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Sample records for bhr group limited

  1. Utilization of Minor Actinides as a Fuel Component for Ultra-Long Life Bhr Configurations: Designs, Advantages and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Pavel V. Tsvetkov

    2009-05-20

    This project assessed the advantages and limitations of using minor actinides as a fuel component to achieve ultra-long life Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) configurations. Researchers considered and compared the capabilities of pebble-bed and prismatic core designs with advanced actinide fuels to achieve ultra-long operation without refueling. Since both core designs permit flexibility in component configuration, fuel utilization, and fuel management, it is possible to improve fissile properties of minor actinides by neutron spectrum shifting through configuration adjustments. The project studied advanced actinide fuels, which could reduce the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository and enable recovery of the energy contained in spent fuel. The ultra-long core life autonomous approach may reduce the technical need for additional repositories and is capable to improve marketability of the Generation IV VHTR by allowing worldwide deployment, including remote regions and regions with limited industrial resources. Utilization of minor actinides in nuclear reactors facilitates developments of new fuel cycles towards sustainable nuclear energy scenarios.

  2. Fluid seals technology at BHR Group Ltd.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leefe, Simon

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for ESA, which couples the rigid body dynamics in four degrees of freedom of a flexibly mounted stator (with Coulomb damping) of a turbopump face seal with the fluid film behavior. The interfacial film is assumed gaseous, and the model incorporates laminar/turbulent flow, inertia and sonic choking. Seal faces may be wavy and coned, while the rotating ring can be eccentrically mounted, misaligned with the shaft and oscillate axially at arbitrary frequency. The model is currently being coded into software. An experimental program using a high speed cryogenic/hot gas test rig is being conducted to verify the output of the computer program.

  3. Fluid seals technology at BHR Group Ltd.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leefe, Simon

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for ESA, which couples the rigid body dynamics in four degrees of freedom of a flexibly mounted stator (with Coulomb damping) of a turbopump face seal with the fluid film behavior. The interfacial film is assumed gaseous, and the model incorporates laminar/turbulent flow, inertia and sonic choking. Seal faces may be wavy and coned, while the rotating ring can be eccentrically mounted, misaligned with the shaft and oscillate axially at arbitrary frequency. The model is currently being coded into software. An experimental program using a high speed cryogenic/hot gas test rig is being conducted to verify the output of the computer program.

  4. BHR equations re-derived with immiscible particle effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzkopf, John Dennis; Horwitz, Jeremy A.

    2015-05-01

    Compressible and variable density turbulent flows with dispersed phase effects are found in many applications ranging from combustion to cloud formation. These types of flows are among the most challenging to simulate. While the exact equations governing a system of particles and fluid are known, computational resources limit the scale and detail that can be simulated in this type of problem. Therefore, a common method is to simulate averaged versions of the flow equations, which still capture salient physics and is relatively less computationally expensive. Besnard developed such a model for variable density miscible turbulence, where ensemble-averaging was applied to the flow equations to yield a set of filtered equations. Besnard further derived transport equations for the Reynolds stresses, the turbulent mass flux, and the density-specific volume covariance, to help close the filtered momentum and continuity equations. We re-derive the exact BHR closure equations which include integral terms owing to immiscible effects. Physical interpretations of the additional terms are proposed along with simple models. The goal of this work is to extend the BHR model to allow for the simulation of turbulent flows where an immiscible dispersed phase is non-trivially coupled with the carrier phase.

  5. Revealing the Jets in the BHR 71 Protostellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Tyler L.; Tobin, John J.; Gusdorf, Antoine; Arce, Hector G.; Tafalla, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The BHR 71 low-mass protostellar binary system powers two highly collimated outflows, with the outflow from the primary (IRS1) producing shock-induced chemical activity only seen in a handful of other outflows (notably L1157, but also L1448 and IRAS04166). This may represent a very short phase in the outflow process that we don’t yet understand. The shocks are likely caused by jets with velocities > 50 km/s impacting on the ambient material, but unlike in the other outflows mentioned above, no such jet has yet been identified in BHR 71, although hints are found in low-resolution Herschel water observations. We report on ALMA observations of SiO toward both protostars within BHR 71, with surprising results.

  6. Validating the BHR RANS model for variable density turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M; Gore, Robert A; Stalsberg - Zarling, Krista L

    2009-01-01

    The BHR RANS model is a turbulence model for multi-fluid flows in which density variation plays a strong role in the turbulence processes. In this paper they demonstrate the usefulness of BHR over a wide range of flows which include the effects of shear, buoyancy, and shocks. The results are in good agreement with experimental and DNS data across the entire set of validation cases, with no need to retune model coefficients between cases. The model has potential application to a number of aerospace related flow problems.

  7. The Bok globule BHR 160: structure and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haikala, L. K.; Reipurth, B.

    2017-01-01

    Context. BHR 160 is a virtually unstudied cometary globule within the Sco OB4 association in Scorpius at a distance of 1600 pc. It is part of a system of cometary clouds which face the luminous O star HD 155806. BHR 160 is special because it has an intense bright rim. Aims: We attempt to derive physical parameters for BHR 160 and to understand its structure and the origin of its peculiar bright rim. Methods: BHR 160 was mapped in the , and C18O(2-1) and (1-0) and CS (3-2) and (2-1) lines. These data, augmented with stellar photometry derived from the ESO VVV survey, were used to derive the mass and distribution of molecular material in BHR 160 and its surroundings. Archival mid-infrared data from the WISE satellite was used to find IR excess stars in the globule and its neighbourhood. Results: An elongated 1' by 0.´6 core lies adjacent to the globule bright rim. emission covers the whole globule, but the , C18Oand CS emission is more concentrated to the core. The line profiles indicate the presence of outflowing material near the core, but the spatial resolution of the mm data is not sufficient for a detailed spatial analysis. The BHR 160 mass estimated from the C18Omapping is100 ± 50 M⊙ (d/1.6 kpc)2 where d is the distance to the globule. Approximately 70% of the mass lies in the dense core. The total mass of molecular gas in the direction of BHR 160 is 210 ± 80 (d/1.6 kpc)2 M⊙ when estimated from the more extended VVV near-infrared photometry. We argue that the bright rim of BHR 160 is produced by a close-by early B-type star, HD 319648, that was likely recently born in the globule. This star is likely to have triggered the formation of a source, IRS 1, that is embedded within the core of the globule and detected only in Ks and by WISE and IRAS. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla or Paranal Observatories.Reduced molecular line spectra (The SEST spectra as FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  8. Neonatal Handling Increases Cardiovascular Reactivity to Contextual Fear Conditioning in Borderline Hypertensive Rats (BHR)

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Brian J.; Knoepfler, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Much research has demonstrated that events occurring in early life can have a profound influence on future biobehavioral responses to stressful and emotion provoking situations. The purpose of these studies was to determine the effects of an early environmental manipulation, handling (HAN) on cardiovascular (CV) reactivity, freezing behavior and corticosterone (CORT) responses to contextual fear conditioning in the borderline hypertensive rat (BHR), which is susceptible to environmental stressors. HAN subjects were separated from the nest for 15 min/day on post-natal days 1–14, while non-handled (NON-HAN) controls remained in the home cage. Adult subjects were exposed to the contextual fear conditioning procedure and returned to the chamber 24 h later for a 10 min test period. HAN subjects displayed significantly more freezing behavior compared to NON-HAN(92%±2.2 vs 80.7%±5.7, p < .05). Although resting MAP did not differ between groups, HAN subjects had increased MAP reactivity when re-exposed to the chamber. In addition, HAN subjects had significantly lower CORT levels at the end of the 10 min test period (174.2±9 ng/ml vs 237.2±12.9 ng/ml, p < .05). In the second experiment, CORT responses to 60 min of restraint stress and recovery following return to the home cage were assessed in separate groups of HAN and NON-HAN subjects. HAN subjects showed reduced CORT levels in response to acute restraint stress. These results indicate that neonatal handling can modulate biobehavioral responses to contextual fear conditioning in BHR and may suggest a useful model with which to study emotionality and susceptibility to CV disease. PMID:18538802

  9. Variable-Density Co-Flowing Jet Simulations with BHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments by the Extreme Fluids team at Los Alamos National Laboratory have examined a jet of SF6 injected into co-flowing air. The experiment is designed to aquire detailed diagnostics for comparision to turbulence models. Simultaneous PIV/PLIF is used to measure the Reynolds stress and velicty-density correlations. In the current work, the BHR RANS model is being implemented in an incompressible variable-density code, and compared to the experimental results. Since the jet is not self-similar, both due to co-flow and variable density effects, careful attenstion is payed to the role of inflow conditions. Also, some multi-jet configurations are explored.

  10. RANS modeling of RTI and HVDT with BHR3

    SciTech Connect

    Trettel, Ben

    2012-08-15

    The BHR3 turbulence model was improved to include two different scales as suggested by Livescu et al. [Liv+09, {section}4.4.6]: one for turbulent transport and the other for turbulent dissipation. Additionally, destruction terms modeled analogously to production terms were added to the turbulent mass-weighted velocity equation. New model coefficients were developed for this model. The first change was to use C{sub 2} = 1.77 for the isotropic turbulence decay coefficient rather than the k-e model's 1.92, which is outside of the experimentally measured values [ML90; KF09]. The new model coefficients were developed to accurately model a wide range of experimental and numerical results: constant and variable density Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, and homogeneous variable density turbulence (HVDT) [LR07]. My work focused on the buoyancy-driven flows: Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and HVDT.

  11. Implementation and Validation of the BHR Turbulence Model in the FLAG Hydrocode

    SciTech Connect

    Denissen, Nicholas A.; Fung, Jimmy; Reisner, Jon M.; Andrews, Malcolm J.

    2012-08-29

    The BHR-2 turbulence model, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for variable density and compressible flows, is implemented in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode, FLAG. The BHR-2 formulation is discussed, with emphasis on its connection to multi-component flow formulations that underlie FLAG's treatment of multi-species flow. One-dimensional and two-dimensional validation tests are performed and compared to experiment and Eulerian simulations. Turbulence is an often studied and ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, and modeling its effects is essential in many practical applications. Specifically the behavior of turbulence in the presence of strong density gradients and compressibility is of fundamental importance in applications ranging from Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) [1], supernovae [2], and atmospheric flows. The BHR closure approach [3] seeks to model the physical processes at work in variable density turbulence including Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) [4], Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) [5], and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) [6], driven turbulence. The effectiveness of the BHR-2 implementation has been demonstrated for variable density mixing in the KH, RT, and RM cases in an Eulerian framework [7]. The primary motivation of the present work is to implement the BHR-2 turbulence model in the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics code FLAG. The goal is not only to demonstrate results in agreement with previous Eulerian calculations, but also document behavior that arises from the underlying differences in code philosophy.

  12. Impacts of pure shocks in the BHR71 bipolar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusdorf, A.; Riquelme, D.; Anderl, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Codella, C.; Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Graf, U. U.; Kristensen, L. E.; Leurini, S.; Parise, B.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Ricken, O.; Güsten, R.

    2015-03-01

    Context. During the formation of a star, material is ejected along powerful jets that impact the ambient material. This outflow regulates star formation by e.g. inducing turbulence and heating the surrounding gas. Understanding the associated shocks is therefore essential to the study of star formation. Aims: We present comparisons of shock models with CO, H2, and SiO observations in a "pure" shock position in the BHR71 bipolar outflow. These comparisons provide an insight into the shock and pre-shock characteristics, and allow us to understand the energetic and chemical feedback of star formation on Galactic scales. Methods: New CO (Jup = 16, 11, 7, 6, 4, 3) observations from the shocked regions with the SOFIA and APEX telescopes are presented and combined with earlier H2 and SiO data (from the Spitzer and APEX telescopes). The integrated intensities are compared to a grid of models that were obtained from a magneto-hydrodynamical shock code, which calculates the dynamical and chemical structure of these regions combined with a radiative transfer module based on the "large velocity gradient" approximation. Results: The CO emission leads us to update the conclusions of our previous shock analysis: pre-shock densities of 104 cm-3 and shock velocities around 20-25 km s-1 are still constrained, but older ages are inferred (~4000 years). Conclusions: We evaluate the contribution of shocks to the excitation of CO around forming stars. The SiO observations are compatible with a scenario where less than 4% of the pre-shock SiO belongs to the grain mantles. We infer outflow parameters: a mass of 1.8 × 10-2 M⊙ was measured in our beam, in which a momentum of 0.4 M⊙ km s-1 is dissipated, corresponding to an energy of 4.2 × 1043 erg. We analyse the energetics of the outflow species by species. Comparing our results with previous studies highlights their dependence on the method: H2 observations only are not sufficient to evaluate the mass of outflows.

  13. Patient satisfaction and clinical results at a mean eight years following BHR arthroplasty: results from a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Sandiford, Nemandra A; Ahmed, Syed; Doctor, Cyrus; East, Debra J; Miles, Kim; Apthorp, Hugh D

    2014-01-01

    We present the clinical and radiological results of a prospective study of a consecutive series of patients treated with the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) prosthesis between 1999 and 2006 and followed for six to 12 years. Patients were reviewed preoperatively and six, 12, 26 and 52 weeks postoperatively and annually thereafter. They were assessed clinically and radiographically and the Merle d'Aubigne Postel and Oxford Hip scores were calculated at each visit. A SF-36 form assessed general health. Patient satisfaction was assessed by a Visual Analogue Score. Kaplan Meier survival analysis was performed.One hundred and seven patients (109 hips) were included (45 males, 62 females). Median age was 44 years. Mean follow-up was 97.4 months. Median preoperative Merle d'Aubigne Postel and Oxford hip scores were 10 (3-14) and 42 (26-55) respectively. Median SF36 score was 29 (0-65) and patients rated their level of pain as 7.7 on a scale of 0-10 (10 being the worst score). At final follow-up, median MDP and OHS scores were 17 (16-18) and 25 (12-46). Median SF36 score was 72 (27-97). Seven revisions were performed in six females and one male patient. Survival was 96.2% with revision for any reason as the end point. No revisions were performed in the group with hip dysplasia.The BHR prosthesis provides pain relief, high levels of patient satisfaction and improvement of function and well being in the medium-term. Failures occurred primarily in the female group.

  14. Researching Women's Groups Findings, Limitations, and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leech, Nancy L.; Kees, Nathalie L.

    2005-01-01

    There is not a "typical" women's group, nor are there "typical" women's issues. Every women's group is diverse, with as many viewpoints and perspectives as there are members in the group. Using the group format for women is common practice with many counselors. It is interesting that there has been little empirical research reported on women's…

  15. Researching Women's Groups Findings, Limitations, and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leech, Nancy L.; Kees, Nathalie L.

    2005-01-01

    There is not a "typical" women's group, nor are there "typical" women's issues. Every women's group is diverse, with as many viewpoints and perspectives as there are members in the group. Using the group format for women is common practice with many counselors. It is interesting that there has been little empirical research reported on women's…

  16. A BHR Composite Network-Based Visualization Method for Deformation Risk Level of Underground Space

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoya; Lu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a visualization processing method for the deformation risk level of underground space. The proposed method is based on a BP-Hopfield-RGB (BHR) composite network. Complex environmental factors are integrated in the BP neural network. Dynamic monitoring data are then automatically classified in the Hopfield network. The deformation risk level is combined with the RGB color space model and is displayed visually in real time, after which experiments are conducted with the use of an ultrasonic omnidirectional sensor device for structural deformation monitoring. The proposed method is also compared with some typical methods using a benchmark dataset. Results show that the BHR composite network visualizes the deformation monitoring process in real time and can dynamically indicate dangerous zones. PMID:26011618

  17. A BHR Composite Network-Based Visualization Method for Deformation Risk Level of Underground Space.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoya; Lu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a visualization processing method for the deformation risk level of underground space. The proposed method is based on a BP-Hopfield-RGB (BHR) composite network. Complex environmental factors are integrated in the BP neural network. Dynamic monitoring data are then automatically classified in the Hopfield network. The deformation risk level is combined with the RGB color space model and is displayed visually in real time, after which experiments are conducted with the use of an ultrasonic omnidirectional sensor device for structural deformation monitoring. The proposed method is also compared with some typical methods using a benchmark dataset. Results show that the BHR composite network visualizes the deformation monitoring process in real time and can dynamically indicate dangerous zones.

  18. The Chemistry and Dynamics of the Molecular Outflow in BHR71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovill, M. S.; Bourke, T. L.; Bergin, E. A.

    2002-12-01

    We present observations of BHR71, in rotational transitions of 12CO, 13CO and C18O and selected additional molecules. BHR71 is an isolated Bok Globule 200 pc from the Sun with an embedded protostellar system, that also contains a highly collimated outflow with unusually active chemistry. Our observations are used to probe the physical and chemical structure of this outflow. We derive the excitation temperature and opacity for several positions in the outflow using the multi-transitional CO data. With this information we estimate the mass to be 1.7 Msun and the excitation temperature to be 15 K in the outflow, slightly elevated above the temperature in the ambient gas (10 K). There is evidence for even higher temperatures towards a position in the blue lobe that is coincident with knots of H2 emission. CO column densities calculated with these temperatures are used to analyze the chemical abundances in the outflow relative to the ambient gas. SiO, CS, HCN, and H2CO all show increased abundances relative to the ambient and molecular ions (HCO+, DCO+, and N+H+) show depletion. These abundances agree qualitatively with those estimated for L1157, the only other outflow that has been extensively studied with regards to the chemistry. However, we find significant disagreements in the magnitude of the abundance changes. BHR71 abundances show agreement with chemical theory. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST-9731923 to the SAO Summer Intern program.

  19. Company profile: QuantuMDx group limited.

    PubMed

    Burn, Jamie

    2013-07-01

    QuantuMDx Group Ltd (QMDx) is a group of companies based in the International Centre for Life, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. The Group owns the founding patent and the exclusive worldwide license for, among others, the use of nanowires and nanotubes in DNA detection. It has further developed a patent estate around the functionalization of nanowires for DNA detection, and is working with commercial partners globally to produce the Q-POC™, a handheld point-of-care genetic testing device. This novel lab-on-a-chip technology integrates and automates the sample-to-result genetic testing process in a single microfluidic channel, incorporating novel lysis technologies, the filtration of cellular constituents to achieve DNA extraction and fractionation, a rapid, thermal PCR system, and nanowires functionalized with nucleic acid probes to capture targeted sequences of genetic material. The device further makes use of novel chemistries to boost the charge of nucleotides binding to the isolated material, increasing the sensitivity and read length of the device and making it capable of robust SNP and pathogen detection. Complete with a sophisticated software package, the Q-POC™ can detect binding events through changes in resistance and effectively convert genetic code into binary code, providing a simple display of the results, complete with treatment options. The competitive advantages of this system are the sensitivity and specificity of the nanowire detection system, the extremely low cost profile of the technology, and the speed of the process, which will allow the sample-to-result detection of targeted genetic material in less than 15 min.

  20. Modeling Variable-Density Jets with Co-Flow Using BHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The two-fluid jet in a co-flow has two similarity breaking features which make it more interesting, and challenging, than the simple self-similar jet. First, it transitions from strong jet to weak jet, and second, from shear driven to buoyancy driven. These two simultaneous mechanisms make it a strong test for a turbulence model. The Extreme Fluids team at Los Alamos National Laboratory has an on-going experimental campaign examining an SF6 jet injected downwards into a co-flowing air stream. Using simultaneous PIV/PLIF they have obtained measurements of important turbulence quantities, including the Reynolds stresses, and the velocity-density correlations. In the current work, these measurements are used to validate the BHR turbulence model. The BHR model (Besnard et al., 1992) is a variable-density turbulence model similar to the LRR model for shear flows, but with additional transport equations for ρai = ρ'ui' ' ̲ and b = ρ'v' ̲ . Here we examine both the conventional model form, as well as a new version (Schwarzkopf et al., 2016) which include two length-scale equations: one for the dissipation scale, and one for the turbulent transport scale.

  1. A Poststructuralist View on Student's Project Groups: Possibilities and Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how poststructuralism and social constructionism can contribute to the empirical research on groups in problem-based learning (PBL). The paper outlines the analytical complexity and shows, through empirical examples, the potentials and limitations of this perspective as an alternative to traditional group…

  2. A Poststructuralist View on Student's Project Groups: Possibilities and Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how poststructuralism and social constructionism can contribute to the empirical research on groups in problem-based learning (PBL). The paper outlines the analytical complexity and shows, through empirical examples, the potentials and limitations of this perspective as an alternative to traditional group…

  3. More on the renormalization group limit cycle in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Evgeny Epelbaum; Hans-Werner Hammer; Ulf-G. Meissner; Andreas Nogga

    2006-02-26

    We present a detailed study of the recently conjectured infrared renormalization group limit cycle in QCD using chiral effective field theory. We show that small increases in the up and down quark masses, corresponding to a pion mass around 200 MeV, can move QCD to the critical renormalization group trajectory for an infrared limit cycle in the three-nucleon system. At the critical values of the quark masses, the binding energies of the deuteron and its spin-singlet partner are tuned to zero and the triton has infinitely many excited states with an accumulation point at the three-nucleon threshold. At next-to-leading order in the chiral counting, we find three parameter sets where this effect occurs. For one of them, we study the structure of the three-nucleon system using both chiral and contact effective field theories in detail. Furthermore, we calculate the influence of the limit cycle on scattering observables.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Bok globule BHR 160 radio lines spectra (Haikala+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haikala, L. K.; Reipurth, B.

    2016-11-01

    Radio spectral lines in maps covering approximately 2' by 2' with 20" spacing and a tilt of 60 degrees of the Bok globule BHR160 are presented. The spectra were obtained at Swedish ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) in 1999. The observed molecular lines were 12CO(1-0), 12CO(2-1), 13CO(1-0), 13CO (2-1), C18O(1-0), C18O(2-1), CS(2-1) and CS(3-2). The SEST 2 and 3mm SESIS and 1 and 3mm IRAM dual SIS SSB receivers and the high resolution 2000 channel AOS spectrometer (channel spacing 41.711kHz) were used. The spectrometer was split into two to observe both channels simultaneously. The observations were made in the frequency switch mode. The switch was 5MHz (the 3mm channels) and 15MHz (the 1 and 2mm channels). The calibration was obtained using the chopper wheel method. The temperature scale of the spectra is in Ta* units, i.e. corrected to outside of the atmosphere but not for beam coupling. The 12CO spectra have been processed to correct for the artefact produced by the frequency switching method by the atmospheric CO and the -5km/s component (12CO (1-0)) and the -5km/s velocity component (12CO(2-1). The spectra are presented in 9 binary table FITS files. (10 data files).

  5. Group chase and escape with sight-limited chasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huodong; Han, Wenchen; Yang, Junzhong

    2017-01-01

    We study group chase and escape with sight-limited chasers. Two search strategies, random-walk-strategy and relocation-strategy, are introduced for chasers when escapers are out of their fields of vision. There exist two regimes for the group lifetime of escapers. In the narrow sight regime, the group lifetime is a decreasing function of chasers' sight range. In the wide sight regime, the group lifetime stays at a constant when chasers adopting random-walk-strategy while increases with the sight range when chasers adopting relocation-strategy. The impacts of the two search strategies on group chase and escape are studied by investigating the lifetime distribution of all escapers and the dependence of the minimum lifetime on the number of chasers. We also find that, to reach the most efficient and the lowest energy cost chase for chasers, the ratio between the number of chasers and escapers stays at around 6 under random-walk-strategy. However, the optimal number of chasers vanishes and the energy cost monotonically increases with increasing the number of chasers under relocation-strategy.

  6. Limiting case of modified electroweak model for contracted gauge group

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A.

    2011-06-15

    The modification of the Electroweak Model with 3-dimensional spherical geometry in the matter fields space is suggested. The Lagrangian of this model is given by the sum of the free (without any potential term) matter fields Lagrangian and the standard gauge fields Lagrangian. The vector boson masses are generated by transformation of this Lagrangian from Cartesian coordinates to coordinates on the sphere S{sup 3}. The limiting case of the bosonic part of the modified model, which corresponds to the contracted gauge group SU(2; j) x U(1) is discussed. Within framework of the limit model Z boson and electromagnetic fields can be regarded as external ones with respect to W-boson fields in the sence that W-boson fields do not effect on these external fields. The masses of all particles of the Electroweak Model remain the same, but field interactions in contracted model are more simple as compared with the standard Electroweak Model.

  7. The Class 0 Protostar BHR71: Herschel Observations and Dust Continuum Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yao-Lun; Evans, Neal J., II; Green, Joel D.; Dunham, Michael M.; Jørgensen, Jes K.

    2017-02-01

    We use Herschel spectrophotometry of BHR71, an embedded Class 0 protostar, to provide new constraints on its physical properties. We detect 645 (non-unique) spectral lines among all spatial pixels. At least 61 different spectral lines originate from the central region. A CO rotational diagram analysis shows four excitation temperature components, 43, 197, 397, and 1057 K. Low-J CO lines trace the outflow while the high-J CO lines are centered on the infrared source. The low-excitation emission lines of {{{H}}}2{{O}} trace the large-scale outflow, while the high-excitation emission lines trace a small-scale distribution around the equatorial plane. We model the envelope structure using the dust radiative transfer code, hyperion, incorporating rotational collapse, an outer static envelope, outflow cavity, and disk. The evolution of a rotating collapsing envelope can be constrained by the far-infrared/millimeter spectral energy distribution along with the azimuthally averaged radial intensity profile, and the structure of the outflow cavity plays a critical role at shorter wavelengths. Emission at 20-40 μm requires a cavity with a constant-density inner region and a power-law density outer region. The best-fit model has an envelope mass of 19 {M}⊙ inside a radius of 0.315 pc and a central luminosity of 18.8 {L}⊙ . The time since collapse began is 24,630-44,000 years, most likely around 36,000 years. The corresponding mass infall rate in the envelope (1.2 × 10-5 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1) is comparable to the stellar mass accretion rate, while the mass-loss rate estimated from the CO outflow is 20% of the stellar mass accretion rate. We find no evidence for episodic accretion.

  8. Time-Limited Group Counseling for Chronic Home Hemodialysis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Compared effects of six sessions of group counseling of nine chronic home hemodialysis patients with a comparable no treatment control group. Comparisons revealed no significant differences between groups. Subsequent testing a year later suggested that hemodialysis patients use the defensive mechanism of denial in adapting to their condition.…

  9. Time-Limited Group Counseling for Chronic Home Hemodialysis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Compared effects of six sessions of group counseling of nine chronic home hemodialysis patients with a comparable no treatment control group. Comparisons revealed no significant differences between groups. Subsequent testing a year later suggested that hemodialysis patients use the defensive mechanism of denial in adapting to their condition.…

  10. The daily pattern of heart rate, body temperature, locomotor activity, and autonomic nervous activity in congenitally bronchial-hypersensitive (BHS) and bronchial-hyposensitive (BHR) guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Akita, Megumi; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Nishibata, Ryoji; Mikami, Hiroki; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2004-04-01

    We studied the characteristics of the rhythmicity of heart rate (HR), body temperature (BT), locomotor activity (LA) and autonomic nervous activity in bronchial-hypersensitive (BHS) and bronchial-hyposensitive (BHR) guinea pigs. For this purpose, HR, BT, LA, and electrocardiogram (ECG) were recorded from conscious and unrestrained guinea pigs using a telemetry system. Autonomic nervous activity was analyzed by power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Nocturnal patterns, in which the values in the dark phase (20:00-06:00) were higher than those in the light phase (06:00-20:00), were observed in HR, BT and LA in both strains of guinea pigs. The autonomic nervous activity in BHS guinea pigs showed a daily pattern, although BHR guinea pigs did not show such a rhythmicity. The high frequency (HF) power in BHS guinea pigs was higher than that in BHR guinea pigs throughout the day. Moreover, the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio in BHS guinea pigs was lower than that in BHR guinea pigs throughout the day. These results suggest that parasympathetic nervous activity may be predominant in BHS guinea pigs.

  11. The shocked gas of the BHR71 outflow observed by Herschel: indirect evidence for an atomic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedettini, M.; Gusdorf, A.; Nisini, B.; Lefloch, B.; Anderl, S.; Busquet, G.; Ceccarelli, C.; Codella, C.; Leurini, S.; Podio, L.

    2017-01-01

    Context. In the BHR71 region, two low-mass protostars IRS1 and IRS2 drive two distinguishable outflows. They constitute an ideal laboratory to investigate both the effects of shock chemistry and the mechanisms that led to their formation. Aims: We aim to define the global morphology of the warm gas component of the BHR71 outflow and at modelling its shocked component. Methods: We present the first far infrared Herschel images of the BHR71 outflows system in the CO (14-13), H2O (221-110), H2O (212-101) and [O i] 145 μm transitions, revealing the presence of several knots of warm, shocked gas associated with the fast outflowing gas. In two of these knots we performed a detailed study of the physical conditions by comparing a large set of transitions from several molecules to a grid of shock models. Results: The Herschel lines ratios in the outflow knots are quite similar, showing that the excitation conditions of the fast moving gas do not change significantly within the first 0.068 pc of the outflow, apart at the extremity of the southern blue-shifted lobe that is expanding outside the parental molecular cloud. Rotational diagram, spectral line profile and LVG analysis of the CO lines in knot A show the presence of two gas components: one extended, cold (T 80 K) and dense (n(H2) = 3 × 105-4 × 106 cm-3) and another compact (18''), warm (T = 1700-2200 K) with slightly lower density (n(H2) = 2 × 104-6 × 104 cm-3). In the two brightest knots (where we performed shock modelling) we found that H2 and CO are well fitted with non-stationary (young) shocks. These models, however, significantly underestimate the observed fluxes of [O i] and OH lines, but are not too far off those of H2O, calling for an additional, possibly dissociative, J-type shock component. Conclusions: Our modelling indirectly suggests that an additional shock component exists, possibly a remnant of the primary jet. Direct, observational evidence for such a jet must be searched for. Herschel is an

  12. Group Urges Tougher Limits on Chemical in Shampoos, Cosmetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... of science and regulation," said Brian Sansoni, vice president of sustainability initiatives with the Washington,D.C.- ... Group (EWG), Washington, D.C.; Brian Sansoni, vice president, sustainability initiatives, and vice president, communication & membership, American ...

  13. Women Entering the Elite Group: A Limited Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yunshan; Wang, Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Based on studies of literature and the freshman admission data from 1978 to 2005 in Peking University, the research reveals how female student enrollments grew from nil to a considerable size, and how the exclusion of women college admission was overcome to achieve gender balance. However, the paper argues that this progress is limited in that…

  14. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Kathryn A.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D.; Tagg, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  15. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Group Participation in the Organization: Social Loafing as a Limitation of Group Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallmark, James R.; Downs, Timothy M.

    Organizational studies traditionally take the position that the more people involved in group decision making the more ideas will be generated. Recent studies demonstrate that people have a tendency to "loaf" in group situations and thus decrease the level of effort exerted by individual group members. This paper first reviews the…

  17. 26 CFR 56.4911-10 - Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... is similarly bound by Q's positions. R and S have interlocking governing boards, within the meaning... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Members of a limited affiliated group of... Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations. (a) Scope. This section provides additional rules...

  18. Spatial contraction of the Poincare group and Maxwell's equations in the electric limit

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, H.T. Wickramasekara, S.

    2010-05-15

    The contraction of the Poincare group with respect to the space translations subgroup gives rise to a group that bears a certain duality relation to the Galilei group, that is, the contraction limit of the Poincare group with respect to the time translations subgroup. In view of this duality, we call the former the dual Galilei group. A rather remarkable feature of the dual Galilei group is that the time translations constitute a central subgroup. Therewith, in unitary irreducible representations (UIRs) of the group, the Hamiltonian appears as a Casimir operator proportional to the identity H = EI, with E (and a spin value s) uniquely characterizing the representation. Hence, a physical system characterized by a UIR of the dual Galilei group displays no non-trivial time evolution. Moreover, the combined U(1) gauge group and the dual Galilei group underlie a non-relativistic limit of Maxwell's equations known as the electric limit. The analysis presented here shows that only electrostatics is possible for the electric limit, wholly in harmony with the trivial nature of time evolution governed by the dual Galilei group.

  19. A Response to "Time-Limited Service Alternatives: Using Therapeutic Enactment in Open Group Therapy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayshield, Lisa; Waldo, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article offers comments on the Keats and Sabharwal article, "Time-Limited Service Alternatives: Using Therapeutic Enactment in Open Group Therapy," including the rationale for the approach, its conceptual base, the group process and ethical issues. Suggestions for further research on this approach are presented, including examination of its…

  20. A Response to "Time-Limited Service Alternatives: Using Therapeutic Enactment in Open Group Therapy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayshield, Lisa; Waldo, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article offers comments on the Keats and Sabharwal article, "Time-Limited Service Alternatives: Using Therapeutic Enactment in Open Group Therapy," including the rationale for the approach, its conceptual base, the group process and ethical issues. Suggestions for further research on this approach are presented, including examination of its…

  1. Burrow limitations and group living in the communally rearing rodent, Octodon degus

    PubMed Central

    Ebensperger, Luis A.; Chesh, Adrian S.; Castro, Rodrigo A.; Tolhuysen, Liliana Ortiz; Quirici, Verónica; Burger, Joseph Robert; Sobrero, Raúl; Hayes, Loren D.

    2012-01-01

    Group living is thought to evolve whenever individuals attain a net fitness advantage due to reduced predation risk or enhanced foraging efficiency, but also when individuals are forced to remain in groups, which often occurs during high-density conditions due to limitations of critical resources for independent breeding. The influence of ecological limitations on sociality has been studied little in species in which reproduction is more evenly shared among group members. Previous studies in the caviomorph rodent Octodon degus (a New World hystricognath) revealed no evidence that group living confers an advantage and suggest that burrow limitations influence formation of social groups. Our objective was to examine the relevance of ecological limitations on sociality in these rodents. Our 4-year study revealed no association between degu density and use of burrow systems. The frequency with which burrow systems were used by degus was not related to the quality of these structures; only in 1 of the 4 years did the frequency of burrow use decrease with decreasing abundance of food. Neither the number of females per group nor total group size (related measures of degu sociality) changed with yearly density of degus. Although the number of males within social groups was lower in 2008, this variation was not related clearly to varying density. The percentage of females in social groups that bred was close to 99% and did not change across years of varying density. Our results suggest that sociality in degus is not the consequence of burrow limitations during breeding. Whether habitat limitations contribute to variation in vertebrate social systems is discussed. PMID:22328789

  2. Young Children's Understanding of the Limits and Benefits of Group Ownership.

    PubMed

    Huh, Michelle; Friedman, Ori

    2017-02-20

    Group ownership is ubiquitous-property is owned by countries, corporations, families, and clubs. However, people cannot understand group ownership by simply relying on their conceptions of ownership by individuals, as group ownership is subject to complexities that do not arise when property is individually owned. We report 6 experiments investigating whether children ages 3 to 6 (N = 540) understand group ownership. In Experiments 1 and 2 children were asked who different objects belong to, and they appropriately judged that certain objects are more likely to belong to a group than to individual people. Experiments 3 and 4 investigated whether children understand the limits of group ownership. Children saw vignettes where agents modified or depleted property. Children ages 3 and older understood that individual members of a group should not deplete group-owned property, and children ages 5 and 6 understood that individual members should not modify group-owned property. Finally, Experiments 5 and 6 investigated whether children understand the benefits of group ownership. Children ages 5 and 6 judged that it is more acceptable for a group member to take group property than for a nonmember to do this, and children ages 4 to 6 judged that group members can take more group resources than can nonmembers. Together, these results are informative about how children conceive of group ownership rights, and about children's conceptions of groups. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. The effect of limited (tertiary) Gleason pattern 5 on the new prostate cancer grade groups.

    PubMed

    Baras, Alexander S; Nelson, Joel B; Han, Misop; Parwani, Anil V; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2017-05-01

    The risk of recurrence for prostatic adenocarcinoma after prostatectomy, as detected by prostate-specific antigen or other modalities, is based primarily on Gleason score along with pathologic tumor stage and surgical margin status. Recent large multi-institutional data spanning the last decade have supported modification of risk of recurrence stratification based on grade groups: grade group 1 (3+3=6), grade group 2 (3+4=7), grade group 3 (4+3=7), grade group 4 (4+4=8), and grade group 5 (Gleason scores 9 and 10). Using currently accepted grading definitions of grade patterns and grading rules, this study examines how the introduction of a limited, less than 5%, Gleason pattern 5 component at prostatectomy affects prognosis and fits into the grade group schema and reporting. The aggregate data from 2 independent major academic medical centers comprising 7606 patient records were analyzed with respect to biochemical recurrence-free survival. The presence of a limited (tertiary) Gleason pattern 5 component in the context of Gleason scores 3+4=7 (grade group 2) and 4+3=7 (grade group 3) imparts an intermediate prognosis relative to the next highest grade group. As such, we suggest that an additional comment and designation to the grade groups be provided reflecting the increased risk of recurrence in such cases (such as grade group 2+ or 3+). In contrast, the presence of limited (<5%) Gleason pattern 5 in the context of Gleason score 4+4=8 imparts a poor prognosis equivalent to grade group 5 and therefore should be reported as grade group 5. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Retrohoming of a Mobile Group II Intron in Human Cells Suggests How Eukaryotes Limit Group II Intron Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Truong, David M; Hewitt, F Curtis; Hanson, Joseph H; Cui, Xiaoxia; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2015-08-01

    Mobile bacterial group II introns are evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a "ribozyme") and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote intron integration into new DNA sites by a mechanism termed "retrohoming". Although mobile group II introns splice and retrohome efficiently in bacteria, all examined thus far function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where their ribozyme activity is limited by low Mg2+ concentrations, and intron-containing transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) and translational repression. Here, by using RNA polymerase II to express a humanized group II intron reverse transcriptase and T7 RNA polymerase to express intron transcripts resistant to NMD, we find that simply supplementing culture medium with Mg2+ induces the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB intron to retrohome into plasmid and chromosomal sites, the latter at frequencies up to ~0.1%, in viable HEK-293 cells. Surprisingly, under these conditions, the Ll.LtrB intron reverse transcriptase is required for retrohoming but not for RNA splicing as in bacteria. By using a genetic assay for in vivo selections combined with deep sequencing, we identified intron RNA mutations that enhance retrohoming in human cells, but <4-fold and not without added Mg2+. Further, the selected mutations lie outside the ribozyme catalytic core, which appears not readily modified to function efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations. Our results reveal differences between group II intron retrohoming in human cells and bacteria and suggest constraints on critical nucleotide residues of the ribozyme core that limit how much group II intron retrohoming in eukaryotes can be enhanced. These findings have implications for group II intron use for gene targeting in eukaryotes and suggest how differences in intracellular Mg2+ concentrations between bacteria and eukarya may have impacted the

  5. Retrohoming of a Mobile Group II Intron in Human Cells Suggests How Eukaryotes Limit Group II Intron Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Truong, David M.; Hewitt, F. Curtis; Hanson, Joseph H.; Cui, Xiaoxia; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile bacterial group II introns are evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a “ribozyme”) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote intron integration into new DNA sites by a mechanism termed “retrohoming”. Although mobile group II introns splice and retrohome efficiently in bacteria, all examined thus far function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where their ribozyme activity is limited by low Mg2+ concentrations, and intron-containing transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) and translational repression. Here, by using RNA polymerase II to express a humanized group II intron reverse transcriptase and T7 RNA polymerase to express intron transcripts resistant to NMD, we find that simply supplementing culture medium with Mg2+ induces the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB intron to retrohome into plasmid and chromosomal sites, the latter at frequencies up to ~0.1%, in viable HEK-293 cells. Surprisingly, under these conditions, the Ll.LtrB intron reverse transcriptase is required for retrohoming but not for RNA splicing as in bacteria. By using a genetic assay for in vivo selections combined with deep sequencing, we identified intron RNA mutations that enhance retrohoming in human cells, but <4-fold and not without added Mg2+. Further, the selected mutations lie outside the ribozyme catalytic core, which appears not readily modified to function efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations. Our results reveal differences between group II intron retrohoming in human cells and bacteria and suggest constraints on critical nucleotide residues of the ribozyme core that limit how much group II intron retrohoming in eukaryotes can be enhanced. These findings have implications for group II intron use for gene targeting in eukaryotes and suggest how differences in intracellular Mg2+ concentrations between bacteria and eukarya may have impacted the

  6. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  7. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  8. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  9. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  10. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  11. Women Healing Women: Time-Limited, Psychoeducational Group Therapy for Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweig, Terri L.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a time-limited, psychoeducational group in its 16th consecutive year of providing a safe and supportive milieu that breaks down isolation while helping women understand the impact of abuse on their lives and empowering them to alter their victim identity. Cognitive, affective, and expressive arts approaches are used to address aspects of…

  12. Prenatal group visit program for a population with limited English proficiency.

    PubMed

    Little, Sahoko H; Motohara, Satoko; Miyazaki, Kei; Arato, Nora; Fetters, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    The declining number of family physicians providing pregnancy care is of concern because they are an important source of pregnancy care in underserved communities. Innovative approaches might reinforce family physician participation in pregnancy care for the underserved. Since group prenatal visits have been shown to improve patient education, support, and satisfaction, we implemented and evaluated a group prenatal visit program for Japanese women in Michigan, an underserved population because of their limited proficiency with English. We conducted a convergent quantitative and qualitative mixed methods evaluation involving repeated survey administration (program evaluations, 4-item Patient Health Questionnaire, pregnancy distress questionnaire) to participants during 5 group visits and in-depth postpartum interviews in the University of Michigan Japanese Family Health Program setting. We conducted independent quantitative and qualitative analytics and then thematically integrated these data. Cultural adaptations to the Centering Pregnancy format involved changes in total visits, educational content, and participation format. Based on 5 groups attending 5 sessions each, 42 women evaluated the program through 158 surveys after the sessions. Participants evaluated multiple parameters positively: being with other pregnant women (98%), improving their understanding about prenatal care (96%), preparation for labor and delivery (96%), organization of visits (94%), and preparation for newborn care (85%). In final evaluations, 96% to 100% of participants rated 7 educational topics as "covered" or "covered well." Qualitative interviews with 20 women revealed positive views of social support from prenatal group visits and group facilitation but mixed enthusiasm for clinical assessments in the prenatal group visit setting and partner and children attendance at the sessions. This research demonstrates the feasibility and cultural acceptability of prenatal group visits for

  13. Factors limiting deceased organ donation: focus groups' perspective from culturally diverse community.

    PubMed

    Wong, L P

    2010-06-01

    In-depth understanding of cultural and religious factors limiting organ donation of three ethnic populations (Malay, Chinese, and Indian) in Southeast Asia is lacking. Identification of factors limiting organ donation among these three ethnic groups will provide insights into culturally appropriate strategies to promote acceptance of organ donation in a multiethnic Asian community. A total of 17 focus group discussions (105 participants) were conducted between September and December 2008. Participants were members of the general public aged 18 to 60 years, recruited through convenient sampling around the Klang Valley area of Malaysia. Although the majority had favorable attitudes toward deceased organ donation and transplantation, a diversity of myths and misinformation were unearthed from the discussions across the ethnic groups. These include perceived religious prohibition, cultural myths and misperceptions, fear of disfigurement, fear of surgery, distrust of the medical system, and family disapproval. Culture and religious beliefs played important prohibitive roles among those opposed to organ donations. There were distinctive ethnic differences in cultural and religious concerns regarding organ donation. Less-educated and rural groups appeared to have more misconceptions than the well-educated and the urban groups. Our findings may assist organ donation and transplantation organizations to reach diverse sociodemographic and ethnic communities with culture-specific information about organ donation. The involvement of community and religious leaders is critical in organ donation requests.

  14. Time-limited group psychotherapy for patients with personality disorders: outcomes and dropouts.

    PubMed

    Budman, S H; Demby, A; Soldz, S; Merry, J

    1996-07-01

    This study reports on the time-limited (18-month long) group therapy of 49 outpatients, most of whom were diagnosed with DSM-III-R, Axis II personality disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 1987). Although many patients did not complete the full course of treatment, those who did experienced many areas of change. Completers reported substantial changes in self-esteem, symptomatology, and diagnosability on Axis II. This type of group treatment appears to be a promising mode of intervention for those with personality disorders.

  15. Association between limited English proficiency and understanding prescription labels among five ethnic groups in California.

    PubMed

    Masland, Mary C; Kang, Soo H; Ma, Yifei

    2011-04-01

    Misunderstanding of prescription labels results in adverse drug events and non-adherence. We assessed the effect of limited English and other factors on prescription understanding among five ethnic groups in a controlled analysis. Subjects were respondents to California's 2007 Health Interview Survey who received a prescription in the past year. In separate logistic regressions, limited English's effect on self-reported prescription understanding - controlling for bilingual doctor, education level, medications for chronic conditions, disability, years in USA, citizenship and socio-demographics - was estimated for Mexicans, Central Americans, Chinese, Koreans, and Vietnamese. Unweighted sample size was 48,968. Approximately 14% had limited English and 8% had difficulty in understanding prescriptions. In multivariate analysis, limited English increased odds of difficulty in understanding prescriptions by three times for Mexicans, Central Americans, and Koreans, and four times for Chinese; it was insignificant for Vietnamese. Generally, having a bilingual doctor reduced odds of difficulty while disability, low education, low income or recent immigration increased odds of difficulty. Effects varied according to the ethnic group. In controlled analysis, Chinese and Korean ethnicity increased odds of difficulty compared to Mexican or Central American ethnicity; Vietnamese ethnicity reduced odds of difficulty compared to others. Limited English blocked prescription understanding for all groups except Vietnamese. Translated prescription labels and interpreted in-person pharmacy consultations are indicated. Education and ethnicity affected prescription understanding; prescription instructions must be compatible with patients' educational level and culture. Bilingual/bicultural providers and interpreters can help bridge linguistic/cultural gaps but efforts should be made to ensure that they are truly culturally and linguistically concordant. Linguistic, cultural or

  16. An analysis of confidence limit calculations used in AAPM Task Group No. 119

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, Cory; Snyder, Michael

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The report issued by AAPM Task Group No. 119 outlined a procedure for evaluating the effectiveness of IMRT commissioning. The procedure involves measuring gamma pass-rate indices for IMRT plans of standard phantoms and determining if the results fall within a confidence limit set by assuming normally distributed data. As stated in the TG report, the assumption of normally distributed gamma pass rates is a convenient approximation for commissioning purposes, but may not accurately describe the data. Here the authors attempt to better describe gamma pass-rate data by fitting it to different distributions. The authors then calculate updated confidence limits using those distributions and compare them to those derived using TG No. 119 method. Methods: Gamma pass-rate data from 111 head and neck patients are fitted using the TG No. 119 normal distribution, a truncated normal distribution, and a Weibull distribution. Confidence limits to 95% are calculated for each and compared. A more general analysis of the expected differences between the TG No. 119 method of determining confidence limits and a more time-consuming curve fitting method is performed. Results: The TG No. 119 standard normal distribution does not fit the measured data. However, due to the small range of measured data points, the inaccuracy of the fit has only a small effect on the final value of the confidence limits. The confidence limits for the 111 patient plans are within 0.1% of each other for all distributions. The maximum expected difference in confidence limits, calculated using TG No. 119's approximation and a truncated distribution, is 1.2%. Conclusions: A three-parameter Weibull probability distribution more accurately fits the clinical gamma index pass-rate data than the normal distribution adopted by TG No. 119. However, the sensitivity of the confidence limit on distribution fit is low outside of exceptional circumstances.

  17. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  18. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  19. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-06-01

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation.

  20. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-06-25

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation.

  1. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation. PMID:26109237

  2. A Time-Limited Behavioral Group for Treatment of Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Van Noppen, Barbara L.; Pato, Michele T.; Marsland, Richard; Rasmussen, Steven A.

    1998-01-01

    In vivo exposure with response prevention is an effective treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) either alone or combined with pharmacotherapy. Widespread application of this technique has been limited by lack of trained therapists and the expense of intensive individual behavioral therapy. This report describes a time-limited 10-session behavioral therapy group for OCD whose key elements are exposure, response prevention, therapist and participant modeling, and cognitive restructuring. In a naturalistic open trial of 90 patients meeting DSM-III-R criteria for OCD who completed the 10-session group, self-administered Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale scores (mean ± SD) were 21.8 ± 5.6 at baseline and 16.6 ± 6.4 after the 10-week treatment, a significant decrease. A descriptive analysis of the therapeutic elements of the group and its advantages over individual behavioral treatment are presented. (The Journal of Psychotherapy Practice and Research 1998; 7:272–280) PMID:9752638

  3. Limits on the AGN Activities in X-Ray-underluminous Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarakanath, K. S.; Nath, Biman B.

    2006-12-01

    We have observed four X-ray-underluminous groups of galaxies using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The groups NGC 524, 720, 3607, and 4697 are underluminous in relation to the extrapolation of the LX-T relation from rich clusters and do not show any evidence of current AGN activities that can account for such a departure. The GMRT observations carried out at low frequencies (235 and 610 MHz) were aimed at detecting low surface brightness, steep-spectrum sources indicative of past AGN activities in these groups. No such radio emissions were detected in any of these four groups. The corresponding upper limits on the total energy in relativistic particles is ~3×1057 ergs. This value is more than a factor of 100 less than that required to account for the decreased X-ray luminosities (or enhanced entropies) of these four groups in the AGN-heating scenario. Alternatively, the AGN activity must have ceased ~4 Gyr ago, allowing the relativistic particles to diffuse out to such a large extent (~250 kpc) that their radio emission could have been undetected by the current observations. If the latter scenario is correct, the ICM was preheated before the assembly of galaxy clusters.

  4. A Response to "Time-Limited Service Alternatives: Using Therapeutic Enactment in Open Group Therapy": A Dramatic Effort to Redefine Short-Term and Time-Limited Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagley, John C.; Thomas, Chippewa M.

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic Enactment (TE) groups, as presented in the article, "Time-Limited Service Alternatives: Using Therapeutic Enactment in Open Group Therapy," offer an exciting and promising addition to the types of groups traditionally offered in university counseling centers. The brevity of member participation, the lack of empirical evidence of…

  5. A Response to "Time-Limited Service Alternatives: Using Therapeutic Enactment in Open Group Therapy": A Dramatic Effort to Redefine Short-Term and Time-Limited Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagley, John C.; Thomas, Chippewa M.

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic Enactment (TE) groups, as presented in the article, "Time-Limited Service Alternatives: Using Therapeutic Enactment in Open Group Therapy," offer an exciting and promising addition to the types of groups traditionally offered in university counseling centers. The brevity of member participation, the lack of empirical evidence of…

  6. Optimized phenomenological renormalization group for geometrical models: Applications to diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, J. Lee; Family, Fereydoon; Vicsek, Tamas; Nakanishi, Hisao

    1985-10-01

    We propose a new phenomenological rule for the weight function in the position-space renormalization-group approach for the calculation of the fractal dimension in models of geometrical disorder in order to avoid strong corrections to scaling due to surface effects. In our scheme the radius of gyration is used as a characteristic measure of the spatial extent of the clusters. In addition, an optimization parameter is introduced. Application to diffusion-limited aggregation in two dimensions shows that our method gives good estimates even when relatively small cells are used.

  7. Applying tensor renormalization group methods to frustrated and glassy systems: advantages, limitations, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zheng; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2014-03-01

    We study the thermodynamic properties of the two-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin-glass model on a square lattice using the tensor renormalization group method based on a higher-order singular-value decomposition. Our estimates of the internal energy per spin agree very well with high-precision parallel tempering Monte Carlo studies, thus illustrating that the method can, in principle, be applied to frustrated magnetic systems. In particular, we discuss the necessary tuning of parameters for convergence, memory requirements, efficiency for different types of disorder, as well as advantages and limitations in comparison to conventional multicanonical and Monte Carlo methods. Extensions to higher space dimensions, as well as applications to spin glasses in a field are explored.

  8. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells promote beiging of adipose and limit obesity

    PubMed Central

    Brestoff, Jonathan R.; Kim, Brian S.; Saenz, Steven A.; Stine, Rachel R.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Thome, Joseph J.; Farber, Donna L.; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Seale, Patrick; Artis, David

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly prevalent disease regulated by genetic and environmental factors. Emerging studies indicate that immune cells, including monocytes, granulocytes and lymphocytes, regulate metabolic homeostasis and are dysregulated in obesity1,2. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) can regulate adaptive immunity3,4 and eosinophil and alternatively-activated macrophage responses5, and were recently identified in murine white adipose tissue (WAT)5 where they may act to limit the development of obesity6. However, ILC2s have not been identified in human adipose tissue, and the mechanisms by which ILC2s regulate metabolic homeostasis remain unknown. Here, we identify ILC2s in human WAT and demonstrate that decreased ILC2 responses in WAT are a conserved characteristic of obesity in humans and mice. Interleukin (IL)-33 was found to be critical for the maintenance of ILC2s in WAT and in limiting adiposity in mice by increasing caloric expenditure. This was associated with recruitment of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)+ beige adipocytes in WAT, a process known as beiging or browning that regulates caloric expenditure7–9. IL-33-induced beiging was dependent on ILC2s, and IL-33 treatment or transfer of IL-33-elicited ILC2s was sufficient to drive beiging independently of the adaptive immune system, eosinophils or IL-4 receptor signaling. We found that ILC2s produce methionine-enkephalin peptides that can act directly on adipocytes to upregulate Ucp1 expression in vitro and that promote beiging in vivo. Collectively, these studies indicate that in addition to responding to infection or tissue damage, ILC2s can regulate adipose function and metabolic homeostasis in part via production of enkephalin peptides that elicit beiging. PMID:25533952

  9. The Effects of Time Limit on Correctness of Decision and Member Satisfaction in Decision-Making Group Discussions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, William G.; And Others

    This study examines the viability of time limit as an independent variable for investigating the decision-making process. Three major aspects of time and decision making are investigated: (1) time and accuracy of group decision, (2) time and member satisfaction with the group decision, and (3) time and perceived accuracy of group decision. A pilot…

  10. Focus group evaluation of "Secret Feelings": a depression fotonovela for Latinos with limited English proficiency.

    PubMed

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Contreras, Sandra; Aragón, Rebeca; Molina, Gregory B; Baron, Melvin

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the authors examined reactions of Latino adults with limited English proficiency (LEP) to a culturally and linguistically adapted depression fotonovela, titled "Secret Feelings." Fotonovelas are popular health education tools that use posed photographs, text bubbles with simple text, and dramatic narratives to engage audiences and raise their awareness and knowledge about specific health issues. Four focus groups (N = 32) were conducted at an adult school program (e.g., GED classes). Content analysis was used to generate themes from transcripts and memos. "Secret Feelings" was viewed as an entertaining, engaging, and educational tool that helped combat stigma toward depression and its treatments in the Latino community. Despite learning about depression, participants reported they wanted more information about the causes of depression, the process of recovery, and felt that the story did not shift their apprehensions toward antidepressants. The findings suggest that "Secret Feelings" is a promising depression literacy tool for Latinos with LEP that can raise awareness and knowledge about depression and its treatments, reduce stigma toward depression and antidepressant medications, and model appropriate help-seeking behaviors.

  11. Group A streptococcal infections of the skin: molecular advances but limited therapeutic progress.

    PubMed

    Currie, Bart J

    2006-04-01

    With the sequencing of several Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus) genomes have come major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of group A Streptococcus-associated diseases. This review focuses on group A Streptococcus skin infections and summarizes data published in the English language medical literature in 2004 and 2005. Group A Streptococcus shows enormous and evolving molecular diversity driven by horizontal transmission between group A Streptococcus strains and between group A Streptococcus and other streptococci. Acquisition of prophages accounts for much of the diversity, conferring both virulence through phage-associated virulence factors and increased bacterial survival against host defences. Studies of group A Streptococcus isolates outside the US also question the generalizability of classic group A Streptococcus M serotype associations with specific disease entities such as acute rheumatic fever and necrotizing fasciitis. The distinction between throat and skin group A Streptococcus has become blurred. Although there have been few advances in treatment of group A Streptococcus skin infections, developments towards group A Streptococcus vaccines are promising. The diversity of group A Streptococcus remains a challenge for vaccine development. As acute rheumatic fever and streptococcal pyoderma occur predominantly in disadvantaged populations, international funding support will be necessary for any group A Streptococcus vaccine to have a sustained impact on the global burden of disease.

  12. Young Children's Understanding of the Limits and Benefits of Group Ownership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huh, Michelle; Friedman, Ori

    2017-01-01

    Group ownership is ubiquitous-property is owned by countries, corporations, families, and clubs. However, people cannot understand group ownership by simply relying on their conceptions of ownership by individuals, as group ownership is subject to complexities that do not arise when property is individually owned. We report 6 experiments…

  13. Mountain gorilla tug-of-war: Silverbacks have limited control over reproduction in multimale groups

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Brenda J.; Robbins, Martha M.; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Steklis, H. Dieter; Steklis, Netzin Gerald; Eckhardt, Nadin; Boesch, Christophe; Vigilant, Linda

    2005-01-01

    To determine who fathers the offspring in wild mountain gorilla groups containing more than one adult male silverback, we genotyped nearly one-fourth (n = 92) of the mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) living in the Virunga Volcanoes region of Africa. Paternity analysis of 48 offspring born into four groups between 1985 and 1999 revealed that, although all infants were sired by within-group males, the socially dominant silverback did not always monopolize reproduction within his group. Instead, the second-ranking male sired an average of 15% of group offspring. This result, in combination with previous findings that second-ranking males fare best by not leaving the group but by staying and waiting to assume dominance even if no reproduction is possible while waiting, is not consistent with expectations from a reproductive skew model in which the silverback concedes controllable reproduction to the second-ranking male. Instead, the data suggest a “tug-of-war” scenario in which neither the dominant nor the second-ranking male has full control over his relative reproductive share. The two top-ranked males were typically unrelated and this, in combination with the mixed paternity of group offspring, means that multimale gorilla groups do not approximate family groups. Instead, as long-term assemblages of related and unrelated individuals, gorilla groups are similar to chimpanzee groups and so offer interesting possibilities for kin-biased interactions among individuals. PMID:15964984

  14. 76 FR 54801 - Reynolds Food Packaging LLC, a Subsidiary of Reynolds Group Holding Limited, Grove City, PA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Reynolds Food Packaging LLC, a Subsidiary of Reynolds Group Holding... Reynolds Food Packaging LLC, a subsidiary of Reynolds Group Holding Limited, Grove City, Pennsylvania... make the following certification: All workers of Reynolds Food Packaging LLC, a subsidiary of...

  15. 29 CFR 2520.104-21 - Limited exemption for certain group insurance arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of premiums to the insurance company. (c) Limitations. This exemption does not exempt the... research and analysis (section 513). (d) Examples. (1) A welfare plan has 25 participants at the beginning...

  16. 40 CFR 76.6 - NOX emission limitations for Group 2 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.6 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2, the...

  17. 40 CFR 76.6 - NOX emission limitations for Group 2 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.6 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2, the...

  18. 40 CFR 76.6 - NOX emission limitations for Group 2 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.6 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2, the...

  19. 40 CFR 76.6 - NOX emission limitations for Group 2 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.6 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2, the...

  20. 40 CFR 76.6 - NOX emission limitations for Group 2 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.6 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2, the...

  1. Limitations of spectral measures and observations of the group structure of surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo-Christensen, Erik

    1987-01-01

    Wave-group structure, which plays a significant role in flux processes and the mechanics of the transfer of wave energy and momentum to the mean current field, is studied. The origin of wave groups, in particular sideband instabilities, the effects of amplitude variations on wave frequency and of wave damping on isolated groups, and flow separation over waves, is discussed. The mechanisms that cause the group formation are compared to the dynamics that result in wave propagation. The bifurcation and shift in wave modulations, and the possible existence of a unique asymptotic statistical state for the wave-modulation field are examined.

  2. Fluid Dynamics Panel Working Group 10 on Calculation of 3D Separate Turbulent Flows in Boundary Layer Limit (Le Calcul des Ecoulements Turbulents, Decolles Tridimensionnels en Couche Limite)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    sufficient inspiration to appreciate the work performed by the various members of the Working Group and their co-workers. The participants’ names are given...Depuis la premiere reunion, organis&c vera la fin de l’annee 1985, un certain nombre de problimes d’ordre technique et logistique se sont poses et le...96503-0007 1. INTRODUCTION Flow separation plays a dominant role in the high lift performance of combat aircraft, invariably limiting takeoff and

  3. Historical limitations of determinant based exposure groupings in the rubber manufacturing industry

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, R; Kromhout, H

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To study the validity of using a cross-sectional industry-wide exposure survey to develop exposure groupings for epidemiological purposes that extend beyond the time period in which the exposure data were collected. Methods: Exposure determinants were used to group workers into high, medium, and low exposure groups. The contrast of this grouping and other commonly used grouping schemes based on plant and department within this exposure survey and a previously conducted survey within the same industry (and factories) were estimated and compared. Results: Grouping of inhalable and dermal exposure based on exposure determinants resulted in the highest, but still modest, contrast (ε ∼ 0.3). Classifying subjects based on a combination of plant and department resulted in a slightly lower contrast (ε ∼ 0.2). If the determinant based grouping derived from the 1997 exposure survey was used to classify workers in the 1988 survey the average contrast decreased significantly for both exposures (ε ∼ 0.1). On the contrary, the exposure classification based on plant and department increased in contrast (from ε ∼ 0.2 to ε ∼ 0.3) and retained its relative ranking overtime. Conclusions: Although determinant based groupings seem to result in more efficient groupings within a cross-sectional survey, they have to be used with caution as they might result in significant less contrast beyond the studied population or time period. It is concluded that a classification based on plant and department might be more desirable for retrospective studies in the rubber manufacturing industry, as they seem to have more historical relevance and are most likely more accurately recorded historically than information on exposure determinants in a particular industry. PMID:16234406

  4. Are There Limits to Collectivism? Culture and Children's Reasoning About Lying to Conceal a Group Transgression.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Monica A; Heyman, Gail D; Fu, Genyue; Lee, Kang

    2010-07-01

    This study explored the effects of collectivism on lying to conceal a group transgression. Seven-, 9-, and 11-year-old US and Chinese children (N = 374) were asked to evaluate stories in which protagonists either lied or told the truth about their group's transgression and were then asked about either the protagonist's motivations or justification for their own evaluations. Previous research suggests that children in collectivist societies such as China find lying for one's group to be more acceptable than do children from individualistic societies such as the United States. The current study provides evidence that this is not always the case: Chinese children in this study viewed lies told to conceal a group's transgressions less favourably than did US children. An examination of children's reasoning about protagonists' motivations for lying indicated that children in both countries focused on an impact to self when discussing motivations for protagonists to lie for their group. Overall, results suggest that children living in collectivist societies do not always focus on the needs of the group.

  5. 40 CFR 76.5 - NOX emission limitations for Group 1 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.5 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2, the... 404(d) of the Act, the date the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emissions reduction requirements...

  6. 40 CFR 76.5 - NOX emission limitations for Group 1 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.5 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2, the... 404(d) of the Act, the date the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emissions reduction requirements...

  7. 40 CFR 76.5 - NOX emission limitations for Group 1 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.5 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2, the... 404(d) of the Act, the date the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emissions reduction requirements...

  8. 40 CFR 76.5 - NOX emission limitations for Group 1 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.5 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2, the... 404(d) of the Act, the date the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emissions reduction requirements...

  9. 40 CFR 76.5 - NOX emission limitations for Group 1 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.5 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2, the... subject to section 404(d) of the Act, the date the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emissions reduction...

  10. 26 CFR 56.4911-10 - Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... takes a position favoring approval by Congress of a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution... “national legislative issue” means legislation, limited to action by the Congress of the United States or by... provisions of this section are illustrated by the following examples: Example 1. State X has an income...

  11. Beam splitting and entanglement: Generalized coherent states, group contraction, and the classical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerry, Christopher C.; Benmoussa, Adil

    2005-06-01

    Recently, Markham and Vedral [Phys. Rev. A 67, 042113 (2003)] investigated the effect of beam splitting on the spin, or SU(2), coherent states for a single mode field. The spin coherent state is a binomial coherent state related to the Holstein-Primakoff realization of the su(2) Lie algebra given in terms of a set of single mode bose annihilation and creation operators. Upon beam splitting, the ordinary (or Glauber) coherent states merely split into products of ordinary coherent states with reduced amplitudes without becoming entangled, as one would expect for a classical-like field. The above authors expected the spin coherent states to go over to the ordinary coherent states in the limit of high spin, j→∞ , and thus to become product states after beam splitting. But this expectation was not confirmed through numerical calculation of the entropy which, instead of going to zero, leveled off with increasing spin. In this paper we find similar behavior for SU(1,1) coherent states of the Perelomov type for large Bargman index k , but also find that the Barut-Girardello SU(1,1) coherent states appear to rapidly become product states after beam splitting for increasing k . We explain these results by showing that, in reality, neither the spin coherent states nor the Perelomov SU(1,1) coherent states go over to ordinary coherent states in the limits of large j or k , and that the Barut-Girardello coherent states merely go over to the vacuum in the large k limit. Finally, we examine the correct limiting procedure for obtaining separable states (i.e., products of coherent states) upon beam splitting by performing contractions of the su(2) and su(1,1) Lie algebras and of their associated coherent states.

  12. Beam splitting and entanglement: Generalized coherent states, group contraction, and the classical limit

    SciTech Connect

    Gerry, Christopher C.; Benmoussa, Adil

    2005-06-15

    Recently, Markham and Vedral [Phys. Rev. A 67, 042113 (2003)] investigated the effect of beam splitting on the spin, or SU(2), coherent states for a single mode field. The spin coherent state is a binomial coherent state related to the Holstein-Primakoff realization of the su(2) Lie algebra given in terms of a set of single mode bose annihilation and creation operators. Upon beam splitting, the ordinary (or Glauber) coherent states merely split into products of ordinary coherent states with reduced amplitudes without becoming entangled, as one would expect for a classical-like field. The above authors expected the spin coherent states to go over to the ordinary coherent states in the limit of high spin, j{yields}{infinity}, and thus to become product states after beam splitting. But this expectation was not confirmed through numerical calculation of the entropy which, instead of going to zero, leveled off with increasing spin. In this paper we find similar behavior for SU(1,1) coherent states of the Perelomov type for large Bargman index k, but also find that the Barut-Girardello SU(1,1) coherent states appear to rapidly become product states after beam splitting for increasing k. We explain these results by showing that, in reality, neither the spin coherent states nor the Perelomov SU(1,1) coherent states go over to ordinary coherent states in the limits of large j or k, and that the Barut-Girardello coherent states merely go over to the vacuum in the large k limit. Finally, we examine the correct limiting procedure for obtaining separable states (i.e., products of coherent states) upon beam splitting by performing contractions of the su(2) and su(1,1) Lie algebras and of their associated coherent states.

  13. The Limitations of the Interaction Hypothesis in Regard to Ability Grouping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuCette, Joseph; Wolk, Stephen

    The question of an interaction over time between ability grouping and personality variables was the focus of the present study which examined pertinent data from 260 female high school students. Two standardized personality instruments, in addition to several scales designed by the E's, were administered to students of the upper and lower ability…

  14. The Benefits and Limitations of Online Group Work in a Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Heejung; Kim, Sangkyung

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the benefits and difficulties that graduate student teachers perceived while participating in online collaborative group activities during their first year of a masters program. Overall, it was discovered that the three most prominent perceived learning outcomes involved 1) the teachers' recognition of the value of a supportive…

  15. Complexity in Dioryctria zimmermani Species Group: Incongruence Between Species Limits and Molecular Diversity

    Treesearch

    Amanda D. Roe; Daniel R. Miller; Susan J. Weller

    2011-01-01

    Dioryctria (Zeller 1846) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Phycitinae) moths, commonlyknown as coneworms, are a group of important coniferous pests. InterspeciÞc overlap of molecular, morphological, and behavioral traits has made identiÞcation and delimitation of these species problematic, impeding their management and control. In particular, delimitation of members of the...

  16. Testing the limits of tolerance: how intergroup anxiety amplifies negative and offensive responses to out-group-initiated contact.

    PubMed

    Van Zomeren, Martijn; Fischer, Agneta H; Spears, Russell

    2007-12-01

    Three studies examine the amplifying effects of intergroup anxiety on individuals' negative and offensive responses to out-group-initiated contact. Because intergroup anxiety typically results in avoidance of the initiation of intergroup contact, these studies explored how intergroup anxiety affected individuals' interpretation of and responses to out-group-initiated contact. The authors hypothesized that intergroup anxiety amplifies individuals' threat appraisal of out-group-initiated contact as well as their feelings of anger and offensive action tendencies toward the out-group. Results showed consistent support for these hypotheses by demonstrating that intergroup anxiety amplified individuals' threat appraisal (Studies 2 and 3), anger (Studies 1-3), and offensive action tendencies toward the out-group (Study 2). Anger consistently predicted offensive action tendencies (Studies 2-3). Thus, intergroup anxiety decreased individuals' limits of tolerance by increasing their threat appraisal of out-group-initiated contact. The results are discussed in relation to theories of threat, emotion, and tolerance.

  17. Disadvantaged Social Groups and the Cigarette Epidemic: Limits of the Diffusion of Innovations Vision

    PubMed Central

    Khlat, Myriam; Pampel, Fred; Bricard, Damien; Legleye, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The original four-stage model of the cigarette epidemic has been extended with diffusion of innovations theory to reflect socio-economic differences in cigarette use. Recently, two revisions of the model have been proposed: (1) separate analysis of the epidemic stages for men and women, in order to improve generalization to developing countries, and; (2) addition of a fifth stage to the smoking epidemic, in order to account for the persistence of smoking in disadvantaged social groups. By developing a cohort perspective spanning a 35-year time period in France and the USA, we uncover distinctive features which challenge the currently held vision on the evolution of smoking inequalities within the framework of the cigarette epidemic. We argue that the reason for which the model may not be fit to the lower educated is that the imitation mechanism underlying the diffusion of innovations works well with regard to adoption of the habit, but is much less relevant with regard to its rejection. Based on those observations, we support the idea that the nature and timing of the epidemic differs enough to treat the stages separately for high and low education groups, and discuss policy implications. PMID:27973442

  18. Disadvantaged Social Groups and the Cigarette Epidemic: Limits of the Diffusion of Innovations Vision.

    PubMed

    Khlat, Myriam; Pampel, Fred; Bricard, Damien; Legleye, Stéphane

    2016-12-11

    The original four-stage model of the cigarette epidemic has been extended with diffusion of innovations theory to reflect socio-economic differences in cigarette use. Recently, two revisions of the model have been proposed: (1) separate analysis of the epidemic stages for men and women, in order to improve generalization to developing countries, and; (2) addition of a fifth stage to the smoking epidemic, in order to account for the persistence of smoking in disadvantaged social groups. By developing a cohort perspective spanning a 35-year time period in France and the USA, we uncover distinctive features which challenge the currently held vision on the evolution of smoking inequalities within the framework of the cigarette epidemic. We argue that the reason for which the model may not be fit to the lower educated is that the imitation mechanism underlying the diffusion of innovations works well with regard to adoption of the habit, but is much less relevant with regard to its rejection. Based on those observations, we support the idea that the nature and timing of the epidemic differs enough to treat the stages separately for high and low education groups, and discuss policy implications.

  19. Two's company, three's a crowd: food and shelter limitation outweigh the benefits of group living in a shoaling fish.

    PubMed

    Ford, John R; Swearer, Stephen E

    2013-05-01

    Identifying how density and number-dependent processes regulate populations is important for predicting population response to environmental change. Species that live in groups, such as shoaling fish, can experience both direct density-dependent mortality through resource limitation and inverse number-dependent mortality via increased feeding rates and predator evasion in larger groups. To investigate the role of these processes in a temperate reef fish population, we manipulated the density and group size of the shoaling species Trachinops caudimaculatus on artificial patch reefs at two locations with different predator fields in Port Phillip Bay, Australia. We compared mortality over four weeks to estimates of predator abundance and per capita availability of refuge and food to identify mechanisms for density or number dependence. Mortality was strongly directly density dependent throughout the experiment, regardless of the dominant predator group; however, the limiting resource driving this effect changed over time. In the first two weeks when densities were highest, density-dependent mortality was best explained by refuge competition and the abundance of benthic predators. During the second two weeks, food competition best explained the pattern of mortality. We detected no effect of group size at either location, even where pelagic-predator abundance was high. Overall, direct density effects were much stronger than those of group size, suggesting little survival advantage to shoaling on isolated patch reefs where resource competition is high. This study is the first to observe a temporal shift in density-dependent mechanisms in reef fish, and the first to observe food limitation on short temporal scales. Food competition may therefore be an important regulator of postsettlement reef fish cohorts after the initial intense effects of refuge limitation and predation.

  20. Social familiarity relaxes the constraints of limited attention and enhances reproduction of group-living predatory mites

    PubMed Central

    Strodl, Markus A; Schausberger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In many group-living animals, within-group associations are determined by familiarity, i.e. familiar individuals, independent of genetic relatedness, preferentially associate with each other. The ultimate causes of this behaviour are poorly understood and rigorous documentation of its adaptive significance is scarce. Limited attention theory states that focusing on a given task has interrelated cognitive, behavioural and physiological costs with respect to the attention paid to other tasks. In multiple signal environments attention has thus to be shared among signals. Assuming that familiar neighbours require less attention than unfamiliar ones, associating with familiar individuals should increase the efficiency in other tasks and ultimately increase fitness. We tested this prediction in adult females of the group-living, plant-inhabiting predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis. We evaluated the influence of social familiarity on within-group association behaviour, activity, predation and reproduction. In mixed groups (familiar and unfamiliar), familiar predator females preferentially associated with each other. In pure groups (either familiar or unfamiliar), familiar predator females produced more eggs than unfamiliar females at similar predation rates. Higher egg production was correlated with lower activity levels, indicating decreased restlessness. In light of limited attention theory, we argue that the ability to discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar individuals and preferential association with familiar individuals confers a selective advantage because familiar social environments are cognitively and physiologically less taxing than unfamiliar social environments. PMID:24273345

  1. Accelerators-Limitations of Technology A Summary of the Snowmass Accelerator Working Group Reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigner, Maury

    1983-04-01

    Hadron colliders and accelerators in the 20 TeV energy range turned out to be the majority interest among active members of the Accelerator Row Group. While other types of accelerator and other energy ranges were discussed, largely on the basis of work done else-where, our primary creative activities at this summer study focused on the hadron facility. Examining both the economic and accelerator physics dimensions of such a facility, we were able to give some hope to the idea that a well designed and concentrated R/D program, elaborating much further on technologies we now possess, might bring a 20 TeV facility within our national reach. The central challenges for this R/D program appear to be 1. Achievement of virtual automation of superconducting magnet, accelerator housing and other accelerator component manufacture and installation. 2. Achievement of a thorough understanding of the field vs. cost relation for superconducting magnets. 3. Achievement of a thorough understanding of the luminosity-aperture-energy relation.

  2. Roles of Long-Range Tertiary Interactions in Limiting Dynamics of the Tetrahymena Group I Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of mutating the long-range tertiary contacts of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme on the dynamics of its substrate helix (referred to as P1) and on catalytic activity. Dynamics were assayed by fluorescence anisotropy of the fluorescent base analogue, 6-methyl isoxanthopterin, incorporated into the P1 helix, and fluorescence anisotropy and catalytic activity were measured for wild type and mutant ribozymes over a range of conditions. Remarkably, catalytic activity correlated with P1 anisotropy over 5 orders of magnitude of activity, with a correlation coefficient of 0.94. The functional and dynamic effects from simultaneous mutation of the two long-range contacts that weaken P1 docking are cumulative and, based on this RNA’s topology, suggest distinct underlying origins for the mutant effects. Tests of mechanistic predictions via single molecule FRET measurements of rate constants for P1 docking and undocking suggest that ablation of the P14 tertiary interaction frees P2 and thereby enhances the conformational space explored by the undocked attached P1 helix. In contrast, mutation of the metal core tertiary interaction disrupts the conserved core into which the P1 helix docks. Thus, despite following a single correlation, the two long-range tertiary contacts facilitate P1 helix docking by distinct mechanisms. These results also demonstrate that a fluorescence anisotropy probe incorporated into a specific helix within a larger RNA can report on changes in local helical motions as well as differences in more global dynamics. This ability will help uncover the physical properties and behaviors that underlie the function of RNAs and RNA/protein complexes. PMID:24738560

  3. Improved Hand Function, Self-Rated Health and Decreased Activity Limitations - results after a two month hand osteoarthritis group intervention.

    PubMed

    Bjurehed, Linda; Brodin, Nina; Nordenskiöld, Ulla; Björk, Mathilda

    2017-10-03

    Hand Osteoarthritis (hand OA) causes pain, impaired mobility and reduced grip force, which cause activity limitations. Osteoarthritis group interventions in primary care settings are sparsely reported. To evaluate the effects on hand function, activity limitations and self-rated health of a primary care hand OA group intervention. 64 individuals with hand OA agreed to participate, 15 were excluded due to not fulfilling the inclusion criteria. The 49 remaining (90% female) participated in OA group intervention at a primary care unit with education, paraffin wax bath and hand exercise over a six-week period. Data were collected at baseline, end of intervention and after one year. Instruments used were the Grip Ability Test (GAT), the Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI), the JAMAR (dynamometry), hand pain at rest using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulders and Hand (Quick-DASH) and the EuroQol VAS (EQ VAS). Data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics. Hand function, activity limitation and self-rated health significantly improved from baseline to end of intervention, JAMAR (right hand, p<0.001, left hand, p=0.008), SOFI (p=0.011), GAT (p<0.001), hand pain at rest (p<0.001), PSFS (1, p=0.008, 2, p<0.001, 3, p=0.004), Quick- DASH (p=0.001), and EQ VAS (p=0.039)and the effects were sustained after one year. The hand OA group intervention in primary care improves hand function, activity limitation and self-rated health. The benefits are sustained one year after completion of the intervention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. A Within-Group Analysis of African American Mothers' Authoritarian Attitudes, Limit-Setting and Children's Self-Regulation.

    PubMed

    LeCuyer, Elizabeth A; Swanson, Dena Phillips

    2017-03-01

    Research suggests that higher levels of authoritarian parenting exist in African American (AA) families than in European American (EA) families, and that authoritarian attitudes may be associated with more positive outcomes in AA families than EA families. However, less is known about authoritarian attitudes and children's development within AA families. This within-group study of 50 African American mothers and their 3-year-old children examined associations between maternal authoritarian attitudes, observed maternal limit-setting strategies, and children's self-regulation during a limit-setting interaction. The findings indicate that while AA families may hold more authoritarian attitudes than EA families, the direction of effect of authoritarian attitudes on children's outcomes appears to be the same in both ethnic groups. In this sample, when examining AA authoritarian attitudes relative to those of other AA mothers, less or lower authoritarian attitudes were associated with authoritative limit-setting behavior (firm limits within the context of overall warmth and responsiveness) and better children's self-regulation.

  5. Limited novel influenza A (H1N1) 09 infection in travelling high‐school tour group

    PubMed Central

    Mardani, Janine; Calder, Lester; Laurie, Karen; Barr, Ian; Kelso, Anne; Jones, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Mardani et al. (2011) Limited novel influenza A (H1N1) 09 infection in travelling high‐school tour group. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 47–51. Background  A single case of novel influenza A (H1N1) 09 infection was identified by PCR among a New Zealand high‐school group that toured California in April 2009. Close monitoring of the tour group and their New Zealand contacts identified 11 other tour members with respiratory symptoms who were investigated. In all nine instances where nasopharyngeal swabs were indicated, tests were negative for novel influenza A (H1N1) 09 by PCR. Objective  To determine whether serology could identify any cases of novel influenza A (H1N1) 09 that had not been detected by PCR. Methods  Acute and convalescent serological testing for antibodies against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal A (H1N1) influenza viruses using haemagglutination inhibition assays and microneutralisation assays. Results  Serological analysis of symptomatic tour members identified a further possible case of novel influenza A (H1N1) 09 infection. The possible case had not been tested by PCR because he or she had already received prophylaxis with oseltamivir. Conclusions  These findings suggest infection among tour group members was limited despite prolonged periods of close contact during travel. Furthermore, multiple public health interventions are likely to have effectively prevented an outbreak following the tour group’s return. PMID:21138540

  6. Efimov-like phase of a three-stranded DNA and the renormalization-group limit cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Sadhukhan, Poulomi; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2015-04-01

    A three-stranded DNA with short range base pairings only is known to exhibit a classical analog of the quantum Efimov effect, viz., a three-chain bound state at the two-chain melting point where no two are bound. By using a nonperturbative renormalization-group method for a rigid duplex DNA and a flexible third strand, with base pairings and strand exchange, we show that the Efimov-DNA is associated with a limit cycle type behavior of the flow of an effective three-chain interaction. The analysis also shows that thermally generated bubbles play an essential role in producing the effect. A toy model for the flow equations shows the limit cycle in an extended three-dimensional parameter space of the two-chain coupling and a complex three-chain interaction.

  7. Limitations of Species Delimitation Based on Phylogenetic Analyses: A Case Study in the Hypogymnia hypotrypa Group (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xinli; McCune, Bruce; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Li, Hui; Leavitt, Steven; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Tchabanenko, Svetlana; Wei, Jiangchun

    2016-01-01

    reveals the potential limitations of relying on distinct reproductive strategies as diagnostic taxonomic characters for Hypogymnia and also the challenges of using popular sequence-based species delimitation methods in groups with recent diversification histories. PMID:27828951

  8. Conditional solvation thermodynamics of isoleucine in model peptides and the limitations of the group-transfer model.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Weber, Valéry; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Asthagiri, D

    2014-04-17

    The hydration thermodynamics of the amino acid X relative to the reference G (glycine) or the hydration thermodynamics of a small-molecule analog of the side chain of X is often used to model the contribution of X to protein stability and solution thermodynamics. We consider the reasons for successes and limitations of this approach by calculating and comparing the conditional excess free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of hydration of the isoleucine side chain in zwitterionic isoleucine, in extended penta-peptides, and in helical deca-peptides. Butane in gauche conformation serves as a small-molecule analog for the isoleucine side chain. Parsing the hydrophobic and hydrophilic contributions to hydration for the side chain shows that both of these aspects of hydration are context-sensitive. Furthermore, analyzing the solute-solvent interaction contribution to the conditional excess enthalpy of the side chain shows that what is nominally considered a property of the side chain includes entirely nonobvious contributions of the background. The context-sensitivity of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration and the conflation of background contributions with energetics attributed to the side chain limit the ability of a single scaling factor, such as the fractional solvent exposure of the group in the protein, to map the component energetic contributions of the model-compound data to their value in the protein. But ignoring the origin of cancellations in the underlying components the group-transfer model may appear to provide a reasonable estimate of the free energy for a given error tolerance.

  9. Group III/IV muscle afferents limit the intramuscular metabolic perturbation during whole body exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mangum, Tyler S.; Sidhu, Simranjit K.; Weavil, Joshua C.; Hureau, Thomas J.; Jessop, Jacob E.; Bledsoe, Amber D.; Richardson, Russell S.; Amann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Key points The purpose of this study was to determine the role of group III/IV muscle afferents in limiting the endurance exercise‐induced metabolic perturbation assayed in muscle biopsy samples taken from locomotor muscle.Lumbar intrathecal fentanyl was used to attenuate the central projection of μ‐opioid receptor‐sensitive locomotor muscle afferents during a 5 km cycling time trial.The findings suggest that the central projection of group III/IV muscle afferent feedback constrains voluntary neural ‘drive’ to working locomotor muscle and limits the exercise‐induced intramuscular metabolic perturbation.Therefore, the CNS might regulate the degree of metabolic perturbation within locomotor muscle and thereby limit peripheral fatigue. It appears that the group III/IV muscle afferents are an important neural link in this regulatory mechanism, which probably serves to protect locomotor muscle from the potentially severe functional impairment as a consequence of severe intramuscular metabolic disturbance. Abstract To investigate the role of metabo‐ and mechanosensitive group III/IV muscle afferents in limiting the intramuscular metabolic perturbation during whole body endurance exercise, eight subjects performed 5 km cycling time trials under control conditions (CTRL) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing lower limb muscle afferent feedback (FENT). Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before and immediately after exercise. Motoneuronal output was estimated through vastus lateralis surface electromyography (EMG). Exercise‐induced changes in intramuscular metabolites were determined using liquid and gas chromatography‐mass spectrometry. Quadriceps fatigue was quantified by pre‐ to post‐exercise changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch torque (ΔQTsingle) evoked by electrical femoral nerve stimulation. Although motoneuronal output was 21 ± 12% higher during FENT compared to CTRL (P < 0.05), time to complete the time trial

  10. Conditional Solvation Thermodynamics of Isoleucine in Model Peptides and the Limitations of the Group-Transfer Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hydration thermodynamics of the amino acid X relative to the reference G (glycine) or the hydration thermodynamics of a small-molecule analog of the side chain of X is often used to model the contribution of X to protein stability and solution thermodynamics. We consider the reasons for successes and limitations of this approach by calculating and comparing the conditional excess free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of hydration of the isoleucine side chain in zwitterionic isoleucine, in extended penta-peptides, and in helical deca-peptides. Butane in gauche conformation serves as a small-molecule analog for the isoleucine side chain. Parsing the hydrophobic and hydrophilic contributions to hydration for the side chain shows that both of these aspects of hydration are context-sensitive. Furthermore, analyzing the solute–solvent interaction contribution to the conditional excess enthalpy of the side chain shows that what is nominally considered a property of the side chain includes entirely nonobvious contributions of the background. The context-sensitivity of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration and the conflation of background contributions with energetics attributed to the side chain limit the ability of a single scaling factor, such as the fractional solvent exposure of the group in the protein, to map the component energetic contributions of the model-compound data to their value in the protein. But ignoring the origin of cancellations in the underlying components the group-transfer model may appear to provide a reasonable estimate of the free energy for a given error tolerance. PMID:24650057

  11. [Breastfeeding experiences in a group of women: the limits of "the body for the child" and "the body for oneself"].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ana Márcia Spanó

    2003-01-01

    This study aims to understand the meanings ascribed by a group of women from Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State, to their experiences with breastfeeding in relation to the sensations and manifestations in their own bodies as well as those they perceive in their children. The phenomenon was viewed as integrated with value systems related to motherhood and the body. The research methodology was qualitative. Participants included twenty primiparous women who had given birth less than 30 days previously who came to primary health care clinics due to various complaints. The analysis of interviews and observations was based on the thematic modality of content analysis. For these women, breastfeeding means to be a good mother and to give the best of oneself to the child. In breastfeeding practice, among limits and possibilities, they measure what they consider a "problem" based on the perceived manifestations in their own bodies and especially in those of their children. Their concerns are based on harm and danger to which they expose the child. Such experiences play out at the limits of being: the body for the child and the body for oneself, thereby establishing a sharp conflict between motherhood and individuality.

  12. Adapting the Crossmodal Congruency Task for Measuring the Limits of Visual-Tactile Interactions Within and Between Groups.

    PubMed

    Poole, Daniel; Couth, Samuel; Gowen, Emma; Warren, Paul A; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The crossmodal congruency task (CCT) is a commonly used paradigm for measuring visual-tactile interactions and how these may be influenced by discrepancies in space and time between the tactile target and visual distractors. The majority of studies which have used this paradigm have neither measured, nor attempted to control, individual variability in unisensory (tactile) performance. We have developed a version of the CCT in which unisensory baseline performance is constrained to enable comparisons within and between participant groups. Participants were instructed to discriminate between single and double tactile pulses presented to their dominant hand, at their own approximate threshold level. In Experiment 1, visual distractors were presented at -30 ms, 100 ms, 200 ms and 400 ms stimulus onset asynchronies. In Experiment 2, ipsilateral visual distractors were presented 0 cm, 21 cm, and 42 cm vertically from the target hand, and 42 cm in a symmetrical, contralateral position. Distractors presented -30 ms and 0 cm from the target produced a significantly larger congruency effect than at other time points and spatial locations. Thus, the typical limits of visual-tactile interactions were replicated using a version of the task in which baseline performance can be constrained. The usefulness of this approach is supported by the observation that tactile thresholds correlated with self-reported autistic traits in this non-clinical sample. We discuss the suitability of this adapted version of the CCT for measuring visual-tactile interactions in populations where unisensory tactile ability may differ within and between groups.

  13. 50 CFR Table 1c to Part 660... - 2009, Open Access and Limited Entry Allocations by Species or Species Group (weights in metric tons)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009, Open Access and Limited Entry... Part 660, Subpart G—2009, Open Access and Limited Entry Allocations by Species or Species Group... limited entry fixed gear, 2.5 mt for directed open access, 4.9 mt for Washington recreational, 16.0 mt...

  14. Focus Group Evaluation of “Secret Feelings”: A Depression Fotonovela for Latinos With Limited English Proficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Contreras, Sandra; Aragón, Rebeca; Molina, Gregory B.; Baron, Melvin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined reactions of Latino adults with limited English proficiency (LEP) to a culturally and linguistically adapted depression fotonovela, titled “Secret Feelings.” Fotonovelas are popular health education tools that use posed photographs, text bubbles with simple text, and dramatic narratives to engage audiences and raise their awareness and knowledge about specific health issues. Four focus groups (N = 32) were conducted at an adult school program (e.g., GED classes). Content analysis was used to generate themes from transcripts and memos. “Secret Feelings” was viewed as an entertaining, engaging, and educational tool that helped combat stigma toward depression and its treatments in the Latino community. Despite learning about depression, participants reported they wanted more information about the causes of depression, the process of recovery, and felt that the story did not shift their apprehensions toward antidepressants. The findings suggest that “Secret Feelings” is a promising depression literacy tool for Latinos with LEP that can raise awareness and knowledge about depression and its treatments, reduce stigma toward depression and antidepressant medications, and model appropriate help-seeking behaviors. PMID:21807951

  15. XMM-Newton and Chandra Observations of the Galaxy Group NGC 5044. 1; Evidence for Limited Multiphase Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buote, David A.; Lewis, Aaron D.; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Mathews, William G.

    2003-01-01

    Using new XMM and Chandra observations, we present an analysis of the temperature structure of the hot gas within a radius of 100 kpc of the bright nearby galaxy group NGC 5044. A spectral deprojection analysis of data extracted from circular annuli reveals that a two-temperature model (2T) of the hot gas is favored over single-phase or cooling flow (M = 4.5 +/- 0.2 solar mass/yr) models within the central approx.30 kpc. Alternatively, the data can be fitted equally well if the temperature within each spherical shell varies continuously from approx.T(sub h) to T(sub c) approx. T(sub h)/2, but no lower. The high spatial resolution of the Chandra data allows us to determine that the temperature excursion T(sub h) approaches T(sub c) required in each shell exceeds the temperature range between the boundaries of the same shell in the best-fitting single-phase model. This is strong evidence for a multiphase gas having a limited temperature range. We do not find any evidence that azimuthal temperature variations within each annulus on the sky can account for the range in temperatures within each shell. We provide a detailed investigation of the systematic errors on the derived spectral models considering the effects of calibration, plasma codes, bandwidth, variable NH, and background rate. We find that the RGS gratings and the EPIC and ACIS CCDs give fully consistent results when the same models are fitted over the same energy ranges for each instrument. The cooler component of the 2T model has a temperature (T(sub c) approx. 0.7 keV) similar to the kinetic temperature of the stars. The hot phase has a temperature (T(sub h) approx. 1.4 keV) characteristic of the virial temperature of the solar mass halo expected in the NGC 5044 group. However, in view of the morphological disturbances and X-ray holes visible in the Chandra image within R approx. equals 10 kpc, bubbles of gas heated to approx.T(sub h) in this region may be formed by intermittent AGN feedback. Some

  16. XMM-Newton and Chandra Observations of the Galaxy Group NGC 5044. 1; Evidence for Limited Multiphase Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buote, David A.; Lewis, Aaron D.; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Mathews, William G.

    2003-01-01

    Using new XMM and Chandra observations, we present an analysis of the temperature structure of the hot gas within a radius of 100 kpc of the bright nearby galaxy group NGC 5044. A spectral deprojection analysis of data extracted from circular annuli reveals that a two-temperature model (2T) of the hot gas is favored over single-phase or cooling flow (M = 4.5 +/- 0.2 solar mass/yr) models within the central approx.30 kpc. Alternatively, the data can be fitted equally well if the temperature within each spherical shell varies continuously from approx.T(sub h) to T(sub c) approx. T(sub h)/2, but no lower. The high spatial resolution of the Chandra data allows us to determine that the temperature excursion T(sub h) approaches T(sub c) required in each shell exceeds the temperature range between the boundaries of the same shell in the best-fitting single-phase model. This is strong evidence for a multiphase gas having a limited temperature range. We do not find any evidence that azimuthal temperature variations within each annulus on the sky can account for the range in temperatures within each shell. We provide a detailed investigation of the systematic errors on the derived spectral models considering the effects of calibration, plasma codes, bandwidth, variable NH, and background rate. We find that the RGS gratings and the EPIC and ACIS CCDs give fully consistent results when the same models are fitted over the same energy ranges for each instrument. The cooler component of the 2T model has a temperature (T(sub c) approx. 0.7 keV) similar to the kinetic temperature of the stars. The hot phase has a temperature (T(sub h) approx. 1.4 keV) characteristic of the virial temperature of the solar mass halo expected in the NGC 5044 group. However, in view of the morphological disturbances and X-ray holes visible in the Chandra image within R approx. equals 10 kpc, bubbles of gas heated to approx.T(sub h) in this region may be formed by intermittent AGN feedback. Some

  17. A Pilot Study for a Structured, Time-Limited Therapy Group for Sexually Abused Pre-Adolescent Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Billie F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Structured group therapy techniques were developed to foster mastery skill development and defense mechanisms in the treatment of eight sexually abused female children, aged six to eight. The techniques included development of intellectualization defenses through board games, cathartic exploration of feelings through art and storytelling, and…

  18. Are There Limits to Collectivism? Culture and Children’s Reasoning About Lying to Conceal a Group Transgression

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Monica A.; Heyman, Gail D.; Fu, Genyue; Lee, Kang

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the effects of collectivism on lying to conceal a group transgression. Seven-, 9-, and 11-year-old US and Chinese children (N = 374) were asked to evaluate stories in which protagonists either lied or told the truth about their group’s transgression and were then asked about either the protagonist’s motivations or justification for their own evaluations. Previous research suggests that children in collectivist societies such as China find lying for one’s group to be more acceptable than do children from individualistic societies such as the United States. The current study provides evidence that this is not always the case: Chinese children in this study viewed lies told to conceal a group’s transgressions less favourably than did US children. An examination of children’s reasoning about protagonists’ motivations for lying indicated that children in both countries focused on an impact to self when discussing motivations for protagonists to lie for their group. Overall, results suggest that children living in collectivist societies do not always focus on the needs of the group. PMID:20953286

  19. Upper limits on carbon group ions near the orbit of Titan: Implications for methane escape from Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crary, Frank; Smith, H. Todd; Reisenfeld, Daniel; Young, Dave

    High neutral methane escape rates from Titan (˜3x109 cm-2 s-1 ) have been inferred from Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer observations [Yelle et al., 2008]. This is much higher than past predictions (e.g. due to Jeans loss). To investigate this hypothesis, we have examined Cassini Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) data obtained near Titan's orbit. We have used the CAPS linear electric field (LEF) mass spectra, which provide high resolution measurements of atomic ions and the atomic constituents of molecular ions. The expected lifetime of neutral methane is sufficiently long that escaping molecules would not ionize in Titan's immediate vicinity. However, ionospheric methane ions are observed in Titan's atmosphere. To distinguish between these two possible sources of methane ions, we have examined spectra obtained within five Saturn radii of Titan's orbit, but at distances of over one Saturn radius from Titan itself. Between March 2005 and Dec. 2009, 5466 LEF spectra were obtained in this region. These data show a clear oxygen peak, either from atomic O+ or from fragmentation of oxygen-bearing molecular ions. A weaker nitrogen peak, with 5.9% the amplitude of the oxygen peak, is also present. At the instrument's noise level, no carbon peak is present. This non-detection corresponds to an abundance of carbon ions and carbon-bearing molecular ions under 0.28% that of oxygen and oxygen-bearing ions. Estimates of the neutral and ion loss rates, and ion production rates, allow us to convert this upper limit into an upper limit on the escape rate of neutral methane from Titan. Unless there is some currently unknown and efficient loss process for neutral methane (i.e. other than ionization), this upper limit is several orders of magnitude lower than the escape rate determined by Yelle et al., 2008.

  20. A pilot study for a structured, time-limited therapy group for sexually abused pre-adolescent children.

    PubMed

    Corder, B F; Haizlip, T; DeBoer, P

    1990-01-01

    The critical role of specific types of mastery skill development in the treatment of sexually abused children is explored, and defense mechanisms of "invulnerable children," who function adequately despite trauma and stress, are described. The authors describe their development of structured group therapy techniques designed to foster these types of mastery skills with sexually abused children aged 6 to 8. These techniques include development of intellectualization defenses through original coloring books and therapeutic board games, cathartic exploration of feelings through structured art and storytelling exercises, cognitive relabeling and self-esteem building through role-play, "chants and cheers," homework shared with mothers, and other structured group procedures designed to develop specific coping skills.

  1. ON THE LIMIT DISTRIBUTION OF THE NUMBER OF SOLUTIONS OF THE EQUATION x^k = a IN THE SYMMETRIC GROUP S_n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. I.

    1983-02-01

    The limit distribution of the number of solutions of the equation x^k = a as n \\to \\infty is investigated for a fixed integer k \\geq 2, where a is in the symmetric group S_n of degree n.Bibliography: 2 titles.

  2. International Neurocognitive Normative Study: Neurocognitive Comparison Data in Diverse Resource Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, SR; Marra, CM; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, TB; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N; La Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L.; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-01-01

    Summary ACTG A5271 collected neurocognitive normative comparison test data in 2400 at-risk HIV seronegative participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand and Zimbabwe. The participants were enrolled in strata by site (10 levels), age (2 levels), education (2 levels), and gender (2 levels). These data provide necessary normative data infrastructure for future clinical research and care in these diverse resource limited settings. Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment, and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impede research and clinical care. Here we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel, and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At 10 sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n=240), India (n=480), Malawi (n=481), Peru (n=239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n=240) and Zimbabwe (n=240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline, and 770 at six-months. Participants were enrolled in 8 strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 years and ≥ 10 years), and age (<35 years and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the six-month follow up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p<.0001). There was variation between the age, gender and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the

  3. International neurocognitive normative study: neurocognitive comparison data in diverse resource-limited settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271.

    PubMed

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, S R; Marra, C M; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, T B; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S; Kumarasamy, N; la Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-08-01

    Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource-limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impedes research and clinical care. Here, we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At ten sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n = 240), India (n = 480), Malawi (n = 481), Peru (n = 239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n = 240), and Zimbabwe (n = 240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline and 770 at 6 months. Participants were enrolled in eight strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 and ≥10 years), and age (<35 and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the 6-month follow-up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p < 0.0001). There was variation between the age, gender, and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance, and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the necessary neurocognitive normative data needed to build infrastructure for future neurological and neurocognitive studies in diverse RLS. These normative data are a much-needed resource for both clinicians and researchers.

  4. Karyotype reorganisation in the subtilis group of birch mice (Rodentia, Dipodidae, Sicista): unexpected taxonomic diversity within a limited distribution.

    PubMed

    Kovalskaya, Y M; Aniskin, V M; Bogomolov, P L; Surov, A V; Tikhonov, I A; Tikhonova, G N; Robinson, T J; Volobouev, V T

    2011-01-01

    Conventional cytogenetic studies of Sicista subtilis and S. severtzovi (Dipodidae, Sicistinae), both attributable to the subtilis group of birch mice, revealed extensive karyotype diversity with 2n = 16-26 and NFa values of 26-46 indicating the overwhelming non-Robertsonian nature of chromosomal reorganization in these species. The numerical and structural chromosome variability was principally found in specimens located within a confined region of the East European (Russian) Plain. The approximately 135,000-km(2) area occurs in the vicinity of the Don River bend between 49°13'N/43°46'E and 51°32'N/36°16'E. The detection of cytotypes sharing similar 2n and NF values, but having morphologically distinct chromosomes, suggests that these may result from polymorphisms present both within recognized species and in cryptic taxa not hitherto described. We conducted a comprehensive, comparative chromosome banding analysis of 52 birch mice (21 localities) referable to the subtilis group and report the presence of 5 distinct karyotypes, each characterized by a combination of stable, variable, and partly overlapping 2n/NFa values. These karyotypes differed from each other by 10-29 structural chromosomal rearrangements (18.1 ± 6.3) that comprised Rb fusions/fissions (42.2%), pericentric inversions (31.1%), and tandem translocations (22.2%). The composition, and the high numbers of these chromosomal changes, is likely to provide an effective means of post-mating isolation, suggesting that taxonomic diversity within the subtilis group is larger than currently accepted. Additionally, we report the frequent fixation of tandem translocations in sample populations, one of which was found in a polymorphic state representing, as far as we are aware, the first case of an in statu nascendi tandem fusion in wild populations. Moreover, our data revealed that bi-armed chromosomes were involved in fusions detected in some of the subtilis taxa. In each instance, however, fusions were

  5. Strategies to Support Recruitment of Patients with Life-limiting illness for Research: The Palliative Care Research Cooperative Group

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Laura C.; Bull, Janet; Wessell, Kathryn; Massie, Lisa; Bennett, Rachael E.; Kutner, Jean S.; Aziz, Noreen M.; Abernethy, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Context The Palliative Care Research Cooperative group (PCRC) is the first clinical trials cooperative for palliative care in the United States. Objectives To describe barriers and strategies for recruitment during the inaugural PCRC clinical trial. Methods The parent study was a multi-site randomized controlled trial enrolling adults with life expectancy anticipated to be 1–6 months, randomized to discontinue statins (intervention) vs. to continue on statins (control). To study recruitment best practices, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 site Principal Investigators (PI) and Clinical Research Coordinators (CRC), and reviewed recruitment rates. Interviews covered 3 topics – 1) successful strategies for recruitment, 2) barriers to recruitment, and 3) optimal roles of the PI and CRC. Results All eligible site PIs and CRCs completed interviews and provided data on statin protocol recruitment. The parent study completed recruitment of n=381 patients. Site enrollment ranged from 1–109 participants, with an average of 25 enrolled per site. Five major barriers included difficulty locating eligible patients, severity of illness, family and provider protectiveness, seeking patients in multiple settings, and lack of resources for recruitment activities. Five effective recruitment strategies included systematic screening of patient lists, thoughtful messaging to make research relevant, flexible protocols to accommodate patients’ needs, support from clinical champions, and the additional resources of a trials cooperative group. Conclusion The recruitment experience from the multi-site PCRC yields new insights into methods for effective recruitment to palliative care clinical trials. These results will inform training materials for the PCRC and may assist other investigators in the field. PMID:24863152

  6. A Limited Group of Class I Histone Deacetylases Acts To Repress Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Keedy, Kara S.; Archin, Nancie M.; Gates, Adam T.; Espeseth, Amy; Hazuda, Daria J.; Margolis, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Silencing of the integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome in resting CD4+ T cells is a significant contributor to the persistence of infection, allowing the virus to evade both immune detection and pharmaceutical attack. Nonselective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are capable of inducing expression of quiescent HIV-1 in latently infected cells. However, potent global HDAC inhibition can induce host toxicity. To determine the specific HDACs that regulate HIV-1 transcription, we evaluated HDAC1 to HDAC11 RNA expression and protein expression and compartmentalization in the resting CD4+ T cells of HIV-1-positive, aviremic patients. HDAC1, -3, and -7 had the highest mRNA expression levels in these cells. Although all HDACs were detected in resting CD4+ T cells by Western blot analysis, HDAC5, -8, and -11 were primarily sequestered in the cytoplasm. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we detected HDAC1, -2, and -3 at the HIV-1 promoter in Jurkat J89GFP cells. Targeted inhibition of HDACs by small interfering RNA demonstrated that HDAC2 and HDAC3 contribute to repression of HIV-1 long terminal repeat expression in the HeLa P4/R5 cell line model of latency. Together, these results suggest that HDAC inhibitors specific for a limited number of class I HDACs may offer a targeted approach to the disruption of persistent HIV-1 infection. PMID:19279091

  7. The Integration of Family and Group Therapy as an Alternative to Juvenile Incarceration: A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation Using Parenting with Love and Limits.

    PubMed

    Karam, Eli A; Sterrett, Emma M; Kiaer, Lynn

    2015-10-28

    The current study employed a quasi-experimental design using both intent-to-treat and protocol adherence analysis of 155 moderate- to high-risk juvenile offenders to evaluate the effectiveness of Parenting with Love and Limits® (PLL), an integrative group and family therapy approach. Youth completing PLL had significantly lower rates of recidivism than the comparison group. Parents also reported statistically significant improvements in youth behavior. Lengths of service were also significantly shorter for the treatment sample than the matched comparison group by an average of 4 months. This study contributes to the literature by suggesting that intensive community-based combined family and group treatment is effective in curbing recidivism among high-risk juveniles.

  8. Regularity properties and pathologies of position-space renormalization-group transformations: Scope and limitations of Gibbsian theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Enter, Aernout C. D.; Fernández, Roberto; Sokal, Alan D.

    1993-09-01

    We reconsider the conceptual foundations of the renormalization-group (RG) formalism, and prove some rigorous theorems on the regularity properties and possible pathologies of the RG map. Our main results apply to local (in position space) RG maps acting on systems of bounded spins (compact single-spin space). Regarding regularity, we show that the RG map, defined on a suitable space of interactions (=formal Hamiltonians), is always single-valued and Lipschitz continuous on its domain of definition. This rules out a recently proposed scenario for the RG description of first-order phase transitions. On the pathological side, we make rigorous some arguments of Griffiths, Pearce, and Israel, and prove in several cases that the renormalized measure is not a Gibbs measure for any reasonable interaction. This means that the RG map is ill-defined, and that the conventional RG description of first-order phase transitions is not universally valid. For decimation or Kadanoff transformations applied to the Ising model in dimension d⩾3, these pathologies occur in a full neighborhood { β> β 0, ¦h¦< ɛ( β)} of the low-temperature part of the first-order phase-transition surface. For block-averaging transformations applied to the Ising model in dimension d⩾2, the pathologies occur at low temperatures for arbitrary magnetic field strength. Pathologies may also occur in the critical region for Ising models in dimension d⩾4. We discuss the heuristic and numerical evidence on RG pathologies in the light of our rigorous theorems. In addition, we discuss critically the concept of Gibbs measure, which is at the heart of present-day classical statistical mechanics. We provide a careful, and, we hope, pedagogical, overview of the theory of Gibbsian measures as well as (the less familiar) non-Gibbsian measures, emphasizing the distinction between these two objects and the possible occurrence of the latter in different physical situations. We give a rather complete catalogue of

  9. Detection of upper limit of normal values of anti-DNase B antibody in children's age groups who were admitted to hospital with noninfectious reasons.

    PubMed

    Delice, Servet; Adaleti, Riza; Cevan, Simin; Alagoz, Pinar; Bedel, Aynur; Nuhoglu, Cagatay; Aksaray, Sebahat

    2015-01-01

    Anti-streptolysin O (ASO) and anti-DNase B (ADB) titers are used for the diagnosis of poststreptococcal complications. Ranges of normal values of ASO and ADB titers vary, depending on age, population and different time intervals. Although many studies have been performed for determination of the ASO titer in our country, only a few studies have been conducted for specification the upper limit of normal for (ULN) ADB. In our study we aimed to determine the upper limit of normal of ADB antibody titers in children aged 5-15. One hundred and twenty one children aged from 5-15 who were admitted to our outpatient clinic of Haydarpaşa Numune Training and Research Hospital with noninfectious reasons between November 2013 and March 2014 were included in the study. Patients who met the following criteria were included in the study; absence of streptococcal infection in the last three months in physical examination and/or no growth of group A, C, and G of beta-haemolytic streptococci in throat culture, normal ranges of ASO and C reactive protein (CRP) levels. All serum samples were analyzed collectively by nephelometric method. The upper limit of normal value for anti-DNase B has been defined by separating the upper 20% from the lower 80% of all measurements. Anti-DNase B antibody levels were ranged between 50-576 IU/ml and its upper limit was 219.2 IU/ml. When analyzed according to age groups, anti-DNase B antibody levels in the group aged between 5-10, ranged between 50-576 IU/ml and its upper limit was 212.2 IU/ml, anti-DNase B antibody levels in the group aged 10-15, ranged between 50-408 IU/ml and its upper limit was 231.2 IU/ml (p=0.008). Based on our results, upper normal values ADB antibody showed variations with age in our results. Therefore national reference values should be detected by more comprehensive studies.

  10. Detection of upper limit of normal values of anti-DNase B antibody in children’s age groups who were admitted to hospital with noninfectious reasons

    PubMed Central

    Delice, Servet; Adaleti, Riza; Cevan, Simin; Alagoz, Pinar; Bedel, Aynur; Nuhoglu, Cagatay; Aksaray, Sebahat

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Anti-streptolysin O (ASO) and anti-DNase B (ADB) titers are used for the diagnosis of poststreptococcal complications. Ranges of normal values of ASO and ADB titers vary, depending on age, population and different time intervals. Although many studies have been performed for determination of the ASO titer in our country, only a few studies have been conducted for specification the upper limit of normal for (ULN) ADB. In our study we aimed to determine the upper limit of normal of ADB antibody titers in children aged 5–15. METHODS: One hundred and twenty one children aged from 5–15 who were admitted to our outpatient clinic of Haydarpaşa Numune Training and Research Hospital with noninfectious reasons between November 2013 and March 2014 were included in the study. Patients who met the following criteria were included in the study; absence of streptococcal infection in the last three months in physical examination and/or no growth of group A, C, and G of beta-haemolytic streptococci in throat culture, normal ranges of ASO and C reactive protein (CRP) levels. All serum samples were analyzed collectively by nephelometric method. The upper limit of normal value for anti-DNase B has been defined by separating the upper 20% from the lower 80% of all measurements. RESULTS: Anti-DNase B antibody levels were ranged between 50–576 IU/ml and its upper limit was 219.2 IU/ml. When analyzed according to age groups, anti-DNase B antibody levels in the group aged between 5–10, ranged between 50–576 IU/ml and its upper limit was 212.2 IU/ml, anti-DNase B antibody levels in the group aged 10–15, ranged between 50–408 IU/ml and its upper limit was 231.2 IU/ml (p=0.008). CONCLUSION: Based on our results, upper normal values ADB antibody showed variations with age in our results. Therefore national reference values should be detected by more comprehensive studies. PMID:28058354

  11. Cross-species amplification of microsatellites reveals incongruence in the molecular variation and taxonomic limits of the Pilosocereus aurisetus group (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Moraes, Evandro M; Perez, Manolo F; Téo, Mariana F; Zappi, Daniela C; Taylor, Nigel P; Machado, Marlon C

    2012-09-01

    The Pilosocereus aurisetus group contains eight cactus species restricted to xeric habitats in eastern and central Brazil that have an archipelago-like distribution. In this study, 5-11 microsatellite markers previously designed for Pilosocereus machrisii were evaluated for cross-amplification and polymorphisms in ten populations from six species of the P. aurisetus group. The genotypic information was subsequently used to investigate the genetic relationships between the individuals, populations, and species analyzed. Only the Pmac101 locus failed to amplify in all of the six analyzed species, resulting in an 88 % success rate. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 12, and the most successfully amplified loci showed at least one population with a larger number of alleles than were reported in the source species. The population relationships revealed clear genetic clustering in a neighbor-joining tree that was partially incongruent with the taxonomic limits between the P. aurisetus and P. machrisii species, a fact which parallels the problematic taxonomy of the P. aurisetus group. A Bayesian clustering analysis of the individual genotypes confirmed the observed taxonomic incongruence. These microsatellite markers provide a valuable resource for facilitating large-scale genetic studies on population structures, systematics and evolutionary history in this group.

  12. Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, David; Dear, Keith; Le, Thai; Barton, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Porter, David; Roos, Daniel; Pratt, Gary

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

  13. A quantitative framework to group nanoscale and microscale particles by hazard potency to derive occupational exposure limits: Proof of concept evaluation.

    PubMed

    Drew, Nathan M; Kuempel, Eileen D; Pei, Ying; Yang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    The large and rapidly growing number of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) presents a challenge to assessing the potential occupational health risks. An initial database of 25 rodent studies including 1929 animals across various experimental designs and material types was constructed to identify materials that are similar with respect to their potency in eliciting neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation, a response relevant to workers. Doses were normalized across rodent species, strain, and sex as the estimated deposited particle mass dose per gram of lung. Doses associated with specific measures of pulmonary inflammation were estimated by modeling the continuous dose-response relationships using benchmark dose modeling. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify similar materials. The 18 nanoscale and microscale particles were classified into four potency groups, which varied by factors of approximately two to 100. Benchmark particles microscale TiO2 and crystalline silica were in the lowest and highest potency groups, respectively. Random forest methods were used to identify the important physicochemical predictors of pulmonary toxicity, and group assignments were correctly predicted for five of six new ENMs. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated for this framework. More comprehensive data are needed for further development and validation for use in deriving categorical occupational exposure limits. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Designs for testing group-based interventions with limited numbers of social units: The dynamic wait-listed and regression point displacement designs

    PubMed Central

    Wyman, Peter A.; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic wait-listed design (DWLD) and regression point displacement design (RPDD) address several challenges in evaluating group-based interventions when there is a limited number of groups. Both DWLD and RPDD utilize efficiencies that increase statistical power and can enhance balance between community needs and research priorities. The DWLD blocks on more time units than traditional wait-listed designs, thereby increasing the proportion of a study period during which intervention and control conditions can be compared, and can also improve logistics of implementing intervention across multiple sites and strengthen fidelity. We discuss DWLDs in the larger context of roll-out randomized designs and compare it with its cousin the Stepped Wedge design. The RPDD uses archival data on the population of settings from which intervention unit(s) are selected to create expected posttest scores for units receiving intervention, to which actual posttest scores are compared. High pretest-posttest correlations give the RPDD statistical power for assessing intervention impact even when one or a few settings receive intervention. RPDD works best when archival data are available over a number of years prior to and following intervention. If intervention units were not randomly selected, propensity scores can be used to control for nonrandom selection factors. Examples are provided of the DWLD and RPDD used to evaluate, respectively, suicide prevention training (QPR) in 32 schools and a violence prevention program (CeaseFire) in 2 Chicago police districts over a 10-year period. How DWLD and RPDD address common threats to internal and external validity, as well as their limitations, are discussed. PMID:25481512

  15. Improved Neuropsychological and Neurological Functioning Across Three Antiretroviral Regimens in Diverse Resource-Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5199, the International Neurological Study

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, K.; Jiang, H.; Kumwenda, J.; Supparatpinyo, K.; Evans, S.; Campbell, T. B.; Price, R.; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N.; La Rosa, A.; Santos, B.; Silva, M. T.; Montano, S.; Kanyama, C.; Faesen, S.; Murphy, R.; Hall, C.; Marra, C. M.; Marcus, C.; Berzins, B.; Allen, R.; Housseinipour, M.; Amod, F.; Sanne, I.; Hakim, J.; Walawander, A.; Nair, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) A5199 compared the neurological and neuropsychological (NP) effects of 3 antiretroviral regimens in participants infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in resource-limited settings. Methods. Participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and Zimbabwe were randomized to 3 antiretroviral treatment arms: A (lamivudine-zidovudine plus efavirenz, n = 289), B (atazanavir, emtricitabine, and didanosine-EC, n = 293), and C (emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate plus efavirenz, n = 278) as part of the ACTG PEARLS study (A5175). Standardized neurological and neuropsychological (NP) screening examinations (grooved pegboard, timed gait, semantic verbal fluency, and finger tapping) were administered every 24 weeks from February 2006 to May 2010. Associations with neurological and neuropsychological function were estimated from linear and logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations. Results. The median weeks on study was 168 (Q1 = 96, Q3 = 192) for the 860 participants. NP test scores improved (P < .05) with the exception of semantic verbal fluency. No differences in neurological and neuropsychological functioning between treatment regimens were detected (P > .10). Significant country effects were noted on all NP tests and neurological outcomes (P < .01). Conclusions. The study detected no significant differences in neuropsychological and neurological outcomes between randomized ART regimens. Significant improvement occurred in neurocognitive and neurological functioning over time after initiation of ARTs. The etiology of these improvements is likely multifactorial, reflecting reduced central nervous system HIV infection, better general health, and practice effects. This study suggests that treatment with either of the World Health Organization –recommended first-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings will improve

  16. QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged ≥45 Years with Activity Limitations, by Age Group and Type of Limitation* - National Health Interview Survey,(†) United States, 2000-2015.

    PubMed

    2016-08-26

    The percentage of adults aged 45-64 years with limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) increased from 1.3% in 2000 to 2.0% in 2015, and the percentage with limitations in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) increased from 2.8% to 4.0%. Among adults aged ≥65 years, the percentage with limitations in ADLs increased from 6.4% to 6.9%, and the percentage with limitations in IADLs decreased from 12.9% to 11.7%.

  17. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Paulus, Rebecca; Ettinger, David S.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.; Choy, Hak

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538

  18. Can the renormalization group improved effective potential be used to estimate the Higgs mass in the conformal limit of the standard model?

    SciTech Connect

    Chishtie, F. A.; Jia, J.; Hanif, T.; Mann, R. B.; McKeon, D. G. C.; Sherry, T. N.; Steele, T. G.

    2011-05-15

    We consider the effective potential V in the standard model with a single Higgs doublet in the limit that the only mass scale {mu} present is radiatively generated. Using a technique that has been shown to determine V completely in terms of the renormalization group (RG) functions when using the Coleman-Weinberg renormalization scheme, we first sum leading-log (LL) contributions to V using the one loop RG functions, associated with five couplings (the top quark Yukawa coupling x, the quartic coupling of the Higgs field y, the SU(3) gauge coupling z, and the SU(2)xU(1) couplings r and s). We then employ the two loop RG functions with the three couplings x, y, z to sum the next-to-leading-log (NLL) contributions to V and then the three to five loop RG functions with one coupling y to sum all the N{sup 2}LL...N{sup 4}LL contributions to V. In order to compute these sums, it is necessary to convert those RG functions that have been originally computed explicitly in the minimal subtraction scheme to their form in the Coleman-Weinberg scheme. The Higgs mass can then be determined from the effective potential: the LL result is m{sub H}=219 GeV/c{sup 2} and decreases to m{sub H}=188 GeV/c{sup 2} at N{sup 2}LL order and m{sub H}=163 GeV/c{sup 2} at N{sup 4}LL order. No reasonable estimate of m{sub H} can be made at orders V{sub NLL} or V{sub N}{sup 3}{sub LL} since the method employed gives either negative or imaginary values for the quartic scalar coupling. The fact that we get reasonable values for m{sub H} from the LL, N{sup 2}LL, and N{sup 4}LL approximations is taken to be an indication that this mechanism for spontaneous symmetry breaking is in fact viable, though one in which there is slow convergence towards the actual value of m{sub H}. The mass 163 GeV/c{sup 2} is argued to be an upper bound on m{sub H}.

  19. buffer Layer Growth, the Thickness Dependence of Jc in Coated Conductors, Local Identification of Current Limiting Mechanisms and Participation in the Wire Development Group

    SciTech Connect

    Larbalestier, David; Hellstron, Eric; Abraimov, Dmytro

    2011-12-17

    The primary thrusts of our work were to provide critical understanding of how best to enhance the current-carrying capacity of coated conductors. These include the deconstruction of Jc as a function of fim thickness, the growth of in situ films incorporating strong pinning centers and the use of a suite of position-sensitive tools that enable location and analysis of key areas where current-limiting occurs.

  20. Contemporary Jus Ad Bellum on Use of Force in Self-Defense by States Against Non-State Terrorist Groups -- Limitations, Evolutions and Alternatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    of legal analysis, or “ IRAC ” (Lawnerds.com). IRAC involves the definition of the legal issue in question, a detailed review of the current legal...conclusions on how the law should judge the facts of the case in light of the issue. In this case, IRAC is used to: first, identify the legal and...global, non-state terror groups. 9 III. LEGAL ISSUE DEFINED To employ IRAC effectively in examining this paper’s overarching problem, it is

  1. Phylogeny, divergence times and species limits of spiny lizards (Sceloporus magister species group) in western North American deserts and Baja California.

    PubMed

    Leaché, Adam D; Mulcahy, Daniel G

    2007-12-01

    The broad distribution of the Sceloporus magister species group (squamata: phrynosomatidae) throughout western North America provides an appropriate model for testing biogeographical hypotheses explaining the timing and origins of diversity across mainland deserts and the Baja California Peninsula. We inferred concordant phylogenetic trees describing the higher-level relationships within the magister group using 1.6 kb of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and 1.7 kb of nuclear DNA data. These data provide strong support for the parallel divergence of lineages endemic to the Baja California Peninsula (S. zosteromus and the orcutti complex) in the form of two sequential divergence events at the base of the magister group phylogeny. A relaxed phylogenetic analysis of the mtDNA data using one fossil and one biogeographical constraint provides a chronology of these divergence events and evidence that further diversification within the Baja California clades occurred simultaneously, although patterns of geographical variation and speciation between clades differ. We resolved four major phylogeographical clades within S. magister that (i) provide a novel phylogenetic placement of the Chihuahuan Desert populations sister to the Mojave Desert; (ii) illustrate a mixed history for the Colorado Plateau that includes Mojave and Sonoran Desert components; and (iii) identify an area of overlap between the Mojave and Sonoran Desert clades near Yuma, Arizona. Estimates of bidirectional migration rates among populations of S. magister using four nuclear loci support strong asymmetries in gene flow among the major mtDNA clades. Based on the nonexclusivity of mtDNA haplotypes, nuclear gene flow among populations and wide zones of phenotypic intergradation, S. magister appears to represent a single geographically variable and widespread species.

  2. Exploring the Limit of Accuracy of the Global Hybrid Meta Density Functional for Main-Group Thermochemistry, Kinetics, and Noncovalent Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2008-11-11

    The hybrid meta density functionals M05-2X and M06-2X have been shown to provide broad accuracy for main group chemistry. In the present article we make the functional form more flexible and improve the self-interaction term in the correlation functional to improve its self-consistent-field convergence. We also explore the constraint of enforcing the exact forms of the exchange and correlation functionals through second order (SO) in the reduced density gradient. This yields two new functionals called M08-HX and M08-SO, with different exact constraints. The new functionals are optimized against 267 diverse main-group energetic data consisting of atomization energies, ionization potentials, electron affinities, proton affinities, dissociation energies, isomerization energies, barrier heights, noncovalent complexation energies, and atomic energies. Then the M08-HX, M08-SO, M05-2X, and M06-2X functionals and the popular B3LYP functional are tested against 250 data that were not part of the original training data for any of the functionals, in particular 164 main-group energetic data in 7 databases, 39 bond lengths, 38 vibrational frequencies, and 9 multiplicity-changing electronic transition energies. These tests include a variety of new challenges for complex systems, including large-molecule atomization energies, organic isomerization energies, interaction energies in uracil trimers, and bond distances in crowded molecules (in particular, cyclophanes). The M08-HX functional performs slightly better than M08-SO and M06-2X on average, significantly better than M05- 2X, and much better than B3LYP for a combination of main-group thermochemistry, kinetics, noncovalent interactions, and electronic spectroscopy. More important than the slight improvement in accuracy afforded by M08-HX is the conformation that the optimization procedure works well for data outside the training set. Problems for which the accuracy is especially improved by the new M08-HX functional include

  3. Randomized comparison of ABVD chemotherapy with a strategy that includes radiation therapy in patients with limited-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ralph M; Gospodarowicz, Mary K; Connors, Joseph M; Pearcey, Robert G; Bezjak, Andrea; Wells, Woodrow A; Burns, Bruce F; Winter, Jane N; Horning, Sandra J; Dar, A Rashid; Djurfeldt, Marina S; Ding, Keyue; Shepherd, Lois E

    2005-07-20

    We report results of a randomized trial comparing ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine) chemotherapy alone with treatment that includes radiation therapy in patients with limited-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Patients with nonbulky clinical stage I to IIA Hodgkin's lymphoma were stratified into favorable and unfavorable risk cohorts. Patients allocated to radiation-containing therapy received subtotal nodal radiation if favorable risk or combined-modality therapy if unfavorable risk. Patients allocated to ABVD received four to six treatment cycles. We evaluated 399 patients. Median follow-up is 4.2 years. In comparison with ABVD alone, 5-year freedom from disease progression is superior in patients allocated to radiation therapy (P = .006; 93% v 87%); no differences in event-free survival (P = .06; 88% v 86%) or overall survival (P = .4; 94% v 96%) were detected. In a subset analyses comparing patients stratified into the unfavorable cohort, freedom from disease progression was superior in patients allocated to combined-modality treatment (P = .004; 95% v 88%); no difference in overall survival was detected (P = .3; 92% v 95%). Of 15 deaths observed, nine were attributed to causes other than Hodgkin's lymphoma or acute treatment-related toxicity. In patients with limited-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma, no difference in overall survival was detected between patients randomly assigned to receive treatment that includes radiation therapy or ABVD alone. Although 5-year freedom from disease progression was superior in patients receiving radiation therapy, this advantage is offset by deaths due to causes other than progressive Hodgkin's lymphoma or acute treatment-related toxicity.

  4. Stereochemical conversion of C3-vinyl group to 1-hydroxyethyl group in bacteriochlorophyll c by the hydratases BchF and BchV: adaptation of green sulfur bacteria to limited-light environments.

    PubMed

    Harada, Jiro; Teramura, Misato; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria inhabit anaerobic environments with very low-light conditions. To adapt to such environments, these bacteria have evolved efficient light-harvesting antenna complexes called as chlorosomes, which comprise self-aggregated bacteriochlorophyll c in the model green sulfur, bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. The pigment possess a hydroxy group at the C3(1) position that produces a chiral center with R- or S-stereochemistry and the C3(1) -hydroxy group serves as a connecting moiety for the self-aggregation. Chlorobaculum tepidum carries the two possible homologous genes for C3-vinyl hydratase, bchF and bchV. In the present study, we constructed deletion mutants of each of these genes. Pigment analyses of the bchF-inactivated mutant, which still has BchV as a sole hydratase, showed higher ratios of S-epimeric bacteriochlorophyll c than the wild-type strain. The heightened prevalence of S-stereoisomers in the mutant was more remarkable at lower light intensities and caused a red shift of the chlorosomal Qy absorption band leading to advantages for light-energy transfer. In contrast, the bchV-mutant possessing only BchF showed a significant decrease of the S-epimers and accumulations of C3-vinyl BChl c species. As trans- criptional level of bchV was upregulated at lower light intensity, the Chlorobaculum tepidum adapted to low-light environments by control of the bchV transcription.

  5. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer: background including evidence-based data, pitfalls of the data, limitation of treatment in certain groups

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Yukiharu; Watari, Hidemichi

    2016-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is regarded as the standard treatment for locally advanced uterine cervical cancer (LACC), including stage Ib2-IVa disease [International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging]. However, approximately a third of eligible patients in previous studies died of LACC despite receiving CCRT. The therapeutic significance of CCRT alone in stage III-IVa disease has not yet been confirmed. Effective treatment of some LACC is beyond the scope of CCRT. The objective of the present review is to highlight some challenging work aimed at overcoming this seemingly intractable disease. CCRT with increased peak concentrations of cisplatin (CDDP), surgery following CCRT, adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) following CCRT, and neoadjuvant CT followed by CCRT are strategies expected to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of CCRT. If patients with LACC were divided into those with low-risk or high-risk systemic disease or prognoses, novel strategies should be assessed in the group with high-risk disease. PMID:27199520

  6. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer: background including evidence-based data, pitfalls of the data, limitation of treatment in certain groups.

    PubMed

    Todo, Yukiharu; Watari, Hidemichi

    2016-04-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is regarded as the standard treatment for locally advanced uterine cervical cancer (LACC), including stage Ib2-IVa disease [International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging]. However, approximately a third of eligible patients in previous studies died of LACC despite receiving CCRT. The therapeutic significance of CCRT alone in stage III-IVa disease has not yet been confirmed. Effective treatment of some LACC is beyond the scope of CCRT. The objective of the present review is to highlight some challenging work aimed at overcoming this seemingly intractable disease. CCRT with increased peak concentrations of cisplatin (CDDP), surgery following CCRT, adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) following CCRT, and neoadjuvant CT followed by CCRT are strategies expected to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of CCRT. If patients with LACC were divided into those with low-risk or high-risk systemic disease or prognoses, novel strategies should be assessed in the group with high-risk disease.

  7. Analysis of operational, institutional and international limitations for alternative fuel vehicles and technologies: Means/methods for implementing changes. [Public fleet groups--information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This project focused upon the development of an approach to assist public fleet managers in evaluating the characteristics and availability of alternative fuels (AF's) and alternative fuel vehicles (AFV's) that will serve as possible replacements for vehicles currently serving the needs of various public entities. Also of concern were the institutional/international limitations for alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The City of Detroit and other public agencies in the Detroit area were the particular focus for the activities. As the development and initial stages of use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles proceeds, there will be an increasing need to provide information and guidance to decision-makers regarding differences in requirements and features of these fuels and vehicles. There wig be true differences in requirements for servicing, managing, and regulating. There will also be misunderstanding and misperception. There have been volumes of data collected on AFV'S, and as technology is improved, new data is constantly added. There are not, however, condensed and effective sources of information for public vehicle fleet managers on vehicle and equipment sources, characteristics, performance, costs, and environmental benefits. While theoretical modeling of public fleet requirements has been done, there do not seem to be readily available practical''. There is a need to provide the best possible information and means to minimize the problems for introducing the effective use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles.

  8. Demographic and Indication-Specific Characteristics Have Limited Association With Social Network Engagement: Evidence From 24,954 Members of Four Health Care Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Digital health social networks (DHSNs) are widespread, and the consensus is that they contribute to wellness by offering social support and knowledge sharing. The success of a DHSN is based on the number of participants and their consistent creation of externalities through the generation of new content. To promote network growth, it would be helpful to identify characteristics of superusers or actors who create value by generating positive network externalities. Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the feasibility of developing predictive models that identify potential superusers in real time. This study examined associations between posting behavior, 4 demographic variables, and 20 indication-specific variables. Methods Data were extracted from the custom structured query language (SQL) databases of 4 digital health behavior change interventions with DHSNs. Of these, 2 were designed to assist in the treatment of addictions (problem drinking and smoking cessation), and 2 for mental health (depressive disorder, panic disorder). To analyze posting behavior, 10 models were developed, and negative binomial regressions were conducted to examine associations between number of posts, and demographic and indication-specific variables. Results The DHSNs varied in number of days active (3658-5210), number of registrants (5049-52,396), number of actors (1085-8452), and number of posts (16,231-521,997). In the sample, all 10 models had low R2 values (.013-.086) with limited statistically significant demographic and indication-specific variables. Conclusions Very few variables were associated with social network engagement. Although some variables were statistically significant, they did not appear to be practically significant. Based on the large number of study participants, variation in DHSN theme, and extensive time-period, we did not find strong evidence that demographic characteristics or indication severity sufficiently explain the variability in

  9. An area-based study on intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing group B streptococcus early-onset disease: advances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Alberto; Rossi, Cecilia; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Bastelli, Annalisa; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Chiossi, Claudio; Fiorini, Valentina; Gambini, Lucia; Gavioli, Sara; Lanari, Marcello; Memo, Luigi; Papa, Irene; Pini, Luana; Rizzo, Maria Vittoria; Zucchini, Andrea; Facchinetti, Fabio; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of maternal group-B-streptococcus (GBS) colonization and risk factors (RFs) for neonatal early-onset disease (EOD) in Europe are poorly defined. Large-scale information concerning adherence to recommendations for preventing GBS-EOD are lacking. This was a 3-month retrospective area-based study including all regional deliveries  ≥35 weeks' gestation (in 2012). The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, odds ratio and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) among full-term and preterm deliveries and prolonged membrane rupture (PROM) were calculated. Among 7133 women, 259 (3.6%) were preterm (35-36 weeks' gestation). Full-term women were 6874, and 876 (12.7%) had at least 1 RF. Most women (6495) had prenatal screening and 21.4% (1390) were GBS positive. IAP was given to 2369 (33.2%) women (preterm, n = 166; full term, n = 2203). Compared to full-term, preterm women were less likely to receive IAP when indicated (73.2% versus 90.3%, p < 0.01). Full-term women represented the largest area under the curve (AUC, 0.87). PROM showed the highest sensitivity (98.6%), but the lowest specificity (6.9%) and AUC (0.53). Large-scale prenatal screening and IAP are feasible. Women delivering preterm are less likely to receive IAP when indicated. Most unnecessary antibiotics are given in cases of PROM.

  10. Real-Time Pretreatment Review Limits Unacceptable Deviations on a Cooperative Group Radiation Therapy Technique Trial: Quality Assurance Results of RTOG 0933

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Cui, Yunfeng; Mehta, Minesh P.; Manfredi, Denise; Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James M.; Rowley, Howard; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2015-03-01

    cases passed the pre-enrollment credentialing, the pretreatment centralized review disqualified 5.7% of reviewed cases, prevented unacceptable deviations in 24% of reviewed cases, and limited the final unacceptable deviation rate to 5%. Thus, pretreatment review is deemed necessary in future hippocampal avoidance trials and is potentially useful in other similarly challenging radiation therapy technique trials.

  11. Outcome of stage IVA cervical cancer patients with disease limited to the pelvis in the era of chemoradiation: a Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Rose, Peter G; Ali, Shamshad; Whitney, Charles W; Lanciano, Rachelle; Stehman, Frederick B

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the outcome of stage IVA cervical cancer treated with radiation and concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. We conducted a retrospective study of stage IVA cervical cancer patients from four trials (Gynecologic Oncology Group protocols 56, 85, 120, and 165) treated with radiotherapy with or without concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Patient records were reviewed for demographic and tumor features, treatment, and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Stage IVA patients were compared to stage IIIB patients from these same studies. Among the 51 stage IVA patients studied, 92% were stage IVA on the basis of bladder involvement. The median PFS was 10.1 months (95% CI=6.3-14.5 months) and median OS was 21.2 months (95% CI=13.3-30.5 months). The 3 year survival was 32%. On univariate analysis, only advanced age was associated with OS (p=0.0115) but age had only marginal effect on PFS (p=0.083). Pathologic proven pelvic nodal metastasis was of marginal significance for both PFS and OS, p=0.059 and 0.064, respectively. Despite similar patient characteristics, the use of cisplatin-based chemotherapy had no impact on PFS or OS but was underpowered to address this question. When compared to stage IIIB patients, stage IVA patients had a poorer performance status (p=0.0231), larger tumor size (p=0.0302), and more frequent bilateral parametrial involvement (0.0063). Patients with stage IVA disease had poor median survival of only 21 months with only 32% 3 year survival. Stage IVA patients have larger tumor size, more bilateral parametrial involvement, and poorer survival when compared to stage IIIB patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic Analysis of the Aspergillus flavus Vegetative Compatibility Group to Which a Biological Control Agent That Limits Aflatoxin Contamination in U.S. Crops Belongs

    PubMed Central

    Cotty, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Some filamentous fungi in Aspergillus section Flavi produce carcinogenic secondary compounds called aflatoxins. Aflatoxin contamination is routinely managed in commercial agriculture with strains of Aspergillus flavus that do not produce aflatoxins. These non-aflatoxin-producing strains competitively exclude aflatoxin producers and reshape fungal communities so that strains with the aflatoxin-producing phenotype are less frequent. This study evaluated the genetic variation within naturally occurring atoxigenic A. flavus strains from the endemic vegetative compatibility group (VCG) YV36. AF36 is a strain of VCG YV36 and was the first fungus used in agriculture for aflatoxin management. Genetic analyses based on mating-type loci, 21 microsatellite loci, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the aflC gene were applied to a set of 237 YV36 isolates collected from 1990 through 2005 from desert legumes and untreated fields and from fields previously treated with AF36 across the southern United States. One haplotype dominated across time and space. No recombination with strains belonging to VCGs other than YV36 was detected. All YV36 isolates carried the SNP in aflC that prevents aflatoxin biosynthesis and the mat1-2 idiomorph at the mating-type locus. These results suggest that VCG YV36 has a clonal population structure maintained across both time and space. These results demonstrate the genetic stability of atoxigenic strains belonging to a broadly distributed endemic VCG in both untreated populations and populations where the short-term frequency of VCG YV36 has increased due to applications of a strain used to competitively exclude aflatoxin producers. This work supports the hypothesis that strains of this VCG are not involved in routine genetic exchange with aflatoxin-producing strains. PMID:26092465

  13. Genetic Analysis of the Aspergillus flavus Vegetative Compatibility Group to Which a Biological Control Agent That Limits Aflatoxin Contamination in U.S. Crops Belongs.

    PubMed

    Grubisha, Lisa C; Cotty, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Some filamentous fungi in Aspergillus section Flavi produce carcinogenic secondary compounds called aflatoxins. Aflatoxin contamination is routinely managed in commercial agriculture with strains of Aspergillus flavus that do not produce aflatoxins. These non-aflatoxin-producing strains competitively exclude aflatoxin producers and reshape fungal communities so that strains with the aflatoxin-producing phenotype are less frequent. This study evaluated the genetic variation within naturally occurring atoxigenic A. flavus strains from the endemic vegetative compatibility group (VCG) YV36. AF36 is a strain of VCG YV36 and was the first fungus used in agriculture for aflatoxin management. Genetic analyses based on mating-type loci, 21 microsatellite loci, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the aflC gene were applied to a set of 237 YV36 isolates collected from 1990 through 2005 from desert legumes and untreated fields and from fields previously treated with AF36 across the southern United States. One haplotype dominated across time and space. No recombination with strains belonging to VCGs other than YV36 was detected. All YV36 isolates carried the SNP in aflC that prevents aflatoxin biosynthesis and the mat1-2 idiomorph at the mating-type locus. These results suggest that VCG YV36 has a clonal population structure maintained across both time and space. These results demonstrate the genetic stability of atoxigenic strains belonging to a broadly distributed endemic VCG in both untreated populations and populations where the short-term frequency of VCG YV36 has increased due to applications of a strain used to competitively exclude aflatoxin producers. This work supports the hypothesis that strains of this VCG are not involved in routine genetic exchange with aflatoxin-producing strains.

  14. Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids-rich fish oil supplementation attenuates strength loss and limited joint range of motion after eccentric contractions: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yosuke; Yanagimoto, Kenichi; Nakazato, Koichi; Hayamizu, Kohsuke; Ochi, Eisuke

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids-rich fish oil (EPA + DHA) supplementation on eccentric contraction-induced muscle damage. Twenty-four healthy men were randomly assigned to consume the EPA + DHA supplement (EPA, n = 12) or placebo (PL, n = 12) by the double-blind method. Participants consumed EPA + DHA or placebo supplement for 8 weeks prior to exercise and continued it until 5 days after exercise. The EPA group consumed EPA + DHA-rich fish oil containing 600 mg EPA and 260 mg DHA per day. Subjects performed five sets of six maximal eccentric elbow flexion exercises. Changes in the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, range of motion (ROM), upper arm circumference, muscle soreness as well as serum creatine kinase, myoglobin, IL-6, and TNF-α levels in blood were assessed before, immediately after, and 1, 2, 3, and 5 days after exercise. MVC was significantly higher in the EPA group than in the PL group at 2-5 days after exercise (p < 0.05). ROM was also significantly greater in the EPA group than in the PL group at 1-5 days after exercise (p < 0.05). At only 3 days after exercise, muscle soreness of the brachialis was significantly greater in the PL group than in the EPA group (p < 0.05), with a concomitant increase in serum IL-6 levels in the PL group. Eight-week EPA + DHA supplementation attenuates strength loss and limited ROM after exercise. The supplementation also attenuates muscle soreness and elevates cytokine level, but the effect is limited.

  15. Continued Risk of Relapse Independent of Treatment Modality in Limited-Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Final and Long-Term Analysis of Southwest Oncology Group Study S8736

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Deborah M.; Li, Hongli; LeBlanc, Michael L.; Puvvada, Soham D.; Persky, Daniel; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Utility of combined-modality therapy for patients with limited-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was shown in the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) S8736 study, where three cycles of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) plus radiotherapy (CHOP3RT) improved 5-year progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with eight cycles of CHOP (CHOP8). Subsequent analysis showed an unexpected overlap of the PFS curves. We aimed to confirm and investigate this observation by performing long-term analysis of SWOG S8736 and evaluating these data alongside data from similar patients receiving rituximab and CHOP3RT (SWOG S0014 study). Patients and Methods A subset of patients with limited-stage DLBCL randomly assigned to CHOP8 (n = 150) or CHOP3RT (n = 158) in S8736 was analyzed along with a 56-patient subset treated in S0014 for long-term PFS and OS. Results Median follow-up in S8736 was 17.7 years. In patients receiving CHOP8 and CHOP3RT, median PFS was 12.0 (95% CI, 8.8 to 14.3) and 11.1 years (95% CI, 8.9 to 14.4), respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in PFS between the groups (P = .73). Median OS was 13.0 (95% CI, 10.4 to 15.2) and 13.7 years (95% CI, 11.1 to 19.4) for patients treated with CHOP8 and CHOP3RT, respectively. Similarly, there were no statistically significant differences in OS between the groups (P = .38). With a median follow-up time 12 years in S0014, 5- and 10-year OS were 82% and 67%, respectively, with a persistent pattern of relapse despite the addition of rituximab. Conclusion Although 5-year PFS and OS were improved after early analysis in patients with limited-stage DLBCL receiving CHOP3RT versus CHOP8, extended survival data showed similar PFS and OS, with continuous treatment failure. The addition of rituximab (S0014) to combined-modality therapy did not mitigate the continued relapse risk, underscoring the value of prolonged clinical trial patient observation and

  16. Optical Limiting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave EPO RT D A TE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Optical Limiting 6. AUTHOR(S) , 1 oS...to nanoseconds and find that, since the excited state absorption is cummulative, that the dyes can limit well for nanosecond pulses but not for...over which the device limits . In addition, we find that the dynamic range of limiting devices can be substantially increased using two elements without

  17. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  18. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in the assessment of asthma control: Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma: its measurement and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Brannan, John D

    2010-08-01

    The two key pathophysiologic features of asthma are bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and airway inflammation. Symptoms and lung function are the most accessible clinical markers for the diagnosis of asthma as well as for assessing asthma control using the most effective treatment of asthma, inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). However, BHR and inflammation usually take longer to resolve using ICS compared with symptoms and lung function. BHR can be assessed using "direct" stimuli that act on the airway smooth muscle (eg, methacholine) or "indirect" stimuli that require the presence of airway inflammation (eg, exercise, osmotic stimuli). Although there are practical limitations in using BHR to assess asthma control, efforts have been made to make BHR more accessible and standardized. Some studies have demonstrated that treatment aimed to decrease BHR with direct stimuli can lead to improved asthma control; however, it often results in the use of higher doses of ICS. Furthermore, BHR to direct stimuli does not usually resolve using ICS because of a fixed component. By contrast, BHR with an indirect stimulus indicates a responsive smooth muscle that occurs only in the presence of inflammation sensitive to ICS (eg, mast cells, eosinophils). BHR to indirect stimuli does resolve using ICS. Because ICS target both key pathophysiologic features of asthma, assessing indirect BHR in the presence of ICS will identify resolution or persistence of BHR and airway inflammation. This may provide a more clinically relevant marker for asthma control that may also lead to improving the clinical usefulness of ICS.

  19. The amino group in adenine: MP2 and CCSD(T) complete basis set limit calculations of the planarization barrier and DFT/B3LYP study of the anharmonic frequencies of adenine.

    PubMed

    Zierkiewicz, Wiktor; Komorowski, Ludwik; Michalska, Danuta; Cerny, Jiri; Hobza, Pavel

    2008-12-25

    The amino group in adenine plays a key role in formation of hydrogen bonds in nucleic acids and in other molecular systems. Thus, the structure of this group is of fundamental importance in the molecular recognition phenomena. Ab initio MP2 and density functional B3LYP methods with various basis sets have been used to calculate the optimized structure and the infrared spectrum of adenine (the N9-H tautomer). Calculations at the MP2 level with larger basis sets tend to decrease the degree of pyramidalization of the C-NH2 group, whereas the B3LYP method consistently yields the planar or nearly planar structure of adenine. MP2 complete basis set (CBS) limit method with the aug-cc-pVTZ --> aug-cc-pVQZ (aTZ --> aQZ) extrapolation scheme has predicted very small planarization barrier of adenine, 0.015 kcal/mol, which is in very good agreement with the MP2-predicted planarization barrier of 0.020 kcal/mol, reported by S. Wang and H. F. Schaefer III, J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 044303. Similar results were obtained in calculations by the coupled cluster CCSD(T) CBS method. Thus, it can be concluded that the amino group in adenine, in the gas phase, is very flexible with a small degree of nonplanarity. Extremely low planarization barrier implies that adenine requires very little energy to conform the structure of the amino group to formation of the complementary hydrogen bonds with other molecules. This fact is very important for base pairing in nucleic acids or other polymers containing adenine residues. The anharmonic frequencies of adenine have been calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(df,pd) level of theory. The theoretical results show excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The revised assignment of the infrared spectrum of adenine in Ar matrix has been made. The predicted anharmonic frequency of the NH2 inversion, 181 cm(-1), is supported by the experimental data. It is demonstrated that the vibrational frequencies and potential energy distribution (PED

  20. On Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 decades or so, the size of systems we have been able to verify formally with automated tools has increased dramatically. At each point in this development, we encountered a different set of limits -- many of which we were eventually able to overcome. Today, we may have reached some limits that may be much harder to conquer. The problem I will discuss is the following: given a hypothetical machine with infinite memory that is seamlessly shared among infinitely many CPUs (or CPU cores), what is the largest problem size that we could solve?

  1. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  2. Bronchial hyperreactivity in non-atopic children with asthma and reflux: effect of anti-reflux treatment.

    PubMed

    Khoshoo, Vikram; Mohnot, Sopan; Haydel, Robert; Saturno, Emilio; Edell, Dean; Kobernick, Aaron

    2009-11-01

    The prevalence of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) or the effect of anti-reflux treatment on BHR in children with asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is not known. Thirty non-atopic children with persistent asthma were studied. Extended esophageal pH monitoring was used to diagnose GERD and methacholine challenge test (MCT) was used as a marker of BHR and performed before and 2 years after anti-GERD treatment. Of the 21 patients positive for GERD (group A), 15 had positive MCT suggesting BHR. Of the 9 patients negative for GERD (group B), 5 had positive MCT. On repeat testing 2 years later, 11/15 group A patients and 3/5 group B patients tested negative for BHR. Group A patients were receiving fewer asthma medications and experienced fewer exacerbations than Group B patients. BHR is prevalent in children with asthma and GERD and improves with anti-GERD treatment.

  3. Detection limit

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, P.S.; Ward, R.C.; Bell, H.F.

    1988-08-01

    Water quality monitoring data are plagued with levels of chemicals that are too low to be measured precisely. This discussion will focus on the information needs of water quality management and how these needs are best met for monitoring systems that require many trace-level measurements. We propose that the limit of detection (LOD) or the limit of quantitation (LOQ) not be used to censor data. Although LOD and LOQ aid in the interpretation of individual measurements, they hinder statistical analysis of water quality data. More information is gained when a numerical result and an estimate of measurement precision are reported for every measurement, as opposed to reporting not detected or less than. This article is not intended to be a review of the issues pertaining to the LOD and related concepts.

  4. Stereotactic Radiosurgery With or Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Limited Brain Metastases: A Secondary Analysis of the North Central Cancer Treatment Group N0574 (Alliance) Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Churilla, Thomas M; Ballman, Karla V; Brown, Paul D; Twohy, Erin L; Jaeckle, Kurt; Farace, Elana; Cerhan, Jane H; Anderson, S Keith; Carrero, Xiomara W; Garces, Yolanda I; Barker, Fred G; Deming, Richard; Dixon, Jesse G; Burri, Stuart H; Chung, Caroline; Ménard, Cynthia; Stieber, Volker W; Pollock, Bruce E; Galanis, Evanthia; Buckner, Jan C; Asher, Anthony L

    2017-08-05

    To determine whether whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is associated with improved overall survival among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with favorable prognoses at diagnosis. In the N0574 trial, patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or SRS plus WBRT (SRS + WBRT), with a primary endpoint of cognitive deterioration. We calculated diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA) scores for NSCLC patients and evaluated overall survival according to receipt of WBRT and DS-GPA score using 2 separate cut-points (≥2.0 vs <2.0 and ≥2.5 vs <2.5). A total of 126 NSCLC patients were included for analysis, with median follow-up of 14.2 months. Data for DS-GPA calculation were available for 86.3% of all enrolled NSCLC patients. Overall, 50.0% of patients had DS-GPA score ≥2.0, and 23.0% of patients had DS-GPA scores ≥2.5. The SRS and SRS + WBRT groups were well balanced with regard to prognostic factors. The median survival according to receipt of WBRT was 11.3 months (+WBRT) and 17.9 months (-WBRT) for patients with DS-GPA ≥2.0 (favorable prognoses, P=.63; hazard ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval 0.47-1.59). Median survival was 3.7 months (+WBRT) and 6.6 months (-WBRT) for patients with DS-GPA <2.0 patients (unfavorable prognoses, P=.85; hazard ratio 0.95; 95% confidence interval 0.56-1.62). Outcomes according to the receipt of WBRT and DS-GPA remained similar utilizing DS-GPA ≥2.5 as a cutoff for favorable prognoses. There was no interaction between the continuum of the DS-GPA groups and WBRT on overall survival (P=.53). We observed no significant differences in survival according to receipt of WBRT in favorable-prognosis NSCLC patients. This study further supports the approach of SRS alone in the majority of patients with limited brain metastases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SU(2) uncertainty limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabbir, Saroosh; Björk, Gunnar

    2016-05-01

    Although progress has been made recently in defining nontrivial uncertainty limits for the SU(2) group, a description of the intermediate states bound by these limits remains lacking. In this paper we enumerate possible uncertainty relations for the SU(2) group that involve all three observables and that are, moreover, invariant under SU(2) transformations. We demonstrate that these relations however, even taken as a group, do not provide sharp, saturable bounds. To find sharp bounds, we systematically calculate the variance of the SU(2) operators for all pure states belonging to the N =2 and N =3 polarization excitation manifold (corresponding to spin 1 and spin 3/2). Lastly, and perhaps counter to expectation, we note that even pure states can reach the maximum uncertainty limit.

  6. A review of the effects of impermeable bedding encasements on dust-mite allergen exposure and bronchial hyper-responsiveness in dust-mite-sensitized patients.

    PubMed

    Recer, G M

    2004-02-01

    Sensitization and exposure to dust-mite antigens are causative factors in the development and exacerbation of asthma. Impermeable bedding encasements are considered a first-line treatment to reduce dust-mite antigen exposure in clinical asthma-management guidelines. Public-health recommendations for environmental asthma treatments should be based on the weight of evidence supporting the reliability of environmental interventions so that uncertainties regarding their effectiveness can be accurately communicated to patients, and so that limited public-health resources can be most effectively utilized. To evaluate the strength of a clinical-trial evidence supporting the efficacy of bedding encasements as an asthma treatment. A narrative review was conducted of all clinical trials involving bedding encasement for the treatment of asthma. Collective statistical analyses were also performed to characterize the quantitative effect of bedding encasement on dust-mite allergen exposure and bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) when used by asthma patients. Over 30 clinical trials were reviewed. Of those studies reporting adequate exposure and BHR results, four reported significant reduction in dust-mite allergen exposure and concomitant BHR reduction in active-treatment groups using bedding encasements. In 10 studies, mite-allergen exposure was reportedly decreased during the study, but BHR was not changed in the active-treatment group or was reduced to a similar degree in the active-treatment and control groups. Five other studies reported a lack of significant effect of the intervention on exposure and BHR. Collective paired analyses found that the effect of bedding encasement on allergen exposure and BHR tended toward only a modest, non-significant improvement. Collectively, effects of bedding encasement on BHR and dust-mite allergen exposure were modestly correlated only when the baseline exposure was above 2 microg Type 1 antigen per gram settled dust. Although bedding

  7. Age Limits.

    PubMed

    Antfolk, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men-regardless of their age-have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes' age preferences is resolved according to women's preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years). Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men's age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men's sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  8. Use of the scoliosis research society outcomes instrument to evaluate patient outcome in untreated idiopathic scoliosis patients in Japan: part I: comparison with nonscoliosis group: preliminary/limited review in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kei; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Hirano, Toru; Uchiyama, Seiji; Endo, Naoto

    2005-05-15

    This preliminary study evaluates untreated Japanese patients with idiopathic scoliosis using the Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Instrument (SRS-24). To determine the baseline patient outcome score using the SRS-24 for untreated Japanese scoliosis patients compared with a nonscoliosis group. The SRS instrument with 24 questions was developed to help evaluate patient-perceived outcomes of idiopathic scoliosis treatment. Evaluation of untreated Japanese idiopathic scoliosis patients using the SRS instrument has not been reported. Japanese idiopathic scoliosis patients (n = 141) (mean age, 13.6 years; range, 10-17 years) with a Cobb angle of more than 20 degrees who were not treated with a brace or surgery, were evaluated in comparison with a nonscoliosis group (healthy junior high school students; n = 72) using the SRS-24. The scoliosis group was categorized as mild deformity group with a major curve Cobb angle of less than 30 degrees, moderate deformity group with 30 degrees to 49 degrees, and severe deformity group with more than 50 degrees. The patients were evaluated using section 1 (15 questions) of the SRS-24, which was divided into four domains: total pain, general self-image, general function, and activity. Reliability, as determined by internal consistency, was validated using Cronbach's alpha for these domain scales. The severe deformity group had the lowest scores compared with the other deformity groups and the nonscoliosis group in pain (P < 0.0001) and self-image (P < 0.05) domains. The scores for questions 3 (P < 0.0001) and 5 (P < 0.0001), evaluation of self-image of back appearance, were significantly lower in the scoliosis group than those in the nonscoliosis group. This tendency was more significant in the patients with greater curve magnitude. Scores for questions 14 and 15, evaluation of general self-image, in the scoliosis group were, however, higher than those in the nonscoliosis group. Internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha was 0

  9. Group X

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  10. Group Flow and Group Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  11. Grouping for Inequity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macqueen, Suzanne Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The inequity of streaming as a method of organising classes was established by research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s. While the practice produces small advantages for limited groups of students, it hinders the academic and social advancement of the majority. Although streaming has declined, new forms of achievement grouping have emerged, with…

  12. Grouping for Inequity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macqueen, Suzanne Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The inequity of streaming as a method of organising classes was established by research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s. While the practice produces small advantages for limited groups of students, it hinders the academic and social advancement of the majority. Although streaming has declined, new forms of achievement grouping have emerged, with…

  13. Testing the Limits of the BOPHY Platform: Preparation, Characterization, and Theoretical Modeling of BOPHYs and Organometallic BOPHYs with Electron-Withdrawing Groups at β-Pyrrolic and Bridging Positions.

    PubMed

    Zatsikha, Yuriy V; Nemez, Dion B; Davis, Rebecca L; Singh, Simarpreet; Herbert, David E; King, Alex J; Ziegler, Christopher J; Nemykin, Victor N

    2017-07-19

    Several BOPHY derivatives with and without ferrocene fragments, and with electron-withdrawing ester groups appended to the β-pyrrolic positions have been prepared and characterized by NMR, UV/Vis near-infrared (NIR), high-resolution mass spectrometry, and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as X-ray crystallography. The redox properties of new BOPHYs were probed by electrochemical (cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry) and spectroelectrochemical methods. In an attempt to prepare BOPHY derivatives with a cyano group at the bridging position using a similar approach for BODIPY cyanation, adducts from the nucleophilic attack of the cyanide anion on the bridging position in BOPHY have been isolated and characterized by spectroscopic methods. Oxidation of such adducts, however, resulted in formation of either the starting BOPHYs, or partial extrusion of the BF2 fragment from the BOPHY core, which was confirmed by spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. DFT and TDDFT calculations on all target materials correlate well with the experimental data, and suggest the dramatic reduction of the nitrogen atom basicity at the hydrazine bridge of the BOPHY upon introduction of the cyano group at the bridging-carbon atom. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  15. Isopermutation group

    SciTech Connect

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  16. Home Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahler, Theresa M.

    All students enrolled in the entry level foundations course in the College of Education of Kutztown University (Pennsylvania) participate in home groups, a cooperative learning strategy. Each student is assigned to a five- or six-person home group on the first day of class. Although group placements are made on the basis of class lists, every…

  17. Hot Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Collaborators sparked by creative ideas and obsessed by a common task may not realize they're part of a "hot group"--a term coined by business professors Harold J. Leavitt and Jean Lipman-Blumen. Spawned by group decision making and employee empowerment, hot groups can flourish in education settings. They're typically small, short lived,…

  18. Phase I North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial-N9923 of escalating doses of twice-daily thoracic radiation therapy with amifostine and with alternating chemotherapy in limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Garces, Yolanda I. . E-mail: garces.yolanda@Mayo.edu; Okuno, Scott H.; Schild, Steven E.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Bot, Brian M.; Martens, John M.; Wender, Donald B.; Soori, Gamini S.; Moore, Dennis F.; Kozelsky, Timothy F.; Jett, James R.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The primary goal was to identify the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) that can be given with chemotherapy and amifostine for patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC). Methods and Materials: Treatment began with two cycles of topotecan (1 mg/m{sup 2}) Days 1 to 5 and paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) Day 5 (every 3 weeks) given before and after TRT. The TRT began at 6 weeks. The TRT was given in 120 cGy fractions b.i.d. and the dose escalation (from 4,800 cGy, dose level 1, to 6,600 cGy, dose level 4) followed the standard 'cohorts of 3' design. The etoposide (E) (50 mg/day) and cisplatin (C) (3 mg/m{sup 2}) were given i.v. before the morning TRT and amifostine (500 mg/day) was given before the afternoon RT. This was followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were defined as Grade {>=}4 hematologic, febrile neutropenia, esophagitis, or other nonhematologic toxicity, Grade {>=}3 dyspnea, or Grade {>=}2 pneumonitis. Results: Fifteen patients were evaluable for the Phase I portion of the trial. No DLTs were seen at dose levels 1 and 2. Two patients on dose level 4 experienced DLTs: 1 patient had a Grade 4 pneumonitis, dyspnea, fatigue, hypokalemia, and anorexia, and 1 patient had a Grade 5 hypoxia attributable to TRT. One of 6 patients on dose level 3 had a DLT, Grade 3 esophagitis. The Grade {>=}3 toxicities seen in at least 10% of patients during TRT were esophagitis (53%), leukopenia (33%), dehydration (20%), neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (13%). The median survival was 14.5 months. Conclusion: The MTD of b.i.d. TRT was 6000 cGy (120 cGy b.i.d.) with EP and amifostine.

  19. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  20. Determination of the weight percentage gain and of the acetyl group content of acetylated wood by means of different infrared spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Stefke, Barbara; Windeisen, Elisabeth; Schwanninger, Manfred; Hinterstoisser, Barbara

    2008-02-15

    The weight percentage gain (WPG) and the acetyl group content of wood due to acetylation with acetic anhydride have been analyzed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR). Band height ratios (BHR) (1240/1030 (1230/1030) and 1745/1030 (1740/1030)) of the bands at 1745 (1740), 1240 (1230), and 1030 cm-1 were calculated from FTIR-KBr and FTIR-ATR (attenuated total reflection) spectra. The good linear correlation with a coefficient of determination of about 0.94 over a range from 0 to 27% WPG existing between BHRs and WPG and acetyl group content, respectively, requires only a few samples to calibrate FTIR. Partial least-squares regression models based on second derivatives of the NIR spectra in the wavenumber range from 6080 to 5760 cm-1 resulted in a R2 value of 0.99, number of PLS components (rank) between 3 and 5, root-mean-square error of cross-validation between 0.6 and 0.79%, and a residual prediction deviation up to 10. Although a wide range of input parameters (i.e., various wood species and different procedures of acetylation) was used, highly satisfactory results were obtained. Both FTIR and NIR spectroscopic means fulfill the need for determining the WPG and the acetyl content of acetylated wood. By reason of its additional potential for on-line process control, the NIR method may even outperform the FTIR method.

  1. Composite Materials for Optical Limiting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    This project funded two principle investigators to explore materials for optical limiting . Dr. Charles Spangle’s research group synthesized organic...and dendritic materials designed to optically limit via reverse saturable absorption (RSA) via photoinduced formation of charged states. Dr. Lee

  2. GROUP INEQUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Samuel; Loury, Glenn C.; Sethi, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    We explore the combined effect of segregation in social networks, peer effects, and the relative size of a historically disadvantaged group on the incentives to invest in market-rewarded skills and the dynamics of inequality between social groups. We identify conditions under which group inequality will persist in the absence of differences in ability, credit constraints, or labor market discrimination. Under these conditions, group inequality may be amplified even if initial group differences are negligible. Increases in social integration may destabilize an unequal state and make group equality possible, but the distributional and human capital effects of this depend on the demographic composition of the population. When the size of the initially disadvantaged group is sufficiently small, integration can lower the long-run costs of human capital investment in both groups and result in an increase the aggregate skill share. In contrast, when the initially disadvantaged group is large, integration can induce a fall in the aggregate skill share as the costs of human capital investment rise in both groups. We consider applications to concrete cases and policy implications. PMID:25554727

  3. Whitehead Groups of Spinor Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrnyĭ, A. P.; Yanchevskiĭ, V. I.

    1991-02-01

    The Whitehead groups of spinor groups are studied. The known Kneser-Tits conjecture for spinor groups is reduced to a spinor analogue of the Tannaka-Artin problem, namely, to the question of whether the group K1Spin(D), where D is a division ring of exponent 2 , is trivial. A counterexample to the Kneser-Tits problem is constructed in the class of spinor groups. The group K1Spin(D) is computed. The stability of the Whitehead groups of spinor groups under purely transcendental extensions of the ground field is established. The R-equivalence on the k-points of spinor groups and the weak approximation problem are considered. The study of spinor group completes the study of the Whitehead groups of algebraic groups of classical type, that was started in studying reduced K-theory (V.P. Platonov) and was continued for reduced unitary K-theory (V.I. Yanchevskiĭ) and Hermitian K-theory (Platonov and Yanchevskiĭ). Bibliography: 50 titles.

  4. Relationship between Methacholine Challenge Testing and exhaled nitric oxide in adult patients with suspected bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, M; Valli, M; Ribuffo, V; Melara, R; Cappiello, G; Businarolo, E; Andreani, A

    2014-05-01

    Usually, hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine is considered closely associated with a diagnosis of bronchial asthma. Recently, it has been clearly pointed out that bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) is not a constant feature of asthma and that this condition is not always related to airways inflammation. In the present study we evaluated 42 Patients (21 positive and 21 negative for bronchial hyperreactivity, BHR) with the aim to determine the effect of Methacholine Challenge Testing (MCT) on the levels of exhaled nitric oxide (NO). Higher FeNO levels were found before methacholine provocation in the group that eventually resulted positive to the challenge, while after the challenge in both groups FeNO decreased in similar way, with no statistical difference. These data confirm that MCT is a relevant test for asthma diagnosis, but it is not always related to the severity of bronchial inflammation, while FeNO levels in our study have limited clinical significance when evaluated out of asthma exacerbation.

  5. Phase I study of thoracic radiation dose escalation with concurrent chemotherapy for patients with limited small-cell lung cancer: Report of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 97-12

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, Ritsuko . E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org; Swann, R. Suzanne; Ettinger, David S.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Movsas, Benjamin; Suh, John; Byhardt, Roger W.

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of RTOG 97-12 was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of thoracic radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent chemotherapy for patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: Sixty-four patients received four cycles of cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} i.v.) and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} i.v. Days 1-3) (PE), with concurrent thoracic RT starting on Day 1. Thoracic RT was given during the first two cycles with 1.8 Gy/fraction daily to the clinical target volume, followed by thoracic RT to the gross tumor volume b.i.d. for the last 3, 5, 7, 9, or 11 treatment days (total dose 50.4, 54.0, 57.6, 61.2, or 64.8 Gy, respectively). The MTD was based on the dose that produced Grades 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity (mainly esophagitis and pneumonitis) in greater than 50% of patients. Results: After the first 8 patients were enrolled in Arm 1, administration of etoposide was changed from 120 mg/m{sup 2} i.v. on Days 2 and 3 of each cycle to 240 mg/m{sup 2} p.o. for patient convenience as outpatients. Total thoracic RT doses from 50.4 Gy to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks given with PE were well tolerated. Three of the first 5 patients in the 64.8 Gy arm developed Grade 3 acute esophagitis; the MTD was determined to be 61.2 Gy. Fifty-four (87%) of the 62 evaluable patients achieved a complete (68%) or partial (19%) tumor response. The 18-month survival was 25% for patients receiving 50.4 Gy and 82% for those receiving 61.2 Gy. Conclusions: The MTD for this accelerated thoracic RT regimen with concurrent PE was 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks.

  6. Group Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Brian

    The group interpretation approach to theatre production is defined as a method that will lead to production of plays that will appeal to "all the layers of the conscious and unconscious mind." In practice, it means that the group will develop and use resources of the theatre that orthodox companies too often ignore. The first two chapters of this…

  7. Pharmacogenetics of unboosted atazanavir in HIV-infected individuals in resource-limited settings: a sub-study of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) PEARLS study (NWCS 342)

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R.; Aquilante, Christina L.; Wempe, Michael F.; Smeaton, Laura M.; Firnhaber, Cynthia; LaRosa, Alberto M.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Andrade, Adriana; Baheti, Gautam; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Haas, David W.; MaWhinney, Samantha; Anderson, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The multinational PEARLS (ACTG A5175) study, conducted mainly in resource-limited settings, identified an increased treatment failure rate among HIV-infected individuals randomized to once-daily unboosted atazanavir, didanosine-EC, and emtricitabine compared with efavirenz-based regimens. We evaluated associations between selected human genetic polymorphisms and atazanavir pharmacokinetics in PEARLS. Methods Polymorphisms in CYP3A5, ABCB1, SLCO1B1 and NR1I2 were genotyped in PEARLS participants randomized to atazanavir plus didanosine-EC plus emtricitabine in Peru, South Africa and the USA, who also consented to genetic analysis. Non-linear mixed-effects population pharmacokinetic modelling was used to predict atazanavir oral clearance (CL/F) and concentration at 24 h (C24). Atazanavir mono-oxidation metabolites M1 and M2 were quantified from the same single-point plasma sample used to quantify the parent drug. Data were log10 transformed for statistical analysis using unpaired t-tests and one-way ANOVA and are presented as geometric mean (95% CI). Results Eighty-four HIV-infected participants were genotyped, including 44 Black Africans or African Americans and 28 women. Median age was 34 years. We identified 56 CYP3A5 expressers and 28 non-expressers. Atazanavir CL/F and C24 did not differ between CYP3A5 expressers and non-expressers: 13.2 (12.1–14.4) versus 12.7 L/h (11.7–13.9), P = 0.61, and 75.3 (46.1–123.0) versus 130.9 ng/mL (86.9–197.2), P = 0.14, respectively. M1/atazanavir and M2/atazanavir ratios were higher in expressers than in non-expressers: 0.0083 (0.0074–0.0094) versus 0.0063 (0.0053–0.0075), P = 0.008, and 0.0065 (0.0057–0.0073) versus 0.0050 (0.0042–0.0061), P = 0.02, respectively. Conclusions Expression of CYP3A5 appears to be associated with increased M1 and M2 atazanavir metabolite formation, without significantly affecting parent compound pharmacokinetics. PMID:26892777

  8. Pharmacogenetics of unboosted atazanavir in HIV-infected individuals in resource-limited settings: a sub-study of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) PEARLS study (NWCS 342).

    PubMed

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Aquilante, Christina L; Wempe, Michael F; Smeaton, Laura M; Firnhaber, Cynthia; LaRosa, Alberto M; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Andrade, Adriana; Baheti, Gautam; Fletcher, Courtney V; Campbell, Thomas B; Haas, David W; MaWhinney, Samantha; Anderson, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    The multinational PEARLS (ACTG A5175) study, conducted mainly in resource-limited settings, identified an increased treatment failure rate among HIV-infected individuals randomized to once-daily unboosted atazanavir, didanosine-EC, and emtricitabine compared with efavirenz-based regimens. We evaluated associations between selected human genetic polymorphisms and atazanavir pharmacokinetics in PEARLS. Polymorphisms in CYP3A5, ABCB1, SLCO1B1 and NR1I2 were genotyped in PEARLS participants randomized to atazanavir plus didanosine-EC plus emtricitabine in Peru, South Africa and the USA, who also consented to genetic analysis. Non-linear mixed-effects population pharmacokinetic modelling was used to predict atazanavir oral clearance (CL/F) and concentration at 24 h (C24). Atazanavir mono-oxidation metabolites M1 and M2 were quantified from the same single-point plasma sample used to quantify the parent drug. Data were log10 transformed for statistical analysis using unpaired t-tests and one-way ANOVA and are presented as geometric mean (95% CI). Eighty-four HIV-infected participants were genotyped, including 44 Black Africans or African Americans and 28 women. Median age was 34 years. We identified 56 CYP3A5 expressers and 28 non-expressers. Atazanavir CL/F and C24 did not differ between CYP3A5 expressers and non-expressers: 13.2 (12.1-14.4) versus 12.7 L/h (11.7-13.9), P = 0.61, and 75.3 (46.1-123.0) versus 130.9 ng/mL (86.9-197.2), P = 0.14, respectively. M1/atazanavir and M2/atazanavir ratios were higher in expressers than in non-expressers: 0.0083 (0.0074-0.0094) versus 0.0063 (0.0053-0.0075), P = 0.008, and 0.0065 (0.0057-0.0073) versus 0.0050 (0.0042-0.0061), P = 0.02, respectively. Expression of CYP3A5 appears to be associated with increased M1 and M2 atazanavir metabolite formation, without significantly affecting parent compound pharmacokinetics. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for

  9. Group Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  10. Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  11. Group key management

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  12. Animal Welfare Groups Press for Limits on High School Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BioScience, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Discussions from the conference on "The Use of Animals in High School Biology Classes" are highlighted in this article. The list of science fair rules, which resulted from the conference, is included. (SA)

  13. Group interventions and the limits of behavioral medicine.

    PubMed

    Dooley, D; Catalano, R

    2000-01-01

    A wide range of interventions has been devised to address health hazards in the social and physical environment. The authors propose a 2-dimensional matrix to organize these interventions. The timing of interventions is divided into 4 stages: preventing exposure to hazard (proactive primary prevention), preventing symptoms from appearing (reactive primary prevention), preventing early symptoms from becoming chronic or leading to disease (secondary prevention), and managing the disease (tertiary prevention). The level at which the intervention is targeted is divided into 2 categories: micro (individual or family) and macro (more aggregate social level). Large-scale interventions such as media campaigns can target either individual health behaviors (microlevel) or the environment (macrolevel). This typology is illustrated with interventions designed to prevent or ameliorate the health consequences of adverse employment changes such as job loss. The analysis concludes that behavioral medicine and public health approaches are differentially suited to different intervention types.

  14. Group Psychotherapy With Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Teicher, Joseph D.

    1966-01-01

    In working in a large general hospital with groups of disturbed adolescent patients from economically and emotionally deprived walks of life, therapists worked out a plan of outpatient group therapy that in general has had good results as measured by effective living and functioning in school, at home and with peers. Groups were limited to eight patients and meetings were held once a week with two co-therapists of different sexes. Therapists usually did not try to turn discussions in one direction or another. More active than in usual group work, the therapists did not hesitate to be didactic or educational as the topic or problem indicated. At termination of the group sessions, usually at the end of a school year as a natural time of leave-taking, the members who had benefited sufficiently faced the departure with little emotional wrench; those who had not were resentful, anxious, disappointed or relieved. PMID:18730009

  15. Cantor Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Ben; Dow, Chris; Livshits, Leo

    2011-01-01

    The Cantor subset of the unit interval [0, 1) is "large" in cardinality and also "large" algebraically, that is, the smallest subgroup of [0, 1) generated by the Cantor set (using addition mod 1 as the group operation) is the whole of [0, 1). In this paper, we show how to construct Cantor-like sets which are "large" in cardinality but "small"…

  16. Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  17. Underrepresented groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem with the shortage of under represented groups in science and engineering is absolutely crucial, especially considering that U.S. will experience a shortage of 560,000 science and engineering personnel by the year 2010. Most studies by the National Science Foundation also concluded that projected shortages cannot be alleviated without significant increases in the involvement of Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, handicapped persons, and women.

  18. Group Composition and Group Therapy for Complicated Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, William E.; Ogrodniczuk, John S.; Joyce, Anthony S.; Weideman, Rene; Rosie, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This prospective study investigated the impact of group composition on the outcome of 2 forms of time-limited, short-term group therapy (interpretive, supportive) with 110 outpatients from 18 therapy groups, who presented with complicated grief. The composition variable was based on the patient's level of quality of object relations. The higher…

  19. Group Composition and Group Therapy for Complicated Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, William E.; Ogrodniczuk, John S.; Joyce, Anthony S.; Weideman, Rene; Rosie, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This prospective study investigated the impact of group composition on the outcome of 2 forms of time-limited, short-term group therapy (interpretive, supportive) with 110 outpatients from 18 therapy groups, who presented with complicated grief. The composition variable was based on the patient's level of quality of object relations. The higher…

  20. Group Connections: Whole Group Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Dorothy

    2002-01-01

    A learner-centered approach to adult group instruction involved learners in investigating 20th-century events. The approach allowed learners to concentrate on different activities according to their abilities and gave them opportunities to develop basic skills and practice teamwork. (SK)

  1. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  2. Adaptive limit margin detection and limit avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavrucuk, Ilkay

    This thesis concerns the development of methods, algorithms, and control laws for the development of an adaptive flight envelope protection system to be used for both manned and unmanned aircraft. The proposed method lifts the requirement for detailed a priori information of aircraft dynamics by enabling adaptation to system uncertainty. The system can be used for limits that can be either measured or related to selected measurable quantities. Specifically, an adaptive technique for predicting limit margins and calculating the corresponding allowable control or controller command margins of an aircraft is described in an effort to enable true carefree maneuvering. This new approach utilizes adaptive neural network based loops for the approximation of required aircraft dynamics. For limits that reach their maximum value in steady state, a constructed estimator model is used to predict the maneuvering quasi-steady response behavior---the so called dynamic trim---of the limit parameters and the corresponding control or command margins. Linearly Parameterized Neural Networks as well as Single Hidden Layer Neural Networks are used for on-line adaptation. The approach does not require any off-line training of the neural networks, instead all learning is achieved during flight. Lyapunov based weight update laws are derived. The method is extended for multi-channelled control limiting for aircraft subject to multiple limits, and for automatic control and command limiting for UAV's. Simulation evaluations of the method using a linear helicopter model and a nonlinear Generalized Tiltrotor Simulation (GTRSIM) model are presented. Limit avoidance methods are integrated and tested through the implementation of an artificial pilot model and an active-stick controller model for tactile cueing in the tiltrotor simulation, GTRSIM. Load factor, angle-of-attack, and torque limits are considered as examples. Similarly, the method is applied to the Georgia Tech's Yamaha R-Max (GTMax

  3. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  4. 43 CFR 10010.24 - Page limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Page limits. 10010.24 Section 10010.24... Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.24 Page limits. An EIS should be as brief as possible and still convey... complex proposal or group of proposals appears to require more than the normally prescribed limit of 300...

  5. Using an Experiential Group To Teach a Group Therapy Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halgin, Richard P.

    This paper describes one approach to the study of group therapy by graduate and undergraduate psychology students, i.e., student participation in an experiential therapy group. The problems and benefits of this method are explored in terms of issues such as confidentiality, content definition, limit-setting, assignment of grades, effect on…

  6. Limited range of motion

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003173.htm Limited range of motion To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Limited range of motion is a term meaning that a joint or ...

  7. LANSCE beam current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos, Floyd R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  8. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  9. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Interval Graph Limits

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2015-01-01

    We work out a graph limit theory for dense interval graphs. The theory developed departs from the usual description of a graph limit as a symmetric function W (x, y) on the unit square, with x and y uniform on the interval (0, 1). Instead, we fix a W and change the underlying distribution of the coordinates x and y. We find choices such that our limits are continuous. Connections to random interval graphs are given, including some examples. We also show a continuity result for the chromatic number and clique number of interval graphs. Some results on uniqueness of the limit description are given for general graph limits. PMID:26405368

  11. Tiling spaces are inverse limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadun, Lorenzo

    2003-11-01

    Let M be an arbitrary Riemannian homogeneous space, and let Ω be a space of tilings of M, with finite local complexity (relative to some symmetry group Γ) and closed in the natural topology. Then Ω is the inverse limit of a sequence of compact finite-dimensional branched manifolds. The branched manifolds are (finite) unions of cells, constructed from the tiles themselves and the group Γ. This result extends previous results of Anderson and Putnam, of Ormes, Radin, and Sadun, of Bellissard, Benedetti, and Gambaudo, and of Gähler. In particular, the construction in this paper is a natural generalization of Gähler's.

  12. Innovative uses of psychodynamic group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Buchele, B J

    1994-01-01

    Psychodynamic group psychotherapy is gaining renewed attention as an effective form of treatment, due in part to increasing economic constraints that make other forms of treatment less accessible. The author highlights some innovative applications of both extended and time-limited groups. She also describes specific issues that can be addressed effectively in homogeneous time-limited group therapy.

  13. Optimally combined confidence limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janot, P.; Le Diberder, F.

    1998-02-01

    An analytical and optimal procedure to combine statistically independent sets of confidence levels on a quantity is presented. This procedure does not impose any constraint on the methods followed by each analysis to derive its own limit. It incorporates the a priori statistical power of each of the analyses to be combined, in order to optimize the overall sensitivity. It can, in particular, be used to combine the mass limits obtained by several analyses searching for the Higgs boson in different decay channels, with different selection efficiencies, mass resolution and expected background. It can also be used to combine the mass limits obtained by several experiments (e.g. ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at LEP 2) independently of the method followed by each of these experiments to derive their own limit. A method to derive the limit set by one analysis is also presented, along with an unbiased prescription to optimize the expected mass limit in the no-signal-hypothesis.

  14. Systematics and limit calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Wade; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    This note discusses the estimation of systematic uncertainties and their incorporation into upper limit calculations. Two different approaches to reducing systematics and their degrading impact on upper limits are introduced. An improved {chi}{sup 2} function is defined which is useful in comparing Poisson distributed data with models marginalized by systematic uncertainties. Also, a technique using profile likelihoods is introduced which provides a means of constraining the degrading impact of systematic uncertainties on limit calculations.

  15. Detector limitations, STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-07-13

    Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

  16. Computing Confidence Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggs, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Confidence Limits Program (CLP) calculates upper and lower confidence limits associated with observed outcome of N independent trials with M occurrences of event of interest. Calculates probability of event of interest for confidence levels of 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 96, 97, 98, and 99 percent. Provides graphical presentation of all limits and how they relate to maximum-likelihood value. Written in IBM PC BASIC.

  17. Dose limits for astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, W. K.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation exposures to individuals in space can greatly exceed natural radiation exposure on Earth and possibly normal occupational radiation exposures as well. Consequently, procedures limiting exposures would be necessary. Limitations were proposed by the Radiobiological Advisory Panel of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council in 1970. This panel recommended short-term limits to avoid deterministic effects and a single career limit (of 4 Sv) based on a doubling of the cancer risk in men aged 35 to 55. Later, when risk estimates for cancer had increased and were recognized to be age and sex dependent, the NCRP, in Report No. 98 in 1989, recommended a range of career limits based on age and sex from 1 to 4 Sv. NCRP is again in the process of revising recommendations for astronaut exposure, partly because risk estimates have increased further and partly to recognize trends in limiting radiation exposure occupationally on the ground. The result of these considerations is likely to be similar short-term limits for deterministic effects but modified career limits.

  18. Limits to Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  19. Speed limits of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everling, E

    1923-01-01

    This paper is restricted to the question of attainable speed limits and attacks the problem from different angles. Theoretical limits due to air resistance are presented along with design factors which may affect speed such as wing loads, wing areas, wing section shifting, landing speeds, drag-lift ratios, and power coefficients.

  20. Limits to Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  1. Dose limits for astronauts.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, W K

    2000-11-01

    Radiation exposures to individuals in space can greatly exceed natural radiation exposure on Earth and possibly normal occupational radiation exposures as well. Consequently, procedures limiting exposures would be necessary. Limitations were proposed by the Radiobiological Advisory Panel of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council in 1970. This panel recommended short-term limits to avoid deterministic effects and a single career limit (of 4 Sv) based on a doubling of the cancer risk in men aged 35 to 55. Later, when risk estimates for cancer had increased and were recognized to be age and sex dependent, the NCRP, in Report No. 98 in 1989, recommended a range of career limits based on age and sex from 1 to 4 Sv. NCRP is again in the process of revising recommendations for astronaut exposure, partly because risk estimates have increased further and partly to recognize trends in limiting radiation exposure occupationally on the ground. The result of these considerations is likely to be similar short-term limits for deterministic effects but modified career limits.

  2. Characterizing limit order prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withanawasam, R. M.; Whigham, P. A.; Crack, Timothy Falcon

    2013-11-01

    A computational model of a limit order book is used to study the effect of different limit order distribution offsets. Reference prices such as same side/contra side best market prices and last traded price are considered in combination with different price offset distributions. We show that when characterizing limit order prices, varying the offset distribution only produces different behavior when the reference price is the contra side best price. Irrespective of the underlying mechanisms used in computing the limit order prices, the shape of the price graph and the behavior of the average order book profile distribution are strikingly similar in all the considered reference prices/offset distributions. This implies that existing averaging methods can cancel variabilities in limit order book shape/attributes and may be misleading.

  3. The Hugoniot Elastic Limit Decay Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billingsley, J. P.

    1997-07-01

    The Hugoniot Elastic Limit(HEL) precursor decay in shock loaded solids has been the subject of considerable experimental and theoretical investigation. Comparative evidence is presented to show that the elastic precursor wave particle velocity, UPHEL, for certain materials decays asymptotically with propagation distance to the DeBroglie velocity, V1, level. This is demonstrated for the following materials: iron, aluminum alloy 6061-T6, plexiglas(PMMA), nickel alloy(MAR-M200), and lithium flouride(LiF). The DeBroglie velocity, V1, equals h/2md, where h is Planck's Constant, m is the mass of one atom, and d is the closest distance between atoms. Thus a relationship has been established between a microscopically derived velocity, V1, and a macroscopically observed velocity, UPHEL.

  4. AO Group Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2005-10-04

    The Adaptive Optics (AO) Group in I Division develops and tests a broad range of advanced wavefront control technologies. Current applications focus on: Remote sensing, High power lasers, Astronomy, and Human vision. In the area of remote sensing, the AO Group leads a collaborative effort with LLNL's Nonproliferation, Arms Control & International Security (NAI) Directorate on Enhanced Surveillance Imaging. The ability to detect and identify individual people or vehicles from long-range is an important requirement for proliferation detection and homeland security. High-resolution imaging along horizontal paths through the atmosphere is limited by turbulence, which blurs and distorts the image. For ranges over {approx}one km, visible image resolution can be reduced by over an order of magnitude. We have developed an approach based on speckle imaging that can correct the turbulence-induced blurring and provide high resolution imagery. The system records a series of short exposure images which freeze the atmospheric effects. We can then estimate the image magnitude and phase using a bispectral estimation algorithm which cancels the atmospheric effects while maintaining object information at the diffraction limit of the imaging system.

  5. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  6. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  7. Novel limiter pump topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of limiter pumps as the principle plasma exhaust system of a magnetic confinement fusion device promises significant simplification, when compared to previously investigating divertor based systems. Further simplifications, such as the integration of the exhaust system with a radio frequency heating system and with the main reactor shield and structure are investigated below. The integrity of limiters in a reactor environment is threatened by many mechanisms, the most severe of which may be erosion by sputtering. Two novel topolgies are suggested which allow high erosion without limiter failure.

  8. Optical limiting materials

    DOEpatents

    McBranch, Duncan W.; Mattes, Benjamin R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; Heeger, Alan J.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Smilowitz, Laura B.; Klimov, Victor I.; Cha, Myoungsik; Sariciftci, N. Serdar; Hummelen, Jan C.

    1998-01-01

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  9. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  10. Peak acceleration limiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.

    1972-01-01

    Device is described that limits accelerations by shutting off shaker table power very rapidly in acceleration tests. Absolute value of accelerometer signal is used to trigger electronic switch which terminates test and sounds alarm.

  11. PLT rotating pumped limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Budny, R.V.; Corso, V.; Boychuck, J.; Grisham, L.; Heifetz, D.; Hosea, J.; Luyber, S.; Loprest, P.; Manos, D.

    1984-07-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face and the ability to rotate during tokamak discharges has been installed in a PLT pump duct. These features have been selected to handle the unique particle removal and heat load requirements of ICRF heating and lower-hybrid current-drive experiments. The limiter has been conditioned and commissioned in an ion-beam test stand by irradiation with 1 MW power, 200 ms duration beams of 40 keV hydrogen ions. Operation in PLT during ohmic discharges has proven the ability of the limiter to reduce localized heating caused by energetic electron bombardment and to remove about 2% of the ions lost to the PLT walls and limiters.

  12. Technique and Facilitation of Developmental Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Marilyn M.

    Counselors working with developmental groups need: (1) a thorough understanding of their group, (2) great skill, and (3) deep personal involvement. The author suggests specific characteristics for successful developmental groups: (1) the desire of the entire residence hall staff to be involved, (2) a co-ed group limited to eight members, and (3)…

  13. Classical-Quantum Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliynyk, Todd A.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a new approach to analyzing the interaction between classical and quantum systems that is based on a limiting procedure applied to multi-particle Schrödinger equations. The limit equations obtained by this procedure, which we refer to as the classical-quantum limit, govern the interaction between classical and quantum systems, and they possess many desirable properties that are inherited in the limit from the multi-particle quantum system. As an application, we use the classical-quantum limit equations to identify the source of the non-local signalling that is known to occur in the classical-quantum hybrid scheme of Hall and Reginatto. We also derive the first order correction to the classical-quantum limit equation to obtain a fully consistent first order approximation to the Schrödinger equation that should be accurate for modeling the interaction between particles of disparate mass in the regime where the particles with the larger masses are effectively classical.

  14. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty.

  15. A Generally Applicable Computer Algorithm Based on the Group Additivity Method for the Calculation of Seven Molecular Descriptors: Heat of Combustion, LogPO/W, LogS, Refractivity, Polarizability, Toxicity and LogBB of Organic Compounds; Scope and Limits of Applicability.

    PubMed

    Naef, Rudolf

    2015-10-07

    A generally applicable computer algorithm for the calculation of the seven molecular descriptors heat of combustion, logPoctanol/water, logS (water solubility), molar refractivity, molecular polarizability, aqueous toxicity (protozoan growth inhibition) and logBB (log (cblood/cbrain)) is presented. The method, an extendable form of the group-additivity method, is based on the complete break-down of the molecules into their constituting atoms and their immediate neighbourhood. The contribution of the resulting atom groups to the descriptor values is calculated using the Gauss-Seidel fitting method, based on experimental data gathered from literature. The plausibility of the method was tested for each descriptor by means of a k-fold cross-validation procedure demonstrating good to excellent predictive power for the former six descriptors and low reliability of logBB predictions. The goodness of fit (Q²) and the standard deviation of the 10-fold cross-validation calculation was >0.9999 and 25.2 kJ/mol, respectively, (based on N = 1965 test compounds) for the heat of combustion, 0.9451 and 0.51 (N = 2640) for logP, 0.8838 and 0.74 (N = 1419) for logS, 0.9987 and 0.74 (N = 4045) for the molar refractivity, 0.9897 and 0.77 (N = 308) for the molecular polarizability, 0.8404 and 0.42 (N = 810) for the toxicity and 0.4709 and 0.53 (N = 383) for logBB. The latter descriptor revealing a very low Q² for the test molecules (R² was 0.7068 and standard deviation 0.38 for N = 413 training molecules) is included as an example to show the limits of the group-additivity method. An eighth molecular descriptor, the heat of formation, was indirectly calculated from the heat of combustion data and correlated with published experimental heat of formation data with a correlation coefficient R² of 0.9974 (N = 2031).

  16. Neonatal anesthesia with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Bösenberg, Adrian T

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are the most vulnerable age group in terms of anesthetic risk and perioperative mortality, especially in the developing world. Prematurity, malnutrition, delays in presentation, and sepsis contribute to this risk. Lack of healthcare workers, poorly maintained equipment, limited drug supplies, absence of postoperative intensive care, unreliable water supplies, or electricity are further contributory factors. Trained anesthesiologists with the skills required for pediatric and neonatal anesthesia as well as basic monitoring equipment such as pulse oximetry will go a long way to improve the unacceptably high anesthetic mortality. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Group Therapy with Multiple Therapists in A Large Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herschleman, Philip; Freundlich, David

    The utilization of multiple therapists in large group therapy meetings has been found to be a significant improvement over the traditional ward meeting or patient-staff conference. The initially limited goals of reducing ward tension and acting out by means of patients ventilation were surpassed. Despite the size of the meetings it was often…

  18. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  19. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  20. Improved limited discrepancy search

    SciTech Connect

    Korf, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    We present an improvement to Harvey and Ginsberg`s limited discrepancy search algorithm, which eliminates much of the redundancy in the original, by generating each path from the root to the maximum search depth only once. For a complete binary tree of depth d this reduces the asymptotic complexity from O(d+2/2 2{sup d}) to O(2{sup d}). The savings is much less in a partial tree search, or in a heavily pruned tree. The overhead of the improved algorithm on a complete binary tree is only a factor of b/(b - 1) compared to depth-first search. While this constant factor is greater on a heavily pruned tree, this improvement makes limited discrepancy search a viable alternative to depth-first search, whenever the entire tree may not be searched. Finally, we present both positive and negative empirical results on the utility of limited discrepancy search, for the problem of number partitioning.

  1. FANCM limits meiotic crossovers.

    PubMed

    Crismani, Wayne; Girard, Chloé; Froger, Nicole; Pradillo, Mónica; Santos, Juan Luis; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Horlow, Christine; Mercier, Raphaël

    2012-06-22

    The number of meiotic crossovers (COs) is tightly regulated within a narrow range, despite a large excess of molecular precursors. The factors that limit COs remain largely unknown. Here, using a genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified the highly conserved FANCM helicase, which is required for genome stability in humans and yeasts, as a major factor limiting meiotic CO formation. The fancm mutant has a threefold-increased CO frequency as compared to the wild type. These extra COs arise not from the pathway that accounts for most of the COs in wild type, but from an alternate, normally minor pathway. Thus, FANCM is a key factor imposing an upper limit on the number of meiotic COs, and its manipulation holds much promise for plant breeding.

  2. Information-limiting correlations

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Bote, Rubén; Beck, Jeffrey; Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Pitkow, Xaq; Latham, Peter; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Computational strategies used by the brain strongly depend on the amount of information that can be stored in population activity, which in turn strongly depends on the pattern of noise correlations. In vivo, noise correlations tend to be positive and proportional to the similarity in tuning properties. Such correlations are thought to limit information, which has led to the suggestion that decorrelation increases information. In contrast, we found, analytically and numerically, that decorrelation does not imply an increase in information. Instead, the only information-limiting correlations are what we refer to as differential correlations: correlations proportional to the product of the derivatives of the tuning curves. Unfortunately, differential correlations are likely to be very small and buried under correlations that do not limit information, making them particularly difficult to detect. We found, however, that the effect of differential correlations on information can be detected with relatively simple decoders. PMID:25195105

  3. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  4. Optimal Limited Contingency Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Smith, David E.

    2003-01-01

    For a given problem, the optimal Markov policy over a finite horizon is a conditional plan containing a potentially large number of branches. However, there are applications where it is desirable to strictly limit the number of decision points and branches in a plan. This raises the question of how one goes about finding optimal plans containing only a limited number of branches. In this paper, we present an any-time algorithm for optimal k-contingency planning. It is the first optimal algorithm for limited contingency planning that is not an explicit enumeration of possible contingent plans. By modelling the problem as a partially observable Markov decision process, it implements the Bellman optimality principle and prunes the solution space. We present experimental results of applying this algorithm to some simple test cases.

  5. Estimating turbine limit load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for estimating turbine limit-load pressure ratio from turbine map information is presented and demonstrated. It is based on a mean line analysis at the last-rotor exit. The required map information includes choke flow rate at all speeds as well as pressure ratio and efficiency at the onset of choke at design speed. One- and two-stage turbines are analyzed to compare the results with those from a more rigorous off-design flow analysis and to show the sensitivities of the computed limit-load pressure ratios to changes in the key assumptions.

  6. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  7. TROPIX plasma interactions group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Joel L.; Chock, Ricaurte

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to summarize the spacecraft charging analysis conducted by the plasma interactions group during the period from April 1993 to July 1993, on the proposed TROPIX spacecraft, and to make design recommendations which will limit the detrimental effects introduced by spacecraft charging. The recommendations were presented to the TROPIX study team at a Technical Review meeting held on 15 July 1993.

  8. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    PubMed

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended.

  9. Learning without Limits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Susan; Dixon, Annabelle; Drummond, Mary Jane; McIntyre, Donald

    2004-01-01

    This book explores ways of teaching that are free from determinist beliefs about ability. In a detailed critique of the practices of ability labelling and ability-focused teaching, "Learning without Limits" examines the damage these practices can do to young people, teachers and the curriculum. Drawing on a research project at the…

  10. The Outer Limits: English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Barbara R.; Biesekerski, Joan

    The Quinmester course "The Outer Limits" involves an exploration of unknown worlds, mental and physical, through fiction and nonfiction. Its purpose is to focus attention on the ongoing conquest of the frontiers of the mind, the physical world, and outer space. The subject matter includes identification and investigation of unknown…

  11. The Limits of Laughter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mindess, Harvey

    1983-01-01

    Three incidents which elucidate the limits of laughter are described. Most persons enjoy humor as comic relief, but when humor strikes a blow at something they hold dear, they find it very hard to laugh. People are upset by an irreverent attitude toward things they hold in esteem. (RM)

  12. Intellectually Limited Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminer, Ruth K.; Cohen, Herbert J.

    The paper examines whether a relationship exists between intellectual limitation on the mother's part and unfavorable outcomes for her children. The scope of the problem is examined and the difficulties inherent in estimating prevalence are noted. The issue of child neglect, rather than abuse is shown to be a major problem among institutionalized…

  13. Evolution: Sex Limits Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Nosil, Patrik

    2015-07-20

    Evolution is affected by survival of individuals and by mate choice, but how sexual selection affects adaptation remains unclear. A new study finds that sexual selection can limit adaptation by causing male-induced harm to females and thus opposing natural selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The HEL Upper Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billingsley, J. P.

    2002-07-01

    A threshold particle velocity, Vf, derived by Professor E.R. Fitzgerald for the onset of atomic lattice Disintegration Phenomena (LDP) is shown to exceed and/or compare rather well with the maximum experimental Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) particle (mass) velocities (UpHEL) for selected hard strong mineral/ceramic materials.

  15. The Value of Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lee

    2006-01-01

    David Horner, a recent president of North Park College and Theological Seminary has suggested that, in light of the tension between the demands of free inquiry and the need for religious inculcation, Christian colleges have two options: either redefine academic freedom or limit it and be up front and principled about it. In this article, the…

  16. Limits to Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The author reflects briefly on what limited degree of global ecological stability and human cultural stability may be achieved, provided that humanity retains hope and does not give way to despair or hide in denial. These thoughts were triggered by a recent conference on International Stability and Systems Engineering. (Contains 5 notes.)

  17. Learning without Limits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Susan; Dixon, Annabelle; Drummond, Mary Jane; McIntyre, Donald

    2004-01-01

    This book explores ways of teaching that are free from determinist beliefs about ability. In a detailed critique of the practices of ability labelling and ability-focused teaching, "Learning without Limits" examines the damage these practices can do to young people, teachers and the curriculum. Drawing on a research project at the…

  18. Defined by Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arriola, Sonya; Murphy, Katy

    2010-01-01

    Undocumented students are a population defined by limitations. Their lack of legal residency and any supporting paperwork (e.g., Social Security number, government issued identification) renders them essentially invisible to the American and state governments. They cannot legally work. In many states, they cannot legally drive. After the age of…

  19. Limitations in scatter propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, E. W.

    1982-04-01

    A short description of the main scatter propagation mechanisms is presented; troposcatter, meteor burst communication and chaff scatter. For these propagation modes, in particular for troposcatter, the important specific limitations discussed are: link budget and resulting hardware consequences, diversity, mobility, information transfer and intermodulation and intersymbol interference, frequency range and future extension in frequency range for troposcatter, and compatibility with other services (EMC).

  20. Limits to Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The author reflects briefly on what limited degree of global ecological stability and human cultural stability may be achieved, provided that humanity retains hope and does not give way to despair or hide in denial. These thoughts were triggered by a recent conference on International Stability and Systems Engineering. (Contains 5 notes.)

  1. Fracture mechanics validity limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.; Ernst, Hugo A.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture behavior is characteristics of a dramatic loss of strength compared to elastic deformation behavior. Fracture parameters have been developed and exhibit a range within which each is valid for predicting growth. Each is limited by the assumptions made in its development: all are defined within a specific context. For example, the stress intensity parameters, K, and the crack driving force, G, are derived using an assumption of linear elasticity. To use K or G, the zone of plasticity must be small as compared to the physical dimensions of the object being loaded. This insures an elastic response, and in this context, K and G will work well. Rice's J-integral has been used beyond the limits imposed on K and G. J requires an assumption of nonlinear elasticity, which is not characteristic of real material behavior, but is thought to be a reasonable approximation if unloading is kept to a minimum. As well, the constraint cannot change dramatically (typically, the crack extension is limited to ten-percent of the initial remaining ligament length). Rice, et al investigated the properties required of J-type parameters, J(sub x), and showed that the time rate, dJ(sub x)/dt, must not be a function of the crack extension rate, da/dt. Ernst devised the modified-J parameter, J(sub M), that meets this criterion. J(sub M) correlates fracture data to much higher crack growth than does J. Ultimately, a limit of the validity of J(sub M) is anticipated, and this has been estimated to be at a crack extension of about 40-percent of the initial remaining ligament length. None of the various parameters can be expected to describe fracture in an environment of gross plasticity, in which case the process is better described by deformation parameters, e.g., stress and strain. In the current study, various schemes to identify the onset of the plasticity-dominated behavior, i.e., the end of fracture mechanics validity, are presented. Each validity limit parameter is developed in

  2. Radiation sources working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.

    1998-12-31

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, components technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigation, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations.

  3. Primary Analysis of a Phase II Randomized Trial Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0212: Impact of Different Total Doses and Schedules of Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation on Chronic Neurotoxicity and Quality of Life for Patients With Limited-Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, Aaron H.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Komaki, Ritsuko; Meyers, Christina; Movsas, Benjamin; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Choy, Hak

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of dose and fractionation schedule of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on the incidence of chronic neurotoxicity (CNt) and changes in quality of life for selected patients with limited-disease small-cell lung cancer (LD SCLC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LD SCLC who achieved a complete response after chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation were eligible for randomization to undergo PCI to a total dose of 25 Gy in 10 daily fractions (Arm 1) vs. the experimental cohort of 36 Gy. Those receiving 36 Gy underwent a secondary randomization between daily 18 fractions (Arm 2) and twice-daily 24 fractions (Arm 3). Enrolled patients participated in baseline and follow-up neuropsychological test batteries along with quality-of-life assessments. Results: A total of 265 patients were accrued, with 131 in Arm 1, 67 in Arm 2, and 66 in Arm 3 being eligible. There are 112 patients (42.2%) alive with 25.3 months of median follow-up. There were no significant baseline differences among groups regarding quality-of-life measures and one of the neuropsychological tests, namely the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test. However, at 12 months after PCI there was a significant increase in the occurrence of CNt in the 36-Gy cohort (p = 0.02). Logistic regression analysis revealed increasing age to be the most significant predictor of CNt (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Because of the increased risk of developing CNt in study patients with 36 Gy, a total PCI dose of 25 Gy remains the standard of care for patients with LD SCLC attaining a complete response to initial chemoradiation.

  4. Focus group research.

    PubMed

    Traynor, Michael

    2015-05-13

    A focus group is usually understood as a group of people brought together by a researcher to interact as a group. Focus group research explicitly uses interaction as part of its methodology. This article summarises the practice of running focus groups, explores the nature of focus group data and provides an example of focus group analysis.

  5. Constructing Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimlich, Joe E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents guidelines for constructing group learning activities, describes group learning methods (discussion, gaming, role play, simulation, projects), and provides tips for facilitating group activities. (SK)

  6. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Becker, Nils B.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this receptor input noise as much as possible. These networks, however, are also intrinsically stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, which is the timescale over which fluctuations in the state of the receptor, arising from the stochastic receptor-ligand binding, decay. We then describe how downstream signaling pathways integrate these receptor-state fluctuations, and how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time set by the downstream network, together impose a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor input noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes (groups) of resources—receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy—and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade

  7. 26 CFR 1.1502-93A - Consolidated section 382 limitation (or subgroup section 382 limitation) generally applicable for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Corporations Joining Or Leaving Consolidated Groups) Before June 25, 1999 § 1.1502-93A Consolidated section 382... section 382 limitation) for any post-change year is an amount equal to the value of the loss group (or... 382 limitation) when one or more corporations cease to be members of a loss group (or a loss...

  8. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  9. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  10. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  11. Telescopic limiting magnitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1990-01-01

    The prediction of the magnitude of the faintest star visible through a telescope by a visual observer is a difficult problem in physiology. Many prediction formulas have been advanced over the years, but most do not even consider the magnification used. Here, the prediction algorithm problem is attacked with two complimentary approaches: (1) First, a theoretical algorithm was developed based on physiological data for the sensitivity of the eye. This algorithm also accounts for the transmission of the atmosphere and the telescope, the brightness of the sky, the color of the star, the age of the observer, the aperture, and the magnification. (2) Second, 314 observed values for the limiting magnitude were collected as a test of the formula. It is found that the formula does accurately predict the average observed limiting magnitudes under all conditions.

  12. Age Limit of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Amy Peykoff; Hackell, Jesse M

    2017-09-01

    Pediatrics is a multifaceted specialty that encompasses children's physical, psychosocial, developmental, and mental health. Pediatric care may begin periconceptionally and continues through gestation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Although adolescence and young adulthood are recognizable phases of life, an upper age limit is not easily demarcated and varies depending on the individual patient. The establishment of arbitrary age limits on pediatric care by health care providers should be discouraged. The decision to continue care with a pediatrician or pediatric medical or surgical subspecialist should be made solely by the patient (and family, when appropriate) and the physician and must take into account the physical and psychosocial needs of the patient and the abilities of the pediatric provider to meet these needs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Quantum limits of thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stace, Thomas M.

    2010-07-15

    The precision of typical thermometers consisting of N particles scales as {approx}1/{radical}(N). For high-precision thermometry and thermometric standards, this presents an important theoretical noise floor. Here it is demonstrated that thermometry may be mapped onto the problem of phase estimation, and using techniques from optimal phase estimation, it follows that the scaling of the precision of a thermometer may in principle be improved to {approx}1/N, representing a Heisenberg limit to thermometry.

  14. Heat flux limiting sleeves

    DOEpatents

    Harris, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A heat limiting tubular sleeve extending over only a portion of a tube having a generally uniform outside diameter, the sleeve being open on both ends, having one end thereof larger in diameter than the other end thereof and having a wall thickness which decreases in the same direction as the diameter of the sleeve decreases so that the heat transfer through the sleeve and tube is less adjacent the large diameter end of the sleeve than adjacent the other end thereof.

  15. Respiratory factors limiting exercise.

    PubMed

    Bye, P T; Farkas, G A; Roussos, C

    1983-01-01

    The question of respiratory factors limiting exercise has been examined in terms of possible limitations arising from the function of gas exchange, the respiratory mechanics, the energetics of the respiratory muscles, or the development of respiratory muscle fatigue. Exercise capacity is curtailed in the presence of marked hypoxia, and this is readily observed in patients with chronic airflow limitation and interstitial lung disease and in some athletes at high intensities of exercise. In patients with interstitial lung disease, gas exchange abnormality--partly the result of diffusion disequilibrium for oxygen transfer--occurs during exercise despite abnormally high ventilations. In contrast, in certain athletes arterial hypoxemia has been documented during heavy exercise, apparently as a result of relative hypoventilation. During strenuous exercise the maximum expiratory flow volume curves are attained both by patients with chronic airflow limitation and by normal subjects, in particular when they breathe dense gas, so that a mechanical constraint is imposed on further increases in ventilation. Similarly, the force velocity characteristics of the inspiratory muscles may also impose a constraint to further increases in inspiratory flows that affects the ability to increase ventilation. In addition, the oxygen cost of maintaining high ventilations is large. Analysis of results from blood flow experiments reveal a substantial increase in blood flow to the respiratory muscles during exercise, with the result that oxygen supply to the rest of the body may be lessened. Alternatively, high exercise ventilations may not be sustained indefinitely owing to the development of respiratory muscle fatigue that results in hypoventilation and reduced arterial oxygen tension.

  16. Limits of social mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-04-16

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability.

  17. Deriving exposure limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliney, David H.

    1990-07-01

    Historically many different agencies and standards organizations have proposed laser occupational exposure limits (EL1s) or maximum permissible exposure (MPE) levels. Although some safety standards have been limited in scope to manufacturer system safety performance standards or to codes of practice most have included occupational EL''s. Initially in the 1960''s attention was drawn to setting EL''s however as greater experience accumulated in the use of lasers and some accident experience had been gained safety procedures were developed. It became clear by 1971 after the first decade of laser use that detailed hazard evaluation of each laser environment was too complex for most users and a scheme of hazard classification evolved. Today most countries follow a scheme of four major hazard classifications as defined in Document WS 825 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The classifications and the associated accessible emission limits (AEL''s) were based upon the EL''s. The EL and AEL values today are in surprisingly good agreement worldwide. There exists a greater range of safety requirements for the user for each class of laser. The current MPE''s (i. e. EL''s) and their basis are highlighted in this presentation. 2. 0

  18. Limits of social mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-01-01

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  19. LIMITS ON QUAOAR'S ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Gwyn, Stephen; Kavelaars, J. J.; Trujillo, Chad; Stephens, Andrew W.; Gimeno, German

    2013-09-10

    Here we present high cadence photometry taken by the Acquisition Camera on Gemini South, of a close passage by the {approx}540 km radius Kuiper belt object, (50000) Quaoar, of a r' = 20.2 background star. Observations before and after the event show that the apparent impact parameter of the event was 0.''019 {+-} 0.''004, corresponding to a close approach of 580 {+-} 120 km to the center of Quaoar. No signatures of occultation by either Quaoar's limb or its potential atmosphere are detectable in the relative photometry of Quaoar and the target star, which were unresolved during closest approach. From this photometry we are able to put constraints on any potential atmosphere Quaoar might have. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo and likelihood approach, we place pressure upper limits on sublimation supported, isothermal atmospheres of pure N{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4}. For N{sub 2} and CO, the upper limit surface pressures are 1 and 0.7 {mu}bar, respectively. The surface temperature required for such low sublimation pressures is {approx}33 K, much lower than Quaoar's mean temperature of {approx}44 K measured by others. We conclude that Quaoar cannot have an isothermal N{sub 2} or CO atmosphere. We cannot eliminate the possibility of a CH{sub 4} atmosphere, but place upper surface pressure and mean temperature limits of {approx}138 nbar and {approx}44 K, respectively.

  20. Leadership in Moving Human Groups

    PubMed Central

    Boos, Margarete; Pritz, Johannes; Lange, Simon; Belz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    How is movement of individuals coordinated as a group? This is a fundamental question of social behaviour, encompassing phenomena such as bird flocking, fish schooling, and the innumerable activities in human groups that require people to synchronise their actions. We have developed an experimental paradigm, the HoneyComb computer-based multi-client game, to empirically investigate human movement coordination and leadership. Using economic games as a model, we set monetary incentives to motivate players on a virtual playfield to reach goals via players' movements. We asked whether (I) humans coordinate their movements when information is limited to an individual group member's observation of adjacent group member motion, (II) whether an informed group minority can lead an uninformed group majority to the minority's goal, and if so, (III) how this minority exerts its influence. We showed that in a human group – on the basis of movement alone – a minority can successfully lead a majority. Minorities lead successfully when (a) their members choose similar initial steps towards their goal field and (b) they are among the first in the whole group to make a move. Using our approach, we empirically demonstrate that the rules of swarming behaviour apply to humans. Even complex human behaviour, such as leadership and directed group movement, follow simple rules that are based on visual perception of local movement. PMID:24699264

  1. Leadership in moving human groups.

    PubMed

    Boos, Margarete; Pritz, Johannes; Lange, Simon; Belz, Michael

    2014-04-01

    How is movement of individuals coordinated as a group? This is a fundamental question of social behaviour, encompassing phenomena such as bird flocking, fish schooling, and the innumerable activities in human groups that require people to synchronise their actions. We have developed an experimental paradigm, the HoneyComb computer-based multi-client game, to empirically investigate human movement coordination and leadership. Using economic games as a model, we set monetary incentives to motivate players on a virtual playfield to reach goals via players' movements. We asked whether (I) humans coordinate their movements when information is limited to an individual group member's observation of adjacent group member motion, (II) whether an informed group minority can lead an uninformed group majority to the minority's goal, and if so, (III) how this minority exerts its influence. We showed that in a human group--on the basis of movement alone--a minority can successfully lead a majority. Minorities lead successfully when (a) their members choose similar initial steps towards their goal field and (b) they are among the first in the whole group to make a move. Using our approach, we empirically demonstrate that the rules of swarming behaviour apply to humans. Even complex human behaviour, such as leadership and directed group movement, follow simple rules that are based on visual perception of local movement.

  2. Immediate Effects of Bhramari Pranayama on Resting Cardiovascular Parameters in Healthy Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kamaldeen, Dilara; Pitani, Ravishankar; Amaldas, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In yoga, Pranayama has a very important role in maintaining sound health. There is some strong scientific basis on constant physiological changes produced when pranayama is practiced for long duration. Still, there exists a dearth of literature on the effect of Bhramari pranayama (Bhr.p) on physiological systems. Aim To assess the immediate effect of Bhramari pranayama (Bhr.P) practice on the resting cardiovascular parameters in healthy adolescents. Materials and Methods Sixty apparently healthy adolescents of both sex participated in the study. They were randomly divided into Bhr.P (n-30) and control (n-30) group. Informed consent was obtained after explaining the detailed procedure of the study. Bhr.P group practiced Bhramari pranayama for 45 min (5 cycles) and control group was allowed to do normal breathing (12-16 breath /min). Heart rate (HR) was assessed by radial artery palpation method and blood pressure was recorded in supine position after 5 minutes of rest by sphygmomanometer. Results The HR reduced significantly (p-0.001) in Bhr.P group. BP indices, Pulse Pressure (PP), Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), Rate Pressure Product (RPP) and Double Product (DoP) significantly decreased after Bhr.p practice compared with control. Pre and Post inter group analysis also showed that significant reduction in HR and BP indices in Bhr.P group. Conclusion Present study showed that Bhr.P practice produces relaxed state and in this state parasympathetic activity overrides the sympathetic activity. It suggests that Bhramari pranayama improves the resting cardiovascular parameters in healthy adolescents. PMID:27437210

  3. Structural properties of compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Carvalho, R. R.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of a systematic study of galaxies in the regions of Hickson compact groups. Our sample is composed of the 22 Hickson groups which are located in the southern hemisphere and have cz less than 9000 km/s. Making use of digitized images of IIIa-J plates that cover an area of 0.5 x 0.5 deg around each group, we were able to detect and classify images down to a magnitude limit of 19.5 in the B band. This limit is typically three magnitudes fainter than previous studies. Most groups show a statistically significant excess of fainter galaxies compared to the background. These fainter galaxies typically have a somewhat more extended spatial distribution than the brighter galaxies originally classified by Hickson. Our data suggest that Hickson groups have a wide range in density and radius, ranging from very compact structures with overdensities of the order of 10(exp 2) and crossing times of roughly 0.01 H(sub 0 sup -1), to much more diffuse structures, similar to loose groups, with overdensities of about 3 and crossing times of roughly 0.5 H(sub 0 sup -1).

  4. Limits to growth reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Hagen, E E

    1972-01-01

    In their book, ''The Limits of Growth,'' the authors conclude that through pollution, exhaustion of natural resources, and limits to the food supply, the world faces a catastrophic fall in population and in living standards by the middle of the 21st century. The authors fail to state, however, 1 centrally important assumption underlying their results, but which is present through their omission of the contrary assumption. In their model the continuing technical progress that has been a primary feature of the material world for the past 200 years suddenly ceases. The assumptions of the model presented in ''Limits of Growth'' are not the assumptions other analysts make - these are strangely unrealistic. These assumptions require closer examination. The assumption concerning population assumes that the sole determinants of birthrates are the level of industrialization and the food supply. This is not good demography, for demographers have long recognized that it may have been the decrease in death rates, not industrialization or the rise in income, that caused the decrease in birthrates. Furthermore, their theory that many of the natural resources are irreplacable is like the belief that the sun revolves around the earth. It is obvious and false. It neglects that part of technical process which includes invention of new natural resources. Technical advance is needed and the following are some of the problems that technical advance must overcome: 1) a need to discover how to increase food production progressively while preventing the runoff of chemical fertilizers from the soil into waterways, 2) the ''natural'' minerals on which until recently all have depended are ''biodegradable,'' 3) there is a similar problem with radioactive nuclear wastes; 4) energy must dissipate into heat; and 5) there is a need to hasten the decline in birthrates throughout the world. In conclusion, indefinitely continuing growth is not regarded as desirable only as possible.

  5. Limits to Cloud Susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, James A., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    1-kilometer AVHRR observations of ship tracks in low-level clouds off the west coast of the U S. were used to determine limits for the degree to which clouds might be altered by increases in anthropogenic aerosols. Hundreds of tracks were analyzed to determine whether the changes in droplet radii, visible optical depths, and cloud top altitudes that result from the influx of particles from underlying ships were consistent with expectations based on simple models for the indirect effect of aerosols. The models predict substantial increases in sunlight reflected by polluted clouds due to the increases in droplet numbers and cloud liquid water that result from the elevated particle concentrations. Contrary to the model predictions, the analysis of ship tracks revealed a 15-20% reduction in liquid water for the polluted clouds. Studies performed with a large-eddy cloud simulation model suggested that the shortfall in cloud liquid water found in the satellite observations might be attributed to the restriction that the 1-kilometer pixels be completely covered by either polluted or unpolluted cloud. The simulation model revealed that a substantial fraction of the indirect effect is caused by a horizontal redistribution of cloud water in the polluted clouds. Cloud-free gaps in polluted clouds fill in with cloud water while the cloud-free gaps in the surrounding unpolluted clouds remain cloud-free. By limiting the analysis to only overcast pixels, the current study failed to account for the gap-filling predicted by the simulation model. This finding and an analysis of the spatial variability of marine stratus suggest new ways to analyze ship tracks to determine the limit to which particle pollution will alter the amount of sunlight reflected by clouds.

  6. Strategic arms limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen Greb, G.; Johnson, Gerald W.

    1983-10-01

    Following World War II, American scientists and politicians proposed in the Baruch plan a radical solution to the problem of nuclear weapons: to eliminate them forever under the auspices of an international nuclear development authority. The Soviets, who as yet did not possess the bomb, rejected this plan. Another approach suggested by Secretary of War Henry Stimson to negotiate directly with the Soviet Union was not accepted by the American leadership. These initial arms limitation failures both reflected and exacerbated the hostile political relationship of the superpowers in the 1950s and 1960s. Since 1969, the more modest focus of the Soviet-American arms control process has been on limiting the numbers and sizes of both defensive and offensive strategic systems. The format for this effort has been the Strategic Arms Limitatins Talks (Salt) and more recently the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START). Both sides came to these negotiations convinced that nuclear arsenals had grown so large that some for of mutual restraint was needed. Although the SALT/START process has been slow and ponderous, it has produced several concrete the agreements and collateral benefits. The 1972 ABM Treaty restricts the deployment of ballistic missile defense systems, the 1972 Interim Agreement places a quantitative freeze on each side's land based and sea based strategic launchers, and the as yet unratified 1979 SALT II Treaty sets numerical limits on all offensive strategic systems and sublimits on MIRVed systems. Collateral benefits include improved verification procedures, working definitions and counting rules, and permanent bureaucratic apparatus which enhance stability and increase the chances for achieving additional agreements.

  7. The HEL Upper Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billingsley, James

    2001-06-01

    A threshold particle velocity, Vf, derived by Professor E.R. Fitzgerald for the onset of atomic lattice disintegration phenomena (LDP) is shown to exceed or compare rather well with the maximum experimentally observed Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) particle or mass velocities (Uphel) for certain hard and strong mineral/ceramic materials. They are: diamond, quartz, sapphire, alumina, silicon carbide, titanium diboride, and partially stabilized zirconia. The LDP is caused by a conflict between the DeBroglie momentum-wavelength relation and the minimum wavelength allowed in a lattice row of atoms.

  8. Fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  9. The limits of scale.

    PubMed

    Halaburda, Hanna; Oberholzer-Gee, Felix

    2014-04-01

    The value of many products and services rises or falls with the number of customers using them; the fewer fax machines in use, the less important it is to have one. These network effects influence consumer decisions and affect companies' ability to compete. Strategists have developed some well-known rules for navigating business environments with network effects. "Move first" is one, and "get big fast" is another. In a study of dozens of companies, however, the authors found that quite often the conventional wisdom was dead wrong. And when the rules failed, the reason was always the same: Companies trip up when they try to attract large volumes of customers without understanding (1) the strength of mutual attraction among various customer groups and (2) the extent of asymmetric attraction among them. Looking at examples such as TripAdvisor, Wikipedia, and the New York Times, the authors offer strategies for competing in markets with network effects. New entrants should focus on customer groups that they are uniquely positioned to serve or appeal to the most attractive customers in a market. Incumbents pursuing growth strategies in adjacent markets or new geographies should consider how similar the needs of new customers are to those of existing customers. Offering complements also allows incumbents to reach additional customer groups.

  10. Limits to biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, S.

    2013-06-01

    Biofuel production is dependent upon agriculture and forestry systems, and the expectations of future biofuel potential are high. A study of the global food production and biofuel production from edible crops implies that biofuel produced from edible parts of crops lead to a global deficit of food. This is rather well known, which is why there is a strong urge to develop biofuel systems that make use of residues or products from forest to eliminate competition with food production. However, biofuel from agro-residues still depend upon the crop production system, and there are many parameters to deal with in order to investigate the sustainability of biofuel production. There is a theoretical limit to how much biofuel can be achieved globally from agro-residues and this amounts to approximately one third of todays' use of fossil fuels in the transport sector. In reality this theoretical potential may be eliminated by the energy use in the biomass-conversion technologies and production systems, depending on what type of assessment method is used. By surveying existing studies on biofuel conversion the theoretical limit of biofuels from 2010 years' agricultural production was found to be either non-existent due to energy consumption in the conversion process, or up to 2-6000TWh (biogas from residues and waste and ethanol from woody biomass) in the more optimistic cases.

  11. Lean limit phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The concept of flammability limits in the presence of flame interaction, and the existence of negative flame speeds are discussed. Downstream interaction between two counterflow premixed flames of different stoichiometries are experimentally studied. Various flame configurations are observed and quantified; these include the binary system of two lean or rich flames, the triplet system of a lean and a rich flame separated by a diffusion flame, and single diffusion flames with some degree of premixedness. Extinction limits are determined for methane/air and butane/air mixtures over the entire range of mixture concentrations. The results show that the extent of flame interaction depends on the separation distance between the flames which are functions of the mixtures' concentrations, the stretch rate, and the effective Lewis numbers (Le). In particular, in a positively-stretched flow field Le 1 ( 1) mixtures tend to interact strongly (weakly), while the converse holds for flames in a negatively-stretched flow. Also established was the existence of negative flames whose propagation velocity is in the same general direction as that of the bulk convective flow, being supported by diffusion alone. Their existence demonstrates the tendency of flames to resist extinction, and further emphasizes the possibility of very lean or rich mixtures to undergo combustion.

  12. The Globalization of Cooperative Groups.

    PubMed

    Valdivieso, Manuel; Corn, Benjamin W; Dancey, Janet E; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Horvath, L Elise; Perez, Edith A; Urton, Alison; Cronin, Walter M; Field, Erica; Lackey, Evonne; Blanke, Charles D

    2015-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supported adult cooperative oncology research groups (now officially Network groups) have a longstanding history of participating in international collaborations throughout the world. Most frequently, the US-based cooperative groups work reciprocally with the Canadian national adult cancer clinical trial group, NCIC CTG (previously the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group). Thus, Canada is the largest contributor to cooperative groups based in the United States, and vice versa. Although international collaborations have many benefits, they are most frequently utilized to enhance patient accrual to large phase III trials originating in the United States or Canada. Within the cooperative group setting, adequate attention has not been given to the study of cancers that are unique to countries outside the United States and Canada, such as those frequently associated with infections in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Global collaborations are limited by a number of barriers, some of which are unique to the countries involved, while others are related to financial support and to US policies that restrict drug distribution outside the United States. This article serves to detail the cooperative group experience in international research and describe how international collaboration in cancer clinical trials is a promising and important area that requires greater consideration in the future.

  13. The Globalization of Cooperative Groups

    PubMed Central

    Valdivieso, Manuel; Corn, Benjamin W.; Dancey, Janet E.; Wickerham, D. Lawrence; Horvath, L. Elise; Perez, Edith A.; Urton, Alison; Cronin, Walter M.; Field, Erica; Lackey, Evonne; Blanke, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute-supported adult cooperative oncology research groups (now officially Network groups) have a long-standing history of participating in international collaborations throughout the world. Most frequently, the U.S. based cooperative groups work reciprocally with the Canadian national adult cancer clinical trial group, NCIC CTG (previously the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group). Thus, Canada is the largest contributor to cooperative groups based in the U.S., and vice versa. Although international collaborations have many benefits, they are most frequently utilized to enhance patient accrual to large phase III trials originating in the U.S. or Canada. Within the cooperative group setting, adequate attention has not been given to the study of cancers that are unique to countries outside the U.S. and Canada, such as those frequently associated with infections in Latin America, Asia and Africa. Global collaborations are limited by a number of barriers, some of which are unique to the countries involved, while others are related to financial support and to U.S. policies that restrict drug distribution outside the U.S. This manuscript serves to detail the cooperative group experience in international research and describe how international collaboration in cancer clinical trials is a promising and important area that requires greater consideration in the future. PMID:26433551

  14. [Bronchial hyperreactivity in athletes].

    PubMed

    Carlsen, K H

    1994-01-01

    Elite athletics, particularly endurance sports, are characterised by a high prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Findings in several studies suggest short-term high intensity physical activity to cause a transient increase in BHR. Recent studies in Oslo have shown that regular physical endurance training over several years, particularly when combined with such climatic factors as low air temperatures, may result in an increased risk of BHR and EIA among elite athletes--e.g., cross-country skiers. Inhalation beta 2-agonists and steroids have been used by many athletes in endurance sports, particularly skiers. Athletes with symptoms of BHR or EIA should be examined with lung function tests and exercise testing, and the effect of antiasthmatic drugs should be ascertained. Inhaled beta 2-agonists have no beneficial effect upon physical performance in nonasthmatic athletes, and may have a slight limiting effect upon physical endurance.

  15. Practical limitations of epidemiologic methods.

    PubMed

    Lilienfeld, A M

    1983-10-01

    Epidemiologic methods can be categorized into demographic studies of mortality and morbidity and observational studies that are either retrospective or prospective. Some of the limitations of demographic studies are illustrated by a review of one specific mortality study showing possible relationship of nuclear fallout to leukemia. Problems of accuracy of diagnosis or causes of death on death certificates, estimates of population, migration from areas of study, and the issue of "ecological fallacy" are discussed. Retrospective studies have such problems as recall of previous environmental exposure, selection bias and survivor bias. In environmental epidemiology, prospective studies have been used. The problems associated with these studies are illustrated by reviewing some of the details of the study of effects of microwave radiation on embassy employees in Moscow. The study population had to be reconstructed, individuals had to be located and information on exposure status had to be obtained by questionnaire. The relatively small size of the exposed group permitted the detection of only fairly large relative risks. Despite these limitations, epidemiologic studies have been remarkably productive in elucidating etiological factors. They are necessary since "the proper study of man is man."

  16. [Limitations of anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Martí-Fàbregas, J; Delgado-Mederos, R; Mateo, J

    2012-03-01

    Vitamin K antagonists have been shown to be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of systemic and cerebral emboli in patients with cardiac causes of embolism, especially atrial fibrillation. The reduced risk of stroke is greater in secondary prevention, although this reduction is accompanied by an inherent risk of hemorrhagic complications, among which cerebral hemorrhage is especially serious. The therapeutic window of these agents is limited and the best benefit/risk profile is obtained with an INR of between 2 and 3. The anticoagulant effect obtained shows marked variability, requiring frequent clinical and laboratory monitoring of the treatment. The introduction of oral anticoagulants that would aid the administration of these agents with equal or greater efficacy and lower risk is required.

  17. Limiting magnitude of hypertelescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surya, Arun

    Optical stellar interferometers have demonstrated milli-arcsecond resolution with few apertures spaced hundreds of meters apart. To obtain rich direct images, many apertures will be needed, for a better sampling of the incoming wavefront. The coherent imaging thus achievable improves the sensitivity with respect to the incoherent combination of successive fringed exposures, heretofore achieved in the form of optical aperture synthesis. For efficient use of highly diluted apertures, this can be done with pupil densification, a technique also called ``Hypertelescope Imaging". Using numerical simulations we have found out the limiting magnitude of hypertelescopes over different baselines and pupil densifications. Here we discuss the advantages of using hypertelescope systems over classical pairwise optical interferometry.

  18. Limits of Filopodium Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronk, Sander; Geissler, Phillip L.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2008-06-01

    Filopodia are long, fingerlike membrane tubes supported by cytoskeletal filaments. Their shape is determined by the stiffness of the actin filament bundles found inside them and by the interplay between the surface tension and bending rigidity of the membrane. Although one might expect the Euler buckling instability to limit the length of filopodia, we show through simple energetic considerations that this is in general not the case. By further analyzing the statics of filaments inside membrane tubes, and through computer simulations that capture membrane and filament fluctuations, we show under which conditions filopodia of arbitrary lengths are stable. We discuss several in vitro experiments where this kind of stability has already been observed. Furthermore, we predict that the filaments in long, stable filopodia adopt a helical shape.

  19. Limits of filopodium stability.

    PubMed

    Pronk, Sander; Geissler, Phillip L; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2008-06-27

    Filopodia are long, fingerlike membrane tubes supported by cytoskeletal filaments. Their shape is determined by the stiffness of the actin filament bundles found inside them and by the interplay between the surface tension and bending rigidity of the membrane. Although one might expect the Euler buckling instability to limit the length of filopodia, we show through simple energetic considerations that this is in general not the case. By further analyzing the statics of filaments inside membrane tubes, and through computer simulations that capture membrane and filament fluctuations, we show under which conditions filopodia of arbitrary lengths are stable. We discuss several in vitro experiments where this kind of stability has already been observed. Furthermore, we predict that the filaments in long, stable filopodia adopt a helical shape.

  20. Clinical limitations of Invisalign.

    PubMed

    Phan, Xiem; Ling, Paul H

    2007-04-01

    Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations. The majority of these patients reject wearing labial fixed appliances and are looking instead to more esthetic treatment options, including lingual orthodontics and Invisalign appliances. Since Align Technology introduced the Invisalign appliance in 1999 in an extensive public campaign, the appliance has gained tremendous attention from adult patients and dental professionals. The transparency of the Invisalign appliance enhances its esthetic appeal for those adult patients who are averse to wearing conventional labial fixed orthodontic appliances. Although guidelines about the types of malocclusions that this technique can treat exist, few clinical studies have assessed the effectiveness of the appliance. A few recent studies have outlined some of the limitations associated with this technique that clinicians should recognize early before choosing treatment options.

  1. [Does medicine limit enlightenment?].

    PubMed

    Schipperges, H

    1977-01-01

    In the first, historical part the most important programs of "Medical Enlightenment", are pointed out, beginning with Leibniz, followed by the public health movement of the 18th century, up to the time of Immanuel Kant. Based on this historical background several concepts of a "Medical Culture" are analysed in detail, for instance the "Theorie einer Medizinal-Ordnung" by Johann Benjamin Ehrhard (1800), the "Medicinische Reform" by Rudolf Virchow (1848) and the programs of the "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Arzte" (about 1850-1890), the latter bearing both scientific and political character. Following the historical part, the question is raised whether "Enlightenment" is limited by medicine and whether medicine is able to provide a program for individual health education resulting in a more cultivated style of private life, and lastly how this might be realized.

  2. Group Time: Building Language at Group Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Ellen Booth

    2004-01-01

    This article features energizing and surprising activities for children at group time. In the drawing activity, children are asked to give instructions on how to draw a picture using vocabulary and descriptive language. In the mailbox activity, children will be surprised to discover that they have mail at group time. Mailboxes can be used for…

  3. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  4. Diffeomorphism groups, gauge groups, and quantum theory

    SciTech Connect

    Goldin, G.A.; Menikoff, R.; Sharp, D.H.

    1983-12-19

    Unitary representations of the infinite parameter group Diff(R/sup 3/) are presented which describe particles with spin as well as tightly bound composite particles. These results support the idea that Diff(R/sup 3/) can serve as a ''universal group'' for quantum theory.

  5. The Limits to Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, M.; Briggle, A.

    2006-12-01

    Science policy and knowledge production lately have taken a pragmatic turn. Funding agencies increasingly are requiring scientists to explain the relevance of their work to society. This stems in part from mounting critiques of the "linear model" of knowledge production in which scientists operating according to their own interests or disciplinary standards are presumed to automatically produce knowledge that is of relevance outside of their narrow communities. Many contend that funded scientific research should be linked more directly to societal goals, which implies a shift in the kind of research that will be funded. While both authors support the concept of useful science, we question the exact meaning of "relevance" and the wisdom of allowing it to control research agendas. We hope to contribute to the conversation by thinking more critically about the meaning and limits of the term "relevance" and the trade-offs implicit in a narrow utilitarian approach. The paper will consider which interests tend to be privileged by an emphasis on relevance and address issues such as whose goals ought to be pursued and why, and who gets to decide. We will consider how relevance, narrowly construed, may actually limit the ultimate utility of scientific research. The paper also will reflect on the worthiness of research goals themselves and their relationship to a broader view of what it means to be human and to live in society. Just as there is more to being human than the pragmatic demands of daily life, there is more at issue with knowledge production than finding the most efficient ways to satisfy consumer preferences or fix near-term policy problems. We will conclude by calling for a balanced approach to funding research that addresses society's most pressing needs but also supports innovative research with less immediately apparent application.

  6. Can Groups Learn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Elizabeth G.; Lotan, Rachel A.; Abram, Percy L.; Scarloss, Beth A.; Schultz, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the work of sixth grade students' creative problem-solving groups, proposing that providing students with specific guidelines about what makes an exemplary group product would improve the character of the discussion and quality of the group product. Student groups did learn as a result of their discussions and creation of group products.…

  7. Small Group Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  8. Small Groups in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suessmuth, Patrick

    1974-01-01

    Small groups can sometimes be difficult to set up and work with properly. A number of tips for small group instruction are divided into seven areas: (1) presenting tasks; (2) group seating; (3) task time; (4) answering questions; (5) teacher's role in observing groups; (6) group noise level patterns; and (7) serial take-ups. (BP)

  9. Cluster functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  10. 50 CFR 622.382 - Bag and possession limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) King and Spanish mackerel—(1) Bag limits. (i) Atlantic migratory group king mackerel— (A) Mid-Atlantic... does not exceed 5. (ii) Gulf migratory group king mackerel—2. (iii) Atlantic migratory group Spanish mackerel—15. (iv) Gulf migratory group Spanish mackerel—15. (v) Coastal migratory pelagic fish...

  11. 50 CFR 622.382 - Bag and possession limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) King and Spanish mackerel—(1) Bag limits. (i) Atlantic migratory group king mackerel— (A) Mid-Atlantic... does not exceed 5. (ii) Gulf migratory group king mackerel—2. (iii) Atlantic migratory group Spanish mackerel—15. (iv) Gulf migratory group Spanish mackerel—15. (v) Coastal migratory pelagic fish...

  12. 7 CFR 1400.204 - Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.204 Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and other similar...

  13. 7 CFR 1400.204 - Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.204 Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and other similar...

  14. 7 CFR 1400.204 - Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.204 Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and other similar...

  15. 7 CFR 1400.204 - Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.204 Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and other similar...

  16. Group B Strep Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions OverviewWhat is group B strep?Group B streptococcus, or group B strep for short, is a ... can develop an infection of the lungs (called pneumonia), bloodstream (called sepsis), or the fluid around the ...

  17. The limits of endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Timothy David

    2006-09-01

    A skeletal design which favours running and walking, including the greatest ratio of leg length to body weight of any mammal; the ability to sweat and so to exercise vigorously in the heat; and greater endurance than all land mammals other than the Alaskan Husky, indicates that humans evolved as endurance animals. The development of tools to accurately measure time and distance in the nineteenth century inspired some humans to define the limits of this special capacity. Beginning with Six-Day Professional Pedestrian Races in London and New York in the 1880s, followed a decade later by Six-Day Professional Cycling Races - the immediate precursor of the first six-day Tour de France Cycliste race in 1903, which itself inspired the 1928 and 1929 4,960 km "Bunion Derbies" between Los Angeles and New York across the breadth of the United States of America - established those unique sporting events that continue to challenge the modern limits of human endurance. But an analysis of the total energy expenditure achieved by athletes competing in those events establishes that none approaches those reached by another group - the explorers of the heroic age of polar exploration in the early twentieth century. Thus the greatest recorded human endurance performances occurred during the Antarctic sledding expeditions led by Robert Scott in 1911/12 and Ernest Shackleton in 1914/16. By man-hauling sleds for 10 hours daily for approximately 159 and 160 consecutive days respectively, members of those expeditions would have expended close to a total of 1,000,000 kcal. By comparison completing a Six-Day Pedestrian event (55,000 kcal) or the Tour de France (168,000 kcal), or cycling (180,000 kcal) or running (340,000 kcal) across America, requires a considerably smaller total energy expenditure. Thus the limits of human endurance were set at the start of the twentieth century and have not recently been approached. Given good health and an adequate food supply to prevent starvation and

  18. Integrated Current Limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, S.; Alfonso, M. M.; Mirabella, I. B.

    2011-10-01

    The LCL has been extensively used in ESA scientific satellites and since a few years ago is being also the baseline device for earth observation satellites such as CRYOSAT 1 and 2, SENTINAL 1, 2 and 3, EARTWATCH, etc. It seems that the use of this LCL is also being considered as an alternative to fuse approach for commercial telecommunication satellites. Scope of this document is to provide a technical description of the Integrated Current Limiter device (shortly ICL later on) developed inside the domain of ESTECContract22049-09-NL-A Twith STMicroelectronics s.r.l. (ref. Invitation to Tender AO/1-5784/08/NL/A T). The design of the ICL device takes into account both ESA and power electronics designer's experience. This experience is more than 25 years long in Europe. The ICL design has been leaded in order to be fully compliant with the applicable specification issued by ESA and the major European power electronics manufacturers that have participated in its edition.

  19. Limits of computational biology

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Are we close to a complete inventory of living processes so that we might expect in the near future to reproduce every essential aspect necessary for life? Or are there mechanisms and processes in cells and organisms that are presently inaccessible to us? Here I argue that a close examination of a particularly well-understood system— that of Escherichia coli chemotaxis— shows we are still a long way from a complete description. There is a level of molecular uncertainty, particularly that responsible for fine-tuning and adaptation to myriad external conditions, which we presently cannot resolve or reproduce on a computer. Moreover, the same uncertainty exists for any process in any organism and is especially pronounced and important in higher animals such as humans. Embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, immune recognition, memory formation, and survival in the real world, all depend on vast numbers of subtle variations in cell chemistry most of which are presently unknown or only poorly characterized. Overcoming these limitations will require us to not only accumulate large quantities of highly detailed data but also develop new computational methods able to recapitulate the massively parallel processing of living cells. PMID:25318467

  20. Physical limits to magnetogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This is an analysis of how magnetic fields affect biological molecules and cells. It was prompted by a series of prominent reports regarding magnetism in biological systems. The first claims to have identified a protein complex that acts like a compass needle to guide magnetic orientation in animals (Qin et al., 2016). Two other articles report magnetic control of membrane conductance by attaching ferritin to an ion channel protein and then tugging the ferritin or heating it with a magnetic field (Stanley et al., 2015; Wheeler et al., 2016). Here I argue that these claims conflict with basic laws of physics. The discrepancies are large: from 5 to 10 log units. If the reported phenomena do in fact occur, they must have causes entirely different from the ones proposed by the authors. The paramagnetic nature of protein complexes is found to seriously limit their utility for engineering magnetically sensitive cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17210.001 PMID:27529126

  1. Limits of computational biology.

    PubMed

    Bray, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Are we close to a complete inventory of living processes so that we might expect in the near future to reproduce every essential aspect necessary for life? Or are there mechanisms and processes in cells and organisms that are presently inaccessible to us? Here I argue that a close examination of a particularly well-understood system--that of Escherichia coli chemotaxis--shows we are still a long way from a complete description. There is a level of molecular uncertainty, particularly that responsible for fine-tuning and adaptation to myriad external conditions, which we presently cannot resolve or reproduce on a computer. Moreover, the same uncertainty exists for any process in any organism and is especially pronounced and important in higher animals such as humans. Embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, immune recognition, memory formation, and survival in the real world, all depend on vast numbers of subtle variations in cell chemistry most of which are presently unknown or only poorly characterized. Overcoming these limitations will require us to not only accumulate large quantities of highly detailed data but also develop new computational methods able to recapitulate the massively parallel processing of living cells.

  2. Roessing Uranium Limited

    SciTech Connect

    1991-04-01

    The government of Namibia, celebrating the first anniversary (Marsh 21) of the country`s independence from South African rule, is looking to Roessing Uranium Limited (RUL) to improve the economic health of the country. RUL is Namibia`s largest employer, producer of one third of the country`s exports and 13 percent of its domestic product. The Roessing mine is the second largest uranium mine in the world, producing over 108 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} from 1976 through 1989, and still holding an estimated 322 million pounds in reserves. Yet Roessing is one of the lowest grade uranium deposits ever commercially exploited, with an average grade of only 0.035 w/o U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. To efficiently develop such a low-grade deposit, RUL uses extensive real-time cost analysis systems and has the highest rock production rate (ore plus waste) of any uranium mine in the world, over 300 thousand tons per day.

  3. Limited slip differential

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, K.; Torii, S.; Jindo, T.; Imaseki, T.

    1987-07-14

    This patent describes a limited slip differential for a vehicle comprising a casing adapted to be driven; a pair of side gears; a pinion gear retained within the casing and engaging the side gears to form a differential gear mechanism; a pinion mate shaft supporting pinion gear and having a cam portion; a pair of pressure rings retained within the casing having grooves engaged with the cam portion; a pair of friction clutches interposed between the pressure rings and the casing; and means for selectively applying a preload to the friction clutches through control of fluid pressure; a housing within which the casing is retained; a pair of roller bearings rotatably supporting the casing on the housing; and a pair of reaction plates having annular body portions mounted on the casing for movement axially of the casing but against rotation relative to same; each has a portion disposed outside of the casing and a portion projecting inside to engage corresponding one of the friction clutches; and one of the reaction plated rotatably supported on the housing and the other operatively connected to the means to receive a fluid pressure.

  4. 7 CFR 1400.204 - Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL REGULATIONS AND POLICIES PAYMENT LIMITATION AND PAYMENT ELIGIBILITY FOR 2009 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.204 Limited partnerships...

  5. Predictors for asthma at age 7 years for low-income children enrolled in the Childhood Asthma Prevention Study.

    PubMed

    Tamesis, Grace P; Covar, Ronina A; Strand, Matthew; Liu, Andrew H; Szefler, Stanley J; Klinnert, Mary D

    2013-03-01

    To identify the predictive factors of early childhood wheezing in children of low socioeconomic status. The Childhood Asthma Prevention Study enrolled 177 low-income children (9-24 months old) with frequent wheezing. At age 7 years, presence of asthma was assessed through caregiver reports of physician diagnosis of asthma (CRPDA) and corroborated by assessment of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR). Lung function, inflammatory markers, and asthma symptom severity were compared for children with ±CRPDA, ±BHR, and asthma. Baseline predictors for CRPDA, BHR, and asthma at 7 years of age were examined. Maternal symptom report strongly differentiated children with +CRPDA (49%) despite comparable airflow measurements (P < .0001), and spirometric lung function measurements were different for +BHR (65%) versus -BHR (P < .005). Univariate analyses revealed different baseline predictors of +CRPDA and +BHR for children at age 7 years. Higher levels of maternal psychological resources were associated with +CRPDA, but not +BHR. Only 39% of children with a history of frequent wheezing met the conservative definition of asthma at age 7 years, with the following significant predictors found: low birth weight, baseline symptom severity, and maternal psychological resources. This low-income, multi-ethnic group of wheezing infants represents a unique population of children with distinct characteristics and risks for persistent asthma. Determination of asthma status at 7 years of age required objective measurement of BHR in addition to CRPDA. The association of maternal psychological resources with +CRPDA may represent a previously unrecognized factor in the determination of asthma status among low-income groups. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictors for Asthma at Age 7 Years for Low-Income Children Enrolled in the Childhood Asthma Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Tamesis, Grace P; Covar, Ronina A; Strand, Matthew; Liu, Andrew H; Szefler, Stanley J.; Klinnert, Mary D

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify the predictive factors of early childhood wheezing in children of low socioeconomic status. Study design The Childhood Asthma Prevention Study (CAPS) enrolled 177 low-income children (9–24 months old) with frequent wheezing. At age 7 years, presence of asthma was assessed through caregiver reports of physician diagnosis of asthma (CRPDA) and corroborated by assessment of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR). Lung function, inflammatory markers, and asthma symptom severity were compared for children with ±CRPDA, ±BHR, and asthma. Baseline predictors for CRPDA, BHR and asthma at 7 years of age were examined. Results Maternal symptom report strongly differentiated children with +CRPDA (50%) despite comparable airflow measurements (p<0.0001), and spirometric lung function measurements were different for +BHR (65%) vs. −BHR (p<0.005). Univariate analyses revealed different baseline predictors of +CRPDA and +BHR for children at age 7 years. Higher levels of maternal psychological resources were associated with +CRPDA, but not +BHR. Only 39% of children with a history of frequent wheezing met the conservative definition of asthma at age 7 years, with the following significant predictors found: low birth weight, baseline symptom severity and maternal psychological resources. Conclusions This low-income, multi-ethnic group of wheezing infants represents a unique population of children with distinct characteristics and risks for persistent asthma. Determination of asthma status at 7 years of age required objective measurement of BHR in addition to CRPDA. The association of maternal psychological resources with +CRPDA may represent a previously unrecognized factor in determination of asthma status among low-income groups. PMID:23036483

  7. Organocatalytic Hydrophosphonylation Reaction of Carbonyl Groups.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Raquel P

    2017-02-07

    This revision is covering the limited examples reported for a pivotal strategy in the formation of C-P bonds such as the asymmetric organocatalytic hydrophosphonylation of carbonyl groups (Pudovik reaction). The scope and limitations, and the proposed mechanisms for the scarce different possibilities of asymmetric induction are also shown. The recent evolution and future trends of this undeveloped approach are commented.

  8. Confidence limits and their errors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran Raja

    2002-03-22

    Confidence limits are common place in physics analysis. Great care must be taken in their calculation and use especially in cases of limited statistics. We introduce the concept of statistical errors of confidence limits and argue that not only should limits be calculated but also their errors in order to represent the results of the analysis to the fullest. We show that comparison of two different limits from two different experiments becomes easier when their errors are also quoted. Use of errors of confidence limits will lead to abatement of the debate on which method is best suited to calculate confidence limits.

  9. The Group Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, John

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of group dynamics and leadership activities is a component of the CORE Standards for the Master's degree curriculum in Rehabilitation Counseling. A group experience is often included as a learning activity in rehabilitation counselor education curricula as an instructional method of imparting knowledge of group dynamics. Group experience…

  10. [Limits to euthanasia].

    PubMed

    de Kort, Susanne J

    2015-01-01

    A recent survey showed that less than half of Dutch physicians would find it conceivable to grant a request for euthanasia from a patient suffering from psychiatric disease or dementia, or who is tired of life. Because of a broader interpretation by the Regional Review Committees of the official criteria for due care, all recent cases of euthanasia in these specific groups of patients had been accepted. In this commentary it is argued that, following recent social developments in the Netherlands (including cuts in provision of care for the elderly and of mental health care, and a narrowed view about end-of-life issues), the official euthanasia criteria for due care are no longer suitable if we are to avoid a 'slippery slope' effect in cases such as those mentioned above. The criteria of a) a voluntary and well-considered request and b) absence of reasonable treatment alternatives are particularly under pressure. A plea is hold for a return to stricter interpretation of the criteria.

  11. New normal limits for the paediatric electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Rijnbeek, P R; Witsenburg, M; Schrama, E; Hess, J; Kors, J A

    2001-04-01

    Previous studies that determined the normal limits for the paediatric ECG had their imperfections: ECGs were recorded at a relatively low sampling rate, ECG measurements were conducted manually, or normal limits were presented for only a limited set of parameters. The aim of this study was to establish an up-to-date and complete set of clinically relevant normal limits for the paediatric ECG. ECGs from 1912 healthy Dutch children (age 11 days to 16 years) were recorded at a sampling rate of 1200 Hz. The digitally stored ECGs were analysed using a well-validated ECG computer program. The normal limits of all clinically relevant ECG measurements were determined for nine age groups. Clinically significant differences were shown to exist, compared with previously established normal limits. Sex differences could be demonstrated for QRS duration and several amplitude measurements. These new normal limits differ substantially from those commonly used and suggest that diagnostic criteria for the paediatric ECG should be adjusted. Copyright 2001 The European Society of Cardiology.

  12. Group Psychotherapy in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Ívarsson, Ómar

    2015-10-01

    In this overview of group psychotherapy in Iceland, an attempt will be made to describe how it is practiced today, give some glimpses into its earlier history, and clarify seven issues: (1) the standing of group psychotherapy in Iceland, its previous history, and the theoretical orientation of dynamic group therapy in the country; (2) the role of group therapy in the health care system; (3) how training in group therapy is organized; (4) the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice; (5) which issues/processes can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Iceland; and (6) how important are group-related issues within the social background of the country; and (7) what group work holds for the future.

  13. The refractive group.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C

    1997-06-01

    Spherocylindrical optical elements can be decomposed into a sphere-equivalent component and two cross-cylinder components, oriented at 45 degrees to one another. These components in turn can be represented with a simple matrix formalism. This matrix formalism allows it to be seen that the components also form members of an eight element group, designated the refractive group. The structure of this group is developed including its algebra and its representation with Cayley diagrams. The group is identified as the eight element dihedral group, D4, and is compared to another well-known eight element group, the quaternion group. An example is given using the group formal algebra to develop the transfer equations for spherocylindrical wavefronts. Certain properties of propagating spherocylindrical wavefronts, such as nonrotation of cylinder axes, are seen to come directly as consequences of the group properties.

  14. Force limit specifications vs. design limit loads in vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. Y.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the work presented herein is to discuss the results of force limit notching during vibration testing with respect to the traditional limit load design criteria. By using a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system approach, this work shows that with an appropriate force specification the notched response due to force limiting will result in loads comparable with the structural design limit criteria.

  15. The GROOP Effect: Groups Mimic Group Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jessica Chia-Chin; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Research on perception-action links has focused on an interpersonal level, demonstrating effects of observing individual actions on performance. The present study investigated perception-action matching at an inter-group level. Pairs of participants responded to hand movements that were performed by two individuals who used one hand each or they…

  16. CAPE: Automatically Predicting Changes in Group Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliva, Amy; Subrahmanian, V. S.; Martinez, Vanina; Simari, Gerardo

    There is now intense interest in the problem of forecasting what a group will do in the future. Past work [1, 2, 3] has built complex models of a group’s behavior and used this to predict what the group might do in the future. However, almost all past work assumes that the group will not change its past behavior. Whether the group is a group of investors, or a political party, or a terror group, there is much interest in when and how the group will change its behavior. In this paper, we develop an architecture and algorithms called CAPE to forecast the conditions under which a group will change its behavior. We have tested CAPE on social science data about the behaviors of seven terrorist groups and show that CAPE is highly accurate in its predictions—at least in this limited setting.

  17. Focus Groups with Linguistically Marginalized Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardi, Marco M.

    The focus group method has rapidly gained credibility among researchers in many fields, including public health researchers. The increased use of focus groups by public health researchers has underscored the demonstrable need for the capacity to apply this method of research among populations with limited abilities in or cultural resistance to…

  18. Leading Deep Conversations in Collaborative Inquiry Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Tamara Holmlund; Deuel, Angie; Slavit, David; Kennedy, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative inquiry groups, such as professional learning communities and lesson study groups, are proliferating in schools across the United States. In whatever form, the potential for impacting student learning through this collaborative work is expanded or limited by the nature of teachers' conversations. Polite, congenial conversations…

  19. GROUP C ARBOVIRUS INFECTIONS IN RHESUS MONKEYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    demonstrated by monkeys that recovered from one virus infection and challenged with related heterotypic viruses .... infected with any of the group C viruses used were limited to fevers, which were detected in only a few animals. Infections with these viruses appeared to...Macaca mulatta were found to be susceptible to infections with group C arboviruses following subcutaneous inoculation. Infections engendered by

  20. Getting to Grips with Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Rebecca; Coker, Jessica; McNamara, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    It is easy to take for granted that children often work together in groups unproblematically on practical science tasks. However, after a recent exercise in a small rural church school the authors realised that they had not considered fully the limitations they would encounter with group work. They had spent four one-hour sessions working with a…

  1. The group selection controversy.

    PubMed

    Leigh, E G

    2010-01-01

    Many thought Darwinian natural selection could not explain altruism. This error led Wynne-Edwards to explain sustainable exploitation in animals by selection against overexploiting groups. Williams riposted that selection among groups rarely overrides within-group selection. Hamilton showed that altruism can evolve through kin selection. How strongly does group selection influence evolution? Following Price, Hamilton showed how levels of selection interact: group selection prevails if Hamilton's rule applies. Several showed that group selection drove some major evolutionary transitions. Following Hamilton's lead, Queller extended Hamilton's rule, replacing genealogical relatedness by the regression on an actor's genotypic altruism of interacting neighbours' phenotypic altruism. Price's theorem shows the generality of Hamilton's rule. All instances of group selection can be viewed as increasing inclusive fitness of autosomal genomes. Nonetheless, to grasp fully how cooperation and altruism evolve, most biologists need more concrete concepts like kin selection, group selection and selection among individuals for their common good.

  2. Focus Group Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-01

    Time/Date: Unit: Session #: Focus Group Location: Number of Participants: Group Rank Makeup: Demographics (# by race, sex ): Use separate...Sexual Harassment (C) Sex Harassment Retaliation (D) Discrimination - Sex (E) Discrimination - Race (F) Discrimination - Disability (G

  3. Working with Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Joan, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes nine Canadian programs for counseling groups of students. Topics include introducing computer-assisted guidance, future challenges for counselors, sociometry, sexuality, parent counseling, reluctant students, shyness, peer groups, education for living, and guidance advisory committees. (JAC)

  4. What Makes Groups Tick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allcorn, Seth

    1985-01-01

    By reviewing this analysis of the behavior of both groups and individuals in groups, human resources managers can learn to tell whether committees, task forces, and departments may be encouraging or inhibiting the work they set out to do. (Author)

  5. Participants' Perception of Therapeutic Factors in Groups for Incest Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Inese; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated member-perceived curative factors in an incest-survivor group, comparing therapeutic factors reported in closed, time-limited incest survivor group to those in Bonney et al.'s open, long-term survivor group and to Yalom's therapy groups. Findings suggest that relative importance of curative factors may be related to group stages.…

  6. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the limits to open class performance. The contents include: 1) Standard Class; 2) 15m/Racing Class; 3) Open Class; and 4) Design Solutions associated with assumptions, limiting parameters, airfoil performance, current trends, and analysis.

  7. COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2013-01-01

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

  8. Identifying Chemical Groups for Biomonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Krowech, Gail; Hoover, Sara; Plummer, Laurel; Sandy, Martha; Zeise, Lauren; Solomon, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Regulatory agencies face daunting challenges identifying emerging chemical hazards because of the large number of chemicals in commerce and limited data on exposure and toxicology. Evaluating one chemical at a time is inefficient and can lead to replacement with uncharacterized chemicals or chemicals with structural features already linked to toxicity. The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) has developed a process for constructing and assessing chemical groups for potential biomonitoring in California. We screen for chemicals with significant exposure potential and propose possible chemical groups, based on structure and function. To support formal consideration of these groups by Biomonitoring California’s Scientific Guidance Panel, we conduct a detailed review of exposure and toxicity data and examine the likelihood of detection in biological samples. To date, 12 chemical groups have been constructed and added to the pool of chemicals that can be selected for Biomonitoring California studies, including p,p´-bisphenols, brominated and chlorinated organic compounds used as flame retardants, non-halogenated aromatic phosphates, and synthetic polycyclic musks. Evaluating chemical groups, rather than individual chemicals, is an efficient way to respond to shifts in chemical use and the emergence of new chemicals. This strategy can enable earlier identification of important chemicals for monitoring and intervention. PMID:27905275

  9. Internet Discussion Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Bull, Gina; Sigmon, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses newsgroups, listservs, and Web-based discussion groups. Highlights include major categories of international USENET discussion groups; newsgroups versus mailing lists; newsreaders; news servers; newsgroup subscriptions; newsgroups versus Web discussion groups; linking newsgroups, mailing lists, and the Web; and setting up a news host. A…

  10. Customizing Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine; Oxman, Elaine

    The group therapy context provides unparalleled opportunities for cost effective learning. However, within group meetings, therapists must strive to tailor psychological services to address the particular needs of individual patients. Creative means of customizing patients experiences within group are needed in order to address consumer needs…

  11. Parent Group Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parenting for High Potential, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This issue's "Parent Group Spotlight" features Deborah Simon, president of West Sound Gifted, Talented & Twice-Exceptional (WSGT2e), who started a parent group in Washington in 2013. In just one year, this small, but mighty group has held community forums, attended school board meetings, and helped influence local gifted programming.…

  12. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like a waste of parents' time and money, and she refused…

  13. Infant Group Care Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Earline D.

    Children under 3 years of age who are in group care face special health risks. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control indicate the existence of a causal relationship between infant group day care and certain diseases that are spread through contact at day care centers. Children in group care who are still in diapers are especially vulnerable to…

  14. Parent Group Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parenting for High Potential, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This issue's "Parent Group Spotlight" features Deborah Simon, president of West Sound Gifted, Talented & Twice-Exceptional (WSGT2e), who started a parent group in Washington in 2013. In just one year, this small, but mighty group has held community forums, attended school board meetings, and helped influence local gifted programming.…

  15. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like a waste of parents' time and money, and she refused…

  16. Practice and Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although learning has always been a central topic for philosophy of education, little attention has been paid to the notion of group learning. This article outlines and discusses some plausible examples of group learning. Drawing on these examples, various principles and issues that surround the notion of group learning are identified and…

  17. Practice and Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although learning has always been a central topic for philosophy of education, little attention has been paid to the notion of group learning. This article outlines and discusses some plausible examples of group learning. Drawing on these examples, various principles and issues that surround the notion of group learning are identified and…

  18. Spinning fluids: A group theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, Dario; Sarkar, Debajyoti

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a Lagrangian formulation of relativistic non-Abelian spinning fluids in group theory language. The corresponding Mathisson-Papapetrou equation for spinning fluids in terms of the reduction limit of the de Sitter group has been proposed. The equation we find correctly boils down to the one for nonspinning fluids. Two alternative approaches based on a group theoretical formulation of particle dynamics are also explored.

  19. Limit analysis of pipe clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Service Level D (faulted) load capacity of a conventional three-bolt pipe-clamp based upon the limit analysis method is presented. The load distribution, plastic hinge locations, and collapse load are developed for the lower bound limit load method. The results of the limit analysis are compared with the manufacturer's rated loads. 3 refs.

  20. Psychological Disorders and Functional Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brentar, John T.

    2008-01-01

    Psychological disorders lead to functional limitations that can impact a student's performance in school. These students are eligible for accommodations if they can demonstrate that a specific disability exists and that it substantially limits one or more major life activity. The most common functional limitations reported by this population…

  1. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Coit, William George [Bellaire, TX; Griffin, Peter Terry [Brixham, GB; Hamilton, Paul Taylor [Houston, TX; Hsu, Chia-Fu [Granada Hills, CA; Mason, Stanley Leroy [Allen, TX; Samuel, Allan James [Kular Lumpar, ML; Watkins, Ronnie Wade [Cypress, TX

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  2. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  3. Work group diversity.

    PubMed

    van Knippenberg, Daan; Schippers, Michaéla C

    2007-01-01

    Work group diversity, the degree to which there are differences between group members, may affect group process and performance positively as well as negatively. Much is still unclear about the effects of diversity, however. We review the 1997-2005 literature on work group diversity to assess the state of the art and to identify key issues for future research. This review points to the need for more complex conceptualizations of diversity, as well as to the need for more empirical attention to the processes that are assumed to underlie the effects of diversity on group process and performance and to the contingency factors of these processes.

  4. Spin line groups.

    PubMed

    Lazić, Nataša; Milivojević, Marko; Damnjanović, Milan

    2013-11-01

    Spin line groups describe the symmetries of spin arrangements in quasi-one-dimensional systems. These groups are derived for the first family of line groups. Among them, magnetic groups are singled out as a special case. Spin arrangements generated by the derived groups are first discussed for single-orbit systems and then the conclusions are extended to multi-orbit cases. The results are illustrated by the examples of a CuO2 zigzag chain, a (13)C nanotube and the hexaferrite Ba2Mg2Fe12O22. Applications to neutron diffraction and classical ground-state determination are indicated.

  5. Can the Teachers' Creativity Overcome Limited Computer Resources?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolov, Rumen; Sendova, Evgenia

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiences of the Research Group on Education (RGE) at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the Ministry of Education in using limited computer resources when teaching informatics. Topics discussed include group projects; the use of Logo; ability grouping; and out-of-class activities, including publishing a pupils' magazine. (13…

  6. 50 CFR 622.39 - Bag and possession limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vessel that verifies the length of the trip. (c) King and Spanish mackerel—(1) Bag limits. (i) Atlantic migratory group king mackerel— (A) Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic, other than off Florida—3. (B) Off... group king mackerel—2. (iii) Atlantic migratory group Spanish mackerel—15. (iv) Gulf migratory...

  7. 50 CFR 622.39 - Bag and possession limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... vessel that verifies the length of the trip. (c) King and Spanish mackerel—(1) Bag limits. (i) Atlantic migratory group king mackerel— (A) Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic, other than off Florida—3. (B) Off... group king mackerel—2. (iii) Atlantic migratory group Spanish mackerel—15. (iv) Gulf migratory...

  8. 50 CFR 622.39 - Bag and possession limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... vessel that verifies the length of the trip. (c) King and Spanish mackerel—(1) Bag limits. (i) Atlantic migratory group king mackerel— (A) Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic, other than off Florida—3. (B) Off... group king mackerel—2. (iii) Atlantic migratory group Spanish mackerel—15. (iv) Gulf migratory...

  9. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  10. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  11. Ionospheric limitations to time transfer by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    The ionosphere can contribute appreciable group delay and phase change to radio signals traversing it; this can constitute a fundamental limitation to the accuracy of time and frequency measurements using satellites. Because of the dispersive nature of the ionosphere, the amount of delay is strongly frequency-dependent. Ionospheric compensation is necessary for the most precise time transfer and frequency measurements, with a group delay accuracy better than 10 nanoseconds. A priori modeling is not accurate to better than 25%. The dual-frequency compensation method holds promise, but has not been rigorously experimentally tested. Irregularities in the ionosphere must be included in the compensation process.

  12. [A work group reviews the AIDS testing of selected groups].

    PubMed

    Albinus, S

    1988-02-01

    A working group of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) advisory group to the health administration of Denmark has been studying the advantages and disadvantages of routine tests of certain groups. One advantage of offering routine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) tests to all pregnant women is that it makes it possible to follow the course of the epidemic. Secondly, it makes it possible for an individual woman to get an abortion if she is HIV-positive. On the other hand, routine HIV tests may keep female drug addicts who do not wish to be tested out of the pregnancy health care system. A specific problem is the greater number of false positives among pregnant women that among other groups. Normally tests are repeated immediately and again several months later if a new test is ambiguous but this possibility does not apply to pregnant women since the time limit for having an abortion will be exceeded. Still another advantage of offering routine HIV tests to pregnant women is that it will contribute to making HIV tests more routine, which will generally be an advantage to the AIDS campaign. A tentative conclusion is that it will be more productive to have routine HIV tests in venereal disease clinics where there is a higher percentage of population at risk.

  13. Group problems in problem-based learning.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Graham D; Ryan, Greg; Harris, Jennifer

    2003-11-01

    Successful small-group learning in problem-based learning (PBL) educational programmes relies on functional group processes. However, there has been limited research on PBL group problems, and no studies have been conducted on problems as perceived by both students and tutors in the same educational context. The authors investigated PBL group problems in a graduate-entry medical programme, and report the most common group problems, and those that hinder students' learning the most. The possible causes of individual quietness and dominant behaviour, and potential influences that group problems may have on the tutorial process are summarized in an exploratory model of PBL group dysfunction that could be used to guide further research. Specifically, there is a need for further evidence on which to base guidelines for tutors and students to effectively manage group problems.

  14. Thermal Control Working Group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslett, Robert; Mahefkey, E. Thomas

    1986-01-01

    The Thermal Control Working Group limited its evaluation to issues associated with Earth orbiting and planetary spacecraft with power levels up to 50 kW. It was concluded that the space station technology is a necessary precursor but does not meet S/C 2000 needs (life, high heat flux, long term cryogenics, and survivability). Additional basic and applied research are required (fluid/materials compatibility and two phase system modeling). Scaling, the key issue, must define accelerated life test criteria. The two phase systems require 0g to 1 g correlation. Additional ground test beds are required and combined space environment tests of materials.

  15. Interference and memory capacity limitations.

    PubMed

    Endress, Ansgar D; Szabó, Szilárd

    2017-10-01

    Working memory (WM) is thought to have a fixed and limited capacity. However, the origins of these capacity limitations are debated, and generally attributed to active, attentional processes. Here, we show that the existence of interference among items in memory mathematically guarantees fixed and limited capacity limits under very general conditions, irrespective of any processing assumptions. Assuming that interference (a) increases with the number of interfering items and (b) brings memory performance to chance levels for large numbers of interfering items, capacity limits are a simple function of the relative influence of memorization and interference. In contrast, we show that time-based memory limitations do not lead to fixed memory capacity limitations that are independent of the timing properties of an experiment. We show that interference can mimic both slot-like and continuous resource-like memory limitations, suggesting that these types of memory performance might not be as different as commonly believed. We speculate that slot-like WM limitations might arise from crowding-like phenomena in memory when participants have to retrieve items. Further, based on earlier research on parallel attention and enumeration, we suggest that crowding-like phenomena might be a common reason for the 3 major cognitive capacity limitations. As suggested by Miller (1956) and Cowan (2001), these capacity limitations might arise because of a common reason, even though they likely rely on distinct processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. [Severe limitation of mouth opening].

    PubMed

    Reiter, S; Winocur, E; Gavish, A; Eli, I

    2004-10-01

    Limitation of mouth opening is a common source of referral to an orofacial pain clinic with a proposed diagnosis of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMD). The word "trismus" is defined by the American academy of orofacial pain as: "Myospasm of masticatory muscles specifically causing limited jaw opening; early symptom of tetanus". Therefore, once trismus is suspected, TMD should be ruled out. However, it is not uncommon to find the usage of this term to describe severe limitation of opening by causes other than myospasm, therefore posing the risk of misdiagnosis. The purpose of this article is to describe the differential diagnosis of hard end limitation of opening with emphasis on the clinical tools used to differentiate between muscle source of hard end limitation and other sources of hard end limitation. Several cases of hard end limitation of mouth opening are presented and through them major principles of orofacial diagnosis are discussed.

  17. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry.

    PubMed

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  18. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    PubMed Central

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S.; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly. PMID:22291513

  19. Setting Win Limits: An Alternative Approach to "Responsible Gambling"?

    PubMed

    Walker, Douglas M; Litvin, Stephen W; Sobel, Russell S; St-Pierre, Renée A

    2015-09-01

    Social scientists, governments, and the casino industry have all emphasized the need for casino patrons to "gamble responsibly." Strategies for responsible gambling include self-imposed time limits and loss limits on gambling. Such strategies help prevent people from losing more than they can afford and may help prevent excessive gambling behavior. Yet, loss limits also make it more likely that casino patrons leave when they are losing. Oddly, the literature makes no mention of "win limits" as a potential approach to responsible gambling. A win limit would be similar to a loss limit, except the gambler would leave the casino upon reaching a pre-set level of winnings. We anticipate that a self-imposed win limit will reduce the gambler's average loss and, by default, also reduce the casino's profit. We test the effect of a self-imposed win limit by running slot machine simulations in which the treatment group of players has self-imposed and self-enforced win and loss limits, while the control group has a self-imposed loss limit or no limit. We find that the results conform to our expectations: the win limit results in improved player performance and reduced casino profits. Additional research is needed, however, to determine whether win limits could be a useful component of a responsible gambling strategy.

  20. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress.

  1. Exercise Ventilatory Limitation: The Role Of Expiratory Flow Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Babb, Tony G.

    2012-01-01

    Ventilatory limitation to exercise remains an important unresolved clinical issue; as a result, many individuals misinterpret the effects of expiratory flow limitation as an all-or-nothing phenomenon. Expiratory flow limitation is not all-or-none; approaching maximal expiratory flow can have important effects not only on ventilatory capacity but also on breathing mechanics, ventilatory control, and possibly exertional dyspnea and exercise intolerance. PMID:23038244

  2. Thermodynamic limit for coherence-limited solar power conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashaal, Heylal; Gordon, Jeffrey M.

    2014-09-01

    The spatial coherence of solar beam radiation is a key constraint in solar rectenna conversion. Here, we present a derivation of the thermodynamic limit for coherence-limited solar power conversion - an expansion of Landsberg's elegant basic bound, originally limited to incoherent converters at maximum flux concentration. First, we generalize Landsberg's work to arbitrary concentration and angular confinement. Then we derive how the values are further lowered for coherence-limited converters. The results do not depend on a particular conversion strategy. As such, they pertain to systems that span geometric to physical optics, as well as classical to quantum physics. Our findings indicate promising potential for solar rectenna conversion.

  3. Immersive group-to-group telepresence.

    PubMed

    Beck, Stephan; Kunert, André; Kulik, Alexander; Froehlich, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    We present a novel immersive telepresence system that allows distributed groups of users to meet in a shared virtual 3D world. Our approach is based on two coupled projection-based multi-user setups, each providing multiple users with perspectively correct stereoscopic images. At each site the users and their local interaction space are continuously captured using a cluster of registered depth and color cameras. The captured 3D information is transferred to the respective other location, where the remote participants are virtually reconstructed. We explore the use of these virtual user representations in various interaction scenarios in which local and remote users are face-to-face, side-by-side or decoupled. Initial experiments with distributed user groups indicate the mutual understanding of pointing and tracing gestures independent of whether they were performed by local or remote participants. Our users were excited about the new possibilities of jointly exploring a virtual city, where they relied on a world-in-miniature metaphor for mutual awareness of their respective locations.

  4. Ecological diversification in the Bacillus cereus Group.

    PubMed

    Guinebretière, Marie-Hélène; Thompson, Fabiano L; Sorokin, Alexei; Normand, Philippe; Dawyndt, Peter; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Svensson, Birgitta; Sanchis, Vincent; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Vos, Paul

    2008-04-01

    The Bacillus cereus Group comprises organisms that are widely distributed in the environment and are of health and economic interest. We demonstrate an 'ecotypic' structure of populations in the B. cereus Group using (i) molecular data from Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism patterns, ribosomal gene sequences, partial panC gene sequences, 'psychrotolerant' DNA sequence signatures and (ii) phenotypic and descriptive data from range of growth temperature, psychrotolerance and thermal niches. Seven major phylogenetic groups (I to VII) were thus identified, with ecological differences that provide evidence for a multiemergence of psychrotolerance in the B. cereus Group. A moderate thermotolerant group (VII) was basal to the mesophilic group I, from which in turn distinct thermal lineages have emerged, comprising two mesophilic groups (III, IV), an intermediate group (V) and two psychrotolerant groups (VI, II). This stepwise evolutionary transition toward psychrotolerance was particularly well illustrated by the relative abundance of the 'psychrotolerant' rrs signature (as defined by Pruss et al.) copies accumulated in strains that varied according to the phylogenetic group. The 'psychrotolerant' cspA signature (as defined by Francis et al.) was specific to group VI and provided a useful way to differentiate it from the psychrotolerant group II. This study illustrates how adaptation to novel environments by the modification of temperature tolerance limits has shaped historical patterns of global ecological diversification in the B. cereus Group. The implications for the taxonomy of this Group and for the human health risk are discussed.

  5. Big Sunspot Group

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-26

    A large group of sunspots that rotated across the Sun over six days (Aug. 21-26, 2015) started out as a single cluster, but gradually separated into distinct groups. This region produced several M-class (medium-sized) flares. These were the only significant spots on the Sun during this period. The still image shows the separated group as it appeared on Aug. 26., 2015. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19876

  6. What's your group worth?

    PubMed

    Greenberg, M R

    1986-01-01

    With the advent of acquisitions and mergers of healthcare organizations, it has become necessary for medical group practices to know what they are worth. The traditional balance sheet valuation ignores what is perhaps the most important consideration of all: a group's earning potential. Discussed in this article are the many facets of the complex valuation process, including both tangible and intangible assets, and the author provides a method for adequately determining a range of values for a medical group.

  7. E-Group Arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylesworth, Grant R.

    Group E at Uaxactún has long been considered an ancient Maya observatory in which an observer could see the sun rise along architectural alignments at the solstices and equinoxes. E-Groups named for the architectural complex list identified in Group E at Uaxactún, typically consist of a large radial pyramid on their west side and three temples on a raised platform on their east side.

  8. Determination of the Limiting Magnitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingery, Aaron; Blaauw, Rhiannon

    2017-01-01

    The limiting magnitude of an optical camera system is an important property to understand since it is used to find the completeness limit of observations. Limiting magnitude depends on the hardware and software of the system, current weather conditions, and the angular speed of the objects observed. If an object exhibits a substantial angular rate during the exposure, its light spreads out over more pixels than the stationary stars. This spreading causes the limiting magnitude to be brighter when compared to the stellar limiting magnitude. The effect, which begins to become important when the object moves a full width at half max during a single exposure or video frame. For targets with high angular speeds or camera systems with narrow field of view or long exposures, this correction can be significant, up to several magnitudes. The stars in an image are often used to measure the limiting magnitude since they are stationary, have known brightness, and are present in large numbers, making the determination of the limiting magnitude fairly simple. In order to transform stellar limiting magnitude to object limiting magnitude, a correction must be applied accounting for the angular velocity. This technique is adopted in meteor and other fast-moving object observations, as the lack of a statistically significant sample of targets makes it virtually impossible to determine the limiting magnitude before the weather conditions change. While the weather is the dominant factor in observing satellites, the limiting magnitude for meteors also changes throughout the night due to the motion of a meteor shower or sporadic source radiant across the sky. This paper presents methods for determining the limiting stellar magnitude and the conversion to the target limiting magnitude.

  9. EXPERIMENTS IN GROUP PREDICTION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GROUP DYNAMICS, *ATTITUDES(PSYCHOLOGY)), (*PREDICTIONS, ACCURACY), PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION MAKING, CONFORMITY , QUESTIONNAIRES, EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN, SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, FEEDBACK, RELIABILITY, STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

  10. Group Sparse Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junming; Chen, Xi; Xing, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of sparse variable selection in nonparametric additive models, with the prior knowledge of the structure among the covariates to encourage those variables within a group to be selected jointly. Previous works either study the group sparsity in the parametric setting (e.g., group lasso), or address the problem in the nonparametric setting without exploiting the structural information (e.g., sparse additive models). In this paper, we present a new method, called group sparse additive models (GroupSpAM), which can handle group sparsity in additive models. We generalize the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm to Hilbert spaces as the sparsity-inducing penalty in GroupSpAM. Moreover, we derive a novel thresholding condition for identifying the functional sparsity at the group level, and propose an efficient block coordinate descent algorithm for constructing the estimate. We demonstrate by simulation that GroupSpAM substantially outperforms the competing methods in terms of support recovery and prediction accuracy in additive models, and also conduct a comparative experiment on a real breast cancer dataset.

  11. Brucellosis in Occupationally Exposed Groups

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Annapurna G.; Mohite, Shivajirao T.; Gajul, Shivali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In India, high incidence of human brucellosis may be expected, as the conditions conducive for human brucellosis exist. Limited studies have been undertaken on human brucellosis especially in occupationally-exposed groups. Aim To estimate prevalence of anti-brucellar antibodies, evaluate the clinical manifestations, risk factors and Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) levels about brucellosis among occupationally exposed groups. Materials and Methods Blood samples were collected from 2337 occupationally exposed individuals. The serum samples were screened for the presence of anti-brucellar antibodies by Rose Bengal Plate Test (RBPT), Serum Agglutination Test (SAT) and 2-Mercaptoethanol test (2-ME). Clinical manifestations, risk factors and KAP levels were evaluated by personal interview using a structured questionnaire. Results Seroprevalence of brucellosis by RBPT, SAT and 2-ME test was 9.46%, 4.45% and 3.64 % respectively. Clinical symptoms resembling brucellosis were seen in 91 subjects. The major risk factors were animal exposure in veterinarians and abattoirs, both animal exposure and raw milk ingestion in farmers and shepherds, exposure to raw milk and its ingestion in dairy workers and exposure to Brucella culture in laboratory workers. Except laboratory workers, few veterinarians and dairy workers none had heard about brucellosis. KAP levels regarding brucellosis were too poor in all the groups except laboratory workers. Conclusion Brucellosis most of the times was missed or misdiagnosed. Regular screenings for brucellosis and awareness programmes to increase KAP levels are necessary to control brucellosis in occupationally exposed groups. PMID:27190804

  12. Recursive adaptive frame integration limited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Michael K.

    2006-05-01

    Recursive Frame Integration Limited was proposed as a way to improve frame integration performance and mitigate issues related to high data rate needed for conventional frame integration. The technique applies two thresholds - one tuned for optimum probability of detection, the other to manage required false alarm rate - and allows a non-linear integration process that, along with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) gain, provides system designers more capability where cost, weight, or power considerations limit system data rate, processing, or memory capability. However, Recursive Frame Integration Limited may have performance issues when single frame SNR is really low. Recursive Adaptive Frame Integration Limited is proposed as a means to improve limited integration performance with really low single frame SNR. It combines the benefits of nonlinear recursive limited frame integration and adaptive thresholds with a kind of conventional frame integration.

  13. Peer Groups as a Context for School Misconduct: The Moderating Role of Group Interactional Style.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wendy; Zarbatany, Lynne; Chen, Xinyin; Kinal, Megan; Boyko, Lisa

    2017-01-20

    Peer group interactional style was examined as a moderator of the relation between peer group school misconduct and group members' school misconduct. Participants were 705 students (Mage  = 11.59 years, SD = 1.37) in 148 peer groups. Children reported on their school misconduct in fall and spring. In the winter, group members were observed in a limited-resource task and a group conversation task, and negative and positive group interactional styles were assessed. Multilevel modeling indicated that membership in groups that were higher on school misconduct predicted greater school misconduct only when the groups were high on negative or low on positive interactional style. Results suggest that negative laughter and a coercive interactional style may intensify group effects on children's misconduct.

  14. Assurance Limits for Vulnerable Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    IN» At) Ml* 11(t RIA-80-U373 TECHNICAL LffiRARY AD* 0/4, "Wfr NWSC/CR/RDTR-10 ASSURANCE LIMITS FOR 5 0712 01001493 3 VULNERABLE AREA...ASSURANCE LIMITS FOR VULNERABLE AREA DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES OF VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF FY 75 ASSESSMENT...RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtltla) ASSURANCE LIMITS FOR VULNERABLE AREA B. TYPE OF REPORT * PERIOD COVERED 1. AUTHORS

  15. LANGUAGE IDENTIFICATION IN THE LIMIT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    identified in the limit if these guesses are the same and correct after some finite time. Six variations of each of the two basic identification situations...are considered. It was found that identification from informant is powerful enough to identify in the limit primitive recursive languages, which...include contextfree languages. Use of textual information, however, is so weak that not even regular languages are limiting identifiable. (Author)

  16. Group Oral Exams: Exploring Assessment Techniques for New Instructional Paradigms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandeville, Thomas F.; Menchaca, Velma

    1994-01-01

    Describes how a group oral final exam was designed and administered in a block of two teacher education courses taught within the social constructivist perspective. Advocates such group oral exam practices as consistent with valid assessment guidelines. Discusses limitations. (HB)

  17. Learning Through Group Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottaway, A.K.C.

    This book recounts experiments with small groups of social workers and teachers who came together in order to improve their understanding of human relations and personality development. The technique employed can be called non-directive tutoring, and is a type of group-centered discussion. The role of the leader is to clarify and interpret what is…

  18. Group Work with Widows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toth, Andre; Toth, Susan

    1980-01-01

    Describes a group therapy program for recently widowed females, whose purpose was to allow individuals to share with each other the meaning of widowhood. A sense of group identity evolved which helped the women develop insight and courage to deal effectively with their situation. (Author/HLM)

  19. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  20. Democratic Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Erik K.; Tate, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, democratic values have called for abandoning coercive approaches and teaching children and youth to be responsible citizens. The authors explore strategies for creating respectful environments and positive group cultures with challenging youth. They offer suggestions to adult group facilitators to support youth in developing…

  1. User Working Group Members

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-29

    User Working Group Members   Mail for the entire group may be directed to:  larc-asdc-uwg@lists.nasa.gov   Member Status Affiliation E-mail Contact Bob Holz (Co-Chair in 2010) Co-Chair University of ...

  2. Fairness and Ability Grouping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Kenneth A.

    1983-01-01

    A recent controversy regarding ability grouping is that it is often perceived as a means whereby racial or class bias can be subtly transformed into mechanisms of discrimination which exhibit the appearance of fairness and objectivity. This article addresses the question of fairness in ability grouping. (CJB)

  3. Beam dynamics group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper summarizes the activities of the beam dynamics working group of the LHC Collective Effects Workshop that was held in Montreux in 1994. It reviews the presentations that were made to the group, the discussions that ensued, and the consensuses that evolved.

  4. GROUP VERSUS INDIVIDUAL MEASURES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRISMEN, DONALD A.

    THE AUTHOR STATES THAT INFORMATION LOSS IN CURRICULUM EVALUATION IS RELATED TO THE ASSUMPTION THAT GROUP MEASURES AND AVERAGES OF INDIVIDUAL MEASURES ARE INTERCHANGEABLE IN YIELDING IDENTICAL INFORMATION. TYPES OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL MEASURES ARE LISTED. THE AUTHOR DISCUSSES ONE OF THESE TYPES OF RELATIONSHIPS, SPECIFICALLY,…

  5. Major Environmental Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleishman, Terry

    1978-01-01

    The development and present activities of nine environmental groups are discussed. Groups included are the National Audubon Society, Sierra Club, American Forestry Association, National Parks and Conservation Association, Wilderness Society, Izaak Walton League, National Wildlife Federation, Friends of the Earth, and Defenders of Wildlife. (MR)

  6. Topologies on Abelian Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyuk, E. G.; Protasov, I. V.

    1991-04-01

    A filter phi on an abelian group G is called a T-filter if there exists a Hausdorff group topology under which phi converges to zero. G{phi} will denote the group G with the largest topology among those making phi converge to zero. This method of defining a group topology is completely equivalent to the definition of an abstract group by defining relations. We shall obtain characterizations of T-filters and of T-sequences; among these, we shall pay particular attention to T-sequences on the integers. The method of T-sequences will be used to construct a series of counterexamples for several open problems in topological algebra. For instance there exists, on every infinite abelian group, a topology distinguishing between sequentiality and the Fréchet-Urysohn property (this solves a problem posed by V.I. Malykhin) we also find a topology on the group of integers admitting no nontrivial continuous character, thus solving a problem of Nienhuys. We show also that on every infinite abelian group there exists a free ultrafilter which is not a T-ultrafilter.

  7. Democratic Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Erik K.; Tate, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, democratic values have called for abandoning coercive approaches and teaching children and youth to be responsible citizens. The authors explore strategies for creating respectful environments and positive group cultures with challenging youth. They offer suggestions to adult group facilitators to support youth in developing…

  8. Reading Groups: Problems, Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Jim

    The practice of grouping children of similar ability for reading instruction is as much a part of the classroom as the chalkboard, yet for decades research into classroom practice has raised serious questions about ability grouping. A research project using the meta-analysis approach to analyze more than 50 research studies concluded that ability…

  9. Group Work. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  10. Perceiving persons and groups.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D L; Sherman, S J

    1996-04-01

    This article analyzes the similarities and differences in forming impressions of individuals and in developing conceptions of groups. In both cases, the perceiver develops a mental conception of the target (individual or group) on the basis of available information and uses that information to make judgments about that person or group. However, a review of existing evidence reveals differences in the outcomes of impressions formed of individual and group targets, even when those impressions are based on the very same behavioral information. A model is proposed to account for these differences. The model emphasizes the role of differing expectancies of unity and coherence in individual and group targets, which in turn engage different mechanisms for processing information and making judgments. Implications of the model are discussed.

  11. Quality Control in Small Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, L. F.

    2008-11-01

    The smallness of some groups in a set up to control the quality of a service using questionnaires limits the size of the samples, this limitation has several consequences. Indeed the common approach used for relatively large groups, based on the central limit theorem and the law of large numbers, cannot be used anymore to construct estimators for the parameters of the model. Using an inverse probability will lift these restrictions. A questionnaire is a collection of items. In an item the respondent indicates on a Likert scale his or her agreement with a statement. Dimensions are a set of items dealing with one aspect of the service. In a questionnaire several dimensions are addressed but usually the items are presented in a random sequence. The model for an item is hierarchical with following components: a multivariate hypergeometric model takes the sampling in a finite population into account, the multinomial serves as a prior for the sampling and the Dirichlet-distribution serves as a prior for the multinomials. The composition of dimensions allows to use the posterior for one of the items as a prior for another item of that dimension and so on. After analysis of several questionnaires using this model, the reliability of the responses from some respondents turned out to be a key-problem, in the sense the responses can be classified into at least two classes and a decision rule had to be developed to neglect some of them. The influence of rejecting some answers, on the confidence for the most plausible statement can be estimated. This leads often to the result that there is only minimal evidence for the most probable statement.

  12. Computations of Eisenstein series on Fuchsian groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelin, Helen

    2008-09-01

    We present numerical investigations of the value distribution and distribution of Fourier coefficients of the Eisenstein series E(z;s) on arithmetic and non-arithmetic Fuchsian groups. Our numerics indicate a Gaussian limit value distribution for a real-valued rotation of E(z;s) as operatorname{Re} sD1/2 , operatorname{Im} sto infty and also, on non-arithmetic groups, a complex Gaussian limit distribution for E(z;s) when operatorname{Re} s>1/2 near 1/2 and operatorname{Im} sto infty , at least if we allow operatorname{Re} sto 1/2 at some rate. Furthermore, on non-arithmetic groups and for fixed s with operatorname{Re} s ge 1/2 near 1/2 , our numerics indicate a Gaussian limit distribution for the appropriately normalized Fourier coefficients.

  13. Chunk Limits and Length Limits in Immediate Recall: A Reconciliation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhijian; Cowan, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Whereas some research on immediate recall of verbal lists has suggested that it is limited by the number of chunks that can be recalled (e.g., Tulving & Patkau, 1962; Cowan, Chen, & Rouder, 2004), other research has suggested that it is limited by the length of the material to be recalled (e.g., Baddeley, Thomson, & Buchanan, 1975). We investigated this question by teaching new paired associations between words to create two-word chunks. The results suggest that both chunk capacity limits and length limits come into play. For the free recall of 12-word lists, 6 pre-learned pairs could be recalled about as well as 6 pre-exposed singletons, suggesting a chunk limit. However, for the serially-ordered recall of 8-word lists, 4 pre-learned pairs could be recalled about as well as 8 pre-exposed singletons, suggesting a length limit. Other conditions yielded intermediate results suggesting that sometimes both limits may operate together. PMID:16393043

  14. Equivalence of superspace groups

    PubMed Central

    van Smaalen, Sander; Campbell, Branton J.; Stokes, Harold T.

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm is presented which determines the equivalence of two settings of a (3 + d)-dimensional superspace group (d = 1, 2, 3). The algorithm has been implemented as a web tool on , providing the transformation of any user-given superspace group to the standard setting of this superspace group in . It is shown how the standard setting of a superspace group can be directly obtained by an appropriate transformation of the external-space lattice vectors (the basic structure unit cell) and a transformation of the internal-space lattice vectors (new modulation wavevectors are linear combinations of old modulation wavevectors plus a three-dimensional reciprocal-lattice vector). The need for non-standard settings in some cases and the desirability of employing standard settings of superspace groups in other cases are illustrated by an analysis of the symmetries of a series of compounds, comparing published and standard settings and the transformations between them. A compilation is provided of standard settings of compounds with two- and three-dimensional modulations. The problem of settings of superspace groups is discussed for incommensurate composite crystals and for chiral superspace groups. PMID:23250064

  15. Equivalence of superspace groups.

    PubMed

    van Smaalen, Sander; Campbell, Branton J; Stokes, Harold T

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm is presented which determines the equivalence of two settings of a (3 + d)-dimensional superspace group (d = 1, 2, 3). The algorithm has been implemented as a web tool findssg on SSG(3+d)D, providing the transformation of any user-given superspace group to the standard setting of this superspace group in SSG(3+d)D. It is shown how the standard setting of a superspace group can be directly obtained by an appropriate transformation of the external-space lattice vectors (the basic structure unit cell) and a transformation of the internal-space lattice vectors (new modulation wavevectors are linear combinations of old modulation wavevectors plus a three-dimensional reciprocal-lattice vector). The need for non-standard settings in some cases and the desirability of employing standard settings of superspace groups in other cases are illustrated by an analysis of the symmetries of a series of compounds, comparing published and standard settings and the transformations between them. A compilation is provided of standard settings of compounds with two- and three-dimensional modulations. The problem of settings of superspace groups is discussed for incommensurate composite crystals and for chiral superspace groups.

  16. Modification of Amino Groups.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Kieran F

    2016-11-01

    Chemical modification of amino groups in proteins serves a diversity of preparative and analytical purposes. The most prominent is to attach nonpeptide groups with useful properties to proteins. Examples of these groups include biotin for affinity capture and fluorescent dyes for detectability. A widely applied chemistry, and one for which many reagents are available, is reaction of the activated ester of a carboxylic acid (often a succinimidyl ester) with amino groups at mildly basic pH. Reductive alkylation using a carbonyl compound and a hydride-donating reducing agent is another valued reaction with multiple applications. Most proteins contain more than one amino group, so the extent of reaction desired must be considered in advance and the result assessed experimentally after the fact. The distinctive environment of the α-amino group of a polypeptide sets it apart from the ϵ-amino groups of lysine side chains, and can afford useful specificity. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  18. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  19. The limits of crop productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, Bruce; Monje, Oscar

    1992-01-01

    The component processes that govern yield limits in food crops are reviewed and how each process can be individually measured is described. The processes considered include absorption of photosynthetic radiation by green tissue, carbon-fixation efficiency in photosynthesis, carbon use efficiency in respiration, biomass allocation to edible products, and efficiency of photosynthesis and respiration. The factors limiting yields in optimal environments are considered.

  20. New Limit on CPT Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; Marriner, J.; Martens, M.; Ray, R. E.; Streets, J.; Wester, W.; Hu, M.; Snow, G. R.; Armstrong, T.; Buchanan, C.

    2000-01-24

    A search for antiproton decay has been made at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. Limits are placed on fifteen antiproton decay modes. The results are used to place limits on the characteristic mass scale m{sub X} that could be associated with CPT violation accompanied by baryon number violation. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  1. Tachyons in the Galilean limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle, Carles; Gomis, Joaquim; Mezincescu, Luca; Townsend, Paul K.

    2017-04-01

    The Souriau massless Galilean particle of "colour" k and spin s is shown to be the Galilean limit of the Souriau tachyon of mass m = ik and spin s. We compare and contrast this result with the Galilean limit of the Nambu-Goto string and Green-Schwarz superstring.

  2. STOCHASTIC POINT PROCESSES: LIMIT THEOREMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A stochastic point process in R(n) is a triple (M,B,P) where M is the class of all countable sets in R(n) having no limit points, B is the smallest...converge to a mixture of Poisson processes. These results are established via a generalization of a classical limit theorem for Bernoulli trials. (Author)

  3. DISARMAMENT FAILURE AND WEAPONS LIMITATIONS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The American goal of complete nuclear disarmament is discussed. The major American proposals in the field of nuclear disarmament and limitations ...since 1946 are reviewed, and the causes for the failure of these proposals are examined. A policy of limitations on the use of nuclear weapons is suggested.

  4. The limits of crop productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, Bruce; Monje, Oscar

    1992-01-01

    The component processes that govern yield limits in food crops are reviewed and how each process can be individually measured is described. The processes considered include absorption of photosynthetic radiation by green tissue, carbon-fixation efficiency in photosynthesis, carbon use efficiency in respiration, biomass allocation to edible products, and efficiency of photosynthesis and respiration. The factors limiting yields in optimal environments are considered.

  5. Delving into Limits of Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Beth; Smith, Ken W.

    2011-01-01

    Limits are foundational to the central concepts of calculus. However, the authors' experiences with students and educational research abound with examples of students' misconceptions about limits and infinity. The authors wanted calculus students to understand, appreciate, and enjoy their first introduction to advanced mathematical thought. Thus,…

  6. Interpreting Recruitment Limitation in Forests

    Treesearch

    J.S. Clark; B. Beckage; P. Camill; B. Cleveland; J. HilleRisLambers; J. Lichter; J. McLachlan; J. Mohan; P. Wyckoff

    1999-01-01

    Studies of tree recruitment are many, but they provide few general insights into the role of recruitment limitation for population dynamics. That role depends on the vital rates (transitions) from seed production to sapling stages and on overall population growth. To determine the state of our understanding of recruitment limitation we examined how well we can estimate...

  7. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  8. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  9. Beam-limiting and radiation-limiting interlocks

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.

    1996-04-01

    This paper reviews several aspects of beam-limiting and radiation- limiting interlocks used for personnel protection at high-intensity accelerators. It is based heavily on the experience at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) where instrumentation-based protection is used extensively. Topics include the need for ``active`` protection systems, system requirements, design criteria, and means of achieving and assessing acceptable reliability. The experience with several specific devices (ion chamber-based beam loss interlock, beam current limiter interlock, and neutron radiation interlock) designed and/or deployed to these requirements and criteria is evaluated.

  10. Groups and Violence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavnani, Ravi; Miodownik, Dan; Riolo, Rick

    Violence can take place along a multitude of cleavages, e.g., (1) between political groups like the Kach Movement, pitting West Bank settlers against Israeli governments supporting the land-for-peace agenda; (2) between religious groups, such as Christians and Muslims in the Nigerian cities of Jos and Kaduna; (3) along class lines, as in India between Dalits and members of the Brahminical upper castes, upwardly mobile intermediate castes, and even other backward castes such as the Thevars; and (4) between ethnic groups such as the Hutu and Tutsi, both within and across state boundaries in Rwanda and neighboring Burundi.

  11. Conformal Carroll groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2014-08-01

    Conformal extensions of Lévy-Leblond's Carroll group, based on geometric properties analogous to those of Newton-Cartan space-time are proposed. The extensions are labeled by an integer k. This framework includes and extends our recent study of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) and Newman-Unti (NU) groups. The relation to conformal Galilei groups is clarified. Conformal Carroll symmetry is illustrated by ‘Carrollian photons’. Motion both in the Newton-Cartan and Carroll spaces may be related to that of strings in the Bargmann space.

  12. [Group health care].

    PubMed

    Hermida, C

    1986-01-01

    The transition from individual to group health care entails a response to multidisciplinary scientific systems, the enlistment of community participation, and an effort to make the professionals aware of the need to work as a team. The author points to the need to change the information system so that the professional-to-be will acquire a mentality and method of work appropriate for group care. In the architecture of service facilities structural changes must also be provided for the care of groups rather than individuals. In short, the change entails a review of all the elements of care.

  13. Force Limited Vibration Testing Monograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The practice of limiting the shaker force in vibration tests was investigated at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1990 after the mechanical failure of an aerospace component during a vibration test. Now force limiting is used in almost every major vibration test at JPL and in many vibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at many aerospace contractors. The basic ideas behind force limiting have been in the literature for several decades, but the piezo-electric force transducers necessary to conveniently implement force limiting have been available only in the last decade. In 1993, funding was obtained from the NASA headquarters Office of Chief Engineer to develop and document the technology needed to establish force limited vibration testing as a standard approach available to all NASA centers and aerospace contractors. This monograph is the final report on that effort and discusses the history, theory, and applications of the method in some detail.

  14. LANSCE Beam Current Limiter (XL)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an engineered safety system that provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated proton beams. The Beam Current Limiter (XL), as an active component of the RSS, limits the maximum average current in a beamline, thus the current available for a beam spill accident. Exceeding the pre-set limit initiates action by the RSS to mitigate the hazard (insertion of beam stoppers in the low energy beam transport). The beam limiter is an electrically isolated, toroidal transformer and associated electronics. The device was designed to continuously monitor beamline currents independent of any external timing. Fail-safe operation was a prime consideration in its development. Fail-safe operation is defined as functioning as intended (due to redundant circuitry), functioning with a more sensitive fault threshold, or generating a fault condition. This report describes the design philosophy, hardware, implementation, operation, and limitations of the device.

  15. Peer Tutoring and Response Groups. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Peer Tutoring and Response Groups" aims to improve the language and achievement of English language learners by pairing or grouping students to work on a task. The students may be grouped by age or ability (English-only, bilingual, or limited English proficient) or the groups may be mixed. Both peer tutoring pairs and peer response…

  16. SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group

    ScienceCinema

    Viner, Brian; Parker, Matthew J.

    2016-07-12

    The Savannah River National Laboratory, Atmospheric Technologies Group, conducts a best-in class Applied Meteorology Program to ensure the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site is operated safely and complies with stringent environmental regulations.

  17. SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect

    Viner, Brian; Parker, Matthew J.

    2016-05-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory, Atmospheric Technologies Group, conducts a best-in class Applied Meteorology Program to ensure the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site is operated safely and complies with stringent environmental regulations.

  18. User Working Group Charter

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-29

    ... Amended 2010   The Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) User Working Group (UWG) is chartered by the Earth Observing ... of the ASDC user interface, development of the Information Management System (IMS), and ASDC user conferences requirements for and ...

  19. Group Support Systems (GSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamel, Gary P.; Wijesinghe, R.

    1996-01-01

    Groupware is a term describing an emerging computer software technology enhancing the ability of people to work together as a group, (a software driven 'group support system'). This project originated at the beginning of 1992 and reports were issued describing the activity through May 1995. These reports stressed the need for process as well as technology. That is, while the technology represented a computer assisted method for groups to work together, the Group Support System (GSS) technology als required an understanding of the facilitation process electronic meetings demand. Even people trained in traditional facilitation techniques did not necessarily aimlessly adopt groupware techniques. The latest phase of this activity attempted to (1) improve the facilitation process by developing training support for a portable groupware computer system, and (2) to explore settings and uses for the portable groupware system using different software, such as Lotus Notes.

  20. Building Group Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, George

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the value of name recognition for theater companies. Describes steps toward identity and recognition, analyzing the group, the mission statement, symbolic logic, designing and identity, developing a communications plan, and meaningful activities. (SR)

  1. Successful Small Study Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francke, Amiel W.; Kaplan, Walter J.

    1977-01-01

    The authors examine their own experiences with the small study group method used in professional continuing education in the optometric profession, offering some observations and tentative conclusions for other professionals considering the method. (WL)

  2. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses analytical methods selected from current research articles. Groups information by topics of general interest, including acids, aldehydes and ketones, nitro compounds, phenols, and thiols. Cites 97 references. (CS)

  3. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses analytical methods selected from current research articles. Groups information by topics of general interest, including acids, aldehydes and ketones, nitro compounds, phenols, and thiols. Cites 97 references. (CS)

  4. Anxiety Disorders: Support Groups

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research & Practice News Blog Posts Depression and Anxiety Journal Insights ... how to start a support group . ADAA does not have listings in every U.S. state or Canadian province or territory but does have listings in ...

  5. Is Group Counseling Neglected?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Susanne M.

    1972-01-01

    Group counseling is valuable for the psychological and social readjustment of newly disabled persons and their families, with the counselor and physician having major roles in personal rehabilitation. (AG)

  6. UnitedHealth Group

    Cancer.gov

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  7. Building Bunk Group Buddies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Denise Cabrero

    2000-01-01

    Describes how camp counselors can foster camaraderie among campers through participative decision making, name games, listening, adventure courses, storytelling, spending time in nature, decorating cabins, avoiding favoritism, setting rules, admitting faults, setting group goals, and praising sincere efforts. (TD)

  8. Indictment of Ability Grouping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce

    1972-01-01

    The use of ability grouping restricts students to interact with others who have been identified as similar in ability and carries with it the stigma of failure and the operation of the self-fulfilling prophecy. (Author)

  9. Paraprofessional Groups and Associations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Linda J.

    1997-01-01

    The American Library Association's "National Directory: Library Paraprofessional Associations" (1996 edition) lists 46 active library paraprofessional associations or subsidiary groups in the United States. Reviews reasons why paraprofessionals began forming associations, compares selected associations, and examines their place within…

  10. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... PS, Baker CJ. Group B streptococcal infections. In: Cherry J, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ, eds. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  11. Magnetograph group summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.

    1989-01-01

    The Magnetograph Group focussed on the techniques and many practical problems of interleaving ground-based measurements of magnetic fields from diverse sites and instruments to address the original scientific objectives. The predominant view of the discussion group was that present instrumentation and analysis resources do not warrant immediate, specific plans for further worldwide campaigns of cooperative magnetograph observing. The several reasons for this view, together with many caveats, qualifications, and suggestions for future work are presented.

  12. Group Capability Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  13. Parton Distributions Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    de Barbaro, L.; Keller, S. A.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schellman, H.; Tung, W.-K.

    2000-07-20

    This report summarizes the activities of the Parton Distributions Working Group of the QCD and Weak Boson Physics workshop held in preparation for Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. The main focus of this working group was to investigate the different issues associated with the development of quantitative tools to estimate parton distribution functions uncertainties. In the conclusion, the authors introduce a Manifesto that describes an optimal method for reporting data.

  14. Chunk Limits and Length Limits in Immediate Recall: A Reconciliation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zhijian; Cowan, Nelson

    2005-01-01

    Whereas some research on immediate recall of verbal lists has suggested that it is limited by the number of chunks that can be recalled (e.g., N. Cowan, Z. Chen, & J. N. Rouder, 2004; E. Tulving & J. E. Patkau, 1962), other research has suggested that it is limited by the length of the material to be recalled (e.g., A. D. Baddeley, N. Thomson, &…

  15. Cyclic soft groups and their applications on groups.

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Hacı; Özlü, Serif

    2014-01-01

    In crisp environment the notions of order of group and cyclic group are well known due to many applications. In this paper, we introduce order of the soft groups, power of the soft sets, power of the soft groups, and cyclic soft group on a group. We also investigate the relationship between cyclic soft groups and classical groups.

  16. Losing the safety net: how a time-limited welfare policy affects families at risk of reaching time limits.

    PubMed

    Morris, Pamela A; Hendra, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The authors examined the effects of Florida's Family Transition Program (FTP), one of the first welfare reform initiatives to include a time limit on the receipt of federal cash assistance with other welfare requirements, on single-mother welfare-receiving families. Using a regression-based subgroup approach, they identified a group of families who were at risk of reaching the welfare time limit and subsequently assessed the experimental effects of the time-limited welfare policy on this group as compared to an otherwise comparable group of single-mother welfare-recipient families. For the families who were at risk of reaching the welfare time limit, FTP had few effects. FTP decreased mothers' depressive symptoms, and mothers in the FTP group reported higher levels of children's school achievement. There were no effects on parenting behavior or mothers' reports of children's social-emotional outcomes.

  17. Losing the Safety Net: How a Time-Limited Welfare Policy Affects Families at Risk of Reaching Time Limits

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Pamela A.; Hendra, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of Florida’s Family Transition Program (FTP), one of the first welfare reform initiatives to include a time limit on the receipt of federal cash assistance with other welfare requirements, on single-mother welfare-receiving families. Using a regression-based subgroup approach, they identified a group of families who were at risk of reaching the welfare time limit and subsequently assessed the experimental effects of the time-limited welfare policy on this group as compared to an otherwise comparable group of single-mother welfare-recipient families. For the families who were at risk of reaching the welfare time limit, FTP had few effects. FTP decreased mothers’ depressive symptoms, and mothers in the FTP group reported higher levels of children’s school achievement. There were no effects on parenting behavior or mothers’ reports of children’s social-emotional outcomes. PMID:19271826

  18. Geographic range limits: achieving synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the determinants of species' geographic range limits remains poorly integrated. In part, this is because of the diversity of perspectives on the issue, and because empirical studies have lagged substantially behind developments in theory. Here, I provide a broad overview, drawing together many of the disparate threads, considering, in turn, how influences on the terms of a simple single-population equation can determine range limits. There is theoretical and empirical evidence for systematic changes towards range limits under some circumstances in each of the demographic parameters. However, under other circumstances, no such changes may take place in particular parameters, or they may occur in a different direction, with limitation still occurring. This suggests that (i) little about range limitation can categorically be inferred from many empirical studies, which document change in only one demographic parameter, (ii) there is a need for studies that document variation in all of the parameters, and (iii) in agreement with theoretical evidence that range limits can be formed in the presence or absence of hard boundaries, environmental gradients or biotic interactions, there may be few general patterns as to the determinants of these limits, with most claimed generalities at least having many exceptions. PMID:19324809

  19. Limit laws for Zipf's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2011-01-01

    In this communication we establish stochastic limit laws leading from Zipf's law to Pareto's and Heaps' laws. We consider finite ensembles governed by Zipf's law and study their asymptotic statistics as the ensemble size tends to infinity. A Lorenz-curve analysis establishes three types of limit laws for the ensembles' statistical structure: 'communist', 'monarchic', and Paretian. Further considering a dynamic setting in which the ensembles grow stochastically in time, a functional central limit theorem analysis establishes a Gaussian approximation for the ensembles' stochastic growth. The Gaussian approximation provides a generalized and corrected formulation of Heaps' law.

  20. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    One of the frontiers of today`s nuclear science is the ``journey to the limits``: of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective.

  1. Optical limiting in Buckminsterfullerene solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Brandelik, D.M.; McLean, D.G.; Schmitt, M.

    1992-12-01

    New results on solutions of Buckminsterfullerene in toluene as optical limiters with low limiting thresholds are reported. Limiting thresholds are as low as 15mJ/cm{sup 2} with multiple pulse stability. Evidence for a different mechanism than that operational in graphitic carbon black suspensions is presented. Calculated hyperpolarizability values are presented. The combined CW and Q-switched responses of this material and the promise of lower nonlinear thresholds has potential for application in optical protection devices ranging from welder safety goggles to safe surgical endoscopes.

  2. Physical limits in semiconductor electronics.

    PubMed

    Keyes, R W

    1977-03-18

    Although the limitations of the methods of lithography in use at a particular time are easily recognized and attract substantial attention, experience shows that technological ingenuity keeps pushing them to ever-smaller dimensions. There seems to be no fundamental reason to expect that lithographic limits will not continue to recede. The limits to the advance of miniaturization are to be found in the ability of materials to withstand high electric fields and in the ability of packaging technology to remove heat from active components and provide for power distribution, signal interconnection, and flexible mechanical assembly.

  3. REDUCING SYMPTOM LIMITATIONS: A COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    DOORENBOS, ARDITH; GIVEN, BARBARA; GIVEN, CHARLES; VERBITSKY, NATALYA; CIMPRICH, BERNADINE; MCCORKLE, RUTH

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Until now, little research has been conducted examining the reactive dimension, or the degree to which a symptom limits an individual’s life, in a multiplicity of symptoms. This research examines how problem-solving therapy organizes an intervention to decrease symptom limitations. The purpose was threefold: to determine if a cognitive behavioral intervention decreases the impact of symptom limitations among individuals newly diagnosed with cancer, who are receiving chemotherapy; to determine, after adjusting for covariates, how symptom limitations change over time; and to describe which symptoms are most limiting. This randomized control trial was conducted in two comprehensive and four community cancer centers. Two hundred thirty-seven individuals, aged 31–87, newly diagnosed with solid tumor cancers, participated. The experimental group (118 individuals) received a 10-contact, 18-week cognitive behavioral intervention focused on cancer- and chemotherapy-related symptoms. The control group (119 individuals) received conventional care. Interviews occurred at baseline, 10, 20, and 32 weeks. Data analysis used a two-level hierarchical linear model. Participants receiving the cognitive behavioral intervention had lower scores of symptom limitation than did participants in the control group. At the onset of the study, younger patients reported more symptom limitations than their older counterparts; however, this was reversed by the end of the study. The cognitive behavioral intervention was key to decreasing symptom limitations. Findings also suggest that nursing interventions may be particularly helpful to younger individuals in managing cancer-related symptom limitations. PMID:15643674

  4. Reducing symptom limitations: a cognitive behavioral intervention randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Doorenbos, Ardith; Given, Barbara; Given, Charles; Verbitsky, Natalya; Cimprich, Bernadine; McCorkle, Ruth

    2005-07-01

    Until now, little research has been conducted examining the reactive dimension, or the degree to which a symptom limits an individual's life, in a multiplicity of symptoms. This research examines how problem-solving therapy organizes an intervention to decrease symptom limitations. The purpose was threefold: to determine if a cognitive behavioral intervention decreases the impact of symptom limitations among individuals newly diagnosed with cancer, who are receiving chemotherapy; to determine, after adjusting for covariates, how symptom limitations change over time; and to describe which symptoms are most limiting. This randomized control trial was conducted in two comprehensive and four community cancer centers. Two hundred thirty-seven individuals, aged 31-87, newly diagnosed with solid tumor cancers, participated. The experimental group (118 individuals) received a 10-contact, 18-week cognitive behavioral intervention focused on cancer- and chemotherapy-related symptoms. The control group (119 individuals) received conventional care. Interviews occurred at baseline, 10, 20, and 32 weeks. Data analysis used a two-level hierarchical linear model. Participants receiving the cognitive behavioral intervention had lower scores of symptom limitation than did participants in the control group. At the onset of the study, younger patients reported more symptom limitations than their older counterparts; however, this was reversed by the end of the study. The cognitive behavioral intervention was key to decreasing symptom limitations. Findings also suggest that nursing interventions may be particularly helpful to younger individuals in managing cancer-related symptom limitations. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  6. Coordinating Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup.

  7. Group assignment problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poore, Aubrey B.; Gadaleta, Sabino

    2003-12-01

    Multiple frame data association, whether it is based on multiple hypothesis tracking or multi-dimensional assignment problems, has established itself as the method of choice for difficult tracking problems, principally due to the ability to hold difficult data association decisions in abeyance until additional information is available. Over the last twenty years, these methods have focused on one-to-one assignments, many-to-one, and many-to-many assignments. Group tracking, on the other hand, introduces new complexity into the association process, especially if some soft decision making capability is desired. Thus, the goal of this work is to combine multiple grouping hypotheses for each frame of data (tracks or measurements) with matching these hypotheses across multiple frames of data using one-to-one, many-to-one, or many-to-many assignments to determine the correct hypothesis on each frame of data and connectivity across the frames. The resulting formulation is sufficiently general to cover four broad classes of problems in multiple target tracking, namely (a) group cluster tracking, (b) pixel (clump) IR cluster tracking, (c) the merged measurement problem, and (d) MHT for track-to-track fusion. What is more, the cluster assignment problem for either two or multiple dimensions represents a generalized data association problem in the sense that it reduces to the classical assignment problems when there are no overlapping groups or clusters. The formulation of the assignment problem for resolved object tracking and candidate group methods for use in multiple frame group tracking are briefly reviewed. Then, three different formulations of the group assignment problem are developed.

  8. Group assignment problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poore, Aubrey B.; Gadaleta, Sabino

    2004-01-01

    Multiple frame data association, whether it is based on multiple hypothesis tracking or multi-dimensional assignment problems, has established itself as the method of choice for difficult tracking problems, principally due to the ability to hold difficult data association decisions in abeyance until additional information is available. Over the last twenty years, these methods have focused on one-to-one assignments, many-to-one, and many-to-many assignments. Group tracking, on the other hand, introduces new complexity into the association process, especially if some soft decision making capability is desired. Thus, the goal of this work is to combine multiple grouping hypotheses for each frame of data (tracks or measurements) with matching these hypotheses across multiple frames of data using one-to-one, many-to-one, or many-to-many assignments to determine the correct hypothesis on each frame of data and connectivity across the frames. The resulting formulation is sufficiently general to cover four broad classes of problems in multiple target tracking, namely (a) group cluster tracking, (b) pixel (clump) IR cluster tracking, (c) the merged measurement problem, and (d) MHT for track-to-track fusion. What is more, the cluster assignment problem for either two or multiple dimensions represents a generalized data association problem in the sense that it reduces to the classical assignment problems when there are no overlapping groups or clusters. The formulation of the assignment problem for resolved object tracking and candidate group methods for use in multiple frame group tracking are briefly reviewed. Then, three different formulations of the group assignment problem are developed.

  9. Group Music Training and Children's Prosocial Skills

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberg, E. Glenn; Corrigall, Kathleen A.; Dys, Sebastian P.; Malti, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We investigated if group music training in childhood is associated with prosocial skills. Children in 3rd or 4th grade who attended 10 months of music lessons taught in groups were compared to a control group of children matched for socio-economic status. All children were administered tests of prosocial skills near the beginning and end of the 10-month period. Compared to the control group, children in the music group had larger increases in sympathy and prosocial behavior, but this effect was limited to children who had poor prosocial skills before the lessons began. The effect was evident even when the lessons were compulsory, which minimized the role of self-selection. The results suggest that group music training facilitates the development of prosocial skills. PMID:26506414

  10. Group Music Training and Children's Prosocial Skills.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Corrigall, Kathleen A; Dys, Sebastian P; Malti, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We investigated if group music training in childhood is associated with prosocial skills. Children in 3rd or 4th grade who attended 10 months of music lessons taught in groups were compared to a control group of children matched for socio-economic status. All children were administered tests of prosocial skills near the beginning and end of the 10-month period. Compared to the control group, children in the music group had larger increases in sympathy and prosocial behavior, but this effect was limited to children who had poor prosocial skills before the lessons began. The effect was evident even when the lessons were compulsory, which minimized the role of self-selection. The results suggest that group music training facilitates the development of prosocial skills.

  11. Goals for limited strategic defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1989-05-01

    This report reviews the nature of near and mid-term accidental, third-country, and limited threats, discusses the technologies available to defend against them, and examines the development programs required. 22 refs.

  12. Taking Maths to the Limit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, Tony; Reynolds, Charles

    1986-01-01

    Advocated is developing intuitive ideas of limits whenever the opportunity arises in elementary mathematics. Examples are given for geometry, fractions, sequences and series, areas, probability, graphing, and the golden section. (MNS)

  13. Limits to Growth - Two Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Comments by two reviewers (Garrett Hardin and Stephen Berry) on the book The Limits to Growth'' by Meadows and others. The nature of the models used, and the reactions of book reviewers are discussed. (AL)

  14. The limits of cosmic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitching, Thomas D.; Alsing, Justin; Heavens, Alan F.; Jimenez, Raul; McEwen, Jason D.; Verde, Licia

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss the commonly used limiting cases, or approximations, for two-point cosmic-shear statistics. We discuss the most prominent assumptions in this statistic: the flat-sky (small angle limit), the Limber (Bessel-to-delta function limit) and the Hankel transform (large ℓ-mode limit) approximations; that the vast majority of cosmic-shear results to date have used simultaneously. We find that the combined effect of these approximations can suppress power by ≳ 1 per cent on scales of ℓ ≲ 40. A fully non-approximated cosmic-shear study should use a spherical-sky, non-Limber-approximated power spectrum analysis and a transform involving Wigner small-d matrices in place of the Hankel transform. These effects, unaccounted for, would constitute at least 11 per cent of the total budget for systematic effects for a power spectrum analysis of a Euclid-like experiment; but they are unnecessary.

  15. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discusses open or unlimited class aircraft performance limitations and design solutions. Limitations in this class of aircraft include slow climbing flight which requires low wing loading, high cruise speed which requires high wing loading, gains in induced or viscous drag alone which result in only half the gain overall and other structural problems (yaw inertia and spins, flutter and static loads integrity). Design solutions include introducing minimum induced drag for a given span (elliptical span load or winglets) and introducing minimum induced drag for a bell shaped span load. It is concluded that open class performance limits (under current rules and technologies) is very close to absolute limits, though some gains remain to be made from unexplored areas and new technologies.

  16. Model Misunderstandings. Teach the Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamp, Homer W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the idea that models should be taught by emphasizing limitations rather than focusing on their generality. Two examples of gas behavior models are included--the kinetic and static models. (KR)

  17. Limits to Growth - Two Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Comments by two reviewers (Garrett Hardin and Stephen Berry) on the book The Limits to Growth'' by Meadows and others. The nature of the models used, and the reactions of book reviewers are discussed. (AL)

  18. Model Misunderstandings. Teach the Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamp, Homer W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the idea that models should be taught by emphasizing limitations rather than focusing on their generality. Two examples of gas behavior models are included--the kinetic and static models. (KR)

  19. Thermodynamic limit for isokinetic thermostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallavotti, G.; Presutti, E.

    2010-05-01

    Thermostat models in space dimension d =1,2,3 for nonequilibrium statistical mechanics are considered and it is shown that, in the thermodynamic limit, the motions of frictionless thermostats and isokinetic thermostats coincide.

  20. OECD Maximum Residue Limit Calculator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    With the goal of harmonizing the calculation of maximum residue limits (MRLs) across the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the OECD has developed an MRL Calculator. View the calculator.

  1. Faint dwarfs in nearby groups

    SciTech Connect

    Speller, Ryan; Taylor, James E. E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca

    2014-06-20

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to Δm{sub r} ≡ (m{sub r,} {sub sat} – m{sub r,} {sub main}) ∼ 6-8, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead, we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down to Δm{sub r} = 12, 4 mag fainter than most recent studies. We detect an overdensity of objects at separations <400 kpc, corresponding to about 4.6 ± 0.5 satellites per central galaxy, consistent with the satellite abundance expected from the Local Group, given our selection function. Although the sample of satellites detected is incomplete by construction, since it excludes the least and most compact dwarfs, this detection provides a lower bound on the average satellite luminosity function, down to luminosities corresponding to the faintest ''classical'' dwarfs of the Local Group.

  2. Limiting subdifferentials of indefinite integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieu, Nguyen Huy

    2008-05-01

    We compute the limiting subdifferential of the indefinite integral of the form where f is an essentially bounded measurable function, or a function continuous on an interval containing (except for, possibly, ), or a step-function which has a countable number of steps around . The related problem of computing the Aumann integral of the limiting subdifferential mapping [not partial differential]f([dot operator]), where f is a Lipschitz real function defined on an open set , is also investigated.

  3. US ITER limiter module design

    SciTech Connect

    Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.; Hassanein, A.

    1996-08-01

    The recent U.S. effort on the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) shield has been focused on the limiter module design. This is a multi-disciplinary effort that covers design layout, fabrication, thermal hydraulics, materials evaluation, thermo- mechanical response, and predicted response during off-normal events. The results of design analyses are presented. Conclusions and recommendations are also presented concerning, the capability of the limiter modules to meet performance goals and to be fabricated within design specifications using existing technology.

  4. Limit cycle vibrations in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    The focus is on an examination of rotordynamic systems which are simultaneously susceptible to limit cycle instability and subharmonic response. Characteristics of each phenomenon are determined as well as their interrelationship. A normalized, single mass rotor model is examined as well as a complex model of the high pressure fuel turbopump and the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Entrainment of limit cycle instability by subharmonic response is demonstrated for both models. The nonuniqueness of the solution is also demonstrated.

  5. Limiting technology by negotiated agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Carnesale, A.

    1983-01-01

    The author concentrates on anti-ballistic missile (ABM) systems as an example of a continuing effort to limit technology by negotiated agreement. He first discusses the ABM treaty of 1972, ratified by both the US and the USSR. Afterwards, he briefly treats each of the following: ballistic missile defense (BMD) dilemmas; nature of the BMD choice; technology; economics; deterrence; nuclear warfighting; relations with allies; arms control; Star Wars; and on limiting technology.

  6. Automatic noise limiter-blanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A blanker system that may be used with audio noise limiters or automatic noise limiters was described. The system employs a pair of silicon diodes and two RC filters connected across the feedback impedance of an operational amplifier so as to counteract impulse noise interference caused by local spherics activity or 60 Hz harmonics radiated from ac motor control systems. The following information is given: circuit diagram and description, operating details, evaluation, discussion of other noise blanking methods.

  7. The Limits of Offshore Balancing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    UNITED STATES ARMY WAR COLLEGE PRESS Carlisle Barracks, PA ST R ENGTH-’W I SDOM THE LIMITS OF OFFSHORE BALANCING Hal Brands U.S. ARMY WAR...Offshore Balancing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...Strategic Studies Institute and U.S. Army War College Press THE LIMITS OF OFFSHORE BALANCING Hal Brands September 2015

  8. Instructions to working groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foushee, H. Clayton

    1987-01-01

    The key to the success of this workshop is your active participation in the working group process. The goals of this workshop are to address four major questions regarding Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) Training. To some extent the working group topic areas parallel these issues, but in some cases they do not. However, it is important for all of the working groups to keep these general questions in mind during their deliberations: (1) What are the essential elements of an optimal CRM Training program; (2) What are the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to CRM Training; (3) How can CRM Training best be implemented, and what barriers exist; and (4) Is CRM Training effective, do we know, and if not, how can we find out.

  9. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  10. The hydraulic limitation hypothesis revisited.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael G; Phillips, Nathan; Bond, Barbara J

    2006-03-01

    We proposed the hydraulic limitation hypothesis (HLH) as a mechanism to explain universal patterns in tree height, and tree and stand biomass growth: height growth slows down as trees grow taller, maximum height is lower for trees of the same species on resource-poor sites and annual wood production declines after canopy closure for even-aged forests. Our review of 51 studies that measured one or more of the components necessary for testing the hypothesis showed that taller trees differ physiologically from shorter, younger trees. Stomatal conductance to water vapour (g(s)), photosynthesis (A) and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance (K L) are often, but not always, lower in taller trees. Additionally, leaf mass per area is often greater in taller trees, and leaf area:sapwood area ratio changes with tree height. We conclude that hydraulic limitation of gas exchange with increasing tree size is common, but not universal. Where hydraulic limitations to A do occur, no evidence supports the original expectation that hydraulic limitation of carbon assimilation is sufficient to explain observed declines in wood production. Any limit to height or height growth does not appear to be related to the so-called age-related decline in wood production of forests after canopy closure. Future work on this problem should explicitly link leaf or canopy gas exchange with tree and stand growth, and consider a more fundamental assumption: whether tree biomass growth is limited by carbon availability.

  11. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Daniel J.; Cha, Yung S.

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  12. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  13. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  14. Bell, group and tangle

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. I.

    2010-03-15

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  15. Stellar kinematic groups. I - The Ursa Major group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, David R.; Mayor, Michel

    1993-01-01

    The Ursa Major Group (UMaG) is studied as a test case for the authenticity of Stellar Kinematic Groups, using Coravel radial velocities, recent compilations of astrometric data, and new spectroscopic observations. Spectroscopic age indicators, particularly indices of the strength of chromospheric emission, are applied to solar-type candidate members of UMaG, and it is shown that stars that meet the spectroscopic criteria also have kinematics that agree better with the space motions of the nucleus of UMaG than does the starting sample as a whole. The primary limitation on the precision of kinematics is now parallaxes instead of radial velocities. These more restrictive kinematic criteria are then applied to other UMaG candidates and a list summarizing membership is presented. UMaG is also examined as a cluster, confirming its traditional age of 0.3 Gyr, and a mean Fe/H of -0.08 +/- 0.09 for those stars most likely to be bona fide members.

  16. 45 CFR 147.126 - No lifetime or annual limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false No lifetime or annual limits. 147.126 Section 147... to 2014—(1) In general. With respect to plan years (in the individual market, policy years) beginning prior to January 1, 2014, a group health plan, or a health insurance issuer offering group or individual...

  17. Central limit theorems under special relativity.

    PubMed

    McKeague, Ian W

    2015-04-01

    Several relativistic extensions of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution have been proposed, but they do not explain observed lognormal tail-behavior in the flux distribution of various astrophysical sources. Motivated by this question, extensions of classical central limit theorems are developed under the conditions of special relativity. The results are related to CLTs on locally compact Lie groups developed by Wehn, Stroock and Varadhan, but in this special case the asymptotic distribution has an explicit form that is readily seen to exhibit lognormal tail behavior.

  18. Central limit theorems under special relativity

    PubMed Central

    McKeague, Ian W.

    2015-01-01

    Several relativistic extensions of the Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution have been proposed, but they do not explain observed lognormal tail-behavior in the flux distribution of various astrophysical sources. Motivated by this question, extensions of classical central limit theorems are developed under the conditions of special relativity. The results are related to CLTs on locally compact Lie groups developed by Wehn, Stroock and Varadhan, but in this special case the asymptotic distribution has an explicit form that is readily seen to exhibit lognormal tail behavior. PMID:25798020

  19. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  20. Abandoning wells working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.