an Army Workshop on Convergence Forecasting: Mechanochemical Transduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Breakout Session 1, Group 1.........................................................................10  Figure 3. Potential Ultrasound -Mediated...Capabilities in Mechanochemical Transduction ..........10  Figure 4. Factors that Limit Potential Ultrasound -Mediated Mechanochemical Transduction... ultrasound as a mechanism to induce mechanochemical reactions. If ultrasound is to be used to provide the mechanical energy for subsequent chemical

  20. [Screening and identification of key signal transduction pathways in pulmonary silicotic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Xue, Rong; Zhu, Lan; Li, Qian; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Xianhua; Gao, Hongsheng

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the differential gene expression profile of the lung tissues in experimental silicosis rats and to screen for and identify the key signal transduction pathways in pulmonary silicotic fibrosis. A total of 80 rats were randomly divided into control group (n = 40) and silica-instilled group (n = 40). Each group was equally divided into five subgroups, and each subgroup was treated at 1, 7, 14, 21, or 28 d. Intratracheal instillation was used to give 1 ml of silica suspension (50 mg/ml) in the silica-instilled group and normal saline in the control group. Silicotic nodules and type I and III collagen were observed through hematoxylin and eosin staining and Sirius red staining, respectively. Differentially expressed genes in pulmonary silicotic fibrosis were selected by the rat whole-genome gene expression RatRef-12 BeadChip (Illumina, USA), and a fold change cutoff was applied. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was also used to verify differentially expressed genes. Through bioinformatics databases such as Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), preliminary research was performed on the biological pathways of differential genes, key biological signal transduction pathways were identified, and key differentially expressed genes in each pathway at different time points were searched for. A total of 2694 genes were differentially expressed and changed dynamically. The KEGG pathway analysis showed that 141 signal transduction pathways were involved in the development and progression of pulmonary silicotic fibrosis, among which 48 pathways were more significant than others (P < 0.01), with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway exceptionally significant. The differentially expressed genes interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R), tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) in the MAPK pathway were up-regulated at different time points

  1. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Harrison, B.; Stanga, J.; Young, L.-S.; Neal, C.; Sabat, G.; Murthy, N.; Harms, A.; Sedbrook, J.; Masson, P.

    The primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings respond to gravity stimulation by developing a tip curvature that results from differential cellular elongation on opposite flanks of the elongation zone. This curvature appears modulated by a lateral gradient of auxin that originates in the gravity-perceiving cells (statocytes) of the root cap through an apparent lateral repositioning of a component the auxin efflux carrier complex within these cells (Friml et al, 2002, Nature 415: 806-809). Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern early phases of gravity perception and signal transduction within the root-cap statocytes. We have used a molecular genetic approach to uncover some of these mechanisms. Mutations in the Arabidopsis ARG1 and ARL2 genes, which encode J-domain proteins, resulted in specific alterations in root and hypocotyl gravitropism, without pleiotropic phenotypes. Interestingly, ARG1 and ARL2 appear to function in the same genetic pathway. A combination of molecular genetic, biochemical and cell-biological approaches were used to demonstrate that ARG1 functions in early phases of gravity signal transduction within the root and hypocotyl statocytes, and is needed for efficient lateral auxin transport within the cap. The ARG1 protein is associated with components of the secretory and/or endosomal pathways, suggesting its role in the recycling of components of the auxin efflux carrier complex between plasma membrane and endosome (Boonsirichai et al, 2003, Plant Cell 15:2612-2625). Genetic modifiers of arg1-2 were isolated and shown to enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1-2, while resulting in little or no gravitropic defects in a wild type ARG1 background. A slight tendency for arg1-2;mar1-1 and arg1-2;mar2-1 double-mutant organs to display an opposite gravitropic response compared to wild type suggests that all three genes contribute to the interpretation of the gravity-vector information by seedling organs. The

  2. Optogenetics - Bringing light into the darkness of mammalian signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Mühlhäuser, Wignand W D; Fischer, Adrian; Weber, Wilfried; Radziwill, Gerald

    2017-02-01

    Cells receive many different environmental clues to which they must adapt accordingly. Therefore, a complex signal transduction network has evolved. Cellular signal transduction is a highly dynamic process, in which the specific outcome is a result of the exact spatial and temporal resolution of single sub-events. While conventional techniques, like chemical inducer systems, have led to a sound understanding of the architecture of signal transduction pathways, the spatiotemporal aspects were often impossible to resolve. Optogenetics, based on genetically encoded light-responsive proteins, has the potential to revolutionize manipulation of signal transduction processes. Light can be easily applied with highest precision and minimal invasiveness. This review focuses on examples of optogenetic systems which were generated and applied to manipulate non-neuronal mammalian signaling processes at various stages of signal transduction, from cell membrane through cytoplasm to nucleus. Further, the future of optogenetic signaling will be discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Separate TRP channels mediate amplification and transduction in drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Brendan P.; Baker, Allison E.; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2015-12-01

    Auditory receptor cells rely on mechanically-gated channels to transform sound stimuli into neural activity. Several TRP channels have been implicated in Drosophila auditory transduction, but mechanistic studies have been hampered by the inability to record subthreshold signals from receptor neurons. We developed a non-invasive method for measuring these signals by recording from a central neuron that is electrically coupled to a genetically-defined population of auditory receptors. We find that the TRPN family member NompC, which is necessary for the active amplification of motion by the auditory organ, is not required for transduction. Instead, NompC sensitizes the transduction complex to movement and precisely regulates the static forces on the complex. In contrast, the TRPV channels Nanchung and Inactive are required for responses to sound, suggesting they are components of the transduction complex. Thus, transduction and active amplification are genetically separable processes in Drosophila hearing.

  4. LitInspector: literature and signal transduction pathway mining in PubMed abstracts.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Matthias; Klocke, Bernward; Haltmeier, Manuela; Frech, Kornelie

    2009-07-01

    LitInspector is a literature search tool providing gene and signal transduction pathway mining within NCBI's PubMed database. The automatic gene recognition and color coding increases the readability of abstracts and significantly speeds up literature research. A main challenge in gene recognition is the resolution of homonyms and rejection of identical abbreviations used in a 'non-gene' context. LitInspector uses automatically generated and manually refined filtering lists for this purpose. The quality of the LitInspector results was assessed with a published dataset of 181 PubMed sentences. LitInspector achieved a precision of 96.8%, a recall of 86.6% and an F-measure of 91.4%. To further demonstrate the homonym resolution qualities, LitInspector was compared to three other literature search tools using some challenging examples. The homonym MIZ-1 (gene IDs 7709 and 9063) was correctly resolved in 87% of the abstracts by LitInspector, whereas the other tools achieved recognition rates between 35% and 67%. The LitInspector signal transduction pathway mining is based on a manually curated database of pathway names (e.g. wingless type), pathway components (e.g. WNT1, FZD1), and general pathway keywords (e.g. signaling cascade). The performance was checked for 10 randomly selected genes. Eighty-two per cent of the 38 predicted pathway associations were correct. LitInspector is freely available at http://www.litinspector.org/.

  5. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  6. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  7. Signal transduction pathways, intrinsic regulators, and the control of cell fate choice

    PubMed Central

    Fossett, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Information regarding changes in organismal status is transmitted to the stem cell regulatory machinery by a limited number of signal transduction pathways. Consequently, these pathways derive their functional specificity through interactions with stem cell intrinsic master regulators, notably transcription factors. Identifying the molecular underpinnings of these interactions is critical to understanding stem cell function. Scope of review This review focuses on studies in Drosophila that identify the gene regulatory basis for interactions between three different signal transduction pathways and an intrinsic master transcriptional regulator in the context of hematopoietic stem-like cell fate choice. Specifically, the interface between the GATA:FOG regulatory complex and the JAK/STAT, BMP, and Hedgehog pathways is examined. Major conclusions The GATA:FOG complex coordinates information transmitted by at least three different signal transduction pathways as a means to control stem-like cell fate choice. This illustrates emerging principles concerning regulation of stem cell function and describes a gene regulatory link between changes in organismal status and stem cell response. General significance The Drosophila model system offers a powerful approach to identify the molecular basis of how stem cells receive, interpret, and then respond to changes in organismal status. PMID:22705942

  8. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 9 Transduction in the Central Nervous System of Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Samaranch, Lluis; Salegio, Ernesto A.; San Sebastian, Waldy; Kells, Adrian P.; Foust, Kevin D.; Bringas, John R.; Lamarre, Clementine; Forsayeth, John; Kaspar, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Widespread distribution of gene products at clinically relevant levels throughout the CNS has been challenging. Adeno-associated virus type 9 (AAV9) vector has been reported as a good candidate for intravascular gene delivery, but low levels of preexisting antibody titers against AAV in the blood abrogate cellular transduction within the CNS. In the present study we compared the effectiveness of vascular delivery and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) delivery of AAV9 in transducing CNS tissue in nonhuman primates. Both delivery routes generated similar distribution patterns, although we observed a more robust level of transduction after CSF delivery. Consistent with previous reports administering AAV9, we found greater astrocytic than neuronal tropism via both routes, although we did find a greater magnitude of CNS transduction after CSF delivery compared with intravascular delivery. Last, we have demonstrated that delivery of AAV9 into the CSF does not shield against AAV antibodies. This has obvious implications when developing and/or implementing any clinical trial studies. PMID:22201473

  9. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 transduction in the central nervous system of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Samaranch, Lluis; Salegio, Ernesto A; San Sebastian, Waldy; Kells, Adrian P; Foust, Kevin D; Bringas, John R; Lamarre, Clementine; Forsayeth, John; Kaspar, Brian K; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2012-04-01

    Widespread distribution of gene products at clinically relevant levels throughout the CNS has been challenging. Adeno-associated virus type 9 (AAV9) vector has been reported as a good candidate for intravascular gene delivery, but low levels of preexisting antibody titers against AAV in the blood abrogate cellular transduction within the CNS. In the present study we compared the effectiveness of vascular delivery and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) delivery of AAV9 in transducing CNS tissue in nonhuman primates. Both delivery routes generated similar distribution patterns, although we observed a more robust level of transduction after CSF delivery. Consistent with previous reports administering AAV9, we found greater astrocytic than neuronal tropism via both routes, although we did find a greater magnitude of CNS transduction after CSF delivery compared with intravascular delivery. Last, we have demonstrated that delivery of AAV9 into the CSF does not shield against AAV antibodies. This has obvious implications when developing and/or implementing any clinical trial studies.

  10. Resting lymphocyte transduction with measles virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors relies on CD46 and SLAM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qi; Schneider, Irene C.; Gallet, Manuela; Kneissl, Sabrina; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-05-10

    The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) were recently shown to mediate transduction of resting lymphocytes by lentiviral vectors. MV vaccine strains use CD46 or signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as receptor for cell entry. A panel of H protein mutants derived from vaccine strain or wild-type MVs that lost or gained CD46 or SLAM receptor usage were investigated for their ability to mediate gene transfer into unstimulated T lymphocytes. The results demonstrate that CD46 is sufficient for efficient vector particle association with unstimulated lymphocytes. For stable gene transfer into these cells, however, both MV receptors were found to be essential.

  11. Surface modification via strain-promoted click reaction facilitates targeted lentiviral transduction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yanjie; Oum, Yoon Hyeun; Carrico, Isaac S

    2016-01-01

    As a result of their ability to integrate into the genome of both dividing and non-dividing cells, lentiviruses have emerged as a promising vector for gene delivery. Targeted gene transduction of specific cells and tissues by lentiviral vectors has been a major goal, which has proven difficult to achieve. We report a novel targeting protocol that relies on the chemoselective attachment of cancer specific ligands to unnatural glycans on lentiviral surfaces. This strategy exhibits minimal perturbation on virus physiology and demonstrates remarkable flexibility. It allows for targeting but can be more broadly useful with applications such as vector purification and immunomodulation.

  12. Jasmonates: An Update on Biosynthesis, Signal Transduction and Action in Plant Stress Response, Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Wasternack, C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Jasmonates are ubiquitously occurring lipid-derived compounds with signal functions in plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses, as well as in plant growth and development. Jasmonic acid and its various metabolites are members of the oxylipin family. Many of them alter gene expression positively or negatively in a regulatory network with synergistic and antagonistic effects in relation to other plant hormones such as salicylate, auxin, ethylene and abscisic acid. Scope This review summarizes biosynthesis and signal transduction of jasmonates with emphasis on new findings in relation to enzymes, their crystal structure, new compounds detected in the oxylipin and jasmonate families, and newly found functions. Conclusions Crystal structure of enzymes in jasmonate biosynthesis, increasing number of jasmonate metabolites and newly identified components of the jasmonate signal-transduction pathway, including specifically acting transcription factors, have led to new insights into jasmonate action, but its receptor(s) is/are still missing, in contrast to all other plant hormones. PMID:17513307

  13. Role of functionality in two-component signal transduction: A stochastic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Arnab; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K.

    2014-03-01

    We present a stochastic formalism for signal transduction processes in a bacterial two-component system. Using elementary mass action kinetics, the proposed model takes care of signal transduction in terms of a phosphotransfer mechanism between the cognate partners of a two-component system, viz., the sensor kinase and the response regulator. Based on the difference in functionality of the sensor kinase, the noisy phosphotransfer mechanism has been studied for monofunctional and bifunctional two-component systems using the formalism of the linear noise approximation. Steady-state analysis of both models quantifies different physically realizable quantities, e.g., the variance, the Fano factor (variance/mean), and mutual information. The resultant data reveal that both systems reliably transfer information of extracellular environment under low external stimulus and in a high-kinase-and-phosphatase regime. We extend our analysis further by studying the role of the two-component system in downstream gene regulation.

  14. Role of functionality in two-component signal transduction: a stochastic study.

    PubMed

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Arnab; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K

    2014-03-01

    We present a stochastic formalism for signal transduction processes in a bacterial two-component system. Using elementary mass action kinetics, the proposed model takes care of signal transduction in terms of a phosphotransfer mechanism between the cognate partners of a two-component system, viz., the sensor kinase and the response regulator. Based on the difference in functionality of the sensor kinase, the noisy phosphotransfer mechanism has been studied for monofunctional and bifunctional two-component systems using the formalism of the linear noise approximation. Steady-state analysis of both models quantifies different physically realizable quantities, e.g., the variance, the Fano factor (variance/mean), and mutual information. The resultant data reveal that both systems reliably transfer information of extracellular environment under low external stimulus and in a high-kinase-and-phosphatase regime. We extend our analysis further by studying the role of the two-component system in downstream gene regulation.

  15. FIST: a sensory domain for diverse signal transduction pathways in prokaryotes and ubiquitin signaling in eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Borziak, Kirill; Jouline, Igor B

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Sensory domains that are conserved among Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya are important detectors of common signals detected by living cells. Due to their high sequence divergence, sensory domains are difficult to identify. We systematically look for novel sensory domains using sensitive profile-based searches initi-ated with regions of signal transduction proteins where no known domains can be identified by current domain models. Results: Using profile searches followed by multiple sequence alignment, structure prediction, and domain architecture analysis, we have identified a novel sensory domain termed FIST, which is present in signal transduction proteins from Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya. Remote similarity to a known ligand-binding fold and chromosomal proximity of FIST-encoding genes to those coding for proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and transport suggest that FIST domains bind small ligands, such as amino acids.

  16. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches to skin cancer treatments using protein transduction technology.

    PubMed

    Shibagaki, Naotaka; Okamoto, Takashi; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Inozume, Takashi; Kanzaki, Mirei; Shimada, Shinji

    2011-03-01

    Protein-transduction domains (PTDs) are short stretches of cationic amino acids that enable peptides, proteins, oligonucleotides, and other reagents to efficiently enter multiple cell types. Therefore, PTDs offer unique therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of many diseases. Previous studies examined the in vivo distribution of PTD-containing fusion proteins following administration via different routes, including portal vein, intravenous, intraperitoneal, and oral administration. Skin may be an appropriate target organ for this new molecular-carrier system; however, there are no studies on the in vivo kinetics and biological effects of PTD-containing proteins following intradermal application. Among the PTDs, poly-arginine peptides, especially nona-arginine (R9), is transported most efficiently with minimal cytotoxicity. Here, we review protein transduction technology from a different angle, as a novel tool in immunotherapeutic approaches to the skin cancers that depend on the biological characteristics of poly-arginine. This could be used in place of gene therapy for skin cancer patients.

  17. Primary Cilia Modulate IHH Signal Transduction in Response to Hydrostatic Loading of Growth Plate Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Y, Yvonne Y.; Wang, Lai; Welter, J, Jean F.; Ballock, R. Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) is a key component of the regulatory apparatus governing chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in the growth plate. Recent studies have demonstrated that the primary cilium is the site of Ihh signaling within the cell, and that primary cilia are essential for bone and cartilage formation. Primary cilia are also postulated to act as mechanosensory organelles that transduce mechanical forces acting on the cell into biological signals. In this study, we used a hydrostatic compression system to examine Ihh signal transduction under the influence of mechanical load. Our results demonstrate that hydrostatic compression increased both Ihh gene expression and Ihh-responsive Gli-luciferase activity. These increases were aborted by disrupting the primary cilia structure with chloral hydrate. These results suggest that growth plate chondrocytes respond to hydrostatic loading by increasing Ihh signaling, and that the primary cilium is required for this mechano-biological signal transduction to occur. PMID:21930256

  18. Jasmonates: an update on biosynthesis, signal transduction and action in plant stress response, growth and development.

    PubMed

    Wasternack, C

    2007-10-01

    Jasmonates are ubiquitously occurring lipid-derived compounds with signal functions in plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses, as well as in plant growth and development. Jasmonic acid and its various metabolites are members of the oxylipin family. Many of them alter gene expression positively or negatively in a regulatory network with synergistic and antagonistic effects in relation to other plant hormones such as salicylate, auxin, ethylene and abscisic acid. This review summarizes biosynthesis and signal transduction of jasmonates with emphasis on new findings in relation to enzymes, their crystal structure, new compounds detected in the oxylipin and jasmonate families, and newly found functions. Crystal structure of enzymes in jasmonate biosynthesis, increasing number of jasmonate metabolites and newly identified components of the jasmonate signal-transduction pathway, including specifically acting transcription factors, have led to new insights into jasmonate action, but its receptor(s) is/are still missing, in contrast to all other plant hormones.

  19. Receptor component protein (RCP): a member of a multi-protein complex required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Dickerson, I M

    2002-08-01

    The calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor component protein (RCP) is a 148-amino-acid intracellular protein that is required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction at receptors for the neuropeptide CGRP. RCP works in conjunction with two other proteins to constitute a functional CGRP receptor: calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). CRLR has the stereotypical seven-transmembrane topology of a G-protein-coupled receptor; it requires RAMP1 for trafficking to the cell surface and for ligand specificity, and requires RCP for coupling to the cellular signal transduction pathway. We have made cell lines that expressed an antisense construct of RCP and determined that CGRP-mediated signal transduction was reduced, while CGRP binding was unaffected. Furthermore, signalling at two other endogenous G-protein-coupled receptors was unaffected, suggesting that RCP was specific for a limited subset of receptors.

  20. Signal transduction pathways leading to the production of IL-8 by human monocytes are differentially regulated by dexamethasone.

    PubMed Central

    Anttila, H S; Reitamo, S; Ceska, M; Hurme, M

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that IL-8 gene expression is enhanced by various stimuli, which induce different signal transduction pathways. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pathway has been reported to be inhibited by glucocorticoids in monocytes. We have now examined the effect of dexamethasone on the LPS-induced and other signal transduction pathways leading to the production of IL-8 by human monocytes. Dexamethasone inhibited the production of IL-8 stimulated with a cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog or LPS. In contrast, dexamethasone had no significant effect on a phorbol ester (PMA)-stimulated IL-8 production. These results suggest that the signal transduction pathways leading to the production of IL-8 by human monocytes are differentially regulated by dexamethasone. PMID:1325308

  1. Selective transduction of astrocytic and neuronal CNS subpopulations by lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with Chikungunya virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Dieringer, Michael; Poh, Xuan Ying; Sanchez-Garrido, Julia; Gao, Yunan; Sgourou, Argyro; Simmons, Laura E; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2017-04-01

    Lentiviral vectors are gene delivery vehicles that integrate into the host genome of dividing and non-dividing mammalian cells facilitating long-term transgene expression. Lentiviral vector versatility is greatly increased by incorporating heterologous viral envelope proteins onto the vector particles instead of the native envelope, conferring on these pseudotyped vectors a modified tropism and host range specificity. We investigated the pseudotyping efficiency of HIV-1 based lentiviral vectors with alphaviral envelope proteins from the Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV-G) and Sindbis Virus (SINV-G). Following vector production optimisation, titres for the CHIKV-G pseudotype were comparable to the VSV-G pseudotype but those for the SINV-G pseudotype were significantly lower. High titre CHIKV-G pseudotyped vector efficiently transduced various human and mouse neural cell lines and normal human astrocytes (NHA) in vitro. Although transduction was broad, tropism for NHAs was observed. In vivo stereotaxic delivery in striatum, thalamus and hippocampus respectively in the adult rat brain revealed localised transduction restricted to striatal astrocytes and hippocampal dentate granule neurons. Transduction of different subtypes of granule neurons from precursor to post-mitotic stages of differentiation was evident in the sub-granular zone and dentate granule cell layer. No significant inflammatory response was observed, but comparable to that of VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vectors. Robust long-term expression followed for three months post-transduction along with absence of neuroinflammation, coupled to the selective and unique neuron/glial tropism indicates that these vectors could be useful for modelling and gene therapy studies in the CNS.

  2. Ca2+ Sensor GCAP1: A Constitutive element of the ONE-GC modulated odorant signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pertzev, Alexandre; Duda, Teresa; Sharma, Rameshwar K.

    2010-01-01

    In a small subset of the olfactory sensory neurons the odorant receptor ONE-GC guanylate cyclase is a central transduction component of the cyclic GMP signaling pathway. In a two-step transduction model, the odorant, uroguanylin, binds to the extracellular domain and activates its intracellular domain to generate the odorant second messenger, cyclic GMP. The present study through comprehensive technology, including gene-deletion, live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) spectroscopy documents the identity of a remarkably intriguing operation of a Ca2+ sensor component of the ONE-GC transduction machinery, GCAP1. In the ciliary membranes, the sites of odorant-transduction, GCAP1 is biochemically and physiologically coupled to ONE-GC. Strikingly, this coupling reverses its well- established function in ROS-GC1 signaling, linked with phototransduction. In response to the free Ca2+ range from nanomolar to semimicromolar it inhibits ROS-GC1; yet in this range it incrementally stimulates ONE-GC. These two opposite modes of signaling two SENSORY processes by a single Ca2+ sensor define a new transduction paradigm of membrane guanylate cyclases. This paradigm is pictorially presented. PMID:20684533

  3. A Comprehensive Map of CNS Transduction by Eight Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus Serotypes Upon Cerebrospinal Fluid Administration in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Nicolina Cristina; Maffia, Veronica; Strollo, Sandra; Cacace, Vincenzo; Romagnoli, Noemi; Manfredi, Anna; Ventrella, Domenico; Dondi, Francesco; Barone, Francesca; Giunti, Massimo; Graham, Anne-Renee; Huang, Yan; Kalled, Susan L; Auricchio, Alberto; Bacci, Maria Laura; Surace, Enrico Maria; Fraldi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid administration of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors has been demonstrated to be effective in delivering therapeutic genes to the central nervous system (CNS) in different disease animal models. However, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of transduction patterns of the most promising rAAV serotypes for brain targeting in large animal models is missing. Here, we characterize distribution, transduction efficiency, and cellular targeting of rAAV serotypes 1, 2, 5, 7, 9, rh.10, rh.39, and rh.43 delivered into the cisterna magna of wild-type pigs. rAAV9 showed the highest transduction efficiency and the widest distribution capability among the vectors tested. Moreover, rAAV9 robustly transduced both glia and neurons, including the motor neurons of the spinal cord. Relevant cell transduction specificity of the glia was observed after rAAV1 and rAAV7 delivery. rAAV7 also displayed a specific tropism to Purkinje cells. Evaluation of biochemical and hematological markers suggested that all rAAV serotypes tested were well tolerated. This study provides a comprehensive CNS transduction map in a useful preclinical large animal model enabling the selection of potentially clinically transferable rAAV serotypes based on disease specificity. Therefore, our data are instrumental for the clinical evaluation of these rAAV vectors in human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26639405

  4. SAM68: Signal Transduction and RNA Metabolism in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frisone, Paola; Pradella, Davide; Di Matteo, Anna; Belloni, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in expression and/or activity of splicing factors as well as mutations in cis-acting splicing regulatory sequences contribute to cancer phenotypes. Genome-wide studies have revealed more than 15,000 tumor-associated splice variants derived from genes involved in almost every aspect of cancer cell biology, including proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle control, metabolism, apoptosis, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis. In the past decades, several RNA binding proteins (RBPs) have been implicated in tumorigenesis. SAM68 (SRC associated in mitosis of 68 kDa) belongs to the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA metabolism) family of RBPs. SAM68 is involved in several steps of mRNA metabolism, from transcription to alternative splicing and then to nuclear export. Moreover, SAM68 participates in signaling pathways associated with cell response to stimuli, cell cycle transitions, and viral infections. Recent evidence has linked this RBP to the onset and progression of different tumors, highlighting misregulation of SAM68-regulated splicing events as a key step in neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. Here we review recent studies on the role of SAM68 in splicing regulation and we discuss its contribution to aberrant pre-mRNA processing in cancer. PMID:26273626

  5. P2CS: a two-component system resource for prokaryotic signal transduction research.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Mohamed; Ortet, Philippe; Jourlin-Castelli, Cécile; Ansaldi, Mireille; Méjean, Vincent; Whitworth, David E

    2009-07-15

    With the escalation of high throughput prokaryotic genome sequencing, there is an ever-increasing need for databases that characterise, catalogue and present data relating to particular gene sets and genomes/metagenomes. Two-component system (TCS) signal transduction pathways are the dominant mechanisms by which micro-organisms sense and respond to external as well as internal environmental changes. These systems respond to a wide range of stimuli by triggering diverse physiological adjustments, including alterations in gene expression, enzymatic reactions, or protein-protein interactions. We present P2CS (Prokaryotic 2-Component Systems), an integrated and comprehensive database of TCS signal transduction proteins, which contains a compilation of the TCS genes within 755 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and 39 metagenomes. P2CS provides detailed annotation of each TCS gene including family classification, sequence features, functional domains, as well as genomic context visualization. To bypass the generic problem of gene underestimation during genome annotation, we also constituted and searched an ORFeome, which improves the recovery of TCS proteins compared to searches on the equivalent proteomes. P2CS has been developed for computational analysis of the modular TCSs of prokaryotic genomes and metagenomes. It provides a complete overview of information on TCSs, including predicted candidate proteins and probable proteins, which need further curation/validation. The database can be browsed and queried with a user-friendly web interface at http://www.p2cs.org/.

  6. Signal transduction disturbance related to hepatocarcinogenesis in mouse by prolonged exposure to Nanjing drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Yan; Cheng, Shupei; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2013-09-01

    Toxicogenomic approaches were used to investigate the potential hepatocarcinogenic effects on mice by oral exposure to Nanjing drinking water (NJDW). Changes in the hepatic transcriptome of 3 weeks male mice (Mus musculus) were monitored and dissected after oral exposure to NJDW for 90 days. No preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions were observed in the hepatic tissue by the end of NJDW exposure. However, total of 746 genes were changed transcriptionally. Thirty-one percent of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were associated with the functional categories of cell cycle regulation, adhesion, growth, apoptosis, and signal transduction, which are closely implicated in tumorigenesis and progression. Interrogation of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes revealed that 43 DEGs were mapped to several crucial signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In signal transduction network constructed via Genes2Networks software, Egfr, Akt1, Atf2, Ctnnb1, Hras, Mapk1, Smad2, and Ccnd1 were hubs. Direct gene-disease relationships obtained from Comparative Toxicogenomics Database and scientific literatures revealed that the hubs have direct mechanism or biomarker relationships with hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions or hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, prolonged intake of NJDW without employing any indoor water treatment strategy might predispose mouse to HCC. Furthermore, Egfr, Akt1, Ctnnb1, Hras, Mapk1, Smad2, and Ccnd1 were identified as promising biomarkers of the potential combined hepatocarcinogenicity.

  7. Signal transduction by the Fat cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Guohui; Feng, Yongqiang; Ambegaonkar, Abhijit A.; Sun, Gongping; Huff, Matthew; Rauskolb, Cordelia; Irvine, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    The large atypical cadherin Fat is a receptor for both Hippo and planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways. Here we investigate the molecular basis for signal transduction downstream of Fat by creating targeted alterations within a genomic construct that contains the entire fat locus, and by monitoring and manipulating the membrane localization of the Fat pathway component Dachs. We establish that the human Fat homolog FAT4 lacks the ability to transduce Hippo signaling in Drosophila, but can transduce Drosophila PCP signaling. Targeted deletion of conserved motifs identifies a four amino acid C-terminal motif that is essential for aspects of Fat-mediated PCP, and other internal motifs that contribute to Fat-Hippo signaling. Fat-Hippo signaling requires the Drosophila Casein kinase 1ϵ encoded by discs overgrown (Dco), and we characterize candidate Dco phosphorylation sites in the Fat intracellular domain (ICD), the mutation of which impairs Fat-Hippo signaling. Through characterization of Dachs localization and directed membrane targeting of Dachs, we show that localization of Dachs influences both the Hippo and PCP pathways. Our results identify a conservation of Fat-PCP signaling mechanisms, establish distinct functions for different regions of the Fat ICD, support the correlation of Fat ICD phosphorylation with Fat-Hippo signaling, and confirm the importance of Dachs membrane localization to downstream signaling pathways. PMID:23318637

  8. Receptors and transduction of umami taste stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kinnamon, Sue C; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie

    2009-07-01

    L-glutamate and 5'-ribonucleotides, such as GMP and IMP, elicit the "umami" taste, also known as the fifth taste. This review will highlight recent advancements in our understanding of umami taste receptors and their downstream signaling effectors in taste receptor cells. Several G protein-coupled receptors that bind umami stimuli have been identified in taste buds, including the heterodimer T1R1/T1R3, truncated and brain forms of mGluR4 and mGluR1, brain mGluR2, and brain mGluR3. Further, ionotropic glutamate receptors are expressed in taste cells and may play a role in glutamate transduction or signaling between taste cells and/or nerve fibers. Knockout of T1R1 or T1R3 reduces, but does not eliminate, responses to umami stimuli, suggesting that multiple receptors contribute to umami taste. The signaling effectors downstream of umami G protein-coupled receptors involve Gbetagamma activation of PLCbeta2 to elicit Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores and activation of a cation channel, TRPM5. In fungiform and palatal taste buds, T1R1/T1R3 is co-expressed with Galpha gustducin and transducin, but the Galpha proteins involved in circumvallate taste buds have not been identified. In most taste fields, however, cAMP antagonizes responses to umami stimuli, suggesting that the Galpha subunit serves to modulate umami taste sensitivity.

  9. Melanin, Radiation, and Energy Transduction in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Cordero, Radames J B; Bryan, Ruth; Nosanchuk, Joshua; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2017-03-01

    Melanin pigments are found in many diverse fungal species, where they serve a variety of functions that promote fitness and cell survival. Melanotic fungi inhabit some of the most extreme habitats on earth such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl and the highlands of Antarctica, both of which are high-radiation environments. Melanotic fungi migrate toward radioactive sources, which appear to enhance their growth. This phenomenon, combined with the known capacities of melanin to absorb a broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation and transduce this radiation into other forms of energy, raises the possibility that melanin also functions in harvesting such energy for biological usage. The ability of melanotic fungi to harness electromagnetic radiation for physiological processes has enormous implications for biological energy flows in the biosphere and for exobiology, since it provides new mechanisms for survival in extraterrestrial conditions. Whereas some features of the way melanin-related energy transduction works can be discerned by linking various observations and circumstantial data, the mechanistic details remain to be discovered.

  10. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Domenico; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; D’Angelo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development. PMID:27754465

  11. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  12. Confocal Scanner for Highly Sensitive Photonic Transduction of Nanomechanical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Zhu; Losby, Joseph E.; Sauer, Vincent T. K.; Westwood, Jocelyn N.; Freeman, Mark R.; Hiebert, Wayne K.

    2013-06-01

    We show that a simple confocal laser scanning system can be used to couple light through grating couplers into nanophotonic circuits. The coupling efficiency is better than 15% per coupler. Our technique avoids using multi-axis fibre stages and is especially advantageous when the nanophotonic circuit is kept in vacuum, e.g., for nanomechanical resonator displacement transduction. This was demonstrated by recording the resonant response of a nanomechanical doubly clamped beam embedded in a race-track optical cavity. The nanophotonic transduction offers an increase of two orders of magnitude in transduction responsivity compared with conventional free-space optical interferometry.

  13. Identification and Validation of Small Molecules That Enhance Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus Transduction following High-Throughput Screens

    PubMed Central

    Nicolson, Sarah C.; Li, Chengwen; Hirsch, Matthew L.; Setola, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While the recent success of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy in clinical trials is promising, challenges still face the widespread applicability of recombinant AAV(rAAV). A major goal is to enhance the transduction efficiency of vectors in order to achieve therapeutic levels of gene expression at a vector dose that is below the immunological response threshold. In an attempt to identify novel compounds that enhance rAAV transduction, we performed two high-throughput screens comprising 2,396 compounds. We identified 13 compounds that were capable of enhancing transduction, of which 12 demonstrated vector-specific effects and 1 could also enhance vector-independent transgene expression. Many of these compounds had similar properties and could be categorized into five groups: epipodophyllotoxins (group 1), inducers of DNA damage (group 2), effectors of epigenetic modification (group 3), anthracyclines (group 4), and proteasome inhibitors (group 5). We optimized dosing for the identified compounds in several immortalized human cell lines as well as normal diploid cells. We found that the group 1 epipodophyllotoxins (teniposide and etoposide) consistently produced the greatest transduction enhancement. We also explored transduction enhancement among single-stranded, self-complementary, and fragment vectors and found that the compounds could impact fragmented rAAV2 transduction to an even greater extent than single-stranded vectors. In vivo analysis of rAAV2 and all of the clinically relevant compounds revealed that, consistent with our in vitro results, teniposide exhibited the greatest level of transduction enhancement. Finally, we explored the capability of teniposide to enhance transduction of fragment vectors in vivo using an AAV8 capsid that is known to exhibit robust liver tropism. Consistent with our in vitro results, teniposide coadministration greatly enhanced fragmented rAAV8 transduction at 48 h and 8 days. This study provides a

  14. Highly efficient intracellular transduction in three-dimensional gradients for programming cell fate.

    PubMed

    Eltaher, Hoda M; Yang, Jing; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Dixon, James E

    2016-09-01

    Fundamental behaviour such as cell fate, growth and death are mediated through the control of key genetic transcriptional regulators. These regulators are activated or repressed by the integration of multiple signalling molecules in spatio-temporal gradients. Engineering these gradients is complex but considered key in controlling tissue formation in regenerative medicine approaches. Direct programming of cells using exogenously delivered transcription factors can by-pass growth factor complexity but there is still a requirement to deliver such activity spatio-temporally. We previously developed a technology termed GAG-binding enhanced transduction (GET) to efficiently deliver a variety of cargoes intracellularly using GAG-binding domains to promote cell targeting, and cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) to allow cell entry. Herein we demonstrate that GET can be used in a three dimensional (3D) hydrogel matrix to produce gradients of intracellular transduction of mammalian cells. Using a compartmentalised diffusion model with a source-gel-sink (So-G-Si) assembly, we created gradients of reporter proteins (mRFP1-tagged) and a transcription factor (TF, myogenic master regulator MyoD) and showed that GET can be used to deliver molecules into cells spatio-temporally by monitoring intracellular transduction and gene expression programming as a function of location and time. The ability to spatio-temporally control the intracellular delivery of functional proteins will allow the establishment of gradients of cell programming in hydrogels and approaches to direct cellular behaviour for many regenerative medicine applications. Regenerative medicine aims to reform functional biological tissues by controlling cell behaviour. Growth factors (GFs) are soluble cues presented to cells in spatio-temporal gradients and play important roles programming cell fate and gene expression. The efficient transduction of cells by GET (Glycosaminoglycan-enhanced transducing

  15. TRIM5α variations influence transduction efficiency with lentiviral vectors in both human and rhesus CD34(+) cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Evans, Molly E; Kumkhaek, Chutima; Hsieh, Matthew M; Donahue, Robert E; Tisdale, John F; Uchida, Naoya

    2014-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vectors can transduce human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), but transduction efficiency varies among individuals. The innate immune factor tripartite motif-containing protein 5α (TRIM5α) plays an important role for restriction of retroviral infection. In this study, we examined whether TRIM5α could account for variations in transduction efficiency using both an established rhesus gene therapy model and human CD34(+) cell culture. Evaluation of TRIM5α genotypes (Mamu-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, and TrimCyp) in 16 rhesus macaques that were transplanted with transduced CD34(+) cells showed a significant correlation between TRIM5α Mamu-4 and high gene marking in both lymphocytes and granulocytes 6 months after transplantation. Since significant human TRIM5α coding polymorphisms were not known, we evaluated TRIM5α expression levels in human CD34(+) cells from 14 donors. Three days after HIV-1 vector transduction, measured transduction efficiency varied significantly among donors and was negatively correlated with TRIM5α expression levels. In summary, transduction efficiency in both rhesus and human CD34(+) cells was influenced by TRIM5α variations (genotypes and expression levels). Our findings are important for both understanding and mitigating the variability of transduction efficiency for rhesus and human CD34(+) cells.

  16. The transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Gregory A; Johnson, Richard D; Davenport, Paul W

    2002-01-01

    Background Intercostal muscles are richly innervated by mechanoreceptors. In vivo studies of cat intercostal muscle have shown that there are 3 populations of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors: primary muscle spindles (1°), secondary muscle spindles (2°) and Golgi tendon organs (GTO). The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanical transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors in response to controlled length and velocity displacements of the intercostal space. Mechanoreceptors, recorded from dorsal root fibers, were localized within an isolated intercostal muscle space (ICS). Changes in ICS displacement and the velocity of ICS displacement were independently controlled with an electromagnetic motor. ICS velocity (0.5 – 100 μm/msec to a displacement of 2,000 μm) and displacement (50–2,000 μm at a constant velocity of 10 μm/msec) parameters encompassed the full range of rib motion. Results Both 1° and 2° muscle spindles were found evenly distributed within the ICS. GTOs were localized along the rib borders. The 1° spindles had the greatest discharge frequency in response to displacement amplitude followed by the 2° afferents and GTOs. The 1° muscle spindles also possessed the greatest discharge frequency in response to graded velocity changes, 3.0 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. GTOs had a velocity response of 2.4 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1 followed by 2° muscle spindles at 0.6 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. Conclusion The results of this study provide a systematic description of the mechanosenitivity of the 3 types of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors. These mechanoreceptors have discharge properties that transduce the magnitude and velocity of intercostal muscle length. PMID:12392601

  17. The sensory transduction pathways in bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Barry L.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is a useful model for investigating in molecular detail the behavioral response of cells to changes in their environment. Peritrichously flagellated bacteria such as coli and typhimurium swim by rotating helical flagella in a counterclockwise direction. If flagellar rotation is briefly reversed, the bacteria tumble and change the direction of swimming. The bacteria continuously sample the environment and use a temporal sensing mechanism to compare the present and immediate past environments. Bacteria respond to a broad range of stimuli including changes in temperature, oxygen concentration, pH and osmotic strength. Bacteria are attracted to potential sources of nutrition such as sugars and amino acids and are repelled by other chemicals. In the methylation-dependent pathways for sensory transduction and adaptation in E. coli and S. typhimurium, chemoeffectors bind to transducing proteins that span the plasma membrane. The transducing proteins are postulated to control the rate of autophosphorylation of the CheA protein, which in turn phosphorylates the CheY protein. The phospho-CheY protein binds to the switch on the flagellar motor and is the signal for clockwise rotation of the motor. Adaptation to an attractant is achieved by increasing methylation of the transducing protein until the attractant stimulus is cancelled. Responses to oxygen and certain sugars involve methylation-independent pathways in which adaption occurs without methylation of a transducing protein. Taxis toward oxygen is mediated by the electron transport system and changes in the proton motive force. Recent studies have shown that the methylation-independent pathway converges with the methylation-dependent pathway at or before the CheA protein.

  18. Pheromones cause disease: pheromone/odourant transduction.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, B

    2001-09-01

    This paper compares two models of the sense of smell and demonstrates that the new model has advantages over the accepted model with implications for medical research. The accepted transduction model had an odourant or pheromone contacting an aqueous sensory lymph then movement through it to a receptor membrane beneath. If the odourant or pheromone were non-soluble, the odourant/pheromone supposedly would be bound to a soluble protein in the lymph to be carried across. Thus, an odourant/carrier protein complex physically moved through the receptor lymph/mucus to interact with a membrane bound receptor. After the membranous receptor interaction, the molecule would be deactivated and any odourant/pheromone-binding protein recycled. This new electrical chemosensory model being proposed here has the pheromone or other odourant generating an electrical event in the extra-cellular mucus. Before the pheromone arrives, proteins of the 'carrier class' dissolved in the receptor mucus slowly and continuously sequester ions. A sensed pheromonal chemical species sorbs to the mucus and immediately binds to the now ion-holding dissolved protein. The binding of the pheromone to the protein causes a measurable conformational change in the pheromone/odourant-binding protein, desequestering ions. Releasing the bound ions changes the potential differences across a nearby super-sensitive dendritic membrane resulting in dendrite excitation. Pheromones will be implicated in the aetiology of the infectious, psychiatric and autoimmune diseases. This is the third article in a series of twelve to systematically explore this contention (see references 1-9). Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  19. Membrane guanylate cyclase, a multimodal transduction machine: history, present, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    A sequel to these authors' earlier comprehensive reviews which covered the field of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC) from its origin to the year 2010, this article contains 13 sections. The first is historical and covers MGC from the year 1963–1987, summarizing its colorful developmental stages from its passionate pursuit to its consolidation. The second deals with the establishment of its biochemical identity. MGC becomes the transducer of a hormonal signal and founder of the peptide hormone receptor family, and creates the notion that hormone signal transduction is its sole physiological function. The third defines its expansion. The discovery of ROS-GC subfamily is made and it links ROS-GC with the physiology of phototransduction. Sections ROS-GC, a Ca2+-Modulated Two Component Transduction System to Migration Patterns and Translations of the GCAP Signals Into Production of Cyclic GMP are Different cover its biochemistry and physiology. The noteworthy events are that augmented by GCAPs, ROS-GC proves to be a transducer of the free Ca2+ signals generated within neurons; ROS-GC becomes a two-component transduction system and establishes itself as a source of cyclic GMP, the second messenger of phototransduction. Section ROS-GC1 Gene Linked Retinal Dystrophies demonstrates how this knowledge begins to be translated into the diagnosis and providing the molecular definition of retinal dystrophies. Section Controlled By Low and High Levels of [Ca2+]i, ROS-GC1 is a Bimodal Transduction Switch discusses a striking property of ROS-GC where it becomes a “[Ca2+]i bimodal switch” and transcends its signaling role in other neural processes. In this course, discovery of the first CD-GCAP (Ca2+-dependent guanylate cyclase activator), the S100B protein, is made. It extends the role of the ROS-GC transduction system beyond the phototransduction to the signaling processes in the synapse region between photoreceptor and cone ON-bipolar cells; in section Ca2

  20. Insulin Therapy Improves Adeno-Associated Virus Transduction of Liver and Skeletal Muscle in Mice and Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Carrig, Sean; Bijjiga, Enoch; Wopat, Mitchell J; Martino, Ashley T

    2016-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer is a promising treatment for genetic abnormalities. Optimal AAV vectors are showing success in clinical trials. Gene transfer to skeletal muscle and liver is being explored as a potential therapy for some conditions, that is, α1-antitrypsin (AAT) disorder and hemophilia B. Exploring approaches that enhance transduction of liver and skeletal muscle, using these vectors, is beneficial for gene therapy. Regulating hormones as an approach to improve AAV transduction is largely unexplored. In this study we tested whether insulin therapy improves liver and skeletal muscle gene transfer. In vitro studies demonstrated that the temporary coadministration (2, 8, and 24 hr) of insulin significantly improves AAV2-CMV-LacZ transduction of cultured liver cells and differentiated myofibers, but not of lung cells. In addition, there was a dose response related to this improved transduction. Interestingly, when insulin was not coadministered with the virus but given 24 hr afterward, there was no increase in the transgene product. Insulin receptor gene (INSR) expression levels were increased 5- to 13-fold in cultured liver cells and differentiated myofibers when compared with lung cells. Similar INSR gene expression profiles occurred in mouse tissues. Insulin therapy was performed in mice, using a subcutaneously implanted insulin pellet or a high-carbohydrate diet. Insulin treatment began just before intramuscular delivery of AAV1-CMV-schFIX or liver-directed delivery of AAV8-CMV-schFIX and continued for 28 days. Both insulin augmentation therapies improved skeletal muscle- and liver-directed gene transduction in mice as seen by a 3.0- to 4.5-fold increase in human factor IX (hFIX) levels. The improvement was observed even after the insulin therapy ended. Monitoring insulin showed that insulin levels increased during the brief period of rAAV delivery and during the entire insulin augmentation period (28 days). This study demonstrates

  1. Enhanced Baculovirus-Mediated Transduction of Human Cancer Cells by Tumor-Homing Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mäkelä, Anna R.; Matilainen, Heli; White, Daniel J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Tumor cells and vasculature offer specific targets for the selective delivery of therapeutic genes. To achieve tumor-specific gene transfer, baculovirus tropism was manipulated by viral envelope modification using baculovirus display technology. LyP-1, F3, and CGKRK tumor-homing peptides, originally identified by in vivo screening of phage display libraries, were fused to the transmembrane anchor of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein and displayed on the baculoviral surface. The fusion proteins were successfully incorporated into budded virions, which showed two- to fivefold-improved binding to human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-435) and hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells. The LyP-1 peptide inhibited viral binding to MDA-MB-435 cells with a greater magnitude and specificity than the CGKRK and F3 peptides. Maximal 7- and 24-fold increases in transduction, determined by transgene expression level, were achieved for the MDA-MB-435 and HepG2 cells, respectively. The internalization of each virus was inhibited by ammonium chloride treatment, suggesting the use of a similar endocytic entry route. The LyP-1 and F3 peptides showed an apparent inhibitory effect in transduction of HepG2 cells with the corresponding display viruses. Together, these results imply that the efficiency of baculovirus-mediated gene delivery can be significantly enhanced in vitro when tumor-targeting ligands are used and therefore highlight the potential of baculovirus vectors in cancer gene therapy. PMID:16775347

  2. Evidence for a novel signal transduction pathway activated by platelet-derived growth factor and by double-stranded RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.J.; Jones, S.D.; Rollins, B.J.; Stiles, C.D. ); Stiles, C.D. ); Kaplan, D.R.; Whitman, M. )

    1989-04-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and the synthetic double-stranded RNA poly(I) x poly(C) (poly(I x C)) stimulate transcription of the JE gene in BALB/c-3T3 fibroblasts. The response of JE to poly(I x C) does not appear to be channeled through any known component of the PDGF receptor signal transduction apparatus. In addition, JE sequences upstream of the transcription start site are devoid of previously identified poly(I x C)-responsive elements, such as those found in the beta-interferon gene. These data suggest that a novel signal transduction pathway regulates the JE response to PDGF and double-stranded RNA. The c-myc and c-fos proto-oncogenes also respond to this pathway but with poor efficiency. However, this pathway operates very efficiently on other PDGF-inducible genes that encode the secretory proteins KC and M-CSF.

  3. Falsification of the ionic channel theory of hair cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Michelangelo

    2013-11-01

    The hair cell provides the transduction of mechanical vibrations in the balance and acoustic sense of all vertebrates that swim, walk, or fly. The current theory places hair cell transduction in a mechanically controlled ion channel. Although the theory of a mechanical input modulating the flow of ions through an ion pore has been a useful tool, it is falsified by experimental data in the literature and can be definitively falsified by a proposed experiment.

  4. Molecular characterization of a calmodulin involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2010-04-01

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis shows a negative gravitactic behavior. This is based on physiological mechanisms which in the past have been indirectly assessed. Meanwhile, it was possible to isolate genes involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis. The DNA sequences of five calmodulins were found in Euglena, one of which was only known in its protein structure (CaM.1); the other four are new. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of CaM.1-CaM.5 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to determine their involvement in the gravitactic signal transduction chain. RNAi of CaM.1 inhibits free swimming of the cells and pronounced cell-form aberrations. The division of cells was also hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Blockage of CaM.3 to CaM. 5 did not impair gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of CaM.2 has only a transient and not pronounced influence on motility and cell form, but leads to a total loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days. This indicates that CaM.2 is an element in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in E. gracilis. The results are discussed with regard to the current working model of gravitaxis in E. gracilis.

  5. Presenilin-mediated transmembrane cleavage is required for Notch signal transduction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Struhl, Gary; Greenwald, Iva

    2001-01-01

    The cleavage model for signal transduction by receptors of the LIN-12/Notch family posits that ligand binding leads to cleavage within the transmembrane domain, so that the intracellular domain is released to translocate to the nucleus and activate target gene expression. The familial Alzheimer's disease-associated protein Presenilin is required for LIN-12/Notch signaling, and several lines of evidence suggest that Presenilin mediates the transmembrane cleavage event that releases the LIN-12/Notch intracellular domain. However, doubt was cast on this possibility by a report that Presenilin is not required for the transducing activity of NECN, a constitutively active transmembrane form of Notch, in Drosophila. Here, we have reassessed this finding and show instead that Presenilin is required for activity of NECN for all cell fate decisions examined. Our results indicate that transmembrane cleavage and signal transduction are strictly correlated, supporting the cleavage model for signal transduction by LIN-12/Notch and a role for Presenilin in mediating the ligand-induced transmembrane cleavage. PMID:11134525

  6. Mathematical modeling of the insulin signal transduction pathway for prediction of insulin sensitivity from expression data.

    PubMed

    Ho, Clark K; Rahib, Lola; Liao, James C; Sriram, Ganesh; Dipple, Katrina M

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of biological pathways facilitate a systems biology approach to medicine. However, these models need to be updated to reflect the latest available knowledge of the underlying pathways. We developed a mathematical model of the insulin signal transduction pathway by expanding the last major previously reported model and incorporating pathway components elucidated since the original model was reported. Furthermore, we show that inputting gene expression data of key components of the insulin signal transduction pathway leads to sensible predictions of glucose clearance rates in agreement with reported clinical measurements. In one set of simulations, our model predicted that glycerol kinase knockout mice have reduced GLUT4 translocation, and consequently, reduced glucose uptake. Additionally, a comparison of our extended model with the original model showed that the added pathway components improve simulations of glucose clearance rates. We anticipate this expanded model to be a useful tool for predicting insulin sensitivity in mammalian tissues with altered expression protein phosphorylation or mRNA levels of insulin signal transduction pathway components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimized Lentiviral Transduction Protocols by Use of a Poloxamer Enhancer, Spinoculation, and scFv-Antibody Fusions to VSV-G.

    PubMed

    Anastasov, Nataša; Höfig, Ines; Mall, Sabine; Krackhardt, Angela M; Thirion, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) are widely used to successfully transduce cells for research and clinical applications. This optimized LV infection protocol includes a nontoxic poloxamer-based adjuvant combined with antibody-retargeted lentiviral particles. The novel poloxamer P338 demonstrates superior characteristics for enhancing lentiviral transduction over the best-in-class polybrene-assisted transduction. Poloxamer P338 exhibited dual benefits of low toxicity and high efficiency of lentiviral gene delivery into a range of different primary cell cultures. One of the major advantages of P338 is its availability in pharma grade and applicability as cell culture medium additive in clinical protocols. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) can be produced to high titers and mediate high transduction efficiencies in vitro. For clinical applications the need for optimized transduction protocols, especially for transduction of primary T and stem cells, is high. The successful use of retronectin, the second lentivirus enhancer available as GMP material, requires the application of specific coating protocols not applicable in all processes, and results in the need of a relatively high multiplicity of infection (MOI) to achieve effective transduction efficiencies for hematopoietic cells (e.g., CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells). Cell specificity of lentiviral vectors was successfully increased by displaying different ratios of scFv-fused VSV-G glycoproteins on the viral envelope. The system has been validated with human CD30+ lymphoma cells, resulting in preferential gene delivery to CD30+ cells, which was increased fourfold in mixed cell cultures, by presenting scFv antibody fragments binding to respective surface markers. A combination of spinoculation and poloxamer-based chemical adjuvant increases the transduction of primary T-cells by greater than twofold. The combination of poloxamer-based and scFv-retargeted LVs increased

  8. mom identifies a receptor for the Drosophila JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway and encodes a protein distantly related to the mammalian cytokine receptor family

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Chen, Xiu; Oh, Su-Wan; Marinissen, Maria J.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Hou, Steven X.

    2002-01-01

    The JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway controls numerous events in Drosophila melanogaster development. Receptors for the pathway have yet to be identified. Here we have identified a Drosophila gene that shows embryonic mutant phenotypes identical to those in the hopscotch (hop)/JAK kinase and marelle (mrl)/Stat92e mutations. We named this gene master of marelle (mom). Genetic analyses place mom's function between upd (the ligand) and hop. We further show that cultured cells transfected with the mom gene bind UPD and activate the HOP/STAT92E signal transduction pathway. mom encodes a protein distantly related to the mammalian cytokine receptor family. These data show that mom functions as a receptor of the Drosophila JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway. PMID:11825879

  9. The third helix of the murine Hoxc8 homeodomain facilitates protein transduction in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoung-Ah; Gadi, Jogeswar; Park, Hyoung Woo; Bok, Jinwoong Kim, Myoung Hee

    2008-12-05

    Previously, we have demonstrated that purified Hoxc8 homeoprotein has the ability to penetrate the cellular membrane and can be transduced efficiently into COS-7 cells. Moreover, the Hoxc8 protein is able to form a complex with DNA molecules in vitro and helps the DNA be delivered intracellularly, serving as a gene delivery vehicle. Here, we further analyzed the membrane transduction activity of Hoxc8 protein and provide the evidence that the 16 amino acid (a.a.191-206, 2.23 kDa) third helix of murine Hoxc8 protein is an efficient protein transduction domain (PTD). When the 16 amino acid peptide was fused at the carboxyl terminal of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), the fusion proteins were transduced efficiently into the primary pig fetal fibroblast cells. The transduction efficiency increased in a concentration-dependent manner up to 1 {mu}M, and appeared to plateau above a concentration of 1 {mu}M. When tandem multimers of PTD, EGFP-PTD(2), EGFP-PTD(3), EGFP-PTD(4), and EGFP-PTD(5), were analyzed at 500 nM of concentration, the penetrating efficiency increased in a dose-dependent manner. As the number of PTDs increased, the EGFP signal also increased, although the signal maintained plateau after EGFP-PTD(3). These results indicate that the 16 amino acid third helix is the key element responsible for the membrane transduction activity of Hoxc8 proteins, and further suggest that the small peptide could serve as a therapeutic delivery vehicle for large cargo proteins.

  10. Polymeric microspheres as protein transduction reagents.

    PubMed

    Nagel, David; Behrendt, Jonathan M; Chimonides, Gwen F; Torr, Elizabeth E; Devitt, Andrew; Sutherland, Andrew J; Hine, Anna V

    2014-06-01

    Discovering the function of an unknown protein, particularly one with neither structural nor functional correlates, is a daunting task. Interaction analyses determine binding partners, whereas DNA transfection, either transient or stable, leads to intracellular expression, though not necessarily at physiologically relevant levels. In theory, direct intracellular protein delivery (protein transduction) provides a conceptually simpler alternative, but in practice the approach is problematic. Domains such as HIV TAT protein are valuable, but their effectiveness is protein specific. Similarly, the delivery of intact proteins via endocytic pathways (e.g. using liposomes) is problematic for functional analysis because of the potential for protein degradation in the endosomes/lysosomes. Consequently, recent reports that microspheres can deliver bio-cargoes into cells via a non-endocytic, energy-independent pathway offer an exciting and promising alternative for in vitro delivery of functional protein. In order for such promise to be fully exploited, microspheres are required that (i) are stably linked to proteins, (ii) can deliver those proteins with good efficiency, (iii) release functional protein once inside the cells, and (iv) permit concomitant tracking. Herein, we report the application of microspheres to successfully address all of these criteria simultaneously, for the first time. After cellular uptake, protein release was autocatalyzed by the reducing cytoplasmic environment. Outside of cells, the covalent microsphere-protein linkage was stable for ≥90 h at 37 °C. Using conservative methods of estimation, 74.3% ± 5.6% of cells were shown to take up these microspheres after 24 h of incubation, with the whole process of delivery and intracellular protein release occurring within 36 h. Intended for in vitro functional protein research, this approach will enable study of the consequences of protein delivery at physiologically relevant levels, without recourse to

  11. Frequency of F116-mediated transduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a freshwater environment.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, W D; Miller, R V; Sayler, G S

    1978-01-01

    Transduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa streptomycin resistance by a generalized transducing phage, F116, was shown to occur during a 10-day incubation in a flow-through environmental test chamber suspended in a freshwater reservoir. Mean F116 transduction frequencies ranged from 1.4 X 10(-5) to 8.3 X 10(-2) transductants per recipient during the in situ incubation. These transduction frequencies were comparable to transduction frequencies determined in preliminary laboratory transduction experiments. The results demonstrate the potential for naturally occurring transduction in aquatic environments and concurrent environmental and ecological ramifications. Images PMID:103503

  12. Excitable Signal Transduction Networks in Directed Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Devreotes, Peter N; Bhattacharya, Sayak; Edwards, Marc; Iglesias, Pablo A; Lampert, Thomas; Miao, Yuchuan

    2017-08-09

    Although directed migration of eukaryotic cells may have evolved to escape nutrient depletion, it has been adopted for an extensive range of physiological events during development and in the adult organism. The subversion of these movements results in disease, such as cancer. Mechanisms of propulsion and sensing are extremely diverse, but most eukaryotic cells move by extending actin-filled protrusions termed macropinosomes, pseudopodia, or lamellipodia or by extension of blebs. In addition to motility, directed migration involves polarity and directional sensing. The hundreds of gene products involved in these processes are organized into networks of parallel and interconnected pathways. Many of these components are activated or inhibited coordinately with stimulation and on each spontaneously extended protrusion. Moreover, these networks display hallmarks of excitability, including all-or-nothing responsiveness and wave propagation. Cellular protrusions result from signal transduction waves that propagate outwardly from an origin and drive cytoskeletal activity. The range of the propagating waves and hence the size of the protrusions can be altered by lowering or raising the threshold for network activation, with larger and wider protrusions favoring gliding or oscillatory behavior over amoeboid migration. Here, we evaluate the variety of models of excitable networks controlling directed migration and outline critical tests. We also discuss the utility of this emerging view in producing cell migration and in integrating the various extrinsic cues that direct migration. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology Volume 33 is October 6, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  13. Platelet-activating factor: receptors and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1993-06-15

    During the past two decades, studies describing the chemistry and biology of PAF have been extensive. This potent phosphoacylglycerol exhibits a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological effects in various cells and tissues. PAF acts, through specific receptors and a variety of signal transduction systems, to elicit diverse biochemical responses. Several important future directions can be enumerated for the characterization of PAF receptors and their attendant signalling mechanisms. The recent cloning and sequence analysis of the gene for the PAF receptor will allow a number of important experimental approaches for characterizing the structure and analysing the function of the various domains of the receptor. Using molecular genetic and immunological technologies, questions relating to whether there is receptor heterogeneity, the precise mechanism(s) for the regulation of the PAF receptor, and the molecular details of the signalling mechanisms in which the PAF receptor is involved can be explored. Another area of major significance is the examination of the relationship between the signalling response(s) evoked by PAF binding to its receptor and signalling mechanisms activated by a myriad of other mediators, cytokines and growth factors. A very exciting recent development in which PAF receptors undoubtedly play a role is in the regulation of the function of various cellular adhesion molecules. Finally, there remain many incompletely characterized physiological and pathophysiological situations in which PAF and its receptor play a crucial signalling role. Our laboratory has been active in the elucidation of several tissue responses in which PAF exhibits major autocoid signalling responses, e.g. hepatic injury and inflammation, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and cerebral stimulation and/or trauma. As new experimental strategies are developed for characterizing the fine structure of the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue injury and inflammation, the

  14. Proteasome Inhibitors Decrease AAV2 Capsid derived Peptide Epitope Presentation on MHC Class I Following Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Jonathan D; Hui, Daniel; Downey, Harre D; Dunn, Danielle; Pien, Gary C; Mingozzi, Federico; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A

    2009-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are an extensively studied and highly used vector platform for gene therapy applications. We hypothesize that in the first clinical trial using AAV to treat hemophilia B, AAV capsid proteins were presented on the surface of transduced hepatocytes, resulting in clearance by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and consequent loss of therapeutic transgene expression. It has been previously shown that proteasome inhibitors can have a dramatic effect on AAV transduction in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe using the US Food and Drug Administration-approved proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, to decrease capsid antigen presentation on hepatocytes in vitro, whereas at the same time, enhancing gene expression in vivo. Using an AAV capsid-specific T-cell reporter (TCR) line to analyze the effect of proteasome inhibitors on antigen presentation, we demonstrate capsid antigen presentation at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs), and inhibition of antigen presentation at pharmacologic levels of bortezomib. We also demonstrate that bortezomib can enhance Factor IX (FIX) expression from an AAV2 vector in mice, although the same effect was not observed for AAV8 vectors. A pharmacological agent that can enhance AAV transduction, decrease T-cell activation/proliferation, and decrease capsid antigen presentation would be a promising solution to obstacles to successful AAV-mediated, liver-directed gene transfer in humans. PMID:19904235

  15. Genome-wide RNAi screening identifies host restriction factors critical for in vivo AAV transduction.

    PubMed

    Mano, Miguel; Ippodrino, Rudy; Zentilin, Lorena; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-09-08

    Viral vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) hold great promise for in vivo gene transfer; several unknowns, however, still limit the vectors' broader and more efficient application. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput, whole-genome siRNA screening aimed at identifying cellular factors regulating AAV transduction. We identified 1,483 genes affecting vector efficiency more than 4-fold and up to 50-fold, either negatively or positively. Most of these factors have not previously been associated to AAV infection. The most effective siRNAs were independent from the virus serotype or analyzed cell type and were equally evident for single-stranded and self-complementary AAV vectors. A common characteristic of the most effective siRNAs was the induction of cellular DNA damage and activation of a cell cycle checkpoint. This information can be exploited for the development of more efficient AAV-based gene delivery procedures. Administration of the most effective siRNAs identified by the screening to the liver significantly improved in vivo AAV transduction efficiency.

  16. Genome-wide RNAi screening identifies host restriction factors critical for in vivo AAV transduction

    PubMed Central

    Mano, Miguel; Ippodrino, Rudy; Zentilin, Lorena; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Viral vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) hold great promise for in vivo gene transfer; several unknowns, however, still limit the vectors’ broader and more efficient application. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput, whole-genome siRNA screening aimed at identifying cellular factors regulating AAV transduction. We identified 1,483 genes affecting vector efficiency more than 4-fold and up to 50-fold, either negatively or positively. Most of these factors have not previously been associated to AAV infection. The most effective siRNAs were independent from the virus serotype or analyzed cell type and were equally evident for single-stranded and self-complementary AAV vectors. A common characteristic of the most effective siRNAs was the induction of cellular DNA damage and activation of a cell cycle checkpoint. This information can be exploited for the development of more efficient AAV-based gene delivery procedures. Administration of the most effective siRNAs identified by the screening to the liver significantly improved in vivo AAV transduction efficiency. PMID:26305933

  17. An investigation of spatial signal transduction in cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Alam-Nazki, Aiman; Krishnan, J

    2012-07-05

    Spatial signal transduction plays a vital role in many intracellular processes such as eukaryotic chemotaxis, polarity generation and cell division. Furthermore it is being increasingly realized that the spatial dimension to signalling may play an important role in other apparently purely temporal signal transduction processes. It is increasingly being recognized that a conceptual basis for studying spatial signal transduction in signalling networks is necessary. In this work we examine spatial signal transduction in a series of standard motifs/networks. These networks include coherent and incoherent feedforward, positive and negative feedback, cyclic motifs, monostable switches, bistable switches and negative feedback oscillators. In all these cases, the driving signal has spatial variation. For each network we consider two cases, one where all elements are essentially non-diffusible, and the other where one of the network elements may be highly diffusible. A careful analysis of steady state signal transduction provides many insights into the behaviour of all these modules. While in the non-diffusible case for the most part, spatial signalling reflects the temporal signalling behaviour, in the diffusible cases, we see significant differences between spatial and temporal signalling characteristics. Our results demonstrate that the presence of diffusible elements in the networks provides important constraints and capabilities for signalling. Our results provide a systematic basis for understanding spatial signalling in networks and the role of diffusible elements therein. This provides many insights into the signal transduction capabilities and constraints in such networks and suggests ways in which cellular signalling and information processing is organized to conform to or bypass those constraints. It also provides a framework for starting to understand the organization and regulation of spatial signal transduction in individual processes.

  18. An investigation of spatial signal transduction in cellular networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spatial signal transduction plays a vital role in many intracellular processes such as eukaryotic chemotaxis, polarity generation and cell division. Furthermore it is being increasingly realized that the spatial dimension to signalling may play an important role in other apparently purely temporal signal transduction processes. It is increasingly being recognized that a conceptual basis for studying spatial signal transduction in signalling networks is necessary. Results In this work we examine spatial signal transduction in a series of standard motifs/networks. These networks include coherent and incoherent feedforward, positive and negative feedback, cyclic motifs, monostable switches, bistable switches and negative feedback oscillators. In all these cases, the driving signal has spatial variation. For each network we consider two cases, one where all elements are essentially non-diffusible, and the other where one of the network elements may be highly diffusible. A careful analysis of steady state signal transduction provides many insights into the behaviour of all these modules. While in the non-diffusible case for the most part, spatial signalling reflects the temporal signalling behaviour, in the diffusible cases, we see significant differences between spatial and temporal signalling characteristics. Our results demonstrate that the presence of diffusible elements in the networks provides important constraints and capabilities for signalling. Conclusions Our results provide a systematic basis for understanding spatial signalling in networks and the role of diffusible elements therein. This provides many insights into the signal transduction capabilities and constraints in such networks and suggests ways in which cellular signalling and information processing is organized to conform to or bypass those constraints. It also provides a framework for starting to understand the organization and regulation of spatial signal transduction in individual

  19. AAV-mediated transduction and targeting of retinal bipolar cells with improved mGluR6 promoters in rodents and primates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q; Ganjawala, T H; Ivanova, E; Cheng, J G; Troilo, D; Pan, Z-H

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been a powerful gene delivery vehicle to the retina for basic research and gene therapy. For many of these applications, achieving cell type-specific targeting and high transduction efficiency is desired. Recently, there has been increasing interest in AAV-mediated gene targeting to specific retinal bipolar cell types. A 200-bp enhancer in combination with a basal SV40 promoter has been commonly used to target transgenes into ON-type bipolar cells. In the current study, we searched for additional cis-regulatory elements in the mGluR6 gene for improving AAV-mediated transduction efficiency into retinal bipolar cells. Our results showed that the combination of the endogenous mGluR6 promoter with additional enhancers in the introns of the mGluR6 gene markedly enhanced AAV transduction efficiency as well as made the targeting more selective for rod bipolar cells in mice. Furthermore, the AAV vectors with the improved promoter could target to ON bipolar cells with robust transduction efficiency in the parafovea and the far peripheral retina of marmoset monkeys. The improved mGluR6 promoter constructs could provide a valuable tool for genetic manipulation in rod bipolar cells in mice and facilitate clinical applications for ON bipolar cell-based gene therapies.

  20. AAV-Mediated Transduction and Targeting of Retinal Bipolar Cells with Improved mGluR6 Promoters in Rodents and Primates

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q; Ganjawala, TH; Ivanova, E; Cheng, JG; Troilo, D; Pan, Z-H

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been a powerful gene delivery vehicle to the retina for basic research and gene therapy. For many of these applications, achieving cell-type specific targeting and high transduction efficiency is desired. Recently, there has been increasing interest in AAV-mediated gene targeting to specific retinal bipolar cell types. A 200-bp enhancer in combination with a basal SV40 promoter has been commonly used to target transgenes into ON-type bipolar cells. In the current study, we searched for additional cis-regulatory elements in the mGluR6 gene for improving AAV-mediated transduction efficiency into retinal bipolar cells. Our results showed that the combination of the endogenous mGluR6 promoter with additional enhancers in the introns of the mGluR6 gene markedly enhanced AAV transduction efficiency as well as made the targeting more selective for rod bipolar cells in mice. Furthermore, the AAV vectors with the improved promoter could target to ON bipolar cells with robust transduction efficiency in the para-fovea and the far peripheral retina of marmoset monkeys. The improved mGluR6 promoter constructs could provide a valuable tool for genetic manipulation in rod bipolar cells in mice and facilitate clinical applications for ON bipolar cell-based gene therapies. PMID:27115727

  1. Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) significantly increases AAV2/5 transduction of human neuronal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    You, Qisheng; Brown, Laurence A; McClements, Michelle; Hankins, Mark W; Maclaren, Robert E

    2012-04-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) vectors have shown great promise in current ophthalmology clinical trials targeting gene delivery to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). To treat the majority of retinal diseases, however, gene delivery would need to be targeted to photoreceptor neurons of the outer retina. AAV2 pseudotyped with the AAV5 capsid (AAV2/5) has shown far greater transduction efficiency in photoreceptors compared to standard AAV2 vectors. For clinical trial applications using gene therapy, it is helpful to generate pre-clinical data in human cells wherever possible. There is however very little data, indeed some controversy, as to whether AAV2/5 can be used effectively in differentiated neurons in culture. In this study we show that transduction of the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y with recombinant AAV2/5 expressing GFP is well tolerated. Furthermore, we explore the mechanism whereby exposure to retinoic acid (RA) and the phorbol ester 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13- acetate (TPA) can induce this cell line to differentiate into a stable population of human neurons, with significantly increased levels of AAV2/5 transduction. These observations may be helpful for assessing AAV2/5 vectors in vitro, particularly where it is necessary to generate pre-clinical data for clinical trials of gene therapy to the human central nervous system. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. G protein defects in signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A M

    2000-01-01

    G proteins couple receptors for many hormones to effectors that regulate second messenger metabolism. Several endocrine disorders have been shown to be caused by either loss- or gain-of-function mutations in G proteins or G protein-coupled receptors. In pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia), there are generalized hormone resistance (parathyroid hormone [PTH], thyroid-stimulating hormone, gonadotropins) and associated abnormal physical features, Albright hereditary osteodystrophy. Subjects with PHP Ib are normal in appearance and show renal resistance to PTH. In McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS), subjects show autonomous endocrine hyperfunction associated with fibrous dysplasia of bone and skin hyperpigmentation. Germline loss-of-function mutations have been identified in the G(s)-alpha gene in PHP Ia, and recent evidence suggests that the G(s)-alpha gene is paternally imprinted in a tissue-specific manner. Abnormal imprinting of the G(s)-alpha gene may be the cause of PHP Ib. MAS, in contrast, is caused by gain-of-function missense mutations of the G(s)-alpha gene. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Reciprocity and gyrotropism in magnetic resonance transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tropp, James

    2006-12-15

    We give formulas for transduction in magnetic resonance - i.e., the appearance of an emf due to Larmor precession of spins - based upon the modified Lorentz reciprocity principle for gyrotropic (also called 'nonreciprocal') media, i.e., in which a susceptibility tensor is carried to its transpose by reversal of an external static field [cf., R. F. Harrington and A. T. Villeneuve IRE Trans. Microwave Theory and Technique MTT6, 308 (1958)]. Prior applications of reciprocity to magnetic resonance, despite much success, have ignored the gyrotropism which necessarily arises due to nuclear and/or unpaired electronic spins. For detection with linearly polarized fields, oscillating at the Larmor frequency, the emf is written in terms of a volume integral containing a product of two factors which we define as the antenna patterns, i.e. (H{sub 1x}{+-}iH{sub 1y}), where, e.g., for a single transceive antenna, the H's are just the spatially dependent oscillatory magnetic field strengths, per the application of some reference current at the antenna terminals, with the negative sign obtaining for transmission, and the positive for reception. Similar expressions hold for separate transmit and receive antennas; expressions are also given for circular polarization of the fields. We then exhibit a receive-only array antenna of two elements for magnetic resonance imaging of protons, which, due an intensity artifact arising from stray reactive coupling of the elements, produces, despite its own bilateral symmetry, asymmetric proton NMR images of a symmetric cylindrical phantom containing aqueous saline solution [J. Tropp and T. Schirmer, J. Magn. Reson. 151, 146 (2001)]. Modification of this two-port antenna, to function in transmit-receive mode, allows us to demonstrate highly nonreciprocal behavior: that is, to record images (of cylindrical test phantoms containing aqueous saline solution) whose appearance dramatically changes, when the roles of transmission and reception are

  4. AAV8 capsid variable regions at the two-fold symmetry axis contribute to high liver transduction by mediating nuclear entry and capsid uncoating

    SciTech Connect

    Tenney, Rebeca M.; Bell, Christie L.; Wilson, James M.

    2014-04-15

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) is a promising vector for liver-directed gene therapy. Although efficient uncoating of viral capsids has been implicated in AAV8's robust liver transduction, much about the biology of AAV8 hepatotropism remains unclear. Our study investigated the structural basis of AAV8 liver transduction efficiency by constructing chimeric vector capsids containing sequences derived from AAV8 and AAV2 – a highly homologous yet poorly hepatotropic serotype. Engineered vectors containing capsid variable regions (VR) VII and IX from AAV8 in an AAV2 backbone mediated near AAV8-like transduction in mouse liver, with higher numbers of chimeric genomes detected in whole liver cells and isolated nuclei. Interestingly, chimeric capsids within liver nuclei also uncoated similarly to AAV8 by 6 weeks after administration, in contrast with AAV2, of which a significantly smaller proportion were uncoated. This study links specific AAV capsid regions to the transduction ability of a clinically relevant AAV serotype. - Highlights: • We construct chimeric vectors to identify determinants of AAV8 liver transduction. • An AAV2-based vector with 17 AAV8 residues exhibited high liver transduction in mice. • This vector also surpassed AAV2 in cell entry, nuclear entry and onset of expression. • Most chimeric vector particles were uncoated at 6 weeks, like AAV8 and unlike AAV2. • Chimera retained heparin binding and was antigenically distinct from AAV2 and AAV8.

  5. Branched oligomerization of cell-permeable peptides markedly enhances the transduction efficiency of adenovirus into mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, S-H; Doh, J; Park, S I; Lim, J Y; Kim, S M; Youn, J-I; Jin, H-T; Seo, S-H; Song, M-Y; Sung, S Y; Kim, M; Hwang, S J; Choi, J-M; Lee, S-K; Lee, H Y; Lim, C L; Chung, Y J; Yang, D; Kim, H-N; Lee, Z H; Choi, K Y; Jeun, S-S; Sung, Y C

    2010-08-01

    Cell-permeable peptides (CPPs) promote the transduction of nonpermissive cells by recombinant adenovirus (rAd) to improve the therapeutic efficacy of rAd. In this study, branched oligomerization of CPPs significantly enhanced the transduction of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by rAd in a CPP type-independent manner. In particular, tetrameric CPPs increased transduction efficiency at 3000-5000-fold lower concentrations than did monomeric CPPs. Although branched oligomerization of CPPs also increases cytotoxicity, optimal concentrations of tetrameric CPPs required for maximum transduction are at least 300-1000-fold lower than those causing 50% cytotoxicity. Furthermore, although only approximately 60% of MSCs were maximally transduced at 500 muM of monomeric CPPs, >95% of MSCs were transduced with 0.1 muM of tetrameric CPPs. Tetrameric CPPs also significantly increased the formation and net surface charge of CPP/rAd complexes, as well as the binding of rAd to cell membranes at a greater degree than did monomeric CPPs, followed by rapid internalization into MSCs. In a critical-size calvarial defect model, the inclusion of tetrameric CPPs in ex vivo transduction of rAd expressing bone morphogenetic protein 2 into MSCs promoted highly mineralized bone formation. In addition, MSCs that were transduced with rAd expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the presence of tetrameric CPPs improved functional recovery in a spinal cord injury model. These results demonstrated the potential for tetrameric CPPs to provide an innovative tool for MSC-based gene therapy and for in vitro gene delivery to MSCs.

  6. Hepatocyte Heparan Sulfate Is Required for Adeno-Associated Virus 2 but Dispensable for Adenovirus 5 Liver Transduction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zaiss, Anne K.; Foley, Erin M.; Lawrence, Roger; Schneider, Lina S.; Hoveida, Hamidreza; Secrest, Patrick; Catapang, Arthur B.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Alemany, Ramon; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) and adenovirus 5 (Ad5) are promising gene therapy vectors. Both display liver tropism and are currently thought to enter hepatocytes in vivo through cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). To test directly this hypothesis, we created mice that lack Ext1, an enzyme required for heparan sulfate biosynthesis, in hepatocytes. Ext1HEP mutant mice exhibit an 8-fold reduction of heparan sulfate in primary hepatocytes and a 5-fold reduction of heparan sulfate in whole liver tissue. Conditional hepatocyte Ext1 gene deletion greatly reduced AAV2 liver transduction following intravenous injection. Ad5 transduction requires blood coagulation factor X (FX); FX binds to the Ad5 capsid hexon protein and bridges the virus to HSPGs on the cell surface. Ad5.FX transduction was abrogated in primary hepatocytes from Ext1HEP mice. However, in contrast to the case with AAV2, Ad5 transduction was not significantly reduced in the livers of Ext1HEP mice. FX remained essential for Ad5 transduction in vivo in Ext1HEP mice. We conclude that while AAV2 requires HSPGs for entry into mouse hepatocytes, HSPGs are dispensable for Ad5 hepatocyte transduction in vivo. This study reopens the question of how adenovirus enters cells in vivo. IMPORTANCE Our understanding of how viruses enter cells, and how they can be used as therapeutic vectors to manage disease, begins with identification of the cell surface receptors to which viruses bind and which mediate viral entry. Both adeno-associated virus 2 and adenovirus 5 are currently thought to enter hepatocytes in vivo through heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). However, direct evidence for these conclusions is lacking. Experiments presented herein, in which hepatic heparan sulfate synthesis was genetically abolished, demonstrated that HSPGs are not likely to function as hepatocyte Ad5 receptors in vivo. The data also demonstrate that HSPGs are required for hepatocyte transduction by AAV2. These

  7. Efficient and Targeted Transduction of Nonhuman Primate Liver With Systemically Delivered Optimized AAV3B Vectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyong; Ling, Chen; Zhong, Li; Li, Mengxin; Su, Qin; He, Ran; Tang, Qiushi; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Brehm, Michael A; Flotte, Terence R; Mueller, Christian; Srivastava, Arun; Gao, Guangping

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (rAAV3B) can transduce cultured human liver cancer cells and primary human hepatocytes efficiently. Serine (S)- and threonine (T)-directed capsid modifications further augment its transduction efficiency. Systemically delivered capsid-optimized rAAV3B vectors can specifically target cancer cells in a human liver cancer xenograft model, suggesting their potential use for human liver-directed gene therapy. Here, we compared transduction efficiencies of AAV3B and AAV8 vectors in cultured primary human hepatocytes and cancer cells as well as in human and mouse hepatocytes in a human liver xenograft NSG-PiZ mouse model. We also examined the safety and transduction efficacy of wild-type (WT) and capsid-optimized rAAV3B in the livers of nonhuman primates (NHPs). Intravenously delivered S663V+T492V (ST)-modified self-complementary (sc) AAV3B-EGFP vectors led to liver-targeted robust enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) expression in NHPs without apparent hepatotoxicity. Intravenous injections of both WT and ST-modified rAAV3B.ST-rhCG vectors also generated stable super-physiological levels of rhesus chorionic gonadotropin (rhCG) in NHPs. The vector genome predominantly targeted the liver. Clinical chemistry and histopathology examinations showed no apparent vector-related toxicity. Our studies should be important and informative for clinical development of optimized AAV3B vectors for human liver-directed gene therapy.

  8. Syntaxin 5-Dependent Retrograde Transport to the trans-Golgi Network Is Required for Adeno-Associated Virus Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Nonnenmacher, Mathieu E.; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular transport of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) is still incompletely understood. In particular, the trafficking steps preceding the release of incoming AAV particles from the endosomal system into the cytoplasm, allowing subsequent nuclear import and the initiation of gene expression, remain to be elucidated fully. Others and we previously showed that a significant proportion of viral particles are transported to the Golgi apparatus and that Golgi apparatus disruption caused by the drug brefeldin A efficiently blocks AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) transduction. However, because brefeldin A is known to exert pleiotropic effects on the entire endosomal system, the functional relevance of transport to the Golgi apparatus for AAV transduction remains to be established definitively. Here, we show that AAV2 trafficking toward the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the Golgi apparatus correlates with transduction efficiency and relies on a nonclassical retrograde transport pathway that is independent of the retromer complex, late endosomes, and recycling endosomes. AAV2 transduction is unaffected by the knockdown of syntaxins 6 and 16, which are two major effectors in the retrograde transport of both exogenous and endogenous cargo. On the other hand, inhibition of syntaxin 5 function by small interfering RNA silencing or treatment with cyclized Retro-2 strongly decreases AAV2 transduction and transport to the Golgi apparatus. This inhibition of transduction is observed with several AAV serotypes and a number of primary and immortalized cells. Together, our data strongly suggest that syntaxin 5-mediated retrograde transport to the Golgi apparatus is a broadly conserved feature of AAV trafficking that appears to be independent of the identity of the receptors used for viral attachment. IMPORTANCE Gene therapy constitutes a promising approach for the treatment of life-threatening conditions refractory to any other form of remedy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV

  9. [Progress of studies on acu-moxibustion stimulation-induced cellular transmembrane signal transduction of the target-organs].

    PubMed

    Yi, Shou-Xiang; Peng, Yan

    2009-10-01

    Abundant research results have shown that multiple levels and links of cellular transmembrane signal transduction pathways in the target organs were involved in the efficacy of acupuncture. For instance, 1) various extra-cellular growth factors for initiating signal transduction by activating tyrosine protein kinase and non-receptor tyrosine kinase, 2) G protein-coupled protein kinase-second signal messengers, 3) ligands acting on intra-nuclear receptors to activate transduction pathway of nuclear transcription factors of the target genes, have been demonstrated in the favorable regulating process of acupuncture and moxibustion in different pathological animal models. In the present paper, the authors review the progress of studies on the abovementioned mechanism of acu-moxibustion underlying improving some disorders as 1) pain, cerebral ischemia, and senile dementia, 2) inflammation and tumor, and 3) myocardial ischemia. Moreover, the authors also analyze the extant problems and make a prospect on the future studies about the cellular transmembrane signal transduction pathways involving the effects of acupuncture and moxibustion.

  10. Influence of two-component signal transduction systems of Lactobacillus casei BL23 on tolerance to stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cristina; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2011-02-01

    Lactobacillus casei BL23 carries 17 two-component signal transduction systems. Insertional mutations were introduced into each gene encoding the cognate response regulators, and their effects on growth under different conditions were assayed. Inactivation of systems TC01, TC06, and TC12 (LCABL_02080-LCABL_02090, LCABL_12050-LCABL_12060, and LCABL_19600-LCABL_19610, respectively) led to major growth defects under the conditions assayed.

  11. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how different HK domains undergo asymmetric-to-symmetric transitions during signal transduction and catalysis. A thermodynamic framework for signaling that encompasses these various properties is presented and the consequences of weak thermodynamic coupling are discussed. The synthesis of observations from enzymology, structural biology, protein engineering and thermodynamics paves the way for a deeper molecular understanding of histidine kinase signal transduction. PMID:25982528

  12. Nonreciprocal Radio Frequency Transduction in a Parametric Mechanical Artificial Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pu; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Jingwei; Tian, Tian; Yin, Peiran; Duan, Changkui; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Generating nonreciprocal radio frequency transduction plays important roles in a wide range of research and applications, and an aspiration is to integrate this functionality into microcircuits without introducing a magnetic field, which, however, remains challenging. By designing a 1D artificial lattice structure with a neighbor interaction engineered parametrically, we predicted a nonreciprocity transduction with a large unidirectionality. We then experimentally demonstrated the phenomenon on a nanoelectromechanical chip fabricated by conventional complementary metal-silicon processing. A unidirectionality with isolation as high as 24 dB is achieved, and several different transduction schemes are realized by programing the control voltage topology. Apart from being used as a radio frequency isolator, the system provides a way to build a practical on-chip programmable device for broad research and applications in the radio frequency domain.

  13. Cell-penetrating peptides: Possible transduction mechanisms and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHENGRONG; PENG, HUANYAN; KANG, JIWEN; SUN, DIANXING

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also known as protein transduction domains, are a class of diverse peptides with 5–30 amino acids. CPPs are divided into cationic, amphipathic and hydrophobic CPPs. They are able to carry small molecules, plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, proteins, viruses, imaging agents and other various nanoparticles across the cellular membrane, resulting in internalization of the intact cargos. However, the mechanisms of CPP internalization remain to be elucidated. Recently, CPPs have received considerable attention due to their high transduction efficiency and low cytotoxicity. These peptides have a significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, delivery of peptides and proteins for therapeutic application, and delivery of molecules into induced pluripotent stem cells for directing differentiation. The present study reviews the classifications and transduction mechanisms of CPPs, as well as their potential applications. PMID:27123243

  14. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  15. Signal transduction during light-quality acclimation in cyanobacteria: a model system for understanding phytochrome-response pathways in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Stowe-Evans, Emily L; Kehoe, David M

    2004-06-01

    The colorful process of complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA), in which cyanobacteria dramatically alter their pigmentation in response to ambient light color changes, has intrigued scientists for more than a century. Over the past four decades, intensive research on the model organism Fremyella diplosiphon has revealed many details of the photobiology and molecular biology of this process, which includes restructuring of these organism's photosynthetic light-harvesting antennae, called phycobilisomes. This restructuring involves changes in transcription of genes encoding phycobilisome components. These genes have been cloned and their patterns of light-responsive expression characterized. In the past ten years, attention has focused on the signal transduction mechanism(s) through which cyanobacteria sense and respond to changes in ambient light color. Genetic approaches led to the isolation of signal transduction components that control light-color responses in F. diplosiphon. Several of these appear to be within a complex phosphorelay that is in part controlled by a photoreceptor called RcaE, the founding member of a large, novel class of prokaryotic photoreceptors with similarity to both plant phytochrome photoreceptors and sensor histidine kinases. The strong foundation of knowledge provided by years of research on CCA makes this a powerful model system for studying signal transduction systems controlled by prokaryotic phytochromes. In this regard, recent results demonstrate that multiple light sensing systems control this organism's responses to changes in light quality and that large numbers of genes are differentially regulated during this process.

  16. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  17. One-component systems dominate signal transduction in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Luke E.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2009-01-01

    Two-component systems that link environmental signals to cellular responses are viewed as the primary mode of signal transduction in prokaryotes. By analyz-ing information encoded by 145 prokaryotic genomes, we found that the majority of signal transduction systems consist of a single protein that contains input and output domains but lacks phosphotransfer domains typical of two-component systems. One-component systems are evolutionarily older, more widely distributed among bacteria and archaea, and display a greater diversity of domains than two-component systems. PMID:15680762

  18. Protein Interaction and Na/K-ATPase-Mediated Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyu; Xie, Zijian

    2017-06-14

    The Na/K-ATPase (NKA), or Na pump, is a member of the P-type ATPase superfamily. In addition to pumping ions across cell membrane, it is engaged in assembly of multiple protein complexes in the plasma membrane. This assembly allows NKA to perform many non-pumping functions including signal transduction that are important for animal physiology and disease progression. This article will focus on the role of protein interaction in NKA-mediated signal transduction, and its potential utility as target for developing new therapeutics.

  19. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  20. Crosstalk between Photoreceptor and Sugar Signaling Modulates Floral Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Matsoukas, Ianis G.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, integrated genetic, cellular, proteomic and genomic approaches have begun to unravel the surprisingly crosstalk between photoreceptors and sugar signaling in regulation of floral signal transduction. Although a number of physiological factors in the pathway have been identified, the molecular genetic interactions of some components are less well understood. The further elucidation of the crosstalk mechanisms between photoreceptors and sugar signaling will certainly contribute to our better understanding of the developmental circuitry that controls floral signal transduction. This article summarizes our current knowledge of this crosstalk, which has not received much attention, and suggests possible directions for future research. PMID:28659814

  1. Crosstalk between Photoreceptor and Sugar Signaling Modulates Floral Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Matsoukas, Ianis G

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, integrated genetic, cellular, proteomic and genomic approaches have begun to unravel the surprisingly crosstalk between photoreceptors and sugar signaling in regulation of floral signal transduction. Although a number of physiological factors in the pathway have been identified, the molecular genetic interactions of some components are less well understood. The further elucidation of the crosstalk mechanisms between photoreceptors and sugar signaling will certainly contribute to our better understanding of the developmental circuitry that controls floral signal transduction. This article summarizes our current knowledge of this crosstalk, which has not received much attention, and suggests possible directions for future research.

  2. Mechanism and evolution of cytosolic Hedgehog signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christopher W.; Chuang, Pao-Tien

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is required for embryonic patterning and postnatal physiology in invertebrates and vertebrates. With the revelation that the primary cilium is crucial for mammalian Hh signaling, the prevailing view that Hh signal transduction mechanisms are conserved across species has been challenged. However, more recent progress on elucidating the function of core Hh pathway cytosolic regulators in Drosophila, zebrafish and mice has confirmed that the essential logic of Hh transduction is similar between species. Here, we review Hh signaling events at the membrane and in the cytosol, and focus on parallel and divergent functions of cytosolic Hh regulators in Drosophila and mammals. PMID:20530542

  3. Targeted Lymphoma Cell Death by Novel Signal Transduction Modifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-14

    CD22-binding peptides that initiate signal transduction and apoptosis in non -Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), 2) optimize CD22-mediated signal transduction...positive non -Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), much as rituximab (Rituxan) is an option to patients with CD20-positive NHL. By sequencing the heavy and...Int J Pept Res Ther (2008) 14:237–246 8. O’Donnell RT, Pearson D, McKnight HC, Ma YP, Tuscano JM. Treatment of non -Hodgkin’s lymphoma xenografts with

  4. The transduction of Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-negative cells and protection against neutralizing antibodies by HPMA-co-oligolysine copolymer-coated adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chung-Huei K.; Chan, Leslie W.; Johnson, Russell N.; Chu, David S.H.; Shi, Julie; Schellinger, Joan G.; Lieber, Andre; Pun, Suzie H.

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviral (AdV) gene vectors offer efficient nucleic acid transfer into both dividing and non-dividing cells. However issues such as vector immunogenicity, toxicity and restricted transduction to receptor-expressing cells have prevented broad clinical translation of these constructs. To address this issue, engineered AdV have been prepared by both genetic and chemical manipulation. In this work, a polymer-coated Ad5 formulation is optimized by evaluating a series of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA)-co-oligolysine copolymers synthesized by living polymerization techniques. This synthesis approach was used to generate highly controlled and well-defined polymers with varying peptide length (K5, K10 and K15), polymer molecular weight, and degradability to coat the viral capsid. The optimal formulation was not affected by the presence of serum during transduction and significantly increased Ad5 transduction of several cell types that lack the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) by up to 6-fold compared to unmodified AdV. Polymer-coated Ad5 also retained high transduction capability in the presence of Ad5 neutralizing antibodies. The critical role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in mediating cell binding and internalization of polymer-coated AdV was also demonstrated by evaluating transduction in HSPG-defective recombinant CHO cells. The formulations developed here are attractive vectors for ex vivo gene transfer in applications such as cell therapy. In addition, this platform for adenoviral modification allows for facile introduction of alternative targeting ligands. PMID:21959008

  5. Further evidence supporting a role for gs signal transduction in severe malaria pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Auburn, Sarah; Fry, Andrew E; Clark, Taane G; Campino, Susana; Diakite, Mahamadou; Green, Angela; Richardson, Anna; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Pinder, Margaret; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Taylor, Terrie E; Haldar, Kasturi; Rockett, Kirk A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2010-04-01

    With the functional demonstration of a role in erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites, implications in the aetiology of common conditions that prevail in individuals of African origin, and a wealth of pharmacological knowledge, the stimulatory G protein (Gs) signal transduction pathway presents an exciting target for anti-malarial drug intervention. Having previously demonstrated a role for the G-alpha-s gene, GNAS, in severe malaria disease, we sought to identify other important components of the Gs pathway. Using meta-analysis across case-control and family trio (affected child and parental controls) studies of severe malaria from The Gambia and Malawi, we sought evidence of association in six Gs pathway candidate genes: adenosine receptor 2A (ADORA2A) and 2B (ADORA2B), beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1), adenylyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9), G protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3), and regulator of G protein signalling 2 (RGS2). Our study amassed a total of 2278 cases and 2364 controls. Allele-based models of association were investigated in all genes, and genotype and haplotype-based models were investigated where significant allelic associations were identified. Although no significant associations were observed in the other genes, several were identified in ADORA2A. The most significant association was observed at the rs9624472 locus, where the G allele (approximately 20% frequency) appeared to confer enhanced risk to severe malaria [OR = 1.22 (1.09-1.37); P = 0.001]. Further investigation of the ADORA2A gene region is required to validate the associations identified here, and to identify and functionally characterize the responsible causal variant(s). Our results provide further evidence supporting a role of the Gs signal transduction pathway in the regulation of severe malaria, and request further exploration of this pathway in future studies.

  6. Molecular Analysis of the Graviperception Signal Transduction in the Flagellate Euglena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, Donat; Daiker, Viktor; Richter, Peter; Lebert, Michael

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis perceives and reacts to the gravitational vector of the Earth. Recent results of experiments on parabolic rocket flights have revealed that the orientation can be explained by passive orientation only to a small extend while the remainder relies on an active physiological sensor and an internal sensory transduction chain. Our current working hypothesis is based on the fact that the cellular contents is heavier than the surrounding medium and consequently exerts pressure onto the lower membrane where it activates mechano-sensitive ion channels located at the front end under the trailing flagellum. We recently succeeded in identifying these channels as gene products of the TRP family. RNAi of the corresponding gene abolished graviperception. These channels allow a gated influx of calcium which depolarizes the internal electrical potential and eventually causes a course correction by the flagellar beating. The inwardly gated calcium binds to a specific calmodulin which is likewise an intrinsic element of the signal transduction chain. RNAi of the related mRNA also stopped graviperception. This calmodulin is thought to activate an adenylyl cyclase which generates cyclic AMP which in turn modulates the beating pattern of the flagellum.

  7. [Two-component signal transduction as attractive drug targets in pathogenic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Ryutaro; Igarashi, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Gene clusters contributing to processes such as cell growth and pathogenicity are often controlled by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs). TCS consists of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). TCSs are attractive as drug targets for antimicrobials because many HK and RR genes are coded on the bacterial genome though few are found in lower eukaryotes. The HK/RR signal transduction system is distinct from serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation in higher eukaryotes. Specific inhibitors against TCS systems work differently from conventional antibiotics, and developing them into new drugs that are effective against various drug-resistant bacteria may be possible. Furthermore, inhibitors of TCSs that control virulence factors may reduce virulence without killing the pathogenic bacteria. Previous TCS inhibitors targeting the kinase domain of the histidine kinase sensor suffered from poor selectivity. Recent TCS inhibitors, however, target the sensory domains of the sensors blocking the quorum sensing system, or target the essential response regulator. These new targets are introduced, together with several specific TCSs that have the potential to serve as effective drug targets.

  8. Autophagy-mediated catabolism of visual transduction proteins prevents retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jingyu; Jia, Lin; Feathers, Kecia; Lin, Chengmao; Khan, Naheed W; Klionsky, Daniel J; Ferguson, Thomas A; Zacks, David N

    2016-12-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway critical to preventing the accumulation of cytotoxic proteins. Deletion of the essential autophagy gene Atg5 from the rod photoreceptors of the retina (atg5(Δrod) mouse) results in the accumulation of the phototransduction protein transducin and the degeneration of these neurons. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that autophagic degradation of visual transduction proteins prevents retinal degeneration. Targeted deletion of both Gnat1 (a gene encoding the α subunit of the heterotrimeric G-protein transducin) and Atg5 in the rod photoreceptors resulted in a significantly decreased rate of rod cell degeneration as compared to the atg5(Δrod) mouse retina, and considerable preservation of photoreceptors. Supporting this we used a novel technique to immunoprecipitate green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged autophagosomes from the retinas of the GFP-LC3 mice and demonstrated that the visual transduction proteins transducin and ARR/arrestin are associated with autophagosome-specific proteins. Altogether, this study shows that degradation of phototransduction proteins by autophagy is necessary to prevent retinal degeneration. In addition, we demonstrate a simple and easily reproducible immunoisolation technique for enrichment of autophagosomes from the GFP-LC3 mouse retina, providing a novel application to the study of autophagosome contents across different organs and specific cell types in vivo.

  9. Mutations affecting the cAMP transduction pathway modify olfaction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Martín, F; Charro, M J; Alcorta, E

    2001-06-01

    The rutabaga and dunce genes, encode two enzymes of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate transduction pathway in Drosophila, adenylyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase, respectively. Two main second messenger systems, depending on inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, have been associated with olfaction in vertebrates as well as invertebrates. A relationship between the cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway and olfactory reception in Drosophila is suggested by the presence of cyclic nucleotide gated channels and cyclic-nucleotide modulated K+ channels in the antennae, the main olfactory organs. In this report, molecular, electrophysiological and behavioral data support the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in olfactory function for this species. Expression of both genes in the antennae has been shown by messenger ribonucleic acid analysis. Changes in the electroantennogram kinetics have been observed specifically on the slope of the initial rising phase, as predicted for processes that affect cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentration. Olfactory behavior changes due to both mutations were coherent with a functional meaning of the reported electrophysiological phenotype in olfactory perception. Sensitivity level increases or decreases for the mutants compared to the control line depending on the odorant. These results are compatible with some olfactory coding at the reception level by differential activation of a dual transduction system involving the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and cyclic adenosine monophosphate cas