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Sample records for betatron tune profile

  1. First order tune shift calculations for transverse betatron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Garavaglia, T.

    1991-09-01

    An effective Hamiltonian, with non-linear magnetic multipole terms and momentum dispersion contributions, is used to obtain the first order tune-shift results for transverse betatron motion for protons in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). This Hamiltonian is represented in terms of action angle variables, and analytical results are obtained using symbolic algebra methods. Mathematical derivations of the transverse multipole expansion and of the transverse betatron equations, using an invariant action and curvilinear coordinates, are given in the appendices. Numerical and graphical tune-space results are given that illustrate the dependence of tune-shifts on injection amplitude and momentum spread. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Betatron tune measurement at the Argonne Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Rauchas, A.V.; Brumwell, F.R.; Cho, Y.; Czyz, W.S.; Gunderson, G.R.; Knott, M.J.; Suddeth, D.E.; Volk, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the past, betatron tune measurements at the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) were made using a spectrum analyzer for betatron frequency analysis and one of the extraction kicker magnets to induce the coherent betatron motion. This method had several severe limitations: poor signal-to-noise ratio, inability to extract the beam after the measurement and dependence on the horizontal kick coupling into the vertical plane for vertical tune measurements. A new system is presently being constructed which will eliminate these problems. The beam will be kicked by independent horizontal and vertical ferrite pinger magnets. The beam positron data will be digitized and then analyzed by an array-processing computer using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The control system will allow for additional improvements.

  3. Betatron tune measurement at the Argonne rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Rauchas, A.V.; Brumwell, F.R.; Cho, Y.; Czyz, W.S.; Gunderson, G.R.; Knott, M.J.; Suddeth, D.E.; Volk, G.J.

    1981-06-01

    Preliminary tests of the new system have been completed using the extraction kicker as a ''pinger'' magnet. Data has been gathered, digitized, and the FFT calculated. The results are within expectations. The new system expands the tune measurement capabilities tremendously. The computer allows for data processing which improves signal-to-noise ratio and further increases resolution. The system will also lend itself to study beam motion other than betatron. 8 refs.

  4. Tuning of betatron radiation in laser-plasma accelerators via multimodal laser propagation through capillary waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, A.; Giulietti, D.; Petrarca, M.

    2017-02-01

    The betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons in dielectric capillary waveguides is investigated. The multimode laser propagation is responsible for a modulated plasma wakefield structure, which affects the electron transverse dynamics, therefore influencing the betatron radiation spectra. Such a phenomenon can be exploited to tune the energy spectrum of the betatron radiation by controlling the excitation of the capillary modes.

  5. EFFECT OF ORBIT DISTORTIONS LAND BETATRON TUNE ON THE RHIC POLARIZED BEAM.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO,A.U.; PILAT,F.; PTITSYN,V.

    2001-06-18

    Polarized protons have been stored and accelerated in RHIC from G{sub {gamma}} = 46.5 to 60 during Run2000 with only one Siberian snake installed. We simulated with the spin tracking code Spink the behavior of polarized protons, in particular the effect of closed orbit distortions and betatron tune variation on the spin dynamics. According to simulation results, closed orbit and tune effects will be translated into requirements for the tune and orbit correction systems for the RHIC polarized proton Run2001, when both Siberian snakes will be available.

  6. Betatron Tunes in the Proposed Medium-Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Colin; Terzic, Balsa

    2010-11-01

    The future of Jefferson Lab lies within the construction of a Medium-Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC), which is currently in the proposal stage. In a synchrotron collider storage ring, the orbiting beams oscillate transversely in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The frequency of these oscillations is called the betatron tune. Depending on the design tune of the collider, non-linear beam-beam effects can cause rapid degradation of the beam quality, thus yielding poor luminosity, which is the figure of merit in the MEIC. The non-linear nature of the beam-beam effects poses a serious obstacle to the efficient analysis of potential design tunes. The goal of this research was to find an X and Y betatron tune, or working point, which optimizes luminosity performance. Using code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, particle interactions were numerically simulated. Beginning with a previously known working point, systematic simulations were run to scan the adjacent tunespace. A subsequent working point was discovered that provides a 33 percent increase in theoretical peak luminosity over the current MEIC design.

  7. Development of tools for real-time betatron tune measurements at the Nuclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, E. V.; Kirichenko, A. E.; Monakhov, D. V.; Romanov, S. V.; Volkov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    A betatron tune measurement system was developed and tested at the Nuclotron. A white noise and chirp signals were used for transverse beam motion excitation. A custom FlexRIO digitizer module was developed which provides excitation signal generation for kicker electrodes and real-time signal acquisition from pickup electrodes. A high resolution FFT algorithm was implemented inside a NI PXI FPGA module, connected to digitizer. The measurement system is integrated with the NICA control system based on the TANGO Controls. Results and tests performed with the Nuclotron beam are presented.

  8. Tandem betatron

    DOEpatents

    Keinigs, Rhonald K.

    1992-01-01

    Two betatrons are provided in tandem for alternately accelerating an electron beam to avoid the single flux swing limitation of conventional betatrons and to accelerate the electron beam to high energies. The electron beam is accelerated in a first betatron during a period of increasing magnetic flux. The eletron beam is extracted from the first betatron as a peak magnetic flux is reached and then injected into a second betatron at a time of minimum magnetic flux in the second betatron. The cycle may be repeated until the desired electron beam energy is obtained. In one embodiment, the second betatron is axially offset from the first betatron to provide for electron beam injection directly at the axial location of the beam orbit in the second betatron.

  9. Tune Determination of Strongly Coupled Betatron Oscillations in a Fast-Ramping Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Marsh, W; Triplett, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Tune identification -- i.e. attribution of the spectral peak to a particular normal de of oscillations -- can present a significant difficulty in the presence of strong transverse coupling when the normal mode with a lower damping rate dominates spectra of Turn-by-Turn oscillations in both planes. The introduced earlier phased sum algorithm helped to recover the weaker normal mode signal from the noise, but by itself proved to be insufficient for automatic peak identification in the case of close phase advance distribution in both planes. To resolve this difficulty we modified the algorithm by taking and analyzing Turn-by-Turn data for two different ramps with the beam oscillation excited in each plane in turn. Comparison of relative amplitudes of Fourier components allows for correct automatic tune identification. The proposed algorithm was implemented in the Fermilab Booster B38 console application and successfully used for tune, coupling and chromaticity measurements.

  10. Temporal profile of betatron radiation from laser-driven electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horný, Vojtěch; Nejdl, Jaroslav; Kozlová, Michaela; Krůs, Miroslav; Boháček, Karel; Petržílka, Václav; Klimo, Ondřej

    2017-06-01

    The temporal profile of X-ray betatron radiation was theoretically studied for the parameters available with current laser systems. Characteristics of the betatron radiation were investigated for three different configurations of laser wakefield acceleration: typical self-injection regime and optical injection regime with perpendicularly crossed injection and drive beams, both achievable with 100 TW class laser, and ionization injection regime with a sub-10 TW laser system that was experimentally verified. Constructed spectrograms demonstrate that X-ray pulse durations are in the order of few tens of femtoseconds and the optical injection case reveals the possibility of generating X-ray pulses as short as 2.6 fs. The X-ray pulse duration depends mainly on the length of the trapped electron bunch as the emitted photons copropagate with the bunch with nearly the same velocity. These spectrograms were calculated using a novel simplified method based on the theory of Liénard-Wiechert potentials. It takes advantage of the fact that the electron oscillates transversally in the accelerating plasma wave in the wiggler regime and, thus, emits radiation almost exclusively in the turning points of its sine-like trajectory. Therefore, there are only few very narrow time intervals, which contribute significantly to the emission of radiation, while the rest can be neglected. These narrow time intervals are determined from the electron trajectories calculated using particle-in-cell simulations and the power spectrum at given point in far field is computed for each electron using the Fourier transform. Spectrograms of the emitted radiation are constructed by summing contributions of individual particles, since the incoherent nature of the electron bunch is assumed.

  11. Tuning ferromagnetism by varying ion beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariwal, Rajesh V.; Malik, Hitendra K.; Asokan, K.

    2017-02-01

    Present study demonstrates a novel technique to tune the ferromagnetism at room temperature by varying the ion beam profiles from 3 to 7 mm during Carbon ion implantation in ZnO matrix and keeping other beam parameters constant. The interaction of implanted C ions with host ZnO matrix at different profiles result in variable ferromagnetism from 0.75 to 3.0  ×  10‑4 emu gm‑1 due to difference in the induced radiation pressure. Similar variation is also observed in the optical bandgap from 3.35 to 3.24 eV for different beam profiles. This study shows that the material properties can be tuned and controlled by the variation of beam profiles during the ion implantation.

  12. Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ta Phuoc, Kim; Esarey, E.; Leurent, V.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Rousse, A.; Leemans, W.P.

    2009-04-11

    In laser wakefield accelerators, electron motion is driven by intense forces that depend on the plasma density. Transverse oscillations in the accelerated electron orbits produce betatron radiation. The electron motion and the resulting betatron radiation spectrum can therefore be controlled by shaping the plasma density along the orbit of the electrons. Here, a method based on the use of a plasma with a longitudinal density variation (density depression or step) is proposed to increase the transverse oscillation amplitude and the energy of the electrons accelerated in a wakefield cavity. For fixed laser parameters, by appropriately tailoring the plasma profile, the betatron radiation emitted by these electrons is significantly increased in both flux and energy.

  13. Investigation of electron dynamics in an ionization-injection laser-wakefield accelerator via betatron radiation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Alexander; Couperus, Jurjen P.; Zarini, Omid; Pausch, Richard; Krämer, Jakob M.; Debus, Alexander; Bussmann, Michael; Irman, Arie; Schramm, Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    The injection process of electrons into the plasma cavity in laser-wakefield accelerators is a nonlinear process that strongly influences the property of the accelerated electrons. During the acceleration electrons perform transverse (betatron) oscillations around the axis. This results in the emission of hard x-ray radiation (betatron radiation) whose characteristics depend directly on the dynamic of the accelerated electrons. Thus, betatron radiation can be utilized as a powerful diagnostic tool to investigate the acceleration process inside the wakefield. Here we describe our recent LWFA experiments deploying ionization induced injection technique carried out with the Draco Ti:Sapphire laser. We focused 30 fs short pulses down to a FWHM spot size of 19 μm resulting in a normalized vacuum laser intensity a0 = 3.3 on a gas target. The target, which was a supersonic gas jet, provided a flat plasma profile of 3mm length. By varying the plasma density from 2x10^18 cm^-3 to 5x10^18 cm^-3 and the laser pulse energy from 1.6 J to 3.4 J we were able to tune the electron bunch and betatron parameters. Electron spectra were obtained by acquiring an energy resolved and charge calibrated electron profile after detection from the beam axis by a permanent magnetic dipole. Simultaneously, a back-illuminated and deep-depleted CCD placed on axis recorded the emitted x-ray photons with energies up to 20keV. Equipped with an 2D spectroscopy technique based on single pixel absorption events, we reconstructed the corresponding energy resolved x-ray spectrum for every shot and deduced the betatron source size at the plasma exit. Combining the data of the electron and betatron spectrum, we compare the characteristics of the betatron spectra for different electron bunches. In our experiments we recorded a total number of 25x10^4 photons per shot within a divergence angle of 1 mrad and betatron radii in the order of 1 μm. Finally, we compare our results with simulated spectra from the

  14. Pulsed Coreless Betatrons,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-16

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  15. Betatrons with kiloampere beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    Although the magnetic-induction method of acceleration used in the betatron is inherently capable of accelerating intense particle beams to high energy, many beam-instability questions arise when beams in the kilo-ampere range are considered. The intense electromagnetic fields produced by the beam, and by the image currents and charges induced in the surrounding walls, can produce very disruptive effects. Several unstable modes of collective oscillation are possible; the suppression of any one of them usually involves energy spread for Landau damping and careful design of the electrical character of the vacuum chamber. The various design criteria are often mutually incompatible. Space-charge detuning can be severe unless large beam apertures and high-energy injection are used. In order to have an acceptably low degree of space-charge detuning in the acceleration of a 10-kilo-ampere electron beam, for example, an injection energy on the order of 50 MeV seems necessary, in which case the forces due to nearby wall images can have a larger effect than the internal forces of the beam. A method of image compensation was invented for reducing the net image forces; it serves also to decrease the longitudinal beam impedance and thus helps alleviate the longitudinal instability as well. In order to avoid the ion-electron collective instability a vacuum in the range of 10/sup -8/ torr is required for an acceleration time of 1 millisecond. A multi-ring betatron system using the 50-MeV Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL as an injector was conceptually designed.

  16. Coherent synchro-betatron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    Coherent synchro-betatron resonances can present a serious limit for low-energy synchrotrons with strong space charge. Here, an excitation of a dipole transverse mode is considered at resonance condition.

  17. The Plasma Assisted Modified Betatron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-27

    instability. This is a particular concern because it is now established that two other similar devices, HIPAC 16 and SPAC 1117 were disrupted by the ion... HIPAC or SPAC II. In the modified betatron, even if parameters are right for it, there is still a good chance that it will be stabilized by the

  18. Enhanced betatron radiation in strongly magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, K. Q.; Zheng, C. Y. He, X. T.; Cao, L. H.; Liu, Z. J.

    2016-04-15

    Betatron radiation in strongly magnetized plasma is investigated by two dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The results show that the betatron radiation in magnetized plasmas is strongly enhanced and is more collimated compared to that in unmagnetized plasma. Single particle model analysis shows that the frequency and the amplitude of the electrons's betatron oscillation are strongly influenced by the axial external magnetic field and the axial self-generated magnetic field. And the 2D PIC simulation shows that the axial magnetic field is actually induced by the external magnetic field and tends to increase the betatron frequency. By disturbing the perturbation of the plasma density in the laser-produced channel, the hosing instability is also suppressed, which results in a better angular distribution and a better symmetry of the betatron radiation.

  19. THE EFFECTS AND POSSIBLE ORIGINS OF MAINS RIPPLE IN THE VICINITY OF THE BETATRON SPECTRUM.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, P.; GASIOR, M.; JONES, R.; TAN, C.

    2005-06-06

    With the advent of significant improvement in the sensitivity of observation of the betatron spectrum, the appearance of spectral lines at harmonics of the mains power frequency has been observed in the PS and SPS at CERN, the Tevatron at FNAL, and RHIC at BNL. These lines are potentially problematic for accurate tune tracking and the implementation of tune feedback We discuss the possible origins of these lines, and present data to support our discussion.

  20. Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP) and Tuning: What Are They and Why Do They Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Marshall, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of the Degree Qualifications Profile and related Tuning process, summarizing lessons learned from institutional engagement with both. The value and purpose for working with each are explored.

  1. Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP) and Tuning: What Are They and Why Do They Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Marshall, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of the Degree Qualifications Profile and related Tuning process, summarizing lessons learned from institutional engagement with both. The value and purpose for working with each are explored.

  2. Using Betatron Emissions from Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electrons to Probe Ultra-fast Warm Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotick, Jordan; Schumaker, Will; Condamine, Florian; Albert, Felicie; Barbrel, Benjamin; Galtier, Eric; Granados, Eduardo; Ravasio, Alessandra; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been shown to produce short X-ray pulses from betatron oscillations of electrons within the plasma wake. These betatron X-rays pulses have a broad, synchrotron-like energy spectrum and a duration on the order of the driving laser pulse, thereby enabling probing of ultrafast interactions. Using the 1 J, 40fs short-pulse laser at the Matter in Extreme Conditions experimental station at LCLS, we have implemented LWFA to generate and subsequently characterized betatron X-rays. Notch filtering and single photon counting techniques were used to measure the betatron X-ray spectrum while the spatial profile was measured using X-ray CCDs and image plates. We used an ellipsoidal mirror to focus the soft betatron X-rays for pump-probe studies on various targets in conjunction with LCLS X-ray and optical laser pulses. This experimental platform provides the conditions necessary to do a detailed study of warm-dense matter dynamics on the ultrafast time-scale.

  3. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Chen, Y. -H.; Alessi, D.; Pak, A.; Clayton, C. E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  4. Skew chicane based betatron eigenmode exchange module

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2010-12-28

    A skewed chicane eigenmode exchange module (SCEEM) that combines in a single beamline segment the separate functionalities of a skew quad eigenmode exchange module and a magnetic chicane. This module allows the exchange of independent betatron eigenmodes, alters electron beam orbit geometry, and provides longitudinal parameter control with dispersion management in a single beamline segment with stable betatron behavior. It thus reduces the spatial requirements for multiple beam dynamic functions, reduces required component counts and thus reduces costs, and allows the use of more compact accelerator configurations than prior art design methods.

  5. Optimal tuning and calibration of bendable mirrors with slope measuring profilers

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Wayne; Kirschman, Jonathan; MacDowell, Alastair; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2009-06-22

    We describe a technique to optimally tune and calibrate bendable x-ray optics for sub-micron focusing. The focusing is divided between two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair. Each optic is shaped by applying unequal bending couples to each end of a flat mirror. The developed technique allowsoptimal tuning of these systems using surface slope data obtained with a slope measuring instrument, the long trace profiler (LTP). Due to the near linearity of the problem, the minimal set of data necessary for the tuning of each bender, consists of only three slope traces measured before and after a single adjustment of each bending couple. The data are analyzed with software realizing a method of regression analysis with experimentally found characteristic functions of the benders. The resulting approximation to the functional dependence of the desired shape provides nearly final settings. Moreover, the characteristic functions of the benders found in the course of tuning, can be used for retuning to a new desired shape without removal from the beamline and re-measuring. We perform a ray trace, using profiler data for the finally tuned optics, predicting the performance to be expected during use of the optics on the beamline.

  6. High-Current Betatron, Phase I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-16

    Errors in the vertical (Betatron) magnetic field result in tb’ driven resonances that must be crossed during acceleration. The amplitude growth of...case, the self field depends here only on the line density, which does not change as the instability develops. It is thus necessary to cross this...Experimental arrangements of equipment ....... 1-6 3 Magnetic field (top trace) and electrostatic oscillation (middle). Sweep: 50 Vis/div. The bottom

  7. Modified betatron for ion beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rostoker, N.; Fisher, A.

    1986-01-01

    An intense neutralized ion beam can be injected and trapped in magnetic mirror or tokamak geometry. The details of the process involve beam polarization so that the beam crosses the fringing fields without deflection and draining the polarization when the beam reaches the plasma. Equilibrium requires that a large betatron field be added in tokamak geometry. In mirror geometry a toroidal field must be added by means of a current along the mirror axis. In either case, the geometry becomes that of the modified betatron which has been studied experimentally and theoretically in recent years. We consider beams of d and t ions with a mean energy of 500 kev and a temperature of about 50 kev. The plasma may be a proton plasma with cold ions. It is only necessary for beam trapping or to carry currents. The ion energy for slowing down is initially 500 kev and thermonuclear reactions depend only on the beam temperature of 50 kev which changes very slowly. This new configuration for magnetic confinement fusion leads to an energy gain of 10--20 for d-t reactions whereas previous studies of beam target interaction predicted a maximum energy gain of 3--4. The high beam energy available with pulsed ion diode technology is also essential for advanced fuels. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  8. High precision tune and coupling measurements and tune/coupling feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Curcio, A.; Dawson, C.; Degen, C.; Luo, Y.; Marr, G.; Martin, B.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Oddo, P.; Russo, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schroeder, R.; Schulthiess, C.; Wilinski, M.

    2010-08-01

    Precision measurement and control of the betatron tunes and betatron coupling in RHIC are required for establishing and maintaining both good operating conditions and, particularly during the ramp to high beam energies, high proton beam polarization. While the proof-of-principle for simultaneous tune and coupling feedback was successfully demonstrated earlier, routine application of these systems has only become possible recently. Following numerous modifications for improved measurement resolution and feedback control, the time required to establish full-energy beams with the betatron tunes and coupling regulated by feedback was reduced from several weeks to a few hours. A summary of these improvements, select measurements benefitting from the improved resolution and a review of system performance are the subject of this report.

  9. Full characterization of a laser-produced keV x-ray betatron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Shah, R.; Corde, S.; Fitour, R.; Tafzi, A.; Burgy, F.; Douillet, D.; Lefrou, T.; Rousse, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the complete characterization of a kilo-electron-volt laser-based x-ray source. The main parameters of the electron motion (amplitude of oscillations and initial energy) in the laser wakefield have been investigated using three independent methods relying on spectral and spatial properties of this betatron x-ray source. First we will show studies on the spectral correlation between electrons and x-rays that is analyzed using a numerical code to calculate the expected photon spectra from the experimentally measured electron spectra. High-resolution x-ray spectrometers have been used to characterize the x-ray spectra within 0.8-3 keV and to show that the betatron oscillations lie within 1 µm. Then we observed Fresnel edge diffraction of the x-ray beam. The observed diffraction at the center energy of 4 keV agrees with the Gaussian incoherent source profile of full width half maximum <5 µm, meaning that the amplitude of the betatron oscillations is less than 2.5 µm. Finally, by measuring the far field spatial profile of the radiation, we have been able to characterize the electron's trajectories inside the plasma accelerator structure with a resolution better than 0.5 µm.

  10. A study of betatron and momentum collimators in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Stevens, A.J.; Harrison, M.A.; Dell, F.; Peggs, S.

    1997-07-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has two interaction regions where {beta}* = 1--2m, with large detectors PHENIX and STAR. The transverse and longitudinal emittances are expected to double in size between one to two hours due to intra-beam scattering which may lead to transverse beam loss. Primary betatron collimators are positioned in the ring to allow efficient removal of particles with large betatron amplitudes. The authors have investigated distributions and losses coming from the out-scattered particles from the primary collimators, as well as the best positions for the secondary momentum and betatron collimators.

  11. A Thick Target for Synchrotrons and Betatrons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    McMillan, E. M.

    1950-09-19

    If a wide x-ray beam from an electron synchrotron or betatron is desired, in radiographic work with large objects for example, the usually very thin target may be replaced by a thick one, provided the resulting distortion of the x-ray spectrum due to multiple radiative processes is permissible. It is difficult to make the circulating electron beam traverse a thick target directly because of the small spacing between successive turns. Mounting a very thin beryllium, or other low-z material, fin on the edge of the thick target so that the fin projects into the beam will cause the beam to lose sufficient energy, and therefore radium, to strike the thick target the next time around. Sample design calculations are given.

  12. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D.

    2015-06-15

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  13. Stable, polarized betatron raditation: x-ray absorption spectroscopy in WDM unveiling ultrafast electron heating (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahieu, Benoît; Doepp, Andreas S.; Lifschitz, Agustin; Doche, Antoine; Thaury, Cédric; Corde, Sébastien; Gautier, Julien; Guillaume, Emilien; Malka, Victor; Rousse, Antoine; Jourdain, Noémie; Lecherbourg, Ludovic; Dorchies, Fabien; Ta Phuoc, Kim

    2017-05-01

    Betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerators reproduces the principle of a synchrotron on a millimeter scale, but featuring femtosecond duration. Here we present the outcome of our latest developments, which now allow us to produce stable and polarized X-ray bursts. Moreover, the X-ray polarization can simply be adjusted by tuning the polarization of the laser driving the process. The excellent stability of the source is expressed in terms of pointing, flux, transverse distribution and critical energy of the spectrum. These combined features make our betatron source particularly suitable for applications in ultrafast X-ray science. In this presentation we will describe the generation process, relying on the ionization injection scheme for laser-plasma acceleration. We will show experimental measurements, numerical results and first applications in time-resolved spectroscopy.

  14. ADJUSTED FIELD PROFILE FOR THE CHROMATICITY CANCELLATION IN FFAG ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO, A.G.

    2004-10-13

    In an earlier report they have reviewed four major rules to design the lattice of Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerators. One of these rules deals with the search of the Adjusted Field Profile, that is the field non-linear distribution along the length and the width of the accelerator magnets, to compensate for the chromatic behavior, and thus to reduce considerably the variation of betatron tunes during acceleration over a large momentum range. The present report defines the method for the search of the Adjusted Field Profile.

  15. Exploring the orbital angular momentum of betatron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Joana; Hehmann, Guenda; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Betatron radiation from laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can be used as a broadband X-ray source. Betatron x-rays have attracted great interest and have applications in biological imaging which have been demonstrated experimentally (see for instance). Endowing betatron radiation with well defined states of orbital angular momentum (OAM), a fundamental property of light by which its wave fronts become twisted, could further enhance the imaging spatial resolution. However, the conditions for the generation of betatron x-rays with OAM, and the fundamental mechanisms underlying the transfer of OAM from electron trajectories to the radiation they emit, remain outstanding open questions. To explore these exciting open challenges, we investigate the OAM spectral content of betatron x-rays in LWFA. We explore the conditions and laser driver characteristics (with/without orbital and spin angular momentum) that can enable the emission of OAM x-rays. We support our studies by 3D numerical modelling, using the particle-in-cell code Osiris and using the post processing radiation code jRad. also at DCTI/ISCTE Instituto Universitario de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.

  16. Coherent betatron instability in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, S.A.; Harrison, M.; Ng, K.Y.

    1988-06-09

    The coherent betatron instability was first observed during the recent 1987-88 Tevatron fixed target run. In this operating mode 1000 consecutive bunches are loaded into the machine at 150 GeV with a bunch spacing of 18.8 /times/ 10/sup -9/ sec (53 MHz). The normalized transverse emittance is typically 15 ..pi.. /times/ 10/sup -6/ m rad in each plane with a longitudinal emittance of about 1.5 eV-sec. The beam is accelerated to 800 GeV in 13 sec. and then it is resonantly extracted during a 23 sec flat top. As the run progressed the bunch intensities were increased until at about 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 10/ppb (protons per bunch) we experienced the onset of a coherent horizontal oscillation taking place in the later stages of the acceleration cycle (>600 GeV). This rapidly developing coherent instability results in a significant emittance growth, which limits machine performance and in a catastrophic scenario it even prevents extraction of the beam. In this paper we will present a simple analytic description of the observed instability. We will show that a combination of a resistive wall coupled bunch effect and a single bunch slow head-tail instability is consistent with the above observations. Finally, a systematic numerical analysis of our model (growth-time vs chromaticity plots) points to the existence of the greater than or equal to1 slow head-tail modes as a plausible mechanism for the observed coherent instability. This last claim, as mentioned before, does not have conclusive experimental evidence, although it is based on a very good agreement between the measured values of the instability growth-time and the ones calculated on the basis of our model. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Metabolomic profiling reveals a finely tuned, starvation-induced metabolic switch in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Barisón, María Julia; Rapado, Ludmila Nakamura; Merino, Emilio F; Furusho Pral, Elizabeth Mieko; Mantilla, Brian Suarez; Marchese, Letícia; Nowicki, Cristina; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Cassera, Maria Belen

    2017-05-26

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is a protozoan parasite with a complex life cycle involving a triatomine insect and mammals. Throughout its life cycle, the T. cruzi parasite faces several alternating events of cell division and cell differentiation in which exponential and stationary growth phases play key biological roles. It is well accepted that arrest of the cell division in the epimastigote stage, both in the midgut of the triatomine insect and in vitro, is required for metacyclogenesis, and it has been previously shown that the parasites change the expression profile of several proteins when entering this quiescent stage. However, little is known about the metabolic changes that epimastigotes undergo before they develop into the metacyclic trypomastigote stage. We applied targeted metabolomics to measure the metabolic intermediates in the most relevant pathways for energy metabolism and oxidative imbalance in exponentially growing and stationary growth-arrested epimastigote parasites. We show for the first time that T. cruzi epimastigotes transitioning from the exponential to the stationary phase exhibit a finely tuned adaptive metabolic mechanism that enables switching from glucose to amino acid consumption, which is more abundant in the stationary phase. This metabolic plasticity appears to be crucial for survival of the T. cruzi parasite in the myriad different environmental conditions to which it is exposed during its life cycle. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Probing warm dense silica with betatron radiation - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotick, Jordan

    2015-08-24

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been shown to produce short X-ray pulses from oscillations of electrons within the plasma wake. These betatron X-rays pulses have a broad, synchrotron-like energy spectrum and a duration on the order of the driving laser pulse, thereby enabling probing of ultrafast interactions. Using the 1 J, 40fs short-pulse laser at the Matter in Extreme Conditions experimental station at LCLS, we have implemented LWFA to generate and subsequently characterized betatron X-rays. A scintillator and lanex screen were used to measure the charge fluence and energy spectrum of the produced electron beam.

  19. A study of betatron and momentum collimators in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Stevens, A.J.; Harrison, M.

    1997-12-01

    Two separate accelerator rings in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will provide collisions between equal and unequal heavy ion species up to the gold ions, including the two polarized proton beams. There are six interaction points with two regions with {beta}* = 1--2 m occupied by the large detectors PHENIX and STAR. The transverse and longitudinal emittances of the gold ions are expected to double in size between one to two hours due to intra-beam scattering which may lead to transverse beam loss. Primary betatron collimators are positioned in the ring where the betatron functions have large values to allow efficient removal of particles with large betatron amplitudes. In this report the authors investigated distributions and losses coming from the out-scattered particles from the primary collimators, as well as the best positions for the secondary momentum and betatron collimators. Additional studies of the detector background due to beam halo and other details about the collimation in RHIC are reported elsewhere, while more information about the momentum collimation was previously reported in Momentum Collimation at Q9 by S. Peggs and G.F. Dell.

  20. Trace-space reconstruction of low-emittance electron beams through betatron radiation in laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, A.; Anania, M.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Giulietti, D.; Marocchino, A.; Petrarca, M.; Shpakov, V.; Zigler, A.

    2017-01-01

    A new methodology able to model and reconstruct the transverse trace space of low-emittance electron beams accelerated in the bubble regime of laser-plasma interaction is presented. The single-shot measurement of both the electron energy spectrum and the betatron radiation spectrum is shown to allow a complete measurement of the transverse emittance, including the correlation term. A novel technique to directly measure the betatron oscillation amplitude distribution is described and tested at the SPARC-LAB test facility through the interaction of the ultrashort ultraintense Ti:Sa laser FLAME with a He gas-jet target. Via the exposed technique the beam transverse profile is also retrieved. From the study of the electron transverse dynamics inside the plasma bubble, the nonlinear correlation between the betatron amplitude and the divergence, i.e. the angle with respect the acceleration axis, is found. The angular distribution of the electron beam inside the bubble is retrieved. The knowledge of the trace-space density allows a more accurate measurement of the transverse emittance with respect to previous paradigms.

  1. Betatron stochastic cooling in the Debuncher: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Visnjic, V.

    1993-07-01

    A detailed study of the betatron stochastic cooling in the Debuncher is presented. First, a complete theoretical model including the emittance-dependent signal-to-noise ratio as well as time-dependent mixing is constructed. The emittance measurements in the Debuncher are described and it is shown that the model is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The idea of gain shaping is proposed and it is shown that the gain shaping would improve the cooling of the beam. Several proposals for future improvements are studied and appraised, in particular, gain shaping, ramped {eta}, and cryogenic and ``smart`` pickups and kickers. Finally, the demands which the Main Injector will impose on the Debuncher are analyzed and a design of the betatron stochastic cooling system for the Main Injector era is outlined.

  2. Design of the Core 2-4 GHz Betatron Equalizer

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, C.; /Fermilab

    2000-01-01

    The core betatron equalizer in the Accumulator in the Antiproton Source at Fermilab needed to be upgraded. The performance could be rated as only circa 650 MHz when the system was a 2 GHz system. The old equalizer did not correct for the strong phase mismatch for the relatively strong gain of the system slightly below 2 GHz. The design corrects this phase mismatch and is relatively well matched both in and out of band.

  3. Single-shot betatron source size measurement from a laser-wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, A.; Couperus, J. P.; Zarini, O.; Jochmann, A.; Irman, A.; Schramm, U.

    2016-09-01

    Betatron radiation emitted by accelerated electrons in laser-wakefield accelerators can be used as a diagnostic tool to investigate electron dynamics during the acceleration process. We analyze the spectral characteristics of the emitted Betatron pattern utilizing a 2D x-ray imaging spectroscopy technique. Together with simultaneously recorded electron spectra and x-ray images, the betatron source size, thus the electron beam radius, can be deduced at every shot.

  4. Enhanced x-rays from resonant betatron oscillations in laser wakefield with external wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. M.; Zhang, B.; Hong, W.; Yu, M. Y.; Deng, Z. G.; Teng, J.; He, S. K.; Gu, Y. Q.

    2016-11-01

    Generation of ultra-short betatron x-rays by laser-accelerated electron beams is of great research interest as it has many applications. In this paper, we propose a scheme for obtaining bright betatron x-rays by applying external wiggler magnetic field in the laser wakefield to resonantly drive the betatron oscillations of the accelerated electrons therein. This results in a significant enhancement of the betatron oscillation amplitude and generation of bright x-rays with high photon energy. The scheme is demonstrated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and discussed using a simple analytical model.

  5. High Precision Tune and Coupling Feedback and Beam Transfer Function Measurements in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Curcio, A.; Dawson, C.; Degen, C.; Luo, Y.; Marr, G.; Martin, B.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Oddo, P.; Russo, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schroeder, R.; Schultheiss, C.; Wilinski, M.

    2010-05-23

    Precision measurement and control of the betatron tunes and betatron coupling in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are required for establishing and maintaining both good operating conditions and, particularly during the ramp to high beam energies, high proton beam polarization. While the proof-of-principle for simultaneous tune and coupling feedback was successfully demonstrated earlier, routine application of these systems has only become possible recently. Following numerous modifications for improved measurement resolution and feedback control, the time required to establish full-energy beams with the betatron tunes and coupling regulated by feedback was reduced from several weeks to a few hours. A summary of these improvements, select measurements benefitting from the improved resolution and a review of system performance are the subject of this report.

  6. Tune tracking with a PLL in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.

    2005-11-01

    The Tevatron tune tracker is based on the idea that the phase of the transverse frequency response of the beam can be measured quickly and accurately enough so that the phase at the betatron tune resonance can be tracked by a phase locked loop (PLL). In this paper, a mathematical model of this idea is discussed and is used as the basis for the realization of the tune tracker hardware. The tune tracker has been successfully tested under different beam conditions and is now operational in the Tevatron.

  7. Simulation studies on a novel betatron injection scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, W.; Faehl, R.J.; Mako, F.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of external transport into a modified betatron by the propagation of a relativistic electron beam into a z-pinch channel is discussed. Results from particle-in-cell simulations do not indicate any deleterious instabilities. Though the plasma collision frequency is shown to be just large enough to suppress the beam-plasma instability, a discharge current tapering scheme for decreasing the beam perpendicular velocity will also be a principal stabilizing mechanism. A new high-frequency microwave source based on this study is also detailed.

  8. Ambient betatron motion and its excitation by ``ghost lines'' in Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander

    2011-08-02

    Transverse betatron motion of the Tevatron proton beam is measured and analysed. It is shown that the motion is coherent and excited by external sources of unknown origins. The observations of the time varying “ghost lines“ in the betatron spectra are reported.

  9. The Tevatron tune tracker pll - theory, implementation and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The Tevatron tune tracker is based on the idea that the transverse phase response of the beam can be measured quickly and accurately enough to allow us to track the betatron tune with a phase locked loop (PLL). The goal of this paper is to show the progress of the PLL project at Fermilab. We will divide this paper into three parts: theory, implementation and measurements. In the theory section, we will use a simple linear model to show that our design will track the betatron tune under conditions that occur in the Tevatron. In the implementation section we will break down and examine each part of the PLL and in some cases calculate the actual PLL parameters used in our system from beam measurements. And finally in the measurements section we will show the results of the PLL performance.

  10. Spectroscopy of betatron radiation emitted from laser-produced wakefield accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Thorn, D B; Geddes, C G R; Matlis, N H; Plateau, G R; Esarey, E H; Battaglia, M; Schroeder, C B; Shiraishi, S; Stöhlker, Th; Tóth, C; Leemans, W P

    2010-10-01

    X-ray betatron radiation is produced by oscillations of electrons in the intense focusing field of a laser-plasma accelerator. These hard x-rays show promise for use in femtosecond-scale time-resolved radiography of ultrafast processes. However, the spectral characteristics of betatron radiation have only been inferred from filter pack measurements. In order to achieve higher resolution spectral information about the betatron emission, we used an x-ray charge-coupled device to record the spectrum of betatron radiation, with a full width at half maximum resolution of 225 eV. In addition, we have recorded simultaneous electron and x-ray spectra along with x-ray images that allow for a determination of the betatron emission source size, as well as differences in the x-ray spectra as a function of the energy spectrum of accelerated electrons.

  11. Minimization of betatron oscillations of electron beam injected into a time-varying lattice via extremum seeking

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Huang, Xiaobiao; Wu, Juhao

    2017-02-20

    Here, we report on a beam-based experiment performed at the SPEAR3 storage ring of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in which a model-independent extremum-seeking optimization algorithm was utilized to minimize betatron oscillations in the presence of a time-varying kicker magnetic field, by automatically tuning the pulsewidth, voltage, and delay of two other kicker magnets, and the current of two skew quadrupole magnets, simultaneously, in order to optimize injection kick matching. Adaptive tuning was performed on eight parameters simultaneously. The scheme was able to continuously maintain the match of a five-magnet lattice while the fieldmore » strength of a kicker magnet was continuously varied at a rate much higher (±6% sinusoidal voltage change over 1.5 h) than typically experienced in operation. Lastly, the ability to quickly tune or compensate for time variation of coupled components, as demonstrated here, is very important for the more general, more difficult problem of global accelerator tuning to quickly switch between various experimental setups.« less

  12. Betatron Application in Mobile and Relocatable Inspection Systems for Freight Transport Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhlov, S. V.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.; Osipov, S. P.; Stein, M. M.; Stein, A. M.; Xiaoming, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerators with energy level up to 4 MeV having high level of penetration ability by steel equivalent are the popular to control oversize cargo transported by road, by railway and by river. Betatron's usage as cyclic induction accelerator has some advantages in comparison with linear accelerators and other sources. Tomsk Polytechnic University has developed many types of betatrons, most of them are being produced by separate affiliated company " Foton ". Article is shown the results of application of the betatrons in inspection custom systems.

  13. The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  14. Bruno Touschek: From Betatrons to Electron-Positron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pancheri, Giulia; Pellegrini, Claudio

    Bruno Touschek’s life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders and storage rings, and made important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek’s life in Austria, where he was born, in Germany, where he participated in the construction of a betatron during WWII, and in Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his lifestyle and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  15. Bruno Touschek: From Betatrons to Electron-Positron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pancheri, Giulia; Pellegrini, Claudio

    Bruno Touschek's life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders and storage rings, and made important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek's life in Austria, where he was born, in Germany, where he participated in the construction of a betatron during WWII, and in Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his lifestyle and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  16. Betatron-Function Measurement in Lattices with 90-Degrees Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Wienands, U.; Biagini, M.E.; /Frascati

    2012-04-24

    Lattice functions derived from betatron phase-advance measurements have been used successfully at many e{sup +}-e{sup -} facilities in the world, including at the PEP-II High Energy Ring. For the Low energy Ring of PEP-II, however, extraction of meaningful beta functions is hampered by the 90{sup o} phase advance/cell in the arcs, which causes a singularity in the expressions for beta. An algorithm has been developed calculating beta functions based on {beta} and {alpha} at the beginning of an arc and tracking the Twiss parameters through the arc while matching the observed phase advance/cell. Stability of the algorithm is improved by doing the same calculation 'backward' as well as forward and averaging the result. The algorithm allows estimating beta functions at bad BPMs in many cases. The paper presents the algorithm used as well as examples of use in PEP.

  17. PRINCIPLE OF SKEW QUADRUPOLE MODULATION TO MEASURE BETATRON COUPLING.

    SciTech Connect

    LUO.Y.PILAT,F.ROSER,T.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    The measurement of the residual betatron coupling via skew quadrupole modulation is a new diagnostics technique that has been developed and tested at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as a very promising method for the linear decoupling on the ramp. By modulating the strengths of different skew quadrupole families the two eigentunes are precisely measured with the phase lock loop system. The projections of the residual coupling coefficient onto the skew quadrupole coupling modulation directions are determined. The residual linear coupling could be corrected according to the measurement. An analytical solution for skew quadrupole modulation based on Hamiltonian perturbation approximation is given, and simulation code using smooth accelerator model is also developed. Some issues concerning the practical applications of this technique are discussed.

  18. Proteome-wide reactivity profiling identifies diverse carbamate chemotypes tuned for serine hydrolase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Cognetta, Armand B; Niphakis, Micah J; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2013-07-19

    Serine hydrolases are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in Nature. Inhibitors of serine hydrolases are used to treat many diseases, including obesity, diabetes, cognitive dementia, and bacterial and viral infections. Nonetheless, the majority of the 200+ serine hydrolases in mammals still lack selective inhibitors for their functional characterization. We and others have shown that activated carbamates, through covalent reaction with the conserved serine nucleophile of serine hydrolases, can serve as useful inhibitors for members of this enzyme family. The extent to which carbamates, however, cross-react with other protein classes remains mostly unexplored. Here, we address this problem by investigating the proteome-wide reactivity of a diverse set of activated carbamates in vitro and in vivo, using a combination of competitive and click chemistry (CC)-activity-based protein profiling (ABPP). We identify multiple classes of carbamates, including O-aryl, O-hexafluoroisopropyl (HFIP), and O-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) carbamates that react selectively with serine hydrolases across entire mouse tissue proteomes in vivo. We exploit the proteome-wide specificity of HFIP carbamates to create in situ imaging probes for the endocannabinoid hydrolases monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and α-β hydrolase-6 (ABHD6). These findings, taken together, designate the carbamate as a privileged reactive group for serine hydrolases that can accommodate diverse structural modifications to produce inhibitors that display exceptional potency and selectivity across the mammalian proteome.

  19. Proteome-wide reactivity profiling identifies diverse carbamate chemotypes tuned for serine hydrolase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Won; Cognetta, Armand B.; Niphakis, Micah J.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    Serine hydrolases are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in Nature. Inhibitors of serine hydrolases are used to treat many diseases, including obesity, diabetes, cognitive dementia, and bacterial and viral infections. Nonetheless, the majority of the 200+ serine hydrolases in mammals still lack selective inhibitors for their functional characterization. We and others have shown that activated carbamates, through covalent reaction with the conserved serine nucleophile of serine hydrolases, can serve as useful inhibitors for members of this enzyme family. The extent to which carbamates, however, cross-react with other protein classes remains mostly unexplored. Here, we address this problem by investigating the proteome-wide reactivity of a diverse set of activated carbamates in vitro and in vivo using a combination of competitive and click chemistry (CC)-activity-based protein profiling (ABPP). We identify multiple classes of carbamates, including O-aryl, O-hexafluoroisopropyl (HFIP), and O-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) carbamates that react selectively with serine hydrolases across entire mouse tissue proteomes in vivo. We exploit the proteome-wide specificity of HFIP carbamates to create in situ imaging probes for the endocannabinoid hydrolases monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and alpha-beta hydrolase-6 (ABHD6). These findings, taken together, designate the carbamate as a privileged reactive group for serine hydrolases that can accommodate diverse structural modifications to produce inhibitors that display exceptional potency and selectivity across the mammalian proteome. PMID:23701408

  20. Tuning the Biological Activity Profile of Antibacterial Polymers via Subunit Substitution Pattern

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Binary nylon-3 copolymers containing cationic and hydrophobic subunits can mimic the biological properties of host-defense peptides, but relationships between composition and activity are not yet well understood for these materials. Hydrophobic subunits in previously studied examples have been limited mostly to cycloalkane-derived structures, with cyclohexyl proving to be particularly promising. The present study evaluates alternative hydrophobic subunits that are isomeric or nearly isomeric with the cyclohexyl example; each has four sp3 carbons in the side chains. The results show that varying the substitution pattern of the hydrophobic subunit leads to relatively small changes in antibacterial activity but causes significant changes in hemolytic activity. We hypothesize that these differences in biological activity profile arise, at least in part, from variations among the conformational propensities of the hydrophobic subunits. The α,α,β,β-tetramethyl unit is optimal among the subunits we have examined, providing copolymers with potent antibacterial activity and excellent prokaryote vs eukaryote selectivity. Bacteria do not readily develop resistance to the new antibacterial nylon-3 copolymers. These findings suggest that variation in subunit conformational properties could be generally valuable in the development of synthetic polymers for biological applications. PMID:24601599

  1. Non-Uniform Bias Enhancement of a Varactor-Tuned FSS used with a Low Profile 2.4 GHz Dipole Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cure, David; Weller, Thomas M.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a low profile antenna using a nonuniformly biased varactor-tuned frequency selective surface (FSS) is presented. The tunable FSS avoids the use of vias and has a simplified DC bias network. The voltages to the DC bias ports can be varied independently allowing adjustment in the frequency response and enhanced radiation properties. The measured data demonstrate tunability from 2.15 GHz to 2.63 GHz with peak efficiencies that range from 50% to 90% and instantaneous bandwidths of 50 MHz to 280 MHz within the tuning range. The total antenna thickness is approximately lambda/45.

  2. Controlled Betatron X-Ray Radiation from Tunable Optically Injected Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Corde, S.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Fitour, R.; Faure, J.; Tafzi, A.; Goddet, J. P.; Malka, V.; Rousse, A.

    2011-12-16

    The features of Betatron x-ray emission produced in a laser-plasma accelerator are closely linked to the properties of the relativistic electrons which are at the origin of the radiation. While in interaction regimes explored previously the source was by nature unstable, following the fluctuations of the electron beam, we demonstrate in this Letter the possibility to generate x-ray Betatron radiation with controlled and reproducible features, allowing fine studies of its properties. To do so, Betatron radiation is produced using monoenergetic electrons with tunable energies from a laser-plasma accelerator with colliding pulse injection [J. Faure et al., Nature (London) 444, 737 (2006)]. The presented study provides evidence of the correlations between electrons and x-rays, and the obtained results open significant perspectives toward the production of a stable and controlled femtosecond Betatron x-ray source in the keV range.

  3. Controlled betatron x-ray radiation from tunable optically injected electrons.

    PubMed

    Corde, S; Phuoc, K Ta; Fitour, R; Faure, J; Tafzi, A; Goddet, J P; Malka, V; Rousse, A

    2011-12-16

    The features of Betatron x-ray emission produced in a laser-plasma accelerator are closely linked to the properties of the relativistic electrons which are at the origin of the radiation. While in interaction regimes explored previously the source was by nature unstable, following the fluctuations of the electron beam, we demonstrate in this Letter the possibility to generate x-ray Betatron radiation with controlled and reproducible features, allowing fine studies of its properties. To do so, Betatron radiation is produced using monoenergetic electrons with tunable energies from a laser-plasma accelerator with colliding pulse injection [J. Faure et al., Nature (London) 444, 737 (2006)]. The presented study provides evidence of the correlations between electrons and x-rays, and the obtained results open significant perspectives toward the production of a stable and controlled femtosecond Betatron x-ray source in the keV range.

  4. Calculation of Optimal Geometrical Magnification and Spatial Resolution of Betatron Tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Y.; Chaklov, S. V.; Trinh, V. B.

    2017-04-01

    One of the perspective directions of development of non-destructive testing is the method of computed tomography. Computed tomography really enhances the ability of X-ray inspection, from thin and simple to thick and complex parts. There are many factors that influence the performance of computed tomography, the main parameters for computed tomography scanners and also scanner based on betatron, are geometric magnification and spatial resolution. Calculations of these parameters for the betatron tomograph are shown in this paper.

  5. Acceleration of an Electron Ring in a Modified Betatron with Transverse Pressure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-06

    chamber with circular cross section of minor radius 12.5 cm, and major radius 100 cm (see Fig. 1). The applied vertical field B is initially set equal to...Modified betatron Equilibrium studies Self- field effects Adiabatic behavior (Continues) 5 9 ABSTRACT (C"tfnue on reverse if necessary and identify by block...4high current accelerator. It is designed to overcome the current limitations in a conventional betatron, where the defocusing self- field forces

  6. Experimental Profiling of a Non-truncated Focused Gaussian Beam and Fine-tuning of the Quadratic Phase in the Fresnel Gaussian Shape Invariant

    SciTech Connect

    S., Juan Manuel Franco; Cywiak, Moises; Cywiak, David; Mourad, Idir

    2015-06-24

    A homodyne profiler is used for recording the intensity distribution of focused non-truncated Gaussian beams. The spatial distributions are obtained at planes in the vicinity of the back-focal plane of a focusing lens placed at different distances from a He–Ne laser beam with a Gaussian intensity profile. Comparisons of the experimental data with those obtained from the analytical equations for an ideal focusing lens allow us to propose formulae to fine-tune the quadratic term in the Fresnel Gaussian shape invariant at each interface of the propagated field. Furthermore, we give analytical expressions to calculate adequately the propagation of the field through an optical system.

  7. Site-specific modification of calmodulin Ca²(+) affinity tunes the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor activation profile.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Zhou, Yubin; Zou, Jin; Chen, Yanyi; Patel, Priya; Yang, Jenny J; Balog, Edward M

    2010-11-15

    The skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor Ca²(+)-release channel (RyR1) is regulated by Ca²(+) and CaM (calmodulin). CaM shifts the biphasic Ca²(+)-dependence of RyR1 activation leftward, effectively increasing channel opening at low Ca²(+) and decreasing channel opening at high Ca²(+). The conversion of CaM from a RyR1 activator into an inhibitor is due to the binding of Ca²(+) to CaM; however, which of CaM's four Ca²(+)-binding sites serves as the switch for this conversion is unclear. We engineered a series of mutant CaMs designed to individually increase the Ca²(+) affinity of each of CaM's EF-hands by increasing the number of acidic residues in Ca²(+)-chelating positions. Domain-specific Ca²(+) affinities of each CaM variant were determined by equilibrium fluorescence titration. Mutations in sites I (T26D) or II (N60D) in CaM's N-terminal domain had little effect on CaM Ca²(+) affinity and regulation of RyR1. However, the site III mutation N97D increased the Ca²(+)-binding affinity of CaM's C-terminal domain and caused CaM to inhibit RyR1 at a lower Ca²(+) concentration than wild-type CaM. Conversely, the site IV mutation Q135D decreased the Ca²(+)-binding affinity of CaM's C-terminal domain and caused CaM to inhibit RyR1 at higher Ca²(+) concentrations. These results support the hypothesis that Ca²(+) binding to CaM's C-terminal acts as the switch converting CaM from a RyR1 activator into a channel inhibitor. These results indicate further that targeting CaM's Ca²(+) affinity may be a valid strategy to tune the activation profile of CaM-regulated ion channels.

  8. Tune Evaluation From Phased BPM Turn-By-Turn Data

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Marsh, W.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-18

    In fast ramping synchrotrons like the Fermilab Booster the conventional methods of betatron tune evaluation from the turn-by-turn data may not work due to rapid changes of the tunes (sometimes in a course of a few dozens of turns) and a high level of noise. We propose a technique based on phasing of signals from a large number of BPMs which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio. Implementation of the method in the Fermilab Booster control system is described and some measurement results are presented.

  9. Spin tune dependence on closed orbit in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn, V.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    Polarized proton beams are accelerated in RHIC to 250 GeV energy with the help of Siberian Snakes. The pair of Siberian Snakes in each RHIC ring holds the design spin tune at 1/2 to avoid polarization loss during acceleration. However, in the presence of closed orbit errors, the actual spin tune can be shifted away from the exact 1/2 value. It leads to a corresponding shift of locations of higher-order ('snake') resonances and limits the available betatron tune space. The largest closed orbit effect on the spin tune comes from the horizontal orbit angle between the two snakes. During RHIC Run in 2009 dedicated measurements with polarized proton beams were taken to verify the dependence of the spin tune on the local orbits at the Snakes. The experimental results are presented along with the comparison with analytical predictions.

  10. Simplified Approach to Evaluation of Beam-Beam Tune Spread Compression by Electron Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, A.L.; Valishev, A.A.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-19

    One of the possible ways to increase luminosity of hadron colliders is the compensation of beam-beam tunespread with an electron lens (EL). At the same time, EL as an additional nonlinear element in the lattice can increase strength of nonlinear resonances so that its overall effect on the beam lifetime will be negative. Time-consuming numerical simulations are often used to study the effects of the EL. In this report we present a simplified model, which uses analytical formulae derived for certain electron beam profiles. Based on these equations the idealized shapes of the compressed tune spread can be rapidly calculated. Obtained footprints were benchmarked against several reference numerical simulations for the Tevatron in order to evaluate the selected configurations. One of the tested criteria was the so-called 'folding' of the compensated footprint, which occurs when particles with different betatron amplitudes have the same tune shift. Also studied were the effects of imperfections, including misalignment of the electron and proton beams, and mismatch of their shapes.

  11. [The development of betatrons in the Siemens centers of Berlin and Erlangen].

    PubMed

    Usch, Uwe; Bautz, Werner

    2005-01-01

    Starting from the fundaments set by Rolf Wideroe and Max Steenbeck, the first medical betatron was developed by Konrad Gund at the Siemens centre in Erlangen. This was the first highly sophisticated, large-scale technical device in medicine. Over a period of 30 years Siemens has manufactured a total of 137 betatrons with different maximum energies and sold them worldwide to scientific institutes and radiotherapy departments, among them the most prestigious therapy centres in Germany and Europe. Methodological investigations on high energy electrons und ultrahard X-rays have paved the way for the establishment of the modern high-energy radiation therapy. The interdisciplinary and increasingly more biophysics-oriented research on and with betatrons has had a decisive influence on the establishment of the profession of the medical physicist.

  12. Fine-Tuning the Antimicrobial Profile of Biocompatible Gold Nanoparticles by Sequential Surface Functionalization Using Polyoxometalates and Lysine

    PubMed Central

    Daima, Hemant K.; Selvakannan, P. R.; Shukla, Ravi; Bhargava, Suresh K.; Bansal, Vipul

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial action of nanomaterials is typically assigned to the nanomaterial composition, size and/or shape, whereas influence of complex corona stabilizing the nanoparticle surface is often neglected. We demonstrate sequential surface functionalization of tyrosine-reduced gold nanoparticles (AuNPsTyr) with polyoxometalates (POMs) and lysine to explore controlled chemical functionality-driven antimicrobial activity. Our investigations reveal that highly biocompatible gold nanoparticles can be tuned to be a strong antibacterial agent by fine-tuning their surface properties in a controllable manner. The observation from the antimicrobial studies on a gram negative bacterium Escherichia coli were further validated by investigating the anticancer properties of these step-wise surface-controlled materials against A549 human lung carcinoma cells, which showed a similar toxicity pattern. These studies highlight that the nanomaterial toxicity and biological applicability are strongly governed by their surface corona. PMID:24147146

  13. Asymmetric lateral coherence of betatron radiation emitted in laser-driven light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paroli, B.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Petrillo, V.; Potenza, M. A. C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Shpakov, V.

    2015-08-01

    We show that the radiation emitted by betatron oscillations of a high-energy electron beam undergoing wake-field acceleration is endowed with peculiar coherence properties which deliver quantitative information about the electron trajectories. Such results are achieved by means of accurate numerical simulations and a simple geometrical model gives a clear physical interpretation.

  14. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, L. M.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, M. H.; Chen, M.; Mirzaie, M.; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 108/shot and 108 photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3rd generation synchrotrons.

  15. Bright betatron X-ray radiation from a laser-driven-clustering gas target

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L. M.; Yan, W. C.; Li, D. Z.; Hu, Z. D.; Zhang, L.; Wang, W. M.; Hafz, N.; Mao, J. Y.; Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Lu, X.; Sheng, Z. M.; Wei, Z. Y.; Gao, J.; Zhang, J.

    2013-01-01

    Hard X-ray sources from femtosecond (fs) laser-produced plasmas, including the betatron X-rays from laser wakefield-accelerated electrons, have compact sizes, fs pulse duration and fs pump-probe capability, making it promising for wide use in material and biological sciences. Currently the main problem with such betatron X-ray sources is the limited average flux even with ultra-intense laser pulses. Here, we report ultra-bright betatron X-rays can be generated using a clustering gas jet target irradiated with a small size laser, where a ten-fold enhancement of the X-ray yield is achieved compared to the results obtained using a gas target. We suggest the increased X-ray photon is due to the existence of clusters in the gas, which results in increased total electron charge trapped for acceleration and larger wiggling amplitudes during the acceleration. This observation opens a route to produce high betatron average flux using small but high repetition rate laser facilities for applications. PMID:23715033

  16. Resonant interaction between laser and electrons undergoing betatron oscillations in the bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, Alessandro; Giulietti, Danilo; Dattoli, Giuseppe; Ferrario, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    > The betatron radiation in the bubble regime is studied in the presence of resonant interaction between the accelerated electrons and the driver laser pulse tail. The calculations refer to experimental parameters available at the FLAME laser facility at the National Laboratories of Frascati (LNF), and represent the radiation spectra and spatial distributions to be expected in forthcoming experiments.

  17. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Huang, K.; Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, L. M.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, M. H.; Chen, M.; Mirzaie, M.; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 108/shot and 108 photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3rd generation synchrotrons. PMID:27273170

  18. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Li, Y F; Li, D Z; Chen, L M; Tao, M Z; Ma, Y; Zhao, J R; Li, M H; Chen, M; Mirzaie, M; Hafz, N; Sokollik, T; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2016-06-08

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 10(8)/shot and 10(8 )photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3(rd) generation synchrotrons.

  19. Betatron x-ray radiation in the self-modulated wakefield acceleration regime (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Felicie

    2017-05-01

    Betatron x-ray radiation, driven by electrons from laser-wakefield acceleration, has unique properties to probe high energy density (HED) plasmas and warm dense matter. Betatron radiation is produced when relativistic electrons oscillate in the plasma wake of a laser pulse. Its properties are similar to those of synchrotron radiation, with a 1000 fold shorter pulse. This presentation will focus on the experimental challenges and results related to the development of betatron radiation in the self modulated regime of laser wakefield acceleration. We observed multi keV Betatron x-rays from a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator. The experiment was performed at the Jupiter Laser Facility, LLNL, by focusing the Titan short pulse beam (4-150 J, 1 ps) onto the edge of a Helium gas jet at electronic densities around 1019 cm-3. For the first time on this laser system, we used a long focal length optic, which produced a laser normalized potential a0 in the range 1-3. Under these conditions, electrons are accelerated by the plasma wave created in the wake of the light pulse. As a result, intense Raman satellites, which measured shifts depend on the electron plasma density, were observed on the laser spectrum transmitted through the target. Electrons with energies up to 200 MeV, as well as Betatron x-rays with critical energies around 20 keV, were measured. OSIRIS 2D PIC simulations confirm that the electrons gain energy both from the plasma wave and from their interaction with the laser field.

  20. The Use of VTE prophylaxis in relatioN to patiEnt risk profiling (TUNE-IN) Wave 2 study.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Barry F; Louw, Susan; Riback, Wayne

    2014-11-09

    The TUNE-IN (The Use of VTE prophylaxis in relatioN to patiEnt risk profiling) study evaluated venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) risk assessment and prophylaxis in private medical and surgical inpatients in Gauteng Province, South Africa. The study concluded that of the 608 patients enrolled, 54.1% were clinically evaluated to be at risk for VTE. A VTE risk assessment model (RAM), the Caprini score, increased the rate to 74.6%. TUNE-IN Wave 2, an extension of TUNE-IN, was conducted on a national level including the public sector, focusing on surgical inpatients. The study was a national, prospective, non-interventional, multisite, epidemiological disease registry enrolling 453 surgical inpatients. The perceived clinical VTE risk, VTE risk score on Caprini RAM, VTE prophylaxis and clinical details were documented during a baseline visit. A bleeding risk score was provided. Of the cohort, 269 patients (59.4%) were assessed to be at risk for VTE before applying the RAM. All patients (100%), however, were at risk on the RAM score. Early mobilisation and assessment of the VTE risk as low were the most frequent reasons for non-prescription of prophylaxis. Only 15 patients in the private and 2 in the public sector were assessed as having a bleeding risk. Chemoprophylaxis differed between the healthcare sectors, with low-molecular-weight heparin predominating in the private sector and unfractionated heparin being prescribed only in the public sector. VTE risk assessment and prophylaxis need to improve in both the public and the private sectors. A formal RAM will improve identification of patients at risk of VTE.

  1. Measurement of Beam Tunes in the Tevatron Using the BBQ System

    SciTech Connect

    Edstrom, Dean R.; /Indiana U.

    2009-04-01

    Measuring the betatron tunes in any synchrotron is of critical importance to ensuring the stability of beam in the synchrotron. The Base Band Tune, or BBQ, measurement system was developed by Marek Gasior of CERN and has been installed at Brookhaven and Fermilab as a part of the LHC Accelerator Research Program, or LARP. The BBQ was installed in the Tevatron to evaluate its effectiveness at reading proton and antiproton tunes at its flattop energy of 980 GeV. The primary objectives of this thesis are to examine the methods used to measure the tune using the BBQ tune measurement system, to incorporate the system into the Fermilab accelerator controls system, ACNET, and to compare the BBQ to existing tune measurement systems in the Tevatron.

  2. Comparative phosphoproteome profiling reveals a function of the STN8 kinase in fine-tuning of cyclic electron flow (CEF)

    PubMed Central

    Reiland, Sonja; Finazzi, Giovanni; Endler, Anne; Willig, Adrian; Baerenfaller, Katja; Grossmann, Jonas; Gerrits, Bertran; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Rochaix, Jean-David; Baginsky, Sacha

    2011-01-01

    Important aspects of photosynthetic electron transport efficiency in chloroplasts are controlled by protein phosphorylation. Two thylakoid-associated kinases, STN7 and STN8, have distinct roles in short- and long-term photosynthetic acclimation to changes in light quality and quantity. Although some substrates of STN7 and STN8 are known, the complexity of this regulatory kinase system implies that currently unknown substrates connect photosynthetic performance with the regulation of metabolic and regulatory functions. We performed an unbiased phosphoproteome-wide screen with Arabidopsis WT and stn8 mutant plants to identify unique STN8 targets. The phosphorylation status of STN7 was not affected in stn8, indicating that kinases other than STN8 phosphorylate STN7 under standard growth conditions. Among several putative STN8 substrates, PGRL1-A is of particular importance because of its possible role in the modulation of cyclic electron transfer. The STN8 phosphorylation site on PGRL1-A is absent in both monocotyledonous plants and algae. In dicots, spectroscopic measurements with Arabidopsis WT, stn7, stn8, and stn7/stn8 double-mutant plants indicate a STN8-mediated slowing down of the transition from cyclic to linear electron flow at the onset of illumination. This finding suggests a possible link between protein phosphorylation by STN8 and fine-tuning of cyclic electron flow during this critical step of photosynthesis, when the carbon assimilation is not commensurate to the electron flow capacity of the chloroplast. PMID:21768351

  3. Correction of dispersion and the betatron functions in the CEBAF accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.A.; Bickley, M.; Schaffner, S.; Zeijts, J. van; Krafft, G.A.; Watson, C.

    1996-10-01

    During the commissioning of the CEBAF accelerator, correction of dispersion and momentum compaction, and, to a lesser extent, transverse transfer matrices were essential for robust operation. With changing machine conditions, repeated correction was found necessary. To speed the diagnostic process the authors developed a method which allows one to rapidly track the machine optics. The method is based on measuring the propagation of 30 Hz modulated betatron oscillations downstream of a point of perturbation. Compared to the usual methods of dispersion or difference orbit measurement, synchronous detection of the beam displacement, as measured by beam position monitors, offers significantly improved speed and accuracy of the measurements. The beam optics of the accelerator was altered to decrease lattice sensitivity at critical points and to simplify control of the betatron function match. The calculation of the Courant-Snyder invariant from signals of each pair of nearby beam position monitors has allowed one to perform on-line measurement and correction of the lattice properties.

  4. Studies of local horizontal-vertical betatron coupling in the Fermilab Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bourianoff, G.; Sun, N.; Tsironis, G.P.; Kourbanis, I.

    1993-09-01

    We give preliminary evidence that local horizontal-vertical betatron coupling can be detected using digital signal processing techniques. We use the Fermilab Main ring to perform a number of local detection experiments using UDAS. For the data analysis we use straightforward FFT`s as well as more sophisticated parametric estimation techniques. We show that the latter enables the detection of local coupling with some accuracy.

  5. Possible application of carbon nanotubes to the field emission electron source for portable betatrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takehiro; Endo, Ichita; Hayashi, Kenji; Kohara, Akitsugu; Yoshida, Takuo; Lukyanovich Chakhlov, Gennady; Leonidovich Malikov, Evgeny; Petrovich Naydukov, Aleksey; Ekino, Toshikazu; Nishiyama, Fumitaka

    2005-02-01

    In order to study the feasibility of a carbon nanotube-based electron gun for small and portable betatrons, the characteristics of electron emission from carbon nanotubes were measured at around ≈1×10 -4 Pa, a typical pressure in the vacuum chamber of such betatrons. The sample cathodes were made from powders of single-walled nanotube (SWNT) and multi-walled nanotube (MWNT) that were fixed on the stainless steel plate with gold paste. We found that the emission was weaker at the lower vacuum for both MWNT and SWNT. However, when the vacuum level was restored to ≈1×10 -4 Pa after being kept at 4.0×10 -4 Pa for 15 minutes, the emission-current recovered to some extent but did not fully come back to the original value. The observed current densities from SWNT and MWNT are 550 and 540 μA/mm 2, respectively, at the high-voltage we tried: 2 kV for SWNT and 1.1 kV for MWNT across a 300 μm gap. It is likely that the carbon nanotube, under the pulsed operation, has advantages over the thermal cathode for the electron emitters of portable betatrons.

  6. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  7. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ho Nakajima, Kazuhisa Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Yoo, Byung Ju; Shin, Kang Woo; Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Choi, Il Woo; Rhee, Yong Joo; Shin, Jung Hun; Jo, Sung Ha; Hojbota, Calin; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-15

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime.

  8. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Hojbota, Calin; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime.

  9. Carcinoma of the cervix: surgical staging and radiotherapy with 32 MeV Betatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.; Olson, M.H.; Dillard, E.A.

    1982-09-01

    Fifty-six patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were staged by exploratory laparotomy. Twenty-eight of them received radiotherapy with 32 MeV Betatron and intracavitary radium. Twenty-one patients with Stage IB or IIA had a radical hysterectomy, five had post-operative pelvic irradiation, and two had primary exenteration. An overall 23.2% of patients had metastases in the paraaortic fields. Four patients with paraaortic node disease received extended field irradiation: 4500 rad in 5 weeks to paraaortic nodes. Two of them are alive and disease-free at 5.5 to 6.5 years.

  10. Formation of field-reversed-configuration plasma with punctuated-betatron-orbit electrons.

    PubMed

    Welch, D R; Cohen, S A; Genoni, T C; Glasser, A H

    2010-07-02

    We describe ab initio, self-consistent, 3D, fully electromagnetic numerical simulations of current drive and field-reversed-configuration plasma formation by odd-parity rotating magnetic fields (RMF{o}). Magnetic-separatrix formation and field reversal are attained from an initial mirror configuration. A population of punctuated-betatron-orbit electrons, generated by the RMF{o}, carries the majority of the field-normal azimuthal electrical current responsible for field reversal. Appreciable current and plasma pressure exist outside the magnetic separatrix whose shape is modulated by the RMF{o} phase. The predicted plasma density and electron energy distribution compare favorably with RMF{o} experiments.

  11. Experimental Study of Synchro-Betatron Coupling Induced By Dipole Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.; Ball, M.; Brabson, B.; Budnick, J.; Caussyn, D.D.; Chao, A.W.; Collins, J.; Derenchuk, V.; Dutt, S.; East, G.; Ellison, M.; Ellison, T.; Friesel, D.; Gabella, W.; Hamilton, B.; Huang, H.; Jones, W.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Li, D.; Minty, M.G.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Unlisted /Indiana U., IUCF /SLAC /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven

    2011-11-04

    Synchro-betatron coupling in a proton storage ring with electron cooling was studied experimentally by modulating a transverse dipole field close to the synchrotron frequency. The combination of the electron cooling and transverse field modulation on the synchrotron oscillation is equivalent to a dissipative parametric resonant system. The proton bunch was observed to split longitudinally into two pieces, or beamlets, converging toward attractors of the dissipative system. These phenomena might be important in understanding the effect of ground vibration on the Superconducting Super Collider beam, and the effect of power supply ripple on the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider beam.

  12. RF systems for the betatron-node scheme experiment at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.; De Santis, Stefano; Houck, Timothy

    2001-06-22

    Two-beam accelerators based upon relativistic klystrons (RK's) have been proposed as power sources for future generation electron-positron linear colliders. These drivers are known to suffer from several transverse beam-breakup (BBU) instabilities. A program to study a particular technique (the 'betatron node scheme') of ameliorating the high frequency BBU is under way at LBL. Central to this study are the pillbox RF cavities and RF beam position monitors (BPM's) employed. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, and testing of the RF components. Details of the signal processing and analysis will be presented.

  13. Formation of Field-reversed-Configuration Plasma with Punctuated-betatron-orbit Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D. R.; Cohen, S. A.; Genoni, T. C.; Glasser, A. H.

    2010-06-28

    We describe ab initio, self-consistent, 3D, fully electromagnetic numerical simulations of current drive and field-reversed-configuration plasma formation by odd-parity rotating magnetic fields (RMFo). Magnetic-separatrix formation and field reversal are attained from an initial mirror configuration. A population of punctuated-betatron-orbit electrons, generated by the RMFo, carries the majority of the field-normal azimuthal electrical current responsible for field reversal. Appreciable current and plasma pressure exist outside the magnetic separatrix whose shape is modulated by the RMFo phase. The predicted plasma density and electron energy distribution compare favorably with RMFo experiments. __________________________________________________

  14. Phase contrast imaging using Betatron x-ray beams produced by a 100 TW high intensity laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Corde, Sebastien; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Lassonde, Philippe; Martin, Francois; Malka, Victor; Rousse, Antoine; Kieffer, Jean

    2011-10-01

    Development of x-ray phase contrast imaging applications with a laboratory scale source have been limited by the long exposure time needed to obtain one image. We demonstrate, using the Betatron x-ray radiation produced when electrons are accelerated and wiggled in the laser-wakefield cavity, the potential of Betatron x-ray radiation for femtosecond phase contrast imaging. We characterize the x-ray source using a knife edge technique and nylon wires for calibration. We then show that high-quality phase contrast images of complex objects located in air, can be obtained with only a single laser shot. The Betatron x-ray source used in this demonstration experiment has a source diameter of 1.7 microns and produces a synchrotron spectrum with critical energy Ec = 12 . 3 + / - 2 . 5 keV and 109 photons per shot in the whole spectrum.

  15. Synchro-betatron effects in the presence of large Piwinski angle and crab cavities at the HL-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    White S.; Calaga, R.; Miyamoto, R.

    2012-05-20

    The reduction of {beta}* at the collision points for the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) requires an increment in the crossing angle to maintain the normalized beam separation to suppress the effects of long-range beam-beam interactions. However, an increase in the crossing angle may give rise to synchro-betatron resonances which may negatively affect the beam emittance and lifetime. 6D weak-strong and strong-strong simulations were performed to study the effect of synchro-betatron resonances in the context of the HL-LHC layout and its suppression via crab crossing.

  16. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC_LAB test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC_LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation.

  17. Betatron motion with coupling of horizontal and vertical degrees of freedom

    DOE PAGES

    Lebedev, V. A.; Bogacz, S. A.

    2010-10-21

    Presently, there are two most frequently used parameterezations of linear x-y coupled motion used in the accelerator physics. They are the Edwards-Teng and Mais-Ripken parameterizations. The article is devoted to an analysis of close relationship between the two representations, thus adding a clarity to their physical meaning. It also discusses the relationship between the eigen-vectors, the beta-functions, second order moments and the bilinear form representing the particle ellipsoid in the 4D phase space. Then, it consideres a further development of Mais-Ripken parameteresation where the particle motion is descrabed by 10 parameters: four beta-functions, four alpha-functions and two betatron phase advances.more » In comparison with Edwards-Teng parameterization the chosen parametrization has an advantage that it works equally well for analysis of coupled betatron motion in circular accelerators and in transfer lines. In addition, considered relationship between second order moments, eigen-vectors and beta-functions can be useful in interpreting tracking results and experimental data. As an example, the developed formalizm is applied to the FNAL electron cooler and Derbenev’s vertex-to-plane adapter.« less

  18. Ionization dynamics and radiative behavior of a betatron driven gold atom

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Whitney, K. G.

    2014-03-15

    The study of inner-shell transitions induced by an intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) ultrashort (∼5 fs) x-ray pulse provides a challenging opportunity to investigate the behavior and dynamics of hollow atoms and to explore the feasibility of creating population inversions in some of the inner-shell states that may lead to a variety of amplifications and gains in the x-ray regime. In this paper, we investigate the interaction through inner-shell photoionizations of a spectrally broad femtosecond pulse of betatron x-ray radiation incident on a gold atom. The level populations of Pt-like Au and Ir-like Au are described by non-(local thermodynamic equilibrium) inner-shell dynamics and compared and contrasted with the level populations created by a 'single' frequency x-ray laser pulse. Gain coefficients for a variety of transitions are calculated. It is found that long wavelength x-rays must be filtered from the betatron spectrum before any population inversions can be generated.

  19. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source.

    PubMed

    Wenz, J; Schleede, S; Khrennikov, K; Bech, M; Thibault, P; Heigoldt, M; Pfeiffer, F; Karsch, S

    2015-07-20

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources.

  20. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  1. Betatron motion with coupling of horizontal and vertical degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V. A.; Bogacz, S. A.

    2010-10-21

    Presently, there are two most frequently used parameterezations of linear x-y coupled motion used in the accelerator physics. They are the Edwards-Teng and Mais-Ripken parameterizations. The article is devoted to an analysis of close relationship between the two representations, thus adding a clarity to their physical meaning. It also discusses the relationship between the eigen-vectors, the beta-functions, second order moments and the bilinear form representing the particle ellipsoid in the 4D phase space. Then, it consideres a further development of Mais-Ripken parameteresation where the particle motion is descrabed by 10 parameters: four beta-functions, four alpha-functions and two betatron phase advances. In comparison with Edwards-Teng parameterization the chosen parametrization has an advantage that it works equally well for analysis of coupled betatron motion in circular accelerators and in transfer lines. In addition, considered relationship between second order moments, eigen-vectors and beta-functions can be useful in interpreting tracking results and experimental data. As an example, the developed formalizm is applied to the FNAL electron cooler and Derbenev’s vertex-to-plane adapter.

  2. Betatron motion with coupling of horizontal and vertical degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.A.; Bogacz, S.A.; /Jefferson Lab

    2010-09-01

    Presently, there are two most frequently used parameterizations of linear x-y coupled motion used in the accelerator physics. They are the Edwards-Teng and Mais-Ripken parameterizations. The article is devoted to an analysis of close relationship between the two representations, thus adding a clarity to their physical meaning. It also discusses the relationship between the eigen-vectors, the beta-functions, second order moments and the bilinear form representing the particle ellipsoid in the 4D phase space. Then, it consideres a further development of Mais-Ripken parameteresation where the particle motion is described by 10 parameters: four beta-functions, four alpha-functions and two betatron phase advances. In comparison with Edwards-Teng parameterization the chosen parametrization has an advantage that it works equally well for analysis of coupled betatron motion in circular accelerators and in transfer lines. Considered relationship between second order moments, eigen-vectors and beta-functions can be useful in interpreting tracking results and experimental data. As an example, the developed formalizm is applied to the FNAL electron cooler and Derbenev's vertex-to-plane adapter.

  3. PROGRESS IN TUNE, COUPLING, AND CHROMATICITY MEASUREMENT AND FEEDBACK DURING RHIC RUN 7

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON,P.; DELLAPENNA, A.; HOFF, L.; LUO, Y.; MARUSIC, A.; SCHULTHEISS, C.; TEPIKIAN, S.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Tune feedback was first implemented in RHIC in 2002, as a specialist activity. The transition of the tune feedback system to full operational status was impeded by dynamic range problems, as well as by overall loop instabilities driven by large coupling. The dynamic range problem was solved by the CERN development of the Direct Diode Detection Analog Front End. Continuous measurement of all projections of the betatron eigenmodes made possible the world's first implementation of coupling feedback during beam acceleration, resolving the problem of overall loop instabilities. Simultaneous tune and coupling feedbacks were utilized as specialist activities for ramp development during the 2006 RHIC run. At the beginning of the 2007 RHIC run there remained two obstacles to making these feedbacks fully operational in RHIC - chromaticity measurement and control, and the presence of strong harmonics of the power line frequency in the betatron spectrum. We report on progress in tune, coupling, and chromaticity measurement and feedback, and discuss the relevance of our results to LHC commissioning.

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of warm dense matter with betatron x-ray radiation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Felicie

    2017-05-01

    Betatron x-ray radiation, driven by electrons from laser-wakefield acceleration, has unique properties to probe high energy density (HED) plasmas and warm dense matter. Betatron radiation is produced when relativistic electrons oscillate in the plasma wake of a laser pulse. Its properties are similar to those of synchrotron radiation, with a 1000 fold shorter pulse. This presentation will focus on the experimental challenges and results related to the development of betatron radiation for x-ray absorption spectroscopy of HED matter at large-scale laser facilities. A detailed presentation of the source mechanisms and characteristics in the blowout regime of laser-wakefield acceleration will be followed by a description of recent experiments performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). At LCLS, we have recently commissioned the betatron x-ray source driven by the MEC short pulse laser (1 J, 40 fs). The source is used as a probe for investigating the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum at the K- or L-edge of iron and silicon oxide driven to a warm dense matter state (temperature of a few eV and solid densities). The driver is either LCLS itself or an optical laser. These experiments demonstrate the capability to study the electron-ion equilibration mechanisms in warm dense matter with sub-picosecond resolution.

  5. Focusing Betatron Radiation Produced by Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electrons with a Spherically Curved Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2011-10-01

    Laser Wakefield Acceleration in the bubble regime can be used to accelerate electrons to GeV energies while simultaneously wiggling them to produce a synchotron like x-ray radiation. Using HERCULES, a 100TW TiSapphire laser, 30fs pulses are focused onto a 5mm He gas jet to accelerate electrons in the bubble regime. The betatron x-rays produced by the transverse motion of the accelerated electrons are focused onto a detector by a spherically curved quartz, and other crystals. This result shows the feasibility of dynamic studies of crystal diffraction, with femtosecond level accuracy, using pump probe techniques. This work was supported by NSF FOCUS Grant No. PHY-0114336, and NRC Grant No. 38-09-953.

  6. RESULTS FROM BETATRON PHASE MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC DURING THE SEXTANT TEST.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.

    1998-06-26

    The Sextant Test of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was an important step towards its completion. One sixth of the two RHIC accelerators was fully commissioned. Gold ion beam was injected and transported through one sextant of one of the two rings. The betatron phase advance per cell was measured by recording differences in the horizontal and vertical positions of the beam at the end of the sextant due to a sequence of correction dipole kicks along the beam line. Measurement results show excellent agreement with predicted values, confirming that production measurements of the integral functions of the quadrupoles were very accurate, and that the polarity of all elements (correction dipoles, quadrupoles, dipoles etc.) was correct.

  7. Results from betatron phase measurements in RHIC during the sextant test

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Connolly, R.; Fischer, W.

    1998-08-01

    The Sextant Test of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was an important step towards its completion. One sixth of the two RHIC accelerators was fully commissioned. gold ion beam was injected and transported through one sextant of one of the two rings. The betatron phase advance per cell was measured by recording differences in the horizontal and vertical positions of the beam at the end of the sextant due to a sequence of correction dipole kicks along the beam line. Measurement results show excellent agreement with predicted values, confirming that production measurements of the integral functions of the quadrupoles were very accurate, and that the polarity of all elements (correction dipoles, quadrupoles, dipoles etc.) was correct.

  8. Measurements of ionization states in warm dense aluminum with betatron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, M. Z.; Chen, Z.; Fourmaux, S.; Saraf, A.; Kerr, S.; Otani, K.; Masoud, R.; Kieffer, J.-C.; Tsui, Y.; Ng, A.; Fedosejevs, R.

    2017-05-01

    Time-resolved measurements of the ionization states of warm dense aluminum via K-shell absorption spectroscopy are demonstrated using betatron radiation generated from laser wakefield acceleration as a probe. The warm dense aluminum is generated by irradiating a free-standing nanofoil with a femtosecond optical laser pulse and was heated to an electron temperature of ˜20 -25 eV at a close-to-solid mass density. Absorption dips in the transmitted x-ray spectrum due to the Al4 + and Al5 + ions are clearly seen during the experiments. The measured absorption spectra are compared to simulations with various ionization potential depression models, including the commonly used Stewart-Pyatt model and an alternative modified Ecker-Kröll model. The observed absorption spectra are in approximate agreement with these models, though indicating a slightly higher state of ionization and closer agreement for simulations with the modified Ecker-Kröll model.

  9. Positron Production by X Rays Emitted By Betatron Motion in a Plasma Wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.K.; Auerbach, D.; Blumenfeld, I.; Barnes, C.D.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Deng, S.; Emma, P.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Kirby, N.; Krejcik, P.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Muggli, P.; O'Connell, C.L.; /UCLA /SLAC /Southern California U.

    2007-01-25

    Positrons in the energy range of 3-30 MeV, produced by x rays emitted by betatron motion in a plasma wiggler of 28.5 GeV electrons from the SLAC accelerator, have been measured. The extremely high-strength plasma wiggler is an ion column induced by the electron beam as it propagates through and ionizes dense lithium vapor. X rays in the range of 1-50 MeV in a forward cone angle of 0.1 mrad collide with a 1.7 mm thick tungsten target to produce electron-positron pairs. The positron spectra are found to be strongly influenced by the plasma density and length as well as the electron bunch length. By characterizing the beam propagation in the ion column these influences are quantified and result in excellent agreement between the measured and calculated positron spectra.

  10. Single-particle dynamics in a nonlinear accelerator lattice: attaining a large tune spread with octupoles in IOTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, S. A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.

    2017-04-01

    Fermilab is constructing the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) as the centerpiece of the Accelerator R&D Program towards high-intensity circular machines. One of the factors limiting the beam intensity in present circular accelerators is collective instabilities, which can be suppressed by a spread of betatron frequencies (tunes) through the Landau damping mechanism or by an external damper, if the instability is slow enough. The spread is usually created by octupole magnets, which introduce the tune dependence on the amplitude and, in some cases, by a chromatic spread (tune dependence on particle's momentum). The introduction of octupoles usually has both beneficial (improved Landau damping) and harmful properties, such as a resonant behavior and a reduction of the dynamic aperture. One of the research goals at the IOTA ring is to achieve a large betatron tune spread, while retaining a large dynamic aperture, using conventional octupole magnets in a special but realistic accelerator configuration. The configuration, although not integrable by design, approximates an autonomous 2D Hamiltonian system. In this paper, we present results of computer simulations of an electron beam in the IOTA by particle tracking and the Frequency Map Analysis. The results show that the ring's octupole magnets can be configured to provide a betatron tune shift of 0.08 (for particles at large amplitudes) with the dynamical aperture of over 20 beam sigma for a 150-MeV electron beam. The influence of the synchrotron motion, lattice errors, and magnet imperfections is insignificant for the parameters and levels of tolerances set by the design of the ring. The described octupole insert could be beneficial for enhancing Landau damping in high intensity machines.

  11. Study of magnetic hysteresis effects in a storage ring using precision tune measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Xu, Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2016-12-01

    With the advances in accelerator science and technology in recent decades, the accelerator community has focused on the development of next-generation light sources, for example diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), which require precision control of the electron beam energy and betatron tunes. This work is aimed at understanding magnet hysteresis effects on the electron beam energy and lattice focusing in circular accelerators, and developing new methods to gain better control of these effects. In this paper, we will report our recent experimental study of the magnetic hysteresis effects and their impacts on the Duke storage ring lattice using the transverse feedback based precision tune measurement system. The major magnet hysteresis effects associated with magnet normalization and lattice ramping are carefully studied to determine an effective procedure for lattice preparation while maintaining a high degree of reproducibility of lattice focusing. The local hysteresis effects are also studied by measuring the betatron tune shifts which result from adjusting the setting of a quadrupole. A new technique has been developed to precisely recover the focusing strength of the quadrupole by returning it to a proper setting to overcome the local hysteresis effect. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  12. Options in Education, Transcript for December 1, 1975: Guaranteed Student Loan Investigation, Child Abuse, Profile of the Experimental and Bilingual Institute, and Learning to Tune a Piano.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    "Options in Education" is a radio program which focuses on issues and developments in education. This transcript of the show contains discussions of the guaranteed-student-loan investigation, child abuse, the Experimental and Bilingual Institute in Spanish Harlem, and learning how to tune a piano. Participants in the program include John…

  13. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Cho, Byoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1-10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  14. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ho Nakajima, Kazuhisa Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Choi, Il Woo; Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Cho, Byoung Ick; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-15

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1–10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  15. Coherence properties and diagnostics of betatron radiation emitted by an externally-injected electron beam propagating in a plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paroli, B.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Petrillo, V.; Potenza, M. A. C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2015-07-01

    A 3-dimensional time-domain simulation of X-ray produced by a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam was performed in order to know its properties like intensity, spectrum, divergence and coherence. Particular attention was paid to the coherence around the acceleration axis. The broad spectrum of betatron radiation (1-10 keV) leads to a short coherence length. Nevertheless we observe that under particular detection condition the spatial coherence has a characteristic enlargement. We give a simplified interpretation of this effect in terms of phase shift of the electric field on a virtual detector. Moreover we describe a near field scattering technique to characterize the betatron radiation. This diagnostics will be used to map the transverse spatio-temporal coherence of X-ray radiation in the laser wakefield accelerator under development at Frascati National Laboratories (LNF).

  16. Betatron x-rays from laser plasma accelerators: a new probe for warm dense matter at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Felicie

    2016-10-01

    Betatron x-ray radiation, driven by electrons from laser-wakefield acceleration, has unique properties to probe high energy density (HED) plasmas and warm dense matter. Betatron radiation is produced when relativistic electrons oscillate in the plasma wake of a laser pulse. Its properties are similar to those of synchrotron radiation, with a 1000 fold shorter pulse. This presentation will focus on the experimental challenges and results related to the development of betatron radiation for x-ray absorption spectroscopy of HED matter at large-scale laser facilities. A detailed presentation of the source mechanisms and characteristics in the blowout regime of laser-wakefield acceleration will be followed by a description of recent experiments performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). At LCLS, we have recently commissioned the betatron x-ray source driven by the MEC short pulse laser (1 J, 40 fs). The source is used as a probe for investigating the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum at the K- or L-edge of iron and silicon oxide driven to a warm dense matter state (temperature of a few eV and solid densities). The driver is either LCLS itself or an optical laser. These experiments demonstrate the capability to study the electron-ion equilibration mechanisms in warm dense matter with sub-picosecond resolution. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and supported by the Laboratory Directed research and development program under tracking codes 13-LW-076, 16-ERD-041 and by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under SCW1476 and SCW1569.

  17. Influence of an external axial magnetic field on betatron radiation from the interaction of a circularly polarized laser with plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bao; Wang, Xiao-Fang

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, theoretical analyses and numerical calculations are carried out to investigate the influence of an externally applied axial constant magnetic field on electrons' betatron radiation when an ultra-short, circularly polarized laser pulse of a peak intensity I0 = 5 × 1019 W/cm2 propagates in plasma of an electron density n0 = 1020/cm3. Ring-like x-ray radiation is emitted from the electrons' betatron oscillations. The applied magnetic field can modulate the resonance process between an electron's betatron oscillation and the laser electric field, and the electron energy gain from the direct laser acceleration is thus changed. When a magnetic field of strength B0=3 × 103 T is applied, which is in anti-parallel to the self-generated axial magnetic field, both the trapping efficiency of electrons by the wakefield and the maximum accelerated energy are increased. The maximum electron energy, the peak of angular radiation, and the total radiation energy are increased by 11.0%, 45.6%, and 41.1%, respectively, and the radiation spectra are blue-shifted significantly.

  18. Mobile x-ray complex based on ironless pulsed betatrons. X-ray complex conception for small-angle tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, S. G.; Kuropatkin, Yu P.; Nizhegorodtsev, V. I.; Savchenko, K. V.; Selemir, V. D.; Urlin, E. V.; Shamro, O. A.

    2017-05-01

    The conception of creating mobile radiographic complex based on ironless pulsed betatrons is proposed for radiography of dynamic objects having large optical thicknesses. Realization of this conception allows: a) optimizing geometry of the hydrodynamic experiment at the expense of the change of the radiation source and recorder position relatively to the test object, located in the explosion-proof chamber(EPC). Thus, it lets the intensity of the x-ray radiation be increased twice in the recorder plane as compared with available Russian complexes; b) creating an efficient environment protection system at the expense of localization of dangerous explosion products, and a shock wave connected with them; c) significantly decreasing the cost of radiographic complexes, if not building heavy protective casemates and their infrastructure. Instead of them it is possible to use cheap rapidly erected constructions. The mobile radiographic complex is described. Its characteristics, obtained during the testing powering were provided. Thickness of the lead test at 1m from the tantalum target at the limiting energy of the betatron electron beam Elim∼12 MeV( it is determined by the value of a capacitive storage of the pulsed powering system of the electromagnet) was ∼115 mm. Conception of a multibeam complex creation based on ironless pulsed betatrons for small-angle tomography was also considered.

  19. Ultrafast Absorption Spectroscopy of Aluminum Plasmas Created by LCLS using Betatron X-Ray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Felicie

    2016-10-12

    This document summarizes the goals and accomplishments of a six month-long LDRD project, awarded through the LLNL director Early and Mid Career Recognition (EMCR) program. This project allowed us to support beamtime awarded at the Matter under Extreme Conditions (MEC) end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The goal of the experiment was to heat metallic samples with the bright x-rays from the LCLS free electron laser. Then, we studied how they relaxed back to equilibrium by probing them with ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy using laser-based betatron radiation. Our work enabled large collaborations between LLNL, SLAC, LBNL, and institutions in France and in the UK, while providing training to undergraduate and graduate students during the experiment. Following this LDRD project, the PI was awarded a 5-year DOE early career research grant to further develop applications of laser-driven x-ray sources for high energy density science experiments and warm dense matter states.

  20. Measurements of ionization states in warm dense aluminum with betatron radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Mo, M. Z.; Chen, Z.; Fourmaux, S.; ...

    2017-05-19

    Time-resolved measurements of the ionization states of warm dense aluminum via K-shell absorption spectroscopy are demonstrated using betatron radiation generated from laser wakefield acceleration as a probe. The warm dense aluminum is generated by irradiating a free-standing nanofoil with a femtosecond optical laser pulse and was heated to an electron temperature of ~20–25 eV at a close-to-solid mass density. Absorption dips in the transmitted x-ray spectrum due to the Al4+ and Al5+ ions are clearly seen during the experiments. The measured absorption spectra are compared to simulations with various ionization potential depression models, including the commonly used Stewart-Pyatt model andmore » an alternative modified Ecker-Kröll model. Furthermore, the observed absorption spectra are in approximate agreement with these models, though indicating a slightly higher state of ionization and closer agreement for simulations with the modified Ecker-Kröll model.« less

  1. Linear microfocus bremsstrahlung generated in light and heavy narrow targets in B-18 betatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychkov, M. M.; Kaplin, V. V.; Malikov, E. L.; Smolyanskiy, V. A.; Stepanov, I. B.; Lutsenko, A. S.; Gentsel'man, V.; Vas'kovskii, I. K.

    2017-08-01

    The first results of studying the properties of X- and G-ray beams generated at the grazing incidence of 18-MeV electrons with the 50 and 8-μm-thick Si crystals and a 13-μm-thick Ta foil of 4 mm in length along the electron beam are presented. The target has been placed in a goniometer inside the chamber of a B-18 betatron. The results exhibit strong changes in the angular distribution of radiation at the variation of the orientation of the target. This effect is not observed in the case of the normal incidence of electrons on the surface of a thin target. Images of a reference microstructure have been obtained with a high resolution of details of the microstructure owing to the smallness of the source of radiation. The dependence of the contrast of an image on the position of the microstructure in the radiation cone has been demonstrated, which is determined by the change in the effective size of the radiation source when the emission angle of the source is changed.

  2. Radiotherapy of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma: a six year experience with 104 patients. [/sup 125/I; Betatron

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, R.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Mohiuddin, M.; Rosato, F.E.; Weiss, S.M.

    1981-12-01

    From 1974 to 1980, 104 patients with unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas were seen in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Sixty-six patients were accepted for definitive therapy. Of these, 48 patients received precision high dose radiotherapy to a dose of 6800 rad on the 45 MeV Betatron, using either photons alone or mixed photon and high energy electron beams. Eighty-nine percent of the patients completed treatment as per the protocol. Relief of symptoms was obtained in 65% of patients. Median survival was 10 months. In spite of the high doses employed, 67% of the patients had evidence of recurrent tumor in the treatment volume at the time of death. In view of the high incidence of local failure with precision high dose therapy alone, a protocol using Iodine-125 implantation to supplement the external beam therapy was developed in 1978. Since then, 18 patients with disease confined to the region of the pancreas were treated with the combination of Iodine-125 implantation and precision high dose therapy. Eighty-five percent of the patients completed treatment. Follow-up ranges from eight to 22 months. None of the patients completing the treatment protocol have developed local recurrence of tumor. These results are presented together with details of the treatment technique, normal tissue reactions and implications for future approaches to the treatment of localized unresectable cancer of the pancreas.

  3. Electron-ring extraction scheme from the modified betatron accelerator. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetanakos, C.A.; Marsh, S.J.; Dialetis, D.

    1988-06-27

    This report describes an extraction scheme that is easily realizable and has the potential to lead to very high extraction efficiency. The proposed extraction scheme is based on the transformation of the circulating electron ring into a stationary helix, in the toroidal direction, by exciting the resonance that naturally exists for some specific values of the ratio of the vertical to toroidal magnetic field. Transformation of the ring into a helix is achieved with a localized vertical magnetic field disturbance that is generated by an agitator coil. As the minor radius of the helix increases with each passage through the gap of the agitator coil, the electrons eventually reach the extractor, which has the property that all the magnetic field components transverse to its axis are equal to zero. Thus, the electron ring unwinds into a straight beam. A technique is proposed for extracting the electron ring from the modified betatron accelerator. Basically, this technique consists of exciting the resonance that naturally exists for some specific values of the ratio of the vertical to toroidal magnetic field.

  4. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macintosh, Henry G.

    An introduction to profiles is presented with examples provided to permit an overall appraisal of the potential of profiles, of the principles upon which they might be based, and of the problems that will have to be overcome if their potential is to be realized in practice. The larger scale examples of profiles discussed are the Scottish Pupil…

  5. Lossless crossing of a resonance stopband during tune modulation by synchrotron oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. M.; Shaftan, T.; Smaluk, V.; Li, Y.; Rand, R.

    2017-09-01

    Modern high performance circular accelerators require sophisticated corrections of nonlinear lattices. The beam betatron tune footprint may cross many resonances, reducing dynamic aperture and causing particle loss. However, if particles cross a resonance reasonably fast, the beam deterioration may be minimized. This paper describes the experiments with the beam passing through a half-integer resonance stopband via tune modulation by exciting synchrotron oscillations. This is the first time that beam dynamics have been kept under precise control while the beam crosses a half-integer resonance. Our results convincingly demonstrate that particles can cross the half-integer resonance without being lost if the passage is reasonably fast and the resonance stopband is sufficiently narrow.

  6. Lossless crossing of a resonance stopband during tune modulation by synchrotron oscillations

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, G. M.; Shaftan, T.; Smaluk, V.; ...

    2017-09-14

    Modern high performance circular accelerators require sophisticated corrections of nonlinear lattices. The beam betatron tune footprint may cross many resonances, reducing dynamic aperture and causing particle loss. But, if particles cross a resonance reasonably fast, the beam deterioration may be minimized. This paper describes the experiments with the beam passing through a half-integer resonance stopband via tune modulation by exciting synchrotron oscillations. This is the first time that beam dynamics have been kept under precise control while the beam crosses a half-integer resonance. These results convincingly demonstrate that particles can cross the half-integer resonance without being lost if the passagemore » is reasonably fast and the resonance stopband is sufficiently narrow.« less

  7. Higher-order formulas of amplitude-dependent tune shift caused by a sextupole magnetic field distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soutome, Kouichi; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, designs for ring-based light sources use multibend lattices for achieving a very small emittance of around 100 pmrad. In this type of storage ring, the chromaticity correcting sextupoles generally have greater strengths than those used in typical third-generation light sources. Therefore, controlling lattice nonlinearity such as amplitude-dependent tune shift (ADTS) is important for enabling stable operations and smooth beam commissioning. As the strength of the sextupoles increases, their higher-order terms contribute significantly to ADTS, rendering well-known lowest-order formulas inadequate for describing tune variations at large horizontal amplitudes. In response, we have derived explicit expressions of ADTS up to the fourth order in sextupole strength based on the canonical perturbation theory, assuming that the amplitude of a vertical betatron oscillation is smaller compared with the horizontal one. The new formulas express the horizontal and vertical betatron tune variations as functions of the action variables: Jx and Jy up to O (Jx2) and O (Jy) . The derived formulas were applied to a five-bend achromat lattice designed for the SPring-8 upgrade. By comparing the calculated results with the tracking simulations, we found that (1) the formulas accurately express ADTS around a horizontal amplitude of ˜10 mm and (2) the nonlinear terms of the fourth order in sextupole strength govern the behaviors of circulating electrons at large horizontal amplitudes. In this paper, we present explicit expressions of fourth-order formulas of ADTS and provide some examples to illustrate their effectiveness.

  8. Deducing the electron-beam diameter in a laser-plasma accelerator using x-ray betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Michael; Sävert, Alexander; Landgraf, Björn; Reuter, Maria; Nicolai, Maria; Jäckel, Oliver; Peth, Christian; Thiele, Tobias; Jansen, Oliver; Pukhov, Alexander; Willi, Oswald; Kaluza, Malte C; Spielmann, Christian

    2012-02-17

    We investigate the properties of a laser-plasma electron accelerator as a bright source of keV x-ray radiation. During the interaction, the electrons undergo betatron oscillations and from the carefully measured x-ray spectrum the oscillation amplitude of the electrons can be deduced which decreases with increasing electron energies. From the oscillation amplitude and the independently measured x-ray source size of (1.8±0.3) μm we are able to estimate the electron bunch diameter to be (1.6±0.3) μm.

  9. Laser-Driven Coherent Betatron Oscillation in a Laser-Wakefield Cavity: Formation of Sinusoid Beam Shapes and Coherent Trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Li Yuelin; Shang Hairong; Harkay, Katherine C.; Shen Baifei; Crowell, Robert; Cary, John R.

    2009-01-22

    High amplitude coherent electron-trajectories have been seen in 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the colliding pulse injection scheme of laser-wakefield accelerators in the bubble regime, and explained as a consequence of laser-driven coherent betatron oscillation in our recent paper [K. Nemeth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 095002 (2008)]. In the present paper we provide more details on the shape of the trajectories, their relationship to the phase velocity of the laser and indicate the dependence of the phenomenon on the accuracy of the numerical representation and choice of laser/plasma parameters.

  10. Ionization injection effects in x-ray spectra generated by betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, K. T.; Zhao, T. Z.; Cole, J. M.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Nees, J.; Wood, J. C.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2016-05-01

    Single photon counting techniques were used with an x-ray CCD camera to measure features of synchrotron-like x-ray spectra generated by betatron oscillations of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with different injection techniques. Measurements were made using the Hercules laser system at the University of Michigan. With a single stage gas cell, we demonstrate that pure helium gas in our wakefield accelerator will produce spectra with higher critical energies than when helium mixed with nitrogen is used. This result was not evident when a two stage gas cell was used.

  11. Enzymatic profiling of cellulosomal enzymes from the human gut bacterium, Ruminococcus champanellensis, reveals a fine-tuned system for cohesin-dockerin recognition.

    PubMed

    Moraïs, Sarah; Ben David, Yonit; Bensoussan, Lizi; Duncan, Sylvia H; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Martens, Eric C; Flint, Harry J; Bayer, Edward A

    2016-02-01

    Ruminococcus champanellensis is considered a keystone species in the human gut that degrades microcrystalline cellulose efficiently and contains the genetic elements necessary for cellulosome production. The basic elements of its cellulosome architecture, mainly cohesin and dockerin modules from scaffoldins and enzyme-borne dockerins, have been characterized recently. In this study, we cloned, expressed and characterized all of the glycoside hydrolases that contain a dockerin module. Among the 25 enzymes, 10 cellulases, 4 xylanases, 3 mannanases, 2 xyloglucanases, 2 arabinofuranosidases, 2 arabinanases and one β-glucanase were assessed for their comparative enzymatic activity on their respective substrates. The dockerin specificities of the enzymes were examined by ELISA, and 80 positives out of 525 possible interactions were detected. Our analysis reveals a fine-tuned system for cohesin-dockerin specificity and the importance of diversity among the cohesin-dockerin sequences. Our results imply that cohesin-dockerin pairs are not necessarily assembled at random among the same specificity types, as generally believed for other cellulosome-producing bacteria, but reveal a more organized cellulosome architecture. Moreover, our results highlight the importance of the cellulosome paradigm for cellulose and hemicellulose degradation by R. champanellensis in the human gut. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  13. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  14. PERI auto-tuning.

    SciTech Connect

    Chame, J.; Chen, C.; Dongarra, J.; Hall, M.; Hollingsworth, J. K.; Hovland, P.; Moore, S.; Seymour, K.; Shin, J.; Tiwari, A.; Williams, S.; You, H.; Bailey, D. H.

    2008-01-01

    The enormous and growing complexity of today's high-end systems has increased the already significant challenges of obtaining high performance on equally complex scientific applications. Application scientists are faced with a daunting challenge in tuning their codes to exploit performance-enhancing architectural features. The Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI) is working toward the goal of automating portions of the performance tuning process. This paper describes PERI's overall strategy for auto-tuning tools and recent progress in both building auto-tuning tools and demonstrating their success on kernels, some taken from large-scale applications.

  15. Synchro-Betatron Stop-Bands Due to a Single Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A

    2004-06-17

    We analyze the stop-band due to crab cavities for horizontal tunes that are either close to integers or close to half integers. The latter case is relevant for today's electron/positron colliders. We compare this stop-band to that created by dispersion in an accelerating cavity and show that a single typical crab cavity creates larger stop-bands than a typical dispersion at an accelerating cavity. We furthermore analyze whether it is beneficial to place the crab cavity at a position where the dispersion and its slope vanish. We find that this choice is worth while if the horizontal tune is close to a half integer, but not if it is close to an integer. Furthermore we find that stop-bands can be avoided when the horizontal tune is located at a favorable side of the integer or the half integer. While we are here concerned with the installation of a single crab cavity in a storage ring, we show that the stop-bands can be weakened, although not eliminated, significantly when two crab cavities per ring are chosen suitably.

  16. Observation of Betatron X-Ray Radiation in a Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Accelerator Driven with Picosecond Laser Pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Albert, F.; Lemos, N.; Shaw, J. L.; ...

    2017-03-31

    We investigate a new regime for betatron x-ray emission that utilizes kilojoule-class picosecond lasers to drive wakes in plasmas. When such laser pulses with intensities of ~ 5 × 1 0 18 W / cm 2 are focused into plasmas with electron densities of ~ 1 × 1 0 19 cm - 3 , they undergo self-modulation and channeling, which accelerates electrons up to 200 MeV energies and causes those electrons to emit x rays. The measured x-ray spectra are fit with a synchrotron spectrum with a critical energy of 10–20 keV, and 2D particle-in-cell simulations were used to modelmore » the acceleration and radiation of the electrons in our experimental conditions« less

  17. Observation of Betatron X-Ray Radiation in a Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Accelerator Driven with Picosecond Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Albert, F; Lemos, N; Shaw, J L; Pollock, B B; Goyon, C; Schumaker, W; Saunders, A M; Marsh, K A; Pak, A; Ralph, J E; Martins, J L; Amorim, L D; Falcone, R W; Glenzer, S H; Moody, J D; Joshi, C

    2017-03-31

    We investigate a new regime for betatron x-ray emission that utilizes kilojoule-class picosecond lasers to drive wakes in plasmas. When such laser pulses with intensities of ∼5×10^{18}  W/cm^{2} are focused into plasmas with electron densities of ∼1×10^{19}  cm^{-3}, they undergo self-modulation and channeling, which accelerates electrons up to 200 MeV energies and causes those electrons to emit x rays. The measured x-ray spectra are fit with a synchrotron spectrum with a critical energy of 10-20 keV, and 2D particle-in-cell simulations were used to model the acceleration and radiation of the electrons in our experimental conditions.

  18. Tuned borehole gravity gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lautzenhiser, T.V.; Nekut, A.G. Jr.

    1986-04-15

    A tuned borehole gravity gradiometer is described for detecting variations in gravity gradient which consists of: a suspended dipole mass system having symmetrically distributed dipole masses and suspension means for suspending the dipole masses such that the gravity gradient to be measured produces an angular displacement about a rotation axis of the dipole mass system from a reference position; and tuning means with the dipole mass system for selectively varying the sensitivity to angular displacements with respect to the rotation axis of the dipole mass system to variations in gravity gradient, wherein the tuning means includes means for selectively varying the metacentric height of the dipole mass system.

  19. TUNE: Compiler-Directed Automatic Performance Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Mary

    2014-09-18

    This project has developed compiler-directed performance tuning technology targeting the Cray XT4 Jaguar system at Oak Ridge, which has multi-core Opteron nodes with SSE-3 SIMD extensions, and the Cray XE6 Hopper system at NERSC. To achieve this goal, we combined compiler technology for model-guided empirical optimization for memory hierarchies with SIMD code generation, which have been developed by the PIs over the past several years. We examined DOE Office of Science applications to identify performance bottlenecks and apply our system to computational kernels that operate on dense arrays. Our goal for this performance-tuning technology has been to yield hand-tuned levels of performance on DOE Office of Science computational kernels, while allowing application programmers to specify their computations at a high level without requiring manual optimization. Overall, we aim to make our technology for SIMD code generation and memory hierarchy optimization a crucial component of high-productivity Petaflops computing through a close collaboration with the scientists in national laboratories.

  20. Linking Behavioral and Neurophysiological Indicators of Perceptual Tuning to Language

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Bortfeld, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms that underlie tuning to the native language(s) in early infancy. Here we review language tuning through the lens of type and amount of language experience and introduce a new manner in which to conceptualize the phenomenon of language tuning: the relative speed of tuning hypothesis. This hypothesis has as its goal a characterization of the unique time course of the tuning process, given the different components (e.g., phonology, prosody, syntax, semantics) of one or more languages as they become available to infants, and biologically based maturational constraints. In this review, we first examine the established behavioral findings and integrate more recent neurophysiological data on neonatal development, which together demonstrate evidence of early language tuning given differential language exposure even in utero. Next, we examine traditional accounts of sensitive and critical periods to determine how these constructs complement current data on the neural mechanisms underlying language tuning. We then synthesize the extant infant behavioral and neurophysiological data on monolingual, bilingual, and sensory deprived tuning, thereby scrutinizing the effect of these three different language profiles on the specific timing, progression, and outcome of language tuning. Finally, we discuss future directions researchers might pursue to further understand this aspect of language development, advocating our relative speed of tuning hypothesis as a useful framework for conceptualizing the complex process by which language experience works together with biological constraints to shape language development. PMID:21866226

  1. Complier-Directed Automatic Performance Tuning (TUNE) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chame, Jacqueline

    2013-06-07

    TUNE was created to develop compiler-directed performance tuning technology targeting the Cray XT4 system at Oak Ridge. TUNE combines compiler technology for model-guided empirical optimization for memory hierarchies with SIMD code generation. The goal of this performance-tuning technology is to yield hand-tuned levels of performance on DOE Office of Science computational kernels, while allowing application programmers to specify their computations at a high level without requiring manual optimization. Overall, TUNE aims to make compiler technology for SIMD code generation and memory hierarchy optimization a crucial component of high-productivity Petaflops computing through a close collaboration with the scientists in national laboratories.

  2. Spatiotemporal frequency and speed tuning in the owl visual wulst.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lucas; Baron, Jerome

    2009-10-01

    The avian visual wulst is hodologically equivalent to the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1). In contrast to most birds, owls have a massive visual wulst, which shares striking functional similarities with V1. To provide a better understanding of how motion is processed within this area, we used sinusoidal gratings to characterize the spatiotemporal frequency and speed tuning profiles of 131 neurones recorded from awake burrowing owls. Cells were found to be clearly tuned to both spatial and temporal frequencies, and in a way that is similar to what has been reported in the striate cortex of primates and carnivores. Our results also suggest the presence of spatial frequency tuning domains in the wulst. Speed tuning was assessed by several methods devised to measure the degree of dependence between spatial and temporal frequency tuning. Although many neurones were found to be independently tuned, a significant proportion of cells showed at least some degree of dependence, compatible with the idea that some kind of initial transformation towards an explicit representation of speed is being carried out by the owl wulst. Interestingly, under certain constraints, a higher incidence of spatial frequency-invariant speed tuned profiles was obtained by combining our experimentally measured responses using a recent cortical model of speed tuning. Overall, our findings reinforce the notion that, like V1, the owl wulst is an important initial stage for motion processing, a function that is usually attributed to areas of the tectofugal pathway in lateral-eyed birds.

  3. Tuned air gun array

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehle, W.H.

    1983-05-10

    The present invention provides a method for determining the spacing and size of air guns in a tuned air gun array. Volume ratios are calculated based upon a predetermined maximum volume for any individual air gun. The volumes are cross-referenced to spacings for optimum air gun interaction. The resulting air gun array operates as a broadband high-energy point source.

  4. Tuning the Blend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    "Tuning the blend" is a phrase that educators hear a lot these days. It refers to finding the correct balance of online activities and face-to-face instruction in hybrid--or blended--courses. Finding a mix that meets the needs of both faculty and students requires experimentation, experience, and constant tweaking. And, as with coffee, the same…

  5. Electronically Tuned Microwave Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, Mysore

    1987-01-01

    Features include low phase noise and frequency stability. Bias-tuned, low-phase-noise microwave oscillator circuit based on npn bipolar transistor and dielectric resonator. Operating at frequency of about 8.4 GHz, oscillator adjusted to give low phase noise, relatively flat power output versus frequency, and nearly linear frequency versus bias voltage.

  6. Tuning the Blend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    "Tuning the blend" is a phrase that educators hear a lot these days. It refers to finding the correct balance of online activities and face-to-face instruction in hybrid--or blended--courses. Finding a mix that meets the needs of both faculty and students requires experimentation, experience, and constant tweaking. And, as with coffee, the same…

  7. Tuning toward Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Marcus; Kalina, Michelle; Chapman, Adina

    2013-01-01

    The Obama administration and the Lumina Foundation have been the principal drivers focusing the nation on increasing the number of high-quality degrees and credentials. Tuning, a faculty-driven process for defining clear student learning outcomes--what a student should know, understand, and be able to do--is one of the ways to support this goal.

  8. On self-tuning control of Tokamak thermokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Varadarajan, V. . Fusion Studies Lab.)

    1992-12-01

    Adaptive control techniques can be applied to on-line gain tuning of tokamak thermokinetics. In this paper, a self-tuning control scheme is explored for both the plasma profile and power control. The distributed parameter system of the flux-surface-averaged one-dimensional transport equations is discretized by a nonlinear variational procedure. A finite-dimensional multiple-input/multiple-output control algorithm is derived using the linearized equations. A particular class of nonlinear three-parameter profiles is used for plasma density, temperature, and deuterium fraction profiles. Feedback gains are determined using a simplified minimum variance control law of self-tuning control. In the examples, normal multiple-output specifications for the plasma profile parameters for the density and power control are shown to be controllable by multiple-particle inputs alone.

  9. High-quality electron beam generation and bright betatron radiation from a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Li, Wentao; Qi, Rong; Zhang, Zhijun; Yu, Changhai; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiaqi; Qing, Zhiyong; Ming, Fang; Xu, Yi; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2017-05-01

    betatron radiation via manipulating the e-beam transverse oscillation in the wakefield. Very brilliant quasi-monochromatic betatron x-rays in tens of keV with significant enhancement both in photon yield and peak energy have been generated. Besides, by employing a self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering scheme, in which the electron beam collided with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a plasma mirror, we produced tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays ( 33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of 3.1×1022 photons s-1 mm-2 mrad-2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV, which is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value in MeV regime to the best of our knowledge. 1. J. S. Liu, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011). 2. X. Wang, et al., Nat. Commun. 4, 1988 (2013). 3. W. P. Leemans, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 245002 (2014) 4. W. T. Wang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 124801 (2016). 5. Z. J. Zhang et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 053106 (2016). 6. C. H. Yu et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 29518 (2016).

  10. RF tuning element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, William R. (Inventor); Lubecke, Victor M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device for tuning a circuit includes a substrate, a transmission line on the substrate that includes first and second conductors coupled to a circuit to be tuned, and a movable short-circuit for varying the impedance the transmission line presents to the circuit to be tuned. The movable short-circuit includes a dielectric layer disposed atop the transmission line and a distributed shorting element in the form of a conductive member that is configured to be slid along at least a portion of the transmission line atop the dielectric layer. The conductive member is configured to span the first and second conductors of the transmission line and to define at least a first opening that spans the two conductors so that the conductive member includes first and second sections separated by the first opening. The first and second sections of the conductive member combine with the first and second conductors of the transmission line to form first and second low impedance sections of transmission line, and the opening combines with the first and second conductors of the transmission line and the dielectric layer to form a first high impedance section of transmission line intermediate the first and second low impedance sections. Each of the first low impedance section and the first high impedance section have a length along the transmission line of approximately one-quarter wavelength, thus providing a periodic variation of transmission line impedance. That enhances reflection of rf power.

  11. Tuning for the first 9-cell TESLA cavity of PKU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; He, Fei-Si; Xu, Wen-Can; Zhu, Feng; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Zhao, Kui

    2010-04-01

    A method based on circuit model is used to tune the first home-made 9-cell TESLA type superconducting niobium cavity at Peking University. After tuning, a flat field profile with a final π-mode frequency within 3 kHz of target frequency is achieved. The field flatness is measured by a bead-pull method, and the relative electric field is calculated from the frequency shift perturbed by the bead stepping along the axis of the cavity.

  12. Ultrahigh resolution and brilliance laser wakefield accelerator betatron x-ray source for rapid in vivo tomographic microvasculature imaging in small animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Krol, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    We are developing ultrahigh spatial resolution (FWHM < 2 μm) high-brilliance x-ray source for rapid in vivo tomographic microvasculature imaging micro-CT angiography (μCTA) in small animal models using optimized contrast agent. It exploits Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) betatron x-ray emission phenomenon. Ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse interacting with a supersonic gas jet produces an ion cavity ("bubble") in the plasma in the wake of the laser pulse. Electrons that are injected into this bubble gain energy, perform wiggler-like oscillations and generate burst of incoherent x-rays with characteristic duration time comparable to the laser pulse duration, continuous synchrotron-like spectral distribution that might extend to hundreds keV, very high brilliance, very small focal spot and highly directional emission in the cone-beam geometry. Such LWFA betatron x-ray source created in our lab produced 1021 -1023 photonsṡ shot-1ṡmrad-2ṡmm-2/0.1%bw with mean critical energy in the12-30 keV range. X-ray source size for a single laser shot was FWHM=1.7 μm x-ray beam divergence 20-30 mrad, and effective focal spot size for multiple shots FWHM= 2 μm. Projection images of simple phantoms and complex biological objects including insects and mice were obtained in single laser shots. We conclude that ultrahigh spatial resolution μCTA (FWHM 2 μm) requiring thousands of projection images could be accomplished using LWFA betatron x-ray radiation in approximately 40 s with our existing 220 TW laser and sub seconds with next generation of ultrafast lasers and x-ray detectors, as opposed to several hours required using conventional microfocal x-ray tubes. Thus, sub second ultrahigh resolution in vivo microtomographic microvasculature imaging (in both absorption and phase contrast mode) in small animal models of cancer and vascular diseases will be feasible with LWFA betatron x-ray source.

  13. Electronically tuned optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, J. A.; Pasierb, E. F.; Oh, C. S.; Mccaffrey, M. T.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed account is given of efforts to develop a three layer, polychromic filter that can be tuned electronically. The operation of the filter is based on the cooperative alignment of pleochroic dye molecules by nematic liquid crystals activated by electric fields. This orientation produces changes in the optical density of the material and thus changes in the color of light transmitted through the medium. In addition, attempts to improve materials and devices which employ field induced changes of a cholesteric to a nematic liquid crystal are presented.

  14. Probing the K-edge of a laser heated aluminum plasma using X-rays from betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator with femtosecond resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Keegan; Hussein, Amina; Zhao, Tony; Hill, Edward; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Nees, John; Yanovsky, Victor; Mangles, Stuart; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team; Plasmas Group Team

    2016-10-01

    Presented here are data from a two-beam pump-probe experiment. We used synchrotron-like X-rays created by betatron oscillations to probe a thin metal foil that is pumped by the secondary laser beam. The Hercules Ti:Sapphire laser facility was operated with a pulse duration of 34 fs and a power of 80 TW split. A 75-25 beam splitter was used to drive a laser wakefield accelerator and heat the secondary target. We observed opacity changes around the K-edge of thin aluminum foil as it was heated by an ultrafast pump laser. To understand how the opacity is changing with heating and expansion of the plasma, the delay between the two laser paths was adjusted on a femtosecond time scale from 50 to 400 fs. Experimental data for aluminum shows variation in opacity around the K-edge with changes in the probe delay. The transmitted synchrotron-like spectrum was measured using single photon counting on an X-ray CCD camera and was available on a shot-by-shot basis. The success of this work demonstrates a practical application for X-rays produced from betatron oscillations in a wakefield accelerator. U.S. Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  15. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological samples using a betatron x-ray source generated in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaulagain, U.; Bohacek, K.; Kozlova, M.; Nejdl, J.; Krus, M.; Horny, V.; Mahieu, B.; Ta-Phuoc, K.

    2017-05-01

    In a plasma wakefield accelerator, an intense laser pulse propagates in an under-dense plasma that drives a relativistic plasma wave in which electrons can be injected and accelerated to relativistic energies within a short distance. These accelerated electrons undergo betatron oscillation and emit a collimated X-ray beam along the direction of electron velocity. This X-ray source is characterised with a source size of the order of a micrometer, a pulse duration of the order of femtosecond, and with a high spectral brightness. This novel X-ray source provides an excellent imaging tool to achieve unprecedented high-resolution image through phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast technique has the potential to reveal structures which are invisible with the conventional absorption imaging. In the X-ray phase contrast imaging, the image contrast is obtained thanks to phase shifts induced on the X-rays passing through the sample. It involves the real part of refractive index of the object. Here we present high-resolution phase contrast X-ray images of two biological samples using laser-driven Betatron X-ray source.

  16. Femtosecond probing around the K-edge of a laser heated plasma using X-rays from betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Keegan; Zhao, Tony; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Yanovsky, Victor; Nees, John; Mangles, Stuart; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team; Plasmas Group Team

    2015-11-01

    Presented here are data from a two-beam pump-probe experiment. We used synchrotron-like X-rays created by betatron oscillations to probe a thin metal foil that is pumped by the secondary laser beam. The Hercules Ti:Sapph laser facility was operated with a pulse duration of 34 fs and a power of 65 TW split to drive a laser wakefield accelerator and heat the secondary target. We observed opacity changes around the K-edge of thin foils as they were heated by an ultrafast pump laser. To understand how the opacity is changing with heating and expansion of the plasma, the delay between the two laser paths was adjusted on a fs and ps time scale. Experimental data for polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) and aluminum show variations in opacity around the Cl and Al K-edges with changes in the probe delay. The transmitted synchrotron-like spectrum was measured using single photon counting on an X-ray CCD camera and was available on a shot-by-shot basis. The success of this work demonstrates a practical application for X-rays produced from betatron oscillations in a wakefield accelerator. The compact size of these ``table-top'' accelerators and the ultrashort nature of the generated X-ray pulses allows pump-probe experiments that can probe events that occur on the femtosecond time scale.

  17. Tuning Broadband Microwave Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Alaniz, Gabriel

    2003-09-05

    The PEP-II/DA {Phi} NE/ALS longitudinal feedback systems are complex wide bandwidth systems requiring analog, digital and microwave circuits. The solid-state amplifier is one of the components in the microwave circuit that is required to suppress the coupled bunch instabilities that exist in the PEP-II accelerator. The suppression is achieved by using an antenna as a kicker structure that provides an electric field in order to increase or decrease the energy of particles passing through the structure. The amplifier is made up of sixteen 30 to 35W microstrip GaAs FET modules that are combined to obtain 500W over a bandwidth of 850MHz to 1850MHz. The amplifier malfunctioned causing a reduction in the functionality and power output of the individual GaAs FET modules. The amplifier must be repaired. After repair, the amplifier must be tuned to optimize the gain while maintaining proper power output. The amplifier is tuned using microstrip circuit techniques. A variety of microstrip methods are used to obtain the proper line impedance. The result is a working amplifier that operates efficiently.

  18. Reversible hysteresis loop tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A.; Binek, Ch.; Margulies, D. T.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2006-02-01

    We utilize antiferromagnetically coupled bilayer structures to magnetically tune hysteresis loop properties. Key element of this approach is the non-overlapping switching field distribution of the two magnetic layers that make up the system: a hard magnetic CoPtCrB layer (HL) and a soft magnetic CoCr layer (SL). Both layers are coupled antiferromagnetically through an only 0.6-nm-thick Ru interlayer. The non-overlapping switching field distribution allows the measurement of magnetization reversal in the SL at low fields while keeping the magnetization state of the HL unperturbed. Applying an appropriate high field or high field sequence changes the magnetic state of the HL, which then influences the SL magnetization reversal due to the interlayer coupling. In this way, the position and shape of the SL hysteresis loop can be changed or tuned in a fully reversible and highly effective manner. Here, we study specifically how the SL hysteresis loop characteristics change as we move the HL through an entire high field hysteresis loop sequence.

  19. Nanoplasmonics tuned "click chemistry".

    PubMed

    Tijunelyte, I; Guenin, E; Lidgi-Guigui, N; Colas, F; Ibrahim, J; Toury, T; Lamy de la Chapelle, M

    2016-04-07

    Nanoplasmonics is a growing field of optical condensed matter science dedicated to optical phenomena at the nanoscale level in metal systems. Extensive research on noble metallic nanoparticles (NPs) has emerged within the last two decades due to their ability to keep the optical energy concentrated in the vicinity of NPs, in particular, the ability to create optical near-field enhancement followed by heat generation. We have exploited these properties in order to induce a localised "click" reaction in the vicinity of gold nanostructures under unfavourable experimental conditions. We demonstrate that this reaction can be controlled by the plasmonic properties of the nanostructures and we propose two physical mechanisms to interpret the observed plasmonic tuning of the "click" chemistry.

  20. Nanoplasmonics tuned ``click chemistry''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijunelyte, I.; Guenin, E.; Lidgi-Guigui, N.; Colas, F.; Ibrahim, J.; Toury, T.; Lamy de La Chapelle, M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoplasmonics is a growing field of optical condensed matter science dedicated to optical phenomena at the nanoscale level in metal systems. Extensive research on noble metallic nanoparticles (NPs) has emerged within the last two decades due to their ability to keep the optical energy concentrated in the vicinity of NPs, in particular, the ability to create optical near-field enhancement followed by heat generation. We have exploited these properties in order to induce a localised ``click'' reaction in the vicinity of gold nanostructures under unfavourable experimental conditions. We demonstrate that this reaction can be controlled by the plasmonic properties of the nanostructures and we propose two physical mechanisms to interpret the observed plasmonic tuning of the ``click'' chemistry.Nanoplasmonics is a growing field of optical condensed matter science dedicated to optical phenomena at the nanoscale level in metal systems. Extensive research on noble metallic nanoparticles (NPs) has emerged within the last two decades due to their ability to keep the optical energy concentrated in the vicinity of NPs, in particular, the ability to create optical near-field enhancement followed by heat generation. We have exploited these properties in order to induce a localised ``click'' reaction in the vicinity of gold nanostructures under unfavourable experimental conditions. We demonstrate that this reaction can be controlled by the plasmonic properties of the nanostructures and we propose two physical mechanisms to interpret the observed plasmonic tuning of the ``click'' chemistry. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: NMR study on reaction initiation, SERS spectra and temperature calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09018k

  1. Modified Betatron Accelerator Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Stability Calcula- tions," AMRC-N-207 (Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, 1982). 6. T. J. Fessenden , W. A. Atchison, D. L. Birx, R. J. Briggs...Hughes, AMRC-N-207 (Mission Research Corpora- tion, Albuquerque, 1982). *6. T. J. Fessenden , W. A. Atchison, D. L. Blrx, R. J. Briggs, J. C. Clark, R. E

  2. Varactor tuned transistor oscillators /Survey/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriugin, I. A.; Kitaev, Iu. I.; Solodovnikov, N. P.

    1981-03-01

    Major developments in the theory and technology of varactor tuned solid state oscillators are surveyed on the basis of data appearing in periodical and patent literature. Attention is given to problems in general theory, modulation characteristics, transient processes occurring during tuning, stability properties, and circuit fabrication aspects.

  3. Plasmonic color tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoungho; Yun, Hansik; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Hwi

    2016-03-01

    In general, color filter is an optical component to permit the transmission of a specific color in cameras, displays, and microscopes. Each filter has its own unchangeable color because it is made by chemical materials such as dyes and pigments. Therefore, in order to express various colorful images in a display, one pixel should have three sub-pixels of red, green, and blue colors. Here, we suggest new plasmonic structure and method to change the color in a single pixel. It is comprised of a cavity and a metal nanoaperture. The optical cavity generally supports standing waves inside it, and various standing waves having different wavelength can be confined together in one cavity. On the other hand, although light cannot transmit sub-wavelength sized aperture, surface plasmons can propagate through the metal nanoaperture with high intensity due to the extraordinary transmission. If we combine the two structures, we can organize the spatial distribution of amplitudes according to wavelength of various standing waves using the cavity, and we can extract a light with specific wavelength and amplitude using the nanoaperture. Therefore, this cavity-aperture structure can simultaneously tune the color and intensity of the transmitted light through the single nanoaperture. We expect that the cavity-apertures have a potential for dynamic color pixels, micro-imaging system, and multiplexed sensors.

  4. Tuning the engine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the last years post-transcriptional regulation (PTR) of gene expression has been increasingly recognized to be a powerful and general determinant of the quantitative changes in proteomes, and therefore a driving force for cell phenotypes. By means of networks of trans-factors on one hand, and cis-elements found primarily in untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNA on the other hand, mRNA availability to translation and translation rates are tightly controlled and can be rapidly tuned according to the changing state of the cell. A number of dedicated resources and tools, including databases and predictive algorithms, have been proposed as bioinformatics aids for the study of this fundamental layer of gene expression regulation. Their use, however, is rendered difficult by heterogeneity and fragmentation. This review aims to locate these resources in their proper space, classifying them according to their goals, limitations and integration capabilities and, in the end, to provide the user with an initial toolbox for the bioinformatic analysis of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The accompanying website, available at www.ptrguide.org, lists all resources, provides summary and features for each one and will be regularly updated in the future. PMID:22995832

  5. Tuning The Laser Heater Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary

    2010-12-03

    The laser heater undulator for the LCLS requires different tuning techniques than the main undulators. It is a pure permanent magnet (PPM) undulator, rather than the hybrid design of the main undulators. The PPM design allows analytic calculation of the undulator fields. The calculations let errors be introduced and correction techniques be derived. This note describes how the undulator was modelled, and the methods which were found to correct potential errors in the undulator. The laser heater undulator for the LCLS is a pure permanent magnet device requiring different tuning techniques than the main undulators. In this note, the laser heater undulator is modelled and tuning techniques to compensate various errors are derived.

  6. Tuning of Pectin Methylesterification

    PubMed Central

    Sénéchal, Fabien; L'Enfant, Mélanie; Domon, Jean-Marc; Rosiau, Emeline; Crépeau, Marie-Jeanne; Surcouf, Ogier; Esquivel-Rodriguez, Juan; Marcelo, Paulo; Mareck, Alain; Guérineau, François; Kim, Hyung-Rae; Mravec, Jozef; Bonnin, Estelle; Jamet, Elisabeth; Kihara, Daisuke; Lerouge, Patrice; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Pectin methylesterases (PMEs) catalyze the demethylesterification of homogalacturonan domains of pectin in plant cell walls and are regulated by endogenous pectin methylesterase inhibitors (PMEIs). In Arabidopsis dark-grown hypocotyls, one PME (AtPME3) and one PMEI (AtPMEI7) were identified as potential interacting proteins. Using RT-quantitative PCR analysis and gene promoter::GUS fusions, we first showed that AtPME3 and AtPMEI7 genes had overlapping patterns of expression in etiolated hypocotyls. The two proteins were identified in hypocotyl cell wall extracts by proteomics. To investigate the potential interaction between AtPME3 and AtPMEI7, both proteins were expressed in a heterologous system and purified by affinity chromatography. The activity of recombinant AtPME3 was characterized on homogalacturonans (HGs) with distinct degrees/patterns of methylesterification. AtPME3 showed the highest activity at pH 7.5 on HG substrates with a degree of methylesterification between 60 and 80% and a random distribution of methyl esters. On the best HG substrate, AtPME3 generates long non-methylesterified stretches and leaves short highly methylesterified zones, indicating that it acts as a processive enzyme. The recombinant AtPMEI7 and AtPME3 interaction reduces the level of demethylesterification of the HG substrate but does not inhibit the processivity of the enzyme. These data suggest that the AtPME3·AtPMEI7 complex is not covalently linked and could, depending on the pH, be alternately formed and dissociated. Docking analysis indicated that the inhibition of AtPME3 could occur via the interaction of AtPMEI7 with a PME ligand-binding cleft structure. All of these data indicate that AtPME3 and AtPMEI7 could be partners involved in the fine tuning of HG methylesterification during plant development. PMID:26183897

  7. Tuning Forks and Monitor Screens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, M. A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Defines the vibrations of a tuning fork against a computer monitor screen as a pattern that can illustrate or explain physical concepts like wave vibrations, wave forms, and phase differences. Presents background information and demonstrates the experiment. (Author/YDS)

  8. Manganite films: Tuning phase diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailovic, Dragan

    2016-09-01

    Strain engineering can tune a manganite film into an antiferromagnetic insulating state whose extreme photo-susceptibility allows for the ordinary ferromagnetic metal state to then be transiently realized.

  9. Tuning Forks and Monitor Screens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, M. A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Defines the vibrations of a tuning fork against a computer monitor screen as a pattern that can illustrate or explain physical concepts like wave vibrations, wave forms, and phase differences. Presents background information and demonstrates the experiment. (Author/YDS)

  10. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  11. High speed tuning mechanism for CO/sub 2/ lidar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Ahl, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    A method for rapidly tuning lasers is presented. The system utilizes a rotating eight-sided mirror and a fixed grating. It is demonstrated that the entire CO/sub 2/ lasing spectrum can be tuned at effective rates of up to 400 Hz. It is shown that, although the pulse energy is diminished as the tuning rate is increased, the loss comes from the tail of the pulse, and the peak power is almost unchanged. In addition, the tuning method preserves the spatial beam profile while contributing a minimum of beam steering.

  12. Adaptive Self-Tuning Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, H. A.; Draelos, T.; Young, C. J.; Lawry, B.; Chael, E. P.; Faust, A.; Peterson, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The quality of automatic detections from seismic sensor networks depends on a large number of data processing parameters that interact in complex ways. The largely manual process of identifying effective parameters is painstaking and does not guarantee that the resulting controls are the optimal configuration settings. Yet, achieving superior automatic detection of seismic events is closely related to these parameters. We present an automated sensor tuning (AST) system that learns near-optimal parameter settings for each event type using neuro-dynamic programming (reinforcement learning) trained with historic data. AST learns to test the raw signal against all event-settings and automatically self-tunes to an emerging event in real-time. The overall goal is to reduce the number of missed legitimate event detections and the number of false event detections. Reducing false alarms early in the seismic pipeline processing will have a significant impact on this goal. Applicable both for existing sensor performance boosting and new sensor deployment, this system provides an important new method to automatically tune complex remote sensing systems. Systems tuned in this way will achieve better performance than is currently possible by manual tuning, and with much less time and effort devoted to the tuning process. With ground truth on detections in seismic waveforms from a network of stations, we show that AST increases the probability of detection while decreasing false alarms.

  13. A novel optical tuning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miron, Nicolae

    2007-02-01

    A novel optical tuning technology based on new non-resonant interferometer (Optune interferometer) is described. This interferometer has a totally reflective layer either parallel with a partially reflective layer or tilted with a small angle, with an adjustable air gap between them. An input fiber optic collimator delivers a free space collimated beam that is incident first on the totally reflective layer at a small incidence angle. This beam bounces many times between the two reflective layers. An output fiber optic collimator collects all the beams going through the partially reflective layer making them to interfere at the entrance aperture of the output fiber. The optical configuration has no resonant frequencies. A broadband signal at the input is available at the output as a comb with even spacing. Any arbitrary wavelength can be selected by adjusting accurately the gap size. Tuning across 90 nm range could require less than 10 μm change of the gap size. Some properties of Optune interferometer are: 240 nm tuning range, no tuning holes, 0.2 ms / 100 nm tuning speed, 1 pm tuning accuracy, 0.15 nm bandwidth, 1 dB insertion loss, 45 dB contrast, 0.2 dB flatness, 0.15 dB polarization dependent loss. Optune interferometer can be used either for filtering or for generating optical wavelengths in a broad range of applications such as optical monitoring of structures (FBG and Brillouin technologies), and in optical communications. U.S. Patent No. 7,002,696 covers Optune interferometer and also optical tuning technology based on it.

  14. Tuning a Tetrahertz Wire Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Qi; Williams, Benjamin S.; Kumar, Sushil; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Tunable terahertz lasers are desirable in applications in sensing and spectroscopy because many biochemical species have strong spectral fingerprints at terahertz frequencies. Conventionally, the frequency of a laser is tuned in a similar manner to a stringed musical instrument, in which pitch is varied by changing the length of the string (the longitudinal component of the wave vector) and/ or its tension (the refractive index). However, such methods are difficult to implement in terahertz semiconductor lasers because of their poor outcoupling efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate a novel tuning mechanism based on a unique 'wire laser' device for which the transverse dimension w is much much less than lambda. Placing a movable object close to the wire laser manipulates a large fraction of the waveguided mode propagating outside the cavity, thereby tuning its resonant frequency. Continuous single-mode redshift and blueshift tuning is demonstrated for the same device by using either a dielectric or metallic movable object. In combination, this enables a frequency tuning of approximately equal to 137 GHz (3.6%) from a single laser device at approximately equal to 3.8 THz.

  15. Tuning a terahertz wire laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qi; Williams, Benjamin S.; Kumar, Sushil; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2009-12-01

    Tunable terahertz lasers are desirable in applications in sensing and spectroscopy because many biochemical species have strong spectral fingerprints at terahertz frequencies. Conventionally, the frequency of a laser is tuned in a similar manner to a stringed musical instrument, in which pitch is varied by changing the length of the string (the longitudinal component of the wave vector) and/or its tension (the refractive index). However, such methods are difficult to implement in terahertz semiconductor lasers because of their poor outcoupling efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate a novel tuning mechanism based on a unique `wire laser' device for which the transverse dimension w is <<λ. Placing a movable object close to the wire laser manipulates a large fraction of the waveguided mode propagating outside the cavity, thereby tuning its resonant frequency. Continuous single-mode redshift and blueshift tuning is demonstrated for the same device by using either a dielectric or metallic movable object. In combination, this enables a frequency tuning of ~137 GHz (3.6%) from a single laser device at ~3.8 THz.

  16. Tuning the chemosensory window

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shanshan; Mackay, Trudy FC

    2010-01-01

    Accurate perception of chemical signals from the environment is critical for the fitness of most animals. Drosophila melanogaster experiences its chemical environment through families of chemoreceptors that include olfactory receptors, gustatory receptors and odorant binding proteins. Its chemical environment, however, changes during its life cycle and the interpretation of chemical signals is dependent on dynamic social and physical surroundings. Phenotypic plasticity of gene expression of the chemoreceptor repertoire allows flies to adjust the chemosensory window through which they “view” their world and to modify the ensemble of expressed chemoreceptor proteins in line with their developmental and physiological state and according to their needs to locate food and oviposition sites under different social and physical environmental conditions. Furthermore, males and females differ in their expression profiles of chemoreceptor genes. Thus, each sex experiences its chemical environment via combinatorial activation of distinct chemoreceptor ensembles. The remarkable phenotypic plasticity of the chemoreceptor repertoire raises several fundamental questions. What are the mechanisms that translate environmental cues into regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression? How are gustatory and olfactory cues integrated perceptually? What is the relationship between ensembles of odorant binding proteins and odorant receptors? And, what is the significance of co-regulated chemoreceptor transcriptional networks? PMID:20305396

  17. PID Tuning Using Extremum Seeking

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N; Krstic, M

    2005-11-15

    Although proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in the process industry, their effectiveness is often limited due to poor tuning. Manual tuning of PID controllers, which requires optimization of three parameters, is a time-consuming task. To remedy this difficulty, much effort has been invested in developing systematic tuning methods. Many of these methods rely on knowledge of the plant model or require special experiments to identify a suitable plant model. Reviews of these methods are given in [1] and the survey paper [2]. However, in many situations a plant model is not known, and it is not desirable to open the process loop for system identification. Thus a method for tuning PID parameters within a closed-loop setting is advantageous. In relay feedback tuning [3]-[5], the feedback controller is temporarily replaced by a relay. Relay feedback causes most systems to oscillate, thus determining one point on the Nyquist diagram. Based on the location of this point, PID parameters can be chosen to give the closed-loop system a desired phase and gain margin. An alternative tuning method, which does not require either a modification of the system or a system model, is unfalsified control [6], [7]. This method uses input-output data to determine whether a set of PID parameters meets performance specifications. An adaptive algorithm is used to update the PID controller based on whether or not the controller falsifies a given criterion. The method requires a finite set of candidate PID controllers that must be initially specified [6]. Unfalsified control for an infinite set of PID controllers has been developed in [7]; this approach requires a carefully chosen input signal [8]. Yet another model-free PID tuning method that does not require opening of the loop is iterative feedback tuning (IFT). IFT iteratively optimizes the controller parameters with respect to a cost function derived from the output signal of the closed-loop system, see [9

  18. Apparatuses and methods for tuning center frequencies

    DOEpatents

    Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Olsson, Roy H.

    2016-02-23

    Apparatuses and methods for tuning center frequencies are described herein. Examples of tuning described herein including tuning using feedback from the resonator. Variable gain feedback for tuning of acoustic wave resonators is provided in some examples. An example apparatus may include a resonator and a feedback loop. The resonator may be configured to receive a tuning signal and to provide a feedback signal. The feedback signal may be based on the tuning signal. The feedback loop may be configured to receive the feedback signal from the resonator. The feedback loop further may be configured to provide the tuning signal to actively tune a center frequency of the resonator. The tuning signal may be based on the feedback signal.

  19. Remote tuning of NMR probe circuits.

    PubMed

    Kodibagkar, V D; Conradi, M S

    2000-05-01

    There are many circumstances in which the probe tuning adjustments cannot be located near the rf NMR coil. These may occur in high-temperature NMR, low-temperature NMR, and in the use of magnets with small diameter access bores. We address here circuitry for connecting a fixed-tuned probe circuit by a transmission line to a remotely located tuning network. In particular, the bandwidth over which the probe may be remotely tuned while keeping the losses in the transmission line acceptably low is considered. The results show that for all resonant circuit geometries (series, parallel, series-parallel), overcoupling of the line to the tuned circuit is key to obtaining a large tuning bandwidth. At equivalent extents of overcoupling, all resonant circuit geometries have nearly equal remote tuning bandwidths. Particularly for the case of low-loss transmission line, the tuning bandwidth can be many times the tuned circuit's bandwidth, f(o)/Q. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Acoustically-tuned optical spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklar, E.

    1981-01-01

    Lens arrangement corrects for aberrations and gives resolution of 0.7 seconds of arc. In spectrometer, light from telescope is relayed by doublet lens to acoustically tuned optical filter. Selected wavelengths are relayed by triplet lens to charge coupled device camera. Intervening cylindrical lens, tilted at 12 degree angle, corrects for astigmatism and coma introduced by two element birefringent crystal in filter.

  1. Multi-GeV electron beam and high brightness betatron x-ray generation in recent Texas Petawatt laser-driven plasma accelerator experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Fazel, Neil; Li, Zhengyan; Zhang, Xi; Henderson, Watson; Chang, Yen-Yu; Korzekwa, Rick; Tsai, H.-E.; Quevedo, Hernan; Dyer, Gilliss; Gaul, Erhard; Martinez, Mikael; Bernstein, Aaron; Spinks, Michael; Gordan, Joseph; Donovan, Michael; Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady; Ditmire, Todd; Downer, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Compact laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) driven by petawatt (PW) lasers have produced highly collimated, quasi-monoenergetic multi-GeV electron bunches with ~100 pC charge, which are promising sources of ultrafast x-rays. Here we report three recent advances in PW-LPA performance brought about by optimizing the focal volume of the Texas PW laser with a deformable mirror. First, we accelerated electrons up to 3 GeV with hundreds of pC over 1 GeV and <0.5 mrad divergence. Second, we significantly improved shot-to-shot reproducibility (90% shots >1 GeV, 10% >2 GeV). Third, by introducing a double-peaked laser focus, creating a ``double bubble'' that subsequently merged, we significantly increased electron charge (0.5 nC) above 1 GeV, while producing brighter (1022photon/mm2/rad/0.1%), harder (up to 30 keV) betatron x-rays, characterized by a multi-metal filter pack and phase-contrast imaging. We observe evidence of dimuon production by irradiating a high-Z target with this high-charge, GeV electron beam.

  2. INVESTIGATION OF A RESIDUAL VERTICAL INSTRINSIC RESONANCES WITH DUAL PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    LIN,F.; LEE, S.Y.; AHRENS, L.A.; BAI, M.; BROWN, K.; COURANT, E.D.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Two partial helical dipole snakes were found to be able to overcome all imperfection and intrinsic spin resonances provided that the vertical betatron tunes were maintained in the spin tune gap near the integer 9. Recent vertical betatron tune scan showed that the two weak resonances at the beginning of the acceleration cycle may be the cause of polarization loss. This result has been confirmed by the vertical polarization profile measurement, and spin tracking simulations. Possible cure of the remaining beam polarization is discussed.

  3. Self-tuning regulators. [adaptive control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astrom, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a research project are discussed for self-tuning regulators for active control. An algorithm for the self-tuning regulator is described as being stochastic, nonlinear, time variable, and not trivial.

  4. Tuning in the bullfrog ear.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, E R

    1988-01-01

    When electrical resonances were observed in acoustic sensory cells of lower vertebrates, the hearing research community was presented with the exciting possibility that tuning in the ears of those animals might be explained directly in terms of familiar molecular devices. It is reported here that in the frog sacculus, where electrical resonances have been observed in isolated hair cells, the effects of those resonances are completely obscured in the tuning properties of the sacculus in the intact ear. This observation has important implications not only for students of the ear, but for reductionist biologists in general. All of the dynamic properties of a system of connected, bidirectional processes are consequences of all of those processes at once; in such a system, the properties of an experimentally isolated subsystem may be totally obscured in the operation of the system as a whole. PMID:3258166

  5. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  8. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  9. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  10. Simple lumped circuit model applied to field flatness tuning of four-rod radio frequency quadrupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. Y.; Schmidt, J. S.; Schempp, A.

    2014-01-01

    The field flatness of any radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is an important parameter that needs to be carefully tuned because it can affect beam transmission efficiency. In four-rod RFQs, the heights of a set of tuning plates determine the quality of the field flatness. The goals of this paper are (a) to show that by using a lumped circuit model of a four-rod RFQ, the field flatness profile for any tuning plate height distribution can be quickly calculated, (b) to derive a perturbative solution of the model so that insights into the physics of the tuning process and its effects can be understood, and (c) to compare the predicted field profiles to measurements.

  11. JEM's 2009 Tune-up

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Scientific journals, like cars, require periodic tune-ups to keep them running smoothly. Effective immediately, several changes to the JEM publication policies will take effect. Our aim is to address policy issues that have arisen over the past several years and, more broadly, to maintain the quality and integrity of the research we publish. The upcoming changes to JEM policies and the impetus behind them are outlined here.

  12. Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatron oscillations, and beam steering in a plasma wakefield experiment at 30 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Catravas, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Assmann, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Whittum, D.; Blue, B.; Clayton, C.; Joshi, C.; Marsh, K.; Mori, W.B.; Wang, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.

    2001-01-01

    A method for using Cerenkov radiation near atomic spectral lines to measure plasma source properties for plasma wakefield applications has been discussed and experimentally verified. Because the radiation co-propagates with the electron beam, the radiation samples the source properties exactly along the path of interest with perfect temporal synchronization. Observation wavelengths were chosen with respect to the atomic resonances of the plasma source, where the relative change in the index of refraction strongly affects the Cerenkov cone angle, and permits flexible diagnostic design. The Cerenkov spatial profiles were systematically studied for a Lithium heat pipe oven as a function of oven temperature and observation wavelength. Neutral densities and plasma densities were extracted from the measurements.

  13. Eighth-Grade Violinists' Instrument Tuning Ability: A Comparison of Pitch Perception and Tuning Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between eighth-grade violinists' pitch perception and instrument tuning skill. The perceptual task was a researcher-developed computer-based Violin Tuning Perception Test. The instrument tuning task involved tuning two violins, one mistuned flat and the other mistuned sharp. Participants (N…

  14. New tuning method for PID controller.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing-Chung

    2002-10-01

    In this paper, a tuning method for proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller and the performance assessment formulas for this method are proposed. This tuning method is based on a genetic algorithm based PID controller design method. For deriving the tuning formula, the genetic algorithm based design method is applied to design PID controllers for a variety of processes. The relationship between the controller parameters and the parameters that characterize the process dynamics are determined and the tuning formula is then derived. Using simulation studies, the rules for assessing the performance of a PID controller tuned by the proposed method are also given. This makes it possible to incorporate the capability to determine if the PID controller is well tuned or not into an autotuner. An autotuner based on this new tuning method and the corresponding performance assessment rules is also established. Simulations and real-time experimental results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and usefulness of these formulas.

  15. On aspects of burn/profile control

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Varadarajan, V.

    1991-12-31

    Distributed parameter system can be flexibly turned into lumped parameter system. Multiple control objectives such as profile and power control requirements can be simultaneously modeled. Profile control is essential to control the sawteeth inversion radius and optimum power production. In this paper, a simple self-tuning control scheme is used to analyze the tokamak control behavior. The model uncertainties can be accommodated in self-tuning systems.

  16. On aspects of burn/profile control

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Varadarajan, V.

    1991-01-01

    Distributed parameter system can be flexibly turned into lumped parameter system. Multiple control objectives such as profile and power control requirements can be simultaneously modeled. Profile control is essential to control the sawteeth inversion radius and optimum power production. In this paper, a simple self-tuning control scheme is used to analyze the tokamak control behavior. The model uncertainties can be accommodated in self-tuning systems.

  17. Artifical intelligence techniques for tuning linear induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, D.; Brand, H.; Chambers, F.; Coffield, F.; Maurer, W.; Turner, W.

    1991-05-01

    We developed an expert system that acts as an intelligent assistant for tuning particle beam generators called MAESTRO, Model and Expert System Resource for Operators. MAESTRO maintains a knowledge base of the accelerator containing not only the interconnections of the beamline components, but also their physical attributes such as measured magnetic tilts, offsets, and field profiles. MAESTRO incorporates particle trajectory and beam envelope models which are coupled to the knowledge base permitting large numbers of real-time orbit and envelope calculations in the control-room environment. To date we have used this capability in three ways: First, to implement a tuning algorithm for minimizing transverse beam motion. Second, to produce a beam waist with arbitrary radius at the entrance to a brightness diagnostic. And finally, to measure beam energy along the accelerator by fitting orbits to focusing and steering sweeps.

  18. Tuning magnetofluidic spreading in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Varma, V. B.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetofluidic spreading (MFS) is a phenomenon in which a uniform magnetic field is used to induce spreading of a ferrofluid core cladded by diamagnetic fluidic streams in a three-stream channel. Applications of MFS include micromixing, cell sorting and novel microfluidic lab-on-a-chip design. However, the relative importance of the parameters which govern MFS is still unclear, leading to non-optimal control of MFS. Hence, in this work, the effect of various key parameters on MFS was experimentally and numerically studied. Our multi-physics model, which combines magnetic and fluidic analysis, showed excellent agreement between theory and experiment. It was found that spreading was mainly due to cross-sectional convection induced by magnetic forces, and can be enhanced by tuning various parameters. Smaller flow rate ratio, higher magnetic field, higher core stream or lower cladding stream dynamic viscosity, and larger magnetic particle size can increase MFS. These results can be used to tune magnetofluidic spreading in microchannels.

  19. Electrostatic Tuning of Cellular Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Börjesson, Sara I.; Parkkari, Teija; Hammarström, Sven; Elinder, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-gated ion channels regulate the electric activity of excitable tissues, such as the heart and brain. Therefore, treatment for conditions of disturbed excitability is often based on drugs that target ion channels. In this study of a voltage-gated K channel, we propose what we believe to be a novel pharmacological mechanism for how to regulate channel activity. Charged lipophilic substances can tune channel opening, and consequently excitability, by an electrostatic interaction with the channel's voltage sensors. The direction of the effect depends on the charge of the substance. This was shown by three compounds sharing an arachidonyl backbone but bearing different charge: arachidonic acid, methyl arachidonate, and arachidonyl amine. Computer simulations of membrane excitability showed that small changes in the voltage dependence of Na and K channels have prominent impact on excitability and the tendency for repetitive firing. For instance, a shift in the voltage dependence of a K channel with −5 or +5 mV corresponds to a threefold increase or decrease in K channel density, respectively. We suggest that electrostatic tuning of ion channel activity constitutes a novel and powerful pharmacological approach with which to affect cellular excitability. PMID:20141752

  20. Testing obliquity-tuned timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeden, Christian; Meyers, Stephen R.; Lourens, Lucas J.; Hilgen, Frederik J.

    2016-04-01

    Astrochronology seeks to use rhythmic sedimentary alterations to provide high-resolution age models, and this method now provides a backbone for much of the Cenozoic and Mesozoic time scale. While a range of methods for orbital tuning are available, a common approach is to directly match observed sedimentary alternations to target curves from astronomical computations, followed by evaluation of amplitude modulations (AM) as a means of verification. A quantitative test for precession-eccentricity modulations in astronomically-tuned data has been recently developed, however, a similar test for obliquity is lacking. Here, we introduce an algorithm for obliquity AM assessment, which avoids effects of obliquity frequency modulation that can artificially mimic the expected AM. The approach can be used to test for correlation with the theoretical astronomical solution in a way similar to the precession AM method. Obliquity is an especially dominant component of orbitally-driven climate variability in the early Quaternary; here Quaternary models and climate proxy records are used to evaluate the reliability of the proposed method.

  1. Design of fast tuning elements for the ITER ICH system

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, D.W.; Goulding, R.H.

    1996-05-01

    The coupling between the ion cyclotron (IC) antenna and the ITER plasma (as expressed by the load resistance the antenna sees) will experience relatively fast variations due to plasma edge profile modifications. If uncompensated, these will cause an increase in the amount of power reflected back to the transmitter and ultimately a decrease in the amount of radio frequency (rf) power to the plasma caused by protective suppression of the amount of rf power generated by the transmitter. The goals of this task were to study several alternate designs for a tuning and matching (T&M) system and to recommend some research and development (R&D) tasks that could be carried out to test some of the most promising concepts. Analyses of five different T&M configurations are presented in this report. They each have different advantages and disadvantages, and the choice among them must be made depending on the requirements for the IC system. Several general conclusions emerge from our study: The use of a hybrid splitter as a passive reflected-power dump [``edge localized mode (ELM)-dump``] appears very promising; this configuration will protect the rf power sources from reflected power during changes in plasma loading due to plasma motion or profile changes (e.g., ELM- induced changes in the plasma scrape-off region) and requires no active control of the rf system. Trade-offs between simplicity of design and capability of the system must be made. Simple system designs with few components near the antenna either have high voltages over considerable distances of transmission lines, or they are not easily tuned to operate at different frequencies. Designs using frequency shifts and/or fast tuning elements can provide fast matching over a wide range of plasma loading; however, the designs studied here require components near the antenna, complicating assembly and maintenance. Capacitor-tuned resonant systems may offer a good compromise.

  2. POET: Parameterized Optimization for Empirical Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Q; Seymour, K; You, H; Vuduc, R; Quinlan, D

    2007-01-29

    The excessive complexity of both machine architectures and applications have made it difficult for compilers to statically model and predict application behavior. This observation motivates the recent interest in performance tuning using empirical techniques. We present a new embedded scripting language, POET (Parameterized Optimization for Empirical Tuning), for parameterizing complex code transformations so that they can be empirically tuned. The POET language aims to significantly improve the generality, flexibility, and efficiency of existing empirical tuning systems. We have used the language to parameterize and to empirically tune three loop optimizations-interchange, blocking, and unrolling-for two linear algebra kernels. We show experimentally that the time required to tune these optimizations using POET, which does not require any program analysis, is significantly shorter than that when using a full compiler-based source-code optimizer which performs sophisticated program analysis and optimizations.

  3. Self tuning scalar tensor black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmousis, Christos; Iosifidis, Damianos

    2015-04-01

    Studying a certain sub class of higher order Horndeski (scalar-tensor) theories we discuss a method discovered recently permitting analytic black hole solutions with a non trivial and regular scalar field. One of the solutions found has de Sitter asymptotics and self tunes the bulk cosmological constant. Using the aforementioned method we find and analyse new black hole solutions which can also have de Sitter asymptotics. By looking at small deviations of the integration constant responsible for self tuning we discuss the robustness of the self tuning mechanism. We find that neighboring solutions to the one previously found present also self tuning properties with unaltered effective cosmological constant.

  4. Tune measurement methods of the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng-Yang Tan; Xiaolong Zhang; Paul Lebrun

    2003-06-10

    We will discuss several methods for measuring the tunes in the Tevatron. These methods can be separated into three classes: active, passive and hybrid. In the active method, the beam is tickled in order to obtain a frequency response. In the passive method, a Schottky detector which uses a resonant stripline is used to measure the Schottky spectrum of the beam. In the hybrid method, we tickle the beam using kickers, or the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) in order to bring the tune signal above the noise floor of the Schottky detectors. An automatic tune fitting algorithm is also under development which allows us to measure the tune without human intervention.

  5. Auto-tuning of cascade control systems.

    PubMed

    Song, Sihai; Cai, Wenjian; Wang, Ya-Gang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a novel auto-tuning method for a cascade control system is proposed. By employing a simple relay feedback test, both inner and outer loop model parameters can be simultaneously identified. Consequently, well-established proportional-integral-derivative (PID) tuning rules can be applied to tune both loops. Compared with existing methods, the new method is simpler and yet more effective. It can be directly integrated into commercially available industrial auto-tuning systems. Some examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  6. Tuning universality far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Markus; Nowak, Boris; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm. PMID:23928853

  7. Tuning innate immunity by translation.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Robert; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-12-01

    In multicellular organisms, the epithelia is a contact surface with the surrounding environment and is exposed to a variety of adverse biotic (pathogenic) and abiotic (chemical) factors. Multi-layered pathways that operate on different time scales have evolved to preserve cellular integrity and elicit stress-specific response. Several stress-response programs are activated until a complete elimination of the stress is achieved. The innate immune response, which is triggered by pathogenic invasion, is rather harmful when active over a prolonged time, thus the response follows characteristic oscillatory trajectories. Here, we review different translation programs that function to precisely fine-tune the time at which various components of the innate immune response dwell between active and inactive. We discuss how different pro-inflammatory pathways are co-ordinated to temporally offset single reactions and to achieve an optimal balance between fighting pathogens and being less harmful for healthy cells.

  8. Tuned alexandrite laser for dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Jan; Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    1999-12-01

    A tunable solid state laser system has been developed emitting visible light in the region from 710 to 775 nm, which can be used for medical applications. The laser head of this system is composed of alexandrite crystal rod, two dielectric mirrors, and a tuning element. The maximum reached output energy in the free running multimode regime was 400 mJ with the pulse duration of 70 micrometers . The output laser radiation was guided via a multimode quartz fiber or via a special fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide. At first, this radiation with laser fluency of 2.5 J/cm2 was used for the ablation of dental calculus. Next, the laser radiation propagation in the root canal and its effect on bacteria was proved. The dissipated energy measurement was made inside and outside the tooth. Hence, the alexandrite laser could be useful for medical applications in dentistry.

  9. Optimization methods for passive damper placement and tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, M. H.; Chu, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of viscous elements in introducing damping in a structure is a function of several variables, including their number, their location in the structure, and their physical properties. In this paper several optimization problems are posed to optimize these variables. The paper investigates various metrics to define the optimization problem, and compares the damping profiles that are obtained. Both discrete and continuous optimization problems are formulated and solved, corresponding, respectively, to the problems of placement of damping elements and to the tuning of their parameters. The paper particularly emphasizes techniques to make feasible the large scale problems resulting from the optimization formulations. Numerical results involving a lightly damped tested structure are presented.

  10. Electric field engineering using quantum-size-effect-tuned heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinolfi, V.; Ning, Z.; Xu, J.; Masala, S.; Zhitomirsky, D.; Thon, S. M.; Sargent, E. H.

    2013-07-01

    A quantum junction solar cell architecture was recently reported that employs colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) on each side of the p-n junction. This architecture extends the range of design opportunities for CQD photovoltaics, since the bandgap can be tuned across the light-absorbing semiconductor layer via control over CQD size, employing solution-processed, room-temperature fabricated materials. We exploit this feature by designing and demonstrating a field-enhanced heterojunction architecture. We optimize the electric field profile within the solar cell through bandgap engineering, thereby improving carrier collection and achieving an increased open circuit voltage, resulting in a 12% improvement in power conversion efficiency.

  11. Dual band tuned radomes for radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, E. C.; Naor, M.; Smolski, A. P.

    Highly effective dual-band tuning methods have been developed for sandwich panel-structure radome joints, simultaneously reducing perturbations to the joints in both the PSR and SSR bands. The new methodology, which solves the logistic problems associated with the previously used zoned tuning method, allows greater flexibility in the use of the same radome with different radars.

  12. Strings on a Violin: Location Dependence of Frequency Tuning in Active Dendrites.

    PubMed

    Das, Anindita; Rathour, Rahul K; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-01-01

    Strings on a violin are tuned to generate distinct sound frequencies in a manner that is firmly dependent on finger location along the fingerboard. Sound frequencies emerging from different violins could be very different based on their architecture, the nature of strings and their tuning. Analogously, active neuronal dendrites, dendrites endowed with active channel conductances, are tuned to distinct input frequencies in a manner that is dependent on the dendritic location of the synaptic inputs. Further, disparate channel expression profiles and differences in morphological characteristics could result in dendrites on different neurons of the same subtype tuned to distinct frequency ranges. Alternately, similar location-dependence along dendritic structures could be achieved through disparate combinations of channel profiles and morphological characteristics, leading to degeneracy in active dendritic spectral tuning. Akin to strings on a violin being tuned to different frequencies than those on a viola or a cello, different neuronal subtypes exhibit distinct channel profiles and disparate morphological characteristics endowing each neuronal subtype with unique location-dependent frequency selectivity. Finally, similar to the tunability of musical instruments to elicit distinct location-dependent sounds, neuronal frequency selectivity and its location-dependence are tunable through activity-dependent plasticity of ion channels and morphology. In this morceau, we explore the origins of neuronal frequency selectivity, and survey the literature on the mechanisms behind the emergence of location-dependence in distinct forms of frequency tuning. As a coda to this composition, we present some future directions for this exciting convergence of biophysical mechanisms that endow a neuron with frequency multiplexing capabilities.

  13. Strings on a Violin: Location Dependence of Frequency Tuning in Active Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anindita; Rathour, Rahul K.; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-01-01

    Strings on a violin are tuned to generate distinct sound frequencies in a manner that is firmly dependent on finger location along the fingerboard. Sound frequencies emerging from different violins could be very different based on their architecture, the nature of strings and their tuning. Analogously, active neuronal dendrites, dendrites endowed with active channel conductances, are tuned to distinct input frequencies in a manner that is dependent on the dendritic location of the synaptic inputs. Further, disparate channel expression profiles and differences in morphological characteristics could result in dendrites on different neurons of the same subtype tuned to distinct frequency ranges. Alternately, similar location-dependence along dendritic structures could be achieved through disparate combinations of channel profiles and morphological characteristics, leading to degeneracy in active dendritic spectral tuning. Akin to strings on a violin being tuned to different frequencies than those on a viola or a cello, different neuronal subtypes exhibit distinct channel profiles and disparate morphological characteristics endowing each neuronal subtype with unique location-dependent frequency selectivity. Finally, similar to the tunability of musical instruments to elicit distinct location-dependent sounds, neuronal frequency selectivity and its location-dependence are tunable through activity-dependent plasticity of ion channels and morphology. In this morceau, we explore the origins of neuronal frequency selectivity, and survey the literature on the mechanisms behind the emergence of location-dependence in distinct forms of frequency tuning. As a coda to this composition, we present some future directions for this exciting convergence of biophysical mechanisms that endow a neuron with frequency multiplexing capabilities. PMID:28348519

  14. Two-level tuning of fuzzy PID controllers.

    PubMed

    Mann, G I; Hu, B G; Gosine, R G

    2001-01-01

    Fuzzy PID tuning requires two stages of tuning; low level tuning followed by high level tuning. At the higher level, a nonlinear tuning is performed to determine the nonlinear characteristics of the fuzzy output. At the lower level, a linear tuning is performed to determine the linear characteristics of the fuzzy output for achieving overall performance of fuzzy control. First, different fuzzy systems are defined and then simplified for two-point control. Non-linearity tuning diagrams are constructed for fuzzy systems in order to perform high level tuning. The linear tuning parameters are deduced from the conventional PID tuning knowledge. Using the tuning diagrams, high level tuning heuristics are developed. Finally, different applications are demonstrated to show the validity of the proposed tuning method.

  15. Novel tune diagnostics for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    In the Tevatron collider, protons and antiprotons share the same beam pipe. This poses a challenge in the measurement of tunes for both species simultaneously because of the possibility of signal contamination from the other species. The tune of each bunch is also very different because of beam-beam effects from parasitic crossing points. This means that the tune diagnostics must be able to differentiate between protons and anti-protons, it also has to measure tunes from each bunch. There are three different tune pickups used in the Tevatron: 1.7 GHz Schottky pickups, 21.4 MHz Schottky pickups and baseband pickups. These devices will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  16. The Modified Betatron Accelerator Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-06

    experiments at NRL and Columbia led to a collaborative effort on NRL’s VEBA generator in which a quasioptical cavity was used to provide feedback...Consequently, the NRL VEBA group (Parker et al., 1982) designed an improved diode in which 90% of the diode current was removed from the beam with a

  17. Algorithms to Automate LCLS Undulator Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-03

    Automation of the LCLS undulator tuning offers many advantages to the project. Automation can make a substantial reduction in the amount of time the tuning takes. Undulator tuning is fairly complex and automation can make the final tuning less dependent on the skill of the operator. Also, algorithms are fixed and can be scrutinized and reviewed, as opposed to an individual doing the tuning by hand. This note presents algorithms implemented in a computer program written for LCLS undulator tuning. The LCLS undulators must meet the following specifications. The maximum trajectory walkoff must be less than 5 {micro}m over 10 m. The first field integral must be below 40 x 10{sup -6} Tm. The second field integral must be below 50 x 10{sup -6} Tm{sup 2}. The phase error between the electron motion and the radiation field must be less than 10 degrees in an undulator. The K parameter must have the value of 3.5000 {+-} 0.0005. The phase matching from the break regions into the undulator must be accurate to better than 10 degrees. A phase change of 113 x 2{pi} must take place over a distance of 3.656 m centered on the undulator. Achieving these requirements is the goal of the tuning process. Most of the tuning is done with Hall probe measurements. The field integrals are checked using long coil measurements. An analysis program written in Matlab takes the Hall probe measurements and computes the trajectories, phase errors, K value, etc. The analysis program and its calculation techniques were described in a previous note. In this note, a second Matlab program containing tuning algorithms is described. The algorithms to determine the required number and placement of the shims are discussed in detail. This note describes the operation of a computer program which was written to automate LCLS undulator tuning. The algorithms used to compute the shim sizes and locations are discussed.

  18. An automatically tuning intrusion detection system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenwei; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Weigert, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    An intrusion detection system (IDS) is a security layer used to detect ongoing intrusive activities in information systems. Traditionally, intrusion detection relies on extensive knowledge of security experts, in particular, on their familiarity with the computer system to be protected. To reduce this dependence, various data-mining and machine learning techniques have been deployed for intrusion detection. An IDS is usually working in a dynamically changing environment, which forces continuous tuning of the intrusion detection model, in order to maintain sufficient performance. The manual tuning process required by current systems depends on the system operators in working out the tuning solution and in integrating it into the detection model. In this paper, an automatically tuning IDS (ATIDS) is presented. The proposed system will automatically tune the detection model on-the-fly according to the feedback provided by the system operator when false predictions are encountered. The system is evaluated using the KDDCup'99 intrusion detection dataset. Experimental results show that the system achieves up to 35% improvement in terms of misclassification cost when compared with a system lacking the tuning feature. If only 10% false predictions are used to tune the model, the system still achieves about 30% improvement. Moreover, when tuning is not delayed too long, the system can achieve about 20% improvement, with only 1.3% of the false predictions used to tune the model. The results of the experiments show that a practical system can be built based on ATIDS: system operators can focus on verification of predictions with low confidence, as only those predictions determined to be false will be used to tune the detection model.

  19. Musical experience sharpens human cochlear tuning.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Nelms, Caitlin; Bhagat, Shaum P

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian cochlea functions as a filter bank that performs a spectral, Fourier-like decomposition on the acoustic signal. While tuning can be compromised (e.g., broadened with hearing impairment), whether or not human cochlear frequency resolution can be sharpened through experiential factors (e.g., training or learning) has not yet been established. Previous studies have demonstrated sharper psychophysical tuning curves in trained musicians compared to nonmusicians, implying superior peripheral tuning. However, these findings are based on perceptual masking paradigms, and reflect engagement of the entire auditory system rather than cochlear tuning, per se. Here, by directly mapping physiological tuning curves from stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs)-cochlear emitted sounds-we show that estimates of human cochlear tuning in a high-frequency cochlear region (4 kHz) is further sharpened (by a factor of 1.5×) in musicians and improves with the number of years of their auditory training. These findings were corroborated by measurements of psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) derived via simultaneous masking, which similarly showed sharper tuning in musicians. Comparisons between SFOAE and PTCs revealed closer correspondence between physiological and behavioral curves in musicians, indicating that tuning is also more consistent between different levels of auditory processing in trained ears. Our findings demonstrate an experience-dependent enhancement in the resolving power of the cochlear sensory epithelium and the spectral resolution of human hearing and provide a peripheral account for the auditory perceptual benefits observed in musicians. Both local and feedback (e.g., medial olivocochlear efferent) mechanisms are discussed as potential mechanisms for experience-dependent tuning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ionic liquid tunes microemulsion curvature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liping; Bauduin, Pierre; Zemb, Thomas; Eastoe, Julian; Hao, Jingcheng

    2009-02-17

    Middle-phase microemulsions formed from cationic dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODMAC), anionic sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), n-butanol, and n-heptane were studied. An ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF4]), was employed as the electrolyte in the aqueous media instead of inorganic salts usually used in microemulsion formulation. Studies have been carried out as a function of the concentrations of [bmim][BF4], n-butanol, total surfactant (cDODMAC+SDS), and temperature on the phase behavior and the ultralow interfacial tensions in which the anionic component is present in excess in the catanionic film. Ultralow interfacial tension measurements confirmed the formation of middle-phase microemulsions and the necessary conditions for stabilizing middle-phase microemulsions. Electrical conductivity, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments were also performed, indicating that the typical heptane domain size has an average radius of 360 A and the ionic liquid induces softening of the charged catanionic film. Most interestingly, the IL concentration (cIL) is shown to act as an effective interfacial curvature-control parameter, representing a new approach to tuning the formulation of microemulsions and emulsions. The results expand the potential uses of ILs but also point to the design of new ILs that may achieve superefficient control over interfacial and self-assembly systems.

  1. Tuned alexandrite laser for dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Jan; Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2000-04-01

    For medical applications tunable solid state laser system emitting a visible light in a region from 710 to 775 nm was developed. Laser head of this system was composed of alexandrite crystal rod (4 mm in diameter, 90 mm of length), two dielectric mirrors and tuning element (dispersing prism or thin-film polarizer). For Q-switching, three different optics shutters were proved: a saturable NC-dye or LiF crystal, LiNbO3 Pockels cell, and rotating prism. Maximum output energy in free-running and Q-switching regime was 400 mJ and 70 mJ, respectively. The pulse duration was 70 microsecond(s) in the free-running and 45 - 250 ns in Q-switching regime. The output free running laser radiation was guided via a multimode quartz fiber (1 m of length, core diameter 600 micrometers ) or via a special fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide (0.62 m of length, inner diameter 1 mm). At first, this radiation with a laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm2 was used for an ablation of a dental calculus. Next, the laser radiation propagation in a root canal and its effect on bacteria was proved. The dissipated energy measurement was made inside and outside of the tooth. From the results follow that the alexandrite laser could be useful for medical applications.

  2. 2-Shock layered tuning campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, Laurent; Dittrich, T.; Khan, S.; Kyrala, G.; Ma, T.; MacLaren, S.; Ralph, J.; Salmonson, J.; Tipton, R.; Los Alamos Natl Lab Team; Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab Team

    2016-10-01

    The 2-Shock platform has been developed to maintain shell sphericity throughout the compression phase of an indirect-drive target implosion and produce a stagnating hot spot in a quasi 1D-like manner. A sub-scale, 1700 _m outer diameter, and thick, 200 _m, uniformly Silicon doped, gas-filled plastic capsule is driven inside a nominal size 5750 _m diameter ignition hohlraum. The hohlraum fill is near vacuum to reduce back-scatter and improve laser/drive coupling. A two-shock pulse of about 1 MJ of laser energy drives the capsule. The thick capsule prevents ablation front feed-through to the imploded core. This platform has demonstrated its efficiency to tune a predictable and reproducible 1-D implosion with a nearly round shape. It has been shown that the high foot performance was dominated by the local defect growth due to the ablation front instability and by the hohlraum radiation asymmetries. The idea here is to take advantage of this 2-Shock platform to design a 1D-like layered implosion and eliminates the deleterious effects of radiation asymmetries and ablation front instability growth. We present the design work and our first experimental results of this near one-dimensional 2-Shock layered design. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Tuning superconductivity by carrier injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Paul

    2011-03-01

    All high-Tc cuprates are stacking sequences of Cu O2 layers and charge reservoir layers consisting of metal oxides. Upon doping the Cu O2 layers, antiferromagnetic order is destroyed and metallic conductivity is established. Usually doping is achieved by a non-stoichiometric composition of the charge reservoir layer. However, we already have shown that we can change the carrier concentration of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O8 + δ single crystals by current injection along the c- axis. Critical temperature, c-axis resistivity and critical current of intrinsic Josephson junctions can be tuned in a large range from underdoping to extreme overdoping. This effect is persistent up to annealing temperatures of approximately 270 K. Using current injection at higher bias, we were able to reduce the carrier concentration again. We investigated in detail the superconducting properties by performing macroscopic quantum tunneling experiments of intrinsic Josephson junctions. The experiments have been carried out repeatedly on samples, whose properties were changed only by current injection. An exponential increase of the critical current density with hole concentration was observed. At the same time, the capacitance of intrinsic Josephson junctions increased significantly. Finally, only by current injection, we were able to convert into the superconducting state a nonsuperconducting, oxygen depleted sample. This work was done in collaboration with Y. Koval, X.Y. Jin, S. Probst, Y. Simsek, C. Steiner (Universität Erlangen), H. B. Wang (NIMS, Tsukuba), and G. Behr, B. Büchner (IFW Dresden).

  4. A STUDY OF RAPID CAVITY TUNING.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, Y.

    2001-07-12

    An FFAG moot likely requires rapid cavity tuning. The cavity must also have a very high gradient. To satisfy both the high power and rapid tuning requirements is a big challenge. Detailed investigation of the possibility is addressed. Included are general thoughts, dual-loop and simple loop analyses, and a study of using ferrite or PIN diodes. Also proposed is a phase control scheme, which may be a better solution if the needed components can be developed. Finally, an energy analysis reveals the difficult of high power tuning.

  5. Fine tunings for inflation with simple potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, K.-I.

    2014-11-01

    We continue to investigate possible parameter choices for primordial inflation with simple potentials such as power-law and two-term potentials. We examine the amount of parameter tuning required to make the slow-roll inflation eternal. In particular, we adopt the critical coupling for marginally eternal inflation and see whether realistic primordial inflation is attainable under such a parameter choice. It turns out that potentials with mass scale of grand unification provide, after tuning, consistent results with experimental data so that the considered tuning is allowed observationally. Namely, the primordial inflation is possibly marginal in such a setup.

  6. Optimal neuronal tuning for finite stimulus spaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W. Michael; Backer, Alejandro

    2004-09-01

    The efficiency of neuronal encoding in sensory and motor systems has been proposed as a first principle governing response properties within the central nervous system. We present a continuation of a theoretical study presented by Zhang and Sejnowski, where the influence of neuronal tuning properties on encoding accuracy is analyzed using information theory. When a finite stimulus space is considered, we show that the encoding accuracy improves with narrow tuning for one- and two-dimensional stimuli. For three dimensions and higher, there is an optimal tuning width.

  7. Domain Tuning of Bilingual Lexicons for MT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    SUBTITLE Domain Tuning of Bilingual Lexicons for MT 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Domain Tuning of Bilingual Lexicons for MT Necip Fazıl Ayan, Bonnie J. Dorr, Okan Kolak...umiacs.umd.edu Domain Tuning of Bilingual Lexicons for MT Abstract Our overall objective is to translate a domain-specific document in a for- eign language (in

  8. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  9. Tuning the Response in Disordered Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashine, Nidhi; Rocks, Jason W.; Bischofberger, Irmgard; Goodrich, Carl P.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Liu, Andrea J.

    The fact that amorphous materials are structurally different from crystals has important consequences for how the properties of a disordered structure can be tuned. We have used jamming as a method to create spring networks in both two and three dimensions. By selectively removing a small percentage of bonds, we can tune the network to have a desired response. For example, we can tune the network's Poisson ratio anywhere between the auxetic and incompressible limits. We can also produce a targeted response at a local scale; by perturbing the positions of pair of particles at one point we can tune in a desired response a large distance away. This response is similar to the allosteric regulation in proteins where a reaction at one site activates another site of the protein molecule. Experimentally, we have successfully demonstrated such mechanical networks in 2D (by laser cutting) or in 3D (3D printing).

  10. Phased waveguide array with fixed tuning elements

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.; Bernabei, S.; Hooke, W.M.; Paoloni, F.J.

    1980-04-01

    The waveguide grill excites both penetrating lower hybrid waves and surface plasma waves. Quarter wavelength tuning elements attached to the sides of a twin waveguide are shown to reduce the surface wave component by a factor of approx. 3..

  11. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  12. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  13. Tune control in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    G. Wu et al.

    1999-04-16

    We describe methods used to measure and control tunes in the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI). Emphasis is given to software implementation of the operator interface, to the front-end embedded computer system, and handling of hysteresis of main dipole and quadrupole magnets. Techniques are developed to permit control of tune of the Main Injector through several acceleration cycles: from 8.9 GeV/c to 120 GeV/c, from 8.9 GeV/c to 150 GeV/c, and from 150 GeV/c to 8.9 GeV/c. Systems which automate the complex interactions between tune measurement and the variety of ramping options are described. Some results of tune measurements and their comparison with the design model are presented.

  14. Black phosphorus: A new bandgap tuning knob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Rafael; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2017-07-01

    An external 'tuning knob' by means of applying a transverse electric field has been experimentally demonstrated to modify the bandgap of black phosphorus, making the two-dimensional material practical for integration in functional nanodevices.

  15. Event generator tuning using Bayesian optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilten, P.; Williams, M.; Yang, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Monte Carlo event generators contain a large number of parameters that must be determined by comparing the output of the generator with experimental data. Generating enough events with a fixed set of parameter values to enable making such a comparison is extremely CPU intensive, which prohibits performing a simple brute-force grid-based tuning of the parameters. Bayesian optimization is a powerful method designed for such black-box tuning applications. In this article, we show that Monte Carlo event generator parameters can be accurately obtained using Bayesian optimization and minimal expert-level physics knowledge. A tune of the PYTHIA 8 event generator using e+e- events, where 20 parameters are optimized, can be run on a modern laptop in just two days. Combining the Bayesian optimization approach with expert knowledge should enable producing better tunes in the future, by making it faster and easier to study discrepancies between Monte Carlo and experimental data.

  16. Learning and Tuning of Fuzzy Rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter, we review some of the current techniques for learning and tuning fuzzy rules. For clarity, we refer to the process of generating rules from data as the learning problem and distinguish it from tuning an already existing set of fuzzy rules. For learning, we touch on unsupervised learning techniques such as fuzzy c-means, fuzzy decision tree systems, fuzzy genetic algorithms, and linear fuzzy rules generation methods. For tuning, we discuss Jang's ANFIS architecture, Berenji-Khedkar's GARIC architecture and its extensions in GARIC-Q. We show that the hybrid techniques capable of learning and tuning fuzzy rules, such as CART-ANFIS, RNN-FLCS, and GARIC-RB, are desirable in development of a number of future intelligent systems.

  17. Gravity orientation tuning in macaque anterior thalamus.

    PubMed

    Laurens, Jean; Kim, Byounghoon; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2016-12-01

    Gravity may provide a ubiquitous allocentric reference to the brain's spatial orientation circuits. Here we describe neurons in the macaque anterior thalamus tuned to pitch and roll orientation relative to gravity, independently of visual landmarks. We show that individual cells exhibit two-dimensional tuning curves, with peak firing rates at a preferred vertical orientation. These results identify a thalamic pathway for gravity cues to influence perception, action and spatial cognition.

  18. An optimal tuning strategy for tidal turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennell, Ross

    2016-11-01

    Tuning wind and tidal turbines is critical to maximizing their power output. Adopting a wind turbine tuning strategy of maximizing the output at any given time is shown to be an extremely poor strategy for large arrays of tidal turbines in channels. This `impatient-tuning strategy' results in far lower power output, much higher structural loads and greater environmental impacts due to flow reduction than an existing `patient-tuning strategy' which maximizes the power output averaged over the tidal cycle. This paper presents a `smart patient tuning strategy', which can increase array output by up to 35% over the existing strategy. This smart strategy forgoes some power generation early in the half tidal cycle in order to allow stronger flows to develop later in the cycle. It extracts enough power from these stronger flows to produce more power from the cycle as a whole than the existing strategy. Surprisingly, the smart strategy can often extract more power without increasing maximum structural loads on the turbines, while also maintaining stronger flows along the channel. This paper also shows that, counterintuitively, for some tuning strategies imposing a cap on turbine power output to limit loads can increase a turbine's average power output.

  19. An optimal tuning strategy for tidal turbines.

    PubMed

    Vennell, Ross

    2016-11-01

    Tuning wind and tidal turbines is critical to maximizing their power output. Adopting a wind turbine tuning strategy of maximizing the output at any given time is shown to be an extremely poor strategy for large arrays of tidal turbines in channels. This 'impatient-tuning strategy' results in far lower power output, much higher structural loads and greater environmental impacts due to flow reduction than an existing 'patient-tuning strategy' which maximizes the power output averaged over the tidal cycle. This paper presents a 'smart patient tuning strategy', which can increase array output by up to 35% over the existing strategy. This smart strategy forgoes some power generation early in the half tidal cycle in order to allow stronger flows to develop later in the cycle. It extracts enough power from these stronger flows to produce more power from the cycle as a whole than the existing strategy. Surprisingly, the smart strategy can often extract more power without increasing maximum structural loads on the turbines, while also maintaining stronger flows along the channel. This paper also shows that, counterintuitively, for some tuning strategies imposing a cap on turbine power output to limit loads can increase a turbine's average power output.

  20. Revisiting fine-tuning in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Graham G.; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Staub, Florian

    2017-03-01

    We evaluate the amount of fine-tuning in constrained versions of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), with different boundary conditions at the GUT scale. Specifically we study the fully constrained version as well as the cases of non-universal Higgs and gaugino masses. We allow for the presence of additional non-holomorphic soft-terms which we show further relax the fine-tuning. Of particular importance is the possibility of a Higgsino mass term and we discuss possible origins for such a term in UV complete models. We point out that loop corrections typically lead to a reduction in the fine-tuning by a factor of about two compared to the estimate at tree-level, which has been overlooked in many recent works. Taking these loop corrections into account, we discuss the impact of current limits from SUSY searches and dark matter on the fine-tuning. Contrary to common lore, we find that the MSSM fine-tuning can be as small as 10 while remaining consistent with all experimental constraints. If, in addition, the dark matter abundance is fully explained by the neutralino LSP, the fine-tuning can still be as low as ˜ 20 in the presence of additional non-holomorphic soft-terms. We also discuss future prospects of these models and find that the MSSM will remain natural even in the case of a non-discovery in the foreseeable future.

  1. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme for uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.

  2. Beam profile monitors in the NLCTA

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Brown, R.L.; Fuller, R.; Rifkin, J.

    1997-05-01

    The transverse current profile in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) electron beam can be monitored at several locations along the beam line by means of profile monitors. These consist of insertable phosphor screens, light collection and transport systems, CID cameras, a frame-grabber, and PC and VAX based image analysis software. In addition to their usefulness in tuning and steering the accelerator, the profile monitors are utilized for emittance measurement. A description of these systems and their performance is presented.

  3. Tune Feedback in PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A

    2003-10-31

    The PEP-II B Factory is a 2.2-km-circumference, storage-ring collider in which 9-GeV electrons in the high-energy ring collide with 3.1-GeV positrons in the low-energy ring. In 2002 we installed tracking loops to measure each ring's horizontal and vertical tunes. (The tune, a critical parameter for beam stability and for luminosity, is the fractional part of the number of oscillations of the beam about the central orbit in one revolution.) Each tracker uses a lock-in amplifier to measure the phase difference between a sinusoidal excitation of the beam and its response. If the drive frequency is swept across the tune resonance, this phase drops by 180 degrees. The tracker continually adjusts the frequency to maintain the phase at the middle of this transition. This drive frequency, normalized to the revolution frequency, gives the fractional tune. Recently these four loops (electron and positron, x and y) have been extended to controlling the tunes, by adjusting combinations of quadrupole magnets. However, at the same time we have increased the luminosity by setting the tunes just above the half-integer resonance, where a misadjustment can quickly lose the beam, and beam-beam forces from collisions make the tune spectra broad and complex. Consequently, we added a few non-colliding bunches to the fill pattern of each ring. Fast gates let us excite and measure only these bunches, and let us stop feedback damping of transverse motion for them.

  4. Photonic liquid crystal fibers tuning by four electrode system produced with 3D printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertman, Slawomir; Bednarska, Karolina; Czapla, Aleksandra; Woliński, Tomasz R.

    2015-09-01

    Photonic liquid crystal fiber has been intensively investigated in last few years. It has been proved that guiding properties of such fibers could be tuned with an electric field. In particular efficient tuning could be obtained if multi-electrode system allowing for dynamic change of not only intensity of the electric field, but also its direction. In this work we report a simple to build four electrode system, which is based on a precisely aligned four cylindrical microelectrodes. As an electrodes we use enameled copper wire with diameter adequate to the diameter of the fiber to be tuned. To ensure uniform and parallel alignment of the wires a special micro-profiles has been designed and then produced with filament 3D printer. The possibility of the dynamic change of the electric field direction in such scalable and cost effective electrode assembly has been experimentally confirmed.

  5. Wavelength tuning of InAs quantum dot laser by micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J. Y.; Gong, Q.; Kang, C. Z.; Xu, H. X.; Cao, C. F.; Li, Y. Y.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, H. L.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the InAs quantum dot (QD) external cavity laser (ECL) using a digital mirror device (DMD) as the key component for wavelength tuning. The InAs QD laser diode was grown by gas source molecular-beam epitaxy, which had a broad gain profile. Single mode operation was achieved with the side mode suppression ratio of 21 dB when the optical feedback was provided by a mirror pattern consisting of 9 micromirrors. Moreover, two-color lasing was demonstrated with two laser lines having frequency difference in the THz range. The incorporation of DMD in the ECL enables great flexibility and many unique features, such as high tuning speed independent of the tuning step, two-color or multi-color lasing, and adjustable intensity for individual laser lines.

  6. Stay tuned: active amplification tunes tree cricket ears to track temperature-dependent song frequency.

    PubMed

    Mhatre, Natasha; Pollack, Gerald; Mason, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Tree cricket males produce tonal songs, used for mate attraction and male-male interactions. Active mechanics tunes hearing to conspecific song frequency. However, tree cricket song frequency increases with temperature, presenting a problem for tuned listeners. We show that the actively amplified frequency increases with temperature, thus shifting mechanical and neuronal auditory tuning to maintain a match with conspecific song frequency. Active auditory processes are known from several taxa, but their adaptive function has rarely been demonstrated. We show that tree crickets harness active processes to ensure that auditory tuning remains matched to conspecific song frequency, despite changing environmental conditions and signal characteristics. Adaptive tuning allows tree crickets to selectively detect potential mates or rivals over large distances and is likely to bestow a strong selective advantage by reducing mate-finding effort and facilitating intermale interactions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Resonant tuning fork detector for electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Willer, Ulrike; Bauer, Christoph; Schade, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    A mechanical quartz microresonator (tuning fork) is used to detect electromagnetic radiation. The detection scheme is based on forces created due to the incident electromagnetic radiation on the piezoelectric tuning fork. A force can be created due to the transfer of the photon momentum of the incident electromagnetic radiation. If the surfaces of the tuning fork are nonuniformly heated, a second force acts on it, the so-called photophoretic force. These processes occur for all wavelengths of the incident radiation, making the detector suitable for sensing of ultraviolet, visible, and mid-infrared light, even THz-radiation. Here the detector is characterized in the visible range; noise analysis is performed for 650 nm and 5.26 microm. A linear power characteristic and the dependence on pulse lengths of the incoming light are shown. Examples for applications for the visible and mid-infrared spectral region are given by 2f and absorption spectroscopy of oxygen and nitric oxide, respectively.

  8. Widespread auditory deficits in tune deafness.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jennifer L; Zalewski, Christopher; Brewer, Carmen; Lucker, Jay; Drayna, Dennis

    2009-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate auditory function in individuals with deficits in musical pitch perception. We hypothesized that such individuals have deficits in nonspeech areas of auditory processing. We screened 865 randomly selected individuals to identify those who scored poorly on the Distorted Tunes test (DTT), a measure of musical pitch recognition ability. Those who scored poorly were given a comprehensive audiologic examination, and those with hearing loss or other confounding audiologic factors were excluded from further testing. Thirty-five individuals with tune deafness constituted the experimental group. Thirty-four individuals with normal hearing and normal DTT scores, matched for age, gender, handedness, and education, and without overt or reported psychiatric disorders made up the normal control group. Individual and group performance for pure-tone frequency discrimination at 1000 Hz was determined by measuring the difference limen for frequency (DLF). Auditory processing abilities were assessed using tests of pitch pattern recognition, duration pattern recognition, and auditory gap detection. In addition, we evaluated both attention and short- and long-term memory as variables that might influence performance on our experimental measures. Differences between groups were evaluated statistically using Wilcoxon nonparametric tests and t-tests as appropriate. The DLF at 1000 Hz in the group with tune deafness was significantly larger than that of the normal control group. However, approximately one-third of participants with tune deafness had DLFs within the range of performance observed in the control group. Many individuals with tune deafness also displayed a high degree of variability in their intertrial frequency discrimination performance that could not be explained by deficits in memory or attention. Pitch and duration pattern discrimination and auditory gap-detection ability were significantly poorer in the group with tune deafness

  9. Software Controls For Automated Feedback Tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarski, K.; Alkire, R. W.; Duke, N. E. C.; Rotella, F. J.

    2004-05-01

    The Structural Biology Center (SBC) beamlines have been designed to take full advantage of the highly intense radiation available at Argonne's Advance Photon Source for crystallography experiments. In order to facilitate the delivery of an intense, stable x-ray beam to crystallographic samples, new beam position stabilization software has been developed. Using the beam-position monitor developed by Alkire, Rosenbaum and Evans, the position of the beam is corrected in real time by applying changes to the monochromator tune using DC servomotors. Real-time monitoring tools were developed, in addition to the technique of selecting the reference trigger points. A user interface for feedback tuning has been developed in conjunction with real-time monitoring and interacting with data acquisition at the bending-magnet beamline (19BM) of the SBC. Preliminary results showed positional stability of the beam to better than 1 μrad in tune.

  10. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme formore » uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.« less

  11. Tuning Metamaterials by using Amorphous Magnetic Microwires.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Dominguez, V; Garcia, M A; Marin, P; Hernando, A

    2017-08-24

    In this work, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the possibility of tuning the electromagnetic properties of metamaterials with magnetic fields by incorporating amorphous magnetic microwires. The large permeability of these wires at microwave frequencies allows tuning the resonance of the metamaterial by using magnetic fields of the order of tens of Oe. We describe here the physical basis of the interaction between a prototypical magnetic metamaterial with magnetic microwires and electromagnetic waves plus providing detailed calculations and experimental results for the case of an array of Split Ring Resonators with Co-based microwires.

  12. The nonlinear piezoelectric tuned vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, P.; Kerschen, G.

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a piezoelectric vibration absorber, termed the nonlinear piezoelectric tuned vibration absorber (NPTVA), for the mitigation of nonlinear resonances of mechanical systems. The new feature of the NPTVA is that its nonlinear restoring force is designed according to a principle of similarity, i.e., the NPTVA should be an electrical analog of the nonlinear host system. Analytical formulas for the NPTVA parameters are derived using the homotopy perturbation method. Doing so, a nonlinear generalization of Den Hartog’s equal-peak tuning rule is developed for piezoelectric vibration absorbers.

  13. Structural Composites With Tuned EM Chirality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0018 STRUCTURAL COMPOSITES WITH TUNED EM CHIRALITY Siavouche Nemat Nasser UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO Final Report 12/23...REPORT Grant/Contract  Title:        STRUCTURAL  COMPOSITES  WITH  TUNED  EM   CHIRALITY     Grant  No.:  FA9550-­‐09-­‐1...structural   composites  with   tunable   chiral   elements   has   produced   some   impressive   results   in   the

  14. Fine-tuning in DBI inflationary mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang

    2008-12-15

    We show a model-independent fine-tuning issue in the DBI inflationary mechanism. DBI inflation requires a warp factor h small enough to sufficiently slow down the inflation. On the other hand, the Einstein equation in extra dimensions under the inflationary background deforms the warp space on the IR side. Generically these two locations coincide with each other, spoiling the DBI inflation. The origin and tuning of this 'h problem' is closely related, through the AdS/CFT duality, to those of the well-known '{eta} problem' in the slow-roll inflationary mechanism.

  15. Turbine bucket natural frequency tuning rib

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; Norton, Paul Francis; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Jacala, Ariel Caesar-Prepena

    2002-01-01

    A tuning rib is added preferably in the aft cavity of a cored turbine bucket to alter the bucket's natural frequencies. The tuning rib may be a solid rib or a segmented rib and is particularly suited for altering high order frequency modes such as 2T, 4F and 1-3S. As such, detrimental crossings of natural bucket frequencies and gas turbine stimuli can be avoided to thereby improve the reliability of a gas turbine without impacting other features of the bucket that are important to the performance of the gas turbine.

  16. Tuning properties of columnar nanocomposite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhaoliang; Gao, Peng; Stadler, Shane; Jin, Rongying; Pan, Xiaoqing; Plummer, E. W.; Zhang, Jiandi

    2013-07-01

    One major challenge for engineering functional nanocomposites is how to tune the geometry structure and control the chemical composition. We demonstrate here that columnar nanocomposite films can be grown by using alternate deposition of La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 and V2O3 on LaAlO3 (111). A solid state reaction, rather than simple spinodal decomposition, dictates the nanocomposite structure, chemical composition, and functionality. By controlling the deposition time ratio of the two compounds, the physical properties of the composite films can be tuned, thus providing a flexible way to tailor nanocomposites for advanced functionality.

  17. The use of Argo for validation and tuning of mixed layer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acreman, D. M.; Jeffery, C. D.

    We present results from validation and tuning of 1-D ocean mixed layer models using data from Argo floats and data from Ocean Weather Station Papa (145°W, 50°N). Model tests at Ocean Weather Station Papa showed that a bulk model could perform well provided it was tuned correctly. The Large et al. [Large, W.G., McWilliams, J.C., Doney, S.C., 1994. Oceanic vertical mixing: a review and a model with a nonlocal boundary layer parameterisation. Rev. Geophys. 32 (Novermber), 363-403] K-profile parameterisation (KPP) model also gave a good representation of mixed layer depth provided the vertical resolution was sufficiently high. Model tests using data from a single Argo float indicated a tendency for the KPP model to deepen insufficiently over an annual cycle, whereas the tuned bulk model and general ocean turbulence model (GOTM) gave a better representation of mixed layer depth. The bulk model was then tuned using data from a sample of Argo floats and a set of optimum parameters was found; these optimum parameters were consistent with the tuning at OWS Papa.

  18. Fine-tuning tomato agronomic properties by computational genome redesign.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Javier; Fernández Del Carmen, Asun; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Rambla, Jose Luis; Pons, Clara; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Elena, Santiago F; Granell, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Considering cells as biofactories, we aimed to optimize its internal processes by using the same engineering principles that large industries are implementing nowadays: lean manufacturing. We have applied reverse engineering computational methods to transcriptomic, metabolomic and phenomic data obtained from a collection of tomato recombinant inbreed lines to formulate a kinetic and constraint-based model that efficiently describes the cellular metabolism from expression of a minimal core of genes. Based on predicted metabolic profiles, a close association with agronomic and organoleptic properties of the ripe fruit was revealed with high statistical confidence. Inspired in a synthetic biology approach, the model was used for exploring the landscape of all possible local transcriptional changes with the aim of engineering tomato fruits with fine-tuned biotechnological properties. The method was validated by the ability of the proposed genomes, engineered for modified desired agronomic traits, to recapitulate experimental correlations between associated metabolites.

  19. Fine-Tuning Tomato Agronomic Properties by Computational Genome Redesign

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Javier; Fernández del Carmen, Asun; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Rambla, Jose Luis; Pons, Clara; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Elena, Santiago F.; Granell, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Considering cells as biofactories, we aimed to optimize its internal processes by using the same engineering principles that large industries are implementing nowadays: lean manufacturing. We have applied reverse engineering computational methods to transcriptomic, metabolomic and phenomic data obtained from a collection of tomato recombinant inbreed lines to formulate a kinetic and constraint-based model that efficiently describes the cellular metabolism from expression of a minimal core of genes. Based on predicted metabolic profiles, a close association with agronomic and organoleptic properties of the ripe fruit was revealed with high statistical confidence. Inspired in a synthetic biology approach, the model was used for exploring the landscape of all possible local transcriptional changes with the aim of engineering tomato fruits with fine-tuned biotechnological properties. The method was validated by the ability of the proposed genomes, engineered for modified desired agronomic traits, to recapitulate experimental correlations between associated metabolites. PMID:22685389

  20. Geometrical tuning art for entirely subwavelength grating waveguide based integrated photonics circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheng; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, Donglei; Wang, Yaguo; Subbaraman, Harish; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-05-05

    Here, subwavelength grating (SWG) waveguide is an intriguing alternative to conventional optical waveguides due to the extra degree of freedom it offers in tuning a few important waveguide properties, such as dispersion and refractive index. Devices based on SWG waveguides have demonstrated impressive performances compared to conventional waveguides. However, the high loss of SWG waveguide bends jeopardizes their applications in integrated photonic circuits. In this work, we propose a geometrical tuning art, which realizes a pre-distorted refractive index profile in SWG waveguide bends. The pre-distorted refractive index profile can effectively reduce the mode mismatch and radiation loss simultaneously, thus significantly reduce the bend loss. This geometry tuning art has been numerically optimized and experimentally demonstrated in present study. Through such tuning, the average insertion loss of a 5 μm SWG waveguide bend is reduced drastically from 5.43 dB to 1.10 dB per 90° bend for quasi-TE polarization. In the future, the proposed scheme will be utilized to enhance performance of a wide range of SWG waveguide based photonics devices.

  1. Geometrical tuning art for entirely subwavelength grating waveguide based integrated photonics circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zheng; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, Donglei; ...

    2016-05-05

    Here, subwavelength grating (SWG) waveguide is an intriguing alternative to conventional optical waveguides due to the extra degree of freedom it offers in tuning a few important waveguide properties, such as dispersion and refractive index. Devices based on SWG waveguides have demonstrated impressive performances compared to conventional waveguides. However, the high loss of SWG waveguide bends jeopardizes their applications in integrated photonic circuits. In this work, we propose a geometrical tuning art, which realizes a pre-distorted refractive index profile in SWG waveguide bends. The pre-distorted refractive index profile can effectively reduce the mode mismatch and radiation loss simultaneously, thus significantlymore » reduce the bend loss. This geometry tuning art has been numerically optimized and experimentally demonstrated in present study. Through such tuning, the average insertion loss of a 5 μm SWG waveguide bend is reduced drastically from 5.43 dB to 1.10 dB per 90° bend for quasi-TE polarization. In the future, the proposed scheme will be utilized to enhance performance of a wide range of SWG waveguide based photonics devices.« less

  2. Geometrical tuning art for entirely subwavelength grating waveguide based integrated photonics circuits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, Donglei; Wang, Yaguo; Subbaraman, Harish; Chen, Ray T

    2016-05-05

    Subwavelength grating (SWG) waveguide is an intriguing alternative to conventional optical waveguides due to the extra degree of freedom it offers in tuning a few important waveguide properties, such as dispersion and refractive index. Devices based on SWG waveguides have demonstrated impressive performances compared to conventional waveguides. However, the high loss of SWG waveguide bends jeopardizes their applications in integrated photonic circuits. In this work, we propose a geometrical tuning art, which realizes a pre-distorted refractive index profile in SWG waveguide bends. The pre-distorted refractive index profile can effectively reduce the mode mismatch and radiation loss simultaneously, thus significantly reduce the bend loss. This geometry tuning art has been numerically optimized and experimentally demonstrated in present study. Through such tuning, the average insertion loss of a 5 μm SWG waveguide bend is reduced drastically from 5.43 dB to 1.10 dB per 90° bend for quasi-TE polarization. In the future, the proposed scheme will be utilized to enhance performance of a wide range of SWG waveguide based photonics devices.

  3. Geometrical tuning art for entirely subwavelength grating waveguide based integrated photonics circuits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, Donglei; Wang, Yaguo; Subbaraman, Harish; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-01-01

    Subwavelength grating (SWG) waveguide is an intriguing alternative to conventional optical waveguides due to the extra degree of freedom it offers in tuning a few important waveguide properties, such as dispersion and refractive index. Devices based on SWG waveguides have demonstrated impressive performances compared to conventional waveguides. However, the high loss of SWG waveguide bends jeopardizes their applications in integrated photonic circuits. In this work, we propose a geometrical tuning art, which realizes a pre-distorted refractive index profile in SWG waveguide bends. The pre-distorted refractive index profile can effectively reduce the mode mismatch and radiation loss simultaneously, thus significantly reduce the bend loss. This geometry tuning art has been numerically optimized and experimentally demonstrated in present study. Through such tuning, the average insertion loss of a 5 μm SWG waveguide bend is reduced drastically from 5.43 dB to 1.10 dB per 90° bend for quasi-TE polarization. In the future, the proposed scheme will be utilized to enhance performance of a wide range of SWG waveguide based photonics devices. PMID:27145872

  4. Tuning of Muscle Synergies During Walking Along Rectilinear and Curvilinear Trajectories in Humans.

    PubMed

    Chia Bejarano, Noelia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco; Baccinelli, Walter; Monticone, Marco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Ferrante, Simona

    2017-01-31

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology based on muscle synergies to investigate whether rectilinear and curvilinear walking shared the same neuro-motor organization, and how this organization was fine-tuned by the walking condition. Thirteen healthy subjects walked on rectilinear and curvilinear paths. Electromyographic data from thirteen back and lower-limb muscles were acquired, together with kinematic data using inertial sensors. Four macroscopically invariant muscle synergies, extracted through non-negative matrix factorization, proved a shared modular organization across conditions. The fine-tuning of muscle synergies was studied through non-negative matrix reconstruction, applied by fixing muscle weights or activation profiles to those of the rectilinear condition. The activation profiles tended to be recruited for a longer period and with a larger amplitude during curvilinear walking. The muscles of the posterior side of the lower limb were those mainly influenced by the fine-tuning, with the muscles inside the rotation path being more active than the outer muscles. This study shows that rectilinear and curvilinear walking share a unique motor command. However, a fine-tuning in muscle synergies is introduced during curvilinear conditions, adapting the kinematic strategy to the new biomechanical needs.

  5. Tuning without over-tuning: parametric uncertainty quantification for the NEMO ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Daniel B.; Blaker, Adam T.; Sinha, Bablu

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we discuss climate model tuning and present an iterative automatic tuning method from the statistical science literature. The method, which we refer to here as iterative refocussing (though also known as history matching), avoids many of the common pitfalls of automatic tuning procedures that are based on optimisation of a cost function, principally the over-tuning of a climate model due to using only partial observations. This avoidance comes by seeking to rule out parameter choices that we are confident could not reproduce the observations, rather than seeking the model that is closest to them (a procedure that risks over-tuning). We comment on the state of climate model tuning and illustrate our approach through three waves of iterative refocussing of the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ORCA2 global ocean model run at 2° resolution. We show how at certain depths the anomalies of global mean temperature and salinity in a standard configuration of the model exceeds 10 standard deviations away from observations and show the extent to which this can be alleviated by iterative refocussing without compromising model performance spatially. We show how model improvements can be achieved by simultaneously perturbing multiple parameters, and illustrate the potential of using low-resolution ensembles to tune NEMO ORCA configurations at higher resolutions.

  6. Dreams, mnemonics, and tuning for criticality.

    PubMed

    Pearlmutter, Barak A; Houghton, Conor J

    2013-12-01

    According to the tuning-for-criticality theory, the essential role of sleep is to protect the brain from super-critical behaviour. Here we argue that this protective role determines the content of dreams and any apparent relationship to the art of memory is secondary to this.

  7. Tuning Knobs for the NLC Final Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri

    2002-06-18

    Compensation of optics errors at the Interaction Point (IP) is essential for maintaining maximum luminosity at the NLC. Several correction systems (knobs) using the Final Focus sextupoles have been designed to provide orthogonal compensation of linear and the second order optics aberrations at IP. Tuning effects of these knobs on the 250 GeV beam were verified using tracking simulations.

  8. Fine-Tuning Your Ensemble's Jazz Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Antonio J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposes instructional strategies for directors of jazz groups, including guidelines for developing of skills necessary for good performance. Includes effective methods for positive changes in ensemble style. Addresses jazz group problems such as beat, tempo, staying in tune, wind power, and solo/ensemble lines. Discusses percussionists, bassists,…

  9. Understanding the Fine Tuning in Our Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bernard L.

    2008-01-01

    It is often stated that the physical properties of our universe are "fine tuned"--that is, they must be almost exactly as they are to make the development of intelligent life possible. The implications of this statement, called the "anthropic principle," have been widely discussed in a philosophical context, but the scientific basis for the…

  10. Does Face Inversion Change Spatial Frequency Tuning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willenbockel, Verena; Fiset, Daniel; Chauvin, Alan; Blais, Caroline; Arguin, Martin; Tanaka, James W.; Bub, Daniel N.; Gosselin, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined spatial frequency (SF) tuning of upright and inverted face identification using an SF variant of the Bubbles technique (F. Gosselin & P. G. Schyns, 2001). In Experiment 1, they validated the SF Bubbles technique in a plaid detection task. In Experiments 2a-c, the SFs used for identifying upright and inverted inner facial…

  11. Understanding the Fine Tuning in Our Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bernard L.

    2008-01-01

    It is often stated that the physical properties of our universe are "fine tuned"--that is, they must be almost exactly as they are to make the development of intelligent life possible. The implications of this statement, called the "anthropic principle," have been widely discussed in a philosophical context, but the scientific basis for the…

  12. Efficient receiver tuning using differential evolution strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Caleb H.; Toland, Trevor G.

    2016-08-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is a powerful and computationally inexpensive optimization strategy that can be used to search an entire parameter space or to converge quickly on a solution. The Kilopixel Array Pathfinder Project (KAPPa) is a heterodyne receiver system delivering 5 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth in the tuning range of 645-695 GHz. The fully automated KAPPa receiver test system finds optimal receiver tuning using performance feedback and DE. We present an adaptation of DE for use in rapid receiver characterization. The KAPPa DE algorithm is written in Python 2.7 and is fully integrated with the KAPPa instrument control, data processing, and visualization code. KAPPa develops the technologies needed to realize heterodyne focal plane arrays containing 1000 pixels. Finding optimal receiver tuning by investigating large parameter spaces is one of many challenges facing the characterization phase of KAPPa. This is a difficult task via by-hand techniques. Characterizing or tuning in an automated fashion without need for human intervention is desirable for future large scale arrays. While many optimization strategies exist, DE is ideal for time and performance constraints because it can be set to converge to a solution rapidly with minimal computational overhead. We discuss how DE is utilized in the KAPPa system and discuss its performance and look toward the future of 1000 pixel array receivers and consider how the KAPPa DE system might be applied.

  13. Tuning Knobs for the NLC Final Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosochkov, Y.

    2002-06-01

    Compensation of optics errors at the Interaction Point (IP) is essential for maintaining maximum luminosity at the NLC. Several correction systems (knobs) using the Final Focus sextupoles have been designed to provide orthogonal compensation of linear and the second order optics aberrations at IP. Tuning effects of these knobs on the 250 GeV beam were verified using tracking simulations.

  14. Electro-Optic Diffraction Grating Tuned Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent concerns an electro - optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro - optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro - optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating.

  15. Does Face Inversion Change Spatial Frequency Tuning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willenbockel, Verena; Fiset, Daniel; Chauvin, Alan; Blais, Caroline; Arguin, Martin; Tanaka, James W.; Bub, Daniel N.; Gosselin, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined spatial frequency (SF) tuning of upright and inverted face identification using an SF variant of the Bubbles technique (F. Gosselin & P. G. Schyns, 2001). In Experiment 1, they validated the SF Bubbles technique in a plaid detection task. In Experiments 2a-c, the SFs used for identifying upright and inverted inner facial…

  16. At the centre of the tuning fork

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-02

    This galaxy is known as Mrk 820 and is classified as a lenticular galaxy — type S0 on the Hubble Tuning Fork. The Hubble Tuning Fork is used to classify galaxies according to their morphology. Elliptical galaxies look like smooth blobs in the sky and lie on the handle of the fork. They are arranged along the handle based on how elliptical they are, with the more spherical galaxies furthest from the tines of the fork, and the more egg-shaped ones closest to the end of the handle where it divides. The two prongs of the tuning fork represent types of unbarred and barred spiral galaxies. Lenticular galaxies like Mrk 820 are in the transition zone between ellipticals and spirals and lie right where the fork divides. A closer look at the appearance of Mrk 820 reveals hints of a spiral structure embedded in a circular halo of stars. Surrounding Mrk 820 in this image is good sampling of other galaxy types, covering almost every type found on the Hubble Tuning Fork, both elliptical and spiral. Most of the smears and specks are distant galaxies, but the prominent bright object at the bottom is a foreground star called TYC 4386-787-1. A version of this image was entered into the Hubble's Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Judy Schmidt.

  17. Natural tuning: towards a proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Gorbenko, Victor; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad

    2013-09-01

    The cosmological constant problem and the absence of new natural physics at the electroweak scale, if confirmed by the LHC, may either indicate that the nature is fine-tuned or that a refined notion of naturalness is required. We construct a family of toy UV complete quantum theories providing a proof of concept for the second possibility. Low energy physics is described by a tuned effective field theory, which exhibits relevant interactions not protected by any symmetries and separated by an arbitrary large mass gap from the new "gravitational" physics, represented by a set of irrelevant operators. Nevertheless, the only available language to describe dynamics at all energy scales does not require any fine-tuning. The interesting novel feature of this construction is that UV physics is not described by a fixed point, but rather exhibits asymptotic fragility. Observation of additional unprotected scalars at the LHC would be a smoking gun for this scenario. Natural tuning also favors TeV scale unification.

  18. Fine-Tuning in a Design Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Foo Him; Toh, Pee Choon; Toh, Tin Lam

    2013-01-01

    Quek, Tay, Toh, Leong, and Dindyal (2011) proposed that a design-theory-practice troika should always be considered for a designed package to be acceptable to the research users who, in this case, are teachers and schools. This paper describes the fine-tuning to the MProSE problem-solving design made by the teachers in the school after first round…

  19. Effective resist profile control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Yu; Wang, Chien-Wei; Huang, Chun-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yu; Ku, Yao-Ching

    2014-03-01

    To meet Moore's law, resist resolution improvement has become more and more important. However, it is difficult to improve resist resolution and keep vertical sidewall profile. For example, a high contrast hole resist may cause trench scum, due to very T-top profile. This paper reports several concepts for resist profile tuning without losing performance for lithographic factor , including mask error enhancement factor (MEEF), depth of focus (DOF), and critical dimension uniformity (CDU). To quantitative analysis the resist profile improvement, we define a new factor, Scum fail ratio (F/R%) for new techniques evaluation. The new techniques, including floatable additive, floatable PAG, and new monomer, are discussed. From X-SEM and CD-SEM data, former three concepts could improve resist sidewall profile quantitatively evaluated by Scum fail F/R% and keep lithographic factors. In addition, another key factor, resist residue defect, is also discussed. The high contrast resist with higher receding contact angle (RCA) easily generates more residue defect after development. With the new monomer composition, RCA of Resist E is decreased from 54 to 48 degree after development. Therefore, the residue defect is improved one order.

  20. Optimizing the properties of the protein corona surrounding nanoparticles for tuning payload release.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-Rius, Anna; de Puig, Helena; Kah, James Chen Yong; Borros, Salvador; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2013-11-26

    We manipulate the passive release rates of DNA payloads on protein coronas formed around nanoparticles (NPs) by varying the corona composition. The coronas are prepared using a mixture of hard and soft corona proteins. We form coronas around gold nanorods (NRs), nanobones (NBs), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from human serum (HS) and find that tuning the amount of human serum albumin (HSA) in the NR-coronas (NR-HS-DNA) changes the payload release profile. The effect of buffer strength, HS concentration, and concentration of the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) passivating the NP surfaces on passive release is explored. We find that corona properties play an important role in passive release, and concentrations of CTAB, HS, and phosphate buffer used in corona formation can tune payload release profiles. These advances in understanding protein corona properties bring us closer toward developing a set of basic design rules that enable their manipulation and optimization for particular biological applications.

  1. Rinne revisited: steel versus aluminum tuning forks.

    PubMed

    MacKechnie, Cheryl A; Greenberg, Jesse J; Gerkin, Richard C; McCall, Andrew A; Hirsch, Barry E; Durrant, John D; Raz, Yael

    2013-12-01

    (1) Determine whether tuning fork material (aluminum vs stainless steel) affects Rinne testing in the clinical assessment of conductive hearing loss (CHL). (2) Determine the relative acoustic and mechanical outputs of 512-Hz tuning forks made of aluminum and stainless steel. Prospective, observational. Outpatient otology clinic. Fifty subjects presenting May 2011 to May 2012 with negative or equivocal Rinne in at least 1 ear and same-day audiometry. Rinne test results using aluminum and steel forks were compared and correlated with the audiometric air-bone gap. Bench top measurements using sound-level meter, microphone, and artificial mastoid. Patients with CHL were more likely to produce a negative Rinne test with a steel fork than with an aluminum fork. Logistic regression revealed that the probability of a negative Rinne reached 50% at a 19 dB air-bone gap for stainless steel versus 27 dB with aluminum. Bench top testing revealed that steel forks demonstrate, in effect, more comparable air and bone conduction efficiencies while aluminum forks have relatively lower bone conduction efficiency. We have found that steel tuning forks can detect a lesser air-bone gap compared to aluminum tuning forks. This is substantiated by observations of clear differences in the relative acoustic versus mechanical outputs of steel and aluminum forks, reflecting underlying inevitable differences in acoustic versus mechanical impedances of these devices, and thus efficiency of coupling sound/vibratory energy to the auditory system. These findings have clinical implications for using tuning forks to determine candidacy for stapes surgery.

  2. Differential Resonant Ring YIG Tuned Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Ronald A.

    2010-01-01

    A differential SiGe oscillator circuit uses a resonant ring-oscillator topology in order to electronically tune the oscillator over multi-octave bandwidths. The oscillator s tuning is extremely linear, because the oscillator s frequency depends on the magnetic tuning of a YIG sphere, whose resonant frequency is equal to a fundamental constant times the DC magnetic field. This extremely simple circuit topology uses two coupling loops connecting a differential pair of SiGe bipolar transistors into a feedback configuration using a YIG tuned filter creating a closed-loop ring oscillator. SiGe device technology is used for this oscillator in order to keep the transistor s 1/f noise to an absolute minimum in order to achieve minimum RF phase noise. The single-end resonant ring oscillator currently has an advantage in fewer parts, but when the oscillation frequency is greater than 16 GHz, the package s parasitic behavior couples energy to the sphere and causes holes and poor phase noise performance. This is because the coupling to the YIG is extremely low, so that the oscillator operates at near the unloaded Q. With the differential resonant ring oscillator, the oscillation currents are just in the YIG coupling mechanisms. The phase noise is even better, and the physical size can be reduced to permit monolithic microwave integrated circuit oscillators. This invention is a YIG tuned oscillator circuit making use of a differential topology to simultaneously achieve an extremely broadband electronic tuning range and ultra-low phase noise. As a natural result of its differential circuit topology, all reactive elements, such as tuning stubs, which limit tuning bandwidth by contributing excessive open loop phase shift, have been eliminated. The differential oscillator s open-loop phase shift is associated with completely non-dispersive circuit elements such as the physical angle of the coupling loops, a differential loop crossover, and the high-frequency phase shift of the n

  3. Application of genetic algorithms to tuning fuzzy control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, Todd; Vombrack, Endre; Aldridge, Jack

    1993-01-01

    Real number genetic algorithms (GA) were applied for tuning fuzzy membership functions of three controller applications. The first application is our 'Fuzzy Pong' demonstration, a controller that controls a very responsive system. The performance of the automatically tuned membership functions exceeded that of manually tuned membership functions both when the algorithm started with randomly generated functions and with the best manually-tuned functions. The second GA tunes input membership functions to achieve a specified control surface. The third application is a practical one, a motor controller for a printed circuit manufacturing system. The GA alters the positions and overlaps of the membership functions to accomplish the tuning. The applications, the real number GA approach, the fitness function and population parameters, and the performance improvements achieved are discussed. Directions for further research in tuning input and output membership functions and in tuning fuzzy rules are described.

  4. Application of Stark Tuned Laser for Interferometry and Polarimetry in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    H.K. Park; K.C. Lee; B. Deng; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; B. Nathan; and N.C. Luhmann, Jr.

    2001-09-07

    A Stark-tuned optically pumped far-infrared CH(subscript ''3'')OH laser at 119 mm has been successfully applied in the Far Infrared Tangential Interferometer/Polarimeter (FIReTIP) system for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The system will provide temporally and radially resolved 2-D electron density profile [n(subscript ''e'')(r,t)] and toroidal field profile [B(subscript ''T'')(r,t)] data. In the 2001 campaign, a single channel interferometer system has been operated and tested for the Faraday rotation measurement. A plan for improvement and upgrading of the FIReTIP is discussed.

  5. Evolutionary Computation Applied to the Tuning of MEMS Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Fink, Wolfgang; Ferguson, Michael I.; Peay, Chris; Oks, Boris; Terrile, Richard; Yee, Karl

    2005-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for MEMS gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning and, furthermore, to find the optimally tuned configuration for this state of increased sensitivity. The tuning method was tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-resonator MEMS gyroscope using the measurement of the frequency response of the MEMS device in open-loop operation.

  6. Evolutionary Computation Applied to the Tuning of MEMS Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Fink, Wolfgang; Ferguson, Michael I.; Peay, Chris; Oks, Boris; Terrile, Richard; Yee, Karl

    2005-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for MEMS gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning and, furthermore, to find the optimally tuned configuration for this state of increased sensitivity. The tuning method was tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-resonator MEMS gyroscope using the measurement of the frequency response of the MEMS device in open-loop operation.

  7. Tuning flexibility to control selectivity in soft porous crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahynski, Nathan A.; Shen, Vincent K.

    2017-01-01

    We use flat-histogram Monte Carlo simulations to study how changing the flexibility of soft porous crystals (SPCs) affects their selective adsorption of a binary, size-asymmetric supercritical fluid. Specifically, we consider mesoporous SPCs which have multiple minima in their free energy profiles as a function of pore size such that they are capable of exhibiting polymorphism between a narrow and large pore phase. While specific fluid-pore interactions determine the shape of both pores' selectivity curve as a function of adsorbate pressure, an individual pore tends to selectively adsorb a species based on the size of the adsorbate molecule relative to itself, thereby shifting the pore's selectivity curve relative to its polymorph. By controlling the flexibility of a SPC, the relative thermodynamic stability of the two pore phases may be varied, thereby changing the overall selectivity of the SPC during adsorbate loading. We investigate this for two classes of SPCs: one representative of "gate-opening" materials and another of "breathing" materials. For gate-opening materials, this control is much more salient than in breathing ones. However, for the latter, we illustrate how to tune the free energy profile to create materials which breathe multiple times during adsorption/desorption.

  8. The Design of a Transparent Vertical Multizone Furnace: Application to Thermal Field Tuning and Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvual, Walter M. B.; Batur, Celal; Bennett, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    We present an innovative design of a vertical transparent multizone furnace which can operate in the temperature range of 25 C to 750 C and deliver thermal gradients of 2 C/cm to 45 C/cm for the commercial applications to crystal growth. The operation of the eight zone furnace is based on a self-tuning temperature control system with a DC power supply for optimal thermal stability. We show that the desired thermal profile over the entire length of the furnace consists of a functional combination of the fundamental thermal profiles for each individual zone obtained by setting the set-point temperature for that zone. The self-tuning system accounts for the zone to zone thermal interactions. The control system operates such that the thermal profile is maintained under thermal load, thus boundary conditions on crystal growth ampoules can be predetermined prior to crystal growth. Temperature profiles for the growth of crystals via directional solidification, vapor transport techniques, and multiple gradient applications are shown to be easily implemented. The unique feature of its transparency and ease of programming thermal profiles make the furnace useful in scientific and commercial applications for determining the optimized process parameters for crystal growth.

  9. Quartz tuning fork based microwave impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yong-Tao; Ma, Eric Yue; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-06-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), a near-field microwave scanning probe technique, has become a powerful tool to characterize local electrical responses in solid state samples. We present the design of a new type of MIM sensor based on quartz tuning fork and electrochemically etched thin metal wires. Due to a higher aspect ratio tip and integration with tuning fork, such design achieves comparable MIM performance and enables easy self-sensing topography feedback in situations where the conventional optical feedback mechanism is not available, thus is complementary to microfabricated shielded stripline-type probes. The new design also enables stable differential mode MIM detection and multiple-frequency MIM measurements with a single sensor.

  10. The dynamics and tuning of orchestral crotales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Bradley M.; Ramirez, Cherie L.; Moore, Thomas R.

    2004-10-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the acoustic and vibrational properties of orchestral crotales within the range C6 to C8 is reported. Interferograms of the acoustically important modes of vibration are presented and the frequencies are reported. It is shown that the acoustic spectra of crotales are not predicted by assuming that they are either thin circular plates or annular plates clamped at the center, despite the physical resemblance to these objects. Results from finite element analysis are presented that demonstrate how changing the size of the central mass affects the tuning of the instruments, and it is concluded that crotales are not currently designed to ensure optimal tuning. The possibility of using annular plates as crotales is also investigated and the physical parameters for such a set of instruments are presented. .

  11. Optical fiber grating tuning device and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Fei; Yeh, T.

    2008-12-01

    A new design for tuning optical fiber grating is proposed. The fiber grating is placed in the grooves between a pair of slides, in which one end of the fiber is bonded on the bottom slide, and the other end of the fiber is bonded on the top slide, the grating section of the fiber is confined in grooves, so that the fiber grating is remaining straight without buckling during axial compressive force applied to the fiber. An actuator is used for driving slide to apply force on fiber to axially compress or stretch the fiber grating. The wavelength of the fiber grating is tuned according to applied stress on the fiber. The applications of the device include tunable fiber laser, tunable fiber filter etc.

  12. Tuning of fault tolerant control design parameters.

    PubMed

    DeLima, Pedro G; Yen, Gary G

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents two major contributions in the field of fault tolerant control. First, it gathers points of concern typical to most fault tolerant control applications and translates the chosen performance metrics into a set of six practical design specifications. Second, it proposes initialization and tuning procedures through which a particular fault tolerant control architecture not only can be set to comply with the required specifications, but also can be tuned online to compensate for a total of twelve properties, such as the noise rejection levels for fault detection and diagnosis signals. The proposed design is realized over a powerful architecture that combines the flexibility of adaptive critic designs with the long term memory and learning capabilities of a supervisor. This paper presents a practical design procedure to facilitate the applications of a fundamentally sound fault tolerant control architecture in real-world problems.

  13. I Tune, You Tube, We Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shida, R. Y.; Gater, W.

    2007-10-01

    The website YouTube was created in 2005 and has rapidly become one of the most popular entertainment websites on the internet. It is riding the online video wave today like few other online companies and is currently more popular than the video sections of either Yahoo or Google. iTunes, a digital media application created by Apple in 2001, where one can download and play music and videos, has had a similar success. There is little doubt that they both represent important communication channels in a world heavily influenced by online media, especially among teenagers and young adults. As science communicators we can use this direct route to a younger audience to our advantage. This article aims to give a taste of these applications with a few selected examples demonstrating that both YouTube and iTunes are excellent tools to teach and inspire the general public.

  14. Tuning strain in flexible graphene nanoelectromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Fen; Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Averin, Dmitri V.; Du, Xu

    2015-11-01

    The structural flexibility of low dimensional nanomaterials offers unique opportunities for studying the impact of strain on their physical properties and for developing innovative devices utilizing strain engineering. A key towards such goals is a device platform which allows the independent tuning and reliable calibration of the strain. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of graphene nanoelectromechanical resonators (GNEMRs) on flexible substrates. Combining substrate bending and electrostatic gating, we achieve the independent tuning of the strain and sagging in graphene and explore the nonlinear dynamics over a wide parameter space. Analytical and numerical studies of a continuum mechanics model, including the competing higher order nonlinear terms, reveal a comprehensive nonlinear dynamics phase diagram, which quantitatively explains the complex behaviors of GNEMRs.

  15. Musician's and Physicist's View on Tuning Keyboard Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubenow, Martin; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2007-01-01

    The simultaneous sound of several voices or instruments requires proper tuning to achieve consonance for certain intervals and chords. Most instruments allow enough frequency variation to enable pure tuning while being played. Keyboard instruments such as organ and piano have given frequencies for individual notes and the tuning must be based on a…

  16. Musician's and Physicist's View on Tuning Keyboard Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubenow, Martin; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2007-01-01

    The simultaneous sound of several voices or instruments requires proper tuning to achieve consonance for certain intervals and chords. Most instruments allow enough frequency variation to enable pure tuning while being played. Keyboard instruments such as organ and piano have given frequencies for individual notes and the tuning must be based on a…

  17. Turbine blade with tuned damping structure

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X.; Messmann, Stephen J.

    2015-09-01

    A turbine blade is provided comprising: a root; an airfoil comprising an external wall extending radially from the root and having a radially outermost portion; and a damping structure. The external wall may comprise first and second side walls joined together to define an inner cavity of the airfoil. The damping structure may be positioned within the airfoil inner cavity and coupled to the airfoil so as to define a tuned mass damper.

  18. Thiadiazoloquinoxalines: tuning physical properties through smart synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dallos, Timea; Hamburger, Manuel; Baumgarten, Martin

    2011-04-15

    The synthesis of π-conjugated acceptors based on thiadiazoloquinoxaline (TQ) derivatives is described. Apart from reporting on the functionalization of the TQ core, the influence of the substituents was studied by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry measurements, and DFT calculations. By changing the donor as well as the π-spacer, a fine-tuning of the photo- and electrochemical properties was achieved.

  19. Resistive Fine Tuning of Resonant Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Simple fixed-inductance/fixed-capacitance tank circuit modified for fine adjustment of resonant frequency by addition of small inductance with potentiometer across it. Additional winding built into full winding as integral part or added externally. Technique provides quick way of tuning reactance out of power-transformer circuit to maximize power transfer or to adjust frequency of oscillator. Applications include rotary transformers, servo amplifiers, and analog computer modules.

  20. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  1. Dynamical Tuning of Nanowire Lasing Spectra.

    PubMed

    Zapf, Maximilian; Röder, Robert; Winkler, Karl; Kaden, Lisa; Greil, Johannes; Wille, Marcel; Grundmann, Marius; Schmidt-Grund, Rudiger; Lugstein, Alois; Ronning, Carsten

    2017-09-29

    Realizing visionary concepts of integrated photonic circuits, nanospectroscopy, and nanosensing will tremendously benefit from dynamically tunable coherent light sources with lateral dimensions on the subwavelength scale. Therefore, we demonstrate an individual nanowire laser based device which can be gradually tuned by reversible length changes of the nanowire such that uniaxial tensile stress is applied to the respective semiconductor gain material. By straining the device, the spontaneous excitonic emission of the nanowire shifts to lower energies caused by the bandgap reduction of the semiconductor. Moreover, the optical gain spectrum of the nanolaser can be precisely strain-tuned in the high excitation regime. The tuning of the emission does not affect the laser threshold of the device, which is very beneficial for practical applications. The applied length change furthermore adjusts the laser resonances inducing a redshift of the longitudinal modes. Thus, this concept of gradually and dynamically tunable nanolasers enables controlling and modulating the coherent emission on the nanoscale without changing macroscopic ambient conditions. This concept holds therefore huge impact on nanophotonic switches and photonic circuit technology.

  2. Tonotopic Tuning in a Sound Localization Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Slee, Sean J.; Higgs, Matthew H.; Fairhall, Adrienne L.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleus laminaris (NL) neurons encode interaural time difference (ITD), the cue used to localize low-frequency sounds. A physiologically based model of NL input suggests that ITD information is contained in narrow frequency bands around harmonics of the sound frequency. This suggested a theory, which predicts that, for each tone frequency, there is an optimal time course for synaptic inputs to NL that will elicit the largest modulation of NL firing rate as a function of ITD. The theory also suggested that neurons in different tonotopic regions of NL require specialized tuning to take advantage of the input gradient. Tonotopic tuning in NL was investigated in brain slices by separating the nucleus into three regions based on its anatomical tonotopic map. Patch-clamp recordings in each region were used to measure both the synaptic and the intrinsic electrical properties. The data revealed a tonotopic gradient of synaptic time course that closely matched the theoretical predictions. We also found postsynaptic band-pass filtering. Analysis of the combined synaptic and postsynaptic filters revealed a frequency-dependent gradient of gain for the transformation of tone amplitude to NL firing rate modulation. Models constructed from the experimental data for each tonotopic region demonstrate that the tonotopic tuning measured in NL can improve ITD encoding across sound frequencies. PMID:20220079

  3. Tuning Your Priors to the World

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The idea that perceptual and cognitive systems must incorporate knowledge about the structure of the environment has become a central dogma of cognitive theory. In a Bayesian context, this idea is often realized in terms of “tuning the prior”—widely assumed to mean adjusting prior probabilities so that they match the frequencies of events in the world. This kind of “ecological” tuning has often been held up as an ideal of inference, in fact defining an “ideal observer.” But widespread as this viewpoint is, it directly contradicts Bayesian philosophy of probability, which views probabilities as degrees of belief rather than relative frequencies, and explicitly denies that they are objective characteristics of the world. Moreover, tuning the prior to observed environmental frequencies is subject to overfitting, meaning in this context overtuning to the environment, which leads (ironically) to poor performance in future encounters with the same environment. Whenever there is uncertainty about the environment—which there almost always is—an agent's prior should be biased away from ecological relative frequencies and toward simpler and more entropic priors. PMID:23335572

  4. How viruses hijack the ERAD tuning machinery.

    PubMed

    Noack, Julia; Bernasconi, Riccardo; Molinari, Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    An essential step during the intracellular life cycle of many positive-strand RNA viruses is the rearrangement of host cell membranes to generate membrane-bound replication platforms. For example, Nidovirales and Flaviviridae subvert the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for their replication. However, the absence of conventional ER and secretory pathway markers in virus-induced ER-derived membranes has for a long time hampered a thorough understanding of their biogenesis. Recent reports highlight the analogies between mouse hepatitis virus-, equine arteritis virus-, and Japanese encephalitis virus-induced replication platforms and ER-associated degradation (ERAD) tuning vesicles (or EDEMosomes) that display nonlipidated LC3 at their cytosolic face and segregate the ERAD factors EDEM1, OS-9, and SEL1L from the ER lumen. In this Gem, we briefly summarize the current knowledge on ERAD tuning pathways and how they might be hijacked for viral genome replication. As ERAD tuning components, such as SEL1L and nonlipidated LC3, appear to contribute to viral infection, these cellular pathways represent novel candidate drug targets to combat positive-strand RNA viruses.

  5. Tuning your priors to the world.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The idea that perceptual and cognitive systems must incorporate knowledge about the structure of the environment has become a central dogma of cognitive theory. In a Bayesian context, this idea is often realized in terms of "tuning the prior"-widely assumed to mean adjusting prior probabilities so that they match the frequencies of events in the world. This kind of "ecological" tuning has often been held up as an ideal of inference, in fact defining an "ideal observer." But widespread as this viewpoint is, it directly contradicts Bayesian philosophy of probability, which views probabilities as degrees of belief rather than relative frequencies, and explicitly denies that they are objective characteristics of the world. Moreover, tuning the prior to observed environmental frequencies is subject to overfitting, meaning in this context overtuning to the environment, which leads (ironically) to poor performance in future encounters with the same environment. Whenever there is uncertainty about the environment-which there almost always is-an agent's prior should be biased away from ecological relative frequencies and toward simpler and more entropic priors. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  6. Parameterizing loop fusion for automated empirical tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y; Yi, Q; Kennedy, K; Quinlan, D; Vuduc, R

    2005-12-15

    Traditional compilers are limited in their ability to optimize applications for different architectures because statically modeling the effect of specific optimizations on different hardware implementations is difficult. Recent research has been addressing this issue through the use of empirical tuning, which uses trial executions to determine the optimization parameters that are most effective on a particular hardware platform. In this paper, we investigate empirical tuning of loop fusion, an important transformation for optimizing a significant class of real-world applications. In spite of its usefulness, fusion has attracted little attention from previous empirical tuning research, partially because it is much harder to configure than transformations like loop blocking and unrolling. This paper presents novel compiler techniques that extend conventional fusion algorithms to parameterize their output when optimizing a computation, thus allowing the compiler to formulate the entire configuration space for loop fusion using a sequence of integer parameters. The compiler can then employ an external empirical search engine to find the optimal operating point within the space of legal fusion configurations and generate the final optimized code using a simple code transformation system. We have implemented our approach within our compiler infrastructure and conducted preliminary experiments using a simple empirical search strategy. Our results convey new insights on the interaction of loop fusion with limited hardware resources, such as available registers, while confirming conventional wisdom about the effectiveness of loop fusion in improving application performance.

  7. Neural Tuning to Numerosity Relates to Perceptual Tuning in 3–6-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Alyssa J.

    2017-01-01

    Neural representations of approximate numerical value, or numerosity, have been observed in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) in monkeys and humans, including children. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that children as young as 3–4 years old exhibit neural tuning to cardinal numerosities in the IPS and that their neural responses are accounted for by a model of numerosity coding that has been used to explain neural responses in the adult IPS. We also found that the sensitivity of children's neural tuning to number in the right IPS was comparable to their numerical discrimination sensitivity observed behaviorally, outside of the scanner. Children's neural tuning curves in the right IPS were significantly sharper than in the left IPS, indicating that numerical representations are more precise and mature more rapidly in the right hemisphere than in the left. Further, we show that children's perceptual sensitivity to numerosity can be predicted by the development of their neural sensitivity to numerosity. This research provides novel evidence of developmental continuity in the neural code underlying numerical representation and demonstrates that children's neural sensitivity to numerosity is related to their cognitive development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here we test for the existence of neural tuning to numerosity in the developing brain in the youngest sample of children tested with fMRI to date. Although previous research shows evidence of numerical distance effects in the intraparietal sulcus of the developing brain, those effects could be explained by patterns of neural activity that do not represent neural tuning to numerosity. These data provide the first robust evidence that from as early as 3–4 years of age there is developmental continuity in how the intraparietal sulcus represents the values of numerosities. Moreover, the study goes beyond previous research by examining the relation between neural tuning and perceptual tuning in children

  8. Temporal tuning of word and face selective cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yeatman, Jason D.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitivity to temporal change places fundamental limits on object processing in the visual system. An emerging consensus from the behavioral and neuroimaging literature suggests that temporal resolution differs substantially for stimuli of different complexity and for brain areas at different levels of the cortical hierarchy. Here we used Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEPs) to directly measure three fundamental parameters that characterize the underlying neural response to text and face images: temporal resolution, peak temporal frequency and response latency. We presented full-screen images of text or a human face, alternated with a scrambled image, at temporal frequencies between 1 and 12 Hz. These images elicited a robust response at the first harmonic that showed differential tuning, scalp topography and delay for the text and face images. Face selective responses were maximal at 4 Hz, but text selective responses, by contrast were maximal at 1 Hz. The topography of the text image response was strongly left-lateralized at higher stimulation rates, while the response to the face image was slightly right-lateralized but nearly bilateral at all frequencies. Both text and face images elicited steady state activity at more than one apparent latency; we observed early (141ms–160ms) and late (>250ms) text and face selective responses. These differences in temporal tuning profiles are likely to reflect differences in the nature of the computations performed by word and face selective cortex. Despite the close proximity of word and face selective regions on the cortical surface, our measurements demonstrate substantial differences in the temporal dynamics of word-versus face-selective responses. PMID:27378330

  9. Automated tuning of an eight-channel cardiac transceive array at 7 tesla using piezoelectric actuators

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Graeme A; Rodgers, Christopher T; Hess, Aaron T; Snyder, Carl J; Vaughan, J Thomas; Robson, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ultra-high field (UHF) MR scanning in the body requires novel coil designs due to B1 field inhomogeneities. In the transverse electromagnetic field (TEM) design, maximum B1 transmit power can only be achieved if each individual transmit element is tuned and matched for different coil loads, which requires a considerable amount of valuable scanner time. Methods An integrated system for autotuning a multichannel parallel transmit (pTx) cardiac TEM array was devised, using piezoelectric actuators, power monitoring equipment and control software. The reproducibility and performance of the system were tested and the power responses of the coil elements were profiled. An automated optimization method was devised and evaluated. Results The time required to tune an eight-element pTx cardiac RF array was reduced from a mean of 30 min to less than 10 min with the use of this system. Conclusion Piezoelectric actuators are an attractive means of tuning RF coil arrays to yield more efficient B1 transmission into the subject. An automated mechanism for tuning these elements provides a practical solution for cardiac imaging at UHF, bringing this technology closer to clinical use. Magn Reson Med 73:2390–2397, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:24986525

  10. Spatiotemporal frequency tuning dynamics of neurons in the owl visual wulst.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lucas; Baron, Jerome

    2010-06-01

    The transformation of spatial (SF) and temporal frequency (TF) tuning functions from broad-band/low-pass to narrow band-pass profiles is one of the key emergent properties of neurons in the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1). The mechanisms underlying such transformation are still a matter of ongoing debate. With the aim of providing comparative insights into the issue, we analyzed various aspects of the spatiotemporal tuning dynamics of neurons in the visual wulst of four awake owls. The wulst is the avian telencephalic target of the retinothalamofugal pathway and, in owls, bears striking functional analogy with V1. Most neurons in our sample exhibited fast and large-magnitude adaptation to the visual stimuli with response latencies very similar to those reported for V1. Moreover, latency increased as a function of stimulus SF but not TF, which suggests that parvo- and magno-like geniculate inputs could be converging onto single wulst neurons. No net shifts in preferred SF or TF were observed along the initial second of stimulation, but bandwidth decreased roughly during the first 200 ms after response latency for both stimulus dimensions. For SF, this occurred exclusively as a consequence of low-frequency suppression, whereas suppression was observed both at the low- and high-frequency limbs of TF tuning curves. Overall these results indicate that SF and TF tuning curves in the wulst are shaped by both feedforward and intratelencephalic suppressive mechanisms, similarly to what seems to be the case in the mammalian striate cortex.

  11. Sample skewness as a statistical measurement of neuronal tuning sharpness.

    PubMed

    Samonds, Jason M; Potetz, Brian R; Lee, Tai Sing

    2014-05-01

    We propose using the statistical measurement of the sample skewness of the distribution of mean firing rates of a tuning curve to quantify sharpness of tuning. For some features, like binocular disparity, tuning curves are best described by relatively complex and sometimes diverse functions, making it difficult to quantify sharpness with a single function and parameter. Skewness provides a robust nonparametric measure of tuning curve sharpness that is invariant with respect to the mean and variance of the tuning curve and is straightforward to apply to a wide range of tuning, including simple orientation tuning curves and complex object tuning curves that often cannot even be described parametrically. Because skewness does not depend on a specific model or function of tuning, it is especially appealing to cases of sharpening where recurrent interactions among neurons produce sharper tuning curves that deviate in a complex manner from the feedforward function of tuning. Since tuning curves for all neurons are not typically well described by a single parametric function, this model independence additionally allows skewness to be applied to all recorded neurons, maximizing the statistical power of a set of data. We also compare skewness with other nonparametric measures of tuning curve sharpness and selectivity. Compared to these other nonparametric measures tested, skewness is best used for capturing the sharpness of multimodal tuning curves defined by narrow peaks (maximum) and broad valleys (minima). Finally, we provide a more formal definition of sharpness using a shape-based information gain measure and derive and show that skewness is correlated with this definition.

  12. Sample Skewness as a Statistical Measurement of Neuronal Tuning Sharpness

    PubMed Central

    Samonds, Jason M.; Potetz, Brian R.; Lee, Tai Sing

    2014-01-01

    We propose using the statistical measurement of the sample skewness of the distribution of mean firing rates of a tuning curve to quantify sharpness of tuning. For some features, like binocular disparity, tuning curves are best described by relatively complex and sometimes diverse functions, making it difficult to quantify sharpness with a single function and parameter. Skewness provides a robust nonparametric measure of tuning curve sharpness that is invariant with respect to the mean and variance of the tuning curve and is straightforward to apply to a wide range of tuning, including simple orientation tuning curves and complex object tuning curves that often cannot even be described parametrically. Because skewness does not depend on a specific model or function of tuning, it is especially appealing to cases of sharpening where recurrent interactions among neurons produce sharper tuning curves that deviate in a complex manner from the feedforward function of tuning. Since tuning curves for all neurons are not typically well described by a single parametric function, this model independence additionally allows skewness to be applied to all recorded neurons, maximizing the statistical power of a set of data. We also compare skewness with other nonparametric measures of tuning curve sharpness and selectivity. Compared to these other nonparametric measures tested, skewness is best used for capturing the sharpness of multimodal tuning curves defined by narrow peaks (maximum) and broad valleys (minima). Finally, we provide a more formal definition of sharpness using a shape-based information gain measure and derive and show that skewness is correlated with this definition. PMID:24555451

  13. Orientation tuning of the spatial-frequency-tuned mechanisms of the red-green channel.

    PubMed

    Pandey Vimal, R L

    1997-10-01

    Significant orthogonal masking for color stimuli [Invest. Ophthalmol. Visual Sci. 34, 782 (No. 405-54) (1993)] but not for achromatic stimuli [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 1, 226 (1984)] under sustained presentation led us to investigate the orientation tuning of the spatial-frequency- (SF-) tuned color mechanisms. The Red-Green channel was isolated from the achromatic channel by the minimum flicker technique and from the Yellow-Blue channel by the hue cancellation technique. Contrast sensitivity functions, threshold elevation versus mask orientation curves (measured by orientation masking), and threshold elevation versus mask contrast curves were measured by the method of constant stimuli and a two-interval forced-choice technique on two normal observers. Test targets were spatially localized (D6), vertical color patterns, and masks were sinusoidal color patterns oriented 15 degrees-90 degrees from the vertical in 15 degrees steps and had the same SF's as those of test patterns. Mask contrasts were varied between 1.2% and 60%. The orientation tuning curves of the SF-tuned color mechanisms were extracted by obtaining the best fit to contrast sensitivity and threshold elevation data simultaneously at a given SF with use of the masking model. Results show that threshold elevations depend on test SF, mask SF, mask orientation, and mask contrast. Half-bandwidths at half-height (with respect to 15 degrees from the vertical) of threshold elevation versus mask orientation curves range from 90 degrees to 29 degrees depending on SF's. The slopes of threshold elevation versus mask contrast curves range from 0.76 to 0.29 on octave-octave coordinates depending on SF's. Orientation half-bandwidths at half-height of orientation tuning curves of the SF-tuned color mechanisms (1) range from 79 degrees to 28 degrees and (2) average from 68 degrees to 30 degrees for SF's 0.063-8 cycles per degree (cpd). Data suggest that the orientation tuning curves of the SF-tuned chromatic mechanisms are

  14. Adiabatic Betatron deceleration of ionospheric charged particles: a new explanation for (i) the rapid outflow of ionospheric O ions, and for (ii) the increase of plasma mass density observed in magnetospheric flux tubes during main phases of geomagnetic s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Joseph; Pierrard, Viviane; Darrouzet, Fabien

    2013-04-01

    Using European arrays of magnetometers and the cross-phase analysis to determine magnetic field line resonance frequencies, it has been found by Kale et al. (2009) that the plasma mass density within plasmaspheric flux tubes increased rapidly after the SSC of the Hallowe'en 2003 geomagnetic storms. These observations tend to confirm other independent experimental results, suggesting that heavy ion up-flow from the ionosphere is responsible for the observed plasma density increases during main phases of geomagnetic storms. The aim of our contribution is to point out that, during main phases, reversible Betatron effect induced by the increase of the southward Dst-magnetic field component (|Δ Bz|), diminishes slightly the perpendicular kinetic energy (W?) of charged particles spiraling along field lines. Furthermore, due to the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant (μ = Wm/ Bm) the mirror points of all ionospheric ions and electrons are lifted up to higher altitudes i.e. where the mirror point magnetic field (Bm) is slightly smaller. Note that the change of the mirror point altitude is given by: Δ hm = -1/3 (RE + hm) Δ Bm / Bm. It is independent of the ion species and it does not depend of their kinetic energy. The change of kinetic energy is determined by: Δ Wm = Wm Δ Bm / Bm. Both of these equations have been verified numerically by Lemaire et al. (2005; doi: 10.1016/S0273-1177(03)00099-1) using trajectory calculations in a simple time-dependant B-field model: i.e. the Earth's magnetic dipole, plus an increasing southward B-field component: i.e. the Dst magnetic field whose intensity becomes more and more negative during the main phase of magnetic storms. They showed that a variation of Bz (or Dst) by more than - 50 nT significantly increases the mirror point altitudes by more than 100 km which is about equal to scale height of the plasma density in the topside ionosphere where particles are almost collisionless (see Fig. 2 in Lemaire et al., 2005

  15. Dynamic functional tuning of nonlinear cortical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetter, Martin

    2006-03-01

    The mammalian neocortex is a highly complex and nonlinear dynamic system. One of its most prominent features is an omnipresent spontaneous neuronal activity. Here the possible functional role of this global background for cognitive flexibility is studied in a prototypic mean-field model area. It is demonstrated that the level of global background current efficiently controls the stimulus-response threshold and the stability and properties of short-term memory states. Moreover, it can dynamically gate arbitrary cortical subnetworks, when applied to parts of the area as a weak bias signal. These results suggest a central functional role of the level of background activation: the dynamic functional tuning of neocortical circuits.

  16. Stretchable Binary Fresnel Lens for Focus Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueming; Wei, Lei; Poelma, René H.; Vollebregt, Sten; Wei, Jia; Urbach, Hendrik Paul; Sarro, Pasqualina M.; Zhang, Guo Qi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a tuneable binary amplitude Fresnel lens produced by wafer-level microfabrication. The Fresnel lens is fabricated by encapsulating lithographically defined vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles inside a polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) layer. The composite lens material combines the excellent optical absorption properties of the CNT with the transparency and stretchability of the PDMS. By stretching the elastomeric composite in radial direction, the lens focal length is tuned. Good focusing response is demonstrated and a large focus change (≥24%) was achieved by stretching lenses up to 11.4%. PMID:27139747

  17. Tuning quantum correlations with intracavity photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Maria M. de; Gomila, Damia; Zambrini, Roberta; Garcia-March, Miguel Angel

    2011-09-15

    We show how to tune quantum noise in nonlinear systems by means of periodic spatial modulation. We prove that the introduction of an intracavity photonic crystal in a multimode optical parametric oscillator inhibits and enhances light quantum fluctuations. Furthermore, it leads to a significant noise reduction in field quadratures, robustness of squeezing in a wider angular range, and spatial entanglement. These results have potential benefits for quantum imaging, metrology, and quantum information applications and suggest a control mechanism of fluctuations by spatial modulation of interest also in other nonlinear systems.

  18. Stretchable Binary Fresnel Lens for Focus Tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xueming; Wei, Lei; Poelma, René H.; Vollebregt, Sten; Wei, Jia; Urbach, Hendrik Paul; Sarro, Pasqualina M.; Zhang, Guo Qi

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a tuneable binary amplitude Fresnel lens produced by wafer-level microfabrication. The Fresnel lens is fabricated by encapsulating lithographically defined vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles inside a polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) layer. The composite lens material combines the excellent optical absorption properties of the CNT with the transparency and stretchability of the PDMS. By stretching the elastomeric composite in radial direction, the lens focal length is tuned. Good focusing response is demonstrated and a large focus change (≥24%) was achieved by stretching lenses up to 11.4%.

  19. Stretchable Binary Fresnel Lens for Focus Tuning.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueming; Wei, Lei; Poelma, René H; Vollebregt, Sten; Wei, Jia; Urbach, Hendrik Paul; Sarro, Pasqualina M; Zhang, Guo Qi

    2016-05-03

    This paper presents a tuneable binary amplitude Fresnel lens produced by wafer-level microfabrication. The Fresnel lens is fabricated by encapsulating lithographically defined vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles inside a polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) layer. The composite lens material combines the excellent optical absorption properties of the CNT with the transparency and stretchability of the PDMS. By stretching the elastomeric composite in radial direction, the lens focal length is tuned. Good focusing response is demonstrated and a large focus change (≥24%) was achieved by stretching lenses up to 11.4%.

  20. Tuning bacterial hydrodynamics with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, C. J.; Mumper, E.; Brown, E. E.; Brangham, J. T.; Lower, B. H.; Lower, S. K.; Yang, F. Y.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2017-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a group of motile prokaryotes that synthesize chains of lipid-bound, magnetic nanoparticles called magnetosomes. This study exploits their innate magnetism to investigate previously unexplored facets of bacterial hydrodynamics at surfaces. Through use of weak, uniform, external magnetic fields and local, micromagnetic surface patterns, the relative strength of hydrodynamic, magnetic, and flagellar force components is tuned through magnetic control of the bacteria's orientation. The resulting swimming behaviors provide a means to experimentally determine hydrodynamic parameters and offer a high degree of control over large numbers of living microscopic entities. The implications of this controlled motion for studies of bacterial motility near surfaces and for micro- and nanotechnology are discussed.

  1. Automatic tuning of the reinforcement function

    SciTech Connect

    Touzet, C.; Santos, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work is to present a method that helps tuning the reinforcement function parameters in a reinforcement learning approach. Since the proposal of neural based implementations for the reinforcement learning paradigm (which reduced learning time and memory requirements to realistic values) reinforcement functions have become the critical components. Using a general definition for reinforcement functions, the authors solve, in a particular case, the so called exploration versus exploitation dilemma through the careful computation of the RF parameter values. They propose an algorithm to compute, during the exploration part of the learning phase, an estimate for the parameter values. Experiments with the mobile robot Nomad 200 validate their proposals.

  2. Magnetically tuned varistor-transistor hybrid device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. K.; Stapleton, W. A.; Padmini, P.; Dou, J.; Schad, R.

    2012-12-01

    The paper deals with the effect of magnetic fields on the I-V characteristics of an IHC45 varistor. It is found that: (a) the nonlinear I-V characteristics of the varistor can be tuned by a magnetic field resulting in enhanced device performance; and (b) the contributions of a magnetic field on the output signal show all the characteristics of a typical transistor. The potential applications of these devices could be magnetically controlled voltage amplifiers, magnetically controlled current amplifiers, sensors, memory elements, microphone pickup with integrated pre-amplifier using a single transistor, and high temperature electronics.

  3. Underground tuning: quantitative regulation of root growth.

    PubMed

    Satbhai, Santosh B; Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Plants display a high degree of phenotypic plasticity that allows them to tune their form and function to changing environments. The plant root system has evolved mechanisms to anchor the plant and to efficiently explore soils to forage for soil resources. Key to this is an enormous capacity for plasticity of multiple traits that shape the distribution of roots in the soil. Such root system architecture-related traits are determined by root growth rates, root growth direction, and root branching. In this review, we describe how the root system is constituted, and which mechanisms, pathways, and genes mainly regulate plasticity of the root system in response to environmental variation.

  4. Pre - big bang inflation requires fine tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Michael S.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    1997-10-01

    The pre-big-bang cosmology inspired by superstring theories has been suggested as an alternative to slow-roll inflation. We analyze, in both the Jordan and Einstein frames, the effect of spatial curvature on this scenario and show that too much curvature --- of either sign --- reduces the duration of the inflationary era to such an extent that the flatness and horizon problems are not solved. Hence, a fine-tuning of initial conditions is required to obtain enough inflation to solve the cosmological problems.

  5. Lipid Profile

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Lipid Profile Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... as: Lipid Panel; Coronary Risk Panel Formal name: Lipid Profile Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; ...

  6. Otoacoustic Estimation of Cochlear Tuning: Validation in the Chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Guinan, John J.; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze published auditory-nerve and otoacoustic measurements in chinchilla to test a network of hypothesized relationships between cochlear tuning, cochlear traveling-wave delay, and stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs). We find that the physiological data generally corroborate the network of relationships, including predictions from filter theory and the coherent-reflection model of OAE generation, at locations throughout the cochlea. The results support the use of otoacoustic emissions as noninvasive probes of cochlear tuning. Developing this application, we find that tuning ratios—defined as the ratio of tuning sharpness to SFOAE phase-gradient delay in periods—have a nearly species-invariant form in cat, guinea pig, and chinchilla. Analysis of the tuning ratios identifies a species-dependent parameter that locates a transition between “apical-like” and “basal-like” behavior involving multiple aspects of cochlear physiology. Approximate invariance of the tuning ratio allows determination of cochlear tuning from SFOAE delays. We quantify the procedure and show that otoacoustic estimates of chinchilla cochlear tuning match direct measures obtained from the auditory nerve. By assuming that invariance of the tuning ratio extends to humans, we derive new otoacoustic estimates of human cochlear tuning that remain mutually consistent with independent behavioral measurements obtained using different rationales, methodologies, and analysis procedures. The results confirm that at any given characteristic frequency (CF) human cochlear tuning appears sharper than that in the other animals studied, but varies similarly with CF. We show, however, that the exceptionality of human tuning can be exaggerated by the ways in which species are conventionally compared, which take no account of evident differences between the base and apex of the cochlea. Finally, our estimates of human tuning suggest that the spatial spread of excitation of a pure tone

  7. A Schottky receiver for non-perturbative tune monitoring in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.; Cliff, P.; Fellenz, B.; Horton, B.; Jackson, G.; McConnell, D.; Shafer, R.; Siemann, R.

    1989-03-01

    Transverse Schottky noise and coherent betatron modulation of the bunched beam revolution harmonics are continuously monitored by a sensitive receiver. The electronics relies upon low noise amplifiers, narrow-band filters, and spectrally pure oscillators to obtain a minimum detectable signal of -160 dBm. Dynamic range is 80 dB. Separate baseband proton and antiproton signals are continuously analyzed in the Main Control Room.

  8. State Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State-Federal Information Clearinghouse for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA.

    State-by-state public policy profiles are provided by the Council for Exceptional Children's State-Federal Information Clearinghouse. These profiles summarize the present legal base for the delivery of educational services to handicapped children in the United States. Included in each profile is information from various avenues used to establish…

  9. Telling in-tune from out-of-tune: widespread evidence for implicit absolute intonation.

    PubMed

    Van Hedger, Stephen C; Heald, Shannon L M; Huang, Alex; Rutstein, Brooke; Nusbaum, Howard C

    2017-04-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability to name or produce an isolated musical note without the aid of a reference note. One skill thought to be unique to AP possessors is the ability to provide absolute intonation judgments (e.g., classifying an isolated note as "in-tune" or "out-of-tune"). Recent work has suggested that absolute intonation perception among AP possessors is not crystallized in a critical period of development, but is dynamically maintained by the listening environment, in which the vast majority of Western music is tuned to a specific cultural standard. Given that all listeners of Western music are constantly exposed to this specific cultural tuning standard, our experiments address whether absolute intonation perception extends beyond AP possessors. We demonstrate that non-AP listeners are able to accurately judge the intonation of completely isolated notes. Both musicians and nonmusicians showed evidence for absolute intonation recognition when listening to familiar timbres (piano and violin). When testing unfamiliar timbres (triangle and inverted sine waves), only musicians showed weak evidence of absolute intonation recognition (Experiment 2). Overall, these results highlight a previously unknown similarity between AP and non-AP possessors' long-term musical note representations, including evidence of sensitivity to frequency.

  10. Small-amplitude synchrotron tune near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The separatrices of the rf buckets near transition are mapped when the synchronous phase is neither 0 or {pi}. The small-amplitude synchronous tune is derived when the rf frequency is changed. Synchrotron radiation is present in all electron storage ring. As a result, the synchronous phase is always offset from {phi}{sub s} = {pi} to compensate for the power loss. Even for proton storage rings with negligible synchrotron radiation, the synchronous phase is also required to be offset from {phi}{sub s} = 0 or {pi} slightly to compensate for beam loading. Thus for all storage rings operating near transition, beam particles reside in accelerating buckets instead of stationary bucket. It is of interest to map these buckets and see how they evolve near transition. When the rf frequency is varied, the closed orbit is pushed radially inward or outward. The momentum of the particle synchronous with the rf is thus changed. By measuring the small-amplitude synchrotron tune as a function of the rf frequency, the lowest first few orders of the slip factor can be inferred. Here, we derive this relationship up to the lowest first three orders of the slip factor when the particle velocity is not ultra-relativistic.

  11. Tuning bilayer twist using chiral counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, R.; Huc, I.; Schmutz, M.; Candau, S. J.; Mackintosh, F. C.

    1999-06-01

    From seashells to DNA, chirality is expressed at every level of biological structures. In self-assembled structures it may emerge cooperatively from chirality at the molecular scale. Amphiphilic molecules, for example, can form a variety of aggregates and mesophases that express the chirality of their constituent molecules at a supramolecular scale of micrometres (refs 1-3). Quantitative prediction of the large-scale chirality based on that at themolecular scale remains a largely unsolved problem. Furthermore, experimental control over the expression of chirality at the supramolecular level is difficult to achieve: mixing of different enantiomers usually results in phase separation. Here we present an experimental and theoretical description of a system in which chirality can be varied continuously and controllably (`tuned') in micrometre-scale structures. We observe the formation of twisted ribbons consisting of bilayers of gemini surfactants (two surfactant molecules covalently linked at their charged head groups). We find that the degree of twist and the pitch of the ribbons can be tuned by the introduction of opposite-handed chiral counterions in various proportions. This degree of control might be of practical value; for example, in the use of thehelical structures as templates for helical crystallization of macromolecules,.

  12. Color-tuned channelrhodopsins for multiwavelength optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Prigge, Matthias; Schneider, Franziska; Tsunoda, Satoshi P; Shilyansky, Carrie; Wietek, Jonas; Deisseroth, Karl; Hegemann, Peter

    2012-09-14

    Channelrhodopsin-2 is a light-gated ion channel and a major tool of optogenetics. It is used to control neuronal activity via blue light. Here we describe the construction of color-tuned high efficiency channelrhodopsins (ChRs), based on chimeras of Chlamydomonas channelrhodopsin-1 and Volvox channelrhodopsin-1. These variants show superb expression and plasma membrane integration, resulting in 3-fold larger photocurrents in HEK cells compared with channelrhodopsin-2. Further molecular engineering gave rise to chimeric variants with absorption maxima ranging from 526 to 545 nm, dovetailing well with maxima of channelrhodopsin-2 derivatives ranging from 461 to 492 nm. Additional kinetic fine-tuning led to derivatives in which the lifetimes of the open state range from 19 ms to 5 s. Finally, combining green- with blue-absorbing variants allowed independent activation of two distinct neural cell populations at 560 and 405 nm. This novel panel of channelrhodopsin variants may serve as an important toolkit element for dual-color cell stimulation in neural circuits.

  13. Electrical tuning of a quantum plasmonic resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaoge; Kang, Ju -Hyung; Yuan, Hongtao; ...

    2017-06-12

    Surface plasmon (SP) excitations in metals facilitate confinement of light into deep-subwavelength volumes and can induce strong light–matter interaction. Generally, the SP resonances supported by noble metal nanostructures are explained well by classical models, at least until the nanostructure size is decreased to a few nanometres, approaching the Fermi wavelength λF of the electrons. Although there is a long history of reports on quantum size effects in the plasmonic response of nanometre-sized metal particles systematic experimental studies have been hindered by inhomogeneous broadening in ensemble measurements, as well as imperfect control over size, shape, faceting, surface reconstructions, contamination, charging effectsmore » and surface roughness in single-particle measurements. In particular, observation of the quantum size effect in metallic films and its tuning with thickness has been challenging as they only confine carriers in one direction. Here, we show active tuning of quantum size effects in SP resonances supported by a 20-nm-thick metallic film of indium tin oxide (ITO), a plasmonic material serving as a low-carrier-density Drude metal. An ionic liquid (IL) is used to electrically gate and partially deplete the ITO layer. The experiment shows a controllable and reversible blue-shift in the SP resonance above a critical voltage. As a result, a quantum-mechanical model including the quantum size effect reproduces the experimental results, whereas a classical model only predicts a red shift.« less

  14. Tuning climate models with Palaeoclimate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, P. J.; Annan, J.; Hargreaves, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    It has been common to perform comparisons between palaeoclimate model simulations with palaeoclimate reconstructions to better understand the mechanisms of climate change, and the accuracy of data reconstructions. However, it is surprisingly rare that palaeoclimate data has actually resulted in a change of the models. This is particularly true for the state-of-the-art GCMs. The talk will focus on two examples of using model parameter perturbation methodogies to effectivily tune the model to palaeoclimate data. The main example will use the Last Glacial Maximum and focus on the stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. We will also discuss older time periods such as the earlly Eocene. In both cases we will use versions of the Hadley Centre climate model. It will be shown that the model initially appears to be too stable to forcings, particularly input of fresh water. By tuning the model, we can get enhanced sensitivity of the model. The results show that this can give significant differences in the response of the model at regional scale, although the overall climate sensitivity of the model to future clinate change is relatively unaltered.

  15. Neuromechanical tuning of nonlinear postural control dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Lena H.; van Antwerp, Keith W.; Scrivens, Jevin E.; McKay, J. Lucas; Welch, Torrence D. J.; Bingham, Jeffrey T.; DeWeerth, Stephen P.

    2009-06-01

    Postural control may be an ideal physiological motor task for elucidating general questions about the organization, diversity, flexibility, and variability of biological motor behaviors using nonlinear dynamical analysis techniques. Rather than presenting "problems" to the nervous system, the redundancy of biological systems and variability in their behaviors may actually be exploited to allow for the flexible achievement of multiple and concurrent task-level goals associated with movement. Such variability may reflect the constant "tuning" of neuromechanical elements and their interactions for movement control. The problem faced by researchers is that there is no one-to-one mapping between the task goal and the coordination of the underlying elements. We review recent and ongoing research in postural control with the goal of identifying common mechanisms underlying variability in postural control, coordination of multiple postural strategies, and transitions between them. We present a delayed-feedback model used to characterize the variability observed in muscle coordination patterns during postural responses to perturbation. We emphasize the significance of delays in physiological postural systems, requiring the modulation and coordination of both the instantaneous, "passive" response to perturbations as well as the delayed, "active" responses to perturbations. The challenge for future research lies in understanding the mechanisms and principles underlying neuromechanical tuning of and transitions between the diversity of postural behaviors. Here we describe some of our recent and ongoing studies aimed at understanding variability in postural control using physical robotic systems, human experiments, dimensional analysis, and computational models that could be enhanced from a nonlinear dynamics approach.

  16. Tuning the Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Jamison, Andrew C.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Willson, Richard C.; Lee, T. Randall

    2013-01-01

    The tremendous interest in magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is reflected in published research that ranges from novel methods of synthesis of unique nanoparticle shapes and composite structures to a large number of MNP characterization techniques, and finally to their use in many biomedical and nanotechnology-based applications. The knowledge gained from this vast body of research can be made more useful if we organize the associated results to correlate key magnetic properties with the parameters that influence them. Tuning these properties of MNPs will allow us to tailor nanoparticles for specific applications, thus increasing their effectiveness. The complex magnetic behavior exhibited by MNPs is governed by many factors; these factors can either improve or adversely affect the desired magnetic properties. In this report, we have outlined a matrix of parameters that can be varied to tune the magnetic properties of nanoparticles. For practical utility, this review focuses on the effect of size, shape, composition, and shell-core structure on saturation magnetization, coercivity, blocking temperature, and relaxation time. PMID:23912237

  17. Passive vibration tuning with neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiDomenico, Eric D.

    1994-05-01

    Neural network control of flexible structures demonstrates better settling time and energy dissipation than linear design methods. Optimal tuning of passive vibration absorbers for reduced order control is examined using linear and non-linear cases. Quasi-Newton (BFGS) and simplex optimization methods improved the Den Hartog parameters where unsupervised LMS or backpropagation techniques were unstable. Lessons on unsupervised training for dynamic system control are illustrated by examining convergence to the solution in `error space' (parameters vs. cost). Spring stiffness and passive damping of a reaction mass actuator (RMA) are `tuned' for best disturbance rejection using total energy as a cost function. A single neuron using two weights (one for damping and the other for the spring coefficient) improved beam energy over the Den Hartog parameters for the linear bi-modal case. The non-linear case demonstrates even better performance. A multiple layer network is then demonstrated for both the linear and non-linear cases. Optimization techniques improved linear system parameters when initiated at the linear solutions. Lab data for the linear single neuron case validates model fidelity.

  18. Fast tuning of superconducting microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, M.; Wilson, C. M.; Persson, F.; Johansson, G.; Shumeiko, V.; Bauch, T.; Duty, T.; Delsing, P.

    2008-11-07

    Photons are fundamental excitations of electromagnetic fields and can be captured in cavities. For a given cavity with a certain size, the fundamental mode has a fixed frequency f which gives the photons a specific 'color'. The cavity also has a typical lifetime {tau}, which results in a finite linewidth {delta}f. If the size of the cavity is changed fast compared to {tau}, and so that the frequency change {delta}f>>{delta}f, then it is possible to change the 'color' of the captured photons. Here we demonstrate superconducting microwave cavities, with tunable effective lengths. The tuning is obtained by varying a Josephson inductance at one end of the cavity. We show data on four different samples and demonstrate tuning by several hundred linewidths in a time {delta}t<<{tau}. Working in the few photon limit, we show that photons stored in the cavity at one frequency will leak out from the cavity with the new frequency after the detuning. The characteristics of the measured devices make them suitable for different applications such as dynamic coupling of qubits and parametric amplification.

  19. Integrated tuned vibration absorbers: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, Paolo; Zilletti, Michele

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a simulation study on two integrated tuned vibration absorbers (TVAs) designed to control the global flexural vibration of lightly damped thin structures subject to broad frequency band disturbances. The first one consists of a single axial switching TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on variable axial spring and damper elements so that the characteristic damping and natural frequency of the absorber can be switched iteratively to control the resonant response of three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The second one consists of a single three-axes TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on axial and rotational springs and dampers, which are arranged in such a way that the suspended mass is characterized by uncoupled heave and pitch-rolling vibrations. In this case the three damping and natural frequency parameters of the absorber are tuned separately to control three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The simulation study shows that the proposed single-unit absorbers produce, respectively, 5.3 and 8.7 dB reductions of the global flexural vibration of a rectangular plate between 20 and 120 Hz.

  20. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  1. Electrical tuning of a quantum plasmonic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoge; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Yuan, Hongtao; Park, Junghyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Cui, Yi; Hwang, Harold Y.; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2017-09-01

    Surface plasmon (SP) excitations in metals facilitate confinement of light into deep-subwavelength volumes and can induce strong light-matter interaction. Generally, the SP resonances supported by noble metal nanostructures are explained well by classical models, at least until the nanostructure size is decreased to a few nanometres, approaching the Fermi wavelength λF of the electrons. Although there is a long history of reports on quantum size effects in the plasmonic response of nanometre-sized metal particles, systematic experimental studies have been hindered by inhomogeneous broadening in ensemble measurements, as well as imperfect control over size, shape, faceting, surface reconstructions, contamination, charging effects and surface roughness in single-particle measurements. In particular, observation of the quantum size effect in metallic films and its tuning with thickness has been challenging as they only confine carriers in one direction. Here, we show active tuning of quantum size effects in SP resonances supported by a 20-nm-thick metallic film of indium tin oxide (ITO), a plasmonic material serving as a low-carrier-density Drude metal. An ionic liquid (IL) is used to electrically gate and partially deplete the ITO layer. The experiment shows a controllable and reversible blue-shift in the SP resonance above a critical voltage. A quantum-mechanical model including the quantum size effect reproduces the experimental results, whereas a classical model only predicts a red shift.

  2. Cloverleaf microgyroscope with electrostatic alignment and tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A micro-gyroscope (10) having closed loop output operation by a control voltage (V.sub.ty), that is demodulated by a drive axis (x-axis) signal V.sub.thx of the sense electrodes (S1, S2), providing Coriolis torque rebalance to prevent displacement of the micro-gyroscope (10) on the output axis (y-axis) V.sub.thy.about.0. Closed loop drive axis torque, V.sub.tx maintains a constant drive axis amplitude signal, V.sub.thx. The present invention provides independent alignment and tuning of the micro-gyroscope by using separate electrodes and electrostatic bias voltages to adjust alignment and tuning. A quadrature amplitude signal, or cross-axis transfer function peak amplitude is used to detect misalignment that is corrected to zero by an electrostatic bias voltage adjustment. The cross-axis transfer function is either V.sub.thy/V.sub.ty or V.sub.tnx/V.sub.tx. A quadrature signal noise level, or difference in natural frequencies estimated from measurements of the transfer functions is used to detect residual mistuning, that is corrected to zero by a second electrostatic bias voltage adjustment.

  3. Grating tuned unstable resonator laser cavity

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Larry C.

    1982-01-01

    An unstable resonator to be used in high power, narrow line CO.sub.2 pump lasers comprises an array of four reflectors in a ring configuration wherein spherical and planar wavefronts are separated from each other along separate optical paths and only the planar wavefronts are impinged on a plane grating for line tuning. The reflector array comprises a concave mirror for reflecting incident spherical waves as plane waves along an output axis to form an output beam. A plane grating on the output axis is oriented to reflect a portion of the output beam off axis onto a planar relay mirror spaced apart from the output axis in proximity to the concave mirror. The relay mirror reflects plane waves from the grating to impinge on a convex expanding mirror spaced apart from the output axis in proximity to the grating. The expanding mirror reflects the incident planar waves as spherical waves to illuminate the concave mirror. Tuning is provided by rotating the plane grating about an axis normal to the output axis.

  4. Color-tuned Channelrhodopsins for Multiwavelength Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Prigge, Matthias; Schneider, Franziska; Tsunoda, Satoshi P.; Shilyansky, Carrie; Wietek, Jonas; Deisseroth, Karl; Hegemann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Channelrhodopsin-2 is a light-gated ion channel and a major tool of optogenetics. It is used to control neuronal activity via blue light. Here we describe the construction of color-tuned high efficiency channelrhodopsins (ChRs), based on chimeras of Chlamydomonas channelrhodopsin-1 and Volvox channelrhodopsin-1. These variants show superb expression and plasma membrane integration, resulting in 3-fold larger photocurrents in HEK cells compared with channelrhodopsin-2. Further molecular engineering gave rise to chimeric variants with absorption maxima ranging from 526 to 545 nm, dovetailing well with maxima of channelrhodopsin-2 derivatives ranging from 461 to 492 nm. Additional kinetic fine-tuning led to derivatives in which the lifetimes of the open state range from 19 ms to 5 s. Finally, combining green- with blue-absorbing variants allowed independent activation of two distinct neural cell populations at 560 and 405 nm. This novel panel of channelrhodopsin variants may serve as an important toolkit element for dual-color cell stimulation in neural circuits. PMID:22843694

  5. Bendable X-ray Optics at the ALS: Design, Tuning, Performance and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Church, Matthew N.; Knight, Jason W.; Kunz, Martin; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Tamura, Nabumichi; Warwick, Tony

    2008-09-08

    We review the development at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of bendable x-ray optics widely used for focusing of beams of soft and hard x-rays. Typically, the focusing is divided in the tangential and sagittal directions into two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, the so-called Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair [1]. Because fabrication of elliptical surfaces is complicated, the cost of directly fabricated tangential elliptical cylinders is often prohibitive. This is in contrast to flat optics, that are simpler to manufacture and easier to measure by conventional interferometry. The figure of a flat substrate can be changed by placing torques (couples) at each end. Equal couples form a tangential cylinder, and unequal couples can approximate a tangential ellipse or parabola. We review the nature of the bending, requirements and approaches to the mechanical design, and describe a technique developed at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory (OML) for optimal tuning of bendable mirrors before installation in the beamline [2]. The tuning technique adapts a method previously used to adjust bendable mirrors on synchrotron radiation beamlines [3]. However, in our case, optimal tuning of a bendable mirror is based on surface slope trace data obtained with a slope measuring instrument--in our case, the long trace profiler (LTP). We show that due to the near linearity of the bending problem, the minimal set of data, necessary for tuning of two benders, consists of only three slope traces measured before and after a single adjustment of each bending couple. We provide an algorithm that was used in dedicated software for finding optimal settings for the mirror benders. The algorithm is based on the method of regression analysis with experimentally found characteristic functions of the benders. The resulting approximation to the functional dependence of the desired slope shape provides nearly final settings for the benders. Moreover, the characteristic functions of the

  6. Band Gap Tuning of Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons by Using Antidotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoghi, Milad; Goharrizi, Arash Yazdanpanah; Saremi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    The electronic properties of armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) can be changed by creating antidotes within the pristine ribbons and producing antidote super lattice AGNRs (ASL-AGNRs). In the present work, band gap tuning of ASL-AGNRs is investigated by varying the width of ribbons ( d W) and the distance between antidotes ( d L) for five different antidote topologies. Numerical tight-binding model is applied to obtain the band structure of the ribbons. Based on our results, it is found that the band gap of ASL-AGNRs can be increased or decreased in different cases. Furthermore, changing the width of ribbons generally results in more predictable␣band gap profiles compared to the variation of distance between antidotes. Consequently, by opting appropriate antidote topologies and dimensional parameters ( d W and d L), it is possible to gain a desired band gap size. This can be considered as an alternative solution in design of electronic and optoelectronic devices where tunable band gap values are needed.

  7. Non-equilibrium tuning of attractive colloidal gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2015-11-01

    In colloidal gel systems, the presence of multiple interactions in multiple length scales such as Van der Waals, depletion attractions, and electrostatic repulsions makes these systems challenging from both experimental and simulation aspects. Recently, there has been growing interest to tune and manipulate the structural and dynamics properties of those systems without adjusting interparticle interactions, just by taking them out of equilibrium. In this work, we used Core-Modified Dissipative Particle Dynamics (CM-DPD) with a modified depletion potential, as a coarse-grain model to address the gel formation process in short ranged-attractive colloidal suspensions for a range of volume fractions and attraction strengths. It is suggested that at high volume fractions and near the glass transition, there is a transformation from non-bonded glass to bonded-glass for which that the effect of topological frustration (caging) will be alleviated by the presence of attractive potentials (bonding) i.e. melting during cooling. In the first part of the presentation, we discuss our similar findings for semi-dilute volume fraction of attractive bimodal colloidal gels at equilibrium, which can be explained through local densification of attractive colloidal gels. In the second part, structural and dynamics properties of arrested gels will be studied under shear and after cessation of shear to study how the different flow profiles and history will alter final morphology of the gel systems.

  8. Small Commercial Building Re-tuning: A Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Underhill, Ronald M.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2013-09-30

    To help building owners and managers address issues related to energy-efficient operation of small buildings, DOE has developed a Small Building Re-tuning training curriculum. This "primer" provides additional background information to understand some of the concepts presented in the Small Building Re-tuning training. The intent is that those who are less familiar with the buidling energy concepts will review this material before taking the building re-tuning training class.

  9. Heading Tuning in Macaque Area V6

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Reuben H.; Liu, Sheng; DeAngelis, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical areas, such as the dorsal subdivision of the medial superior temporal area (MSTd) and the ventral intraparietal area (VIP), have been shown to integrate visual and vestibular self-motion signals. Area V6 is interconnected with areas MSTd and VIP, allowing for the possibility that V6 also integrates visual and vestibular self-motion cues. An alternative hypothesis in the literature is that V6 does not use these sensory signals to compute heading but instead discounts self-motion signals to represent object motion. However, the responses of V6 neurons to visual and vestibular self-motion cues have never been studied, thus leaving the functional roles of V6 unclear. We used a virtual reality system to examine the 3D heading tuning of macaque V6 neurons in response to optic flow and inertial motion stimuli. We found that the majority of V6 neurons are selective for heading defined by optic flow. However, unlike areas MSTd and VIP, V6 neurons are almost universally unresponsive to inertial motion in the absence of optic flow. We also explored the spatial reference frames of heading signals in V6 by measuring heading tuning for different eye positions, and we found that the visual heading tuning of most V6 cells was eye-centered. Similar to areas MSTd and VIP, the population of V6 neurons was best able to discriminate small variations in heading around forward and backward headings. Our findings support the idea that V6 is involved primarily in processing visual motion signals and does not appear to play a role in visual–vestibular integration for self-motion perception. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To understand how we successfully navigate our world, it is important to understand which parts of the brain process cues used to perceive our direction of self-motion (i.e., heading). Cortical area V6 has been implicated in heading computations based on human neuroimaging data, but direct measurements of heading selectivity in individual V6 neurons have been lacking. We

  10. Bandwidth and threshold calculations for angle-tuned parametric oscillators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, R.; Steier, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The bandwidth of angle-tuned optical parametric oscillators, in some cases, is limited by the noncolinear interaction of the pump, signal, and idler beams, which results when the nonlinear material is rotated relative to the pump beam. To determine this bandwidth, a theoretical expression for the pump power threshold is derived in the near field limit taking into account double refraction for a noncolinear interaction. Angle tuning can be done by (1) rotating the crystal and mirrors as a unit, or by (2) rotating the crystal only. Expressions for determining the tuning rate and threshold increase for both tuning methods are derived.

  11. Giant Bragg Wavelength Tuning of Tunable Hollow Waveguide Bragg Reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yasuki; Matsutani, Akihiro; Sakaguchi, Takahiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate a giant Bragg wavelength tuning with a grating loaded hollow waveguide Bragg reflector. An air-core thickness change of a hollow waveguide enables us to achieve a large propagation constant change over few tens percent, which would be useful for various tunable optical devices. Our observed Bragg-wavelength tuning range is over 160 nm at an air-core thickness change from 10.7 to 1.8 μm, which corresponds to a propagation constant change of over 10%. This is the record large tuning value ever reported in conventional tuning schemes such as thermo-optic or electro-optic effects.

  12. ADVANCES TOWARDS THE MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL LHC TUNE AND CHROMATICITY

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, P.; CUPOLO, J.; DEGEN, C.; DELLAPENNA, A.; HOFF, L.; MEAD, J.; SIKORA, R.

    2005-06-06

    Requirements for tune and chromaticity control in most superconducting hadron machines, and in particular the LHC, are stringent. In order to reach nominal operation, the LHC will almost certainly require feedback on both tune and chromaticity. Experience at RHIC has also shown that coupling control is crucial to successful tune feedback. A prototype baseband phase-locked loop (PLL) tune measurement system has recently been brought into operation at RHIC as part of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). We report on the performance of that system and compare it with the extensive accumulation of data from the RHIC 245MHz PLL.

  13. Automatic Tuning of AN Aculight Optical Parametric Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, A. M.; Liang, T.; Douberly, G. E.

    2011-06-01

    We have automated the tuning of a continuous wave, singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (Lockheed-Martin Aculight ARGOS 2400-SF-15). This OPO is capable of producing >1 Watt of continuously tunable idler output between 2.3 and 3.9 μm. We will discuss a simple algorithm and its implementation that synchronizes the tuning of three separate OPO tuning elements, which allows for several hundred wavenumbers of efficient, automatic, continuous tuning. Continuous feedback from a wavemeter (Bristol Instruments 621A) limits the frequency resolution to ˜10 MHz.

  14. A Numerical Optimization Approach for Tuning Fuzzy Logic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Garg, Devendra P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a method to tune fuzzy controllers using numerical optimization. The main attribute of this approach is that it allows fuzzy logic controllers to be tuned to achieve global performance requirements. Furthermore, this approach allows design constraints to be implemented during the tuning process. The method tunes the controller by parameterizing the membership functions for error, change-in-error and control output. The resulting parameters form a design vector which is iteratively changed to minimize an objective function. The minimal objective function results in an optimal performance of the system. A spacecraft mounted science instrument line-of-sight pointing control is used to demonstrate results.

  15. Wireless tuning fork gyroscope for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Sarukesi, K.

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a Bluetooth enabled wireless tuning fork gyroscope for the biomedical applications, including gait phase detection system, human motion analysis and physical therapy. This gyroscope is capable of measuring rotation rates between -90 and 90 and it can read the rotation information using a computer. Currently, the information from a gyroscope can trigger automobile airbag deployment during rollover, improve the accuracy and reliability of GPS navigation systems and stabilize moving platforms such as automobiles, airplanes, robots, antennas, and industrial equipment. Adding wireless capability to the existing gyroscope could help to expand its applications in many areas particularly in biomedical applications, where a continuous patient monitoring is quite difficult. This wireless system provides information on several aspects of activities of patients for real-time monitoring in hospitals.

  16. Tuning energy relaxation along quantum Hall channels.

    PubMed

    Altimiras, C; le Sueur, H; Gennser, U; Cavanna, A; Mailly, D; Pierre, F

    2010-11-26

    The chiral edge channels in the quantum Hall regime are considered ideal ballistic quantum channels, and have quantum information processing potentialities. Here, we demonstrate experimentally, at a filling factor of ν(L)=2, the efficient tuning of the energy relaxation that limits quantum coherence and permits the return toward equilibrium. Energy relaxation along an edge channel is controllably enhanced by increasing its transmission toward a floating Ohmic contact, in quantitative agreement with predictions. Moreover, by forming a closed inner edge channel loop, we freeze energy exchanges in the outer channel. This result also elucidates the inelastic mechanisms at work at ν(L)=2, informing us, in particular, that those within the outer edge channel are negligible.

  17. Tuning quantum properties in bilayer ruthenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xianglin

    The mutual coupling among spin, charge, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom in transition-metal oxide materials often leads to the competition of various types of energetic states. This makes such materials dramatically susceptible to external parameters, giving rise to novel physical properties and rich phase diagrams. In this talk, I shall use a bilayer ruthenate, Ca3Ru2O7, as an example to discuss the emergent phenomena achieved by systematically tuning materials magnetic and electronic properties via chemical doping, magnetic field, and pressure. I shall show that this system provides a rare opportunity to investigate the interplay between correlated metal and Mott insulator. This work was done in collaboration with M. Zhu, T. Tao, S. D. Mahanti, Z. Q. Mao, J. Peng, T. Hong, W. Tian, H. Cao, C. R. dela Cruz, D. Singh, and K. Prokes.

  18. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  19. Interphase tuning for stronger and tougher composites

    PubMed Central

    Livanov, Konstantin; Yang, Lin; Nissenbaum, Asaf; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The development of composite materials that are simultaneously strong and tough is one of the most active topics of current material science. Observations of biological structural materials show that adequate introduction of reinforcements and interfaces, or interphases, at different scales usually improves toughness, without reduction in strength. The prospect of interphase properties tuning may lead to further increases in material toughness. Here we use evaporation-driven self-assembly (EDSA) to deposit a thin network of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on ceramic surfaces, thereby generating an interphase reinforcing layer in a multiscale laminated ceramic composite. Both strength and toughness are improved by up to 90%, while keeping the overall volume fraction of nanotubes in a composite below 0.012%, making it a most effective toughening and reinforcement technique. PMID:27230418

  20. Nonsingular multidimensional cosmologies without fine tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, Kirill A.; Fabris, Julio C.

    2002-09-01

    Exact cosmological solutions for effective actions in D dimensions inspired by the tree-level superstring action are studied. For a certain range of free parameters existing in the model, nonsingular bouncing solutions are found. Among them, of particular interest can be open hyperbolic models, in which, without any fine tuning, the internal scale factor and the dilaton field (connected with string coupling in string theories) tend to constant values at late times. A cosmological singularity is avoided due to nonminimal dilaton-gravity coupling and, for D>11, due to pure imaginary nature of the dilaton, which conforms to currently discussed unification models. The existence of such and similar solutions supports the opinion that the Universe had never undergone a stage driven by full-scale quantum gravity.

  1. Tuning the Catalytic Activity of Subcellular Nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Jakobson, Christopher M; Chen, Yiqun; Slininger, Marilyn F; Valdivia, Elias; Kim, Edward Y; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-07-31

    Bacterial microcompartments are naturally occurring subcellular organelles of bacteria and serve as a promising scaffold for the organization of heterologous biosynthetic pathways. A critical element in the design of custom biosynthetic organelles is quantitative control over the loading of heterologous enzymes to the interior of the organelles. We demonstrate that the loading of heterologous proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization microcompartment of Salmonella enterica can be controlled using two strategies: by modulating the transcriptional activation of the microcompartment container and by coordinating the expression of the microcompartment container and the heterologous cargo. These strategies allow general control over the loading of heterologous proteins localized by two different N-terminal targeting peptides and represent an important step toward tuning the catalytic activity of bacterial microcompartments for increased biosynthetic productivity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Climatology tuned reflectivity-rain rate relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Atlas, David

    1989-01-01

    The climatologically-tuned relationships between reflectivity, Z, and rain rate, R, are examined. A method is presented which selects the Z-R relation that assures that the values of R are weighted according to their climatological frequency of occurrence. The method is an extension of the approach suggested by Calheiros and Zawadski (1987). Also, consideration is given to the method of optimizing Z-R relations by matching hourly gage and radar-deduced rain amounts proposed by Smith et al. (1975). These two methods are described and applied to data from Germany and from the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment. The differences in the Z-R relations obtained using the two approaches are discussed.

  3. Dynamic range tuning of graphene nanoresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Marsha M.; Gangavarapu, P. R. Yasasvi; Naik, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    From sensing perspective, smaller electromechanical devices, in general, are expected to be more responsive to the stimuli. This enhanced performance, however, is contingent upon the noise sources remaining unchanged and the onset of nonlinear behavior not being precipitated by miniaturization. In this paper, we study the effect of strain on the nonlinearities and dynamic range in graphene nanoresonators. The dynamic response and the onset of nonlinearity in these devices are sensitive both to the electrostatic field used to actuate the device and the strain. By tuning the strain of the device by two orders of magnitude, we observe an enhancement of 25 dB in the dynamic range leading to a mass resolution of 100 yoctogram. The increase in dynamic range in our devices is modeled as a combined effect of strain and partial cancellation of elastic and electrostatic nonlinearities.

  4. Tuning of superconducting niobium nitride terahertz metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingbo; Jin, Biaobing; Xue, Yuhua; Zhang, Caihong; Dai, Hao; Zhang, Labao; Cao, Chunhai; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2011-06-20

    Superconducting planar terahertz (THz) metamaterials (MMs), with unit cells of different sizes, are fabricated on 200 nm-thick niobium nitride (NbN) films deposited on MgO substrates. They are characterized using THz time domain spectroscopy over a temperature range from 8.1 K to 300 K, crossing the critical temperature of NbN films. As the gap frequency (f(g) = 2Δ0/h, where Δ0 is the energy gap at 0 K and h is the Plank constant) of NbN is 1.18 THz, the experimentally observed THz spectra span a frequency range from below f(g) to above it. We have found that, as the resonance frequency approaches f(g), the relative tuning range of MMs is quite wide (30%). We attribute this observation to the large change of kinetic inductance of superconducting film.

  5. Climatology tuned reflectivity-rain rate relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Atlas, David

    1989-01-01

    The climatologically-tuned relationships between reflectivity, Z, and rain rate, R, are examined. A method is presented which selects the Z-R relation that assures that the values of R are weighted according to their climatological frequency of occurrence. The method is an extension of the approach suggested by Calheiros and Zawadski (1987). Also, consideration is given to the method of optimizing Z-R relations by matching hourly gage and radar-deduced rain amounts proposed by Smith et al. (1975). These two methods are described and applied to data from Germany and from the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment. The differences in the Z-R relations obtained using the two approaches are discussed.

  6. Optical tuning of electronic valleys (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sie, Edbert J.; Gedik, Nuh

    2017-02-01

    Monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides such as MoS2 and WS2 are prime examples of atomically thin semiconducting crystals that exhibit remarkable electronic and optical properties. They have a pair of valleys that can serve as a new electronic degree of freedom, and these valleys obey optical selection rules with circularly polarized light. Here, we discuss how ultrafast laser pulses can be used to tune their energy levels in a controllable valley-selective manner. The energy tunability is extremely large, comparable to what would be obtained using a hundred Tesla of magnetic field. We will also show that such valley tunability can be performed while we effectively manipulate the valley selection rules. Finally, we will explore the prospect of using this technique through photoemission spectroscopy to create a new phase of matter called a valley Floquet topological insulator.

  7. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed. PMID:27630768

  8. A cyclic universe approach to fine tuning

    DOE PAGES

    Alexander, Stephon; Cormack, Sam; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2016-04-05

    We present a closed bouncing universe model where the value of coupling constants is set by the dynamics of a ghost-like dilatonic scalar field. We show that adding a periodic potential for the scalar field leads to a cyclic Friedmann universe where the values of the couplings vary randomly from one cycle to the next. While the shuffling of values for the couplings happens during the bounce, within each cycle their time-dependence remains safely within present observational bounds for physically-motivated values of the model parameters. Our model presents an alternative to solutions of the fine tuning problem based on stringmore » landscape scenarios. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Funded by SCOAP(3).« less

  9. Bandgap tuning of multiferroic oxide solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechache, R.; Harnagea, C.; Li, S.; Cardenas, L.; Huang, W.; Chakrabartty, J.; Rosei, F.

    2015-01-01

    Multiferroic films are increasingly being studied for applications in solar energy conversion because of their efficient ferroelectric polarization-driven carrier separation and above-bandgap generated photovoltages, which in principle can lead to energy conversion efficiencies beyond the maximum value (˜34%) reported in traditional silicon-based bipolar heterojunction solar cells. However, the efficiency reported so far is still too low (<2%) to be considered for commercialization. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to effectively tune the bandgap of double perovskite multiferroic oxides by engineering the cationic ordering for the case of Bi2FeCrO6. Using this approach, we report a power conversion efficiency of 8.1% under AM 1.5 G irradiation (100 mW cm-2) for Bi2FeCrO6 thin-film solar cells in a multilayer configuration.

  10. Performance Optimization and Auto-Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark

    2012-10-01

    In the broader computational research community, one subject of recent research is the problem of adapting algorithms to make effective use of multi- and many-core processors. Effective use of these architectures, which have complex memory hierarchies with many layers of cache, typically involves a careful examination of how an algorithm moves data through the memory hierarchy. Unfortunately, there is often a non-obvious relationship between algorithmic parameters like blocking strategies, and their impact on memory utilization, and, in turn, the relationship with runtime performance. Auto-tuning is an empirical method used to discover optimal values for tunable algorithmic parameters under such circumstances. The challenge is compounded by the fact that the settings that produce the best performance for a given problem and a given platform may not be the best for a different problem on the same platform, or the same problem on a different platform. The high performance visualization research community has begun to explore and adapt the principles of auto-tuning for the purpose of optimizing codes on modern multi- and many-core processors. This report focuses on how performance optimization studies reveal a dramatic variation in performance for two fundamental visualization algorithms: one based on a stencil operation having structured, uniform memory access, and the other is ray casting volume rendering, which uses unstructured memory access patterns. The two case studies highlighted in this report show the extra effort required to optimize such codes by adjusting the tunable algorithmic parameters can return substantial gains in performance. Additionally, these case studies also explore the potential impact of and the interaction between algorithmic optimizations and tunable algorithmic parameters, along with the potential performance gains resulting from leveraging architecture-specific features.

  11. Frequency tuning in the electroreceptive periphery.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, E S; Smullin, L D

    1989-01-01

    Our studies are concerned with the frequency tuning that is provided by the electrical resonance of tuberous electroreceptors. Frequency selectivity had previously been measured in the electroreceptor's afferent fibers, and resonant conductances in the electroreceptor cell membrane had been implicated in producing the selectivity. With transdermal application of sinusoidal current, we measured the frequency dependence of the impedance of small areas of the electroreceptor/skin structure of the weakly electric fish Sternopygus and Eigenmannia, and used our data to make a quantitative linear model of the structure. The qualitative form of the model was proposed by Bennett (1). The quantitative model allows us to estimate the frequency selectivity of the voltage across the innervated membrane of the electroreceptor cells. The frequency selectivity of electroreceptor cell voltage derived from our data are as sharp as the neural selectivity at frequencies close to the most sensitive frequency. Many of our measurements supported the linear system model. However, spontaneous electroreceptor voltage oscillations were detected in some of our specimens, suggesting that the electroreceptors can operate in a regime of active nonlinearity. A simple explanation for the observed oscillations is that they arise when damping in the electroreceptor cell's resonant membrane is negative for a limited span of membrane voltage surrounding the resting voltage. The response of oscillating units to sinusoidal current was compatible with this explanation. We report experimental observations bearing on the consequences of active nonlinearity for the frequency tuning of a resonant system. Images FIGURE 11 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 PMID:2765655

  12. Continuous Tuning and Calibration of Vibratory Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayworth, Ken

    2003-01-01

    A method of control and operation of an inertial reference unit (IRU) based on vibratory gyroscopes provides for continuously repeated cycles of tuning and calibration. The method is intended especially for application to an IRU containing vibratory gyroscopes that are integral parts of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and that have cloverleaf designs, as described in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The method provides for minimization of several measures of spurious gyroscope output, including zero-rate offset (ZRO), angle random walk (ARW), and rate drift. These benefits are afforded both at startup and thereafter during continuing operation, in the presence of unknown rotation rates and changes in temperature. A vibratory gyroscope contains a precision mechanically resonant structure containing two normal modes of vibration nominally degenerate in frequency and strongly coupled via a Coriolis term. In the case of the cloverleaf design MEMS gyro, these normal modes of vibration are plate rocking modes. The rocking motion of the plate is described by giving two angles, theta(sub 1) and theta(sub 2). A proof mass consisting of a post orthogonal to the plate ensures a high degree of Coriolis coupling of vibratory energy from one mode into the other under inertial rotation. The plate is driven and sensed capacitively across a few-microns-wide gap, and the normal mode frequencies can be tuned electrostatically by DC voltages applied across this gap. In order to sense rotation, the resonator plate is caused to rock in the theta(sub 1) direction, then any small motions in the theta(sub 2) direction are sensed, rebalanced, and interpreted as inertial rotation. In this scenario, the "drive" has been assigned to the theta(sub 1) direction, and the "sense" has been assigned to the theta(sub 2) direction.

  13. A NARX damper model for virtual tuning of automotive suspension systems with high-frequency loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghafir, M. N.; Dunne, J. F.

    2012-02-01

    A computationally efficient NARX-type neural network model is developed to characterise highly nonlinear frequency-dependent thermally sensitive hydraulic dampers for use in the virtual tuning of passive suspension systems with high-frequency loading. Three input variables are chosen to account for high-frequency kinematics and temperature variations arising from continuous vehicle operation over non-smooth surfaces such as stone-covered streets, rough or off-road conditions. Two additional input variables are chosen to represent tuneable valve parameters. To assist in the development of the NARX model, a highly accurate but computationally excessive physical damper model [originally proposed by S. Duym and K. Reybrouck, Physical characterization of non-linear shock absorber dynamics, Eur. J. Mech. Eng. M 43(4) (1998), pp. 181-188] is extended to allow for high-frequency input kinematics. Experimental verification of this extended version uses measured damper data obtained from an industrial damper test machine under near-isothermal conditions for fixed valve settings, with input kinematics corresponding to harmonic and random road profiles. The extended model is then used only for simulating data for training and testing the NARX model with specified temperature profiles and different valve parameters, both in isolation and within quarter-car vehicle simulations. A heat generation and dissipation model is also developed and experimentally verified for use within the simulations. Virtual tuning using the quarter-car simulation model then exploits the NARX damper to achieve a compromise between ride and handling under transient thermal conditions with harmonic and random road profiles. For quarter-car simulations, the paper shows that a single tuneable NARX damper makes virtual tuning computationally very attractive.

  14. Phase lock acquisition system having FLL for coarse tuning and PLL for fine tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, S. P.; Decker, M. J.; Jelen, R. A.

    1986-04-01

    The acquisition of phase lock to a reference frequency by a signal acquisition system is accomplished using a voltage controlled oscillator, a wideband frequency discriminator, a prepositioning circuit, and a phase lock loop. The voltage controlled oscillator is prepositioned within a loop bandwidth of the reference frequency by the prepositioning circuit and the wide band frequency discriminator which provide coarse tuning. The voltage controlled oscillator achieves phase lock with the reference frequency when it receives the fine tune signal from the phase lock loop. Using both the discriminator and the phase lock loop allows fast acquisition without the need to calibrate the voltage controlled oscillator. Since the discriminator pull-in range is much larger than the phase-lock loop bandwidth, the number of bits can be much smaller than in acquisition circuit using a digital prepositioning circuit alone.

  15. Tuning third harmonic generation of impurity doped quantum dots in the presence of Gaussian white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Surajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-03-01

    We perform a broad exploration of profiles of third harmonic generation (THG) susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in the presence and absence of noise. We have invoked Gaussian white noise in the present study. A Gaussian impurity has been introduced into the QD. Noise has been applied to the system additively and multiplicatively. A perpendicular magnetic field emerges out as a confinement source and a static external electric field has been applied. The THG profiles have been pursued as a function of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, Al concentration, dopant potential, relaxation time and noise strength assume different values. Moreover, the role of the pathway through which noise is applied (additive/multiplicative) on the THG profiles has also been deciphered. The THG profiles are found to be decorated with interesting observations such as shift of THG peak position and maximization/minimization of THG peak intensity. Presence of noise alters the characteristics of THG profiles and sometimes enhances the THG peak intensity. Furthermore, the mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) also regulates the THG profiles in a few occasions in contrasting manners. The observations highlight the possible scope of tuning the THG coefficient of doped QD systems in the presence of noise and bears tremendous technological importance.

  16. Model-based auralizations of violin sound trends accompanying plate-bridge tuning or holding.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George; Mores, Robert

    2015-04-01

    To expose systematic trends in violin sound accompanying "tuning" only the plates or only the bridge, the first structural acoustics-based model auralizations of violin sound were created by passing a bowed-string driving force measured at the bridge of a solid body violin through the dynamic filter (DF) model radiativity profile "filter" RDF(f) (frequency-dependent pressure per unit driving force, free-free suspension, anechoic chamber). DF model auralizations for the more realistic case of a violin held/played in a reverberant auditorium reveal that holding the violin greatly diminishes its low frequency response, an effect only weakly compensated for by auditorium reverberation.

  17. Interactive beam tuning simulator for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.T.; Kozanecki, W.; Lohse, T.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1989-03-01

    An interface to the DIMAD beam optics computer program enables the operator to perform in simulation the sequence of magnet adjustments that would be used online for tuning the Stanford Linear Collider Final Focus System. The program accepts any input beam matrix from a disk file and presents a menu of magnet adjustments and scan and display options. The results of a ray trace calculation are presented as profiles or envelope plots on the graphics screen. We give results from studies of the optimization of the beam under various input conditions. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  18. PSO algorithm enhanced with Lozi Chaotic Map - Tuning experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pluhacek, Michal; Senkerik, Roman; Zelinka, Ivan

    2015-03-10

    In this paper it is investigated the effect of tuning of control parameters of the Lozi Chaotic Map employed as a chaotic pseudo-random number generator for the particle swarm optimization algorithm. Three different benchmark functions are selected from the IEEE CEC 2013 competition benchmark set. The Lozi map is extensively tuned and the performance of PSO is evaluated.

  19. Dynamic tuning of chemiresistor sensitivity using mechanical strain

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E; Read, Douglas H

    2014-09-30

    The sensitivity of a chemiresistor sensor can be dynamically tuned using mechanical strain. The increase in sensitivity is a smooth, continuous function of the applied strain, and the effect can be reversible. Sensitivity tuning enables the response curve of the sensor to be dynamically optimized for sensing analytes, such as volatile organic compounds, over a wide concentration range.

  20. Grid cell spatial tuning reduced following systemic muscarinic receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Ehren L.; Climer, Jason R.; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Grid cells of the medial entorhinal cortex exhibit a periodic and stable pattern of spatial tuning that may reflect the output of a path integration system. This grid pattern has been hypothesized to serve as a spatial coordinate system for navigation and memory function. The mechanisms underlying the generation of this characteristic tuning pattern remain poorly understood. Systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine flattens the typically positive correlation between running speed and entorhinal theta frequency in rats. The loss of this neural correlate of velocity, an important signal for the calculation of path integration, raises the question of what influence scopolamine has on the grid cell tuning as a read out of the path integration system. To test this, the spatial tuning properties of grid cells were compared before and after systemic administration of scopolamine as rats completed laps on a circle track for food rewards. The results show that the spatial tuning of the grid cells was reduced following scopolamine administration. The tuning of head direction cells, in contrast, was not reduced by scopolamine. This is the first report to demonstrate a link between cholinergic function and grid cell tuning. This work suggests that the loss of tuning in the grid cell network may underlie the navigational disorientation observed in Alzheimer's patients and elderly individuals with reduced cholinergic tone. PMID:24493379

  1. New Directions for IR, the DQP, and Tuning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Marshall, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This concluding essay provides a glimpse to the future and alerts IR professionals to related initiatives as well as provides an update to ongoing work with DQP and Tuning. Pulling from the prior chapters it provides some implications for IR offices to consider, not only in their work with the DQP and Tuning, but in terms of general decision…

  2. Tune shifts due to systematic errors in bend magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.

    1983-12-01

    The presence of systematic error multipoles in bend magnets, persistent currents at low magnet excitation, and saturation effects at high magnet excitation may all lead to tune shifts which could prove detrimental to the operation of the SSC. It is the purpose of this note to report estimates of the magnitude of these tune shifts and the corrector strengths required to circumvent them.

  3. Tuning Engineering Education into the European Higher Education Orchestra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maffioli, Francesco; Augusti, Giuliano

    2003-01-01

    The 'Bologna Process' promotes fundamental changes throughout European higher education. The EC 'Tuning' project was set up to investigate the feasibility of this process. Summarizes the final report of the Engineering Synergy Group which examined the 'tuning' of engineering education (EE), taking advantage of the work of previous and current…

  4. Local tuning of photonic crystal cavities using chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraon, Andrei; Englund, Dirk; Bulla, Douglas; Luther-Davies, Barry; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Stoltz, Nick; Petroff, Pierre; Vučković, Jelena

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to locally change the refractive index in planar optical devices by photodarkening of a thin chalcogenide glass layer deposited on top of the device. The method is used to tune the resonance of GaAs-based photonic crystal cavities by up to 3nm at 940nm. The method has broad applications for postproduction tuning of photonic devices.

  5. New Directions for IR, the DQP, and Tuning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Marshall, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This concluding essay provides a glimpse to the future and alerts IR professionals to related initiatives as well as provides an update to ongoing work with DQP and Tuning. Pulling from the prior chapters it provides some implications for IR offices to consider, not only in their work with the DQP and Tuning, but in terms of general decision…

  6. Single-gene tuning of Caulobacter cell cycle period and noise, swarming motility, and surface adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Crosson, Sean; Scherer, Norbert F

    2010-01-01

    Sensor histidine kinases underlie the regulation of a range of physiological processes in bacterial cells, from chemotaxis to cell division. In the gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the membrane-bound histidine kinase, DivJ, is a polar-localized regulator of cell cycle progression and development. We show that DivJ localizes to the cell pole through a dynamic diffusion and capture mechanism rather than by active localization. Analysis of single C. crescentus cells in microfluidic culture demonstrates that controlled expression of divJ permits facile tuning of both the mean and noise of the cell division period. Simulations of the cell cycle that use a simplified protein interaction network capture previously measured oscillatory protein profiles, and recapitulate the experimental observation that deletion of divJ increases the cell cycle period and noise. We further demonstrate that surface adhesion and swarming motility of C. crescentus in semi-solid media can also be tuned by divJ expression. We propose a model in which pleiotropic control of polar cell development by the DivJ–DivK–PleC signaling pathway underlies divJ-dependent tuning of cell swarming and adhesion behaviors. PMID:21179017

  7. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning

    PubMed Central

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  8. Frequency tuning of synaptic inhibition underlying duration-tuned neurons in the mammalian inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Valdizón-Rodríguez, Roberto; Faure, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    Inhibition plays an important role in creating the temporal response properties of duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) in the mammalian inferior colliculus (IC). Neurophysiological and computational studies indicate that duration selectivity in the IC is created through the convergence of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs offset in time. We used paired-tone stimulation and extracellular recording to measure the frequency tuning of the inhibition acting on DTNs in the IC of the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus). We stimulated DTNs with pairs of tones differing in duration, onset time, and frequency. The onset time of a short, best-duration (BD), probe tone set to the best excitatory frequency (BEF) was varied relative to the onset of a longer-duration, nonexcitatory (NE) tone whose frequency was varied. When the NE tone frequency was near or within the cell's excitatory bandwidth (eBW), BD tone-evoked spikes were suppressed by an onset-evoked inhibition. The onset of the spike suppression was independent of stimulus frequency, but both the offset and duration of the suppression decreased as the NE tone frequency departed from the BEF. We measured the inhibitory frequency response area, best inhibitory frequency (BIF), and inhibitory bandwidth (iBW) of each cell. We found that the BIF closely matched the BEF, but the iBW was broader and usually overlapped the eBW measured from the same cell. These data suggest that temporal selectivity of midbrain DTNs is created and preserved by having cells receive an onset-evoked, constant-latency, broadband inhibition that largely overlaps the cell's excitatory receptive field. We conclude by discussing possible neural sources of the inhibition.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) arise from temporally offset excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. We used single-unit recording and paired-tone stimulation to measure the spectral tuning of the inhibitory inputs to DTNs. The onset of inhibition was independent of

  9. A Generalized Framework for Auto-tuning Stencil Computations

    SciTech Connect

    Kamil, Shoaib; Chan, Cy; Williams, Samuel; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Prabhat,

    2009-05-01

    This work introduces a generalized framework for automatically tuning stencil computations to achieve superior performance on a broad range of multicore architectures. Stencil (nearest-neighbor) based kernels constitute the core of many important scientific applications involving block-structured grids. Auto-tuning systems search over optimization strategies to find the combination of tunable parameters that maximizes computational efficiency for a given algorithmic kernel. Although the auto-tuning strategy has been successfully applied to libraries, generalized stencil kernels are not amenable to packaging as libraries. Studied kernels in this work include both memory-bound kernels as well as a computation-bound bilateral filtering kernel. We introduce a generalized stencil auto-tuning framework that takes a straightforward Fortran expression of a stencil kernel and automatically generates tuned implementations of the kernel in C or Fortran to achieve performance portability across diverse computer architectures.

  10. Otoacoustic Estimates of Cochlear Tuning: Testing Predictions in Macaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.; Bergevin, Christopher; Kalluri, Radha; Mc Laughlin, Myles; Michelet, Pascal; van der Heijden, Marcel; Joris, Philip X.

    2011-11-01

    Otoacoustic estimates of cochlear frequency selectivity suggest substantially sharper tuning in humans. However, the logic and methodology underlying these estimates remain untested by direct measurements in primates. We report measurements of frequency tuning in macaque monkeys, Old-World primates phylogenetically closer to humans than the small laboratory animals often taken as models of human hearing (e.g., cats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas). We find that measurements of tuning obtained directly from individual nerve fibers and indirectly using otoacoustic emissions both indicate that peripheral frequency selectivity in macaques is significantly sharper than in small laboratory animals, matching that inferred for humans at high frequencies. Our results validate the use of otoacoustic emissions for noninvasive measurement of cochlear tuning and corroborate the finding of sharper tuning in humans.

  11. Compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Wang, G.

    2015-05-03

    The effects of space charge play a significant role in modern-day accelerators, frequently constraining the beam parameters attainable in an accelerator or in an accelerator chain. They also can limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with sub-TeV high-brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Using an appropriate electron beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam in a coasting beam. But these methods cannot compensate space charge tune spread in a bunched hadron beam. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with mismatched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread.

  12. Vibration absorbers for chatter suppression: A new analytical tuning methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Neil D.

    2007-04-01

    Vibration absorbers have been widely used to suppress undesirable vibrations in machining operations, with a particular emphasis on avoiding chatter. However, it is well known that for vibration absorbers to function effectively their stiffness and damping must be accurately tuned based upon the natural frequency of the vibrating structure. For general vibration problems, suitable tuning strategies were developed by Den Hartog and Brock over 50 years ago. However, the special nature of the chatter stability problem means that this classical tuning methodology is no longer optimal. Consequently, vibration absorbers for chatter mitigation have generally been tuned using ad hoc methods, or numerical or graphical approaches. The present article introduces a new analytical solution to this problem, and demonstrates its performance using time domain milling simulations. A 40-50% improvement in the critical limiting depth of cut is observed, compared to the classically tuned vibration absorber.

  13. Tuning the beam: a physics perspective on beam diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gulley, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    In a nutshell, the role of a beam diagnostic measurement is to provide information needed to get a particle beam from Point A (injection point) to Point B (a target) in a useable condition, with 'useable' meaning the right energy and size and with acceptable losses. Specifications and performance requirements of diagnostics are based on the physics of the particle beam to be measured, with typical customers of beam parameter measurements being the accelerator operators and accelerator physicists. This tutorial will be a physics-oriented discussion of the interplay between tuning evolutions and the beam diagnostics systems that support the machine tune. This will include the differences between developing a tune and maintaining a tune, among other things. Practical longitudinal and transverse tuning issues and techniques from a variety of proton and electron machines will also be discussed.

  14. Tuning of a neuro-fuzzy controller by genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Seng, T L; Bin Khalid, M; Yusof, R

    1999-01-01

    Due to their powerful optimization property, genetic algorithms (GAs) are currently being investigated for the development of adaptive or self-tuning fuzzy logic control systems. This paper presents a neuro-fuzzy logic controller (NFLC) where all of its parameters can be tuned simultaneously by GA. The structure of the controller is based on the radial basis function neural network (RBF) with Gaussian membership functions. The NFLC tuned by GA can somewhat eliminate laborious design steps such as manual tuning of the membership functions and selection of the fuzzy rules. The GA implementation incorporates dynamic crossover and mutation probabilistic rates for faster convergence. A flexible position coding strategy of the NFLC parameters is also implemented to obtain near optimal solutions. The performance of the proposed controller is compared with a conventional fuzzy controller and a PID controller tuned by GA. Simulation results show that the proposed controller offers encouraging advantages and has better performance.

  15. Active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase tuning

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo O.; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Impedance metasurface is composed of electrical small scatters in two dimensional plane, of which the surface impedance can be designed to produce desired reflection phase. Tunable reflection phase can be achieved by incorporating active element into the scatters, but the tuning range of the reflection phase is limited. In this paper, an active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase control is presented to remove the phase tuning deficiency in conventional approach. The unit cell of the metasurface is a multiple resonance structure with two resonance poles and one resonance zero, capable of providing 360° reflection phase variation and active tuning within a finite frequency band. Linear reflection phase tuning can also be obtained. Theoretical analysis and simulation are presented and validated by experiment at microwave frequency. The proposed approach can be applied to many cases where fine and full phase tuning is needed, such as beam steering in reflectarray antennas. PMID:24162366

  16. Collider constraints on tuning in composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, James; White, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Two potential sources of tuning exist in composite Higgs models: one comes from keeping the Higgs VEV below the compositeness scale and one comes from keeping the Higgs light after constraints on the top partner masses are applied. We construct a measure that determines whether these tunings are independent or not and combines them appropriately. We perform a comprehensive scan of the parameter space for three explicit models and report the minimum tuning values compatible with existing collider constraints. Tuning values are given as functions of resonance masses and deviations to the Higgs couplings so the effect of future constraints can easily be quantified. The current minimum tuning in the minimal model is 2.5-5% and will be decreased to around 0.8-3.3% if no top partners are observed over the lifetime of the LHC

  17. Tuning magnetism by Kondo effect and frustration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhneysen, Hilbert V.

    2014-03-01

    Heavy-fermion systems are an ideal playground for studying the quantum phase transition (QPT) between paramagnetic and magnetically ordered ground states arising from the competition between Kondo and RKKY interactions. Two different routes have been identified by various experiments, i. e., the more traditional spin-density-wave (SDW) and the Kondo-breakdown approaches. However, up to now an a-priori assignment of a given system to these different routes has not been possible. Yet another route to quantum criticality not included in the above approaches might be geometric frustration of magnetic moments, a route well known for insulating magnets with competing interactions. First experiments on metallic systems have recently been conducted. In the canonical partially frustrated antiferromagnetic system CePd1-xNixAl, the Néel temperature TN(x) decreases, with TN --> 0 at the critical concentration xc ~ 0.144. The low-temperature specific heat C(T) evolves toward C/ Tα ln(T0/ T) for x -->xc. The unusual T dependence of C/ T is compatible with the Hertz-Millis-Moriya (HMM) scenario of quantum criticality if the quantum-critical fluctuations are two-dimensional in nature. Here two-dimensionality might arise from antiferromagnetic planes that are effectively decoupled by the frustrated Ce atoms in between. An exciting possibility is that the planes of frustrated Ce moments form a two-dimensional spin liquid. In the prototypical heavy-fermion system CeCu6-xAux the experiments by Schröder et al. provided the initial evidence of local quantum criticality. While concentration and pressure tuning of the quantum phase transition (QPT) are described by this scenario, magnetic-field tuning the QPT is in line with the SDW scenario. Elastic neutron scattering experiments on CeCu5.5Au0.5 under hydrostatic pressure p show that at p = 8 kbar, TN and the magnetic propagation vector attain almost the values of CeCu5.7Au0.3. This x - p analogy away from the QPT is highly remarkable

  18. Fine tuning of activity for nanoscale catalysts.

    SciTech Connect

    Strmcnik, D.; van derVliet, D.; Lucas, C.; Karapetrov, G.; Markovic, N.; Stamenkovic, V.; Materials Science Division

    2008-01-01

    Ability to tune the electronic and structural properties of nanocatalysts can potentially lead towards the superior catalytic enhancement that was reported for the Pt{sub 3}Ni(111)-skin surface. Here we report investigation of the extended well-defined surfaces of Pt and PtM alloys (M=Ni,Co,Fe,V,Ti,Re) as well as Pt(hkl) single crystalline surfaces for various catalytic reaction. The electrode surfaces were initially characterized in ultra-high vacuum by AES, LEIS and UPS before controlled transfer into electrochemical environment. Catalytic properties have been determined in three compartment electrochemical cell for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by rotational disk electrode technique. The single crystalline surfaces of Pt electrodes have been used to benchmark the activity range that could be expected on pure Pt electrodes. We have proposed that surface modifications induced by the second metal, and consequent catalytic enhancements could occur through the following effects: (1) Electronic effect, due to changes in the metallic d-band center position vs. Fermi level; and (2) Structural effect, which reflects relationship between atomic geometry, and/or surface chemistry, i.e., dissolution - surface roughening. It has been reported that Pt bimetallic alloys, could form surfaces with two different compositions. Due to surface segregation annealed surfaces can form the outermost Pt-skin surface layer, while the lightly sputtered surfaces have the bulk ratio of alloying components and form Pt-skeleton outermost layers as a result of dissolution of non-precious atoms. In principle, different near-surface compositions (Pt-skin, Pt-skeleton and polycrystalline Pt) have been found to have different electronic structures. Modification in Pt electronic properties alters adsorption/catalytic properties of corresponding materials. The most active systems for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are established to be the Pt-skin near-surface formation. The

  19. Simultaneous gains tuning in boiler/turbine PID-based controller clusters using iterative feedback tuning methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Taft, Cyrus W; Bentsman, Joseph; Hussey, Aaron; Petrus, Bryan

    2012-09-01

    Tuning a complex multi-loop PID based control system requires considerable experience. In today's power industry the number of available qualified tuners is dwindling and there is a great need for better tuning tools to maintain and improve the performance of complex multivariable processes. Multi-loop PID tuning is the procedure for the online tuning of a cluster of PID controllers operating in a closed loop with a multivariable process. This paper presents the first application of the simultaneous tuning technique to the multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) PID based nonlinear controller in the power plant control context, with the closed-loop system consisting of a MIMO nonlinear boiler/turbine model and a nonlinear cluster of six PID-type controllers. Although simplified, the dynamics and cross-coupling of the process and the PID cluster are similar to those used in a real power plant. The particular technique selected, iterative feedback tuning (IFT), utilizes the linearized version of the PID cluster for signal conditioning, but the data collection and tuning is carried out on the full nonlinear closed-loop system. Based on the figure of merit for the control system performance, the IFT is shown to deliver performance favorably comparable to that attained through the empirical tuning carried out by an experienced control engineer.

  20. Distinct Evolutionary Patterns between Chemoreceptors of 2 Vertebrate Olfactory Systems and the Differential Tuning Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Grus, Wendy E.

    2008-01-01

    Most tetrapod vertebrates have 2 olfactory systems, the main olfactory system (MOS) and the vomeronasal system (VNS). According to the dual olfactory hypothesis, the MOS detects environmental odorants, whereas the VNS recognizes intraspecific pheromonal cues. However, this strict functional distinction has been blurred by recent reports that both systems can perceive both types of signals. Studies of a limited number of receptors suggest that MOS receptors are broadly tuned generalists, whereas VNS receptors are narrowly tuned specialists. However, whether this distinction applies to all MOS and VNS receptors remains unknown. The differential tuning hypothesis predicts that generalist MOS receptors detect an overlapping set of ligands and thus are more likely to be conserved over evolutionary time than specialist VNS receptors, which would evolve in a more lineage-specific manner. Here we test this prediction for all olfactory chemoreceptors by examining the evolutionary patterns of MOS-expressed odorant receptors (ORs) and trace amine–associated receptors (TAARs) and VNS-expressed vomeronasal type 1 receptors (V1Rs) and vomeronasal type 2 receptors (V2Rs) in 7 tetrapods (mouse, rat, dog, opossum, platypus, chicken, and frog). The phylogenies of V1Rs and V2Rs show abundant lineage-specific gene gains/losses and virtually no one-to-one orthologs between species. Opposite patterns are found for ORs and TAARs. Analysis of functional data and ligand-binding sites of ORs confirms that paralogous chemoreceptors are more likely than orthologs to have different ligands and that functional divergence between paralogous chemoreceptors is established relatively quickly following gene duplication. Together, these results strongly suggest that the functional profile of the VNS chemoreceptor repertoire evolves much faster than that of the MOS chemoreceptor repertoire and that the differential tuning hypothesis applies to the majority, if not all, of MOS and VNS receptors. PMID

  1. Approaching {lambda} without fine-tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Matarrese, Sabino; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Perrotta, Francesca

    2004-09-15

    We address the fine-tuning problem of dark energy cosmologies which arises when the dark energy density needs to initially lie in a narrow range in order for its present value to be consistent with observations. As recently noticed, this problem becomes particularly severe in canonical quintessence scenarios, when trying to reproduce the behavior of a cosmological constant, i.e., when the dark energy equation of state w{sub Q} approaches -1: these models may be reconciled with a large basin of attraction only by requiring a rapid evolution of w{sub Q} at low redshifts, which is in conflict with the most recent estimates from type Ia Supernovae discovered by Hubble space telescope. Next, we focus on scalar-tensor theories of gravity, discussing the implications of a coupling between the quintessence scalar field and the Ricci scalar ('extended quintessence'). We show that, even if the equation of state today is very close to -1, by virtue of the scalar-tensor coupling the quintessence trajectories still possess the attractive feature which allows to reach the present level of cosmic acceleration starting by a set of initial conditions which covers tens of orders of magnitude; this effect, entirely of gravitational origin, represents a new important consequence of the possible coupling between dark energy and gravity. We illustrate this effect in typical extended quintessence scenarios.

  2. Tuning a microcavity-coupled terahertz laser

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Vezio; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Li, Lianhe; Zhu, Jingxuan; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2015-12-28

    Tunable oscillators are a key component of almost all electronic and photonic systems. Yet, a technology capable of operating in the terahertz (THz)-frequency range and fully suitable for widescale implementation is still lacking. This issue is significantly limiting potential THz applications in gas sensing, high-resolution spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, and optical communications. The THz quantum cascade laser is arguably the most promising solution in terms of output power and spectral purity. In order to achieve reliable, repeatable, and broad tunability, here we exploit the strong coupling between two different cavity mode concepts: a distributed feedback one-dimensional photonic resonator (providing gain) and a mechanically actuated wavelength-size microcavity (providing tuning). The result is a continuously tunable, single-mode emitter covering a 162 GHz spectral range, centered on 3.2 THz. Our source has a few tens of MHz resolution, extremely high differential efficiency, and unprecedented compact and simple design architecture. By unveiling the large potential that lies in this technique, our results provide a robust platform for radically different THz systems exploiting broadly tunable semiconductor lasers.

  3. Wide Tuning Capability for Spacecraft Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James; Mysoor, Narayan; Shah, Biren; Cook, Brian; Smith, Scott

    2007-01-01

    A document presents additional information on the means of implementing a capability for wide tuning of microwave receiver and transmitter frequencies in the development reported in the immediately preceding article, VCO PLL Frequency Synthesizers for Spacecraft Transponders (NPO- 42909). The reference frequency for a PLL-based frequency synthesizer is derived from a numerically controlled oscillator (NCO) implemented in digital logic, such that almost any reference frequency can be derived from a fixed crystal reference oscillator with microhertz precision. The frequency of the NCO is adjusted to track the received signal, then used to create another NCO frequency used to synthesize the transmitted signal coherent with, and at a specified frequency ratio to, the received signal. The frequencies can be changed, even during operation, through suitable digital programming. The NCOs and the related tracking loops and coherent turnaround logic are implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The interface between the analog microwave receiver and transmitter circuits and the FPGA includes analog-to-digital and digital-toanalog converters, the sampling rates of which are chosen to minimize spurious signals and otherwise optimize performance. Several mixers and filters are used to properly route various signals.

  4. TUNED FINITE-DIFFERENCE DIFFUSION OPERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, Jason; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2009-05-15

    Finite-difference simulations of fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics generally require an explicit diffusion operator, either to maintain stability by attenuating grid-scale structure, or to implement physical diffusivities such as viscosity or resistivity. If the goal is stability only, the diffusion must act at the grid scale, but should affect structure at larger scales as little as possible. For physical diffusivities the diffusion scale depends on the problem, and diffusion may act at larger scales as well. Diffusivity can undesirably limit the computational time step in both cases. We construct tuned finite-difference diffusion operators that minimally limit the time step while acting as desired near the diffusion scale. Such operators reach peak values at the diffusion scale rather than at the grid scale, but behave as standard operators at larger scales. These operators will be useful for simulations with high magnetic diffusivity or kinematic viscosity such as in the simulation of astrophysical dynamos with magnetic Prandtl number far from unity, or for numerical stabilization using hyperdiffusivity.

  5. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  6. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Marina A; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing.

  7. Workshop: Tuning the ‘cough center’

    PubMed Central

    Widdicombe, J.; Tatar, M.; Fontana, G.; Hanacek, J.; Davenport, P.; Lavorini, F.; Bolser, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Workshop considered the mechanisms whereby the ‘cough center’ could be tuned by various afferent inputs. There were particular presentations on the effects of inputs from the nose, mouth, respiratory tract and lungs, cerebral cortex, somatic tissues and the pharynx. From all these sites cough induced from the lungs could be increased or decreased in its strength or modified in its pattern. Thus ‘tuning’ of cough could be due to the interaction of afferent inputs, or to the sensitization or desensitization of brainstem neural pathways. The pattern of response depended on the ‘type’ of cough being studied and, in some instances, on the timing of the sensory input into the brainstem. Cough inputs could also affect various ‘non-cough’ motor outputs from the brain, although this was not the main theme of the Workshop. The main conclusion was that cough is not a stereotyped output from the medullary ‘cough center’, but that its pattern and strength depend on many afferent inputs acting on the ‘cough center’. PMID:21215322

  8. Tuning exchange interactions in organometallic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Naveen; Manning, Lane W.; Hua, Kim-Ngan; Headrick, Randall L.; Cherian, Judy G.; Bishop, Michael M.; McGill, Stephen A.; Furis, Madalina I.

    2015-09-01

    Organic semiconductors are emerging as a leading area of research as they are expected to overcome limitations of inorganic semiconductor devices for certain applications where low cost manufacturing, device transparency in the visible range or mechanical flexibility are more important than fast switching times. Solution processing methods produce thin films with millimeter sized crystalline grains at very low cost manufacturing prices, ideally suited for optical spectroscopy investigations of long range many-body effects in organic systems. To this end, we synthesized an entire family of organosoluble 3-d transition metal Pc's and successfully employed a novel solution-based pen-writing deposition technique to fabricate long range ordered thin films of mixtures of metal-free (H2Pc) molecule and organometallic phthalocyanines (MPc's). Our previous studies on the parent MPc crystalline thin films identified different electronic states mediating exchange interactions in these materials. This understanding of spin-dependent exchange interaction between delocalized π-electrons with unpaired d spins enabled the further tuning of these interactions by mixing CoPc and H2Pc in different ratios ranging from 1:1 to 1000:1 H2Pc:MPc. The magnitude of the exchange is also tunable as a function of the average distance between unpaired spins in these materials. Furthermore, high magnetic field (B < 25T) MCD and magneto-photoluminescence show evidence of spin-polarized band-edge excitons in the same materials.

  9. Mechnical tuning of ionized donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Hrubesch, Florian M.; Kuenzl, Markus; Itoh, Kohei M.; Hoehne, Felix; Dreher, Lukas; Brandt, Martin S.

    2015-03-01

    Ionized donors in silicon have been shown to have extraordinarily long coherence times, exceeding tens of minutes even at room temperature, which, combined with the very advanced state of silicon technology, makes them attractive candidates for the realization of solid state qubits. The corresponding near perfect isolation from their environment, however, renders the individual addressing and coupling of such qubits a major challenge on the way towards a spin quantum computer based on ionized donors. We show that the application of strain to the silicon host crystal leads to shifts of the nuclear spin resonance frequencies of 75As+ due to the nuclear quadrupole interaction with crystal fields. This shift can be larger than the resonance linewidth already for modest strains, as we demonstrate by electrically detected electron nuclear double resonance (ED ENDOR) measurements on arsenic donors in strained silicon. We discuss how quadrupole interactions could allow for the individual addressing of ionized nuclear spins by mechanical tuning of their resonance frequency and, possibly, permit the elastic coupling of nuclear spin qubits to a mechanical resonator.

  10. Varistor piezotronics: Mechanically tuned conductivity in varistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraki, Raschid; Novak, Nikola; Hofstätter, Michael; Supancic, Peter; Rödel, Jürgen; Frömling, Till

    2015-08-01

    The piezoelectric effect of ZnO has been investigated recently with the goal to modify metal/semiconductor Schottky-barriers and p-n-junctions by application of mechanical stress. This research area called "piezotronics" is so far focused on nano structured ZnO wires. At the same time, ZnO varistor materials are already widely utilized and may benefit from a piezotronic approach. In this instance, the grain boundary potential barriers in the ceramic can be tuned by mechanical stress. Polycrystalline varistors exhibit huge changes of resistivity upon applied electrical and mechanical fields and therefore offer descriptive model systems to study the piezotronic effect. If the influence of temperature is contemplated, our current mechanistic understanding can be interrogated and corroborated. In this paper, we present a physical model based on parallel conducting pathways. This affords qualitative and semi-quantitative rationalization of temperature dependent electrical properties. The investigations demonstrate that narrow conductive pathways contribute to the overall current, which becomes increasingly conductive with application of mechanical stress due to lowering of the barrier height. Rising temperature increases the thermionic current through the rest of the material with higher average potential barriers, which are hardly affected by the piezoelectric effect. Hence, relative changes in resistance due to application of stress are higher at low temperature.

  11. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  12. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Marina A.; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N.; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing. PMID:27531986

  13. Nonlinear effects in varactor-tuned resonators.

    PubMed

    Everard, Jeremy; Zhou, Liang

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the effects of RF power level on the performance of varactor-tuned resonator circuits. A variety of topologies are considered, including series and parallel resonators operating in both unbalanced and balanced modes. As these resonators were designed to produce oscillators with minimum phase noise, the initial small signal insertion loss was set to 6 dB and, hence, QL/Q0 = 1/2. To enable accurate analysis and simulation, S parameter and PSPICE models for the varactors were optimized and developed. It is shown that these resonators start to demonstrate nonlinear operation at very low power levels demonstrating saturation and lowering of the resonant frequency. On occasion squegging is observed for modified bias conditions. The nonlinear effects are dependent on the unloaded Q (Q0), the ratio of loaded to unloaded Q (QL/Q0), the bias voltage, and circuit configurations with typical nonlinear effects occurring at -8 dBm in a circuit with a loaded Q of 63 and a varactor bias voltage of 3 V. Analysis, simulation, and measurements that show close correlation are presented.

  14. Coral Thermal Tolerance: Tuning Gene Expression to Resist Thermal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bellantuono, Anthony J.; Granados-Cifuentes, Camila; Miller, David J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    The acclimatization capacity of corals is a critical consideration in the persistence of coral reefs under stresses imposed by global climate change. The stress history of corals plays a role in subsequent response to heat stress, but the transcriptomic changes associated with these plastic changes have not been previously explored. In order to identify host transcriptomic changes associated with acquired thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub-lethal temperature of 3°C below bleaching threshold temperature were compared to both non-preconditioned corals and untreated controls using a cDNA microarray platform. After eight days of hyperthermal challenge, conditions under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant) maintained Symbiodinium density, a clear differentiation in the transcriptional profiles was revealed among the condition examined. Among these changes, nine differentially expressed genes separated preconditioned corals from non-preconditioned corals, with 42 genes differentially expressed between control and preconditioned treatments, and 70 genes between non-preconditioned corals and controls. Differentially expressed genes included components of an apoptotic signaling cascade, which suggest the inhibition of apoptosis in preconditioned corals. Additionally, lectins and genes involved in response to oxidative stress were also detected. One dominant pattern was the apparent tuning of gene expression observed between preconditioned and non-preconditioned treatments; that is, differences in expression magnitude were more apparent than differences in the identity of genes differentially expressed. Our work revealed a transcriptomic signature underlying the tolerance associated with coral thermal history, and suggests that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind physiological acclimatization would be critical for the modeling of reefs in impending climate

  15. Coral thermal tolerance: tuning gene expression to resist thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Bellantuono, Anthony J; Granados-Cifuentes, Camila; Miller, David J; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    The acclimatization capacity of corals is a critical consideration in the persistence of coral reefs under stresses imposed by global climate change. The stress history of corals plays a role in subsequent response to heat stress, but the transcriptomic changes associated with these plastic changes have not been previously explored. In order to identify host transcriptomic changes associated with acquired thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub-lethal temperature of 3°C below bleaching threshold temperature were compared to both non-preconditioned corals and untreated controls using a cDNA microarray platform. After eight days of hyperthermal challenge, conditions under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant) maintained Symbiodinium density, a clear differentiation in the transcriptional profiles was revealed among the condition examined. Among these changes, nine differentially expressed genes separated preconditioned corals from non-preconditioned corals, with 42 genes differentially expressed between control and preconditioned treatments, and 70 genes between non-preconditioned corals and controls. Differentially expressed genes included components of an apoptotic signaling cascade, which suggest the inhibition of apoptosis in preconditioned corals. Additionally, lectins and genes involved in response to oxidative stress were also detected. One dominant pattern was the apparent tuning of gene expression observed between preconditioned and non-preconditioned treatments; that is, differences in expression magnitude were more apparent than differences in the identity of genes differentially expressed. Our work revealed a transcriptomic signature underlying the tolerance associated with coral thermal history, and suggests that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind physiological acclimatization would be critical for the modeling of reefs in impending climate

  16. Bias-dependent spectral tuning in InP nanowire-based photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vishal; Heurlin, Magnus; Karimi, Mohammad; Hussain, Laiq; Aghaeipour, Mahtab; Nowzari, Ali; Berg, Alexander; Nylund, Gustav; Capasso, Federico; Samuelson, Lars; Borgström, Magnus T.; Pettersson, Håkan

    2017-03-01

    Nanowire array ensembles contacted in a vertical geometry are extensively studied and considered strong candidates for next generations of industrial scale optoelectronics. Key challenges in this development deal with optimization of the doping profile of the nanowires and the interface between nanowires and transparent top contact. Here we report on photodetection characteristics associated with doping profile variations in InP nanowire array photodetectors. Bias-dependent tuning of the spectral shape of the responsivity is observed which is attributed to a Schottky-like contact at the nanowire–ITO interface. Angular dependent responsivity measurements, compared with simulated absorption spectra, support this conclusion. Furthermore, electrical simulations unravel the role of possible self-gating effects in the nanowires induced by the ITO/SiO x wrap-gate geometry. Finally, we discuss possible reasons for the observed low saturation current at large forward biases.

  17. Bias-dependent spectral tuning in InP nanowire-based photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal; Heurlin, Magnus; Karimi, Mohammad; Hussain, Laiq; Aghaeipour, Mahtab; Nowzari, Ali; Berg, Alexander; Nylund, Gustav; Capasso, Federico; Samuelson, Lars; Borgström, Magnus T; Pettersson, Håkan

    2017-03-17

    Nanowire array ensembles contacted in a vertical geometry are extensively studied and considered strong candidates for next generations of industrial scale optoelectronics. Key challenges in this development deal with optimization of the doping profile of the nanowires and the interface between nanowires and transparent top contact. Here we report on photodetection characteristics associated with doping profile variations in InP nanowire array photodetectors. Bias-dependent tuning of the spectral shape of the responsivity is observed which is attributed to a Schottky-like contact at the nanowire-ITO interface. Angular dependent responsivity measurements, compared with simulated absorption spectra, support this conclusion. Furthermore, electrical simulations unravel the role of possible self-gating effects in the nanowires induced by the ITO/SiO x wrap-gate geometry. Finally, we discuss possible reasons for the observed low saturation current at large forward biases.

  18. An investigation into the use of MMCTP to tune accelerator source parameters and testing its clinical application.

    PubMed

    Conneely, Elaine; Alexander, Andrew; Stroian, Gabriella; Seuntjens, Jan; Foley, Mark J

    2013-03-04

    This paper presents an alternative method to tune Monte Carlo electron beam parameters to match measured data using a minimal set of variables in order to reduce the model setup time prior to clinical implementation of the model. Monte Carlo calculations provide the possibility of a powerful treatment planning verification technique. The nonstandardized and nonautomated process of tuning the required accelerator model is one of the reasons for delays in the clinical implementation of Monte Carlo techniques. This work aims to establish and verify an alternative tuning method that can be carried out in a minimal amount of time, allowing it to be easily implemented in a clinical setting by personnel with minimal experience with Monte Carlo methods. This tuned model can then be incorporated into the MMCTP system to allow the system to be used as a second dose calculation check for IMRT plans. The technique proposed was used to establish the primary electron beam parameters for accelerator models for the Varian Clinac 2100 6 MV photon beam using the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo system. The method is intended to provide a clear, direct, and efficient process for tuning an accelerator model using readily available clinical quality assurance data. The tuning provides a refined model, which agrees with measured dose profile curves within 1.5% outside the penumbra or 3 mm in the penumbra, for square fields with sides of 3 cm up to 30 cm. These models can then be employed as the basis for Monte Carlo recalculations of dose distributions, using the MMCTP system, for clinical treatment plans, providing an invaluable assessment tool. This was tested on six IMRT plans and compared to the measurements performed for the pretreatment QA process. These Monte Carlo values for the average dose to the chamber volume agreed with measurements to within 0.6%.

  19. Nonmonotonic Synaptic Excitation and Imbalanced Inhibition Underlying Cortical Intensity Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guangying K.; Li, Pingyang; Tao, Huizhong W.; Zhang, Li I.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Intensity-tuned neurons, characterized by their nonmonotonic response-level function, may play important roles in the encoding of sound intensity-related information. The synaptic mechanisms underlying intensity-tuning remain yet unclear. Here, in vivo whole-cell recordings in rat auditory cortex revealed that intensity-tuned neurons, mostly clustered in a posterior zone, receive imbalanced tone-evoked excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Excitatory inputs exhibit nonmonotonic intensity-tuning, whereas with tone intensity increments, the temporally-delayed inhibitory inputs increase monotonically in strength. In addition, this delay reduces with the increase of intensity, resulting in an enhanced suppression of excitation at high intensities and a significant sharpening of intensity-tuning. In contrast, non-intensity-tuned neurons exhibit covaried excitatory and inhibitory inputs and the relative time interval between them is stable with intensity increments, resulting in monotonic response-level function. Thus, cortical intensity-tuning is primarily determined by excitatory inputs, and shaped by cortical inhibition through a dynamic control of excitatory and inhibitory timing. PMID:17114053

  20. Acoustic behavior of tuning slots of labial organ pipes.

    PubMed

    Rucz, Péter; Augusztinovicz, Fülöp; Angster, Judit; Preukschat, Tim; Miklós, András

    2014-05-01

    The effect of tuning slots on the sound characteristics of labial organ pipes is investigated in this paper by means of laboratory experiments. Besides changing the pitch of the pipe, the tuning slot also plays an important role in forming the timbre. The objectives of this contribution are to document the influence of tuning slots built with different geometries on the pipe sound and to validate the observed tendencies by means of reproducible experiments. It is found that the measured steady state sound spectra show unique characteristics, typical only for tuning slot organ pipes. By separately adjusting the geometrical parameters of the tuning slots on experimental pipes, the impact of each scaling parameter on the steady state spectrum is determined. It is shown that the scaling procedures used currently in organ building practice do not provide sufficient control over the sound characteristics, leaving the capabilities provided by the tuning slot unexploited. Subjective comparison made by organ builders of sound recordings of various setups confirms that the observed sound quality of tuning slot pipes is strongly dependent on the scaling of the slot.

  1. Biophysical Profile

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Rh positive Worrisome results from other prenatal tests Your health care provider might also recommend a biophysical profile if ... the test and at regular intervals during the test. Your health care provider or a member of your health care ...

  2. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teach, Beverly; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents profiles of two leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Carolyn Guss and Mendel Sherman, both retired professors from Indiana University's program in Information Systems Technology. (KRN)

  3. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robert M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents profiles of three leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Robert Mills Gagne, Florida State University; Robert Heinich, Indiana University; and Charles Francis Schuller, University of Georgia. (SLW)

  4. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robert M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents profiles of three leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Robert Mills Gagne, Florida State University; Robert Heinich, Indiana University; and Charles Francis Schuller, University of Georgia. (SLW)

  5. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teach, Beverly; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents profiles of two leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Carolyn Guss and Mendel Sherman, both retired professors from Indiana University's program in Information Systems Technology. (KRN)

  6. An efficient automated parameter tuning framework for spiking neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Kristofor D.; Nageswaran, Jayram Moorkanikara; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    As the desire for biologically realistic spiking neural networks (SNNs) increases, tuning the enormous number of open parameters in these models becomes a difficult challenge. SNNs have been used to successfully model complex neural circuits that explore various neural phenomena such as neural plasticity, vision systems, auditory systems, neural oscillations, and many other important topics of neural function. Additionally, SNNs are particularly well-adapted to run on neuromorphic hardware that will support biological brain-scale architectures. Although the inclusion of realistic plasticity equations, neural dynamics, and recurrent topologies has increased the descriptive power of SNNs, it has also made the task of tuning these biologically realistic SNNs difficult. To meet this challenge, we present an automated parameter tuning framework capable of tuning SNNs quickly and efficiently using evolutionary algorithms (EA) and inexpensive, readily accessible graphics processing units (GPUs). A sample SNN with 4104 neurons was tuned to give V1 simple cell-like tuning curve responses and produce self-organizing receptive fields (SORFs) when presented with a random sequence of counterphase sinusoidal grating stimuli. A performance analysis comparing the GPU-accelerated implementation to a single-threaded central processing unit (CPU) implementation was carried out and showed a speedup of 65× of the GPU implementation over the CPU implementation, or 0.35 h per generation for GPU vs. 23.5 h per generation for CPU. Additionally, the parameter value solutions found in the tuned SNN were studied and found to be stable and repeatable. The automated parameter tuning framework presented here will be of use to both the computational neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering communities, making the process of constructing and tuning large-scale SNNs much quicker and easier. PMID:24550771

  7. An efficient automated parameter tuning framework for spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Kristofor D; Nageswaran, Jayram Moorkanikara; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    As the desire for biologically realistic spiking neural networks (SNNs) increases, tuning the enormous number of open parameters in these models becomes a difficult challenge. SNNs have been used to successfully model complex neural circuits that explore various neural phenomena such as neural plasticity, vision systems, auditory systems, neural oscillations, and many other important topics of neural function. Additionally, SNNs are particularly well-adapted to run on neuromorphic hardware that will support biological brain-scale architectures. Although the inclusion of realistic plasticity equations, neural dynamics, and recurrent topologies has increased the descriptive power of SNNs, it has also made the task of tuning these biologically realistic SNNs difficult. To meet this challenge, we present an automated parameter tuning framework capable of tuning SNNs quickly and efficiently using evolutionary algorithms (EA) and inexpensive, readily accessible graphics processing units (GPUs). A sample SNN with 4104 neurons was tuned to give V1 simple cell-like tuning curve responses and produce self-organizing receptive fields (SORFs) when presented with a random sequence of counterphase sinusoidal grating stimuli. A performance analysis comparing the GPU-accelerated implementation to a single-threaded central processing unit (CPU) implementation was carried out and showed a speedup of 65× of the GPU implementation over the CPU implementation, or 0.35 h per generation for GPU vs. 23.5 h per generation for CPU. Additionally, the parameter value solutions found in the tuned SNN were studied and found to be stable and repeatable. The automated parameter tuning framework presented here will be of use to both the computational neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering communities, making the process of constructing and tuning large-scale SNNs much quicker and easier.

  8. Transverse Beam Dynamics in the Modified Betatron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    charge, m is the electron rest mass, and c is the speed of light . Self field effects will modify Eq. (1) however. A nonneutral current ring produces both a...magnetic flux or stream func- tion *P(p.) rA, where A, is the usual vector potential. The equations for 4 and 1 are 17 CHERNJN AND SPRANGLE p-[ l 2 - ( o...8217- 4). (A-21) m m 2 Using Eq. (A-21) in Eq. (A-20) the resulting integrals are elementary. The result, for the vector potential inside the beam is Ask

  9. On radiation by electrons in a betatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwinger, J.

    1996-07-31

    Julian Schwinger produced this paper in preprint form in 1945 and, apparently, distributed it only to a few selected colleagues at the time. He later presented the results as a 15-minute invited paper in 1946, at an American Physical Society meeting, under the title "Electron Radiation in High Energy Accelerators" (the abstract is published in Phys. Rev. 70, 798 (1946)). Although he published this work four years later in revised form ("On the Classical Radiation of Accelerated Electrons," Phys. Rev. 75, 1912 (1949)), this original version seems fresher and, in some respects, superior to the published one, hence my motivation to make it widely available. For example, the discussion of coherent radiation (shielded and unshielded) included in this version was wholly omitted in the published paper. In addition, this version exhibits many explicit calculations that are of pedagogical value even today for students of synchrotron radiation. But perhaps the most interesting aspect of this paper is that it shows so well the author's superb dexterity in manipulating mathematical expressions to obtain physical conclusions with clarity and efficiency.

  10. High-Current Betatron and Stereobetatron,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-04

    an increase in the accelerated current and intensity of the radiation/emissicn of charged particle acceleratcrs is at present most urgent/actual and...physics, chemistry, etc. LOC = 80171501 PAGE b In proportion to the introduction of accelarators into the national economy the requirements fcr them are...accelerators, fccus special attention on possibility increases in the accelerated current. An increase in the number of accelerated particles and

  11. Inertia Identification and PI Parameter Tuning of PMSM Servo Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huang

    2017-05-01

    The goal of this paper is to improve the performance of permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM) servo system by identification of the inertia parameter and auto-tuning of PI parameters. The method relies on the speed acceleration and deceleration response produced by speed ramp signals applied to a speed-controlled servo. The proposed method relies on simple numerical calculations, thus make the proposed scheme more practical. After the knowledge of the inertia parameter, the tuning of the speed control loop can be performed. The experimental results verified that the proposed identification scheme can estimate inertia parameters accurately and effectively and the control system tuned can achieve good dynamic performance.

  12. A Tuned Single Parameter for Representing Conjunction Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plakaloic, D.; Hejduk, M. D.; Frigm, R. C.; Newman, L. K.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite conjunction assessment risk analysis is a subjective enterprise that can benefit from quantitative aids and, to this end, NASA/GSFC has developed a fuzzy logic construct - called the F-value - to attempt to provide a statement of conjunction risk that amalgamates multiple indices and yields a more stable intra-event assessment. This construct has now sustained an extended tuning procedure against heuristic analyst assessment of event risk. The tuning effort has resulted in modifications to the calculation procedure and the adjustment of tuning coefficients, producing a construct with both more predictive force and a better statement of its error.

  13. Electro optical tuning of Tamm-plasmon exciton-polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessler, J.; Baumann, V.; Emmerling, M.; Amthor, M.; Winkler, K.; Höfling, S.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.

    2014-11-01

    We report on electro optical tuning of the emission from GaAs quantum wells resonantly coupled to a Tamm-plasmon mode in a hybrid metal/dielectric structure. The structures were studied via momentum resolved photoluminescence and photoreflectance spectroscopy, and the surface metal layer was used as a top gate, which allowed for a precise tuning of the quantum well emission via the quantum confined Stark effect. By tuning the resonance, we were able to observe the characteristic anticrossing behavior of a polaritonic emission in the strong light-matter coupling regime, yielding a Rabi splitting of (9.2 ± 0.2) meV.

  14. Self tuning control of wind-diesel power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mufti, M.D.; Balasubramanian, R.; Tripathy, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper proposes some effective self-tuning control strategies for isolated Wind-Diesel power generation systems. Detailed modeling and studies on both single-input single-output (SISO) as well as multi-input multi-output (MIMO) self tuning regulators, applied to a typical system, are reported. Further, the effect of introducing a Super-conducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) unit on the system performance has been investigated. The MIMO self-tuning regulator controlling the hybrid system and the SMES in a coordinated manner exhibits the best performance.

  15. Development of a self-tuning fuzzy logic controller

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.H.; Nelson, R.M.

    1999-07-01

    To avoid the laborious task of modifying control rule sets for fuzzy logic controllers, a novel model-based self-tuning strategy has been developed. The performance of this advanced fuzzy logic controller is measured and analyzed in a linguistic plane. An optimal performance trajectory functions as the control model. The self-tuning strategy improves the performance automatically until it converges to a predetermined optimal global criterion. The experimental results indicate that the actual performance trajectory of the advanced fuzzy controller with the self-tuning strategy has reached the optimal criterion.

  16. Magnetic tuning of electrically resonant metamaterial with inclusion of ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lei; Zhao, Qian; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhou, Ji

    2008-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a magnetic tuning of electrically resonant metamaterial (EMM) at microwave frequencies by introducing microwave ferrite rods into the periodic array of electrically resonant element. Different from those based on controlling the capacitance of equivalent LC circuit, this tunability arises from a mechanism of magnetically tuning the inductance of resonant element via the active ambient effective permeability. For magnetic fields from 0 to 5000 Oe, resonance frequency of the EMM can be continuously and reversibly tuned in a range of about 800 MHz. The active effective permittivity has also been investigated through the simulated scattering parameters.

  17. Musician's and physicist's view on tuning keyboard instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubenow, Martin; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2007-01-01

    The simultaneous sound of several voices or instruments requires proper tuning to achieve consonance for certain intervals and chords. Most instruments allow enough frequency variation to enable pure tuning while being played. Keyboard instruments such as organ and piano have given frequencies for individual notes and the tuning must be based on a compromise. The equal temperament is not the only solution, but a special choice. Unequal temperaments produce better results in many cases, because important major thirds and triads are improved. Equal temperament was not propagated by Johann Sebastian Bach, as is often stated in introductory literature on this topic.

  18. Electro optical tuning of Tamm-plasmon exciton-polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Gessler, J.; Baumann, V.; Emmerling, M.; Amthor, M.; Winkler, K.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2014-11-03

    We report on electro optical tuning of the emission from GaAs quantum wells resonantly coupled to a Tamm-plasmon mode in a hybrid metal/dielectric structure. The structures were studied via momentum resolved photoluminescence and photoreflectance spectroscopy, and the surface metal layer was used as a top gate, which allowed for a precise tuning of the quantum well emission via the quantum confined Stark effect. By tuning the resonance, we were able to observe the characteristic anticrossing behavior of a polaritonic emission in the strong light-matter coupling regime, yielding a Rabi splitting of (9.2 ± 0.2) meV.

  19. Frequency Tuning of Hearing in the Beluga Whale.

    PubMed

    Sysueva, Evgeniya V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Y

    2016-01-01

    Data on frequency tuning in odontocetes are contradictory: different authors have reported filter qualities from 2 to almost 50. In this study, frequency tuning was measured in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) using a rippled-noise test stimulus in conjunction with the auditory evoked potential (AEP) technique. The response to ripple reversions was considered to indicate resolvability of the ripple pattern. The limit of ripple-pattern resolution ranged from 20 to 32 ripples per octave (rpo). A model of interaction of the ripple spectrum with frequency-tuned filters suggests that this resolution limit requires a filter quality of 29-46.

  20. New auto-tuning technique for the hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, R. L.; Maleki, L.

    1983-01-01

    Auto-tuning of the maser cavity compensates for cavity pulling effect, and other sources of contribution to the long term frequency drift. Schemes previously proposed for the maser cavity auto-tuning can have adverse effects on the performance of the maser. A new scheme is proposed based on the phase relationship between the electric and the magnetic fields inside the cavity. This technique has the desired feature of auto-tuning the cavity with a very high sensitivity and without disturbing the maser performance. Some approaches for the implementation of this scheme and possible areas of difficulty are examined.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species Tune Root Tropic Responses.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Gat; Shkolnik, Doron; Miller, Gad; Fromm, Hillel

    2016-10-01

    The default growth pattern of primary roots of land plants is directed by gravity. However, roots possess the ability to sense and respond directionally to other chemical and physical stimuli, separately and in combination. Therefore, these root tropic responses must be antagonistic to gravitropism. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in gravitropism of maize and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots has been previously described. However, which cellular signals underlie the integration of the different environmental stimuli, which lead to an appropriate root tropic response, is currently unknown. In gravity-responding roots, we observed, by applying the ROS-sensitive fluorescent dye dihydrorhodamine-123 and confocal microscopy, a transient asymmetric ROS distribution, higher at the concave side of the root. The asymmetry, detected at the distal elongation zone, was built in the first 2 h of the gravitropic response and dissipated after another 2 h. In contrast, hydrotropically responding roots show no transient asymmetric distribution of ROS Decreasing ROS levels by applying the antioxidant ascorbate, or the ROS-generation inhibitor diphenylene iodonium attenuated gravitropism while enhancing hydrotropism. Arabidopsis mutants deficient in Ascorbate Peroxidase 1 showed attenuated hydrotropic root bending. Mutants of the root-expressed NADPH oxidase RBOH C, but not rbohD, showed enhanced hydrotropism and less ROS in their roots apices (tested in tissue extracts with Amplex Red). Finally, hydrostimulation prior to gravistimulation attenuated the gravistimulated asymmetric ROS and auxin signals that are required for gravity-directed curvature. We suggest that ROS, presumably H2O2, function in tuning root tropic responses by promoting gravitropism and negatively regulating hydrotropism. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Neuromechanical tuning of nonlinear postural control dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lena H.; van Antwerp, Keith W.; Scrivens, Jevin E.; McKay, J. Lucas; Welch, Torrence D. J.; Bingham, Jeffrey T.; DeWeerth, Stephen P.

    2009-01-01

    Postural control may be an ideal physiological motor task for elucidating general questions about the organization, diversity, flexibility, and variability of biological motor behaviors using nonlinear dynamical analysis techniques. Rather than presenting “problems” to the nervous system, the redundancy of biological systems and variability in their behaviors may actually be exploited to allow for the flexible achievement of multiple and concurrent task-level goals associated with movement. Such variability may reflect the constant “tuning” of neuromechanical elements and their interactions for movement control. The problem faced by researchers is that there is no one-to-one mapping between the task goal and the coordination of the underlying elements. We review recent and ongoing research in postural control with the goal of identifying common mechanisms underlying variability in postural control, coordination of multiple postural strategies, and transitions between them. We present a delayed-feedback model used to characterize the variability observed in muscle coordination patterns during postural responses to perturbation. We emphasize the significance of delays in physiological postural systems, requiring the modulation and coordination of both the instantaneous, “passive” response to perturbations as well as the delayed, “active” responses to perturbations. The challenge for future research lies in understanding the mechanisms and principles underlying neuromechanical tuning of and transitions between the diversity of postural behaviors. Here we describe some of our recent and ongoing studies aimed at understanding variability in postural control using physical robotic systems, human experiments, dimensional analysis, and computational models that could be enhanced from a nonlinear dynamics approach. PMID:19566271

  3. Tuned, driven, and active soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.

    2015-02-01

    One characteristic feature of soft matter systems is their strong response to external stimuli. As a consequence they are comparatively easily driven out of their ground state and out of equilibrium, which leads to many of their fascinating properties. Here, we review illustrative examples. This review is structured by an increasing distance from the equilibrium ground state. On each level, examples of increasing degree of complexity are considered. In detail, we first consider systems that are quasi-statically tuned or switched to a new state by applying external fields. These are common liquid crystals, liquid crystalline elastomers, or ferrogels and magnetic elastomers. Next, we concentrate on systems steadily driven from outside e.g. by an imposed flow field. In our case, we review the reaction of nematic liquid crystals, of bulk-filling periodically modulated structures such as block copolymers, and of localized vesicular objects to an imposed shear flow. Finally, we focus on systems that are "active" and "self-driven". Here our range spans from idealized self-propelled point particles, via sterically interacting particles like granular hoppers, via microswimmers such as self-phoretically driven artificial Janus particles or biological microorganisms, via deformable self-propelled particles like droplets, up to the collective behavior of insects, fish, and birds. As we emphasize, similarities emerge in the features and behavior of systems that at first glance may not necessarily appear related. We thus hope that our overview will further stimulate the search for basic unifying principles underlying the physics of these soft materials out of their equilibrium ground state.

  4. Tune in or tune out: age-related differences in listening to speech in music.

    PubMed

    Russo, Frank A; Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen

    2008-10-01

    To examine age-related differences in listening to speech in music. In the first experiment, the effect of music familiarity on word identification was compared with a standard measure of word identification in multitalker babble. The average level of the backgrounds was matched and two speech-to-background ratios were tested. In the second experiment, recognition recall was measured for background music heard during a word identification task. For older adults, word identification did not depend on the type of background, but for younger adults word identification was better when the background was familiar music than when it was unfamiliar music or babble. Younger listeners remembered background music better than older listeners, with the pattern of false alarms suggesting that younger listeners consciously processed the background music more than older listeners. In other words, younger listeners attempted to "tune in" the music background, but older listeners attempted to "tune out" the background. These findings reveal age-related differences in listening to speech in music. When older listeners are confronted with a music background they tend to focus attention on the speech foreground. In contrast, younger listeners attend to both the speech foreground and music background. When music is familiar, this strategy adopted by younger listeners seems to be beneficial to word identification.

  5. OSKI: A Library of Automatically Tuned Sparse Matrix Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Vuduc, R; Demmel, J W; Yelick, K A

    2005-07-19

    The Optimized Sparse Kernel Interface (OSKI) is a collection of low-level primitives that provide automatically tuned computational kernels on sparse matrices, for use by solver libraries and applications. These kernels include sparse matrix-vector multiply and sparse triangular solve, among others. The primary aim of this interface is to hide the complex decision-making process needed to tune the performance of a kernel implementation for a particular user's sparse matrix and machine, while also exposing the steps and potentially non-trivial costs of tuning at run-time. This paper provides an overview of OSKI, which is based on our research on automatically tuned sparse kernels for modern cache-based superscalar machines.

  6. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    SciTech Connect

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-12-31

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  7. Tuning electrode impedance for the electrical recording of biopotentials.

    PubMed

    Fontes, M A; de Beeck, M; Van Hoof, C; Neves, H P

    2010-01-01

    Tuning the electrode impedance through the DC biasing of iridium oxide is presented. Impedance reduction of up to two orders of magnitude was reproducibly observed in 20 microm diameter microelectrodes at a biasing of 1V.

  8. Tuning of active vibration controllers for ACTEX by genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    1999-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal tuning of digitally programmable analog controllers on the ACTEX-1 smart structures flight experiment. The programmable controllers for each channel include a third order Strain Rate Feedback (SRF) controller, a fifth order SRF controller, a second order Positive Position Feedback (PPF) controller, and a fourth order PPF controller. Optimal manual tuning of several control parameters can be a difficult task even though the closed-loop control characteristics of each controller are well known. Hence, the automatic tuning of individual control parameters using Genetic Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The optimal control parameters of each control law are obtained by imposing a constraint on the closed-loop frequency response functions using the ACTEX mathematical model. The tuned control parameters are then uploaded to the ACTEX electronic control electronics and experiments on the active vibration control are carried out in space. The experimental results on ACTEX will be presented.

  9. Little Known Facts about the Common Tuning Fork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, P. P.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the physical principles of the tuning fork which has a common use in teaching laboratories. Includes information on its vibration, frequency of vibration, elasticity, and reasons for having two prongs. (YDS)

  10. Little Known Facts about the Common Tuning Fork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, P. P.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the physical principles of the tuning fork which has a common use in teaching laboratories. Includes information on its vibration, frequency of vibration, elasticity, and reasons for having two prongs. (YDS)

  11. Professional male singers' formant tuning strategies for the vowel /a/.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Johan; Lã, Filipa M B; Gill, Brian P

    2011-12-01

    Certain spectrum characteristics have been identified as important for register equalization around the male passaggio, an effect ascribed to formant tuning although descriptions of formant tuning diverge. Eight professional singers sang scales including their passaggio range on different vowels, applying two formant tuning strategies as found in (1) classical and (2) non-classical singing. Formant frequencies were measured using inverse filtering. Results revealed differences between the two strategies. For the classical formant tuning, systematic changes of formant frequencies with pitch were observed. For the highest note sung on /a/, F1 was below the second partial and F2 in the vicinity of the third. Similar spectrum characteristics were achieved by different F1 and F2 values between singers.

  12. On the Tuning of High-Resolution NMR Probes

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Huber, Gaspard; Nausner, Martin; Horničáková, Michaela; Desvaux, Hervé; Müller, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Three optimum conditions for the tuning of NMR probes are compared: the conventional tuning optimum, which is based on radio-frequency pulse efficiency, the spin noise tuning optimum based on the line shape of the spin noise signal, and the newly introduced frequency shift tuning optimum, which minimizes the frequency pushing effect on strong signals. The latter results if the radiation damping feedback field is not in perfect quadrature to the precessing magnetization. According to the conventional RLC (resistor–inductor–capacitor) resonant circuit model, the optima should be identical, but significant deviations are found experimentally at low temperatures, in particular on cryogenically cooled probes. The existence of different optima with respect to frequency pushing and spin noise line shape has important consequences on the nonlinearity of spin dynamics at high polarization levels and the implementation of experiments on cold probes. PMID:25210000

  13. Multiple Tune Jumps to Overcome Horizontal Depolarizing Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K. A.; Dutheil, Y.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Lin, F.; Mackay, W. W.; Meot, F.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2016-02-01

    Imperfection and vertical intrinsic depolarizing resonances have been overcome by the two partial Siberian snakes in the Alternative Gradient Synchrotron(AGS). The relatively weak but numerous horizontal resonances are the main source of polarization loss in the AGS. A pair of horizontal tune jump quads have been used to overcome these weak resonances. The locations of the two quads have to be chosen such that the disturbance to the beam optics is minimum. The emittance growth has to be mitigated for this method to work. In addition, this technique needs very accurate jump timing. Using two partial Siberian snakes, with vertical tune inside the spin tune gap and 80% polarization at AGS injection, polarized proton beam had reached 1.5 × 1011 proton per bunch with 65% polarization. With the tune jump timing optimized and emittance preserved, more than 70% polarization with 2 × 1011 protons per bunch has been achieved.

  14. OSKI: A library of automatically tuned sparse matrix kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuduc, Richard; Demmel, James W.; Yelick, Katherine A.

    2005-01-01

    The Optimized Sparse Kernel Interface (OSKI) is a collection of low-level primitives that provide automatically tuned computational kernels on sparse matrices, for use by solver libraries and applications. These kernels include sparse matrix-vector multiply and sparse triangular solve, among others. The primary aim of this interface is to hide the complex decisionmaking process needed to tune the performance of a kernel implementation for a particular user's sparse matrix and machine, while also exposing the steps and potentially non-trivial costs of tuning at run-time. This paper provides an overview of OSKI, which is based on our research on automatically tuned sparse kernels for modern cache-based superscalar machines.

  15. Online automatic tuning and control for fed-batch cultivation

    PubMed Central

    van Straten, Gerrit; van der Pol, Leo A.; van Boxtel, Anton J. B.

    2007-01-01

    Performance of controllers applied in biotechnological production is often below expectation. Online automatic tuning has the capability to improve control performance by adjusting control parameters. This work presents automatic tuning approaches for model reference specific growth rate control during fed-batch cultivation. The approaches are direct methods that use the error between observed specific growth rate and its set point; systematic perturbations of the cultivation are not necessary. Two automatic tuning methods proved to be efficient, in which the adaptation rate is based on a combination of the error, squared error and integral error. These methods are relatively simple and robust against disturbances, parameter uncertainties, and initialization errors. Application of the specific growth rate controller yields a stable system. The controller and automatic tuning methods are qualified by simulations and laboratory experiments with Bordetella pertussis. PMID:18157554

  16. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghalai, John S.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Raphael, Patrick D.; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-12-01

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  17. An improved auto-tuning scheme for PI controllers.

    PubMed

    Mudi, Rajani K; Dey, Chanchal; Lee, Tsu-Tian

    2008-01-01

    Ziegler-Nichols tuned PI and PID controllers are usually found to provide poor performances for high-order and nonlinear systems. In this study, an improved auto-tuning scheme is presented for Ziegler-Nichols tuned PI controllers (ZNPICs). With a view to improving the transient response, the proportional and integral gains of the proposed controller are continuously modified based on the current process trend. The proposed controller is tested for a number of high-order linear and nonlinear dead-time processes under both set-point change and load disturbance. It exhibits significantly improved performance compared to ZNPIC, and Refined Ziegler-Nichols tuned PI controller (RZNPIC). Robustness of the proposed scheme is established by varying the controller parameters as well as the dead-time of the process under control.

  18. Submillimeter Quasioptical Josephson Junction Oscillator with Integrated Tuning Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-30

    demonstrate a Quasioptical Josephson Oscillator with Integratd Tuning Elements using standard Conductus niobium. technology. T~his device is based on a...Elements Contract #F49620-93-C0037 AE$.R 94 0347 Aleksandar Pance Conductus , Inc. Approved for public release; (408) 524 9820 distribution unlimited...Report Summary The goal of this program was to demonstrate a Quasioptical Josephson Oscillator with Integrated Tuning Elements using standard Conductus

  19. Method and apparatus for tuning high power lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Vandersluis, Kenneth L.

    1977-04-19

    This invention relates to high power gas lasers that are adapted to be tuned to a desired lasing wavelength through the use of a gas cell to lower the gain at a natural lasing wavelength and "seeding" the laser with a beam from a low power laser which is lasing at the desired wavelength. This tuning is accomplished with no loss of power and produces a pulse with an altered pulse shape. It is potentially applicable to all gas lasers.

  20. Tuning method for microresonators and microresonators made thereby

    DOEpatents

    Henry, Michael David; Olsson, Roy H.; Greth, Karl Douglas; Young, Travis Ryan; Nguyen, Janet; Stevens, James E.

    2015-12-01

    A micromechanical resonator is disclosed. The resonator includes a resonant micromechanical element. A film of annealable material can be deposited on a facial surface of the element. The resonance of the element can be tuned by annealing the deposited film. Also disclosed are methods of applying a film on a resonator and annealing the film, thereby tuning one or more resonant properties of the resonator.

  1. Tuning micropillar cavity birefringence by laser induced surface defects

    SciTech Connect

    Bonato, Cristian; Ding Dapeng; Gudat, Jan; Exter, Martin P. van; Thon, Susanna; Kim, Hyochul; Petroff, Pierre M.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2009-12-21

    We demonstrate a technique to tune the optical properties of micropillar cavities by creating small defects on the sample surface near the cavity region with an intense focused laser beam. Such defects modify strain in the structure, changing the birefringence in a controllable way. We apply the technique to make the fundamental cavity mode polarization-degenerate and to fine tune the overall mode frequencies, as needed for applications in quantum information science.

  2. Genetic Algorithm Tuned Fuzzy Logic for Gliding Return Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchett, Bradley T.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of designing and flying a trajectory for successful recovery of a reusable launch vehicle is tackled using fuzzy logic control with genetic algorithm optimization. The plant is approximated by a simplified three degree of freedom non-linear model. A baseline trajectory design and guidance algorithm consisting of several Mamdani type fuzzy controllers is tuned using a simple genetic algorithm. Preliminary results show that the performance of the overall system is shown to improve with genetic algorithm tuning.

  3. Laser induced tuning of cholesteric liquid crystal without alignment layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.-C.; Huang, T.-C.; Lee, C.-Y.; Hsiao, Vincent K. S.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a laser induced tuning effect on non-chiral azobenzene-doped CLC (Azo-CLCs) without using orientated substrate. The reversible tuning range is 90 nm under alternative violet (405 nm) and green (532 nm) laser exposure corresponded to the response time of 3 and 15 s, respectively. The current demonstrations may find applications in photoactive micro- or nano-photonic devices where orientated substrate is difficult to be incorporated.

  4. Tuning Wettability and Adhesion of Structured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badge, Ila

    Structured surfaces with feature size ranging from a few micrometers down to nanometers are of great interest in the applications such as design of anti-wetting surfaces, tissue engineering, microfluidics, filtration, microelectronic devices, anti-reflective coatings and reversible adhesives. A specific surface property demands particular roughness geometry along with suitable surface chemistry. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) is a technique that offers control over surface chemistry without significantly affecting the roughness and thus, provides a flexibility to alter surface chemistry selectively for a given structured surface. In this study, we have used PECVD to fine tune wetting and adhesion properties. The research presented focuses on material design aspects as well as the fundamental understanding of wetting and adhesion phenomena of structured surfaces. In order to study the effect of surface roughness and surface chemistry on the surface wettability independently, we developed a model surface by combination of colloidal lithography and PECVD. A systematically controlled hierarchical roughness using spherical colloidal particles and surface chemistry allowed for quantitative prediction of contact angles corresponding to metastable and stable wetting states. A well-defined roughness and chemical composition of the surface enabled establishing a correlation between theory predictions and experimental measurements. We developed an extremely robust superhydrophobic surface based on Carbon-Nanotubes (CNT) mats. The surface of CNTs forming a nano-porous mesh was modified using PECVD to deposit a layer of hydrophobic coating (PCNT). The PCNT surface thus formed is superhydrophobic with almost zero contact angle hysteresis. We demonstrated that the PCNT surface is not wetted under steam condensation even after prolonged exposure and also continues to retain its superhydrophobicity after multiple frosting-defrosting cycles. The anti

  5. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O'Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size

  6. On the sensing and tuning of progressive structural vibration waves.

    PubMed

    Minikes, Adi; Gabay, Ran; Bucher, Izhak; Feldman, Michael

    2005-09-01

    Progressive flexural waves can be generated only in finite structures by fine tuning the excitation and the boundary conditions. The tuning process eliminates the reflected waves arising from discontinuities and edge effects. This work presents and expands two new methods for the identification and tuning of traveling waves. One is a parametric method based on fitting an ellipse to the complex spatial amplitude distribution. The other is a nonparametric method based on the Hilbert transform providing a space-localized estimate. With these methods, an optimization-based tuning of transverse flexural waves in a one-dimensional structure, a vibrating beam, is developed. Existing methods are designed for a single frequency and are based on either combining two vibration modes or mechanical impedance matching. Such methods are limited to a designated excitation frequency determined by a specific configuration of the system. With the proposed methods, structural progressive waves can be generated for a wide range of frequencies under the same given system configuration and can be tuned in real time to accommodate changes in boundary conditions. An analytical study on the nature of the optimal excitation conditions has been carried out, revealing singular configurations. The experimental verification of the sensing and tuning methods is demonstrated on a dedicated laboratory prototype. The proposed methods are not confined to mechanical waves and present a comprehensive approach applicable for other physical wave phenomena.

  7. Tune Variations due to Septum Stray Field F. Pederson &

    SciTech Connect

    Rinolfi, L.

    1986-10-12

    Two types of antiproton instabilities due to trapped ions are harmful in the AA. One is a coherent instability occurring when an ion pocket resonates with a 3-Q mode (hiccups), the other is excitation of 11th and 15th order non-linear resonances due to the non-linear focusing fields from localized ion clouds trapped in uncleared potential well pockets. Accumulation with a good injection yield of antiprotons forces us to locate the tune of the dense core in the general area of the array of 15th order resonances. To avoid harmful blow-up of the dense core the tune is located between the resonances 11Q{sub H} + 4Q{sub V} = 34, 10Q{sub H} + 5Q{sub V} = 34, and 11Q{sub H} = 25, requiring a tune of Q{sub H} = 2.2722 to be maintained with a precision of a few 10{sup -4} (Fig. 4). Different angles of the injection and ejection trajectories require the septum current to be changed from 3860 A during accumulation to 3920 A, during ejection mode. Variations in the septum stray field due to these changes in current cause tune changes in the order of 10{sup -3}. In addition, at a given septum current, a pronounced hysteresis of the stray field causes tune variations of about the same order of magnitude, so also the past history of the septum excitation must be carefully controlled to obtain a reproducible tune.

  8. Economy of scale: a motion sensor with variable speed tuning.

    PubMed

    Perrone, John A

    2005-01-26

    We have previously presented a model of how neurons in the primate middle temporal (MT/V5) area can develop selectivity for image speed by using common properties of the V1 neurons that precede them in the visual motion pathway (J. A. Perrone & A. Thiele, 2002). The motion sensor developed in this model is based on two broad classes of V1 complex neurons (sustained and transient). The S-type neuron has low-pass temporal frequency tuning, p(omega), and the T-type has band-pass temporal frequency tuning, m(omega). The outputs from the S and T neurons are combined in a special way (weighted intersection mechanism [WIM]) to generate a sensor tuned to a particular speed, v. Here I go on to show that if the S and T temporal frequency tuning functions have a particular form (i.e., p(omega)/(m(omega) = k/omega), then a motion sensor with variable speed tuning can be generated from just two V1 neurons. A simple scaling of the S- or T-type neuron output before it is incorporated into the WIM model produces a motion sensor that can be tuned to a wide continuous range of optimal speeds.

  9. Broad tuning range filtering system with Optune interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miron, Nicolae

    2008-08-01

    An optical system built with two Optune interferometers cascaded according to Vernier principle has attractive tunable band pass filtering properties for numerous applications. Several characteristics of Optune interferometer such as 0.2 dB insertion loss flatness across at least 90 nm interval, no tuning holes across 240 nm tuning range, quasi-periodic free spectral range and 1 dB insertion loss are key parameters to obtain a cascade with 0.1 nm band pass tunable across minimum 90 nm. Several properties of Optune interferometers are analyzed to build a cascade tunable across minimum 90 nm: the relationships between the free spectral ranges, bandwidths and tuning conditions. It is presented also a cascade prototype with two interferometers having 9.72 nm free spectral range and respectively 11.12 nm free spectral range. The cascade band pass is 0.1 nm tunable with 1 pm accuracy to any arbitrary wavelength across 150 nm free spectral range, without any tuning hole. It has 0.125 ms / 100 nm tuning speed, the insertion loss is less than 3 dB, 50 dB contrast, 0.5 dB flatness and 0.2 dB polarization dependent loss. A controller based on digital signal processor monitors the operation of the cascade to achieve optimum tuning performance.

  10. Objective estimates of cochlear tuning by otoacoustic emission analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moleti, Arturo; Sisto, Renata

    2003-01-01

    A new method is presented for estimating cochlear tuning starting from measurements of either the transient evoked otoacoustic emission latency or the spontaneous otoacoustic emission minimal spacing. This method could be useful in obtaining indirect information about the tuning curve, particularly for subjects that, like neonates, cannot be studied with psycho-acoustical techniques. Theoretical models of the acoustic transmission along the cochlea based on the transmission line formalism predict a relation between the otoacoustic emission latency and the frequency. This relation depends on the tuning curve, i.e., the frequency dependence of the quality factor of the cochlear resonances. On the other hand, models for the generation of spontaneous emissions based on the concept of coherent scattering from cochlear random inhomogeneities imply an independent relation between the tuning curve and the minimal frequency spacing between spontaneous emissions. In this study, experimental measurements of the otoacoustic emission latency and of the minimal spacing between spontaneous emissions are presented. Theoretical relations are derived, which connect these two measured quantities and the tuning curve. The typically longer latency of neonates implies a higher degree of tuning at high levels of stimulation.

  11. Analysis of tuning methods in semiconductor frequency-selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelya, Corey; Palm, Dominic; Fip, Tassilo; Rahm, Marco

    2017-02-01

    Advanced technology, such as sensing and communication equipment, has recently begun to combine optically sensitive nano-scale structures with customizable semiconductor material systems. Included within this broad field of study is the aptly named frequency-selective surface; which is unique in that it can be artificially designed to produce a specific electromagnetic or optical response. With the inherent utility of a frequency-selective surface, there has been an increased interest in the area of dynamic frequency-selective surfaces, which can be altered through optical or electrical tuning. This area has had exciting break throughs as tuning methods have evolved; however, these methods are typically energy intensive (optical tuning) or have met with limited success (electrical tuning). As such, this work investigates multiple structures and processes which implement semiconductor electrical biasing and/or optical tuning. Within this study are surfaces ranging from transmission meta-structures to metamaterial surface-waves and the associated coupling schemes. This work shows the utility of each design, while highlighting potential methods for optimizing dynamic meta-surfaces. As an added constraint, the structures were also designed to operate in unison with a state-of-the-art Ti:Sapphire Spitfire Ace and Spitfire Ace PA dual system (12 Watt) with pulse front matching THz generation and an EOS detection system. Additionally, the Ti:Sapphire laser system would provide the means for optical tunablity, while electrical tuning can be obtained through external power supplies.

  12. Aircraft interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottwald, James A.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    The focus is on a noise control method which considers aircraft fuselages lined with panels alternately tuned to frequencies above and below the frequency that must be attenuated. An interior noise reduction called alternate resonance tuning (ART) is described both theoretically and experimentally. Problems dealing with tuning single paneled wall structures for optimum noise reduction using the ART methodology are presented, and three theoretical problems are analyzed. The first analysis is a three dimensional, full acoustic solution for tuning a panel wall composed of repeating sections with four different panel tunings within that section, where the panels are modeled as idealized spring-mass-damper systems. The second analysis is a two dimensional, full acoustic solution for a panel geometry influenced by the effect of a propagating external pressure field such as that which might be associated with propeller passage by a fuselage. To reduce the analysis complexity, idealized spring-mass-damper panels are again employed. The final theoretical analysis presents the general four panel problem with real panel sections, where the effect of higher structural modes is discussed. Results from an experimental program highlight real applications of the ART concept and show the effectiveness of the tuning on real structures.

  13. Highly-efficient thermally-tuned resonant optical filters.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, John E; Shubin, Ivan; Zheng, Xuezhe; Pinguet, Thierry; Mekis, Attila; Luo, Ying; Thacker, Hiren; Li, Guoliang; Yao, Jin; Raj, Kannan; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V

    2010-08-30

    We demonstrate spectral tunability for microphotonic add-drop filters manufactured as ring resonators in a commercial 130 nm SOI CMOS technology. The filters are provisioned with integrated heaters built in CMOS for thermal tuning. Their thermal impedance has been dramatically increased by the selective removal of the SOI handler substrate under the device footprint using a bulk silicon micromachining process. An overall ~20x increase in the tuning efficiency has been demonstrated with a 100 µm radius ring as compared to a pre-micromachined device. A total of 3.9 mW of applied tuning power shifts the filter resonant peak across one free spectral node of the device. The Q-factor of the resonator remains unchanged after the co-integration process and hence this device geometry proves to be fully CMOS compatible. Additionally, after the cointegration process our result of 2π shift with 3.9 mW power is among the best tuning performances for this class of devices. Finally, we examine scaling the tuning efficiency versus device footprint to develop a different performance criterion for an easier comparison to evaluate thermal tuning. Our criterion is defined as the unit of power to shift the device resonance by a full 2π phase shift.

  14. Tuning contact transport mechanisms in bilayer MoSe2 transistors up to Fowler-Nordheim regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouafo, L. D. N.; Godel, F.; Froehlicher, G.; Berciaud, S.; Doudin, B.; Venkata Kamalakar, M.; Dayen, J.-F.

    2017-03-01

    Atomically thin molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) is an emerging two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor with significant potential for electronic, optoelectronic, spintronic applications and a common platform for their possible integration. Tuning interface charge transport between such new 2D materials and metallic electrodes is a key issue in 2D device physics and engineering. Here, we report tunable interface charge transport in bilayer MoSe2 field effect transistors with Ti/Au contacts showing high on/off ratio up to 107 at room temperature. Our experiments reveal a detailed map of transport mechanisms obtained by controlling the interface band bending profile via temperature, gate and source-drain bias voltages. This comprehensive investigation leads to demarcating regimes and tuning in transport mechanisms while controlling the interface barrier profile. The careful analysis allows us to identify thermally activated regime at low carrier density, and Schottky barrier driven mechanisms at higher carrier density demonstrating the transition from low-field direct tunneling/ thermionic emission to high-field Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. Furthermore, we show that the transition voltage V trans to Fowler-Nordheim correlates directly to the difference between the chemical potential of the metal electrode and the conduction band minimum in the 2D semiconductor, which opens up opportunities for new theoretical and experimental investigations. Our approach being generic can be extended to other 2D materials, and the possibility of tuning contact transport regimes is promising for designing MoSe2 device applications.

  15. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orey, Michael; Moore, David M.; Reeves, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Contains the following two leadership profiles of individuals who have made significant contributions to the field of instructional technology: "Francis M. Dwyer: Visual Researcher Extraordinaire" (David M. Moore); and "Tribute to John G. Hedberg: Professor of Education, University of Wollongong" (Thomas Reeves). (MES)

  16. Ranking Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the "U.S. News" ranking profiles of four colleges, namely: (1) Smith College; (2) Washington University in St. Louis; (3) Colorado State University at Fort Collins; and (4) Whitman College. Smith College was in the top 10 of the nation's liberal-arts colleges, or just outside it, almost since the "U.S.…

  17. Linking the response properties of cells in auditory cortex with network architecture: co-tuning vs. lateral inhibition

    PubMed Central

    de la Rocha, Jaime; Marchetti, Cristina; Schiff, Max; Reyes, Alex

    2008-01-01

    The frequency-intensity receptive fields (RF) of neurons in primary auditory cortex (AI) are heterogeneous. Some neurons have V-shaped RFs while others have enclosed ovoid RFs. Moreover, there is a wide range of temporal response profiles ranging from phasic to tonic firing. The mechanisms underlying this diversity of receptive field properties are yet unknown. Here we study the characteristics of thalamocortical (TC) and intracortical connectivity that give rise to the individual cell responses. Using a mouse auditory TC slice preparation, we found that the amplitude of synaptic responses in AI varies non-monotonically with the intensity of the stimulation in the medial geniculate nucleus (MGv). We constructed a network model of MGv and AI that was simulated using either rate model cells or in vitro neurons through an iterative procedure that used the recorded neural responses to reconstruct network activity. We compared the receptive fields and firing profiles obtained with networks configured either to have co-tuned excitatory and inhibitory inputs or relatively broad, lateral inhibitory inputs. Each of these networks yielded distinct response properties consistent with those documented in vivo with natural stimuli. The co-tuned network produced V-shaped RFs, phasic-tonic firing profiles, and predominantly monotonic rate-level functions. The lateral inhibitory network produced enclosed RFs with narrow frequency tuning, a variety of firing profiles, and robust non-monotonic rate-level functions. We conclude that both types of circuits must be present in order to account for the wide variety of responses observed in vivo. PMID:18784296

  18. Squeezing Alters Frequency Tuning of WGM Optical Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Maleki, Lute

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical squeezing has been found to alter the frequency tuning of a whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator that has an elliptical shape and is made of lithium niobate. It may be possible to exploit this effect to design reconfigurable optical filters for optical communications and for scientific experiments involving quantum electrodynamics. Some background information is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the squeezing-induced alteration of frequency tuning: The spectrum of a WGM resonator is represented by a comblike plot of intensity versus frequency. Each peak of the comblike plot corresponds to an electromagnetic mode represented by an integer mode number, and the modes are grouped into sets represented by integer mode indices. Because lithium niobate is an electro-optically active material, the WGM resonator can be tuned (that is, the resonance frequencies can be shifted) by applying a suitable bias potential. The frequency shift of each mode is quantified by a tuning rate defined as the ratio between the frequency shift and the applied potential. In the absence of squeezing, all modes exhibit the same tuning rate. This concludes the background information. It has been demonstrated experimentally that when the resonator is squeezed along part of either of its two principal axes, tuning rates differ among the groups of modes represented by different indices (see figure). The differences in tuning rates could be utilized to configure the resonance spectrum to obtain a desired effect; for example, through a combination of squeezing and electrical biasing, two resonances represented by different mode indices could be set at a specified frequency difference something that could not be done through electrical biasing alone.

  19. Autonomous Performance Monitoring System: Monitoring and Self-Tuning (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Chariya; Ziyad, Nigel A.

    2000-01-01

    Maintaining the long-term performance of software onboard a spacecraft can be a major factor in the cost of operations. In particular, the task of controlling and maintaining a future mission of distributed spacecraft will undoubtedly pose a great challenge, since the complexity of multiple spacecraft flying in formation grows rapidly as the number of spacecraft in the formation increases. Eventually, new approaches will be required in developing viable control systems that can handle the complexity of the data and that are flexible, reliable and efficient. In this paper we propose a methodology that aims to maintain the accuracy of flight software, while reducing the computational complexity of software tuning tasks. The proposed Monitoring and Self-Tuning (MAST) method consists of two parts: a flight software monitoring algorithm and a tuning algorithm. The dependency on the software being monitored is mostly contained in the monitoring process, while the tuning process is a generic algorithm independent of the detailed knowledge on the software. This architecture will enable MAST to be applicable to different onboard software controlling various dynamics of the spacecraft, such as attitude self-calibration, and formation control. An advantage of MAST over conventional techniques such as filter or batch least square is that the tuning algorithm uses machine learning approach to handle uncertainty in the problem domain, resulting in reducing over all computational complexity. The underlying concept of this technique is a reinforcement learning scheme based on cumulative probability generated by the historical performance of the system. The success of MAST will depend heavily on the reinforcement scheme used in the tuning algorithm, which guarantees the tuning solutions exist.

  20. AGS tune jump system to cross horizontal depolarization resonances overview

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, J.W.; Ahrens, L.; Fu, W.; Mi, J.L.; Rosas, P.; Schoefer, V.; Theisen, C.; Altinbas, Z.

    2011-03-28

    Two partial snakes overcome the vertical depolarizing resonances in the AGS. But a new type of depolarizing intrinsic resonance from horizontal motion appeared. We reduce these using horizontal tune jumps timed to these resonances. We gain a factor of six in crossing rate with a tune jump of 0.05 in 100 {micro}s. Two quadrapoles, we described in 2009, pulse 42 times, the current matching beam energy. The power supplies for these quads are described in detail elsewhere in this conference. The controls for the Jump Quad system is based on a BNL designed Quad Function Generator. Two modules are used; one for timing, and one to supply reference voltages. Synchronization is provided by a proprietary serial bus, the Event Link. The AgsTuneJump application predicts the times of the resonances during the AGS cycle and calculates the power supply trigger times from externally collected tune and energy versus time data and the Low and High PS voltage functions from a voltage to current model of the power supply. The system was commissioned during runs 09 & 10 and is operational. Many beam effects are described elsewhere. The TuneJump system has worked well and has caused little trouble save for the perturbations in the lattice having such a large effect due to our need to run with the vertical tune within a few thousandths of the integer tune. As these problems were mostly sorted out by correcting the 6th harmonic orbit distortions which caused a large 18 theta beta wave. Also running with minimal chromaticity reduces emittance growth. There are still small beta waves which are being addressed. The timing of the pulses is still being investigated, but as each crossing causes minimal polarization loss, this is a lengthy process.

  1. Neural Tuning Functions Underlie Both Generalization and Interference.

    PubMed

    Howard, Ian S; Franklin, David W

    2015-01-01

    In sports, the role of backswing is considered critical for generating a good shot, even though it plays no direct role in hitting the ball. We recently demonstrated the scientific basis of this phenomenon by showing that immediate past movement affects the learning and recall of motor memories. This effect occurred regardless of whether the past contextual movement was performed actively, passively, or shown visually. In force field studies, it has been shown that motor memories generalize locally and that the level of compensation decays as a function of movement angle away from the trained movement. Here we examine if the contextual effect of past movement exhibits similar patterns of generalization and whether it can explain behavior seen in interference studies. Using a single force-field learning task, the directional tuning curves of both the prior contextual movement and the subsequent force field adaptive movements were measured. The adaptation movement direction showed strong directional tuning, decaying to zero by 90° relative to the training direction. The contextual movement direction exhibited a similar directional tuning, although the effect was always above 60%. We then investigated the directional tuning of the passive contextual movement using interference tasks, where the contextual movements that uniquely specified the force field direction were separated by ±15° or ±45°. Both groups showed a pronounced tuning effect, which could be well explained by the directional tuning functions for single force fields. Our results show that contextual effect of past movement influences predictive force compensation, even when adaptation does not require contextual information. However, when such past movement contextual information is crucial to the task, such as in an interference study, it plays a strong role in motor memory learning and recall. This work demonstrates that similar tuning responses underlie both generalization of movement direction

  2. Neural Tuning Functions Underlie Both Generalization and Interference

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Ian S.; Franklin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    In sports, the role of backswing is considered critical for generating a good shot, even though it plays no direct role in hitting the ball. We recently demonstrated the scientific basis of this phenomenon by showing that immediate past movement affects the learning and recall of motor memories. This effect occurred regardless of whether the past contextual movement was performed actively, passively, or shown visually. In force field studies, it has been shown that motor memories generalize locally and that the level of compensation decays as a function of movement angle away from the trained movement. Here we examine if the contextual effect of past movement exhibits similar patterns of generalization and whether it can explain behavior seen in interference studies. Using a single force-field learning task, the directional tuning curves of both the prior contextual movement and the subsequent force field adaptive movements were measured. The adaptation movement direction showed strong directional tuning, decaying to zero by 90° relative to the training direction. The contextual movement direction exhibited a similar directional tuning, although the effect was always above 60%. We then investigated the directional tuning of the passive contextual movement using interference tasks, where the contextual movements that uniquely specified the force field direction were separated by ±15° or ±45°. Both groups showed a pronounced tuning effect, which could be well explained by the directional tuning functions for single force fields. Our results show that contextual effect of past movement influences predictive force compensation, even when adaptation does not require contextual information. However, when such past movement contextual information is crucial to the task, such as in an interference study, it plays a strong role in motor memory learning and recall. This work demonstrates that similar tuning responses underlie both generalization of movement direction

  3. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT VII, ENGINE TUNE-UP--DETROIT DIESEL ENGINE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF TUNE-UP PROCEDURES FOR DIESEL ENGINES. TOPICS ARE SCHEDULING TUNE-UPS, AND TUNE-UP PROCEDURES. THE MODULE CONSISTS OF A SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL BRANCH PROGRAMED TRAINING FILM "ENGINE TUNE-UP--DETROIT DIESEL ENGINE" AND OTHER MATERIALS. SEE VT 005 655 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.…

  4. Extending the mode-hop-free tuning range of an external-cavity diode laser by synchronous tuning with mode matching.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hai; Liu, Zhigang; Zhou, Yangli; Zhang, Weibo

    2014-11-20

    We present an effective method to extend the mode-hop-free (MHF) tuning range of an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) by synchronous tuning of the longitudinal modes of the external cavity and the internal cavity, with the mode also matched in the initial state. Both the principle of synchronous tuning and the condition of mode matching in a Littman-configuration ECDL are introduced. The necessary tuning parameters could simply be estimated by the output power curve of the tuning with a single photodiode. By using this tuning method, we increased the MHF tuning range of an ECDL with a nonoptimized reflector pivot position from several gigahertzes to over 78 GHz around 774.5 nm. The tuning performance of the ECDL could meet the requirement of frequency scanned interferometry.

  5. On tune deafness (dysmelodia): frequency, development, genetics and musical background.

    PubMed

    Kalmus, H; Fry, D B

    1980-05-01

    With the aid of the Distorted Tunes Test a group of British adults could be established whose melodic aptitude was below a certain level and whom we called tune deaf. They are only a fraction of those popularly called tone deaf. The Distorted Tunes Test is only slightly correlated with pitch discrimination, short term tonal memory or number memory. In children ability to pass the Distorted Tunes Test develops at greatly varying speeds and to a varying degree, reaching stability in adolescence. Tune deafness has a familial distribution and segregates in a way suggesting an autosomal dominant trait with imperfect penetrance. Some degree of positive assortative mating has been established. Some people, unfamiliar with the British melodies which form the basis of the test, pass it. This indicates the existence of a partly innate and partly acquired competence to judge what is acceptable and what is not, within the tradition of Western popular or classical music. This seems to indicate the existence of some deep structure of tonality, comparable with Chomsky's deep language structure. Asians who have not been much exposed to this kind of music find the task very difficult.

  6. Unsteady Aerodynamic Model Tuning for Precise Flutter Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for an unsteady aerodynamic model tuning is proposed in this study. This method is based on the direct modification of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. The aerostructures test wing 2 flight-test data is used to demonstrate the proposed model tuning method. The flutter speed margin computed using only the test validated structural dynamic model can be improved using the additional unsteady aerodynamic model tuning, and then the flutter speed margin requirement of 15 % in military specifications can apply towards the test validated aeroelastic model. In this study, unsteady aerodynamic model tunings are performed at two time invariant flight conditions, at Mach numbers of 0.390 and 0.456. When the Mach number for the unsteady model tuning approaches to the measured fluttering Mach number, 0.502, at the flight altitude of 9,837 ft, the estimated flutter speed is approached to the measured flutter speed at this altitude. The minimum flutter speed difference between the estimated and measured flutter speed is -.14 %.

  7. Unsteady Aerodynamic Model Tuning for Precise Flutter Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for an unsteady aerodynamic model tuning is proposed in this study. This method is based on the direct modification of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. The aerostructures test wing 2 flight-test data is used to demonstrate the proposed model tuning method. The flutter speed margin computed using only the test validated structural dynamic model can be improved using the additional unsteady aerodynamic model tuning, and then the flutter speed margin requirement of 15 percent in military specifications can apply towards the test validated aeroelastic model. In this study, unsteady aerodynamic model tunings are performed at two time invariant flight conditions, at Mach numbers of 0.390 and 0.456. When the Mach number for the unsteady aerodynamic model tuning approaches to the measured fluttering Mach number, 0.502, at the flight altitude of 9,837 ft, the estimated flutter speed is approached to the measured flutter speed at this altitude. The minimum flutter speed difference between the estimated and measured flutter speed is -0.14 percent.

  8. Ionic and neuromodulatory regulation of burst discharge controls frequency tuning.

    PubMed

    Mehaffey, W Hamish; Ellis, Lee D; Krahe, Rüdiger; Dunn, Robert J; Chacron, Maurice J

    2008-01-01

    Sensory neurons encode natural stimuli by changes in firing rate or by generating specific firing patterns, such as bursts. Many neural computations rely on the fact that neurons can be tuned to specific stimulus frequencies. It is thus important to understand the mechanisms underlying frequency tuning. In the electrosensory system of the weakly electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus, the primary processing of behaviourally relevant sensory signals occurs in pyramidal neurons of the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL). These cells encode low frequency prey stimuli with bursts of spikes and high frequency communication signals with single spikes. We describe here how bursting in pyramidal neurons can be regulated by intrinsic conductances in a cell subtype specific fashion across the sensory maps found within the ELL, thereby regulating their frequency tuning. Further, the neuromodulatory regulation of such conductances within individual cells and the consequences to frequency tuning are highlighted. Such alterations in the tuning of the pyramidal neurons may allow weakly electric fish to preferentially select for certain stimuli under various behaviourally relevant circumstances.

  9. An Adaptive Kalman Filter Using a Simple Residual Tuning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    One difficulty in using Kalman filters in real world situations is the selection of the correct process noise, measurement noise, and initial state estimate and covariance. These parameters are commonly referred to as tuning parameters. Multiple methods have been developed to estimate these parameters. Most of those methods such as maximum likelihood, subspace, and observer Kalman Identification require extensive offline processing and are not suitable for real time processing. One technique, which is suitable for real time processing, is the residual tuning method. Any mismodeling of the filter tuning parameters will result in a non-white sequence for the filter measurement residuals. The residual tuning technique uses this information to estimate corrections to those tuning parameters. The actual implementation results in a set of sequential equations that run in parallel with the Kalman filter. A. H. Jazwinski developed a specialized version of this technique for estimation of process noise. Equations for the estimation of the measurement noise have also been developed. These algorithms are used to estimate the process noise and measurement noise for the Wide Field Infrared Explorer star tracker and gyro.

  10. An Adaptive Kalman Filter using a Simple Residual Tuning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    One difficulty in using Kalman filters in real world situations is the selection of the correct process noise, measurement noise, and initial state estimate and covariance. These parameters are commonly referred to as tuning parameters. Multiple methods have been developed to estimate these parameters. Most of those methods such as maximum likelihood, subspace, and observer Kalman Identification require extensive offline processing and are not suitable for real time processing. One technique, which is suitable for real time processing, is the residual tuning method. Any mismodeling of the filter tuning parameters will result in a non-white sequence for the filter measurement residuals. The residual tuning technique uses this information to estimate corrections to those tuning parameters. The actual implementation results in a set of sequential equations that run in parallel with the Kalman filter. Equations for the estimation of the measurement noise have also been developed. These algorithms are used to estimate the process noise and measurement noise for the Wide Field Infrared Explorer star tracker and gyro.

  11. Broad electrical tuning of plasmonic nanoantennas at visible frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thang B.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2016-05-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of electrical tuning of plasmon resonances of optical nanopatch antennas over a wide wavelength range. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes separated from a gold film by a thin 8 nm polyelectrolyte spacer layer. By using ionic liquid and indium tin oxide coated glass as a top electrode, we demonstrate dynamic and reversible tuning of the plasmon resonance over 100 nm in the visible wavelength range using low applied voltages between -3.0 V and 2.8 V. The electrical potential is applied across the nanoscale gap causing changes in the gap thickness and dielectric environment which, in turn, modifies the plasmon resonance. The observed tuning range is greater than the full-width-at-half-maximum of the plasmon resonance, resulting in a tuning figure of merit of 1.05 and a tuning contrast greater than 50%. Our results provide an avenue to create active and reconfigurable integrated nanophotonic components for applications in optoelectronics and sensing.

  12. Broad electrical tuning of plasmonic nanoantennas at visible frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thang B.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2016-05-02

    We report an experimental demonstration of electrical tuning of plasmon resonances of optical nanopatch antennas over a wide wavelength range. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes separated from a gold film by a thin 8 nm polyelectrolyte spacer layer. By using ionic liquid and indium tin oxide coated glass as a top electrode, we demonstrate dynamic and reversible tuning of the plasmon resonance over 100 nm in the visible wavelength range using low applied voltages between −3.0 V and 2.8 V. The electrical potential is applied across the nanoscale gap causing changes in the gap thickness and dielectric environment which, in turn, modifies the plasmon resonance. The observed tuning range is greater than the full-width-at-half-maximum of the plasmon resonance, resulting in a tuning figure of merit of 1.05 and a tuning contrast greater than 50%. Our results provide an avenue to create active and reconfigurable integrated nanophotonic components for applications in optoelectronics and sensing.

  13. Tuning the Model Predictive Control of a Crude Distillation Unit.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, André Shigueo; Zanin, Antonio Carlos; Odloak, Darci

    2016-01-01

    Tuning the parameters of the Model Predictive Control (MPC) of an industrial Crude Distillation Unit (CDU) is considered here. A realistic scenario is depicted where the inputs of the CDU system have optimizing targets, which are provided by the Real Time Optimization layer of the control structure. It is considered the nominal case, in which both the CDU model and the MPC model are the same. The process outputs are controlled inside zones instead of at fixed set points. Then, the tuning procedure has to define the weights that penalize the output error with respect to the control zone, the weights that penalize the deviation of the inputs from their targets, as well as the weights that penalize the input moves. A tuning approach based on multi-objective optimization is proposed and applied to the MPC of the CDU system. The performance of the controller tuned with the proposed approach is compared through simulation with the results of an existing approach also based on multi-objective optimization. The simulation results are similar, but the proposed approach has a computational load significantly lower than the existing method. The tuning effort is also much lower than in the conventional practical approaches that are usually based on ad-hoc procedures.

  14. Distinguishing attentional gain and tuning in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Taylor W; Dixon, Matthew L; Anderson, Adam K; De Rosa, Eve

    2014-11-01

    Here we examined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) whether advanced age affects 2 mechanisms of attention that are widely thought to enhance signal processing in the sensory neocortex: gain and tuning. Healthy young and older adults discriminated faces under varying levels of object competition while fMRI was acquired. In young adults, cortical response magnitude to attended faces was maintained despite increasing competition, consistent with gain. Cortical response selectivity, indexed from repetition suppression, also increased only for attended faces despite increasing competition, consistent with tuning. Older adults exhibited intact gain, but altered tuning, with extrastriate cortical tuning determined by object salience rather than attention. Moreover, the magnitude of this susceptibility to stimulus-driven processing was associated with a redistribution of attention-driven competitive processes to the frontal cortices. These data indicate that although both gain and tuning are modulated by increased perceptual competition, they are functionally dissociable in the extrastriate cortices, exhibit differential susceptibility to advanced aging, and spare the frontal cortices a considerable processing burden through early selection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An Adaptive Kalman Filter using a Simple Residual Tuning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    One difficulty in using Kalman filters in real world situations is the selection of the correct process noise, measurement noise, and initial state estimate and covariance. These parameters are commonly referred to as tuning parameters. Multiple methods have been developed to estimate these parameters. Most of those methods such as maximum likelihood, subspace, and observer Kalman Identification require extensive offline processing and are not suitable for real time processing. One technique, which is suitable for real time processing, is the residual tuning method. Any mismodeling of the filter tuning parameters will result in a non-white sequence for the filter measurement residuals. The residual tuning technique uses this information to estimate corrections to those tuning parameters. The actual implementation results in a set of sequential equations that run in parallel with the Kalman filter. Equations for the estimation of the measurement noise have also been developed. These algorithms are used to estimate the process noise and measurement noise for the Wide Field Infrared Explorer star tracker and gyro.

  16. An Adaptive Kalman Filter Using a Simple Residual Tuning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    One difficulty in using Kalman filters in real world situations is the selection of the correct process noise, measurement noise, and initial state estimate and covariance. These parameters are commonly referred to as tuning parameters. Multiple methods have been developed to estimate these parameters. Most of those methods such as maximum likelihood, subspace, and observer Kalman Identification require extensive offline processing and are not suitable for real time processing. One technique, which is suitable for real time processing, is the residual tuning method. Any mismodeling of the filter tuning parameters will result in a non-white sequence for the filter measurement residuals. The residual tuning technique uses this information to estimate corrections to those tuning parameters. The actual implementation results in a set of sequential equations that run in parallel with the Kalman filter. A. H. Jazwinski developed a specialized version of this technique for estimation of process noise. Equations for the estimation of the measurement noise have also been developed. These algorithms are used to estimate the process noise and measurement noise for the Wide Field Infrared Explorer star tracker and gyro.

  17. A comparative design and tuning for conventional fuzzy control.

    PubMed

    Li, H X

    1997-01-01

    A new methodology is introduced for designing and tuning the scaling gains of the conventional fuzzy logic controller (FLC) based on its well-tuned linear counterpart. The conventional FLC with a linear rule base is very similar to its linear counterpart. The linear three-term controller has proportional, integral and/or derivative gains. Similarly, the conventional fuzzy three-term controller also has fuzzy proportional, integral and/or derivative gains. The new concept "fuzzy transfer function" is invented to connect these fuzzy gains with the corresponding scaling gains. The comparative gain design is presented by using the gains of the well-tuned linear counterpart as the initial fuzzy gains of the conventional FLC. Furthermore, the relationship between the scaling gains and the performance can be deduced to produce the comparative tuning algorithm, which can tune the scaling gains to their optimum by less trial and error. The performance comparison in the simulation demonstrates the viability of the new methodology.

  18. A new hybrid gyroscope with electrostatic negative stiffness tuning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Guan, Yumei; Wang, Shourong; Zou, Qi; Chu, Xian; Xue, Haiyan

    2013-05-30

    A variety of gyroscopes have been extensively studied due to their capability of precision detection of rotation rates and extensive applications in navigation, guidance and motion control. In this work, a new Hybrid Gyroscope (HG) which combines the traditional Dynamically Tuned Gyroscope (DTG) with silicon micromachined technology is investigated. The HG not only has the potentiality of achieving the same high precision as the traditional DTG, but also features a small size and low cost. The theoretical mechanism of the HG with a capacitance transducer and an electrostatic torquer is derived and the influence of the installation errors from the capacitance plate and the disc rotor module is investigated. A new tuning mechanism based on negative stiffness rather than the traditional dynamic tuning is proposed. The experimental results prove that the negative stiffness tuning is practicable and a tuning voltage of as high as 63 V is demonstrated. Due to the decreased installation error, the non-linearity of the scale factor is reduced significantly from 11.78% to 0.64%, as well as the asymmetry from 93.3% to 1.56% in the open loop condition. The rebalancing close-loop control is simulated and achieved experimentally, which proves that the fundamental principle of the HG is feasible.

  19. Orientation tuning in human colour vision at detection threshold

    PubMed Central

    Gheiratmand, Mina; Mullen, Kathy T.

    2014-01-01

    We measure the orientation tuning of red-green colour and luminance vision at low (0.375 c/deg) and mid (1.5 c/deg) spatial frequencies using the low-contrast psychophysical method of subthreshold summation. Orientation bandwidths of the underlying neural detectors are found using a model involving Minkowski summation of the rectified outputs of a bank of oriented filters. At 1.5 c/deg, we find orientation-tuned detectors with similar bandwidths for chromatic and achromatic contrast. At 0.375 c/deg, orientation tuning is preserved with no change in bandwidth for achromatic stimuli, however, for chromatic stimuli orientation tuning becomes extremely broad, compatible with detection by non-oriented colour detectors. A non-oriented colour detector, previously reported in single cells in primate V1 but not psychophysically in humans, can transmit crucial information about the color of larger areas or surfaces whereas orientation-tuned detectors are required to detect the colour or luminance edges that delineate an object's shape. PMID:24594749

  20. Tuning Parameters in Heuristics by Using Design of Experiments Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arin, Arif; Rabadi, Ghaith; Unal, Resit

    2010-01-01

    With the growing complexity of today's large scale problems, it has become more difficult to find optimal solutions by using exact mathematical methods. The need to find near-optimal solutions in an acceptable time frame requires heuristic approaches. In many cases, however, most heuristics have several parameters that need to be "tuned" before they can reach good results. The problem then turns into "finding best parameter setting" for the heuristics to solve the problems efficiently and timely. One-Factor-At-a-Time (OFAT) approach for parameter tuning neglects the interactions between parameters. Design of Experiments (DOE) tools can be instead employed to tune the parameters more effectively. In this paper, we seek the best parameter setting for a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to solve the single machine total weighted tardiness problem in which n jobs must be scheduled on a single machine without preemption, and the objective is to minimize the total weighted tardiness. Benchmark instances for the problem are available in the literature. To fine tune the GA parameters in the most efficient way, we compare multiple DOE models including 2-level (2k ) full factorial design, orthogonal array design, central composite design, D-optimal design and signal-to-noise (SIN) ratios. In each DOE method, a mathematical model is created using regression analysis, and solved to obtain the best parameter setting. After verification runs using the tuned parameter setting, the preliminary results for optimal solutions of multiple instances were found efficiently.